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Sample records for mesial temporal structures

  1. Mesial temporal sclerosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    2005-07-29

    Jul 29, 2005 ... tail of the hippocampus were involved, with associated poor grey- white matter differentiation. In addi- tion, there was atrophy of the hip- pocampus and fornix, with dilatation of the temporal horn (Figs 1 - 4). Discussion. Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is the commonest cause of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  2. Carbamazepine reduces memory induced activation of mesial temporal lobe structures: a pharmacological fMRI-study

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    Okujava Michael

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose It is not known whether carbamazepine (CBZ; a drug widely used in neurology and psychiatry influences the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast changes induced by neuronal activation and measured by functional MRI (fMRI. We aimed to investigate the influence of CBZ on memory induced activation of the mesial temporal lobes in patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Material and Methods Twenty-one individual patients with refractory symptomatic TLE with different CBZ serum levels and 20 healthy controls were studied using BOLD fMRI. Mesial temporal lobe (MTL activation was induced by a task that is based on the retrieval of individually familiar visuo-spatial knowledge. The extent of significant MTL fMRI activation was measured and correlated with the CBZ serum level. Results In TLE patients, the extent of significant fMRI activation over both MTL was negatively correlated to the CBZ serum level (Spearman r = -0.654, P Conclusions In TLE patients, carbamazepine reduces the fMRI-detectable changes within the mesial temporal lobes as induced by effortful memory retrieval. FMRI appears to be suitable to study the effects of chronic drug treatment in patients with epilepsy.

  3. Surgical Considerations of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Warren W. Boling

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of temporal lobe epilepsy is the best opportunity for seizure freedom in medically intractable patients. The surgical approach has evolved to recognize the paramount importance of the mesial temporal structures in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who have a seizure origin in the mesial temporal structures. For those individuals with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, a selective amygdalohippocampectomy surgery can be done that provides an excellent opportunity for seizure freedom and limits the resection to temporal lobe structures primarily involved in seizure genesis.

  4. Functional and structural correlates of memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Alexander James Barnett

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE often show material-specific memory impairment (verbal for left, visuospatial for right hemisphere which can be exacerbated following surgery aimed at the epileptogenic regions of medial and anterolateral temporal cortex. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that characterization of structural and functional integrity of these regions using MRI can aid in prediction of post-surgical risk of further memory decline. We investigated the nature of the relationship between structural and functional indices of hippocampal integrity with preoperative memory performance in a group of 26 patients with unilateral mTLE. Structural integrity was assessed using hippocampal volumes, while functional integrity was assessed using hippocampal activation during the encoding of novel scenes. We quantified structural and functional integrity in terms of asymmetry, calculated as (L - R / (L + R. Factor scores for verbal and visual memory were calculated from a clinical database and an asymmetry score (verbal – visual was used to characterize memory performance. We found, as expected, a significant difference between left and right mTLE groups for hippocampal volume asymmetry, with each group showing an asymmetry favoring the unaffected temporal lobe. Encoding activation asymmetry showed a similar pattern, with left mTLE patients showing activation preferential to the right hemisphere and right mTLE patients showing the reverse. Finally, we demonstrated that functional integrity mediated the relationship between structural integrity and memory performance for memory asymmetry, suggesting that even if structural changes are evident, ultimately it is the functional integrity of the tissue that most closely explains behavioral performance. Our findings argue for the incorporation of functional imaging data in clinical protocols aimed at determining the functional integrity of the MTL in surgical planning.

  5. Thalamic changes with mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

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    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S. [Department of Neuroradiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Elwes, R.C.D. [Department of Neurology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Polkey, C.E. [Department of Neurosurgery, King' s College and Maudsley Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    We reviewed the preoperative images of 28 patients with pathologically proven mesial temporal sclerosis, to assess thalamic asymmetry and signal change. A further 25 nonsurgical patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and unequivocal, unilateral changes of mesial temporal sclerosis, and 20 controls, were also reviewed. None of the control group had unequivocal asymmetry of the thalamus. There was an ipsilateral asymmetrically small thalamus in five (18 %) of the surgical group and in three (12 %) of the nonsurgical patients. In four cases there was thalamic signal change. In three patients with thalamic volume loss there was ipsilateral hemiatrophy. All patients with an asymmetrically small thalamus had an asymmetrically small fornix and all but one a small ipsilateral mamillary body. (orig.)

  6. Thalamic changes with mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S.; Elwes, R.C.D.; Polkey, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the preoperative images of 28 patients with pathologically proven mesial temporal sclerosis, to assess thalamic asymmetry and signal change. A further 25 nonsurgical patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and unequivocal, unilateral changes of mesial temporal sclerosis, and 20 controls, were also reviewed. None of the control group had unequivocal asymmetry of the thalamus. There was an ipsilateral asymmetrically small thalamus in five (18 %) of the surgical group and in three (12 %) of the nonsurgical patients. In four cases there was thalamic signal change. In three patients with thalamic volume loss there was ipsilateral hemiatrophy. All patients with an asymmetrically small thalamus had an asymmetrically small fornix and all but one a small ipsilateral mamillary body. (orig.)

  7. Mesial temporal sclerosis in children Esclerose mesial temporal em crianças

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    Eliana Maria Domingues Brandão

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis is the most frequent cause of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy but has a satisfactory response to surgery, and is considered infrequent in children. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrographic and radiological spectrum of the disease in children. METHOD: Retrospective study by review of charts of 44 children with a diagnosis of mesial temporal sclerosis on magnetic resonance imaging, attended at the "Hospital das Clínicas" of the University of São Paulo Faculty of Medicine. RESULTS: Febrile seizure was identified in the history of 54% of the patients. Injuries at the left side predominated in patients with schooling difficulties (p=0.049, in those with the first seizures between six months and five years (p=0.021 and in those with complex febrile seizure (p=0.032. Thirteen patients were submitted to surgery and of these, eight remained without seizures. CONCLUSION: Febrile seizure may be related in a more direct way to the presence of left-side mesial temporal sclerosis.Em adultos, esclerose mesial temporal é a causa mais freqüente de epilepsia do lobo temporal intratável por medicamentos e que responde satisfatoriamente a cirurgia, sendo considerada pouco freqüente em criança. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o espectro clínico, eletrográfico e radiológico desta patologia em crianças. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo, por revisão de prontuário de 44 crianças com diagnóstico de esclerose mesial temporal na ressonância magnética, atendidos no Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de São Paulo. RESULTADO: Foi identificado que 54% dos pacientes apresentaram antecedente de crise febril. Lesão no lado esquerdo predominou nos pacientes com dificuldade escolar (p=0.049, naqueles com primeiras crises entre seis meses e cinco anos (p=0,021 e naqueles com crise febril complicada (p=0,032. Treze pacientes foram operados, dos quais oito ficaram livres de crises. CONCLUSÃO: Crise febril pode estar

  8. MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho [School of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging findings of 116 patients diagnosed by MRI as suffering from mesial temporal sclerosis. In 18 of these, the condition was also histologically proven. Among the 116 patients, volume loss of the hippocampus was found in 95 (81.9%) and signal changes of the hippocampus in 53 (45.7%). Decreased signal intensity in the hippocampus on T1-weighted images was found in 13 (11.2%) and increased signal on T2-weighted images in 50 (43.1%). Signal abnormality in the hippocampus on both T1- and T2-weighted images was found in ten, and associated extrahippocampal abnormalities, as follows, in 20 (17.2%): atrophy of fornix (n=3D10), atrophy of the mammillary body (n=3D8), atrophy of the amygdala (n=3D10), atrophy or increased T2 signal intensity of the anterior thalamic nuclei (n=3D2), atrophy of the cingulate gyrus (n=3D2), atrophy or increased signal intensity of the anterior temporal lobe (n=3D8), and cerebral hemiatrophy (n=3D4). A high T2 signal and atrophy of the hippocampus are the most common and important MRI findings of mesial temporal sclerosis. Other abnormal findings, if any, which may be found in extrahippocampal structures such as the fornix, mammillary body and temporal lobe, should, however, also be carefully observed. (author)

  9. Evidence for predilection of macrophage infiltration patterns in the deeper midline and mesial temporal structures of the brain uniquely in patients with HIV-associated dementia

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    Hsu Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 penetrates the central nervous system, which is vital for HIV-associated dementia (HAD. But the role of cellular infiltration and activation together with HIV in the development of HAD is poorly understood. Methods To study activation and infiltration patterns of macrophages, CD8+ T cells in relation to HIV in diverse CNS areas of patients with and without dementia. 46 brain regions from two rapidly progressing severely demented patients and 53 regions from 4 HIV+ non-dementia patients were analyzed. Macrophage and CD8+ T cell infiltration of the CNS in relation to HIV was assessed using immuno-histochemical analysis with anti-HIV (P24, anti-CD8 and anti-CD68, anti-S-100A8 and granzyme B antibodies (cellular activation. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 12.0 with Student's t test and ANOVA. Results Overall, the patterns of infiltration of macrophages and CD8+ T cells were indiscernible between patients with and without dementia, but the co-localization of macrophages and CD8+ T cells along with HIV P24 antigen in the deeper midline and mesial temporal structures of the brain segregated the two groups. This predilection of infected macrophages and CD8+ T cells to the middle part of the brain was unique to both HAD patients, along with unique nature of provirus gag gene sequences derived from macrophages in the midline and mesial temporal structures. Conclusion Strong predilection of infected macrophages and CD8+ T cells was typical of the deeper midline and mesial temporal structures uniquely in HAD patients, which has some influence on neurocognitive impairment during HIV infection.

  10. A structural MRI study: gray matter changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with different seizure types

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    Jun-hao XIAO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe gray matter volume changes and evaluate the relation between gray matter changes and duration of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE patients with different seizure types. Methods A total of 40 patients with mTLE, including 20 with partial seizures (mTLE-PS group and 20 with secondarily generalized seizures (mTLE-sGS group, and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (control group were recruited. T1-three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (T1-3D-MPRAGE was scanned for voxel.based morphometry (VBM. Bilateral frontal lobes and thalami were selected as regions of interest (ROIs to compare gray matter volume of brain regions among 3 groups. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between gray matter volume of brain regions and duration. Results There were significant differences in gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, right middle frontal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right middle temproral gyrus, right hippocampus, bilateral thalami and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres among 3 groups (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Compared with control group, gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, right middle temproral gyrus, right hippocampus and right thalamus in mTLE-PS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Compared with control group, gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral thalami, bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, right angular gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus and right hippocampus in mTLE-sGS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Compared with mTLE-PS group, gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral thalami, right medial frontal gyrus and right gyrus rectus in mTLE-sGS group were significantly reduced (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Gray matter volumes in left

  11. Mesial Temporal Sclerosis: Accuracy of NeuroQuant versus Neuroradiologist.

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    Azab, M; Carone, M; Ying, S H; Yousem, D M

    2015-08-01

    We sought to compare the accuracy of a volumetric fully automated computer assessment of hippocampal volume asymmetry versus neuroradiologists' interpretations of the temporal lobes for mesial temporal sclerosis. Detecting mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is important for the evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy as it often guides surgical intervention. One feature of MTS is hippocampal volume loss. Electronic medical record and researcher reports of scans of patients with proved mesial temporal sclerosis were compared with volumetric assessment with an FDA-approved software package, NeuroQuant, for detection of mesial temporal sclerosis in 63 patients. The degree of volumetric asymmetry was analyzed to determine the neuroradiologists' threshold for detecting right-left asymmetry in temporal lobe volumes. Thirty-six patients had left-lateralized MTS, 25 had right-lateralized MTS, and 2 had bilateral MTS. The estimated accuracy of the neuroradiologist was 72.6% with a κ statistic of 0.512 (95% CI, 0.315-0.710) [moderate agreement, P NeuroQuant was 79.4% with a κ statistic of 0.588 (95% CI, 0.388-0.787) [moderate agreement, P NeuroQuant compares favorably with trained neuroradiologists in predicting the side of mesial temporal sclerosis. Neuroradiologists can often detect even small temporal lobe volumetric changes visually. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. Radiosurgery for Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Resulting from Mesial Temporal Sclerosis.

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    Gianaris, Thomas; Witt, Thomas; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is perhaps the most well-defined epilepsy syndrome that is responsive to structural interventions such as surgery. Several minimally invasive techniques have arisen that provide additional options for the treatment of MTS while potentially avoiding many of open surgery's associated risks. By evading these risks, they also open up treatment options to patients who otherwise are poor surgical candidates. Radiosurgery is one of the most intensively studied of these alternatives and has found a growing role in the treatment of medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complications after mesial temporal lobe surgery via inferiortemporal gyrus approach.

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    Vale, Fernando L; Reintjes, Stephen; Garcia, Hermes G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the complications associated with the inferior temporal gyrus approach to anterior mesial temporal lobe resection for temporal lobe epilepsy. This retrospective study examined complications experienced by 483 patients during the 3 months after surgery. All surgeries were performed during 1998-2012 by the senior author (F.L.V.). A total of 13 complications (2.7%) were reported. Complications were 8 delayed subdural hematomas (1.6%), 2 superficial wound infections (0.4%), 1 delayed intracranial hemorrhage (0.2%), 1 small lacunar stroke (0.2%), and 1 transient frontalis nerve palsy (0.2%). Three patients with subdural hematoma (0.6%) required readmission and surgical intervention. One patient (0.2%) with delayed intracranial hemorrhage required readmission to the neuroscience intensive care unit for observation. No deaths or severe neurological impairments were reported. Among the 8 patients with subdural hematoma, 7 were older than 40 years (87.5%); however, this finding was not statistically significant (p = 0.198). The inferior temporal gyrus approach to mesial temporal lobe resection is a safe and effective method for treating temporal lobe epilepsy. Morbidity and mortality rates associated with this procedure are lower than those associated with other neurosurgical procedures. The finding that surgical complications seem to be more common among older patients emphasizes the need for early surgical referral of patients with medically refractory epilepsy.

  14. The circuit of Papez in mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, H.; Sasaki, M.; Tamakawa, Y.; Kamei, A.

    2001-01-01

    We looked at abnormalities in the circuit of Papez in patients with the mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). We reviewed the MRI studies of 15 patients with probable MTS, seeking changes in the fornix, mamillary body, mamillothalamic tract, thalamus and cingulate and parahippocampal gyri. We correlated any abnormalities with each other and with clinical severity. Atrophy and/or signal change in one or more structures in the circuit of Papez were found in five patients. They involved the parahippocampal gyri in all five, the fornices in four, mamillary bodies in three, the thalamus in two and the cingulate gyrus in one. Changes in the fornix, mamillary body, thalamus or cingulate gyrus were always accompanied by hippocampal and parahippocampal atrophy. The patients with abnormalities of the circuit of Papez did not have more severe epilepsy than those without. Changes in the parahippocampal gyrus, including the entorhinal cortex and subiculum, in which forniceal fibres originate, may be crucial in causing abnormalities more distally in the circuit. (orig.)

  15. The circuit of Papez in mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

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    Oikawa, H.; Sasaki, M.; Tamakawa, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan); Kamei, A. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    We looked at abnormalities in the circuit of Papez in patients with the mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). We reviewed the MRI studies of 15 patients with probable MTS, seeking changes in the fornix, mamillary body, mamillothalamic tract, thalamus and cingulate and parahippocampal gyri. We correlated any abnormalities with each other and with clinical severity. Atrophy and/or signal change in one or more structures in the circuit of Papez were found in five patients. They involved the parahippocampal gyri in all five, the fornices in four, mamillary bodies in three, the thalamus in two and the cingulate gyrus in one. Changes in the fornix, mamillary body, thalamus or cingulate gyrus were always accompanied by hippocampal and parahippocampal atrophy. The patients with abnormalities of the circuit of Papez did not have more severe epilepsy than those without. Changes in the parahippocampal gyrus, including the entorhinal cortex and subiculum, in which forniceal fibres originate, may be crucial in causing abnormalities more distally in the circuit. (orig.)

  16. Correlation between memory, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and interictal epileptiform discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy related to mesial temporal sclerosis.

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    Mantoan, Marcele Araújo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; de Figueiredo Ferreira Guilhoto, Laura Maria; Lin, Katia; da Silva Noffs, Maria Helena; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Belzunces, Erich; Carrete, Henrique; Bussoletti, Renato Tavares; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study described here was to examine the relationship between memory function, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) abnormalities, and interictal epileptiform discharge (IED) lateralization in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) related to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis. We assessed performance on tests of memory function and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 29 right-handed outpatients and 24 controls. IEDs were assessed on 30-minute-awake and 30-minute-sleep EEG samples. Patients had (1)H-MRS at 1.5 T. There was a negative correlation between IQ (P=0.031) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test results (P=0.022) and epilepsy duration; between(1)H-MRS findings and epilepsy duration (P=0.027); and between N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels and IEDs (P=0.006) in contralateral mesial temporal structures in the left MTS group. (1)H-MRS findings, IEDs, and verbal function were correlated. These findings suggest that IEDs and NAA/(Cho+Cr) ratios reflecting neural metabolism are closely related to verbal memory function in mesial temporal sclerosis. Higher interictal activity on the EEG was associated with a decline in total NAA in contralateral mesial temporal structures.

  17. Neuropsychology Outcomes Following Trephine Epilepsy Surgery: The Inferior Temporal Gyrus Approach for Amygdalohippocampectomy in Medically Refractory Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Schoenberg, Mike R; Clifton, William E; Sever, Ryan W; Vale, Fernando L

    2017-06-08

    Surgery is indicated in cases of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy(MTLE) that are refractory to medical management. The inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) approach provides access to the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) structures with minimal tissue disruption. Reported neuropsychology outcomes following this approach are limited. To report neuropsychological outcomes using an ITG approach to amygdalohippocampectomy (AH) in patients with medically refractory MTLE based on a prospective design. Fifty-four participants had Engel class I/II outcome following resection of MTL using the ITG approach. All participants had localization-related epilepsy confirmed by long-term surface video-electroencephalography and completed pre/postsurgical evaluations that included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Wada test or functional MRI, and neuropsychology assessment. Clinical semiology/video-electroencephalography indicated that of the 54 patients, 28 (52%) had left MTLE and 26 (48%) had right MTLE. Dominant hemisphere resections were performed on 23 patients (43%), nondominant on 31(57%). Twenty-nine (29) had pathology-confirmed mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Group level analyses found declines in verbal memory for patients with language-dominant resections ( P .05). Neuropsychology outcomes of an ITG approach for selective mesial temporal resection are comparable to other selective AH techniques showing minimal adverse cognitive effects. These data lend support to the ITG approach for selective AH as an option for MTLE. © Congress of Neurological Surgeons 2017.

  18. Adult absence semiology misinterpreted as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Hurst, Rebecca; Chiota-McCollum, Nicole; Tatum, William

    2014-12-01

    Correct diagnosis of seizure type and epilepsy syndrome is the foundation for appropriate antiepileptic drug selection. Inappropriate medication choices occur in the treatment of generalized epilepsy and may aggravate some seizure types, including absence seizures, potentially leading to pseudo-drug resistance. Fortunately, a correct diagnosis of absence seizures is usually not difficult, though rarely demonstrates electroclinical overlap with focal seizures. EEG can be especially misleading when secondary bilateral synchronous discharges occur in patients with focal seizures. However, the semiology of focal seizures associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy has a characteristic and consistent semiology that is the mark of this common epilepsy syndrome in adulthood. We recently encountered a 53-year-old female with refractory seizures and a semiology strongly suggesting mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Instead of focal seizures, prolonged absence seizures were validated by video-EEG monitoring and she became seizure-free after a change to broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs. This case further expands our understanding of the complexity of semiology in electroclinical classification and the spectrum that may occur in adult absence seizures. It serves to underscore the need for ictal EEG recordings and the importance of concordance with the clinical course during the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with lesions and drug-resistant epilepsy. [Published with video sequences].

  19. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy diminishes functional connectivity during emotion perception.

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    Steiger, Bettina K; Muller, Angela M; Spirig, Esther; Toller, Gianina; Jokeit, Hennric

    2017-08-01

    Unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been associated with impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions. Correspondingly, imaging studies showed decreased activity of the amygdala and cortical face processing regions in response to emotional faces. However, functional connectivity among regions involved in emotion perception has not been studied so far. To address this, we examined intrinsic functional connectivity (FC) modulated by the perception of dynamic fearful faces among the amygdala and limbic, frontal, temporal and brainstem regions. Regions of interest were identified in an activation analysis by presenting a block-design with dynamic fearful faces and dynamic landscapes to 15 healthy individuals. This led to 10 predominately right-hemispheric regions. Functional connectivity between these regions during the perception of fearful faces was examined in drug-refractory patients with left- (n=16) or right-sided (n=17) MTLE, epilepsy patients with extratemporal seizure onset (n=15) and a second group of 15 healthy controls. Healthy controls showed a widespread functional network modulated by the perception of fearful faces that encompassed bilateral amygdalae, limbic, cortical, subcortical and brainstem regions. In patients with left MTLE, a downsized network of frontal and temporal regions centered on the right amygdala was present. Patients with right MTLE showed almost no significant functional connectivity. A maintained network in the epilepsy control group indicates that findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy could not be explained by clinical factors such as seizures and antiepileptic medication. Functional networks underlying facial emotion perception are considerably changed in left and right MTLE. Alterations are present for both hemispheres in either MTLE group, but are more pronounced in right MTLE. Disruption of the functional network architecture possibly contributes to deficits in facial emotion recognition frequently

  20. Analysis of dynamics and propagation of parietal cingulate seizures with secondary mesial temporal involvement.

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    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Jouny, Christophe C; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Bergey, Gregory K

    2009-01-01

    Cingulate-onset seizures, particularly those originating from parietal cingulate regions, are inadequately described and confounded by patterns of propagation. We analyzed scalp and depth electrode recordings in a patient whose seizures originated from a lesion in the right posterior cingulate region and produced secondary seizure activity in ipsilateral mesial temporal structures. Analyses included the matching pursuit (MP) method of time-frequency decomposition and the Gabor atom density (GAD) measure of signal complexity. Although scalp recordings suggested a right temporal onset, seizures recorded with depth electrodes clearly began in the parietal cingulate region before producing a secondary discharge in ipsilateral mesial structures. GAD revealed a significant increase in complexity during ictal cingulate activity and a consistent pattern of subsequent complexity changes in the hippocampus 30 seconds later. MP and GAD measures were valuable supplements to confirm the stereotyped pattern of both time-frequency changes and complexity. This provides additional evidence for pathways between the parietal cingulate region and mesial temporal structures and raises questions as to whether parietal cingulate seizures can produce clinical symptoms independent of regional or remote propagation.

  1. Chronic deep brain stimulation in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Boëx, Colette; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliémoz, Serge; Rossetti, Andrea O; Staedler, Claudio; Spinelli, Laurent; Pegna, Alan J; Pralong, Etienne; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Foletti, Giovanni; Pollo, Claudio

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and the effects of changes in parameters of chronic amygdala-hippocampal deep brain stimulation (AH-DBS) in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Eight pharmacoresistant patients, not candidates for ablative surgery, received chronic AH-DBS (130 Hz, follow-up 12-24 months): two patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and six patients with non-lesional mesial TLE (NLES). The effects of stepwise increases in intensity (0-Off to 2 V) and stimulation configuration (quadripolar and bipolar), on seizure frequency and neuropsychological performance were studied. The two HS patients obtained a significant decrease (65-75%) in seizure frequency with high voltage bipolar DBS (≥1 V) or with quadripolar stimulation. Two out of six NLES patients became seizure-free, one of them without stimulation, suggesting a microlesional effect. Two NLES patients experienced reductions of seizure frequency (65-70%), whereas the remaining two showed no significant seizure reduction. Neuropsychological evaluations showed reversible memory impairments in two patients under strong stimulation only. AH-DBS showed long-term efficiency in most of the TLE patients. It is a valuable treatment option for patients who suffer from drug resistant epilepsy and who are not candidates for resective surgery. The effects of changes in the stimulation parameters suggest that a large zone of stimulation would be required in HS patients, while a limited zone of stimulation or even a microlesional effect could be sufficient in NLES patients, for whom the importance of the proximity of the electrode to the epileptogenic zone remains to be studied. Further studies are required to ascertain these latter observations. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional significance of MRI defined mesial temporal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Elza Márcia T. Yacubian

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional significance of MRI-defined mesial temporal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is not completely established. In order to study the possible relationship between signals of mesial temporal sclerosis on MRI and interictal SPECT findings we selected 18 patients with complex partial seizures, unilateral temporal EEG focus and normal CT. The EEG focus was defined by the presence of interictal sharp waves and slow background on several scalp EEG obtained during many years of follow up in all patients and by ictal recordings with sphenoidal electrodes in 12 patients. Group I comprised patients (n=11 in whom MRI showed mesial temporal sclerosis; group II patients (n=7 had normal MRIs. All patients were submitted to interictal 99m-Tc HMPAO injections with concomitant EEG monitoring. Lateralized hypoperfusion ipsilateral to the EEG was found in 13 patients (72%. In all Group II and in 6 Group I patients a temporal hypoperfusion was found. This SPECT study showed a higher positivity rate in patients with normal MRI than previously reported. On the other hand, in all these group II patients a neocortical origin of epileptic focus was suspected on clinical or electroencephalographic basis. Positive SPECT findings may be at least as prevalent in neocortical as in mesiolimbic epilepsy.

  3. Differentiation of cryptogenic lateral from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using regional asymmetric index of F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H. C.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, S. K.; Jeong, J. M.; Jeong, Z. K.; Lee, M. C.; Ko, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    We tried to find the possibility of utilization of F-18-FDG PET to differentiate lateral (neocortical) from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy(TLE) if we adopted quantitative comparison of regional metabolic activities using asymmetric index. We studied 22 pathologically proven mesial TLE(group C in Figure), and 27 lateral TLE patients. Lateral TLE patients were normal on MR(cryptogenic: 15; group A) or had structural lesions (12: group B). Asymmetric index (AI) was calculated as (ipsilateral -contralateral) / (ipsilateral + contralateral ) x 200. AI of medial lobe of cryptogenic lateral TLE was not decreased (-4.66.2, > 0.05) and AI of medial lobe of cryptogenic lateral TLE was not decreased (-4.66.2, >0.05) and AI of lateral lobe was decreased (-13.68.9). AI of medial and lateral lobes of mesial TLE was decreased (-3.44.7 and -16.58.9, respectively). AI of medial lobe of lesional lateral TLE was -7.39.1 (p<0.05 compared with mesial TEL). It was evident that lateral lobe of lesional lateral TLE had metabolic defect or decrease (AI: -21.410.4). While we could not find difference of metabolic activity in lateral temporal lobes between cryptogenic lateral TLE and mesial TLE patients, the difference of metabolic activity was significant in medial temporal lobes which was revealed by AI quantitation. An AI value larger than -10 (cutoff: AI) predicted positively for lateral TLE(PPV:80%) and negatively for mesial TLE(NPV:77%). Asymmetry of metabolic activity in medial and not in lateral lobe of temporal lobe could give hints about whether the epileptogenic zones were mesial or lateral

  4. Age-Dependent Mesial Temporal Lobe Lateralization in Language FMRI

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    Sepeta, Leigh N.; Berl, Madison M.; Wilke, Marko; You, Xiaozhen; Mehta, Meera; Xu, Benjamin; Inati, Sara; Dustin, Irene; Khan, Omar; Austermuehle, Alison; Theodore, William H.; Gaillard, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective FMRI activation of the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) may be important for epilepsy surgical planning. We examined MTL activation and lateralization during language fMRI in children and adults with focal epilepsy. Methods 142 controls and patients with left hemisphere focal epilepsy (Pediatric: epilepsy, n = 17, mean age = 9.9 ± 2.0; controls, n = 48; mean age = 9.1 ± 2.6; Adult: epilepsy, n = 20, mean age = 26.7 ± 5.8; controls, n = 57, mean age = 26.2 ± 7.5) underwent 3T fMRI using a language task (auditory description decision task). Image processing and analyses were conducted in SPM8; ROIs included MTL, Broca’s area, and Wernicke’s area. We assessed group and individual MTL activation, and examined degree of lateralization. Results Patients and controls (pediatric and adult) demonstrated group and individual MTL activation during language fMRI. MTL activation was left lateralized for adults but less so in children (p’s < 0.005). Patients did not differ from controls in either age group. Stronger left-lateralized MTL activation was related to older age (p = 0.02). Language lateralization (Broca’s and Wernicke’s) predicted 19% of the variance in MTL lateralization for adults (p = 0.001), but not children. Significance Language fMRI may be used to elicit group and individual MTL activation. The developmental difference in MTL lateralization and its association with language lateralization suggests a developmental shift in lateralization of MTL function, with increased left lateralization across the age span. This shift may help explain why children have better memory outcomes following resection compared to adults. PMID:26696589

  5. Lateralization of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with chronic ambulatory electrocorticography.

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    King-Stephens, David; Mirro, Emily; Weber, Peter B; Laxer, Kenneth D; Van Ness, Paul C; Salanova, Vicenta; Spencer, David C; Heck, Christianne N; Goldman, Alica; Jobst, Barbara; Shields, Donald C; Bergey, Gregory K; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Worrell, Gregory A; Rossi, Marvin A; Gross, Robert E; Cole, Andrew J; Sperling, Michael R; Nair, Dileep R; Gwinn, Ryder P; Park, Yong D; Rutecki, Paul A; Fountain, Nathan B; Wharen, Robert E; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Miller, Ian O; Barkley, Gregory L; Edwards, Jonathan C; Geller, Eric B; Berg, Michel J; Sadler, Toni L; Sun, Felice T; Morrell, Martha J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with suspected mesial temporal lobe (MTL) epilepsy typically undergo inpatient video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring with scalp and/or intracranial electrodes for 1 to 2 weeks to localize and lateralize the seizure focus or foci. Chronic ambulatory electrocorticography (ECoG) in patients with MTL epilepsy may provide additional information about seizure lateralization. This analysis describes data obtained from chronic ambulatory ECoG in patients with suspected bilateral MTL epilepsy in order to assess the time required to determine the seizure lateralization and whether this information could influence treatment decisions. Ambulatory ECoG was reviewed in patients with suspected bilateral MTL epilepsy who were among a larger cohort with intractable epilepsy participating in a randomized controlled trial of responsive neurostimulation. Subjects were implanted with bilateral MTL leads and a cranially implanted neurostimulator programmed to detect abnormal interictal and ictal ECoG activity. ECoG data stored by the neurostimulator were reviewed to determine the lateralization of electrographic seizures and the interval of time until independent bilateral MTL electrographic seizures were recorded. Eighty-two subjects were implanted with bilateral MTL leads and followed for 4.7 years on average (median 4.9 years). Independent bilateral MTL electrographic seizures were recorded in 84%. The average time to record bilateral electrographic seizures in the ambulatory setting was 41.6 days (median 13 days, range 0-376 days). Sixteen percent had only unilateral electrographic seizures after an average of 4.6 years of recording. About one third of the subjects implanted with bilateral MTL electrodes required >1 month of chronic ambulatory ECoG before the first contralateral MTL electrographic seizure was recorded. Some patients with suspected bilateral MTL seizures had only unilateral electrographic seizures. Chronic ambulatory ECoG in patients with suspected

  6. Small calcified lesions suggestive of neurocysticercosis are associated with mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Marcos C. B. Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested a possible relationship between temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and neurocysticercosis (NC. We performed a case-control study to evaluate the association of NC and MTS. Method: We randomly selected patients with different epilepsy types, including: MTS, primary generalized epilepsy (PGE and focal symptomatic epilepsy (FSE. Patients underwent a structured interview, followed by head computed tomography (CT. A neuroradiologist evaluated the scan for presence of calcified lesions suggestive of NC. CT results were matched with patients’ data. Results: More patients in the MTS group displayed calcified lesions suggestive of NC than patients in the other groups (p=0.002. On multivariate analysis, MTS was found to be an independent predictor of one or more calcified NC lesions (p=0.033. Conclusion: After controlling for confounding factors, we found an independent association between NC calcified lesions and MTS.

  7. Hipometabolismo cerebral em pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal demonstrado pelo FDG-PET Brain hypometabolism in patients with mesial-temporal sclerosis demonstrated by FDG-PET

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    PAULO S. DUARTE

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a extensão do hipometabolismo cerebral em pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal (EMT. MÉTODO: Este estudo retrospectivo incluiu 21 pacientes que apresentavam epilepsia parcial complexa refrataria à terapia e que foram selecionados para cirurgia após análise extensa que incluía: EEG de superfície e estudos de neuroimagem (PET, SPECT e ressonância magnética. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a intervenção cirúrgica e tiveram confirmação histológica de EMT. Uma análise semi-quantitativa foi realizada, utilizando regiões de interesse (ROIs nas seguintes estruturas: lobos frontais, parietais e occipitais, gânglios da base, tálamos, cerebelo e três diferentes regiões nos lobos temporais, que compreendiam o córtex medial, inferior e lateral. Um índice de assimetria (IA foi calculado, comparando as contagens por pixel nas estruturas homólogas em ambos os hemisférios cerebrais. Os IAs das diferentes estruturas foram então correlacionados. RESULTADOS: Uma correlação significativa foi demonstrada entre os IAs do córtex medial dos lobos temporais e aqueles dos lobos frontais, dos lobos parietais, dos gânglios da base e dos tálamos (r = 0,72, 0,62, 0,47 e 0,47 respectivamente com p The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of brain hypometabolism in patients with mesial-temporal sclerosis (MTS. METHOD: This retrospective study included 21 patients who had medically refractory complex partial seizures and were selected for surgical therapy after a comprehensive evaluation which included surface EEG recordings and neuroimaging studies (PET, SPECT and MRI. All patients were subjected to surgical intervention and had an histopathological confirmation of MTS. A semi-quantitative analysis of the PET images was performed using regions of interest in the following structures: frontal, parietal and occipital lobes, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellum and three different regions in the

  8. Temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis: hippocampal neuronal loss as a predictor of surgical outcome

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    Anaclara Prada Jardim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze retrospectively a series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS, and the association of patterns of hippocampal sclerosis with clinical data and surgical prognosis. METHOD: Sixty-six patients with medically refractory TLE with unilateral MTS after anterior temporal lobectomy were included. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patient's clinical data and surgical outcome were reviewed. RESULTS: Occurrence of initial precipitating insult (IPI, as well as better postoperative seizure control (i.e. Engel class 1, were associated with classical and severe patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (MTS type 1a and 1b, respectively. CONCLUSION: Quantitative evaluation of hippocampal neuronal loss patterns predicts surgical outcome in patients with TLE-MTS.

  9. Temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis: hippocampal neuronal loss as a predictor of surgical outcome.

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    Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen Lucia Penteado; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-05-01

    To analyze retrospectively a series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), and the association of patterns of hippocampal sclerosis with clinical data and surgical prognosis. Sixty-six patients with medically refractory TLE with unilateral MTS after anterior temporal lobectomy were included. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patient's clinical data and surgical outcome were reviewed. Occurrence of initial precipitating insult (IPI), as well as better postoperative seizure control (i.e. Engel class 1), were associated with classical and severe patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (MTS type 1a and 1b, respectively). Quantitative evaluation of hippocampal neuronal loss patterns predicts surgical outcome in patients with TLE-MTS.

  10. The Legacy of Henry Molaison (1926-2008) and the Impact of His Bilateral Mesial Temporal Lobe Surgery on the Study of Human Memory.

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    Dossani, Rimal Hanif; Missios, Symeon; Nanda, Anil

    2015-10-01

    In 1953, neurosurgeon William Beecher Scoville performed a bilateral mesial temporal lobe resection on patient Henry Molaison, who suffered from epilepsy. The operation was novel as a treatment for epilepsy and had an unexpected consequence: a severe compromise of Molaison's anterograde memory. In a landmark 1957 publication, Scoville and Milner concluded that mesial temporal lobe structures, particularly the hippocampi, were integral to the formation of new, recent memories. Over the next 5 decades, more than 100 researchers studied Molaison's memory, behavior, and learning skills, making him one of the most famous patients in the history of cognitive neuroscience. Following his death in 2008, his brain was scanned in situ and ex vivo and then sectioned into 2401 sections. Histological evaluation of Molaison's brain further elucidated which mesial temporal lobe structures were preserved or resected in his operation, shedding new light on the neuroanatomic underpinnings of short-term memory. Scoville regretted Molaison's surgical outcome and spoke vigorously about the dangers of bilateral mesial temporal lobe surgery. This report is the first historical account of Molaison's case in the neurosurgical literature, serving as a reminder of Molaison's contributions and of the perils of bilateral mesial temporal lobe surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Recognition memory of serially or simultaneously presented words or figures, of epilepsy patients with or without mesial temporal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.P.H.; Kampen, A. van; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Vlugt, H. van der; Alpherts, W.C.J.; Vermeulen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies, examining short-term recognition memory in patients with partial seizures as a consequence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) have reported inconsistent findings. Dependent on the paradigms used for measuring recognition memory, some studies have demonstrated that the mesial

  12. Persistent Interictal Musical Hallucination in a Patient With Mesial Temporal Sclerosis-Related Epilepsy: First Case Report and Etiopathological Hypothesis.

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    Borelli, Paolo; Vedovello, Marcella; Braga, Massimiliano; Pederzoli, Massimo; Beretta, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Musical hallucination is a disorder of complex sound processing of instrumental music, songs, choirs, chants, etc. The underlying pathologies include moderate to severe acquired hearing loss (the auditory equivalent of Charles Bonnet syndrome), psychiatric illnesses (depression, schizophrenia), drug intoxication (benzodiazepines, salicylate, pentoxifylline, propranolol), traumatic lesions along the acoustic pathways, and epilepsy. The hallucinations are most likely to begin late in life; 70% of patients are women. Musical hallucination has no known specific therapy. Treating the underlying cause is the most effective approach; neuroleptic and antidepressant medications have only rarely succeeded.Musical hallucination in epilepsy typically presents as simple partial seizures originating in the lateral temporal cortex. To our knowledge, no formal report of musical hallucination in the interictal state has been published before. In contrast, other interictal psychotic features are a relatively common complication, especially in patients with long-standing drug-resistant epilepsy.We describe a 62-year-old woman with a long history of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy whose musical hallucination was solely interictal. We speculate on the possible link between temporal epilepsy and her hallucination. We hypothesize that, as a result of her epileptic activity-induced damage, an imbalance developed between the excitatory and inhibitory projections connecting the mesial temporal cortex to the other auditory structures. These structures may have generated hyperactivity in the lateral temporal cortex through a "release" mechanism that eventually resulted in musical hallucination.

  13. Psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy: a study comparing patients with mesial temporal sclerosis and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

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    Filho, Gerardo Maria de Araújo; Rosa, Vivianne Pellegrino; Lin, Katia; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2008-07-01

    We evaluated the frequency of psychiatric disorders (PDs) in a homogenous series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS), as compared with patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), aiming to determine possible differences in psychiatric diagnoses between these two epileptic syndromes. Data from 170 patients with refractory TLE-MTS and from 100 patients with JME were reviewed and compared. The prevalence of PDs was high in both groups of patients with epilepsy: PDs were present in 85 patients with TLE-MTS (50%) and 49 patients with JME (49%). Among the TLE-MTS group, mood (25.8%), psychotic (15.8%), and anxiety (14.1%) disorders were the most frequent diagnoses, whereas anxiety and mood disorders (23 and 19%, respectively) were the most common among patients with JME. Psychoses were significantly associated with MTS (P<0.01) and anxiety disorders with JME (P<0.05). These findings suggest the existence of an anatomic correlation between PDs and brain structures involved in both epilepsy syndromes.

  14. Uso da sequência FLAIR-EPI na análise da esclerose mesial temporal EPI-FLAIR sequence in the evaluation of mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Marcos Alberto da Costa Machado Júnior

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar as alterações morfológicas e de intensidade de sinal das regiões hipocampais em pacientes, com epilepsia temporal fármaco-resistente. Para tal, estudamos 8 pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal, utilizando aparelhagem de RM de 1,5T, com sequências Spin Eco - SE, Fast Spin Eco - FSE, Fluid Atenuation Inversion Recovery, com Eco Planar Imaging - FLAIR-EPI. Observamos a superioridade da sequência FLAIR na detecção do aumento da intensidade de sinal da região hipocampal, particularmente com cortes coronais, em relação às sequências SE e FSE, com a vantagem de ser uma técnica de rápida execução. A sequência STIR evidenciou adelgaçamento da cortical do hipocampo, na metade dos casos que apresentavam alteração de sinal.The purpose of this study is to evaluate morpholologycal and signal intensity changes in the hippocampus in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. We studied 8 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis using a 1.5 -T MR and the following sequences Spin Eco- SE, Fast Spin Echo- FSE, Fluid Atenuation Inversion Recovery Echo Planar Imaging - FLAIR-EPI. We noticed a sensitive increase signal intensity on FLAIR- EPI sequences, particularly, in coronal images, than on SE and FSE sequences. The STIR sequence showed a cortical hippocampus atrophy in half of the cases, in whom signal abnormalities were present.

  15. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis; Diagnostico por imagen con resonancia magnetica de la esclerosis temporal mesial

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    Pastor, E.; Sanchez, J. C.; Rodriguez, I.; Altuzarra, A.; Machado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain); Aguilar, D. [Hospital Clinico Universitario San Cecilio. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean{+-} 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings

  16. Electrode location and clinical outcome in hippocampal electrical stimulation for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondallaz, Percy; Boëx, Colette; Rossetti, Andrea O; Foletti, Giovanni; Spinelli, Laurent; Vulliemoz, Serge; Seeck, Margitta; Pollo, Claudio

    2013-06-01

    To study the clinical outcome in hippocampal deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) according to the electrode location. Eight MTLE patients implanted in the hippocampus and stimulated with high-frequency DBS were included in this study. Five underwent invasive recordings with depth electrodes to localize ictal onset zone prior to chronic DBS. Position of the active contacts of the electrode was calculated on postoperative imaging. The distances to the ictal onset zone were measured as well as atlas-based hippocampus structures impacted by stimulation were identified. Both were correlated with seizure frequency reduction. The distances between active electrode location and estimated ictal onset zone were 11±4.3 or 9.1±2.3mm for patients with a >50% or 50% seizure frequency reduction, 100% had the active contacts located 3mm to the subiculum. Decrease of epileptogenic activity induced by hippocampal DBS in refractory MTLE: (1) seems not directly associated with the vicinity of active electrode to the ictal focus determined by invasive recordings; (2) might be obtained through the neuromodulation of the subiculum. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Granule cell dispersion is not a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Lancellotti, Carmen; Marinho, Taissa Ferrari; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Targas Yacubian, Elza Márcia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was to analyze the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with surgical prognosis, patterns of MTS and clinical data. Hippocampal specimens from 66 patients with MTLE and unilateral MTS and from 13 controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patients' clinical data, types of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 45.5% of cases and was not correlated with clinical variable. More severe neuronal loss was observed in patients with GCD. Except for MTS Type 2 - observed only in four no- GCD patients - groups did not differ with respect to the types of MTS. Surgical outcome was similar in both groups. In conclusion, GCD was associated with the degree of hippocampal cell loss, but was not a predictor of surgical outcome.

  18. Brain-responsive neurostimulation in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Eric B; Skarpaas, Tara L; Gross, Robert E; Goodman, Robert R; Barkley, Gregory L; Bazil, Carl W; Berg, Michael J; Bergey, Gregory K; Cash, Sydney S; Cole, Andrew J; Duckrow, Robert B; Edwards, Jonathan C; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Goldman, Alicia M; Gwinn, Ryder P; Heck, Christianne; Herekar, Aamar; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Jobst, Barbara C; King-Stephens, David; Labar, Douglas R; Leiphart, James W; Marsh, W Richard; Meador, Kimford J; Mizrahi, Eli M; Murro, Anthony M; Nair, Dileep R; Noe, Katherine H; Park, Yong D; Rutecki, Paul A; Salanova, Vicenta; Sheth, Raj D; Shields, Donald C; Skidmore, Christopher; Smith, Michael C; Spencer, David C; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Tatum, William; Van Ness, Paul C; Vossler, David G; Wharen, Robert E; Worrell, Gregory A; Yoshor, Daniel; Zimmerman, Richard S; Cicora, Kathy; Sun, Felice T; Morrell, Martha J

    2017-06-01

    Evaluate the seizure-reduction response and safety of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) brain-responsive stimulation in adults with medically intractable partial-onset seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin. Subjects with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) were identified from prospective clinical trials of a brain-responsive neurostimulator (RNS System, NeuroPace). The seizure reduction over years 2-6 postimplantation was calculated by assessing the seizure frequency compared to a preimplantation baseline. Safety was assessed based on reported adverse events. There were 111 subjects with MTLE; 72% of subjects had bilateral MTL onsets and 28% had unilateral onsets. Subjects had one to four leads placed; only two leads could be connected to the device. Seventy-six subjects had depth leads only, 29 had both depth and strip leads, and 6 had only strip leads. The mean follow-up was 6.1 ± (standard deviation) 2.2 years. The median percent seizure reduction was 70% (last observation carried forward). Twenty-nine percent of subjects experienced at least one seizure-free period of 6 months or longer, and 15% experienced at least one seizure-free period of 1 year or longer. There was no difference in seizure reduction in subjects with and without mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), bilateral MTL onsets, prior resection, prior intracranial monitoring, and prior vagus nerve stimulation. In addition, seizure reduction was not dependent on the location of depth leads relative to the hippocampus. The most frequent serious device-related adverse event was soft tissue implant-site infection (overall rate, including events categorized as device-related, uncertain, or not device-related: 0.03 per implant year, which is not greater than with other neurostimulation devices). Brain-responsive stimulation represents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy, including patients with unilateral or bilateral MTLE who are not candidates for

  19. Increased neuronal synchrony prepares mesial temporal networks for seizures of neocortical origin.

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    Misra, Amrit; Long, Xianda; Sperling, Michael R; Sharan, Ashwini D; Moxon, Karen A

    2018-03-01

    To gain understanding of the neuronal mechanisms underlying regional seizure spread, the impact of regional synchrony between seizure focus and downstream networks on neuronal activity during the transition to seizure in those downstream networks was assessed. Seven patients undergoing diagnostic intracranial electroencephalographic studies for surgical resection of epileptogenic regions were implanted with subdural clinical electrodes into the cortex (site of seizure initiation) and mesial temporal lobe (MTL) structures (downstream) as well as microwires into MTL. Neural activity was recorded (24/7) in parallel with the clinical intracranial electroencephalogram recordings for the duration of the patient's diagnostic stay. Changes in (1) regional synchrony (ie, coherence) between the presumptive neocortical seizure focus and MTL, (2) local synchrony between MTL neurons and their local field potential, and (3) neuronal firing rates within MTL in the time leading up to seizure were examined to study the mechanisms underlying seizure spread. In seizures of neocortical origin, an increase in regional synchrony preceded the spread of seizures into MTL (predominantly hippocampal). Within frequencies similar to those of regional synchrony, MTL networks showed an increase in unit-field coherence and a decrease in neuronal firing rate, specifically for inhibitory interneuron populations but not pyramidal cell populations. These results suggest a mechanism of spreading seizures whereby the seizure focus first synchronizes local field potentials in downstream networks to the seizure activity. This change in local field coherence modifies the activity of interneuron populations in these downstream networks, which leads to the attenuation of interneuronal firing rate, effectively shutting down local interneuron populations prior to the spread of seizure. Therefore, regional synchrony may influence the failure of downstream interneurons to prevent the spread of the seizures

  20. Amygdala enlargement in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without hippocampal sclerosis

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    Ana Carolina Coan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NL represent a challenge for definition of underlying pathology and for presurgical evaluation. In a recent study we observed significant amygdala enlargement in 14% of MTLE patients with MRI signs of HS. Areas of gray matter volume (GMV increase could represent structural abnormalities related to the epileptogenic zone or part of a developmental abnormality. Our objective was to look for undetected areas of increased GMV in MTLE-NL using post processing MRI techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition.Methods: We evaluated 66 patients with MTLE-NL on visual analysis and 82 controls. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM group analysis was performed with VBM8/SPM8 looking for areas of increased GMV. We then performed automatic amygdala volumetry using Freesurfer software and T2 relaxometry to confirm VBM findings.Results: VBM group-analysis demonstrated increased amygdala volume in the MTLE-NL group compared to controls. Individual volumetric analysis confirmed amygdala enlargement (AE in eight (12% patients. Overall, from all patients with AE and defined epileptic focus, four (57% had the predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. These results were cross-validated by a secondary VBM analysis including subgroups of patients according to the volumetric data. T2 relaxometry demonstrated no amygdala hyperintense signal in any individual with significant amygdala enlargement. There were no clinical differences between patients with and without AE.Discussion: This exploratory study demonstrates the occurrence of AE in 12% of patients with MTLE-NL. This finding supports the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NL in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. Further studies are necessary but this finding could be of great importance in the understanding of MTLE-NL.

  1. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is a network disorder with altered cortical hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Woorim; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-05-01

    Electrophysiologic hubs within the large-scale functional networks in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) have not been investigated. We hypothesized that mTLE with HS has different resting-state network hubs in their large-scale functional networks compared to the hubs in healthy controls (HC). We also hypothesized that the hippocampus would be a functional hub in mTLE patients with HS. Resting-state functional networks, identified by using magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands, were evaluated. Networks in 44 mTLE patients with HS (left mTLE = 22; right mTLE = 22) were compared with those in 46 age-matched HC. We investigated betweenness centrality at the source-level MEG network. The main network hubs were at the pole of the left superior temporal gyrus in the beta band, the pole of the left middle temporal gyrus in the beta and gamma bands, left hippocampus in the theta and alpha bands, and right posterior cingulate gyrus in all four frequency bands in mTLE patients; all of which were different from the main network hubs in HC. Only patients with left mTLE showed profound differences from HC at the left hippocampus in the alpha band. Our analysis of resting-state MEG signals shows that altered electrophysiologic functional hubs in mTLE patients reflect pathophysiologic brain network reorganization. Because we detected network hubs in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal areas, it is probable that mTLE is a large-scale network disorder rather than a focal disorder. The hippocampus was a network hub in left mTLE but not in right mTLE patients, which may be due to intrinsic functional and structural asymmetries between left and right mTLE patients. The evaluation of cortical hubs, even in the spike-free resting-state, could be a clinical diagnostic marker of mTLE with HS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Confiabilidade de medidas volumétricas de estruturas temporais mesiais Reliability of mesial temporal lobe volumetric measures

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    Renato L. Marchetti

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available MOTIVO DO ESTUDO: O desenvolvimento de técnicas confiáveis para a realização de medidas volumétricas de estruturas temporais mesiais (amígdala, hipocampo e giro para-hipocampal em exames de ressonância magnética (RM pode fornecer dados para o estudo de vários transtornos neuropsiquiátricos, particularmente epilepsia do lobo temporal, doença de Alzheimer e esquizofrenia. MÉTODO: Investigamos essas técnicas realizando estudo de confiabilidade intra-observador (IO e entre-observador (EO, envolvendo controles normais, pacientes com epilepsia e pacientes com doença de Alzheimer, através do coeficiente de correlação intra-classe (CCI. RESULTADOS: A confiabilidade IO para as estruturas analisadas variou de 0,93 a 0,99 (pRATIONALE: The development of reliable techniques for volumetric measurement of mesial temporal structures (amygdala, hypocampus and parahypocampal gyrus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can provide data for the study of neuropsychiatric disorders, mainly temporal lobe epilepsy, Alzheimer´s disease and schizophrenia. METHOD: We investigated these techniques performing intraobserver and interobserver reliability study concerning normal controls, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease patients using the intra-class correlation coefficient. RESULTS: Intra-observer reliability of evaluated structures ranged from 0.93 to 0.99 (p<0.001. Inter-observer reliability ranged from 0.70 to 0.95 (p <= 0.001. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the technique of MRI morphometry of mesial temporal regions can be considered a reliable tool which may help in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders, since used by adequately trained clinicians and researchers.

  3. Granule cell dispersion is associated with memory impairment in right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen; Ferrari-Marinho, Taíssa; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    We analyzed the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with memory performance, clinical data and surgical outcome in a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Hippocampal specimens from 54 patients with MTLE (27 patients with right MTLE and 27 with left MTLE) and unilateral MTS, who were separated into GCD and no-GCD groups and thirteen controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed using hippocampal sections stained with NeuN. Patients' neuropsychological measures, clinical data, type of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 28 (51.9%) patients. No correlation between GCD and MTS pattern, clinical data or surgical outcome was found. The presence of GCD was correlated with worse visuospatial memory performance in right MTLE, but not with memory performance in left MTLE. GCD may be related to memory impairment in right MTLE-MTS patients. However, the role of GCD in memory function is not precisely defined. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, E.; Sanchez, J. C.; Rodriguez, I.; Altuzarra, A.; Machado, F.; Aguilar, D.

    2001-01-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean± 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings), 4 with tumors and 1 with a ballooned cell

  5. Type of preoperative aura may predict postsurgical outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    As the initial symptoms of epileptic seizures, many types of auras have significant localizing or lateralizing value. In this study, we hypothesized that the type of aura may predict postsurgical outcome in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In this retrospective study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of medically refractory TLE due to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis who underwent epilepsy surgery at the Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups: seizure freedom or relapse. Outcome was compared between seven groups of patients according to their preoperative auras. Two hundred thirty-seven patients were studied. The chance of becoming free of seizures after surgery in patients with abdominal aura was 65.1%, while in other patients, this was 43.3% (P=0.01). In two-by-two comparisons, no other significant differences were observed. Patients with medically refractory TLE-MTS who reported abdominal auras preceding their seizures fared better postoperatively with regard to seizure control compared with those who did not report auras, which may indicate bitemporal dysfunction, and to patients with other auras, which may indicate a widespread epileptogenic zone in the latter group of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Complications After Surgery for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathon, Bertrand; Navarro, Vincent; Bielle, Franck; Nguyen-Michel, Vi-Huong; Carpentier, Alexandre; Baulac, Michel; Cornu, Philippe; Adam, Claude; Dupont, Sophie; Clemenceau, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common cause of drug-resistant epilepsy amenable for surgical treatment and seizure control. This study aimed to analyze morbidities related to surgery of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis and to identify possible risk factors for complications. A retrospective analysis of postoperative complications was made for 389 operations performed between 1990 and 2015 on patients aged 15-67 years (mean 36.8). Three surgical approaches were used: anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) (n = 209), transcortical selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) (n = 144), and transsylvian SAH (n = 36). Complications were classified as minor or major if there was a neurologic impairment or if further surgical or medical treatment was necessary. Complications followed 15.4% of operations. They were classed as major for 4.1% of patients, but there were no mortalities. Persistent neurologic deficits occurred in 0.5% of patients. In 3 cases (0.8%) additional surgery was necessary to treat an intracranial hematoma, a delayed hydrocephalus, and a subdural empyema. Symptomatic visual field defects (VFDs) were frequent and included contralateral superior quadrantanopia (8.2%) or hemianopia (1.3%). Overall complications (P = 0.04) and symptomatic VFDs (P = 0.04) were most frequent in operations on men. Major complications occurred most often with the ATL surgical approach than with transcortical SAH (P = 0.03). Major complications occur rarely after mesial temporal surgery on epileptic patients. They occur more often following the ATL rather than transcortical SAH approach. Complications tend to be temporary with symptoms of limited duration for surgery performed by experienced teams on carefully selected and evaluated patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Survival of mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in humans with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seress, László; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Klemm, Joyce; Byrne, Richard; Bakay, Roy A E

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis can be identified in most patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Surgical removal of the sclerotic hippocampus is widely performed to treat patients with drug-resistant mesial TLE. In general, both epilepsy-prone and epilepsy-resistant neurons are believed to be in the hippocampal formation. The hilar mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are usually considered one of the most vulnerable types of neurons. The aim of this study was to clarify the fate of mossy cells in the hippocampus in epileptic humans. Of the 19 patients included in this study, 15 underwent temporal lobe resection because of drug-resistant TLE. Four patients were used as controls because they harbored tumors that had not invaded the hippocampus and they had experienced no seizures. Histological evaluation of resected hippocampal tissues was performed using immunohistochemistry. Mossy cells were identified in the control as well as the epileptic hippocampi by using cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide immunohistochemistry. In most cases the number of mossy cells was reduced and thorny excrescences were smaller in the epileptic hippocampi than in controls; however, there was a significant loss of pyramidal cells and a partial loss of granule cells in the same epileptic hippocampi in which mossy cell loss was apparent. The loss of mossy cells could be correlated with the extent of hippocampal sclerosis, patient age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and frequency of seizures. In many cases large numbers of mossy cells were present in the hilus of the dentate gyrus when most pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and CA3 areas of the Ammon's horn were lost, suggesting that mossy cells may not be more vulnerable to epileptic seizures than the hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  8. Surgical outcome in adolescents with mesial temporal sclerosis: Is it different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Pue; Hirsch, Lawrence; Levy, Susan; Testa, Francine; Mattson, Richard; Spencer, Dennis

    2017-04-01

    There are extensive studies evaluating mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in adults and limited studies in children, with adolescents being included within both patient populations. Our aim was to evaluate predictors of surgical outcome solely in adolescent patients with MRI- and pathology -proven MTS. The Yale Epilepsy Surgery Database was reviewed from 1987 to 2012 for adolescent patients with confirmed MTS on MRI and pathology who underwent temporal lobectomy and had greater than two-year postsurgical follow-up. Clinical and electrographic data were reviewed. Eighteen patients were identified. Eleven patients (61%) were seizure-free. All seven patients (39%) who were not seizure-free free were found to have lateralized ictal onset within one hemisphere involving two or more lobes on scalp EEG (p<0.001). Of the 7 patients who were not seizure-free, 4 had a history of status epilepticus (compared to 1/11 seizure-free patients; p=0.047), and 4 had lateralized hypometabolism involving two or more lobes within a hemisphere seen on PET (compared to 0/8 seizure-free patients; p=0.002). A novel finding in our study was that lateralized (rather than localized) ictal onset on scalp EEG, lateralized hypometabolism on PET, and history of status epilepticus were risk factors for not attaining seizure freedom in adolescents with MTS who underwent temporal lobectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

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    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo, E-mail: juarezbarbara@hotmail.co [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Neurology

    2010-04-15

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  10. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  11. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: fcendes@unicamp.br

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  12. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  13. Does the patient's hand hold the key to preventing secondary generalization in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Carina Gonçalves Pedroso; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of ictal dystonic posturing (DP) in postoperative seizure outcome and to assess the influence of DP in generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS) occurrence during video-EEG monitoring of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis. The impact of DP on surgical outcome remains controversial. Moreover, DP has been recently associated with brain networks avoiding GTCS occurrence. Five hundred twenty-seven seizures of 171 patients who were submitted to standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) between 2002 and 2010, with at least one year of post-surgical follow-up, were retrospectively analyzed and classified as with or without DP and as evolving or not to GTCS. The ictal semiologic correlates of DP, timing elapsed since precedent seizure and antiepileptic drug (AED) intake before each seizure were evaluated. Seizure outcome after ATL was assessed according to Engel's scale. Fifty-eight out of 171 patients (34%) exhibited ictal DP, of which 91.5% were always unilateral and contralateral to the operated side. DP was related to shorter seizures (p=0.007) and a much lower likelihood of the seizure evolving to GTCS (p=0.001), even during AED withdrawal (p=0.002). There was no association between DP and prognosis regarding seizure control as the result of the surgical resection, either in patients with shorter or in those with longer period of follow-up. Our data support the hypothesis that DP reflects a brain network activation that helps avoid GTCS, even during AED withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuroimaging observations linking neurocysticercosis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino M; Velasco, Tonicarlo R; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Araújo, David; Alexandre, Veriano; Scornavacca, Francisco; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara R; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Carlotti, Carlos G; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2015-10-01

    To test if chronic calcificed neurocysticercosis (cNCC) and hippocampal sclerosis occur more often than by chance ipsilateral to the same brain hemisphere or brain region in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) plus neurocysticercosis. This proof-of-concept would provide important evidence of a direct pathogenic relationship between neurocysticercosis and MTLE-HS. A cohort of 290 consecutive MTLE-HS surgical patients was studied. A test of proportions was used to analyze if the proportion of patients with a single cNCC lesion matching the same brain hemisphere or region of hippocampal sclerosis was significantly greater than 50%, as expected by the chance. Neuroimaging findings of cNCC were observed in 112 (38.6%) of 290 MTLE-HS patients and a single cNCC lesion occurred in 58 (51.8%) of them. There were no differences in main basal clinical characteristics of MTLE-HS patients with single or multiple cNCC lesions. In patients with single cNCC lesions, the lesion matched the side in which hippocampal sclerosis was observed in 43 (74.1%) patients, a proportion significantly greater than that expected to occur by chance (p=0.008). Neurocysticercosis in temporal lobe was ipsilateral to hippocampal sclerosis in 85.0% of patients and accounted mostly for this result. This work is a proof-of-concept that the association of neurocysticercosis and MTLE-HS cannot be explained exclusively by patients sharing common biological or socio-economic predisposing variables. Instead, our results suggest the involvement of more direct pathogenic mechanisms like regional inflammation, repetitive seizures or both. Neurocysticercosis within temporal lobes was particularly related with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis in MTLE-HS, a finding adding new contributions for understanding MTLE-HS plus cNCC or perhaps to other forms of dual pathology in MTLE-HS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversible MRI abnormalities in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a case report

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    Chiara Pizzanelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The question regarding  the existence of abnormalities in the neuroimaging exams immediately after status epilecticus or epileptic seizures, but showing complete reversibility after a proper antiepileptic therapy, has long been debated. The first reports attempting to demonstrate their existence date back to the 1980s, and relied upon computed tomography as the imaging method of choice. After the introduction of MRI, a more appropriate characterization of these abnormalities was obtained along with the description of their most frequent features: (a T2 signal hyperintensity in the white matter and, occasionally, (b reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC and increased signal in DWI sequences.The MRI abnormalities induced by epileptic activity pose a broad differential diagnosis including infections, inflammatory autoimmune encephalopathies, neoplasms. It remains a diagnosis of exclusion and requires proper diagnostic iter in order to reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.In this case report, a thorough presentation will be outlined about MRI alterations in the left mesial temporal lobe, which resulted completely reversible after a proper antiepileptic therapy.

  16. Asymmetrical hippocampal connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence from resting state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellano Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, the most common type of focal epilepsy in adults, is often caused by hippocampal sclerosis (HS. Patients with HS usually present memory dysfunction, which is material-specific according to the hemisphere involved and has been correlated to the degree of HS as measured by postoperative histopathology as well as by the degree of hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Verbal memory is mostly affected by left-sided HS, whereas visuo-spatial memory is more affected by right HS. Some of these impairments may be related to abnormalities of the network in which individual hippocampus takes part. Functional connectivity can play an important role to understand how the hippocampi interact with other brain areas. It can be estimated via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI resting state experiments by evaluating patterns of functional networks. In this study, we investigated the functional connectivity patterns of 9 control subjects, 9 patients with right MTLE and 9 patients with left MTLE. Results We detected differences in functional connectivity within and between hippocampi in patients with unilateral MTLE associated with ipsilateral HS by resting state fMRI. Functional connectivity resulted to be more impaired ipsilateral to the seizure focus in both patient groups when compared to control subjects. This effect was even more pronounced for the left MTLE group. Conclusions The findings presented here suggest that left HS causes more reduction of functional connectivity than right HS in subjects with left hemisphere dominance for language.

  17. Assessment of working memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudesco, Ivanda de Souza Silva; Vaz, Leonardo José; Mantoan, Marcele Araújo Silva; Belzunces, Erich; Noffs, Maria Helena; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether working memory is impaired in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), a controversial and largely unexplored matter. Twenty subjects with left MTLE-HS, 19 with right MTLE-HS, and 21 control right-handed subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment of episodic and semantic memory, executive functions, and specific working memory components. Left and right epileptogenic foci resulted in impairment of verbal and nonverbal episodic memory (verbal memory deficit greater in left MTLE-HS than in right MTLE-HS). In addition, patients with left MTLE-HS were impaired in learning paired associates, verbal fluency, and Trail Making. No differences were seen in the tests carried out to evaluate the working memory components (except visuospatial short-term memory in right MTLE-HS). In this study we did not detect reliable working memory impairment in patients with MTLE-HS with either a left or right focus in most tasks considered as tests of working memory components. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors predicting the outcome following medical treatment of mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sànchez, Javier; Centanaro, Mirella; Solís, Juanita; Delgado, Fabrizio; Yépez, Luis

    2014-06-01

    There is a lack of information from South America regarding factors that predict the clinical outcomes of patients treated medically for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). This study was conducted to determine which of these factors are the most important. This study included 110 South American patients with MTLE-HS treated with antiepileptic drugs. The factors considered included age, gender, age of epilepsy onset, interval between the lesion and the first seizure, central nervous system infection, traumatic brain injury, perinatal asphyxia, febrile convulsion, history of status epilepticus, types of seizures, site of hippocampal sclerosis (HS), extrahippocampal pathology, and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities. The patients were divided into two groups based on the response to treatment: Group I, seizure free for at least two years; and Group II, not seizure free. On the multivariate analysis, the factors associated with a poor prognosis in terms of seizure frequency and control following treatment included the presence of an early onset of seizure, more than 10 seizures per month before treatment, and EEG abnormalities. The recognition of risk factors, such as early onset of seizures, more than 10 seizures per month before treatment, and EEG abnormalities, could lead to the identification of risk groups among patients with MTLE-HS and refractory epilepsy, possibly designating these individuals as candidates for early epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A macaque model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In order to better investigate the cause/effect relationships of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, we hereby describe a new non-human primate model of mTLE. METHODS: Ten macaques were studied and divided into 2 groups: saline control group (n = 4 and kainic acid (KA injection group (n = 6. All macaques were implanted bilaterally with subdural electrodes over temporal cortex and depth electrodes in CA3 hippocampal region. KA was stereotaxically injected into the right hippocampus of macaques. All animals were monitored by video and electrocorticography (ECoG to assess status epilepticus (SE and subsequent spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS. Additionally, in order to evaluate brain injury produced by SE or SRS, we used both neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance image (MRI & magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and histological pathology, including Nissl stainning and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP immunostaining. RESULTS: The typical seizures were observed in the KA-injected animal model. Hippocampal sclerosis could be found by MRI & MRS. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining and GFAP immunostaining showed neuronal loss, proliferation of glial cells, formation of glial scars, and hippocampal atrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of hippocampal tissues revealed neuronal pyknosis, partial ribosome depolymerization, an abnormal reduction in rough endoplasmic reticulum size, expansion of Golgi vesicles and swollen star-shaped cells. Furthermore, we reported that KA was able to induce SE followed by SRS after a variable period of time. Similar to human mTLE, brain damage is confined to the hippocampus. Accordingly, hippocampal volume is in positive correlations with the neuronal cells count in the CA3, especially the ratio of neuron/glial cell. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a model of mTLE can be developed in macaques by intra-hippocampal injection of KA. Brain damage is confined to the hippocampus which

  20. Differential gene expression in dentate granule cells in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nicole G; Wang, Yu; Hulette, Christine M; Halvorsen, Matt; Cronin, Kenneth D; Walley, Nicole M; Haglund, Michael M; Radtke, Rodney A; Skene, J H Pate; Sinha, Saurabh R; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common neuropathologic finding in cases of medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis to show that next-generation sequencing methods can produce interpretable genomic data from RNA collected from small homogenous cell populations, and to shed light on the transcriptional changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis. RNA was extracted, and complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared and amplified from dentate granule cells that had been harvested by laser capture microdissection from surgically resected hippocampi from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Sequencing libraries were sequenced, and the resulting sequencing reads were aligned to the reference genome. Differential expression analysis was used to ascertain expression differences between patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Greater than 90% of the RNA-Seq reads aligned to the reference. There was high concordance between transcriptional profiles obtained for duplicate samples. Principal component analysis revealed that the presence or absence of hippocampal sclerosis was the main determinant of the variance within the data. Among the genes up-regulated in the hippocampal sclerosis samples, there was significant enrichment for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells from surgically resected hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, we have demonstrated the utility of next-generation sequencing methods for producing biologically relevant results from small populations of homogeneous cells, and have provided insight on the transcriptional changes associated with this pathology. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  1. 3T MRI quantification of hippocampal volume and signal in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy improves detection of hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, A C; Kubota, B; Bergo, F P G; Campos, B M; Cendes, F

    2014-01-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, MR imaging quantification of hippocampal volume and T2 signal can improve the sensitivity for detecting hippocampal sclerosis. However, the current contributions of these analyses for the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis in 3T MRI are not clear. Our aim was to compare visual analysis, volumetry, and signal quantification of the hippocampus for detecting hippocampal sclerosis in 3T MRI. Two hundred three patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy defined by clinical and electroencephalogram criteria had 3T MRI visually analyzed by imaging epilepsy experts. As a second step, we performed automatic quantification of hippocampal volumes with FreeSurfer and T2 relaxometry with an in-house software. MRI of 79 healthy controls was used for comparison. Visual analysis classified 125 patients (62%) as having signs of hippocampal sclerosis and 78 (38%) as having normal MRI findings. Automatic volumetry detected atrophy in 119 (95%) patients with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 10 (13%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. Relaxometry analysis detected hyperintense T2 signal in 103 (82%) patients with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 15 (19%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. Considered together, volumetry plus relaxometry detected signs of hippocampal sclerosis in all except 1 (99%) patient with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 22 (28%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. In 3T MRI visually inspected by experts, quantification of hippocampal volume and signal can increase the detection of hippocampal sclerosis in 28% of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androsova, Ganna; Krause, Roland; Borghei, Mojgansadat; Wassenaar, Merel; Auce, Pauls; Avbersek, Andreja; Becker, Felicitas; Berghuis, Bianca; Campbell, Ellen; Coppola, Antonietta; Francis, Ben; Wolking, Stefan; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Craig, John; Delanty, Norman; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Kunz, Wolfram S; Lerche, Holger; Marson, Anthony G; Sander, Josemir W; Sills, Graeme J; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Depondt, Chantal

    2017-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is a common epilepsy syndrome that is often poorly controlled by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Comparative AED effectiveness studies in this condition are lacking. We report retention, efficacy, and tolerability in a cohort of patients with MTLE-HS. Clinical data were collected from a European database of patients with epilepsy. We estimated retention, 12-month seizure freedom, and adverse drug reaction (ADR) rates for the 10 most commonly used AEDs in patients with MTLE-HS. Seven hundred sixty-seven patients with a total of 3,249 AED trials were included. The highest 12-month retention rates were observed with carbamazepine (85.9%), valproate (85%), and clobazam (79%). Twelve-month seizure freedom rates varied from 1.2% for gabapentin and vigabatrin to 11% for carbamazepine. Response rates were highest for AEDs that were prescribed as initial treatment and lowest for AEDs that were used in a third or higher instance. ADRs were reported in 47.6% of patients, with the highest rates observed with oxcarbazepine (35.7%), topiramate (30.9%), and pregabalin (27.4%), and the lowest rates with clobazam (6.5%), gabapentin (8.9%), and lamotrigine (16.6%). The most commonly reported ADRs were lethargy and drowsiness, dizziness, vertigo and ataxia, and blurred vision and diplopia. Our results did not demonstrate any clear advantage of newer versus older AEDs. Our results provide useful insights into AED retention, efficacy, and ADR rates in patients with MTLE-HS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Correlation of neuropsychological and metabolic changes after epilepsy surgery in patients with left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvenç, Canan; Dupont, Patrick; Van den Stock, Jan; Seynaeve, Laura; Porke, Kathleen; Dries, Eva; Van Bouwel, Karen; van Loon, Johannes; Theys, Tom; Goffin, Karolien E; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2018-04-12

    Epilepsy surgery often causes changes in cognition and cerebral glucose metabolism. Our aim was to explore relationships between pre- and postoperative cerebral metabolism as measured with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and neuropsychological test scores in patients with left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), who were rendered seizure-free after epilepsy surgery. Thirteen patients were included. All had neuropsychological testing and an interictal FDG-PET scan of the brain pre- and postoperative. Correlations between changes in neuropsychological test scores and metabolism were examined using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). There were no significant changes in the neuropsychological test scores pre- and postoperatively at the group level. Decreased metabolism was observed in the left mesial temporal regions and occipital lobe. Increased metabolism was observed in the bi-frontal and right parietal lobes, temporal lobes, occipital lobes, thalamus, cerebellum, and vermis. In these regions, we did not find a correlation between changes in metabolism and neuropsychological test scores. A significant negative correlation, however, was found between metabolic changes in the precuneus and Boston Naming Test (BNT) scores. There are significant metabolic decreases in the left mesial temporal regions and increases in the bi-frontal lobes; right parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes; right thalamus; cerebellum; and vermis in patients with left MTLE-HS who were rendered seizure-free after epilepsy surgery. We could not confirm that these changes translate into significant cognitive changes. A significant negative correlation was found between changes in confrontation naming and changes in metabolism in the precuneus. We speculate that the precuneus may play a compensatory role in patients with postoperative naming difficulties after left TLE surgery. Understanding of these neural mechanisms may aid in

  4. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Hippocampal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Espinoza López, Dulce Anabel; Vázquez Gregorio, Rafael; Trenado, Carlos; Fernández-González Aragón, Maricarmen; Morales-Quezada, León; Hernandez Ruiz, Axel; Hernandez-González, Flavio; Alcaraz-Guzmán, Alejandro; Anschel, David J; Fregni, Felipe

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been evaluated in medication refractory epilepsy patients. The results have been inconclusive and protocols have varied between studies. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of two protocols of tDCS in adult patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). This is a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial, with 3 arms, 3 sessions, 5 sessions and placebo stimulation. Frequency of seizures (SZs), interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and adverse effects (AEs) were registered before and after treatment, and at 30 and 60 days follow-up. Descriptive statistics, k-related samples, Friedman's test, and relative risk (RR) estimation were used for analysis. We included twenty-eight subjects (3d n = 12, 5d n = 8, placebo n = 8), 16/28 (57%) men, age 37.8(±10.9) years old. There was a significant reduction of the frequency of SZs at one (p = 0.001) and two (p = 0.0001) months following cathodal tDCS compared to baseline in the 3 arms (p = 0.0001). The mean reduction of SZ frequency at two months in both active groups was significantly higher than placebo (-48% vs. -6.25%, p < 0.008). At 3 days (-43.4% vs. -6.25%, p < 0.007) and 5 days (-54.6% vs. -6.25%, p < 0.010) individual groups showed a greater reduction of SZs. A significant IED reduction effect was found between baseline and immediately after interventions (p = 0.041) in all groups. Side effects were minor. Cathodal tDCS technique of 3 and 5 sessions decreased the frequency of SZs and IEDs (between baseline and immediately post-tDCS) in adult patients with MTLE-HS compared to placebo tDCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Prediction Algorithm for Drug Response in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Based on Clinical and Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Alves, Mariana S; Secolin, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Benilton S; Yasuda, Clarissa L; Bilevicius, Elizabeth; Alvim, Marina K M; Santos, Renato O; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia V; Cendes, Fernando; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2017-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of adult epilepsy in surgical series. Currently, the only characteristic used to predict poor response to clinical treatment in this syndrome is the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes encoding drug transporter and metabolism proteins could influence response to therapy. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate whether combining information from clinical variables as well as SNPs in candidate genes could improve the accuracy of predicting response to drug therapy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For this, we divided 237 patients into two groups: 75 responsive and 162 refractory to antiepileptic drug therapy. We genotyped 119 SNPs in ABCB1, ABCC2, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 genes. We used 98 additional SNPs to evaluate population stratification. We assessed a first scenario using only clinical variables and a second one including SNP information. The random forests algorithm combined with leave-one-out cross-validation was used to identify the best predictive model in each scenario and compared their accuracies using the area under the curve statistic. Additionally, we built a variable importance plot to present the set of most relevant predictors on the best model. The selected best model included the presence of hippocampal sclerosis and 56 SNPs. Furthermore, including SNPs in the model improved accuracy from 0.4568 to 0.8177. Our findings suggest that adding genetic information provided by SNPs, located on drug transport and metabolism genes, can improve the accuracy for predicting which patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are likely to be refractory to drug treatment, making it possible to identify patients who may benefit from epilepsy surgery sooner.

  6. A locus identified on chromosome18p11.31 is associated with hippocampal abnormalities in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vianna Maurer-Morelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the region harboring a putative candidate gene associated with hippocampal abnormalities (HAb in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Genome-wide scan was performed in one large kindred with MTLE using a total of 332 microsatellite markers at ~12cM intervals. An additional 13 markers were genotyped in the candidate region. Phenotypic classes were defined according to the presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or hyperintense hippocampal T2 signal detected on magnetic resonance imaging. We identified a significant positive LOD score on chromosome 18p11.31 with a Zmax of 3.12 at D18S452. Multipoint LOD scores and haplotype analyses localized the candidate locus within a 6cM interval flanked by D18S976 and D18S967. We present here evidence that HAb, which were previously related mainly to environmental risk factors, may be influenced by genetic predisposition. This finding may have major impact in the study of the mechanisms underlying abnormalities in mesial temporal lobe structures and their relationship with MTLE.

  7. Interictal SPECT in the pre surgical evaluation in epileptic patients with normal MRI or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Marques, Lucia H.N. [Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia. Centro Cirurgico de Epilepsia; Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Ferraz-Filho, Jose R.L. [Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Lins-Filho, Mario L.M. [Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Maciel, Marina G.; Yoshitake, Rafael; Filetti, Sarah V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of interictal compared to ictal SPECT in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients that present with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Thirty patients with TLE, for whom MRI examinations were normal or who presented with bilateral MTS, were retrospectively studied. Using a confidence interval of 95% and a level of significance for p-value <0.05, an estimated agreement rate of 73% with a minimum agreement rate of 57% was calculated comparing interictal and ictal SPECTs. In conclusion the interictal SPECT is only useful when associated with the ictal SPECT and does not substitute it in the localization of epileptogenic areas in patients with normal MRI or bilateral MTS. (author)

  8. Sign of the Cross (Signum Crucis): observation of an uncommon ictal manifestation of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Katia; Marx, Catherine; Caboclo, Luis O S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Sakamoto, Américo C; Yacubian, Elza M T

    2009-02-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the clinical characteristics and determine the lateralizing value of ictal Sign of the Cross (SC) as a complex hand automatism (CHA) in patients evaluated by video/EEG monitoring in a comprehensive epilepsy unit. We reviewed video/EEG data of 530 patients with epilepsy recorded in a tertiary epilepsy center from 2002 to 2008. Four patients were found to have manifested a CHA similar to the SC at least once during their complex partial seizures. All patients had unilateral right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) refractory to medical treatment. The limbic system is often suggested as the critical site of religious experience. Moreover, it may be localized predominantly to the temporal regions of the right hemisphere. However, this rare and peculiar ictal manifestation may be related not only to the neural substrate and personality characteristics of TLE, but also to the general religious convictions of Brazilians.

  9. Interictal SPECT in the pre surgical evaluation in epileptic patients with normal MRI or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Lucia H.N.; Ferraz-Filho, Jose R.L.; Lins-Filho, Mario L.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of interictal compared to ictal SPECT in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients that present with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Thirty patients with TLE, for whom MRI examinations were normal or who presented with bilateral MTS, were retrospectively studied. Using a confidence interval of 95% and a level of significance for p-value <0.05, an estimated agreement rate of 73% with a minimum agreement rate of 57% was calculated comparing interictal and ictal SPECTs. In conclusion the interictal SPECT is only useful when associated with the ictal SPECT and does not substitute it in the localization of epileptogenic areas in patients with normal MRI or bilateral MTS. (author)

  10. The role of histopathologic subtype in the setting of hippocampal sclerosis-associated mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Jordan M; Jehi, Lara; Nowacki, Amy; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are among the most common neuropathological findings in those undergoing surgery for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Existing data regarding differences among the most recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) HS subtypes remain limited. This study sought to characterize the roles of HS subtype and coexistent FCD. Epilepsy surgery pathologic specimens in 307 cases of temporal lobe epilepsy with HS were reviewed (mean age±SD, 37±15years; 56% women). HS and coexistent FCD were classified according to ILAE guidelines. Medical records were reviewed for data on seizure recurrence and seizure burden (clinical follow-up mean duration ± SD, 5±4years). Cases of typical HS (ILAE type I) predominated (ILAE type Ia: 41%, Ib: 47%, II: 11%, and III: 0.7%]. The HS subtypes shared similar demographic and etiologic characteristics, as well as associated pathology and postoperative seizure outcomes. Individuals with type Ib HS were more likely to remain seizure free at long-term follow-up when compared with other subtypes, and they had a later age of seizure onset. Two hundred forty-three cases (79%) demonstrated FCD within the adjacent temporal lobe. Its presence was associated with a significantly decreased risk of seizure recurrence (P=.02). When present, FCD was predominantly type I (98%). HS subtype does not appear to affect epilepsy surgery outcomes despite some clinical differences between the subgroups. FCD is often observed in association with HS in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy; the finding of FCD was associated with better postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Facial paresis in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis: clinical and quantitative MRI-based evidence of widespread disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Katia; Carrete, Henrique; Lin, Jaime; de Oliveira, Pedro Alessandro Leite; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2007-08-01

    To assess the frequency and significance of facial paresis (FP) in a well-defined cohort of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients. One hundred consecutive patients with MRI findings consistent with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and concordant electroclinical data underwent facial motor examination at rest, with voluntary expression, and with spontaneous smiling. Hippocampal, amygdaloid, and temporopolar (TP) volumetric measures were acquired. Thirty healthy subjects, matched according to age and sex, were taken as controls. Central-type FP was found in 46 patients. In 41 (89%) of 46, it was visualized at rest, with voluntary and emotional expression characterizing true facial motor paresis. In 33 (72%) of 46 patients, FP was contralateral to the side of MTS. By using a 2-SD cutoff from the mean of normal controls, we found reduction in TP volume ipsilateral to MTS in 61% of patients with FP and in 33% of those without (p = 0.01). Febrile seizures as initial precipitating injury (IPI) were observed in 34% of the patients and were classified as complex in 12 (26%) of 46 of those with FP and in five (9%) of 54 of those without (p = 0.02). The presence of FP was significantly associated with a shorter latent period and younger age at onset of habitual seizures, in particular, with secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Facial paresis is a reliable lateralizing sign in MTLE and was associated with history of complex febrile seizures as IPI, younger age at onset of disease, and atrophy of temporal pole ipsilateral to MTS, indicating more widespread disease.

  12. Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-Convergence on axonal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaalund, Sanne S; Venø, Morten T; Bak, Mads

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be dysregul...

  13. Combined18F-FDG-PET and diffusion tensor imaging in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Javier; Carreño, Mar; Bargalló, Núria; Setoain, Xavier; Rubí, Sebastià; Rumià, Jordi; Falcón, Carles; Calvo, Anna; Martí-Fuster, Berta; Padilla, Nelly; Boget, Teresa; Pintor, Luís; Donaire, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Several studies using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have found both temporal and extratemporal abnormalities in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), but data are lacking about the findings of both techniques in the same patients. We aimed to determine whether the extent of 18 F-FDG-PET hypometabolism is related to DTI abnormalities. Twenty-one patients with MTLE-HS underwent comprehensive preoperative evaluation; 18 (86%) of these underwent epilepsy surgery. We analyzed and compared the pattern of white matter (WM) alterations on DTI and cortical hypometabolism on 18 F-FDG-PET. We found widespread temporal and extratemporal 18 F-FDG-PET and DTI abnormalities. Patterns of WM abnormalities and cortical glucose hypometabolism involved similar brain regions, being more extensive in the left than the right MTLE-HS. We classified patients into three groups according to temporal 18 F-FDG-PET patterns: hypometabolism restricted to the anterior third (n = 7), hypometabolism extending to the middle third (n = 7), and hypometabolism extending to the posterior third (n = 7). Patients with anterior temporal hypometabolism showed DTI abnormalities in anterior association and commissural tracts while patients with posterior hypometabolism showed WM alterations in anterior and posterior tracts. Patients with MTLE-HS have widespread metabolic and microstructural abnormalities that involve similar regions. The distribution patterns of these gray and white matter abnormalities differ between patients with left or right MTLE, but also with the extent of the 18 F-FDG-PET hypometabolism along the epileptogenic temporal lobe. These findings suggest a variable network involvement among patients with MTLE-HS.

  14. Can intraoperative electrocorticography patterns predict surgical outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy secondary to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro A L; Garzon, Eliana; Caboclo, Luís O S F; Sousa, Patrícia S; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo S; Costa, José M P; Machado, Hélio R; Yacubian, Elza M T; Bianchin, Marino M; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2006-10-01

    Intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) can be performed in cases of temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). However, its significance and correlation with surgical outcome are still controversial. To analyze the electrophysiological characteristics of temporal lobe structures during ECoG of patients with TLE-HS, with emphasis on the comparison between pre- and post-resection recordings and surgical outcome. Seventeen patients with refractory TLE-HS submitted to corticoamigdalohipocampectomy were included in the study. Clinical variables included age at the onset, duration of epilepsy and seizure outcome. The post-operative follow-up ranged from 24 to 36 months. According to outcome subjects were divided in two subgroups: (A) individuals free of seizures (Engel 1A), and (B) individuals not-free of seizures (Engel 1B-IV). Four patterns of ECoG findings were identified: isolated discharges; high frequency spikes (HFS); continuous discharges; combination of isolated discharges and HFS. According to predominant topography ECoG was classified as mediobasal, lateral (or neocortical), mediobasal and lateral. The progressive removal of the temporal pole and the hippocampus was associated with significant decrease of neocortical spikes. No correlation between clinical variables and seizure outcome was observed. Patients who only had isolated spikes on intraoperative ECoG presented a statistical trend for excellent surgical control. Patients who presented temporal pole blurring on MRI also had better post-surgical seizure outcome. This study showed that out of diverse clinical and laboratory variables, only isolated discharges on intraoperative ECoG and temporal pole blurring on MRI predicted excellent post-surgical seizure outcome. However, other studies with larger number of patients are still necessary to confirm these findings.

  15. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Carrete, Henrique; Higa, Elisa Mieko Suemitsu; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Castro Neto, Eduardo Ferreira de; Canzian, Mauro; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2011-02-01

    We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO) levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10) were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) -MTS group (p<0.001), suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05) demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  16. Different Surgical Approaches for Mesial Temporal Epilepsy: Resection Extent, Seizure, and Neuropsychological Outcomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Liščák, R.; Šroubek, J.; Lukavský, Jiří; Druga, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 6 (2014), s. 372-380 ISSN 1011-6125 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : temporal lobe epilepsy * stereotactic surgery * neuropsychology outcome Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 2.019, year: 2014

  17. Trans-middle temporal gyrus selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in adults: seizure response rates, complications, and neuropsychological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandt, S Kathleen; Werner, Nicole; Dines, Jennifer; Rashid, Samiya; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Hogan, R Edward; Leuthardt, Eric C; Dowling, Joshua

    2013-07-01

    Selective amygdalohippocampectomy (AHC) has evolved to encompass a variety of techniques to resect the mesial temporal lobe. To date, there have been few large-scale evaluations of trans-middle temporal gyrus selective AHC. The authors examine a large series of patients who have undergone the trans-middle temporal gyrus AHC and assess its clinical and neuropsychological impact. A series of 76 adult patients underwent selective AHC via the trans-middle temporal gyrus approach over a 10-year period, 19 of whom underwent pre- and postoperative neuropsychological evaluations. Favorable seizure response rates were achieved (92% Engel class I or II), with very low surgical morbidity and no mortality. Postoperative neuropsychological assessment revealed a decline in verbal memory for the left AHC group. No postoperative memory decline was identified for the right AHC group, but rather some improvements were noted within this group. The trans-middle temporal gyrus selective AHC is a safe and effective choice for management of medically refractory epilepsy in adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Five-Year Neuropsychological Outcome after Stereotactic Radiofrequency Amygdalohippocampectomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Longitudinal Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Lukavský, Jiří; Stará, M.; Malíková, H.

    Roč. 95, č. 3 ( 2017 ), s. 149-157 ISSN 1011-6125 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : Cognitive outcome * Memory * Temporal lobe epilepsy * Stereotactic surgery Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 1.692, year: 2016

  19. Five-Year Neuropsychological Outcome after Stereotactic Radiofrequency Amygdalohippocampectomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Longitudinal Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Lukavský, Jiří; Stará, M.; Malíková, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 3 (2017), s. 149-157 ISSN 1011-6125 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : Cognitive outcome * Memory * Temporal lobe epilepsy * Stereotactic surgery Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 1.692, year: 2016

  20. Memory impairment is not necessarily related to seizure frequency in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacagnella, Denise; Lopes, Tatila M; Morita, Marcia E; Yasuda, Clarissa L; Cappabianco, Fabio A M; Bergo, Felipe; Balthazar, Marcio L F; Coan, Ana C; Cendes, Fernando

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of seizure frequency on memory, we performed a cross sectional study comparing mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients with frequent and infrequent seizures. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hippocampal volume (HV) measurements and neuropsychological assessment in 22 patients with frequent seizures (at least one dyscognitive seizure [DS] per month) that were refractory to antiepileptic drugs and 20 patients with infrequent seizures (three or less DS per year and no event evolving to a bilateral convulsive seizure), all with MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) on visual analysis. We also included 29 controls for comparison of volumetric data. There was no difference in memory performance between patients with frequent seizures and infrequent seizures. We observed a significant bilateral reduction of HV in patients with MTLE when compared to controls (p loss. There was a positive correlation between age of onset and degree of HA (r = 0.37). Our data suggest that seizure frequency does not explain most of the HV loss or memory impairment in MTLE. Memory impairment appears to be more influenced by hippocampal damage than by seizure frequency. Further studies are necessary to identify the factors that influence memory decline in patients with MTLE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Cavernomas de la región temporal mesial: Anatomía microquirúrgica y abordajes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campero, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Describir la anatomía microquirúrgica y los abordajes a la región temporal mesial (RTM), en relación a cavernomas de dicho sector. Materiales y Método: Cinco cabezas de cadáveres adultos, fijadas en formol e inyectadas con silicona coloreada, fueron estudiadas. Además, desde enero de 2007 a junio de 2014, 7 pacientes con cavernomas localizados en la RTM fueron operados por el autor. Resultados: Anatomia: La RTM fue dividida en 3 sectores: Anterior, medio y posterior. Pacientes: 7 enfermos con cavernomas de la RTM fueron operados por el autor. De acuerdo a la ubicacion en la RTM, 4 cavernomas se ubicaron en el sector anterior, 2 cavernomas se localizaron en el sector medio y 1 cavernoma se ubico en el sector posterior. Para el sector anterior de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje transsilviano-transinsular; para el sector medio de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje transtemporal (lobectomia temporal anterior); y para el sector posterior de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje supracerebeloso-transtentorial. Conclusión: Dividir la RTM en 3 sectores nos permite adecuar el abordaje en función a la localización de la lesión. Así, el sector anterior es bien abordable a través de la fisura silviana; el sector medio a través de una vía transtemporal; y el sector posterior por un abordaje supracerebeloso. PMID:26600986

  2. Correlation between temporal pole MRI abnormalities and surface ictal EEG patterns in patients with unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Garzon, Eliana; Oliveira, Pedro A L; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo S; Bianchin, Marino M; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study is to analyze ictal patterns observed during continuous Video-EEG monitoring in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS), and to correlate these EEG patterns to temporal pole abnormalities observed on magnetic resonance imaging exams. We analyzed 147 seizures from 35 patients with TLE and unilateral HS. Ictal patterns were classified and correlated to signal abnormalities and volumetric measures of the temporal poles. Volume differences over 10% were considered abnormal. The most frequent type of ictal pattern was rhythmic theta activity (RTA), encountered in 65.5% of the seizures. Rhythmic beta activity (RBA) was observed in 11% of the seizures, localized attenuation in 8%, interruption of epileptiform discharges in 6%, repetitive discharges in 5.5%, and rhythmic delta activity (RDA) in 4%. Sixty-six percent of the patients presented signal abnormalities in the temporal pole that were always ipsilateral to the HS. Sixty percent presented significant asymmetry of the temporal poles consisting of reduced volume that was also always ipsilateral to HS. Although patients with RTA as the predominant ictal pattern tended to present asymmetry of temporal poles (p=0.305), the ictal EEG pattern did not correlate with temporal pole asymmetry or signal abnormalities. RTA is the most frequent initial ictal pattern in patients with TLE due to unilateral HS. Temporal pole signal changes and volumetric reduction were commonly found in this group of patients, both abnormalities appearing always ipsilateral to the HS. However, neither temporal pole volume reduction nor signal abnormalities correlated with the predominant ictal pattern, suggesting that the temporal poles are not crucially involved in the process of epileptogenesis.

  3. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies treated with Gamma knife

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    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Cell Therapy and Tissue Repair, V Uvalu 84, 150 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Liscak, Roman; Vymazal, Josef; Vladyka, Vilibald [Department of Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Hospital Na Homolce, 151 19, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2003-05-01

    Proton MR spectroscopy was used to observe long-term post-irradiation metabolic changes in epileptogenic tissue and in the contralateral parts of the brain which are not available with conventional imaging methods. We studied these changes in the temporal lobe in six patients, following radiosurgery on the amygdala and hippocampus. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T with short and long echo times (TE=10 and 135 ms) were used together with standard MR imaging sequences (T1-, T2-weighted). The treatment was performed by Leksell Gamma Knife with a dose of 50 Gy to the center and a 50% isodose to the margin of the target, represented by the mean volume of approximately 7.5 ml. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR spectroscopy examinations were performed at least once per year for 3 years. The most significant changes in spectra were observed approximately 1 year after the irradiation when edema in irradiated area was observed and strong signal of lipids was identified. Later, edema and lipid signals disappeared and follow-up was characterized by a decrease of NAA, Cr, and Cho concentrations in the ipsilateral region of the brain to the irradiation (LCModel calculation from voxel of interest 3.8-4.5 ml positioned into the centrum of target volume). The concentration of NAA, Cr, and Cho after radiosurgery was significantly different from control values (p<0.05) and also from concentrations in the contralateral part of the brain (p<0.05). In the contralateral part, the concentration of NAA was significantly increased (p<0.05) (NAA: before treatment 8.81, after treatment 11.33 mM). No radiotoxic changes were observed in the contralateral part of the brain or behind the area of target volume. The MR spectroscopy findings precluded MRI observation and MRS results completed data about the development of radiotoxic changes in the target volume. (orig.)

  4. Validation of suitable reference genes for expression studies in different pilocarpine-induced models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Thalita Ewellyn Batista Sales Marques

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that the reference gene in a RT-qPCR should be properly validated to ensure that gene expression is unaffected by the experimental condition. We investigated eight potential reference genes in two different pilocarpine PILO-models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE performing a stability expression analysis using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKepeer softwares. Then, as a validation strategy, we conducted a relative expression analysis of the Gfap gene. Our results indicate that in the systemic PILO-model Actb, Gapdh, Rplp1, Tubb2a and Polr1a mRNAs were highly stable in hippocampus of rats from all experimental and control groups, whereas Gusb revealed to be the most variable one. In fact, we observed that using Gusb for normalization, the relative mRNA levels of the Gfap gene differed from those obtained with stable genes. On the contrary, in the intrahippocampal PILO-model, all softwares included Gusb as a stable gene, whereas B2m was indicated as the worst candidate gene. The results obtained for the other reference genes were comparable to those observed for the systemic Pilo-model. The validation of these data by the analysis of the relative expression of Gfap showed that the upregulation of the Gfap gene in the hippocampus of rats sacrificed 24 hours after status epilepticus (SE was undetected only when B2m was used as the normalizer. These findings emphasize that a gene that is stable in one pathology model may not be stable in a different experimental condition related to the same pathology and therefore, the choice of reference genes depends on study design.

  5. Diagnosis of mesial temporal sclerosis: sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Sánchez, Ana María; Orejuela Zapata, Juan Felipe

    2018-02-01

    In the diagnosis of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of qualitative assessment using conventional magnetic resonance imaging are low, mainly in mild or bilateral atrophy. Quantitative analysis may improve this performance. We evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of quantitative analysis using the hippocampal volumetric index (HVI) and hippocampal asymmetry index (HAI) compared with qualitative assessment in the MTS diagnosis. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with MTS, and 25 healthy subjects underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Hippocampal volumes were obtained using an automated software (FreeSurfer); HVI and HAI were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to obtain the optimal threshold values. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for qualitative analysis were 44.00%, 96.00%, 91.67% and 63.16%, respectively. In the quantitative analysis, a threshold value of K = 0.22 for HVI provided a sensitivity value of 76.00%, specificity value of 96.00%, PPV of 95.00% and NPV of 80.00%. A threshold value of K = 0.06 for HAI provided the minimum C1 and C2 errors, with a sensitivity value of 88.00%, specificity value of 100%, PPV of 100% and NPV of 89.30%. A statistically significant difference was observed for HAI ( P analysis and other quantitative techniques. The HAI is highly accurate in the diagnosis of unilateral MTS, whereas the HVI may be better for bilateral MTS cases.

  6. Social cognition in neuropsychiatric populations: a comparison of theory of mind in schizophrenia and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okruszek, Łukasz; Bala, Aleksandra; Wordecha, Małgorzata; Jarkiewicz, Michał; Wysokiński, Adam; Szczepocka, Ewa; Piejka, Aleksandra; Zaborowska, Oliwia; Szantroch, Marta; Rysz, Andrzej; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-03-28

    Social cognition deficits are observed both in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) and in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This may be due to dysfunction of the amygdala network, which is a common feature of both diseases. In this study, SCZ (n = 48) or MTLE (n = 31) and healthy controls (HC, n = 47) completed assessments of mentalising (Reading Mind in the Eyes Test, RMET) and basic cognitive processing, e.g., working memory, executive functions and psychomotor speed (Trail-Making Test B and Digit Symbol). SCZ were also assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). We found that the RMET scores of the two clinical groups were similar (p > 0.05) and lower than in the HCs (SCZ: p < 0.05; MTLE: p < 0.001). In the next step, SCZ were split into two groups with respect to the level of symptoms. Analysis of the RMET scores revealed no differences between the HC (M = 25.7 ± 4.1) and POS-LO (M = 25.3 ± 4.8); both groups outperformed the POS-HI group (M = 21.3 ± 5.2) and the MTLE group (M = 20.8 ± 4.6). No differences were found for the median-split with regard to negative symptoms. In SCZ, the mind-reading deficit appears to be associated with the level of positive symptoms. Both POS-HI and MTLE patients present significant mentalising deficits compared to healthy controls.

  7. MicroRNA hsa-miR-134 is a circulating biomarker for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Simoni H Avansini

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is misdiagnosed in up to 25% of patients, leading to serious and long-lasting consequences. Recently, circulating microRNAs have emerged as potential biomarkers in a number of clinical scenarios. The purpose of this study was to identify and to validate circulating microRNAs that could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure plasma levels of three candidate microRNAs in two phases of study: an initial discovery phase with 14 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, 13 with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and 16 controls; and a validation cohort constituted of an independent cohort of 65 patients with MTLE and 83 controls. We found hsa-miR-134 downregulated in patients with MTLE (p = 0.018 but not in patients with FCD, when compared to controls. Furthermore, hsa-miR-134 expression could be used to discriminate MTLE patients with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.75. To further assess the robustness of hsa-miR-134 as a biomarker for MTLE, we studied an independent cohort of 65 patients with MTLE, 27 of whom MTLE patients were responsive to pharmacotherapy, and 38 patients were pharmacoresistant and 83 controls. We confirmed that hsa-miR-134 was significantly downregulated in the plasma of patients with MTLE when compared with controls (p < 0.001. In addition, hsa-miR-134 identified patients with MTLE regardless of their response to pharmacotherapy or the presence of MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis. We revealed that decreased expression of hsa-miR-134 could be a potential non-invasive biomarker to support the diagnosis of patients with MTLE.

  8. Features of amygdala in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis: An MRI volumetric and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoko; Masuda, Hiroshi; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Higashijima, Takefumi; Kitaura, Hiroki; Fujii, Yukihiko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    It is well-known that there is a correlation between the neuropathological grade of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and neuroradiological atrophy of the hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients. However, there is no strict definition or criterion regarding neuron loss and atrophy of the amygdala neighboring the hippocampus. We examined the relationship between HS and neuronal loss in the amygdala. Nineteen mTLE patients with neuropathological proof of HS were assigned to Group A, while seven mTLE patients without HS were assigned to Group B. We used FreeSurfer software to measure amygdala volume automatically based on pre-operation magnetic resonance images. Neurons observed using Klüver-Barrera (KB) staining in resected amygdala tissue were counted. and the extent of immunostaining with stress marker antibodies was semiquantitatively evaluated. There was no significant difference in amygdala volume between the two groups (Group A: 1.41±0.24; Group B: 1.41±0.29cm 3 ; p=0.98), nor in the neuron cellularity of resected amygdala specimens (Group A: 3.98±0.97; Group B: 3.67±0.67 10× -4 number of neurons/μm 2 ; p=0.40). However, the HSP70 level, representing acute stress against epilepsy, in Group A patients was significantly larger than that in Group B. There was no significant difference in the level of Bcl-2, which is known as a protein that inhibits cell death, between the two groups. Neuronal loss and volume loss in the amygdala may not necessarily follow hippocampal sclerosis. From the analysis of stress proteins, epileptic attacks are as likely to damage the amygdala as the hippocampus but do not lead to neuronal death in the amygdala. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos Varella

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10 were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE -MTS group (p<0.001, suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05 demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  10. MicroRNA and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: Whole miRNome profiling of human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencurova, Petra; Baloun, Jiri; Musilova, Katerina; Radova, Lenka; Tichy, Boris; Pail, Martin; Zeman, Martin; Brichtova, Eva; Hermanova, Marketa; Pospisilova, Sarka; Mraz, Marek; Brazdil, Milan

    2017-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a severe neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. mTLE is frequently accompanied by neurodegeneration in the hippocampus resulting in hippocampal sclerosis (HS), the most common morphological correlate of drug resistance in mTLE patients. Incomplete knowledge of pathological changes in mTLE+HS complicates its therapy. The pathological mechanism underlying mTLE+HS may involve abnormal gene expression regulation, including posttranscriptional networks involving microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNA expression deregulation has been reported in various disorders, including epilepsy. However, the miRNA profile of mTLE+HS is not completely known and needs to be addressed. Here, we have focused on hippocampal miRNA profiling in 33 mTLE+HS patients and nine postmortem controls to reveal abnormally expressed miRNAs. In this study, we significantly reduced technology-related bias (the most common source of false positivity in miRNA profiling data) by combining two different miRNA profiling methods, namely next generation sequencing and miRNA-specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These methods combined have identified and validated 20 miRNAs with altered expression in the human epileptic hippocampus; 19 miRNAs were up-regulated and one down-regulated in mTLE+HS patients. Nine of these miRNAs have not been previously associated with epilepsy, and 19 aberrantly expressed miRNAs potentially regulate the targets and pathways linked with epilepsy (such as potassium channels, γ-aminobutyric acid, neurotrophin signaling, and axon guidance). This study extends current knowledge of miRNA-mediated gene expression regulation in mTLE+HS by identifying miRNAs with altered expression in mTLE+HS, including nine novel abnormally expressed miRNAs and their putative targets. These observations further encourage the potential of microRNA-based biomarkers or therapies. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against

  11. Pre-surgical predictors for psychiatric disorders following epilepsy surgery in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Gerardo Maria de Araújo; Mazetto, Lenon; Gomes, Francinaldo Lobato; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Tavares, Igor Melo; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    Psychiatric outcomes of patients submitted to epilepsy surgery have gained particular interest given the high prevalence of pre-surgical psychiatric disorders (PD) in this population. The present study aimed to verify the possible pre-surgical predictors for psychiatric disorders following epilepsy surgery in a homogeneous series of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Data from 115 TLE-MTS patients (65 females; 56.5%) who underwent cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy were included. Pre- and post-surgical psychiatric evaluations were performed using DSM-IV criteria. Pre-surgical PD - particularly mood, anxiety and psychotic disorders - were diagnosed in 47 patients (40.8%). Twenty-seven patients (54% of those with pre-surgical PD) demonstrated a remission of psychiatric symptoms on post-surgical psychiatric evaluation. Eleven patients (9.6%) developed de novo PD. The presence of pre-surgical depression (OR=3.32; p=0.008), pre-surgical interictal psychosis (OR=4.39; p=0.009) and epileptiform discharges contralateral to the epileptogenic zone (OR=2.73; p=0.01) were risk factors associated with post-surgical PD. Although epilepsy surgery is considered to be the best treatment option for patients with refractory TLE-MTS, the relatively high psychiatric comorbidities observed in surgical candidates and their possible negative impact on post-surgical outcomes require a careful pre-surgical evaluation of clinical, sociodemographic and psychiatric factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Major depressive disorder as a predictor of a worse seizure outcome one year after surgery in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Gomes, Francinaldo Lobato; Mazetto, Lenon; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Tavares, Igor Melo; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-10-01

    The association between pre-surgical psychiatric disorders (PDs) and worse seizure outcome in patients with refractory epilepsy submitted to surgery has been increasingly recognized in the literature. The present study aimed to verify the impact of pre- and post-surgical PD on seizure outcome in a series of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Data from 115 TLE-MTS patients (65 females; 56.5%) who underwent cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy (CAH) were analyzed. Pre- and post-surgical psychiatric evaluations were performed using DSM-IV and ILAE criteria. The outcome subcategory Engel IA was considered as corresponding to a favorable prognosis. A multivariate logistic regression model was applied to identify possible risk factors associated with a worse seizure outcome. Pre-surgical PDs, particularly major depressive disorder (MDD), anxiety and psychotic disorders, were common, being found in 47 patients (40.8%). Fifty-six patients (48.7%) were classified as having achieved an Engel IA one year after CAH. According to the logistic regression model, the presence of pre-surgical MDD (OR=5.23; p=0.003) appeared as the most important risk factor associated with a non-favorable seizure outcome. Although epilepsy surgery may be the best treatment option for patients with refractory TLE-MTS, our findings emphasize the importance of performing a detailed psychiatric examination as part of the pre-surgical evaluation protocol. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical and eeg analysis of mesial and lateral temporal lobe seizures Análise clínica e eletrencefalográfica de crises epilépticas temporais de origem mesial e lateral

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    FÁBIO GALVÃO DANTAS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the temporal lobe seizures through video-EEG systems shows that they often consist of a sequence of clinical and EEG features which may suggest the localization and the lateralization of the epileptogenic lobe. We analyzed clinical and EEG features of 50 temporal lobe seizures which were separated in group 1 with 25 patients (related to mesial temporal sclerosis and group 2 with 25 patients (other neocortical temporal lesions. Among the auras, the epigastric type was the most frequent and predominated in group 1. There were differences between the two groups, considering dystonic and tonic posturing and versive head and eye movements. Dystonic posturing was always contralateral to the ictal onset and was considered the most useful lateralizing clinical feature. Ictal speech, spitting and blinking automatisms, prolonged disorientation for place and a greatest percentage of postictal language preservation occurred in right temporal seizures. Postictal aphasia and global disorientation predominated in left temporal seizures. EEG was important for lateralizing the epileptogenic lobe, specially considering rhythmic ictal activity and postictal findings.As crises epilépticas do lobo temporal tendem a seguir uma sequência previsível de eventos clínicos e eletrencefalográficos, cuja análise, preferencialmente através de sistemas de vídeo-EEG, sugere a localização e a lateralização do lobo epileptogênico. Para este estudo, foram analisadas 50 crises epilépticas do lobo temporal, do ponto de vista clínico e eletrencefalográfico, sendo 25 relacionadas a esclerose mesial (grupo 1 e 25 a patologias neocorticais (grupo 2. Auras abdominais foram as mais frequentes, predominando no grupo 1. Houve diferenças entre os dois grupos, quanto à instalação e duração da postura distônica, à postura tônica e à versão oculocefálica. Postura distônica unilateral foi o mais importante fenômeno clínico lateralizatório, sempre

  14. Modifications of EEG Power Spectra in Mesial Temporal Lobe during n-back tasks of increasing difficulty. A sLORETA study.

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    Claudio eImperatori

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The n-back task is widely used to investigate the neural basis of Working Memory (WM processes. The principal aim of this study was to explore and compare the EEG power spectra during two n-back tests with different levels of difficulty (1-back vs 3-back.Fourteen healthy subjects were enrolled (7 men and 7 women, mean age 31.21±7.05 years, range: 23-48. EEG was recorded while performing the N-back test, by means of 19 surface electrodes referred to joint mastoids. EEG analysis were conducted by means of the standardized LOw Resolution brain Electric Tomography (sLORETA software. The statistical comparison between EEG power spectra in the two conditions was performed using paired t-statistics on the coherence values after Fisher’s z transformation available in the LORETA program package. The frequency bands considered were: delta (0.5-4 Hz; theta (4.5–7.5 Hz; alpha (8–12.5 Hz; beta (13–30 Hz; gamma (30.5–100 Hz. Significant changes occurred in the delta band: in the 3-back condition an increased delta power was localized in a brain region corresponding to the Brodmann Area (BA 28 in the left posterior entorhinal cortex (T = 3.112; p<0.05 and in the BA 35 in the left peririnhal cortex in the parahippocampal gyrus (T = 2.876; p<0.05. No significant differences were observed in the right hemisphere and in the alpha, theta, beta and gamma frequency bands. Our results indicate that the most prominent modification induced by the increased complexity of the task occur in the mesial left temporal lobe structures.

  15. An fMRI study of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with different pathological basis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation analysis

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    Wei WEI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the distinction of abnormal brain activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS or other pathogical basis, and to discuss their underlying pathophysiological mechanism in mTLE.  Methods Thirty mTLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS and 30 mTLE patients with occupying lesion in unilateral temporal lobe (mTLE-OL were investigated by comparing with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. MRI data were collected using a Siemens 3.0T scanner, and all of the participants were studied using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF analysis of resting state fMRI. A cost-function modification was used for image preprocessing, then the difference of extratemporal mALFF changes between the two groups of mTLE patients were analyzed with two-sample t test, and the correlation between mALFF and epilepsy duration of mTLE were also investigated.  Results In the resting state, mTLE-HS patients and mTLE-OL patients all showed significant changes in mALFF in extratemporal structures, but the distribution patterns of changes in brain were different. Compared with mTLE-HS, the mTLE-OL patients showed increased mALFF in bilateral inferior parietal lobes, precuneus, angular gyrus, middle and posterior cingulate gyrus and contralateral middle temporal gyrus, while mALFF reducing was observed in contralateral postcentral gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus and cerebellum (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected, that is to say, the default mode network (DMN in mTLE-HS were inhibited more seriously than in mTLE-OL patients. Correlation analysis showed that no significant correlation was found between mALFF and epilepsy duration in mTLE-HS patients; mALFF in bilateral middle and posterior cingulate gyrus was positively correlated with epilepsy duration in mTLE-OL patients (r = 0.687, P = 0.000, while mALFF in bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus was negatively correlated with epilepsy duration (r

  16. Validação de instrumentos de rastreio para depressão em pacientes com epilepsia mesial temporal refratária

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    Zingano, Bianca de Lemos

    2015-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Médicas, FLorianópolis, 2015. Objetivo: avaliar a validade global e a utilidade para rastreio de depressão da Escala de Depressão de Hamilton (HRSD), do Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI), da Escala Hospitalar de Ansiedade e Depressão (HADS) total e da subescala Depressão (HADS-D) em pacientes com epilepsia mesial temporal com esclerose do hipocampo (EMT-EH...

  17. Long-Term Seizure, Quality of Life, Depression, and Verbal Memory Outcomes in a Controlled Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgical Series Using Portuguese-Validated Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Luis Augusto; Angelis, Geisa de; Teixeira, Wagner Afonso; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate long-term surgical outcomes in patients treated for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy compared with a similar group of patients who underwent a preoperative evaluation. Patient interviews were conducted by an independent neuropsychologist and included a sociodemographic questionnaire and validated versions of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Adverse Events Profile, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31, and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Seventy-one patients who underwent surgery and 20 who underwent mesial temporal lobe epilepsy preoperative evaluations were interviewed. After an 81-month mean postoperative follow-up, 44% of the surgical patients achieved complete seizure relief according to the Engel classification and 68% according to the International League Against Epilepsy classification. The surgical group had a significantly lower prevalence of depression (P = 0.002) and drug-related adverse effects (P = 0.002). Improvement on unemployment (P = 0.02) was achieved but not on driving or education. Delayed verbal memory recall was impaired in 76% of the surgical and 65% of the control cases (P = 0.32). Regarding the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31, the operated patients scored higher in their total score (mean, 75.44 vs. mean, 60.08; P life. Our study found that, although surgical treatment was effective, its impact on social indicators was modest. Moreover, the self-reported quality of life relied not only on seizure control but also on depressive symptoms and antiepileptic drug burden. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Hasboun, D.; Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  19. SCOPE-mTL: A non-invasive tool for identifying and lateralizing mesial temporal lobe seizures prior to scalp EEG ictal onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alice D; Maus, Douglas; Zafar, Sahar F; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2017-09-01

    In mesial temporal lobe (mTL) epilepsy, seizure onset can precede the appearance of a scalp EEG ictal pattern by many seconds. The ability to identify this early, occult mTL seizure activity could improve lateralization and localization of mTL seizures on scalp EEG. Using scalp EEG spectral features and machine learning approaches on a dataset of combined scalp EEG and foramen ovale electrode recordings in patients with mTL epilepsy, we developed an algorithm, SCOPE-mTL, to detect and lateralize early, occult mTL seizure activity, prior to the appearance of a scalp EEG ictal pattern. Using SCOPE-mTL, 73% of seizures with occult mTL onset were identified as such, and no seizures that lacked an occult mTL onset were identified as having one. Predicted mTL seizure onset times were highly correlated with actual mTL seizure onset times (r=0.69). 50% of seizures with early mTL onset were lateralizable prior to scalp ictal onset, with 94% accuracy. SCOPE-mTL can identify and lateralize mTL seizures prior to scalp EEG ictal onset, with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Quantitative analysis of scalp EEG can provide important information about mTL seizures, even in the absence of a visible scalp EEG ictal correlate. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dentate gyrus and hilus transection blocks seizure propagation and granule cell dispersion in a mouse model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Häussler, Ute; Langlois, Mélanie; Hamelin, Sophie; Devaux, Bertrand; Deransart, Colin; Depaulis, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    Epilepsy-associated changes of the anatomical organization of the dentate gyrus and hilus may play a critical role in the initiation and propagation of seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This study evaluated the role of longitudinal projections in the propagation of hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPD) in dorsal hippocampus by performing a selective transection in a mouse model for MTLE obtained by a single unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA). Full transections of the dentate gyrus and hilus were performed in the transverse axis at 22 days after KA injection when spontaneous HPD were fully developed. They: (i) significantly reduced the occurrence of HPD; (ii) increased their duration at the KA injection site; (iii) abolished their spread along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampal formation and; (iv) limited granule cell dispersion (GCD) of the dentate gyrus posterior to the transection. These data suggest that: (i) longitudinal projections through the dentate gyrus and hilus are involved in HPD spread; (ii) distant hippocampal circuits participate in the generation and cessation of HPD and; (iii) GCD requires continuous HPD to develop, even when seizures are established. Our data reveal a critical role for longitudinal projections in the generation and spread of hippocampal seizures. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Factores de Riesgo para Recurrencia de Convulsiones y Pronóstico a Corto Plazo en Cirugía de Epilepsia para Esclerosis Mesial Temporal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Jaramillo Betancur

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Objetivo: Determinar los factores de riesgo para recurrencia de convulsiones y la clasificación posquirúrgica a corto plazo en pacientes operados por esclerosis mesial temporal (EMT.

    Métodos: Estudio de casos y controles anidado en la cohorte de pacientes con EMT diagnosticados por resonancia magnética con dos años de seguimiento posquirúrgico; se excluyeron pacientes con EMT bilateral. Se evaluaron características clínicas prequirúrgicas, foco epileptogénico en video-EEG y variables quirúrgicas con respecto a recurrencia de convulsiones en los primeros dos años posquirúrgicos y clasificación de Engel en el primer y segundo aniversario de la cirugía.

    Resultados: Entre octubre de 2001 y junio de 2008 se han evaluado 144 pacientes con EMT candidatos a cirugía de epilepsia; a junio de 2007, se han operado 89 pacientes, 51.7% con EMT izquierda. 35.8% de los pacientes presentaron recurrencia de convulsiones antes del segundo año posquirúrgico; el factor de riesgo prequirúrgico asociado a recurrencia fue foco bitemporal o temporal único con diseminación contralateral por video-EEG (OR: 6.32; IC95% 1.64-26.41, y posquirúrgico, la presencia de convulsiones durante el primer mes posoperatorio (p:0.0004; no se encontró asociación con recurrencia para: género, convulsiones tónico-clónicas generalizadas prequirúrgicas, lado de la EMT ni tiempo de evolución prequirúrgica de la epilepsia. 66.3% y 75.8% de los pacientes estaban en Engel I al primer y segundo aniversario de la cirugía, respectivamente. 91% de los pacientes intervenidos estaban en buen pronóstico posquirúrgico a los dos años.

    Conclusión: La localización del foco epileptogénico por electrofisiología es factor determinante en el pronóstico posquirúrgico a corto plazo en EMT.

    Palabras clave

    Cirugía de epilepsia, convulsiones, epilepsia del lóbulo temporal

  2. How do people with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy sleep? A clinical and video-EEG with EOG and submental EMG for sleep staging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Vieira Scarlatelli-Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess subjective and objective sleep parameters in a homogeneous group of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE patients through internationally validated clinical questionnaires, video-electroencephalographic (VEEG and polysomnographic (PSG studies. Fifty-six patients with definite diagnosis of MTLE who were candidates for epilepsy surgery underwent a detailed clinical history, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS, neurological examination, 1.5 T brain magnetic resonance imaging, VEEG and PSG. Sixteen percent of patients reported significant daytime sleepiness as measured by ESS and 27% reported low levels of sleep quality as measured by PSQI. Patients with medically resistant epilepsy by MTLE showed increased wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO with mean ± standard deviation of 17.4 ± 15.6, longer non-rapid eye movement (NREM 1 (7.5 ± 4.6% and NREM3 sleep (26.6 ± 11.8%, abnormal rapid eye movement (REM latency in 30/56 patients, shorter REM sleep (16.7 ± 6.6%, and abnormal alpha delta patterns were observed in 41/56 patients. The analysis of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs evidenced highest spiking rate during NREM3 sleep and higher concordance with imaging data when IEDs were recorded in sleep, mainly during REM sleep. We concluded that patients with MTLE showed disrupted sleep architecture that may result in daytime dysfunction and sleep complaints. Furthermore, NREM sleep activated focal IEDs and them - when recorded during sleep - had higher localizing value.

  3. Importance of neuropsychological and clinical features to predict seizure control in medically treated patients with mesial temporal epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-López, Laia; Jiménez, Marta; Ciurans, Jordi; Cáceres, Cynthia; Becerra, Juan Luis

    2017-04-01

    It is not yet understood why seizures in certain patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) develop resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) while others achieve good seizure control with this treatment. We analyzed clinical and neuropsychological features associated with seizure control in patients with MTLE-HS who had not undergone resective surgery. We enrolled 40 patients with medically treated MTLE-HS and retrospectively collected the following data from prospective databases: sex, febrile seizures, central nervous system infection, history of head trauma, cognitive impairment, psychiatric disturbances, history of status epilepticus, age at onset of epilepsy, aura, seizure type and frequency, electroencephalography abnormalities, HS side, AEDs, global cognitive status, and neuropsychological functions such as cognitive processing speed, attention and executive functions, verbal and visual memory, language, and visuospatial ability. These factors were compared between patients who achieved seizure control (no seizures or a >50% reduction in seizure frequency) with AED treatment and those who continued with poor seizure control (increase or no change in frequency or 2seizures per month before treatment (odds ratio [OR] 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-4.8, p=0.04), moderate or severe cognitive impairment (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.8-7.6, p=0.02), and impairment of >2 neuropsychological functions (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2-6.6, p=0.04). No associations were observed between poor seizure control and specific neuropsychological function impairment. Poor seizure control in MTLE-HS is associated with moderate-severe cognitive impairment but not with a specific profile of impairment. Recognizing poor prognostic features such as a high frequency of monthly seizures prior to starting AED treatment could help to identify patients with medically intractable MTLE-HS who may be good candidates for early epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  4. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  5. Protocolo para la evaluación prequirúrgica de las funciones del lenguaje y la memoria en pacientes con epilepsia del lóbulo temporal mesial: estudio de los procesos de plasticidad cerebral y sus consecuencias funcionales

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjuán Tomás, Ana

    2010-01-01

    La epilepsia del lóbulo temporal mesial (ELT) es la causa más común de epilepsia farmacoresistente y se puede beneficiar de terapias alternativas como la neurocirugía. Las alteraciones cognitivas más frecuentes en estos pacientes son en el lenguaje y la memoria. Mediante técnicas de resonancia magnética funcional, la presente tesis aborda dos objetivos: 1) la creación de un protocolo para la evaluación prequirúrgica de las funciones del lenguaje y la memoria y 2) el estudio de los procesos de...

  6. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  7. Surgical outcome in patients with refractory epilepsy associated to MRI-defined unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis Resultados cirúrgicos em pacientes com epilepsia refratária associada a esclerose mesial temporal unilateral definida por ressonância magnética

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Mella Baldauf

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several pre-operative work-up protocols have been used while selecting epileptic patients for surgery among different centers. The relative value of the different available pre-operative tests is still under discussion. OBJECTIVE: We report on the surgical outcome obtained in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy associated to mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and who were evaluated pre-operatively by interictal EEG and MRI alone. METHOD: Forty one patients with refractory unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy were evaluated using interictal EEG and MRI. MRI disclosed unilateral MTS in all patients. All patients had at least 4 interictal EEG recordings. All patients were submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy at the side determined by MRI. RESULTS: Interictal EEG showed unilateral epileptiform discharges compatible with MRI findings in 37 patients; in four out of the 41 patients, bilateral discharges were found. Mean follow-up time was 4.3±1.1 years. Thirty-nine patients (95.1% were classified as Engel’s Class I (70.6% Engel I-A. Two patients (4.9% were rated as Engel's Class II. All patients in whom bilateral discharges were found were in Engel’s Class I. Pathological examination showed MTS in all patients. CONCLUSION: It is possible to adequately select good surgical candidates for temporal lobe resection using MRI and interictal EEG alone. In patients with MRI-defined MTS we should expect a postoperative remission rate higher then 90%. The finding of MTS on MRI is the most important good prognostic factor after temporal lobe resection.INTRODUÇÃO: Protocolos diferentes têm sido utilizados para a investigação pré-operatória de pacientes epilépticos nos diferentes centros. No entanto, o valor relativo de cada teste disponível ainda é controverso na literatura. OBJETIVO: Relatamos os resultados cirúrgicos de pacientes com epilepsia refratária do lobo temporal associada a esclerose hipocampal (EH, cuja

  8. Memória de orientação espacial: avaliação em pacientes com doença de Alzheimer e com epilepsia mesial temporal refratária Spatial orientation memory: evaluation in patents with Alzheimer disease and temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Tuon

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos experimentais identificaram células piramidais no hipocampo de ratos com participação na memória de orientação espacial (MOE, denominadas células de localização. O objetivo deste estudo foi adaptar um teste baseado nesses experimentos para verificar o desempenho de MOE e a participação do hipocampo na MOE em pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal (EMT. Dividiu-se a pesquisa em dois estudos: no primeiro adaptou-se o teste e visando verificar sua capacidade de investigação de déficits de MOE aplicou-se em grupos de 10 indivíduos, um com doença de Alzheimer (DA e outro de idosos saudáveis (pExperimental studies have identified pyramidal cells in hippocampus in rats with participation in the spatial orientation memory (SOM, which are named location cells. This study had the purpose to adapt a test based in these experiments in order to check the performance of SOM and the participation of hippocampus into SOM in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. The research was divided into two studies: the first one the test was adapted, and in order to check its capacity to investigate the deficits of SOM, it has applied in groups of 10 (ten subjects, one group with patients that have Alzheimer disease and the other one with healthy elderly (p<0.001. The second study has evaluated the participation of hippocampus into SOM in 43 patients (23 with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and 20 submitted to selective amygdala hippocampectomy (SAH and 23 healthy volunteers with p<0,05 between MTS and SAH and between controled and SAH. It was shown that the test of SOM is suitable to evaluate deficits, but it seems the SOM is not a specific function of human hippocampus.

  9. Gender, apolipoprotein E genotype, and mesial temporal atrophy: 2-year follow-up in patients with stable mild cognitive impairment and with progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, M.V.; Patrick, K.E.; Collins, H. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Langdon, B.R. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Internal Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Parker, R.O. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Anesthesiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Pravata' , E. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Department of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Collaboration: For the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-11-15

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between gender, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, and mesial temporal atrophy in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with and without progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated 236 MCI patients with (n = 121) and without (n = 115) AD progression. Longitudinal MRI-based hippocampal volumes (HV) and entorhinal cortex (ERC) thickness were obtained. The Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) score was used to assess disease severity. We found a significant effect of APOE, gender, and clinical course (stable MCI versus MCI-AD progression) on HV. There was a significant effect of clinical course and APOE, but not gender, on ERC. Baseline HV and APOE4 status predicted MCI-AD progression in women. Baseline ERC and APOE4 status predicted MCI-AD progression in men. There were significant differences in CDR-SB scores between patients with and without MCI-AD progression, but not between males and females, or APOE4 carriers and non-carriers. HV, but not ERC, is strongly influenced by gender in MCI. The effects of gender and APOE4 on neuroimaging biomarkers have potentially important implications in the prediction of MCI-AD progression and should be taken into account in clinical trials. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study on patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senzaki, Akira; Okubo, Yoshiro; Matsuura, Masato; Toru, Michio; Abe, Tetsuo; Asai, Kunihiko; Moriiwa, Motoi.

    1993-01-01

    In 30 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who had no visual abnormality on either CT or MRI, cerebral changes especially in the mesial temporal region were examined. The findings were compared with those in 20 normal volunteers. In epileptic patients, the mesial temporal region was significantly smaller and T1-weighted values in this region were significantly higher, as compared with the controls. In the group of epilepsy, atrophy especially in the hippocampal and tonsillar regions and increased water content were suggested. Regarding the bilateral difference in the size of the mesial temporal region, there was no significant difference between the group of epilepsy and the control group. The group of epilepsy seemed to have bilateral changes in the mesial temporal region. In 9 patients with the present or past history of organic delusional (schizophrenia-like) disorder, the coronal section of the third ventricle was significantly large, suggesting the likelihood of structural changes surrounding the third ventricle. (N.K.)

  11. Estudo da relação entre alterações de ressonância magnética funcional e estrutural e distúrbios de memória e sintomas depressivos em pacientes com epilepsia do lobo temporal mesial

    OpenAIRE

    Tamires Araujo Zanão

    2016-01-01

    Resumo: A epilepsia é caracterizada pela recorrência de crises epilépticas associadas a diferentes substratos etiológicos, excluindo as crises sintomáticas provocadas por lesões cerebrais agudas. O subtipo mais comum de epilepsia focal é a Epilepsia de Lobo Temporal Mesial (ELTm), correspondendo a cerca de 60% dos casos de Epilepsia de Lobo Temporal (ELT). A epilepsia é uma doença cerebral que além da predisposição para gerar crises epiléticas, também é caracterizada por suas consequências ne...

  12. Temporally resolved refractive index structure parameter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus; Forsling, Robin

    2017-09-01

    The refractive index structure parameter is the most common measure of optical turbulence. It is defined as a statistical quantity for the Kolmogorov spectrum energy cascade of turbulent eddies of different sizes. As such it is formally assumed to be constant in time and space. However, the large scale variation with the diurnal cycle, with altitude or with terrain characteristics is well known. The ensemble average in the definition of the refractive index structure parameter is thus assumed to be applied over a restricted region in space and time. The question of how large volume is needed to determine the refractive index structure parameter and on how short temporal scales it can vary has not received significant attention. To study the temporal variation we have used two independent measurement systems to measure the path-averaged refractive index structure parameter over a 171 m path at 1 m above ground with higher than 1 Hz temporal resolution. One measurement system uses the differential angle-of-arrival of an array of LEDs. The other system measures the scintillation of a single path laser beam using a photon counting system, with time correlation of picosecond pulses for simultaneous measurement of signal and background and with temporal autocorrelation-based variance determination to separate turbulence related scintillations from shot noise. The data shows excellent agreement between the two measurement systems on second level temporal variation, giving confidence in that the measured values show true variation of the refractive index structure parameter. Large scale variation of up to two orders of magnitude can be coupled to solar insolation on this partly cloudy day. High frequency variations that are consistent between the systems used show factor two changes at time scales below one second.

  13. Altered structural connectome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Douw, Linda; Tanaka, Naoaki; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    To study differences in the whole-brain structural connectomes of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and healthy control subjects. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all individuals gave signed informed consent. Sixty-direction diffusion-tensor imaging and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) magnetic resonance imaging volumes were analyzed in 24 patients with left TLE and in 24 healthy control subjects. MP-RAGE volumes were segmented into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) spanning the entire brain. Deterministic white matter tractography was performed after voxelwise tensor calculation. Weighted structural connectivity matrices were generated by using the pairwise density of connecting fibers between ROIs. Graph theoretical measures of connectivity networks were compared between groups by using linear models with permutation testing. Patients with TLE had 22%-45% reduced (P < .01) distant connectivity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, compared with that in healthy subjects. However, local connectivity, as measured by means of network efficiency, was increased by 85%-270% (P < .01) in the medial and lateral frontal cortices, insular cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex in patients with TLE as compared with healthy subjects. This study suggests that TLE involves altered structural connectivity in a network that reaches beyond the temporal lobe, especially in the default mode network.

  14. The temporal structure of vertical arm movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Gaveau

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how the CNS deals with the omnipresent force of gravity during arm motor planning. Previous studies have reported direction-dependent kinematic differences in the vertical plane; notably, acceleration duration was greater during a downward than an upward arm movement. Although the analysis of acceleration and deceleration phases has permitted to explore the integration of gravity force, further investigation is necessary to conclude whether feedforward or feedback control processes are at the origin of this incorporation. We considered that a more detailed analysis of the temporal features of vertical arm movements could provide additional information about gravity force integration into the motor planning. Eight subjects performed single joint vertical arm movements (45° rotation around the shoulder joint in two opposite directions (upwards and downwards and at three different speeds (slow, natural and fast. We calculated different parameters of hand acceleration profiles: movement duration (MD, duration to peak acceleration (D PA, duration from peak acceleration to peak velocity (D PA-PV, duration from peak velocity to peak deceleration (D PV-PD, duration from peak deceleration to the movement end (D PD-End, acceleration duration (AD, deceleration duration (DD, peak acceleration (PA, peak velocity (PV, and peak deceleration (PD. While movement durations and amplitudes were similar for upward and downward movements, the temporal structure of acceleration profiles differed between the two directions. More specifically, subjects performed upward movements faster than downward movements; these direction-dependent asymmetries appeared early in the movement (i.e., before PA and lasted until the moment of PD. Additionally, PA and PV were greater for upward than downward movements. Movement speed also changed the temporal structure of acceleration profiles. The effect of speed and direction on the form of acceleration

  15. The temporal structure of vertical arm movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, Jérémie; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates how the CNS deals with the omnipresent force of gravity during arm motor planning. Previous studies have reported direction-dependent kinematic differences in the vertical plane; notably, acceleration duration was greater during a downward than an upward arm movement. Although the analysis of acceleration and deceleration phases has permitted to explore the integration of gravity force, further investigation is necessary to conclude whether feedforward or feedback control processes are at the origin of this incorporation. We considered that a more detailed analysis of the temporal features of vertical arm movements could provide additional information about gravity force integration into the motor planning. Eight subjects performed single joint vertical arm movements (45° rotation around the shoulder joint) in two opposite directions (upwards and downwards) and at three different speeds (slow, natural and fast). We calculated different parameters of hand acceleration profiles: movement duration (MD), duration to peak acceleration (D PA), duration from peak acceleration to peak velocity (D PA-PV), duration from peak velocity to peak deceleration (D PV-PD), duration from peak deceleration to the movement end (D PD-End), acceleration duration (AD), deceleration duration (DD), peak acceleration (PA), peak velocity (PV), and peak deceleration (PD). While movement durations and amplitudes were similar for upward and downward movements, the temporal structure of acceleration profiles differed between the two directions. More specifically, subjects performed upward movements faster than downward movements; these direction-dependent asymmetries appeared early in the movement (i.e., before PA) and lasted until the moment of PD. Additionally, PA and PV were greater for upward than downward movements. Movement speed also changed the temporal structure of acceleration profiles. The effect of speed and direction on the form of acceleration

  16. Extrahippocampal Desynchronization in Nonlesional Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pastor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is traditionally associated with both hypersynchronous activity in the form of interictal epileptic discharges and hippocampal sclerosis, recent findings suggest that desynchronization also plays a central role in the dynamics of this pathology. The objective of this work is to show the imbalance existing between mesial activities in patients suffering from mesial TLE, with normal mesial structures. Foramen ovale recordings from six patients with mesial TLE and one with lateral TLE were analyzed through a cluster analysis and synchronization matrices. None of the patients present findings in the MRI presurgical evaluation. Numerical analysis was carried out in three different situations: awake and sleep interictal and also during the preictal stage. High levels of desynchronization ipsilateral to the epileptic side were present in mesial TLE patients. Low levels of desynchronization were present in the lateral TLE patient during the interictal stage and almost zero in the preictal stage. Implications of these findings in relation with seizure spreading are discussed.

  17. The temporal structure of urban soundscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botteldooren, D.; De Coensel, B.; De Muer, T.

    2006-04-01

    The influence of noise on the quality of the urban living environment has traditionally been studied focusing on negative effects on man, such as noise annoyance and sleep disturbance. Recently a more holistic approach, including positive and negative aspects as well as non-residential functions of the urban environment, has gained renewed interest. The label "urban soundscape" is often used to refer to this approach. Research towards quantification of the acoustic descriptors of the urban soundscape is, however, still in an early stage. This paper draws on the analogy with music to propose an indicator for studying the temporal structure of the urban soundscape. The link to self-organized criticality of the underlying system is drawn. The influence on the new indicator of road traffic noise, an important soundscape disturber in urban areas, is analyzed in detail.

  18. Dynamic membrane structure induces temporal pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippoldt, J; Händel, C; Dietrich, U; Käs, J A

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of temporal pattern formation in biological systems is essential for insights into regulatory processes of cells. Concerning this problem, the present work introduces a model to explain the attachment/detachment cycle of MARCKS and PKC at the cell membrane, which is crucial for signal transduction processes. Our model is novel with regard to its driving mechanism: Structural changes within the membrane fuel an activator-inhibitor based global density oscillation of membrane related proteins. Based on simulated results of our model, phase diagrams were generated to illustrate the interplay of MARCKS and PKC. They predict the oscillatory behavior in the form of the number of peaks, the periodic time, and the damping constant depending on the amounts of MARCKS and PKC, respectively. The investigation of the phase space also revealed an unexpected intermediate state prior to the oscillations for high amounts of MARCKS in the system. The validation of the obtained results was carried out by stability analysis, which also accounts for further enhanced understanding of the studied system. It was shown, that the occurrence of the oscillating behavior is independent of the diffusion and the consumption of the reactants. The diffusion terms in the used reaction-diffusion equations only act as modulating terms and are not required for the oscillation. The hypothesis of our work suggests a new mechanism of temporal pattern formation in biological systems. This mechanism includes a classical activator-inhibitor system, but is based on the modifications of the membrane structure, rather than a reaction-diffusion system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy via trans-superior temporal gyrus keyhole approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathon, Bertrand; Clemenceau, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common cause of drug-resistant epilepsy amenable for surgical treatment and seizure control. The rationale of the selective amygdalohippocampectomy is to spare cerebral tissue not included in the seizure generator. Describe the selective amygdalohippocampectomy through the trans-superior temporal gyrus keyhole approach. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy for temporal lobe epilepsy is performed when the data (semiology, neuroimaging, electroencephalography) point to the mesial temporal structures. The trans-superior temporal gyrus keyhole approach is a minimally invasive and safe technique that allows disconnection of the temporal stem and resection of temporomesial structures.

  20. Chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, W.J.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.; Singleton, G.T.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen patients with chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures were evaluated and treated at the University of Florida. Seventeen patients have each been followed a minimum of 3 years. Patients were retrospectively staged as having ''local'' or ''advanced'' disease, depending on the presence or absence of bone destruction and/or cranial nerve involvement. Fourteen of the patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their therapy; 6 patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 3 patients were irradiated immediately postoperatively for residual disease, and 5 patients had radiation therapy for recurrence after operation. They were treated with cobalt-60 radiation with doses ranging from 3760 to 5640 rad. All irradiated patients demonstrated evidence of tumor regression, and none have had tumor recurrence with followup of 3-12 years. Of the 8 patients with cranial nerve paralysis prior to therapy, 5 had return of function of 1 or more cranial nerves. One of 6 patients treated initially with radiation therapy had a complication, while 6 of 8 patients irradiated postoperatively had complications. None of the complications were fatal. Three patients treated by operation for early disease limited to the hypotympanum had the disease controlled for 11-12 years. Guidelines for the selection of initial therapy are discussed

  1. Middle Temporal Gyrus Versus Inferior Temporal Gyrus Transcortical Approaches to High-Grade Astrocytomas in the Mediobasal Temporal Lobe: A Comparison of Outcomes, Functional Restoration, and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Raza, Shaan M; Ahmed, Ishrat; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Chaichana, Kaisorn; Olivi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    High-grade astrocytomas of the mesial temporal lobe may pose surgical challenges. Several approaches (trans-sylvian, subtemporal, and transcortical) have been designed to circumnavigate the critical neurovascular structures and white fiber tracts that surround this area. Considering the paucity of literature on the transcortical approach for these lesions, we describe our institutional experience with transcortical approaches to Grade III/IV astrocytomas in the mesial temporal lobe. Between 1999 and 2009, 23 patients underwent surgery at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions for Grade III/IV astrocytomas involving the mesial temporal lobe (without involvement of the temporal neocortex). Clinical notes, operative records, and imaging were reviewed. Thirteen patients had tumors in the dominant hemisphere. All patients underwent surgery via a transcortical approach (14 via the inferior temporal gyrus and 9 via the middle temporal gyrus). Gross total resection was obtained in 92 % of the cohort. Neurological outcomes were: clinically significant stroke (2 patients), new visual deficits (2 patients), new speech deficit (1 patient); seizure control (53 %). In comparison to reported results in the literature for the transylvian and subtemporal approaches, the transcortical approach may provide the access necessary for a gross total resection with minimal neurological consequences. In our series of patients, there was no statistically significant difference in outcomes between the middle temporal gyrus versus the inferior temporal gyrus trajectories.

  2. Temporal and Statistical Information in Causal Structure Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Teresa; Frosch, Caren; Patrick, Fiona; Lagnado, David

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examined children's and adults' abilities to use statistical and temporal information to distinguish between common cause and causal chain structures. In Experiment 1, participants were provided with conditional probability information and/or temporal information and asked to infer the causal structure of a 3-variable mechanical…

  3. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change......-point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights...

  4. The Temporal Organization of Syllabic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation develops analytical tools which enable rigorous evaluation of competing syllabic parses on the basis of temporal patterns in speech production data. The data come from the articulographic tracking of fleshpoints on target speech organs, e.g., tongue, lips, jaw, in experiments with native speakers of American English and Moroccan…

  5. Temporal lobe epilepsy and cavernous malformations: surgical strategies and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Fernando L; Vivas, Andrew C; Manwaring, Jotham; Schoenberg, Mike R; Benbadis, Selim R

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) of the temporal lobe often present with seizures. Surgical resection of these lesions can offer durable seizure control. There is, however, no universally accepted methodology for assessing and surgically treating these patients. We propose an algorithm to maximize positive surgical outcomes (seizure control) while minimizing post-surgical neurological deficit. A retrospective review of 34 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery for radiographically proven temporal lobe CCM was conducted. Patients underwent a relatively standard work-up for seizure localization. In patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), a complete resection of the epileptogenic zone was performed including amygdalo-hippocampectomy in addition to a lesionectomy if not contraindicated by pre-operative work-up. Patients with neocortical epilepsy underwent intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG)-guided lesionectomy. Seizure-free rate for mesial and neocortical (anterior, lateral, and basal) location was 90 vs. 83 %, respectively. Complete resection of the lesion, irrespective of location, was statistically significant for seizure control (p = 0.018). There was no difference in seizure control based on disease duration or location (p > 0.05). Patients with mesial temporal CCM who presented with MTLE were presumed to also have mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), or dual pathology. These patients underwent routine resection of the mesial structures. Interestingly, patients who had MTLE and basal (neocortical) lesions who underwent a mesial resection for suspected MTS were found not to have dual pathology. Patients with temporal lobe CCM should be offered resection for durable seizure control, prevention of secondary epileptogenic foci, and elimination of hemorrhage risk. The preoperative work-up should follow a team approach. Surgical intervention should include complete lesionectomy in all cases. Intra or extra-operative ECoG for neocortical

  6. Avaliação do prognóstico das crises, depressão, memória verbal, efeitos adversos das drogas e qualidade de vida dos pacientes operados por epilepsia do lobo temporal mesial

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Luís Augusto Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Introdução: A cirurgia para epilepsia permanece subutilizada apesar da evidência robusta, em estudos randomizados, da sua superioridade no controle das crises. Todavia, o impacto na qualidade de vida e indicadores sociais são de avaliação mais complexa e demandam estudos com maior seguimento. Objetivos: Analisar, após longo prazo, o impacto do tratamento cirúrgico no controle das crises, depressão, memória verbal e na qualidade de vida dos pacientes operados por epilepsia do lobo temporal me...

  7. combined spatially and temporally structured walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Riahi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Benney's theory of evolution of disturbances in shear flows over smooth and flat boundary is extended to study for shear flows over combined spatially and temporally corrugated walls. Perturbation and multiple-scales analyses are employed for the case where both amplitude of the corrugations and the amplitude of wave motion are small. Analyses for instability of modulated mean shear flows with respect to spanwise-periodic disturbance rolls and for the subsequent vortex formation and vortex stability are presented, and the effects of the corrugated walls on the resulting flow and vortices are determined. It is found that particular corrugated walls can originate and control the longitudinal vortices, while some other types of corrugated walls can enhance instability of such vortices.

  8. Relation of callosal structure to cognitive abilities in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchneider

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to analyse the influence of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE on the morphology of the corpus callosum (CC and its relation to cognitive abilities. More specifically, we investigated correlations between intellectual abilities and callosal morphology, while additionally exploring the modulating impact of (a side of seizure onset (b age of disease onset.For this reason a large representative sample of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (n=79; 35 males; 44 females; age: 18-63 years with disease onset ranging from 0 to 50 years of age, and consisting of 46 left and 33 right TLE patients was recruited. Intelligence was measured using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R.To get localizations of correlations with high anatomic precision, callosal morphology was examined using computational mesh-based modeling methods, applied to anatomical brain MRI scans.Intellectual performance was positively associated with callosal thickness in anterior and midcallosal callosal regions, with anterior parts being slightly more affected by age of disease onset and side of seizure onset than posterior parts. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with lower thickness in anterior and midcallosal regions. In addition, laterality of seizure onset had a significant influence on anterior CC morphology, with left hemispheric origin having stronger effects.We found that in TLE, anterior and midcallosal CC morphology are related to cognitive performance. The findings support recent findings of detrimental effects of early onset mTLE on anterior brain regions and of a distinct effect particularly of left TLE on frontal lobe functioning and structure. The causal nature of the relationship remains an open question, i.e., whether CC morphology impacts IQ development or whether IQ development impacts CC morphology, or both.

  9. Temporal lobe sclerosis associated with hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: neuropathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Maria; Eriksson, Sofia; Martinian, Lillian; Caboclo, Luis O; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2009-08-01

    Widespread changes involving neocortical and mesial temporal lobe structures can be present in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. The incidence, pathology, and clinical significance of neocortical temporal lobe sclerosis (TLS) are not well characterized. We identified TLS in 30 of 272 surgically treated cases of hippocampal sclerosis. Temporal lobe sclerosis was defined by variable reduction of neurons from cortical layers II/III and laminar gliosis; it was typically accompanied by additional architectural abnormalities of layer II, that is, abnormal neuronal orientation and aggregation. Quantitative analysis including tessellation methods for the distribution of layer II neurons supported these observations. In 40% of cases, there was a gradient of TLS with more severe involvement toward the temporal pole, possibly signifying involvement of hippocampal projection pathways. There was a history of a febrile seizure as an initial precipitating injury in 73% of patients with TLS compared with 36% without TLS; no other clinical differences between TLS and non-TLS cases were identified. Temporal lobe sclerosis was not evident preoperatively by neuroimaging. No obvious effect of TLS on seizure outcome was noted after temporal lobe resection; 73% became seizure-free at 2-year follow-up. In conclusion, approximately 11% of surgically treated hippocampal sclerosis is accompanied by TLS. Temporal lobe sclerosis is likely an acquired process with accompanying reorganizational dysplasia and an extension of mesial temporal sclerosis rather than a separate pathological entity.

  10. Did Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R; Novikov, Vladimir P I; Regard, Marianne; Siegel, Adrian M

    2005-07-01

    Many scientific authors--among them famous names such as Henri Gastaut or Sigmund Freud--dealt with the question from what kind of epilepsy Fyodor Mikhailovitch Dostoevsky (1821-1881) might had suffered. Because of the tight interplay between Dostoevsky's literary work and his own disease we throw light on the author's epilepsy against the background of his epileptic fictional characters. Moreover, we attempt to classify Dostoevsky's epilepsy on the basis of his bibliography, language, and literary work.

  11. Mesial temporal sclerosis | Jogi | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2005) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web ...

  12. Mesial temporal sclerosis | Jogi | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract South African Journal of Radiology Vol. 9 (2) 2005: pp. 25-27. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/sajr.v9i2.88 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  13. Visual paired-associate learning: in search of material-specific effects in adult patients who have undergone temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lou; Bigel, Marla; Miller, Laurie A

    2011-02-01

    The mesial temporal lobes are important for learning arbitrary associations. It has previously been demonstrated that left mesial temporal structures are involved in learning word pairs, but it is not yet known whether comparable lesions in the right temporal lobe impair visually mediated associative learning. Patients who had undergone left (n=16) or right (n=18) temporal lobectomy for relief of intractable epilepsy and healthy controls (n=13) were administered two paired-associate learning tasks assessing their learning and memory of pairs of abstract designs or pairs of symbols in unique locations. Both patient groups had deficits in learning the designs, but only the right temporal group was impaired in recognition. For the symbol location task, differences were not found in learning, but again a recognition deficit was found for the right temporal group. The findings implicate the mesial temporal structures in relational learning. They support a material-specific effect for recognition but not for learning and recall of arbitrary visual and visual-spatial associative information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Auras and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy: a new approach on the basis of voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Teresa Castilho Garcia; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; da Silva, Henrique Hattori; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2010-05-01

    MRI investigations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) have demonstrated structural abnormalities extending beyond ipsilateral hippocampus which may be studied through voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We investigated brain morphology related to clinical features in patients with refractory TLE with MTS using VBM. One hundred patients with unilateral TLE with MTS (59 left) and 30 controls were enrolled. VBM5 was employed to analyze (1) hemispheric damage, (2) influence of initial precipitating injury (IPI): 23 patients with febrile seizures and 19 with status epilepticus, and (3) types of auras classified as: mesial, including psychic auras (19 patients); anterior mesio-lateral, as autonomic symptoms, specially epigastric auras (27 patients) and neocortical, which included auditory, vertiginous, somatosensory and visual auras (16 patients). (1) Left TLE patients presented more widespread gray matter volume (GMV) reductions affecting ipsilateral hippocampus, temporal neocortex, insula and also left uncus, precentral gyrus, thalamus, parietal lobule, cuneus and bilateral cingulum. (2) Febrile seizures group presented ipsilateral GMV reductions in hippocampus, neocortical temporal, frontal and occipital cortices, insula and cingulum. Status epilepticus group presented more widespread GMV reductions involving temporal and extratemporal lobes. (3) Patients with mesial auras showed significant ipsilateral GMV reductions in hippocampus and amygdala, particularly right TLE group, who presented greater extension of GMV reduction in the entorhinal cortex. Significant reductions in hippocampus, amygdala and insula were seen in patients with anterior mesio-lateral auras. This study evaluated a large number of TLE-MTS patients showing structural damage extending beyond hippocampus, and different types of IPI associated with the extension of brain damage. Subtypes of auras are related to different clusters of areas of GMV reductions in

  15. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Goetze

    Full Text Available Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII and microsatellite markers (7 loci, we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites, suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton.

  16. A Quantitative Characterization of Weighted Kripke Structures in Temporal Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Thrane, Claus Rørbæk; Fahrenberg, Uli

    2009-01-01

    We extend the usual notion of Kripke Structures with a weighted transition relation, and generalize the usual Boolean satisfaction relation of CTL to a map which assigns to states and temporal formulae a real-valued distance describing the degree of satisfaction. We describe a general approach to...... to obtaining quantitative interpretations for a generic extension of the CTL syntax, and show that, for one such interpretation, the logic is both adequate and expressive with respect to quantitative bisimulation....

  17. Task activation and functional connectivity show concordant memory laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideman, Noah; Chaitanya, Ganne; He, Xiaosong; Doucet, Gaelle; Kim, Na Young; Sperling, Michael R; Sharan, Ashwini D; Tracy, Joseph I

    2018-04-01

    In epilepsy, asymmetries in the organization of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) functions help determine the cognitive risk associated with procedures such as anterior temporal lobectomy. Past studies have investigated the change/shift in a visual episodic memory laterality index (LI) in mesial temporal lobe structures through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task activations. Here, we examine whether underlying task-related functional connectivity (FC) is concordant with such standard fMRI laterality measures. A total of 56 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (Left TLE [LTLE]: 31; Right TLE [RTLE]: 25) and 34 matched healthy controls (HC) underwent fMRI scanning during performance of a scene encoding task (SET). We assessed an activation-based LI of the hippocampal gyrus (HG) and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) during the SET and its correspondence with task-related FC measures. Analyses involving the HG and PHG showed that the patients with LTLE had a consistently higher LI (right-lateralized) than that of the HC and group with RTLE, indicating functional reorganization. The patients with RTLE did not display a reliable contralateral shift away from the pathology, with the mesial structures showing quite distinct laterality patterns (HG, no laterality bias; PHG, no evidence of LI shift). The FC data for the group with LTLE provided confirmation of reorganization effects, revealing that a rightward task LI may be based on underlying connections between several left-sided regions (middle/superior occipital and left medial frontal gyri) and the right PHG. The FCs between the right HG and left anterior cingulate/medial frontal gyri were also observed in LTLE. Importantly, the data demonstrate that the areas involved in the LTLE task activation shift to the right hemisphere showed a corresponding increase in task-related FCs between the hemispheres. Altered laterality patterns based on mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) pathology manifest as several

  18. [The role of temporal fine structure in tone recognition and music perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Gu, X; Liu, B

    2017-11-07

    The sound signal can be decomposed into temporal envelope and temporal fine structure information. The temporal envelope information is crucial for speech perception in quiet environment, and the temporal fine structure information plays an important role in speech perception in noise, Mandarin tone recognition and music perception, especially the pitch and melody perception.

  19. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gordon Watts

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species’ dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a wetland (within-site and (b landscape matrix (between-site characteristics; and (c wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  20. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, P; Billerman, S; Jesmer, B; Micheletti, S; Fortin, M.-J.; Funk, W.C.; Hapeman, P; Muths, Erin L.; Murphy, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  1. Generating spatial precipitation ensembles: impact of temporal correlation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovec, O.; Hazenberg, P.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Weerts, A. H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-09-01

    Sound spatially distributed rainfall fields including a proper spatial and temporal error structure are of key interest for hydrologists to force hydrological models and to identify uncertainties in the simulated and forecasted catchment response. The current paper presents a temporally coherent error identification method based on time-dependent multivariate spatial conditional simulations, which are conditioned on preceding simulations. A sensitivity analysis and real-world experiment are carried out within the hilly region of the Belgian Ardennes. Precipitation fields are simulated for pixels of 10 km × 10 km resolution. Uncertainty analyses in the simulated fields focus on (1) the number of previous simulation hours on which the new simulation is conditioned, (2) the advection speed of the rainfall event, (3) the size of the catchment considered, and (4) the rain gauge density within the catchment. The results for a sensitivity analysis show for typical advection speeds >20 km h-1, no uncertainty is added in terms of across ensemble spread when conditioned on more than one or two previous hourly simulations. However, for the real-world experiment, additional uncertainty can still be added when conditioning on a larger number of previous simulations. This is because for actual precipitation fields, the dynamics exhibit a larger spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, by thinning the observation network with 50%, the added uncertainty increases only slightly and the cross-validation shows that the simulations at the unobserved locations are unbiased. Finally, the first-order autocorrelation coefficients show clear temporal coherence in the time series of the areal precipitation using the time-dependent multivariate conditional simulations, which was not the case using the time-independent univariate conditional simulations. The presented work can be easily implemented within a hydrological calibration and data assimilation framework and can be used as an

  2. Generating spatial precipitation ensembles: impact of temporal correlation structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rakovec

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound spatially distributed rainfall fields including a proper spatial and temporal error structure are of key interest for hydrologists to force hydrological models and to identify uncertainties in the simulated and forecasted catchment response. The current paper presents a temporally coherent error identification method based on time-dependent multivariate spatial conditional simulations, which are conditioned on preceding simulations. A sensitivity analysis and real-world experiment are carried out within the hilly region of the Belgian Ardennes. Precipitation fields are simulated for pixels of 10 km × 10 km resolution. Uncertainty analyses in the simulated fields focus on (1 the number of previous simulation hours on which the new simulation is conditioned, (2 the advection speed of the rainfall event, (3 the size of the catchment considered, and (4 the rain gauge density within the catchment. The results for a sensitivity analysis show for typical advection speeds >20 km h−1, no uncertainty is added in terms of across ensemble spread when conditioned on more than one or two previous hourly simulations. However, for the real-world experiment, additional uncertainty can still be added when conditioning on a larger number of previous simulations. This is because for actual precipitation fields, the dynamics exhibit a larger spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, by thinning the observation network with 50%, the added uncertainty increases only slightly and the cross-validation shows that the simulations at the unobserved locations are unbiased. Finally, the first-order autocorrelation coefficients show clear temporal coherence in the time series of the areal precipitation using the time-dependent multivariate conditional simulations, which was not the case using the time-independent univariate conditional simulations. The presented work can be easily implemented within a hydrological calibration and data assimilation

  3. Extracting the Textual and Temporal Structure of Supercomputing Logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, S; Singh, I; Chandra, A; Zhang, Z; Bronevetsky, G

    2009-05-26

    Supercomputers are prone to frequent faults that adversely affect their performance, reliability and functionality. System logs collected on these systems are a valuable resource of information about their operational status and health. However, their massive size, complexity, and lack of standard format makes it difficult to automatically extract information that can be used to improve system management. In this work we propose a novel method to succinctly represent the contents of supercomputing logs, by using textual clustering to automatically find the syntactic structures of log messages. This information is used to automatically classify messages into semantic groups via an online clustering algorithm. Further, we describe a methodology for using the temporal proximity between groups of log messages to identify correlated events in the system. We apply our proposed methods to two large, publicly available supercomputing logs and show that our technique features nearly perfect accuracy for online log-classification and extracts meaningful structural and temporal message patterns that can be used to improve the accuracy of other log analysis techniques.

  4. Making News by Structuring Time: A Temporal Analysis on Infographic Production in News Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Pai-Lin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    How can organization be able to accomplish its mission of gathering information just in time? As a temporal organization, news media employ temporal structuring strategies to integrate institutional and individual efforts to have the work done before the deadline. This researcher conducted a field research on infographic designers of daily newspapers to observe: (1) how temporal structures of regulate the infographic designers; (2) how designers interact the temporal structures and develo...

  5. Temporal structure of neuronal population oscillations with empirical model decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoli

    2006-01-01

    Frequency analysis of neuronal oscillation is very important for understanding the neural information processing and mechanism of disorder in the brain. This Letter addresses a new method to analyze the neuronal population oscillations with empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Following EMD of neuronal oscillation, a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are obtained, then Hilbert transform of IMFs can be used to extract the instantaneous time frequency structure of neuronal oscillation. The method is applied to analyze the neuronal oscillation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats in vivo, the results show the neuronal oscillations have different descriptions during the pre-ictal, seizure onset and ictal periods of the epileptic EEG at the different frequency band. This new method is very helpful to provide a view for the temporal structure of neural oscillation

  6. Recognition memory is improved by a structured temporal framework during encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathesan eThavabalasingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to function optimally within our environment, we continuously extract temporal patterns from our experiences and formulate expectations that facilitate adaptive behavior. Given that our memories are embedded within spatiotemporal contexts, an intriguing possibility is that mnemonic processes are sensitive to the temporal structure of events. To test this hypothesis, in a series of behavioral experiments we manipulated the regularity of interval durations at encoding to create temporally structured and unstructured frameworks. Our findings revealed enhanced recognition memory (d’ for stimuli that were explicitly encoded within a temporally structured versus unstructured framework. Encoding information within a temporally structured framework was also associated with a reduction in the negative effects of proactive interference and was linked to greater recollective recognition memory. Furthermore, rhythmic temporal structure was found to enhance recognition memory for incidentally encoded information. Collectively, these results support the possibility that we possess a greater capacity to learn and subsequently remember temporally structured information.

  7. Atmospheric structure and dynamics: the spatial and temporal domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, G. M.

    2013-05-01

    Multi-wavelength studies of M supergiants have revealed atmospheric structures with a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Focusing on Betelgeuse, these scales and their perplexing connections from the photosphere to the interstellar medium are reviewed. Of particular current interest is the dynamic origin of the ubiquitous and relatively dust-free mass loss. Is it multiple plumes of convection driven ejecta, episodic ejection of molecular reservoirs, or a more steady and uniform flow? With powerful new facilities such as the VLT and ALMA we may begin to understand the connections and answer such puzzles, but ultimately detailed studies of a sample of M supergiants will be needed to disentangle the physics from the stars' personalities.

  8. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  9. Structural Controllability of Temporal Networks with a Single Switching Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Hou, Bao-Yu; Pan, Yu-Jian; Li, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Temporal network, whose topology evolves with time, is an important class of complex networks. Temporal trees of a temporal network describe the necessary edges sustaining the network as well as their active time points. By a switching controller which properly selects its location with time, temporal trees are used to improve the controllability of the network. Therefore, more nodes are controlled within the limited time. Several switching strategies to efficiently select the location of the controller are designed, which are verified with synthetic and empirical temporal networks to achieve better control performance. PMID:28107538

  10. The Structural Plasticity of White Matter Networks Following Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Duncan, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy…

  11. The Spatial and Temporal Structure of Extreme Rainfall Trends in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Younghun Jung; Ju-Young Shin; Hyunjun Ahn; Jun-Haeng Heo

    2017-01-01

    The spatial and temporal structures of extreme rainfall trends in South Korea are investigated in the current study. The trends in the annual maximum rainfall series are detected and their spatial distribution is analyzed. The scaling exponent is employed as an index representing the temporal structure. The temporal structure of the annual maximum series is calculated and spatially analyzed. Subsequently, the block bootstrap based Mann-Kendall test is employed detect the trend in the scaling ...

  12. Second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for first general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and second inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming...... spatio-temporal separability of the intensity function, we clarify different meanings of second-order spatio-temporal separability. One is second-order spatio-temporal independence and relates e.g. to log-Gaussian Cox processes with an additive covariance structure of the underlying spatio......-temporal Gaussian process. Another concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data (the UK 2001 epidemic foot and mouth disease data)....

  13. Aspects of second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and for inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming spatio......-temporal separability of the intensity function, we clarify different meanings of second-order spatio-temporal separability. One is second-order spatio-temporal independence and relates to log-Gaussian Cox processes with an additive covariance structure of the underlying spatio-temporal Gaussian process. Another...... concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data....

  14. STABILITY AND DYNAMICS OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann Riecke

    2005-10-21

    This document constitutes the final report for the grant. It provides a complete list of publications and presentations that arose from the project as well as a brief description of the highlights of the research results. The research funded by this grant has provided insights into the spontaneous formation of structures of increasing complexity in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium. A classic example of such a system is thermally driven convection in a horizontal fluid layer. Highlights of the research are: (1) explanation of the localized traveling wave pulses observed in binary-mixture convection, (2) explanation of the localized waves in electroconvection, (3) introduction of a new diagnostics for spatially and temporally chaotic states, which is based on the statistics of defect trajectories, (4) prediction of complex states in thermally driven convection in rotating systems. Additional contributions provided insight into the localization mechanism for oscillons, the prediction of a new localization mechanism for traveling waves based on a resonant periodic forcing, and an analysis of the stability of quasi-periodic patterns.

  15. [Extra-hippocampal temporal lesions inducing symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsies. Which surgical procedure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchet, G; Marchal, C; Loiseau, H; Rougier, A

    2005-05-01

    In partial symptomatic epilepsy due to discrete brain lesion, total removal of the epileptogenic lesion generally yields major reduction of seizures, achieved in 85% of the patients. However, prognosis is worse in patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy. Implication of the temporo-mesial structures in the seizures genesis is generally considered. Careful electroclinical and radiological analysis can provide useful but insufficient information. In order to evaluate the criteria we used to guide our surgical strategy, we analyzed retrospectively a series of 47 patients with drug-resistant symptomatic extra hipocampic temporal epilepsy surgically treated either by isolated lesionectomy (group 1, n=17) or by resection of temporo-mesial structures and associated lesionectomy (group 2, n=30). Patients with extrahippocampal lesions and hippocampal sclerosis (dual pathology) were excluded from this study. With a mean follow-up of 72 months, overall results showed that 84% of group 2 patients (Engel's grade Ia) were seizure-free compared with only 47% of group 1 patients. Statistical analysis showed that the type of surgical procedure was the main prognostic factor. In conclusion, the optimal surgical procedure cannot be defined only with the criteria usually retained for temporo-mesial involvement in seizure genesis. Taking into account the prognostic value of such implication, although complex, is of paramount importance. Our results could be explained by the presence of an acquired dual functional pathology.

  16. Transcortical selective amygdalohippocampectomy technique through the middle temporal gyrus revisited: An anatomical study laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Baran; da Silva Centeno, Ricardo; Chaddad-Neto, Feres; da Costa, Marcos Devanir Silva; Goiri, Marcelo Augusto Acosta; Karadag, Ali; Tugcu, Bekir; Ovalioglu, Talat Cem; Tanriover, Necmettin; Kaya, Serdar; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Grande, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) and selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SelAH) have been used for surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We examined the comprehensive white matter tract anatomy of the temporal lobe to gain an insight into the trans-middle temporal gyrus, a lateral approach which has been commonly used. The transmiddle temporal gyrus approach was performed in a stepwise manner on cadaveric human heads to examine the traversing white matter pathways through it and the structures located in the temporal horn. We reviewed the literature to compare the trans-middle temporal gyrus approach with other SelAH techniques based on surgical outcomes. There does not appear to be a significant difference in seizure outcome between SelAH and ATL. However, the SelAH provides a better neuropsychological outcomes than the ATL in selected patients. Each SelAH approach has individual advantages and disadvantages. Based on our anatomical study, in the transcortical amygdalohippocampectomy technique through the middle temporal gyrus the white matter pathways to be encountered. In the temporal horn, the collateral eminence, hippocampus, lateral ventricular sulcus, choroidal fissure, inferior choroidal point, choroid plexus, fimbria of the fornix, and amygdala are exposed. The subpial dissection is performed along the lateral ventricular sulcus from the collateral eminence on lateral side and from the choroidal fissure on medial side by microdissector for en bloc resection of the hippocampus proper. The trans-middle temporal gyrus approach is commonly used in treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients. A better anatomical and functional understanding of the structures of the temporal lobe is crucial for safer and more accurate surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporal and spatial variability in soil food web structure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.P.; Bengtsson, J.

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a prominent feature of most ecosystems. As a result of environmental heterogeneity the distribution of many soil organisms shows a temporal as well as horizontal and vertical spatial patterning. In spite of this, food webs are usually portrayed as static networks with highly

  18. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMARI

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling ... chemical and biological properties of water most often lead to the production of .... Persulfate digestion methods, respectively in the laboratory (APHA,. 2000). Data analysis.

  19. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    through time, 2) predicting the risk of by-catch of undersize individuals. The method demonstrates that it is possible to combine stock assessment and spatio-temporal dynamics, however at a high computational cost. The model can be extended by increasing its ecological fidelity, although computational...

  20. Temporal stability of genetic structure in a mesopelagic copepod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goetze, E.; Andrews, K.R.; Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.; Portner, E.; Norton, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population

  1. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling sites in small water bodies (SWBs) within Lake Victoria basin, Kenya, were investigated monthly from November 2010 to June 2011, in relation to selected physical and chemical water quality ...

  2. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  3. Abstract Linguistic Structure Correlates with Temporal Activity during Naturalistic Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan R.; Stabler, Edward P.; Van Wagenen, Sarah E.; Luh, Wen-Ming; Hale, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Neurolinguistic accounts of sentence comprehension identify a network of relevant brain regions, but do not detail the information flowing through them. We investigate syntactic information. Does brain activity implicate a computation over hierarchical grammars or does it simply reflect linear order, as in a Markov chain? To address this question, we quantify the cognitive states implied by alternative parsing models. We compare processing-complexity predictions from these states against fMRI timecourses from regions that have been implicated in sentence comprehension. We find that hierarchical grammars independently predict timecourses from left anterior and posterior temporal lobe. Markov models are predictive in these regions and across a broader network that includes the inferior frontal gyrus. These results suggest that while linear effects are wide-spread across the language network, certain areas in the left temporal lobe deal with abstract, hierarchical syntactic representations. PMID:27208858

  4. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semah, F.

    2006-01-01

    structural abnormalities outside of the mesial formations were detected in 65% of the cases. Neither the severity of HS nor temporal atrophy appeared related to the topography of hypo-metabolism. However, temporal hypo-metabolism was more extended when temporo-polar signal changes were detected. Among operated patients (n=43), a seizure-free outcome was obtained in 82%. A positive surgical outcome appeared more favorable in the mesial group, however the difference between the 4 groups was not significant. Our results suggest that hypo-metabolism in MTLE may be related to ictal discharge generation and spread pathways, even though structural changes and epilepsy duration may also play a role. The role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizures is suggested by studies in animal models and epileptic patients. It is suggested that circuits of the basal ganglia may control epileptic seizures and that striatal dopaminergic transmission plays a key role in seizure interruption. We first studied patients with ring chromosome 20 (r(20) ) epilepsy which is a very homogenous type of epilepsy and that is clinically characterized by long-lasting seizures suggesting a dysfunction in the seizure control system. The hypothesis that these long-lasting seizures are associated with a reduction of striatal dopamine was addressed in our study. We used [ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA PET in 14 patients with r(20) epilepsy. We found that [ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA uptake was significantly decreased bilaterally in the putamen and in the caudate nucleus of patients. This reduction was equal for both nuclei and was not correlated with the percentage of cells with r(20) (Biraben, 2004). This study suggested that dysfunction of this neurotransmission may impair the mechanisms which interrupt seizures. This study was followed by a pilot study in patients with MTLE and in patients with the absence of medically refractory seizures to investigate if this abnormality could be related with the ring chromosome 20

  5. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornholdt, S. [Heidelberg Univ., (Germany). Inst., fuer Theoretische Physik; Graudenz, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  6. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornholdt, S.

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback

  7. Dispersal Ability Determines the Role of Environmental, Spatial and Temporal Drivers of Metacommunity Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padial, André A.; Ceschin, Fernanda; Declerck, Steven A. J.; De Meester, Luc; Bonecker, Cláudia C.; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio A.; Rodrigues, Liliana; Rodrigues, Luzia C.; Train, Sueli; Velho, Luiz F. M.; Bini, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, community ecologists are focusing on the relative importance of local environmental factors and proxies to dispersal limitation to explain spatial variation in community structure. Albeit less explored, temporal processes may also be important in explaining species composition variation in

  8. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Moreira-Filho

    Full Text Available Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E or late (L disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE and complete (CO - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less

  9. Temporal change in biological community structure in the Fountain Creek basin, Colorado, 2001-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering, began a study to better understand the relations between environmental characteristics and biological communities in the Fountain Creek basin in order to aide water-resource management and guide future monitoring activities. To accomplish this task, environmental (streamflow, habitat, and water chemistry) and biological (fish and macroinvertebrate) data were collected annually at 24 sites over a 6- or 8-year period (fish, 2003 to 2008; macroinvertebrates, 2001 to 2008). For this report, these data were first analyzed to determine the presence of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure among years using nonparametric multivariate statistics. Where temporal change in the biological communities was found, these data were further analyzed using additional nonparametric multivariate techniques to determine which subset of selected streamflow, habitat, or water-chemistry variables best described site-specific changes in community structure relative to a gradient of urbanization. This study identified significant directional patterns of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure at 15 of 24 sites in the Fountain Creek basin. At four of these sites, changes in environmental variables were significantly correlated with the concurrent temporal change identified in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure (Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Monument Creek at Bijou Street at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Bear Creek near Colorado Springs, Colo.; Fountain Creek at Security, Colo.). Combinations of environmental variables describing directional temporal change in the biota appeared to be site specific as no single variable dominated the results; however, substrate composition variables (percent substrate composition composed of sand, gravel, or cobble) collectively were present in 80 percent of the environmental

  10. Mandibular second molar with 3 mesial canals and a radix paramolaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ragavendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular first molar commonly has two roots, the mesial and the distal root. Surprisingly in some mandibular first molar has an unusual extra third root in between mesial and distal root. This extra root is the most commonly seen in lingual side and is called as radix entomolaris. If this extra root is seen on the buccal side, it is termed as radix paramolaris (RP, which is a very rare phenomenon. Recently, various case report studies has shown the presence of third canal in the mesial and distal roots of mandibular molars. They are named as middle mesial and middle distal canal, respectively. Here, we present a case report of mandibular second molar showing three canals in the mesial root and a RP.

  11. Temporal structure of consciousness and minimal self in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice eMartin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the minimal self refers to the consciousness of oneself as an immediate subject of experience. According to recent studies, disturbances of the minimal self may be a core feature of schizophrenia. They are emphasized in classical psychiatry literature and in phenomenological work. Impaired minimal self experience may be defined as a distortion of one’s first-person experiential perspective as, for example, an ‘altered presence’ during which the sense of the experienced self (‘mineness’ is subtly affected, or ‘altered sense of demarcation’, i.e. a difficulty discriminating the self from the non-self. Little is known, however, about the cognitive basis of these disturbances. In fact, recent work indicates that disorders of the self are not correlated with cognitive impairments commonly found in schizophrenia such as working-memory and attention disorders. In addition, a major difficulty with exploring the minimal self experimentally lies in its definition as being non self-reflexive, and distinct from the verbalized, explicit awareness of an ‘I’.In this paper we shall discuss the possibility that disturbances of the minimal self observed in patients with schizophrenia are related to alterations in time processing. We shall review the literature on schizophrenia and time processing that lends support to this possibility. In particular we shall discuss the involvement of temporal integration windows on different time scales (implicit time processing as well as duration perception disturbances (explicit time processing in disorders of the minimal self. We argue that a better understanding of the relationship between time and the minimal self as well of issues of embodiment require research that looks more specifically at implicit time processing. Some methodological issues will be discussed.

  12. Analysis of spatio-temporal structures of the thermospheric density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Bloßfeld, Mathis; Erdogan, Eren; Meraner, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere comprising the thermosphere and the ionosphere exhibits a dynamically coupled non-linear system in terms of chemical and physical processes. The system also interacts with the magnetosphere as well as the lower atmosphere. Several stand-alone or coupled models have been developed to reveal the behaviour of atmospheric target parameters and their interactions such as the neutral and charged particle density of the thermosphere from different perspectives which are, for instance, based on pure physical or (semi) empirical models as well as data assimilative approaches combining available models with new set of observations. The thermospheric neutral density, for instance, plays a crucial role within the equation of motion of Earth orbiting objects at low altitudes since the drag force is one of the largest non-gravitational perturbations and a function of the thermospheric integral density. Besides, the density estimation is of critical consideration for re-entry operations, manoeuvre planning, collision avoidance, precise orbit determination (POD) and satellite lifetime planning. There exist several empirical thermospheric models, which have been used in satellite orbit determination, e.g. the JB2008 or the DTM2013 model. They all include different gas species and provide thermospheric temperature and density as functions of the instantaneous position in altitude, latitude and longitude, as well as the local solar time, solar and geomagnetic storm indices and the harmonics of the year's fraction. In this contribution we study the global spatial and temporal behaviour of the thermospheric density provided by the models JB2008 or the DTM2013. Based on these insights we set up a concept for an empirical model of the thermospheric density. In the future step appropriate model parameters will be estimated from high precise satellite laser ranging observations. This work is related to the DFG project INSIGHT (Interactions of Low

  13. Musical intervention enhances infants’ neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T. Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants’ neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants’ neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants’ neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants’ ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing. PMID:27114512

  14. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-05-10

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants' neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants' neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants' neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants' ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing.

  15. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  16. The Structural Biology of Muscle: Spatial and Temporal Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kenneth C.

    Understanding muscle contraction has resulted from the synergy of a ­number of approaches for which structure has provided an integrating framework. Nearly 60 years ago interference and phase contrast light microscopy established the sliding filament model of muscle contraction. A little later H.E. Huxley exploited electron microscopy to visualize the macromolecular architecture of the sarcomere: the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments with connecting myosin cross-bridges. These observations allowed him to outline a structural basis for muscle contraction: a rowing-like progression of the myosin cross-bridges along the actin filament. X-ray fibre diffraction from insect flight muscle first demonstrated that the cross-bridges could indeed take up two configurations that might represent the ends of an active stroke. Later intense X-ray synchrotron radiation allowed the recording of the movements of the cross-bridges during a contraction with high precision. In 1993 Rayments's group ushered in a much more detailed understanding of myosin function by solving the structure of the myosin cross-bridge by X-ray crystallography. It showed that the cross-bridge consists of a large catalytic domain, often called the motor domain, containing the ATP binding site and the actin binding site. At the C-terminus of the motor domain is a long lever arm. The catalytic mechanism is similar to the G-proteins: the active site contains a P-loop and switch 1 and switch 2 elements. The lever arm was later found in two different conformations (so called pre-power-stroke and post-rigor) showing how switch 2 movement is coupled to a swing of the lever arm. Further crystallographic studies coupled with high resolution em reconstructions of decorated actin (the rigor complex) showed how ATP binding sequesters switch 1 thereby opening the large cleft in the motor domain and breaking the strong binding to actin. Conversely, the strong binding to actin causes a movement of switch 1 with

  17. Gender and hemispheric differences in temporal lobe epilepsy: a VBM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Teresa Castilho Garcia; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Britto, Fernanda Dos Santos; Sandim, Gabriel Barbosa; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    Gender differences are recognized in the functional and anatomical organization of the human brain. Differences between genders are probably expressed early in life, when differential rates of cerebral maturation occur. Sexual dimorphism has been described in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Several voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have shown that TLE-MTS extends beyond mesial temporal structures, and that there are differences in the extent of anatomical damage between hemispheres, although none have approached gender differences. Our aim was to investigate gender differences and anatomical abnormalities in TLE-MTS. VBM5 was employed to analyze gender and hemispheric differences in 120 patients with TLE-MTS and 50 controls. VBM abnormalities were more widespread in left-TLE; while in women changes were mostly seen in temporal areas, frontal regions were more affected in men. Our study confirmed that gender and laterality are important factors determining the nature and severity of brain damage in TLE-MTS. Differential rates of maturation between gender and hemispheres may explain the distinct areas of anatomical damage in men and women. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Deciphering structural and temporal interplays during the architectural development of mango trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambreville, Anaëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Trottier, Catherine; Guédon, Yann; Normand, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    Plant architecture is commonly defined by the adjacency of organs within the structure and their properties. Few studies consider the effect of endogenous temporal factors, namely phenological factors, on the establishment of plant architecture. This study hypothesized that, in addition to the effect of environmental factors, the observed plant architecture results from both endogenous structural and temporal components, and their interplays. Mango tree, which is characterized by strong phenological asynchronisms within and between trees and by repeated vegetative and reproductive flushes during a growing cycle, was chosen as a plant model. During two consecutive growing cycles, this study described vegetative and reproductive development of 20 trees submitted to the same environmental conditions. Four mango cultivars were considered to assess possible cultivar-specific patterns. Integrative vegetative and reproductive development models incorporating generalized linear models as components were built. These models described the occurrence, intensity, and timing of vegetative and reproductive development at the growth unit scale. This study showed significant interplays between structural and temporal components of plant architectural development at two temporal scales. Within a growing cycle, earliness of bud burst was highly and positively related to earliness of vegetative development and flowering. Between growing cycles, flowering growth units delayed vegetative development compared to growth units that did not flower. These interplays explained how vegetative and reproductive phenological asynchronisms within and between trees were generated and maintained. It is suggested that causation networks involving structural and temporal components may give rise to contrasted tree architectures.

  19. Modeling Temporal Structure in Music for Emotion Prediction using Pairwise Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Larsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    such as emotions, genre, and similarity. This paper addresses the specific hypothesis whether temporal information is essential for predicting expressed emotions in music, as a prototypical example of a cognitive aspect of music. We propose to test this hypothesis using a novel processing pipeline: 1) Extracting......The temporal structure of music is essential for the cognitive processes related to the emotions expressed in music. However, such temporal information is often disregarded in typical Music Information Retrieval modeling tasks of predicting higher-level cognitive or semantic aspects of music...... choice self-report paradigm, used for eliciting expressed emotions in music. The methods are evaluated using two data sets and show increased predictive performance using temporal information, thus supporting the overall hypothesis....

  20. Hierarchical organization in the temporal structure of infant-direct speech and song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Simone; Kello, Christopher T

    2017-06-01

    Caregivers alter the temporal structure of their utterances when talking and singing to infants compared with adult communication. The present study tested whether temporal variability in infant-directed registers serves to emphasize the hierarchical temporal structure of speech. Fifteen German-speaking mothers sang a play song and told a story to their 6-months-old infants, or to an adult. Recordings were analyzed using a recently developed method that determines the degree of nested clustering of temporal events in speech. Events were defined as peaks in the amplitude envelope, and clusters of various sizes related to periods of acoustic speech energy at varying timescales. Infant-directed speech and song clearly showed greater event clustering compared with adult-directed registers, at multiple timescales of hundreds of milliseconds to tens of seconds. We discuss the relation of this newly discovered acoustic property to temporal variability in linguistic units and its potential implications for parent-infant communication and infants learning the hierarchical structures of speech and language. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of Dynamic Mode Decomposition: Temporal Evolution of Flow Structures in an Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlin, William; Yu, Paulo; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2017-11-01

    An aneurysm is an enlargement of a weakened arterial wall that can be fatal or debilitating on rupture. Aneurysm hemodynamics is integral to developing an understanding of aneurysm formation, growth, and rupture. The flow in an aneurysm exhibits complex fluid dynamics behavior due to an inherent unsteady inflow condition and its interactions with large-scale flow structures present in the aneurysm. The objective of this study is to identify the large-scale structures in the aneurysm, study temporal behavior, and quantify their interaction with the inflow condition. For this purpose, detailed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed at the center plane of an idealized aneurysm model for a range of inflow conditions. Inflow conditions were precisely controlled using a ViVitro SuperPump system. Dynamic Modal Decomposition (DMD) of the velocity field was used to identify coherent structures and their temporal behavior. DMD was successful in capturing the large-scale flow structures and their temporal behavior. A low dimensional approximation to the flow field was obtained with the most relevant dynamic modes and was used to obtain temporal information about the coherent structures and their interaction with the inflow, formation, evolution, and growth.

  2. The effect of temporal structure on rustling-sound detection in the gleaning bat, Megaderma lyra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M; Wiegrebe, L

    2003-05-01

    For a gleaning bat hunting prey from the ground, rustling sounds generated by prey movements are essential to invoke a hunting behaviour. The detection of prey-generated rustling sounds may depend heavily on the time structure of the prey-generated and the masking sounds due to their spectral similarity. Here, we systematically investigate the effect of the temporal structure on psychophysical rustling-sound detection in the gleaning bat, Megaderma lyra. A recorded rustling sound serves as the signal; the maskers are either Gaussian noise or broadband noise with various degrees of envelope fluctuations. Exploratory experiments indicate that the selective manipulation of the temporal structure of the rustling sound does not influence its detection in a Gaussian-noise masker. The results of the main experiment show, however, that the temporal structure of the masker has a strong and systematic effect on rustling-sound detection: When the width of irregularly spaced gaps in the masker exceeded about 0.3 ms, rustling-sound detection improved monotonically with increasing gap duration. Computer simulations of this experiment reveal that a combined detection strategy of spectral and temporal analysis underlies rustling-sound detection with fluctuating masking sounds.

  3. Monitoring Structural Health of Different Types of Bridges Using Advanced Multi-Temporal InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaoqiong; Liao, Mingsheng; Yang, Mengshi; Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo

    2016-08-01

    Since the bridges paly a significance role in national economic development and transportation safety, the structure health and safety of bridges aroused a lot of concern in society and become a hotspot research in earth observation and civil engineering. However, the materials degradation and environmental stresses increase may destroy the structure of bridges and pose significant risks to public safety and quality of life. This highlighted the importance of developing effective structure health monitoring strategies to reflect the current status of bridges and identify structural problems. In this work, an advanced multi-temporal InSAR technique is introduced into deformation monitoring of bridges. We focus on analysis the distribution of PSs, distinction of stable and unstable parts and recognition temporal-spatial deformation characteristics at the scale of single bridge through the examples of different types of bridges in Tianjin and Shanghai.

  4. A mandibular third molar with three mesial roots: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca

    2008-02-01

    Although its most common configuration is 2 roots and 3 root canals, mandibular molars might have many different combinations. A case of unusual root canal morphology is presented to demonstrate anatomic variations in mandibular molars. Endodontic therapy was performed in a mandibular third molar with 3 separate mesial roots. The appearance of the pulp chamber floor revealed 4 separate canal orifices. Radiographically the 4 root canals ended in their own distinct foramen. Many reports deal with 3 orifices or 3 independent canals in the mesial root, but none described 3 mesial canals in 3 separate mesial roots, indicating a rare anatomic configuration. This report points out the importance of looking for additional canals and unusual canal morphology, because knowledge of their existence might occasionally enable clinicians to treat a case successfully that otherwise might have ended in failure.

  5. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Retreatment of a 6-Canalled Mandibular First Molar with Four Mesial Canals: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Ghabraei, Sholeh; Bolhari, Behnam; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment requires adequate knowledge regarding morphologic variations in root canal system of teeth. This report describes a six-canalled mandibular first molar with four mesial root canals requiring endodontic retreatment. The two additional canals in the mesial root were found during retreatment with the aid of illumination and magnification. In conclusion, the possibility of atypical morphology and additional canals should never be overlooked.

  7. Grasping the mechanisms of narratives' incoherence in schizophrenia: an analysis of the temporal structure of patients' life story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allé, M C; Gandolphe, M-C; Doba, K; Köber, C; Potheegadoo, J; Coutelle, R; Habermas, T; Nandrino, J-L; Danion, J-M; Berna, F

    2016-08-01

    Life narratives of patients with schizophrenia are characterized by impaired coherence so that the listener has often difficulties to grasp the life trajectory of the patients. In order to better understand what causes this reduced temporal coherence, we investigated the temporal structure of patients' life narratives through different temporal narrative elements (elaboration of beginnings and endings, local temporal indicators and temporal deviations from a linear order), across two complementary studies. Life narratives were collected by means of two different methods; a free recall in study 1 and a more structured protocol, aiming at reducing the cognitive task demands in study 2. All narratives from the two studies were analyzed using the same validated method. Both studies showed that global temporal coherence is significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia (ps.02). This is mainly due to their stronger tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order without marking the deviation as such. We also observed significant correlations in the patient groups between global temporal coherence and executive dysfunction (p=.008) or their higher tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order in their life narratives (p<.001). These results shed light on narrative correlates of temporal narrative incoherence in schizophrenia and highlight the central role of executive dysfunction in this incoherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Daily temporal structure in African savanna flower visitation networks and consequences for network sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Katherine C R; Memmott, Jane; Ruiz-Guajardo, Juan Carlos; Roze, Denis; Stone, Graham N

    2011-03-01

    Ecological interaction networks are a valuable approach to understanding plant-pollinator interactions at the community level. Highly structured daily activity patterns are a feature of the biology of many flower visitors, particularly provisioning female bees, which often visit different floral sources at different times. Such temporal structure implies that presence/absence and relative abundance of specific flower-visitor interactions (links) in interaction networks may be highly sensitive to the daily timing of data collection. Further, relative timing of interactions is central to their possible role in competition or facilitation of seed set among coflowering plants sharing pollinators. To date, however, no study has examined the network impacts of daily temporal variation in visitor activity at a community scale. Here we use temporally structured sampling to examine the consequences of daily activity patterns upon network properties using fully quantified flower-visitor interaction data for a Kenyan savanna habitat. Interactions were sampled at four sequential three-hour time intervals between 06:00 and 18:00, across multiple seasonal time points for two sampling sites. In all data sets the richness and relative abundance of links depended critically on when during the day visitation was observed. Permutation-based null modeling revealed significant temporal structure across daily time intervals at three of the four seasonal time points, driven primarily by patterns in bee activity. This sensitivity of network structure shows the need to consider daily time in network sampling design, both to maximize the probability of sampling links relevant to plant reproductive success and to facilitate appropriate interpretation of interspecific relationships. Our data also suggest that daily structuring at a community level could reduce indirect competitive interactions when coflowering plants share pollinators, as is commonly observed during flowering in highly

  9. Neuropsychological deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most prevalent form of complex partial seizures with temporal lobe origin of electrical abnormality. Studies have shown that recurrent seizures affect all aspects of cognitive functioning, including memory, language, praxis, executive functions, and social judgment, among several others. In this article, we will review these cognitive impairments along with their neuropathological correlates in a comprehensive manner. We will see that neuropsychological deficits are prevalent in TLE. Much of the effort has been laid on memory due to the notion that temporal lobe brain structures involved in TLE play a central role in consolidating information into memory. It seems that damage to the mesial structure of the temporal lobe, particularly the amygdale and hippocampus, has the main role in these memory difficulties and the neurobiological plausibility of the role of the temporal lobe in different aspects of memory. Here, we will cover the sub-domains of working memory and episodic memory deficits. This is we will further proceed to evaluate the evidences of executive function deficits in TLE and will see that set-shifting among other EFs is specifically affected in TLE as is social cognition. Finally, critical components of language related deficits are also found in the form of word-finding difficulties. To conclude, TLE affects several of cognitive function domains, but the etiopathogenesis of all these dysfunctions remain elusive. Further well-designed studies are needed for a better understanding of these disorders.

  10. Contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure across lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M; Thomas, Michael S C; Filippi, Roberto; Harth, Helen; Price, Cathy J

    2010-05-01

    Using behavioral, structural, and functional imaging techniques, we demonstrate contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure in 47 healthy volunteers who ranged in age from 7 to 73 years. In the left posterior supramarginal gyrus, vocabulary knowledge was positively correlated with gray matter density in teenagers but not adults. This region was not activated during auditory or visual sentence processing, and activation was unrelated to vocabulary skills. Its gray matter density may reflect the use of an explicit learning strategy that links new words to lexical or conceptual equivalents, as used in formal education and second language acquisition. By contrast, in left posterior temporal regions, gray matter as well as auditory and visual sentence activation correlated with vocabulary knowledge throughout lifespan. We propose that these effects reflect the acquisition of vocabulary through context, when new words are learnt within the context of semantically and syntactically related words.

  11. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Brian C. J.; S?k, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated h...

  12. Temporal structure and gain/loss asymmetry for real and artificial stock indices

    OpenAIRE

    Siven, Johannes Vitalis; Lins, Jeffrey Todd

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the gain/loss asymmetry observed for stock indices vanishes if the temporal dependence structure is destroyed by scrambling the time series. We also show that an artificial index constructed by a simple average of a number of individual stocks display gain/loss asymmetry - this allows us to explicitly analyze the dependence between the index constituents. We consider mutual information and correlation based measures and show that the stock returns indeed have a higher degr...

  13. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  14. Analysis in temporal regime of dispersive invisible structures designed from transformation optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralak, B.; Arismendi, G.; Avril, B.; Diatta, A.; Guenneau, S.

    2016-03-01

    A simple invisible structure made of two anisotropic homogeneous layers is analyzed theoretically in temporal regime. The frequency dispersion is introduced and analytic expression of the transient part of the field is derived for large times when the structure is illuminated by a causal excitation. This expression shows that the limiting amplitude principle applies with transient fields decaying as the power -3 /4 of the time. The quality of the cloak is then reduced at short times and remains preserved at large times. The one-dimensional theoretical analysis is supplemented with full-wave numerical simulations in two-dimensional situations which confirm the effect of dispersion.

  15. Do temporal changes in vegetation structure additional to time since fire predict changes in bird occurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, David B; Candy, Steven G; MacGregor, Christopher I; Banks, Sam C; Westgate, Martin; Ikin, Karen; Pierson, Jennifer; Tulloch, Ayesha; Barton, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Fire is a major ecological process in ecosystems globally. Its impacts on fauna can be both direct (e.g., mortality) and indirect (e.g., altered habitat), resulting in population recovery being driven by several possible mechanisms. Separating direct from indirect impacts of fire on faunal population recovery can be valuable in guiding management of biodiversity in fire-prone environments. However, resolving the influence of direct and indirect processes remains a key challenge because many processes affecting fauna can change concomitantly with time since fire. We explore the mechanisms influencing bird response to fire by posing the question, can temporal changes in vegetation structure predict changes in bird occurrence on sites, and can these be separated from other temporal changes using the surrogate of time since fire? We conducted a 12-yr study of bird and vegetation responses to fire at 124 sites across six vegetation classes in Booderee National Park, Australia. Approximately half of these sites, established in 2002, were burned by a large (>3000 ha) wildfire in 2003. To disentangle collinear effects of temporal changes in vegetation and direct demographic effects on population recovery that are subsumed by time since fire, we incorporated both longitudinal and cross-sectional vegetation effects in addition to time since fire within logistic structural equation models. We identified temporal changes in vegetation structure and richness of plant and bird species that characterized burned and unburned sites in all vegetation classes. For nine bird species, a significant component of the year trend was driven by temporal trends in one of three vegetation variables (number of understory or midstory plant species, or midstory cover). By contrast, we could not separate temporal effects between time since fire and vegetation attributes for bird species richness, reporting rate, and the occurrence of 11 other bird species. Our findings help identify species for

  16. Impaired hippocampal rhythmogenesis in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dugladze, T.; Vida, I.; Tort, A.B.; Gross, A.; Otáhal, Jakub; Heinemann, U.; Kopell, N.J.; Gloveli, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 44 (2007), s. 17530-17535 ISSN 0027-8424 Grant - others:-(BR) 201038/2005-6; -(XE) FP6Epicure; -(DE) TR3/B5; -(US) R01NS46058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : interneurons * oscillations * patch- clamp Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 9.598, year: 2007

  17. Deviations of Mesial Root Canals of Mandibular First Molar Teeth at the Apical Third: A Micro-computed Tomographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Ali; Keskin, Cangül

    2018-04-19

    The present study aimed to quantitatively analyze apical foramen deviations of mesial root canals of mandibular first molar teeth by means of micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging. Micro-CT images of the mesial roots of 109 mandibular first molar teeth with independent mesiobuccal (MB) and mesiolingual (ML) root canals were analyzed. The deviations of the apical foramina of the MB, ML, and middle mesial root canals from the anatomic apex were measured. The vertical distance between the apical foramina of each mesial root canal in relation to each other was also calculated. The distances from the apical foramina of the MB, ML, and middle mesial root canals to the anatomic apex of the mesial root were up to 2.51 mm, 3.21 mm, and 5.67 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference between the deviations of MB and ML root canals from each other (P > .05). The middle mesial root canal showed the greatest deviation compared with the MB and ML canals (P < .05). The apical foramina of mesial root canals of mandibular first molar teeth showed greater variations from each other and anatomic apices than previously reported. Clinically, the use of electronic apex locators for the detection of minor apical foramen of each mesial root canal is of the utmost important. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Temporal Analysis of Bacterioplankton Community Structure in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, K. T.; Moss, J. A.; Snyder, R.; Henriksson, N. L.; Jeffrey, W. H.

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria are found in all oceans around the globe and are vital to many processes in the ocean. Evidence shows that bacteria are a dominant taxa in the marine environment with both abundance and contribution to the biological processes. Resource availability and environmental parameters are both key factors in determining bacterioplankton growth and community structure. Understanding temporal changes in the microbial community structure in the Gulf of Mexico has the potential to shed new light on the transfer of energy into and out of the system as well as through higher trophic levels. A two-year seasonal study was conducted at a station 40 km south of Choctawhatchee Bay on the Florida Shelf in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico. Water column samples were collected from surface and bottom waters ( 90 m) and mid-water deep chlorophyll maxima when present. In addition to microbial diversity, chemical, physical, and biological environmental parameters such as production, nutrients, temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a, and bacterial counts were also taken. 16S rDNA clone libraries were used to analyze temporal patterns and community structure of bacteria at fourteen timepoints and compared to the environmental data. Community structure patterns were seasonal in nature. The primary factors driving community structure are under statistical analyses.

  19. Esthetic perception of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis treatment by canine mesialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Antonino; Pinho, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate perception of the smile in maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) cases treated by mesialization of a canine. Nine images were digitally modified from the same frontal intraoral photograph to simulate various treatment options for space closure in MLIA. A questionnaire was submitted to laypersons (303), general dentists (215), prosthodontists (55) and orthodontists (81). Statistical tests with a significance level of Pdental and gingival reshaping. All study groups considered the simple dental reshaping of the mesial edge of the canine to be attractive. In the analysis of the images grouped together for both unilateral and bilateral MLIA, the view showing dental and gingival reshaping was considered the most attractive whereas unmodified mesialization was considered the least attractive. Regarding the space closure treatments, although all groups regarded simple dental reshaping of the canine to be attractive, the dental professionals considered gingival and crown reshaping to be more esthetic. In contrast, laypersons were not significantly responsive to this dental and gingival modification as compared to only slight reshaping of the mesial edge of the cusp of the mesialized canine in MLIA. Copyright © 2015 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal and spatial influences incur reconfiguration of Arctic heathland soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard; Saetnan, Eli R; Scullion, John; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Ostle, Nick; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-06-01

    Microbial responses to Arctic climate change could radically alter the stability of major stores of soil carbon. However, the sensitivity of plot-scale experiments simulating climate change effects on Arctic heathland soils to potential confounding effects of spatial and temporal changes in soil microbial communities is unknown. Here, the variation in heathland soil bacterial communities at two survey sites in Sweden between spring and summer 2013 and at scales between 0-1 m and, 1-100 m and between sites (> 100 m) were investigated in parallel using 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP and amplicon sequencing. T-RFLP did not reveal spatial structuring of communities at scales structuring effects may not confound comparison between plot-scale treatments, temporal change is a significant influence. Moreover, the prominence of two temporally exclusive keystone taxa suggests that the stability of Arctic heathland soil bacterial communities could be disproportionally influenced by seasonal perturbations affecting individual taxa. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Stability of modularity and structural keystone species in temporal cumulative plant- flower-visitor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2012-01-01

    types of topological roles in a network, based on patterns of within and between-module links: Hubs are highly connected species; peripherals interact with few species, mainly within their own module; and connectors have few interactions, too, but link across modules. We observed interactions between......Modularity is a structural property of ecological networks, which has received much interest, but has been poorly explored. Modules are distinct subsets of species interacting strongly with each other, but sparsely with species outside the subset. Using a series of temporal cumulative networks, we...... investigated the stability of modular organization of pollination networks to temporal scaling. To test for modularity, we used the method ‘functional cartography by simulated annealing’ (Guimera` and Amaral, 2005a,b), a stochastic optimization technique. Modules are detected, and species classified into three...

  2. Structured Spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable...

  3. Structured spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable...

  4. Detecting the Community Structure and Activity Patterns of Temporal Networks: A Non-Negative Tensor Factorization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Panisson, André; Cattuto, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of temporal network data is calling for more research on extracting and characterizing mesoscopic structures in temporal networks and on relating such structure to specific functions or properties of the system. An outstanding challenge is the extension of the results achieved for static networks to time-varying networks, where the topological structure of the system and the temporal activity patterns of its components are intertwined. Here we investigate the use of a latent factor decomposition technique, non-negative tensor factorization, to extract the community-activity structure of temporal networks. The method is intrinsically temporal and allows to simultaneously identify communities and to track their activity over time. We represent the time-varying adjacency matrix of a temporal network as a three-way tensor and approximate this tensor as a sum of terms that can be interpreted as communities of nodes with an associated activity time series. We summarize known computational techniques for tensor decomposition and discuss some quality metrics that can be used to tune the complexity of the factorized representation. We subsequently apply tensor factorization to a temporal network for which a ground truth is available for both the community structure and the temporal activity patterns. The data we use describe the social interactions of students in a school, the associations between students and school classes, and the spatio-temporal trajectories of students over time. We show that non-negative tensor factorization is capable of recovering the class structure with high accuracy. In particular, the extracted tensor components can be validated either as known school classes, or in terms of correlated activity patterns, i.e., of spatial and temporal coincidences that are determined by the known school activity schedule. PMID:24497935

  5. Impaired perception of temporal fine structure and musical timbre in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Joseph; Cantarero, Gabriela; Elhilali, Mounya; Limb, Charles J

    2011-10-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users demonstrate severe limitations in perceiving musical timbre, a psychoacoustic feature of sound responsible for 'tone color' and one's ability to identify a musical instrument. The reasons for this limitation remain poorly understood. In this study, we sought to examine the relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure for timbre judgments, in light of the fact that speech processing strategies employed by CI systems typically employ envelope extraction algorithms. We synthesized "instrumental chimeras" that systematically combined variable amounts of envelope and fine structure in 25% increments from two different source instruments with either sustained or percussive envelopes. CI users and normal hearing (NH) subjects were presented with 150 chimeras and asked to determine which instrument the chimera more closely resembled in a single-interval two-alternative forced choice task. By combining instruments with similar and dissimilar envelopes, we controlled the valence of envelope for timbre identification and compensated for envelope reconstruction from fine structure information. Our results show that NH subjects utilize envelope and fine structure interchangeably, whereas CI subjects demonstrate overwhelming reliance on temporal envelope. When chimeras were created from dissimilar envelope instrument pairs, NH subjects utilized a combination of envelope (p = 0.008) and fine structure information (p = 0.009) to make timbre judgments. In contrast, CI users utilized envelope information almost exclusively to make timbre judgments (p < 0.001) and ignored fine structure information (p = 0.908). Interestingly, when the value of envelope as a cue was reduced, both NH subjects and CI users utilized fine structure information to make timbre judgments (p < 0.001), although the effect was quite weak in CI users. Our findings confirm that impairments in fine structure processing underlie poor perception of musical timbre in CI

  6. Stability and dynamics of spatio-temporal structures. Progress report, September 15, 1993--September 14, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riecke, H.

    1994-05-01

    Goal is to contribute to understanding of localized spatial and spatio-temporal structures far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we report on our progress in the study of three classes of systems. (1) We have studied cellular flame structures arising in a circular burner. Using numerical computations we have found a number of traveling-wave structures in which different cells undergo different motion. Most strikingly, we have found a localized wave traveling through the array of steady cells. Results are interpreted using various asymptotic approaches. They are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. (2) We have continued our investigation of localized waves in binary-mixture convection. Starting from the extended Ginzburg-Landau equations introduced earlier, we have derived equations of motion for interacting fronts connecting the conductive and the convective state. These equations reveal a repulsive interaction between the fronts which implies a new localization mechanism for waves. It is solely due to the long-wavelength mode specific to the extended Ginzburg-Landau equations. The stability properties of the resulting localized waves are in qualitative agreement with very recent experiments. (3) We have extended our investigation of domain structures to include their temporal evolution.

  7. The Auckland volcanic field, New Zealand: Geophysical evidence for structural and spatio-temporal relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, John; Locke, Corinne A.

    2010-08-01

    Geophysical data from the monogenetic Auckland volcanic field reveal complex structural and spatio-temporal relationships at different scales. The volcanic field is coincident with regional magnetic and gravity anomalies that mark a major crustal suture and with a discontinuity marking a significant structural asperity. Here, the linear regional magnetic anomaly splays into a wide band of NNW-trending lineaments, arising from serpentinised shear zones in the upper crust, that matches the extent of the volcanic field and that may reflect a region of crustal weakness creating preferential permeability. However, there appears to be no simple correlation between the locations of individual vents and these lineaments that might delineate more shallow structural controls with this orientation, probably as a consequence of other structural influences. High-resolution aeromagnetic data over the volcanic field show that the volcanoes have a wide range of magnetic signatures indicating a variability of subsurface structure. Scoria cone volcanoes typically have strong anomalies (up to several 100 nT) whilst tuff-ring volcanoes typically have weak anomalies (less than 50 nT), though the surface geology is not always an indicator of the nature and extent of the subsurface deposits. Both cone and tuff-ring volcanoes in the Auckland field appear to be underlain by subsurface bowl-shaped bodies of basalt, implying that their eruption histories commonly involve lava ponding into early excavated craters. The present geophysical data give no evidence for subsurface dyke-like structures or for substantial near-surface volumes of basaltic rocks where there are no known eruption centres or buried flows. Aeromagnetic and palaeomagnetic data suggest that a number of adjacent vents with an implied structural linkage may be contemporaneous, though other examples occur where vents of clearly different ages exploit the same apparent structure. A unique feature of the Auckland field is that at

  8. Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalonis, Ioannis; Christidi, Foteini; Artemiadis, Artemios; Psarros, Constantinos; Papadopoulos, George; Tsivgoulis, George; Gatzonis, Stergios; Siatouni, Anna; Velonakis, Georgios; Karavasilis, Efstratios; Kararizou, Evangelia; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos

    2017-06-01

    Clinicians commonly use verbal and nonverbal measures to test fluency in patients with epilepsy, either during routine cognitive assessment or as part of pre- and postsurgical evaluation. We hypothesized that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis would perform worse than patients with lateral TLE in both verbal and design fluency. We assessed semantic, phonemic, and nonverbal fluency in 49 patients with TLE: 31 with lateral TLE and 18 with mesial TLE plus hippocampal sclerosis. We also gave non-fluency cognitive measures: psychomotor speed, attentional set shifting, selective attention, abstract reasoning, verbal and visual episodic memory, and incidental memory. Patients with mesial TLE performed significantly worse on figural fluency than patients with lateral TLE. Even though group differences on verbal fluency measures were not significant, the patients with mesial TLE had a pattern of poorer performance. The patients with mesial TLE scored significantly worse on measures of selective attention, verbal episodic memory, and incidental memory. Our study underlines differences in cognitive function between patients with mesial and lateral TLE, particularly in figural fluency. Although we cannot directly assess the role of the hippocampus in cognitive aspects of creative and divergent thinking related to figural fluency, the cognitive discrepancies between these two TLE groups could be ascribed to the mesial TLE hippocampal pathology shown in our study and addressed in the literature on hippocampal involvement in divergent thinking. Our findings could benefit cognitive rehabilitation programs tailored to the needs of patients with TLE.

  9. Spatial-temporal structure of mixing-interface turbulence at two large river confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsoer, K. M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Johnson, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Flow convergence at stream confluences produces some of the most highly turbulent locations in fluvial systems. The shear layer/mixing interface that develops within the confluence hydrodynamic zone (CHZ) is characterized by complex patterns of three-dimensional flow that varies both spatially and temporally. Although research has been performed on the flow dynamics of shallow mixing layers, the majority of studies have focused on experimental flumes and small stream confluences. In this paper the spatial and temporal variations of large-scale coherent turbulent structures for two large river confluences in Indiana and Illinois are examined. Flow data were obtained using two Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP); one stationary ADCP located at the upstream end of the mixing interface, and a second ADCP spaced at various locations downstream within the mixing interface. The use of ADCP allowed for three-dimensional flow velocities to be obtained for the entire water column. Time series analysis of flow velocities, temperature, and backscatter data were performed to examine the frequency characteristics and length-scales of large coherent turbulent structures. Results of these analyses show multiple scales of coherent turbulent structures superimposed on large-scale oscillations of the mixing interface as the momentum from the two confluent flows interact. The results also suggest that the momentum ratio between the two confluent flows and the confluence planform geometry are important factors influencing the hydrodynamics of stream confluences.

  10. Temporal structure in neuronal activity during working memory in Macaque parietal cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Pesaran, B; Sahami, M; Mitra, P; Andersen, R A

    2000-01-01

    A number of cortical structures are reported to have elevated single unit firing rates sustained throughout the memory period of a working memory task. How the nervous system forms and maintains these memories is unknown but reverberating neuronal network activity is thought to be important. We studied the temporal structure of single unit (SU) activity and simultaneously recorded local field potential (LFP) activity from area LIP in the inferior parietal lobe of two awake macaques during a memory-saccade task. Using multitaper techniques for spectral analysis, which play an important role in obtaining the present results, we find elevations in spectral power in a 50--90 Hz (gamma) frequency band during the memory period in both SU and LFP activity. The activity is tuned to the direction of the saccade providing evidence for temporal structure that codes for movement plans during working memory. We also find SU and LFP activity are coherent during the memory period in the 50--90 Hz gamma band and no consisten...

  11. Temporal variation in genetic diversity and population structure of Burlina cattle breed

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Maretto; Martino Cassandro

    2014-01-01

    We analysed the temporal variation of inbreeding, genetic variability and population structure in the Burlina (BUR) cattle breed. A total of 279 individuals were chosen for the analysis representing a period of 19 years (1991-2010) and analysed using 24 microsatellite markers. A total of 235 alleles were detected in the population with a mean of 9.79±3.91 alleles per locus. In the 19-year period, a stable pattern in the mean number of alleles was found. The mean observed heterozygosity was 0....

  12. Spatial and temporal variation in population genetic structure of wild Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) across Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of a species is challenging. It often depends not only on the past biogeographic and climatic events but also the contemporary and ecological factors, such as current connectivity and habitat heterogeneity. In fact, these factors might interact with each other and shape the current species distribution. However, to what extent the current population genetic structure reflects the past and the contemporary factors is largely unknown. Here we investigated spatio-temporal genetic structures of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) populations, across their natural distribution in Africa. While its large biogeographic distribution can cause genetic differentiation at the paleo-biogeographic scales, its restricted dispersal capacity might induce a strong genetic structure at micro-geographic scales. Results Using nine microsatellite loci and 350 samples from ten natural populations, we found the highest genetic differentiation among the three ichthyofaunal provinces and regions (Ethiopian, Nilotic and Sudano-Sahelian) (RST = 0.38 - 0.69). This result suggests the predominant effect of paleo-geographic events at macro-geographic scale. In addition, intermediate divergences were found between rivers and lakes within the regions, presumably reflecting relatively recent interruptions of gene flow between hydrographic basins (RST = 0.24 - 0.32). The lowest differentiations were observed among connected populations within a basin (RST = 0.015 in the Volta basin). Comparison of temporal sample series revealed subtle changes in the gene pools in a few generations (F = 0 - 0.053). The estimated effective population sizes were 23 - 143 and the estimated migration rate was moderate (m ~ 0.094 - 0.097) in the Volta populations. Conclusions This study revealed clear hierarchical patterns of the population genetic structuring of O. niloticus in Africa. The effects of paleo-geographic and climatic events were predominant at macro

  13. Spatial and temporal variation in population genetic structure of wild Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus across Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezault Etienne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of a species is challenging. It often depends not only on the past biogeographic and climatic events but also the contemporary and ecological factors, such as current connectivity and habitat heterogeneity. In fact, these factors might interact with each other and shape the current species distribution. However, to what extent the current population genetic structure reflects the past and the contemporary factors is largely unknown. Here we investigated spatio-temporal genetic structures of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus populations, across their natural distribution in Africa. While its large biogeographic distribution can cause genetic differentiation at the paleo-biogeographic scales, its restricted dispersal capacity might induce a strong genetic structure at micro-geographic scales. Results Using nine microsatellite loci and 350 samples from ten natural populations, we found the highest genetic differentiation among the three ichthyofaunal provinces and regions (Ethiopian, Nilotic and Sudano-Sahelian (RST = 0.38 - 0.69. This result suggests the predominant effect of paleo-geographic events at macro-geographic scale. In addition, intermediate divergences were found between rivers and lakes within the regions, presumably reflecting relatively recent interruptions of gene flow between hydrographic basins (RST = 0.24 - 0.32. The lowest differentiations were observed among connected populations within a basin (RST = 0.015 in the Volta basin. Comparison of temporal sample series revealed subtle changes in the gene pools in a few generations (F = 0 - 0.053. The estimated effective population sizes were 23 - 143 and the estimated migration rate was moderate (m ~ 0.094 - 0.097 in the Volta populations. Conclusions This study revealed clear hierarchical patterns of the population genetic structuring of O. niloticus in Africa. The effects of paleo-geographic and climatic events were

  14. Relations between frequency selectivity, temporal fine-structure processing, and speech reception in impaired hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Frequency selectivity, temporal fine-structure (TFS) processing, and speech reception were assessed for six normal-hearing (NH) listeners, ten sensorineurally hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with similar high-frequency losses, and two listeners with an obscure dysfunction (OD). TFS processing...... was investigated at low frequencies in regions of normal hearing, through measurements of binaural masked detection, tone lateralization, and monaural frequency modulation (FM) detection. Lateralization and FM detection thresholds were measured in quiet and in background noise. Speech reception thresholds were...... in a two-talker background and lateralized noise, but not in amplitude-modulated noise. The results provide constraints for future models of impaired auditory signal processing....

  15. On the genesis of spatio-temporal self-organized structures in plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talasman, S.J.; Sanduloviciu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The genesis of luminous sharply defined nearly spherical space charges structures formed in an Argon plasma column was experimental investigated. The results reveal spatio-temporal characteristics proper to systems resulting after a self-organization process. Their phenomenology involves electrical charges separation produced by symmetry breaking and spatial separation of the excitation and ionization cross sections functions in a region where electrons are accelerated and, as a result, the appearance of electrostatic forces that, acting as long range correlations, assures, together with dissipative effects, its stability. (Author) 8 Figs., 31 Refs

  16. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  17. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Temporal Control over Transient Chemical Systems using Structurally Diverse Chemical Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack L-Y; Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Prins, Leonard J

    2017-08-25

    The next generation of adaptive, intelligent chemical systems will rely on a continuous supply of energy to maintain the functional state. Such systems will require chemical methodology that provides precise control over the energy dissipation process, and thus, the lifetime of the transiently activated function. This manuscript reports on the use of structurally diverse chemical fuels to control the lifetime of two different systems under dissipative conditions: transient signal generation and the transient formation of self-assembled aggregates. The energy stored in the fuels is dissipated at different rates by an enzyme, which installs a dependence of the lifetime of the active system on the chemical structure of the fuel. In the case of transient signal generation, it is shown that different chemical fuels can be used to generate a vast range of signal profiles, allowing temporal control over two orders of magnitude. Regarding self-assembly under dissipative conditions, the ability to control the lifetime using different fuels turns out to be particularly important as stable aggregates are formed only at well-defined surfactant/fuel ratios, meaning that temporal control cannot be achieved by simply changing the fuel concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ancient DNA reveals temporal population structure within the South-Central Andes area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, M Gabriela; Mendisco, Fanny; Avena, Sergio A; Crespo, Cristian M; Arencibia, Valeria; Dejean, Cristina B; Seldes, Verónica

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of this work was to contribute to the knowledge of pre-Hispanic genetic variation and population structure among the South-central Andes Area by studying individuals from Quebrada de Humahuaca, North-western (NW) Argentina. We analyzed 15 autosomal STRs in 19 individuals from several archaeological sites in Quebrada de Humahuaca, belonging to the Regional Developments Period (900-1430 AD). Compiling autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosome data, we evaluated population structure and differentiation among eight South-central Andean groups from the current territories of NW Argentina and Peru. Autosomal data revealed a structuring of the analyzed populations into two clusters which seemed to represent different temporalities in the Andean pre-Hispanic history: pre-Inca and Inca. All pre-Inca samples fell into the same cluster despite being from the two different territories of NW Argentina and Peru. Also, they were systematically differentiated from the Peruvian Inca group. These results were mostly confirmed by mitochondrial and Y-chromosome analyses. We mainly found a clearly different haplotype composition between clusters. Population structure in South America has been mostly studied on current native groups, mainly showing a west-to-east differentiation between the Andean and lowland regions. Here we demonstrated that genetic population differentiation preceded the European contact and might have been more complex than thought, being found within the South-central Andes Area. Moreover, divergence among temporally different populations might be reflecting socio-political changes occurred in the evermore complex pre-Hispanic Andean societies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Peri-implant strain around mesially inclined two-implant-retained mandibular overdentures with Locator attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsyad, Moustafa A; Eltowery, Salem M; Gebreel, Ashraf A

    2017-12-27

    This study aimed to evaluate the peri-implant strain around mesially inclined implants used to retain mandibular overdentures with Locator resilient attachments. Four mandibular edentulous acrylic resin models received two implants in the canine areas with 0°, 5°, 10°, and 20° mesial inclinations. Overdentures were connected to the implants using Locator attachments. Pink nylon inserts (light retention) were used for all implant inclinations, and red inserts were used for 20° inclination (20°red). Four strain gages were bonded on the mesial (M), distal (D), buccal (B), and lingual (L) surfaces of each implant. Peri-implant strains were measured during bilateral and unilateral loading. The 20° inclination showed the highest strain, followed by 10° and 5°, and both 0° and 20°red presented with the lowest strain. Site D was associated with the highest strain, followed by M, B, and L, which showed the lowest strain values. Unilateral loading and the loading side presented with significantly higher strain values than bilateral loading and the nonloading side, respectively. Hence, in this study, strains around the two-implant-retained overdentures with Locator attachments increased with increases in mesial implant angulation, except when red male inserts were used.

  1. Transition of Temporal Scaling Behavior in Percolation Assisted Shear-branching Structure during Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingli; Chen, Cun; Wang, Gang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores the temporal scaling behavior induced shear-branching structure in response to variant temperatures and strain rates during plastic deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). The data analysis based on the compression tests suggests that there are two states of shear-branching structures: the fractal structure with a long-range order at an intermediate temperature of 223 K and a larger strain rate of 2.5 × 10-2 s-1 the disordered structure dominated at other temperature and strain rate. It can be deduced from the percolation theory that the compressive ductility, ec, can reach the maximum value at the intermediate temperature. Furthermore, a dynamical model involving temperature is given for depicting the shear-sliding process, reflecting the plastic deformation has fractal structure at the temperature of 223 K and strain rate of 2.5 × 10-2 s-1.

  2. The role of temporal fine structure information for the low pitch of high-frequency complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The fused low pitch evoked by complex tones containing only unresolved high-frequency components demonstrates the ability of the human auditory system to extract pitch using a temporal mechanism in the absence of spectral cues. However, the temporal features used by such a mechanism have been...... a matter of debate. For stimuli with components lying exclusively in high-frequency spectral regions, the slowly varying temporal envelope of sounds is often assumed to be the only information contained in auditory temporal representations, and it has remained controversial to what extent the fast...... amplitude fluctuations, or temporal fine structure (TFS), of the conveyed signal can be processed. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, the present study found that the low pitch of inharmonic transposed tones with unresolved components was consistent with the timing between the most prominent TFS maxima...

  3. Spatio-temporal structure, path characteristics and perceptual grouping in immediate serial spatial recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo De Lillo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immediate serial spatial recall measures the ability to retain sequences of locations in short-term memory and is considered the spatial equivalent of digit span. It is tested by requiring participants to reproduce sequences of movements performed by an experimenter or displayed on a monitor. Different organizational factors dramatically affect serial spatial recall but they are often confounded or underspecified. Untangling them is crucial for the characterization of working-memory models and for establishing the contribution of structure and memory capacity to spatial span. We report five experiments assessing the relative role and independence of factors that have been reported in the literature. Experiment 1 disentangled the effects of spatial clustering and path-length by manipulating the distance of items displayed on a touchscreen monitor. Long-path sequences segregated by spatial clusters were compared with short-path sequences not segregated by clusters. Recall was more accurate for sequences segregated by clusters independently from path-length. Experiment 2 featured conditions where temporal pauses were introduced between or within cluster boundaries during the presentation of sequences with the same paths. Thus, the temporal structure of the sequences was either consistent or inconsistent with a hierarchical representation based on segmentation by spatial clusters but the effect of structure could not be confounded with effects of path-characteristics. Pauses at cluster boundaries yielded more accurate recall, as predicted by a hierarchical model. In Experiment 3, the systematic manipulation of sequence structure, path-length and presence of path-crossings of sequences showed that structure explained most of the variance, followed by the presence/absence of path-crossings, and path-length. Experiments 4 and 5 replicated the results of the previous experiments in immersive virtual reality navigation tasks where the viewpoint of the

  4. Structural alterations of the superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia: Detailed subregional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, K; Matsuda, Y; Shimada, T; Yasuyama, T; Oshima, K; Sawai, K; Kihara, H; Nitta, Y; Okubo, H; Uehara, T; Kawasaki, Y

    2016-05-01

    Reduced gray matter volumes in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) have been reported in patients with schizophrenia. Such volumetric abnormalities might denote alterations in cortical thickness, surface area, local gyrification or all of these factors. The STG can be anatomically divided into five subregions using automatic parcellation in FreeSurfer: lateral aspect of the STG, anterior transverse temporal gyrus of Heschl gyrus (HG), planum polare (PP) of the STG, planum temporale (PT) of the STG and transverse temporal sulcus. We acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3T scans from 40 age- and sex-matched patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy subjects, and the scans were automatically processed using FreeSurfer. General linear models were used to assess group differences in regional volumes and detailed thickness, surface area and local gyrification. As expected, patients with schizophrenia had significantly smaller bilateral STG volumes than healthy subjects. Of the five subregions in the STG, patients with schizophrenia showed significantly and marginally reduced volumes in the lateral aspect of the STG and PT of the STG bilaterally compared with healthy subjects. The volumetric alteration in bilateral lateral STG was derived from both the cortical thickness and surface area but not local gyrification. There was no significant laterality of the alteration in the lateral STG between patients and controls and no correlation among the structures and clinical characteristics. These findings suggest that of five anatomical subregions in the STG, the lateral STG is one of the most meaningful regions for brain pathophysiology in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Discriminant features and temporal structure of nonmanuals in American Sign Language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Fabian Benitez-Quiroz

    Full Text Available To fully define the grammar of American Sign Language (ASL, a linguistic model of its nonmanuals needs to be constructed. While significant progress has been made to understand the features defining ASL manuals, after years of research, much still needs to be done to uncover the discriminant nonmanual components. The major barrier to achieving this goal is the difficulty in correlating facial features and linguistic features, especially since these correlations may be temporally defined. For example, a facial feature (e.g., head moves down occurring at the end of the movement of another facial feature (e.g., brows moves up, may specify a Hypothetical conditional, but only if this time relationship is maintained. In other instances, the single occurrence of a movement (e.g., brows move up can be indicative of the same grammatical construction. In the present paper, we introduce a linguistic-computational approach to efficiently carry out this analysis. First, a linguistic model of the face is used to manually annotate a very large set of 2,347 videos of ASL nonmanuals (including tens of thousands of frames. Second, a computational approach is used to determine which features of the linguistic model are more informative of the grammatical rules under study. We used the proposed approach to study five types of sentences--Hypothetical conditionals, Yes/no questions, Wh-questions, Wh-questions postposed, and Assertions--plus their polarities--positive and negative. Our results verify several components of the standard model of ASL nonmanuals and, most importantly, identify several previously unreported features and their temporal relationship. Notably, our results uncovered a complex interaction between head position and mouth shape. These findings define some temporal structures of ASL nonmanuals not previously detected by other approaches.

  6. Population fragmentation leads to spatial and temporal genetic structure in the endangered Spanish imperial eagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cruz, B; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J

    2007-02-01

    The fragmentation of a population may have important consequences for population genetic diversity and structure due to the effects of genetic drift and reduced gene flow. We studied the genetic consequences of the fragmentation of the Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) population into small patches through a temporal analysis. Thirty-four museum individuals representing the population predating the fragmentation were analysed for a 345-bp segment of the mitochondrial control region and a set of 10 nuclear microsatellite loci. Data from a previous study on the current population (N = 79) were re-analysed for this subset of 10 microsatellite markers and results compared to those obtained from the historical sample. Three shared mitochondrial haplotypes were found in both populations, although fluctuations in haplotype frequencies and the occurrence of a fourth haplotype in the historical population resulted in lower current levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity. However, microsatellite markers revealed undiminished levels of nuclear diversity. No evidence for genetic structure was observed for the historical Spanish imperial eagle population, suggesting that the current pattern of structure is the direct consequence of population fragmentation. Temporal fluctuations in mitochondrial and microsatellite allelic frequencies were found between the historical and the current population as well as for each pairwise comparison between historical and current Centro and historical and current Parque Nacional de Doñana nuclei. Our results indicate an ancestral panmictic situation for the species that management policies should aim to restore. A historical analysis like the one taken here provides the baseline upon which the relative role of recent drift in shaping current genetic patterns in endangered species can be evaluated and this knowledge is used to guide conservation actions.

  7. Structural Neuroimaging of the Medial Temporal Lobe in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-González, Manuel; de Celis Alonso, Benito; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTA) is being used as a criterion to support a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are several structural neuroimaging approaches for quantifying MTA, including semiquantitative visual rating scales, volumetry (3D), planimetry (2D), and linear measures (1D). Current applications of structural neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease clinical trials (ADCTs) incorporate it as a tool for improving the selection of subjects for enrollment or for stratification, for tracking disease progression, or providing evidence of target engagement for new therapeutic agents. It may also be used as a surrogate marker, providing evidence of disease-modifying effects. However, despite the widespread use of volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ADCTs, there are some important challenges and limitations, such as difficulties in the interpretation of results, limitations in translating results into clinical practice, and reproducibility issues, among others. Solutions to these issues may arise from other methodologies that are able to link the results of volumetric MRI from trials with conventional MRIs performed in routine clinical practice (linear or planimetric methods). Also of potential benefit are automated volumetry, using indices for comparing the relative rate of atrophy of different regions instead of absolute rates of atrophy, and combining structural neuroimaging with other biomarkers. In this review, authors present the existing structural neuroimaging approaches for MTA quantification. They then discuss solutions to the limitations of the different techniques as well as the current challenges of the field. Finally, they discuss how the current advances in AD neuroimaging can help AD diagnosis.

  8. Connectome Reorganization Associated With Surgical Outcome in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gong-Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Liao, Wei; Lu, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    To identify the distinct pattern of anatomical network reorganization in surgically refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients using a longitudinal design. We collected longitudinal diffusion-weighted images of 19 MTLE patients before and after anterior temporal lobectomy. Patients were classified as seizure-free (SF) or nonseizure-free (NSF) at least 1 year after surgery. We constructed whole-brain anatomical networks derived from white matter tractography and evaluated network connectivity measures by graph theoretical analysis. The reorganization trajectories of network measures in SF and NSF patients were investigated by two-way mixed analysis of variance, with factors "group" (SF vs NSF) and "treatment" (presurgery vs postsurgery). Widespread brain structures showed opposite reorganization trajectories in FS and NSF groups (interaction effect). Most of them showed group difference before surgery and then converge after surgery, suggesting that surgery remodeled these structures into a similar status. Conversly, contralateral amygdala-planum-temporale and thalamic-parietal tracts showed higher connectivity strength in NSF than in SF patients after surgery, indicating maladaptive neuroplastic responses to surgery in NSF patients. Our findings suggest that surgical outcomes are associated not only with the preoperative pattern of anatomical connectivity, but also with connectome reconfiguration following surgery. The reorganization of contralateral temporal lobe and corticothalamic tracts may be particularly important for seizure control in MTLE.

  9. Visual cortex responses reflect temporal structure of continuous quasi-rhythmic sensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Christian; Thut, Gregor; Gross, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Neural processing of dynamic continuous visual input, and cognitive influences thereon, are frequently studied in paradigms employing strictly rhythmic stimulation. However, the temporal structure of natural stimuli is hardly ever fully rhythmic but possesses certain spectral bandwidths (e.g. lip movements in speech, gestures). Examining periodic brain responses elicited by strictly rhythmic stimulation might thus represent ideal, yet isolated cases. Here, we tested how the visual system reflects quasi-rhythmic stimulation with frequencies continuously varying within ranges of classical theta (4-7Hz), alpha (8-13Hz) and beta bands (14-20Hz) using EEG. Our findings substantiate a systematic and sustained neural phase-locking to stimulation in all three frequency ranges. Further, we found that allocation of spatial attention enhances EEG-stimulus locking to theta- and alpha-band stimulation. Our results bridge recent findings regarding phase locking ("entrainment") to quasi-rhythmic visual input and "frequency-tagging" experiments employing strictly rhythmic stimulation. We propose that sustained EEG-stimulus locking can be considered as a continuous neural signature of processing dynamic sensory input in early visual cortices. Accordingly, EEG-stimulus locking serves to trace the temporal evolution of rhythmic as well as quasi-rhythmic visual input and is subject to attentional bias. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Changes in Structure for a Mediterranean Urban Forest: Santiago, Chile 2002 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Escobedo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on how urban forest ecosystems in South America and Mediterranean climates change across both space and time. This study statistically and spatially analyzed the spatio-temporal dynamics of Santiago, Chile’s urban forest using tree and plot-level data from permanent plots from 2002 to 2014. We found mortality, ingrowth, and tree cover remained stable over the analysis period and similar patterns were observed for basal area (BA and biomass. However, tree cover increased, and was greater in the highest socioeconomic stratum neighborhoods while it dropped in the medium and low strata. Growth rates for the five most common tree species averaged from 0.12 to 0.36 cm·year−1. Spatially, tree biomass and BA were greater in the affluent, northeastern sections of the city and in southwest peri-urban areas. Conversely, less affluent central, northwest, and southern areas showed temporal losses in BA and biomass. Overall, we found that Santiago’s urban forest follows similar patterns as in other parts of the world; affluent areas tend to have more and better managed urban forests than poorer areas, and changes are primarily influenced by social and ecological drivers. Nonetheless, care is warranted when comparing urban forest structural metrics measured with similar sampling-monitoring approaches across ecologically disparate regions and biomes.

  11. Emergence of an abstract categorical code enabling the discrimination of temporally structured tactile stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Pool, Román; Salinas, Emilio; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Vergara, José; Parga, Néstor; Romo, Ranulfo

    2016-12-06

    The problem of neural coding in perceptual decision making revolves around two fundamental questions: (i) How are the neural representations of sensory stimuli related to perception, and (ii) what attributes of these neural responses are relevant for downstream networks, and how do they influence decision making? We studied these two questions by recording neurons in primary somatosensory (S1) and dorsal premotor (DPC) cortex while trained monkeys reported whether the temporal pattern structure of two sequential vibrotactile stimuli (of equal mean frequency) was the same or different. We found that S1 neurons coded the temporal patterns in a literal way and only during the stimulation periods and did not reflect the monkeys' decisions. In contrast, DPC neurons coded the stimulus patterns as broader categories and signaled them during the working memory, comparison, and decision periods. These results show that the initial sensory representation is transformed into an intermediate, more abstract categorical code that combines past and present information to ultimately generate a perceptually informed choice.

  12. Can temporal fine structure represent the fundamental frequency of unresolved harmonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenham, Andrew J; Micheyl, Christophe; Keebler, Michael V

    2009-04-01

    At least two modes of pitch perception exist: in one, the fundamental frequency (F0) of harmonic complex tones is estimated using the temporal fine structure (TFS) of individual low-order resolved harmonics; in the other, F0 is derived from the temporal envelope of high-order unresolved harmonics that interact in the auditory periphery. Pitch is typically more accurate in the former than in the latter mode. Another possibility is that pitch can sometimes be coded via the TFS from unresolved harmonics. A recent study supporting this third possibility [Moore et al. (2006a). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 480-490] based its conclusion on a condition where phase interaction effects (implying unresolved harmonics) accompanied accurate F0 discrimination (implying TFS processing). The present study tests whether these results were influenced by audible distortion products. Experiment 1 replicated the original results, obtained using a low-level background noise. However, experiments 2-4 found no evidence for the use of TFS cues with unresolved harmonics when the background noise level was raised, or the stimulus level was lowered, to render distortion inaudible. Experiment 5 measured the presence and phase dependence of audible distortion products. The results provide no evidence that TFS cues are used to code the F0 of unresolved harmonics.

  13. Understanding structure of urban traffic network based on spatial-temporal correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfang; Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong; Han, Shixiu; Dong, Honghui

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the structural characteristics of urban traffic network comprehensively can provide references for improving road utilization rate and alleviating traffic congestion. This paper focuses on the spatial-temporal correlations between different pairs of traffic series and proposes a complex network-based method of constructing the urban traffic network. In the network, the nodes represent road segments, and an edge between a pair of nodes is added depending on the result of significance test for the corresponding spatial-temporal correlation. Further, a modified PageRank algorithm, named the geographical weight-based PageRank algorithm (GWPA), is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of important segments in the road network. Finally, experiments are conducted by using three kinds of traffic series collected from the urban road network in Beijing. Experimental results show that the urban traffic networks constructed by three traffic variables all indicate both small-world and scale-free characteristics. Compared with the results of PageRank algorithm, GWPA is proved to be valid in evaluating the importance of segments and identifying the important segments with small degree.

  14. MRI-based brain structure volumes in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and their unaffected siblings: a preliminary study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scanlon, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the heritability of brain structure may be useful in simplifying complicated genetic studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). A preliminary study is presented to determine if volume deficits of candidate brain structures present at a higher rate in unaffected siblings than controls subjects.

  15. Temporal structure and gain-loss asymmetry for real and artificial stock indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siven, Johannes Vitalis; Lins, Jeffrey Todd

    2009-11-01

    Previous research has shown that for stock indices, the most likely time until a return of a particular size has been observed is longer for gains than for losses. We demonstrate that this so-called gain-loss asymmetry vanishes if the temporal dependence structure is destroyed by scrambling the time series. We also show that an artificial index constructed by a simple average of a number of individual stocks display gain-loss asymmetry-this allows us to explicitly analyze the dependence between the index constituents. We consider mutual information and correlation-based measures and show that the stock returns indeed have a higher degree of dependence in times of market downturns than upturns.

  16. The Low Pitch of High-Frequency Complex Tones Relies on Temporal Fine Structure Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency complex tones containing only unresolved harmonic components with a frequency spacing Δf usually evoke a low pitch equal to Δf. However, for inharmonic components, the low pitch is often found to deviate slightly from Δf. Whether this pitch shift relies exclusively on temporal fine...... structure (TFS) cues has been a matter of debate. It is also controversial up to which frequency TFS information remains available, and to what extent envelope cues become dominant as frequency increases. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, this study investigated whether the pitch of transposed tones...... with unresolved inharmonic components is determined by (A) the time intervals between the most prominent TFS peaks in their waveform (multimodal distribution of matches around subharmonics of the carrier frequency fc), (B) the timing between peaks in their envelope (unimodal distribution of matches around...

  17. A Separation Algorithm for Sources with Temporal Structure Only Using Second-order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike conventional blind source separation (BSS deals with independent identically distributed (i.i.d. sources, this paper addresses the separation from mixtures of sources with temporal structure, such as linear autocorrelations. Many sequential extraction algorithms have been reported, resulting in inevitable cumulated errors introduced by the deflation scheme. We propose a robust separation algorithm to recover original sources simultaneously, through a joint diagonalizer of several average delayed covariance matrices at positions of the optimal time delay and its integers. The proposed algorithm is computationally simple and efficient, since it is based on the second-order statistics only. Extensive simulation results confirm the validity and high performance of the algorithm. Compared with related extraction algorithms, its separation signal-to-noise rate for a desired source can reach 20dB higher, and it seems rather insensitive to the estimation error of the time delay.

  18. Prediction of the Dynamic Yield Strength of Metals Using Two Structural-Temporal Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selyutina, N. S.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2018-02-01

    The behavior of the yield strength of steel and a number of aluminum alloys is investigated in a wide range of strain rates, based on the incubation time criterion of yield and the empirical models of Johnson-Cook and Cowper-Symonds. In this paper, expressions for the parameters of the empirical models are derived through the characteristics of the incubation time criterion; a satisfactory agreement of these data and experimental results is obtained. The parameters of the empirical models can depend on some strain rate. The independence of the characteristics of the incubation time criterion of yield from the loading history and their connection with the structural and temporal features of the plastic deformation process give advantage of the approach based on the concept of incubation time with respect to empirical models and an effective and convenient equation for determining the yield strength in a wider range of strain rates.

  19. A multicrystal diffraction data-collection approach for studying structural dynamics with millisecond temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Schubert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biochemical processes take place on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds. Accordingly, any time-resolved experiment must be matched to the speed of the structural changes of interest. Therefore, the timescale of interest defines the requirements of the X-ray source, instrumentation and data-collection strategy. In this study, a minimalistic approach for in situ crystallization is presented that requires only a few microlitres of sample solution containing a few hundred crystals. It is demonstrated that complete diffraction data sets, merged from multiple crystals, can be recorded within only a few minutes of beamtime and allow high-resolution structural information of high quality to be obtained with a temporal resolution of 40 ms. Global and site-specific radiation damage can be avoided by limiting the maximal dose per crystal to 400 kGy. Moreover, analysis of the data collected at higher doses allows the time-resolved observation of site-specific radiation damage. Therefore, our approach is well suited to observe structural changes and possibly enzymatic reactions in the low-millisecond regime.

  20. Theoretical analysis of the spatio-temporal structure of bone multicellular units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenzli, P R; Pivonka, P; Gardiner, B S; Smith, D W; Dunstan, C R; Mundy, G R

    2010-01-01

    Bone multicellular units (BMUs) maintain the viability of the skeletal tissue by coordinating locally the sequence of bone resorption and bone formation performed by cells of the osteoclastic and osteoblastic lineage. Understanding the emergence and the net bone balance of such structured microsystems out of the complex network of biochemical interactions between bone cells is fundamental for many bone-related diseases and the evaluation of fracture risk. Based on current experimental knowledge, we propose a spatio-temporal continuum model describing the interactions of osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. We show that this model admits travelling-wave-like solutions with well-confined cell profiles upon specifying external conditions mimicking the environment encountered in cortical bone remodelling. The shapes of the various cell concentration profiles within this travelling structure are intrinsically linked to the parameters of the model such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis rates of bone cells. The internal structure of BMUs is reproduced, allowing for experimental calibration. The spatial distribution of the key regulatory factors can also be exhibited, which in diseased states could give hints as to the biochemical agent most accountable for the disorder.

  1. The spatio-temporal structure of electrostatic turbulence in the WEGA stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsen, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    The main object of this work is to provide a detailed characterisation of electrostatic turbulence in WEGA and to identify the underlying instability mechanism driving turbulence. The spatio-temporal structure of turbulence is studied using multiple Langmuir probes providing a sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolution. Turbulence in WEGA is dominated by drift wave dynamics. The phase shift between density and potential fluctuations is close to zero, fluctuations are mainly driven by the density gradient, and the phase velocity of turbulent structures points in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift. The structure of turbulence is studied mainly in the plasma edge region inside the last closed flux surface. WEGA can be operated in two regimes differing in the magnetic field strength by almost one order of magnitude (57 mT and 500 mT, respectively). At 57 mT large structures with a poloidal extent comparable to the machine dimensions are observed, whereas at 500 mT turbulent structures are much smaller. The poloidal structure size scales nearly linearly with the inverse magnetic field strength. This scaling may be argued to be related to the drift wave dispersion scale, {rho}{sub s}={radical}(m{sub i}k{sub B}T{sub e})/(qB). However, the structure size remains unchanged when the ion mass is changed by using different discharge gases. Inside the last closed flux surface the poloidal E x B drift in WEGA is negligible. The three-dimensional structure is studied in detail using probes which are toroidally separated but aligned along connecting magnetic field lines. A small but finite parallel wavenumber is found. The ratio between the average parallel and perpendicular wavenumber is in the order of anti {kappa} {sub parallel} / anti {kappa}{sub {theta}} {approx} 10{sup -2}. The parallel phase velocity of turbulent structures is in-between the ion sound velocity and the Alfven velocity. In the parallel dynamics a fundamental difference between the two

  2. [Application of miniscrew for extraction of mesially impacted wisdom tooth adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-qing; Fan, Jian-fen; Xu, Pei-cheng; Xiang, Fei; Qin, Fei

    2015-04-01

    To study the value of miniscrew for extraction of mesially impacted wisdom tooth adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal. Fourteen mesially impacted wisdom teeth were proven to be adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal by means of cone-beam CT scan. The treatment began with the miniscrew traction of the wisdom teeth. After 2-5 months, they were moved away from the canal and then extracted. After extraction, all 14 cases did not show any obvious side effect. Application of miniscrew traction is a valuable method for minimally invasive extraction of mesially impacted wisdom tooth that is adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve canal.

  3. A scalable algorithm for structure identification of complex gene regulatory network from temporal expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shupeng; Rice, Andrew P; Chen, Rui; Wu, Liang; Liu, Ji; Miao, Hongyu

    2017-01-31

    Gene regulatory interactions are of fundamental importance to various biological functions and processes. However, only a few previous computational studies have claimed success in revealing genome-wide regulatory landscapes from temporal gene expression data, especially for complex eukaryotes like human. Moreover, recent work suggests that these methods still suffer from the curse of dimensionality if a network size increases to 100 or higher. Here we present a novel scalable algorithm for identifying genome-wide gene regulatory network (GRN) structures, and we have verified the algorithm performances by extensive simulation studies based on the DREAM challenge benchmark data. The highlight of our method is that its superior performance does not degenerate even for a network size on the order of 10 4 , and is thus readily applicable to large-scale complex networks. Such a breakthrough is achieved by considering both prior biological knowledge and multiple topological properties (i.e., sparsity and hub gene structure) of complex networks in the regularized formulation. We also validate and illustrate the application of our algorithm in practice using the time-course gene expression data from a study on human respiratory epithelial cells in response to influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as well as the CHIP-seq data from ENCODE on transcription factor (TF) and target gene interactions. An interesting finding, owing to the proposed algorithm, is that the biggest hub structures (e.g., top ten) in the GRN all center at some transcription factors in the context of epithelial cell infection by IAV. The proposed algorithm is the first scalable method for large complex network structure identification. The GRN structure identified by our algorithm could reveal possible biological links and help researchers to choose which gene functions to investigate in a biological event. The algorithm described in this article is implemented in MATLAB Ⓡ , and the source code is freely

  4. Temporal changes in the structure of a plant-frugivore network are influenced by bird migration and fruit availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Robles, Michelle; Andresen, Ellen; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ecological communities are dynamic collections whose composition and structure change over time, making up complex interspecific interaction networks. Mutualistic plant-animal networks can be approached through complex network analysis; these networks are characterized by a nested structure consisting of a core of generalist species, which endows the network with stability and robustness against disturbance. Those mutualistic network structures can vary as a consequence of seasonal fluctuations and food availability, as well as the arrival of new species into the system that might disorder the mutualistic network structure (e.g., a decrease in nested pattern). However, there is no assessment on how the arrival of migratory species into seasonal tropical systems can modify such patterns. Emergent and fine structural temporal patterns are adressed here for the first time for plant-frugivorous bird networks in a highly seasonal tropical environment. Methods. In a plant-frugivorous bird community, we analyzed the temporal turnover of bird species comprising the network core and periphery of ten temporal interaction networks resulting from different bird migration periods. Additionally, we evaluated how fruit abundance and richness, as well as the arrival of migratory birds into the system, explained the temporal changes in network parameters such as network size, connectance, nestedness, specialization, interaction strength asymmetry and niche overlap. The analysis included data from 10 quantitative plant-frugivorous bird networks registered from November 2013 to November 2014. Results. We registered a total of 319 interactions between 42 plant species and 44 frugivorous bird species; only ten bird species were part of the network core. We witnessed a noteworthy turnover of the species comprising the network periphery during migration periods, as opposed to the network core, which did not show significant temporal changes in species composition. Our results

  5. Influence of Game Evolution and the Phase of Competition on Temporal Game Structure in High-Level Table Tennis Tournaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jorge Vieira de Mello; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Miyagi, Willian; Malta, Elvis de Souza; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were: a) to investigate the game temporal structure in high-level table tennis competitions; b) to verify the influence of game evolution in international competitions from 2009 to 2012 (World Table Tennis Championships and the Olympic Games) on game temporal structure; c) to compare game temporal structure according to the phase of competition. Comparisons between the three international tournaments demonstrated that rally duration decreased significantly (p table tennis, considering longer rest periods adopted by elite athletes in relation to non-elite athletes, the reduction in rally duration and an increase in rest time over the 2009-2012 period and through the competition phases (quarterfinals to finals).

  6. Geostatistical investigation into the temporal evolution of spatial structure in a shallow water table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Lyon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow water tables near-streams often lead to saturated, overland flow generating areas in catchments in humid climates. While these saturated areas are assumed to be principal biogeochemical hot-spots and important for issues such as non-point pollution sources, the spatial and temporal behavior of shallow water tables, and associated saturated areas, is not completely understood. This study demonstrates how geostatistical methods can be used to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the shallow water table for the near-stream region. Event-based and seasonal changes in the spatial structure of the shallow water table, which influences the spatial pattern of surface saturation and related runoff generation, can be identified and used in conjunction to characterize the hydrology of an area. This is accomplished through semivariogram analysis and indicator kriging to produce maps combining soft data (i.e., proxy information to the variable of interest representing general shallow water table patterns with hard data (i.e., actual measurements that represent variation in the spatial structure of the shallow water table per rainfall event. The area used was a hillslope in the Catskill Mountains region of New York State. The shallow water table was monitored for a 120 m×180 m near-stream region at 44 sampling locations on 15-min intervals. Outflow of the area was measured at the same time interval. These data were analyzed at a short time interval (15 min and at a long time interval (months to characterize the changes in the hydrologic behavior of the hillslope. Indicator semivariograms based on binary-transformed ground water table data (i.e., 1 if exceeding the time-variable median depth to water table and 0 if not were created for both short and long time intervals. For the short time interval, the indicator semivariograms showed a high degree of spatial structure in the shallow water table for the spring, with increased range

  7. Temporal variation in genetic diversity and population structure of Burlina cattle breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Maretto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the temporal variation of inbreeding, genetic variability and population structure in the Burlina (BUR cattle breed. A total of 279 individuals were chosen for the analysis representing a period of 19 years (1991-2010 and analysed using 24 microsatellite markers. A total of 235 alleles were detected in the population with a mean of 9.79±3.91 alleles per locus. In the 19-year period, a stable pattern in the mean number of alleles was found. The mean observed heterozygosity was 0.63 and it was slightly lower than the expected in all birth year groups. Neither an increase nor a decrease in heterozygosity and inbreeding estimates were detected over the years, with the exception of the FIS index which was close to zero in two birth year groups: 2001-2002 and 2006. Absence of bottleneck events was proved and structure analysis revealed an increase in breed complexity over the years and a clear differentiation with the Italian Holstein Friesian cattle breed. Molecular markers were successfully applied in the monitoring of the genetic variability of BUR thus enabling the planning and the application of strategies for the in situ conservation of genetic resources and the improving of breed identity.

  8. Factor structure and construct validity of the temporal experience of pleasure scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Paul M; Cooper, Andrew J; Hall, Phillip J; Smillie, Luke D

    2015-01-01

    Feelings of pleasure felt in the moment of goal attainment (consummatory pleasure) are thought to be dissociable from feelings of desire connected with the motivated approach of goals (anticipatory pleasure). The Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scales (TEPS; Gard, Gard, Kring, & John, 2006) was developed to assess individual differences in these distinct processes. Recently, an independent evaluation of the psychometric characteristics of a Chinese-translated TEPS suggested a more complex factor structure (Chan et al., 2012). This study aimed to reexamine the factor structure and convergent and divergent validity of the TEPS in two previously unexamined multiethnic samples. University students in the United Kingdom (N = 294) completed the TEPS and university students in Australia (N = 295) completed the TEPS as well as a battery of conceptually related questionnaires. A confirmatory factor analysis of Gard et al.'s (2006) 2-factor model produced inadequate fit, which model-modification indexes suggested might be due to item cross-loadings. This issue was examined further using an exploratory factor analysis, which revealed a clear 2-factor solution despite cross-loadings among some items. Finally, mixed evidence for convergent-divergent validity was obtained, in terms of relationships between the TEPS and measures of anhedonia, approach-motivation, and positive emotion.

  9. Spatio-temporal structure and cycle to cycle variations of an in-cylinder tumbling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisine, M.; Thomas, L.; Borée, J.; Rey, P.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to make use of PIV and high-speed PIV in a research engine of moderate tumbling ratio in order to analyze both the spatial structure of the flow and its temporal evolution during series of consecutive cycles. Appropriate analyzing tools are introduced, and four different points are addressed: (1) the chain of events driving the generation of the three-dimensional mean tumbling motion is investigated; (2) a Lagrangian analysis of the roll-up of the tumbling jet in individual cycles demonstrates a strong cycle to cycle variation during the compression phase (the rms of the position of the jet front being approximately 10% of the piston stroke); (3) focussing on the "breakdown" phase, phase invariant proper orthogonal decomposition enables us to distinguish cycles according to their structure near top dead center (TDC). We show that when the coherent energy of the flow is conserved, there is no increase in the fluctuating kinetic energy; (4) finally, the phase-averaged Reynolds stresses is decomposed into a contribution of the in-cycle coherence and the turbulence carried by the flow states. Approximately 30% of the fluctuating kinetic energy is due to cycle to cycle fluctuations in this chamber near TDC.

  10. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  11. [Morphological abnormalities of limbic lobe structures in partial temporal lobe epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krémer, S; Braun, M; Kahane, P; Teil, E; Pasquier, B; Benabid, A L; Le Bas, J

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate lesions of the different structures of the Papez circuit in association with hippocampal sclerosis. and methods. 13 patients (32.1+/-8.2 y.o.) suffering from partial, temporal lobe, drug-resistant epilepsy and 20 normal volunteers (31.8+/-7.7 y.o.) were evaluated by MRI on a 1.5 T scanner (Philips): axial T1w 3D Gradient Echo acquisitions, thickness: 1.5mm. Hippocampus and cingulate gyrus volume were calculated after semi-automated segmentation of intrasulcal gray matter using the "Surgiscope Scopeplan" Elekta((R)). The thickness of the posterior column of the fornix and the thickness of the mamillary bodies were also measured. We found 10 cases of ipsolateral hippocampal sclerosis, 6 cases of ipsolateral atrophy of the mamillary body and 4 cases of ipsolateral atrophy of the fornix. We did not find any atrophy of the cingulate gyrus. Hippocampal sclerosis can be associated with lesions of limbic lobe structures (fornix and mamillary body), excluding the cingulate gyrus.

  12. Independent and Confluent Middle Mesial Root Canals in Mandibular First Molars: A Report of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanavelu Deepalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable variations with respect to number of roots and root canals. The possibility of additional root canals should be considered even in teeth with a low frequency of abnormal root canal anatomy. This paper discusses the endodontic management of the rare anatomical complexity middle mesial canals in mandibular first molar and also serves to remind the clinicians that such anatomical variations should be taken into account during the endodontic treatment of the mandibular molars.

  13. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  14. Secondary bilateral synchrony due to fronto-mesial lesions: an invasive recording study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUKIERT ARTHUR

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontal lobe epilepsies may present difficulties in focus localization in the pre-operative work-up for epilepsy surgery. This is specially true in patients with normal MRIs. We report on a 16 years-old girl that started with seizures by the age of 8 years. They were brief nocturnal episodes with automatisms such as bicycling and boxing. Seizure frequency ranged from 4-10 per night. Scalp EEG showed few right frontal convexity spiking and intense secondary bilateral syncrhony (SBS. High resolution MRI directed to the frontal lobes was normal. Ictal SPECT suggested a right fronto-lateral focus. Ictal video-EEG showed no focal onset. She was submitted to invasive recordings after subdural plates implantation. Electrodes covered all the frontal convexity and mesial surface bilaterally. Ictal recordings disclosed stereotyped seizures starting from the right mesial frontal. Using a high-resolution tool to measure intra and interhemispheric latencies, the timing and direction of seizure spread from the right fronto-mesial region were studied. Motor strip mapping was performed by means of electrical stimulation. She was submitted to a right frontal lobe resection, 1.5 cm ahead of the motor strip and has been seizure free since surgery (8 months. Pathological examination found a 4 mm area of cortical dysplasia. Invasive studies are needed to allow adequate localization in patients with non-localizatory non-invasive work-up and may lead to excellent results in relation to seizures after surgery.

  15. Microgeographical population structure and adaptation in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua: spatio-temporal insights from gene-associated DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Loeschcke, V.

    2011-01-01

    populations, indicating long-term temporal adaptive stability driven by strong local selection. In an environmentally dynamic area, on the other hand, patterns of genetic structuring were more variable. Overall, our results not only suggest separation of populations under both evolutionary and ecological...... paradigms, but also illustrate the usefulness of the spatio-temporal approach for making inferences about the dynamics and geographical distribution of adaptive genetic variation in natural populations.......Recent technical advances have stimulated studies on spatial scales of adaptive genetic variation in marine fishes. However, very few studies have combined spatial and temporal sampling to investigate adaptive genetic structuring at local and microgeographical scales, i.e. scales at which neutral...

  16. The spectrum of structural and functional imaging abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Bernasconi, Andrea; Liu, Min; Hong, Seok-Jun; Caldairou, Benoit; Goubran, Maged; Guiot, Marie C; Hall, Jeff; Bernasconi, Neda

    2016-07-01

    Although most temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients show marked hippocampal sclerosis (HS) upon pathological examination, 40% present with no significant cell loss but gliotic changes only. To evaluate effects of hippocampal pathology on brain structure and functional networks, we aimed at dissociating multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics in patients with HS (TLE-HS) and those with gliosis only (TLE-G). In 20 TLE-HS, 19 TLE-G, and 25 healthy controls, we carried out a novel MRI-based hippocampal subfield surface analysis that integrated volume, T2 signal intensity, and diffusion markers with seed-based hippocampal functional connectivity. Compared to controls, TLE-HS presented with marked ipsilateral atrophy, T2 hyperintensity, and mean diffusivity increases across all subfields, whereas TLE-G presented with dentate gyrus hypertrophy, focal increases in T2 intensity and mean diffusivity. Multivariate assessment confirmed a more marked ipsilateral load of anomalies across all subfields in TLE-HS, whereas anomalies in TLE-G were restricted to the subiculum. A between-cohort dissociation was independently suggested by resting-state functional connectivity analysis, revealing marked hippocampal decoupling from anterior and posterior default mode hubs in TLE-HS, whereas TLE-G did not differ from controls. Back-projection connectivity analysis from cortical targets revealed consistently decreased network embedding across all subfields in TLE-HS, while changes in TLE-G were limited to the subiculum. Hippocampal disconnectivity strongly correlated to T2 hyperintensity and marginally to atrophy. Multimodal MRI reveals diverging structural and functional connectivity profiles across the TLE spectrum. Pathology-specific modulations of large-scale functional brain networks lend novel evidence for a close interplay of structural and functional disruptions in focal epilepsy. Ann Neurol 2016;80:142-153. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  17. Prevalence of middle mesial canals in mandibular molars after guided troughing under high magnification: an in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Adham A; Deutsch, Allan S; Solomon, Charles S

    2015-02-01

    A limited number of in vivo studies have discussed the prevalence of middle mesial canals in root canal systems of mandibular molars. The reported results have varied between 1% and 25%, with no detailed description of the depth and direction of troughing needed to identify such small canal orifices. The objective of the present study was to determine (1) the prevalence of a middle mesial canal before and after troughing by using a standardized troughing technique, (2) the pathway of the middle mesial canal in relation to the mesiobuccal (MB) and mesiolingual (ML) canals, and (3) its correlation with the patient's age. Ninety-one mandibular molars from 87 patients were included in this study. The patient's age and tooth number were recorded. After access cavity preparation, a standardized troughing technique was performed between MB and ML canals to search for a middle mesial canal by using a dental operating microscope. If a middle mesial canal was located, it was recorded as separate or as joining the MB or the ML canals. Results were statistically analyzed by using Z test and logistic regression. A middle mesial canal was found in 42 of 91 mandibular molars (46.2%). Six middle mesial canals were located after conventional access preparation (6.6%). The other 36 were located after standardized troughing (39.6%). The results were statistically significant (P magnification, troughing, and patient's age appeared to be determining factors in accessing the middle mesial canal. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Disrupted Structural and Functional Networks and Their Correlation with Alertness in Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Graph Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE involves abnormal structural or functional connectivity in specific brain areas. However, limited comprehensive studies have been conducted on TLE associated changes in the topological organization of structural and functional networks. Additionally, epilepsy is associated with impairment in alertness, a fundamental component of attention. In this study, structural networks were constructed using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, and functional networks were obtained from resting-state functional MRI temporal series correlations in 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE patients and 19 healthy controls. Global network properties were computed by graph theoretical analysis, and correlations were assessed between global network properties and alertness. The results from these analyses showed that rTLE patients exhibit abnormal small-world attributes in structural and functional networks. Structural networks shifted toward more regular attributes, but functional networks trended toward more random attributes. After controlling for the influence of the disease duration, negative correlations were found between alertness, small-worldness, and the cluster coefficient. However, alertness did not correlate with either the characteristic path length or global efficiency in rTLE patients. Our findings show that disruptions of the topological construction of brain structural and functional networks as well as small-world property bias are associated with deficits in alertness in rTLE patients. These data suggest that reorganization of brain networks develops as a mechanism to compensate for altered structural and functional brain function during disease progression.

  19. Thalamic glucose metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy measured with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N; Leenders, KL; Hajek, M; Maguire, P; Missimer, J; Wieser, HG

    1997-01-01

    Thalamic glucose metabolism has been studied in 24 patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using interictal F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). A total of 17 patients had a unilateral TL seizure onset, 11 of these patients had a mesial temporal lobe

  20. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-09-07

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Implication of Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Fine-Structure Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sze-Shiang; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of fine-structure constant α ≡ e2/hbar c in cosmology have been reported in analysis of combination Keck and VLT data. This paper studies the variations based on consideration of basic spacetime symmetry in physics. Both laboratory α 0 and distant α z are deduced from relativistic spectrum equations of atoms (e.g., hydrogen atom) defined in inertial reference systems. When Einstein's Λ≠0, the metric of local inertial reference systems in SM of cosmology is Beltrami metric instead of Minkowski, and the basic spacetime symmetry has to be de Sitter (dS) group. The corresponding special relativity (SR) is dS-SR. A model based on dS-SR is suggested. Comparing the predictions on α-varying with the data, the parameters are determined. The best-fit dipole mode in α's spatial varying is reproduced by this dS-SR model. α-varyings in whole sky are also studied. The results are generally in agreement with the estimations of observations. The main conclusion is that the phenomenon of α-varying cosmologically with dipole mode dominating is due to the de Sitter (or anti de Sitter) spacetime symmetry with a Minkowski point in an extended special relativity called de Sitter invariant special relativity (dS-SR) developed by Dirac-Inönü-Wigner-Gürsey-Lee-Lu-Zou-Guo.

  2. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. J. Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008 suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations of nutrients composition and structure in the main estuaries of Jiaozhou Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Pingli; Yu, Ge; Zheng, Yang; Sun, Xue; Wang, Youxiao

    2017-05-01

    Spatiotemporal distribution of nutrients were investigated in the main estuaries of Jiaozhou Bay in January, April, June, August, October and December, 2016, and the relationships between nutrients and temperature, salinity, pH and DO were analyzed as well. Results showed that, the main estuaries of Jiaozhou Bay total dissolved nitrogen (TN) showed a time trend of decreasing after the first increasing, small changes of TN content in each estuarine water body, organic nitrogen (DON) was the main component of TN, its relative content was about 58.6-98.5%. NH4+-N was the main component of inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in most estuaries, followed by NO3‑ - N, NO22‑ - N lowest relative content. The content of total dissolved phosphorus (TP) was low (averaged 0.15 mg/L), mainly showed a higher spring and summer, autumn and winter low time trends, the change of TP content in the water body of the estuary was also small, the relative content of inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in most estuaries was more than organic phosphorus (DOP). Temperature, salinity, pH and DO with different forms of nutrient analysis showed that there are strong primary productivity and microbial regeneration activities in the study area, environmental factors affected the microbial production activities in estuarine water affecting the spatial and temporal changes in nutrient composition and structure.

  4. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN THE RED GROUPER, EPINEPHELUS MORIO, DEMOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE FROM SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralice Caballero-Arango

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the demographic structure of red grouper Epinephelus morio from the southern part of the Gulf of Mexico, were evaluated during periods when total catches, CPUE and annual yields of the specie decreased. Fishery-dependent samples (n = 1887 were obtained between August 1989 and February 2004 from the Campeche Bank, and size-frequency distributions by sex, sex ratios and sizes of sexual maturation and sex change were compared between three periods: P11989-1992 (n = 886; P21996-1998 (n = 413; and P32003-2004 (n = 588. The temporal stability of size-frequency distribution by sex, with males always being larger than females, and the sex ratios always biased towards females, were consistent with this species’ type of sexuality. Size for females and males, as well as sizes at first sexual maturity and at sex reversal all decreased from the oldest period to the more recent one and could be a consequence of the fishing intensity applied to this stock. The reductions in size of females and males associated with a relatively stable sex ratio and the lack of any drastic decrease in the number of males can be explained by this species’ reproductive ecology. Results are discussed regarding the capacity for reproductive resilience of red grouper in response to fishing pressure like that currently experienced by the Campeche Bank stock.

  5. Localization of musicogenic epilepsy to Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal plane: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Yasunori; Kovach, Christopher K; Ciliberto, Michael; Joshi, Charuta; Rhone, Ariane E; Vesole, Adam; Gander, Phillip E; Nourski, Kirill V; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Dlouhy, Brian J

    2017-09-15

    Musicogenic epilepsy (ME) is an extremely rare form of the disorder that is provoked by listening to or playing music, and it has been localized to the temporal lobe. The number of reported cases of ME in which intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) has been used for seizure focus localization is extremely small, especially with coverage of the superior temporal plane (STP) and specifically, Heschl's gyrus (HG). The authors describe the case of a 17-year-old boy with a history of medically intractable ME who underwent iEEG monitoring that involved significant frontotemporal coverage as well as coverage of the STP with an HG depth electrode anteriorly and a planum temporale depth electrode posteriorly. Five seizures occurred during the monitoring period, and a seizure onset zone was localized to HG and the STP. The patient subsequently underwent right temporal neocortical resection, involving the STP and including HG, with preservation of the mesial temporal structures. The patient remains seizure free 1 year postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of ME in which the seizure focus has been localized to HG and the STP with iEEG monitoring. The authors review the literature on iEEG findings in ME, explain their approach to HG depth electrode placement, and discuss the utility of STP depth electrodes in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  6. Nonlinearity and isotope effect in temporal evolution of mesoscopic structure during hydration of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, S.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of cement is still in its infancy despite the fact that cement is ubiquitous material which is indispensable in the construction industry, in nuclear energy programs for immobilization of non heat-generating low-level radioactive waste, and in the petroleum industry to line oil wells by pumping cement slurry to isolate productive zones and with global production exceeding that of any other material of technological importance. The total world consumption of cement in 2008 was about 2.5 billion metric tons almost double of that of steel. Manufacturing of cement contributes about 4% of global and 5-7% of the total man-made CO 2 emissions. The understanding of the mechanism of its hydration and evolution of cement-water mixtures into a material of high compressive strength is paramount to improve its life time and other macroscopic properties such as compressive strength, permeability, elastic modulus etc. The mechanism of hydration of cement and evolution of cement-water mixtures into gels of high compressive strength is poorly understood, despite extensive research over the past century. Recent investigations, based on neutron scattering measurements, aims at unraveling this enigma and outlines, for the first time, the evolution of the mesoscopic structure of the cement paste which exhibits temporal oscillations, strongly dependent on the scale of observation and on the medium of hydration (light or heavy water). While the formation of hydration products is synchronous for hydration with H 2 O, the process is non-synchronous for hydration with D 2 O. The reason why morphological patterns of domains at different times look dissimilar, as seen before, for different hydration media emerges as a natural consequence of this finding. Mesoscopic structure of cement paste exhibits isotope effect. The structures arise from well- characterised chemical reactions as water diffuses through the porous material to bring about the water-surface interactions within

  7. Temporal Variability and Vertical Structure in Larval Abundance: The Potential Roles of Biological and Physical Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garland, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus of this thesis is on the temporal and spatial variability in larval supply, the extent to which planktonic larval distributions are determined by larval behaviors and physical processes...

  8. Hyper-temporal c-band SAR for baseline woody structural assessments in deciduous savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathieu, Renaud SA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available deciduous savanna environment. Results showed that: the temporal filter reduced image variance; the random forest model out-performed the linear model; while the TCV metric consistently showed marginally higher accuracies than the TCC metric. Combinations...

  9. Spatial and temporal structure of fish assemblages in an ''inverse estuary'', the Sine Saloum system (Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simier, M.; Blanc, L.; Aliaume, C.; Diouf, P. S.; Albaret, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    As a consequence of the Sahelian drought, the Sine Saloum, a large estuarine system located in Senegal (West Africa), has become an "inverse estuary" since the late sixties, i.e. salinity increases upstream and reaches 100 in some places. To study the fish assemblages of such a modified system, a survey was conducted in 1992, collecting fish every two months with a purse seine at eight sites spread over the three main branches of the estuary. A total of 73 species belonging to 35 families were identified. Eight species comprised 97% of the total numbers of fish. The predominant species was a small clupeid, Sardinella maderensis, representing more than half of the total biomass and nearly 70% of the total number of fish. The spatio-temporal structure of the fish assemblages was studied using the STATIS-CoA method, which combines the multitable approach with the correspondence analysis method. Whatever the season, a strong spatial organization of fish assemblages was observed, mainly related to depth and salinity. Three types of assemblages were identified. In shallow water areas, fish assemblages were dominated by Mugilidae, Gerreidae and Cichlidae and were stable with time. In open water areas, large fluctuations in the species composition were observed, due to the occasional presence of large schools of pelagic species: in the southern area, where salinity and water transparency were the lowest, the main species were Ilisha africana, Brachydeuterus auritus and Chloroscombrus chrysurus, associated with a few Sciaenidae and Tetraodontidae, while the poorest areas were characterized by only two dominant species, S. maderensis and Scomberomorus tritor.

  10. α-Calcium calmodulin kinase II modulates the temporal structure of hippocampal bursting patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeiwon Cho

    Full Text Available The alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (α-CaMKII is known to play a key role in CA1/CA3 synaptic plasticity, hippocampal place cell stability and spatial learning. Additionally, there is evidence from hippocampal electrophysiological slice studies that this kinase has a role in regulating ion channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, we report in vivo single unit studies, with α-CaMKII mutant mice, in which threonine 305 was replaced with an aspartate (α-CaMKII(T305D mutants, that indicate that this kinase modulates spike patterns in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Previous studies showed that α-CaMKII(T305D mutants have abnormalities in both hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent learning. We found that besides decreased place cell stability, which could be caused by their LTP impairments, the hippocampal CA1 spike patterns of α-CaMKII(T305D mutants were profoundly abnormal. Although overall firing rate, and overall burst frequency were not significantly altered in these mutants, inter-burst intervals, mean number of intra-burst spikes, ratio of intra-burst spikes to total spikes, and mean intra-burst intervals were significantly altered. In particular, the intra burst intervals of place cells in α-CaMKII(T305D mutants showed higher variability than controls. These results provide in vivo evidence that besides its well-known function in synaptic plasticity, α-CaMKII, and in particular its inhibitory phosphorylation at threonine 305, also have a role in shaping the temporal structure of hippocampal burst patterns. These results suggest that some of the molecular processes involved in acquiring information may also shape the patterns used to encode this information.

  11. A Nonlinear Transmission Line Model of the Cochlea With Temporal Integration Accounts for Duration Effects in Threshold Fine Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Mauermann, Manfred; Epp, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    than for long signals. The present study demonstrates how this effect can be captured by a nonlinear and active model of the cochlear in combination with a temporal integration stage. Since this cochlear model also accounts for fine structure and connected level dependent effects, it is superior......For normal-hearing listeners, auditory pure-tone thresholds in quiet often show quasi periodic fluctuations when measured with a high frequency resolution, referred to as threshold fine structure. Threshold fine structure is dependent on the stimulus duration, with smaller fluctuations for short...

  12. An Investigation into the Elementary Temporal Structure of Solar Flare Hard X-Ray Bursts Using BATSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    The research performed under this contract is part of an on-going investigation to explore the finest time-resolution hard X-ray data available on solar flares. Since 1991, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory has provided almost continual monitoring of the Sun in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray region of the spectrum. BATSE provides for the first time a temporal resolution in the data comparable to the timescales on which flare particle energization occurs. Under this contract, we have employed an important but under-utilized BATSE data type, the Time-To-Spill (TTS) data, to address the question of how fine a temporal structure exists in flare hard X-ray emission. By establishing the extent to which 'energy release fragments,' or characteristic (recurrent) time structures, are building blocks of flare emission, it is possible to place constraints on particle acceleration theories.

  13. METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TEMPORAL CHANGE OF PHYSICAL STRUCTURE IN THE INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL LIFE-CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKUS GÖRING

    2013-10-01

    On one hand, this paper proposes the restructuring of the sequential IEC 61513 I&C life-cycle according to the V-model, so as to adequately integrate the concept of verification and validation. On the other hand, based on a metamodel for the modeling of I&C systems, this paper introduces a method for the modeling and analysis of the effects with respect to the superposition of failure combinations and event sequences on the I&C system design, i.e. the temporal change of physical structure is analyzed. In the first step, the method is concerned with the modeling of the I&C systems. In the second step, the method considers the analysis of temporal change of physical structure, which integrates the concepts of the diversity and defense-in-depth analysis, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis.

  14. Marine protected areas increase temporal stability of community structure, but not density or diversity, of tropical seagrass fish communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Alonso Aller

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs have been shown to increase long-term temporal stability of fish communities and enhance ecosystem resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. Yet, the potential ability of MPAs to buffer effects of environmental variability at shorter time scales remains widely unknown. In the tropics, the yearly monsoon cycle is a major natural force affecting marine organisms in tropical regions, and its timing and severity are predicted to change over the coming century, with potentially severe effects on marine organisms, ecosystems and ecosystem services. Here, we assessed the ability of MPAs to buffer effects of monsoon seasonality on seagrass-associated fish communities, using a field survey in two MPAs (no-take zones and two unprotected (open-access sites around Zanzibar (Tanzania. We assessed the temporal stability of fish density and community structure within and outside MPAs during three monsoon seasons in 2014-2015, and investigated several possible mechanisms that could regulate temporal stability. Our results show that MPAs did not affect fish density and diversity, but that juvenile fish densities were temporally more stable within MPAs. Second, fish community structure was more stable within MPAs for juvenile and adult fish, but not for subadult fish or the total fish community. Third, the observed effects may be due to a combination of direct and indirect (seagrass-mediated effects of seasonality and, potentially, fluctuating fishing pressure outside MPAs. In summary, these MPAs may not have the ability to enhance fish density and diversity and to buffer effects of monsoon seasonality on the whole fish community. However, they may increase the temporal stability of certain groups, such as juvenile fish. Consequently, our results question whether MPAs play a general role in the maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning under changing environmental conditions in tropical seagrass fish communities.

  15. Marine protected areas increase temporal stability of community structure, but not density or diversity, of tropical seagrass fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Aller, Elisa; Jiddawi, Narriman S; Eklöf, Johan S

    2017-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) have been shown to increase long-term temporal stability of fish communities and enhance ecosystem resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. Yet, the potential ability of MPAs to buffer effects of environmental variability at shorter time scales remains widely unknown. In the tropics, the yearly monsoon cycle is a major natural force affecting marine organisms in tropical regions, and its timing and severity are predicted to change over the coming century, with potentially severe effects on marine organisms, ecosystems and ecosystem services. Here, we assessed the ability of MPAs to buffer effects of monsoon seasonality on seagrass-associated fish communities, using a field survey in two MPAs (no-take zones) and two unprotected (open-access) sites around Zanzibar (Tanzania). We assessed the temporal stability of fish density and community structure within and outside MPAs during three monsoon seasons in 2014-2015, and investigated several possible mechanisms that could regulate temporal stability. Our results show that MPAs did not affect fish density and diversity, but that juvenile fish densities were temporally more stable within MPAs. Second, fish community structure was more stable within MPAs for juvenile and adult fish, but not for subadult fish or the total fish community. Third, the observed effects may be due to a combination of direct and indirect (seagrass-mediated) effects of seasonality and, potentially, fluctuating fishing pressure outside MPAs. In summary, these MPAs may not have the ability to enhance fish density and diversity and to buffer effects of monsoon seasonality on the whole fish community. However, they may increase the temporal stability of certain groups, such as juvenile fish. Consequently, our results question whether MPAs play a general role in the maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning under changing environmental conditions in tropical seagrass fish communities.

  16. Temporal Lobe Anatomy and Psychiatric Symptoms in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Miller, Adam M.; Abdulsabur, Nuria; Antshel, Kevin M.; Conchelos, Jena; Fremont, Wanda; Roizen, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between mesial temporal lobe morphology, ratios of prefrontal cortex to amygdala and hippocampus volumes, and psychiatric symptomatology in children and adolescents with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). Method: Scores on behavioral rating scales and volumetric measures of the amygdala, hippocampus, and…

  17. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Thomas; Rhoton, Albert; Paglioli, Eliseu; Azambuja, Ney

    2014-10-01

    To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP) and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohippocampectomy (AH) for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  18. Temporal structure of aggregate power fluctuations in large-eddy simulations of extended wind-farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations represent a major challenge for the incorporation of electric power from large wind-farms into power grids. Wind-farm power output fluctuates strongly in time, over various time scales. Understanding these fluctuations, especially their spatio-temporal characteristics, is particularly

  19. Temporal genetic structure in a poecilogonous polychaete: the interplay of developmental mode and environmental stochasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Kesäniemi, Jenni E; Mustonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    elegans, a poecilogonous polychaete with within-species variation in developmental mode. P. elegans produces either planktonic, benthic, or intermediate larvae, varying both among and within populations, providing a within-species test of the generality of a relationship between temporal genetic variation...

  20. Prosodic Structure Shapes the Temporal Realization of Intonation and Manual Gesture Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Gibert, Nuria; Prieto, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work on the temporal coordination between gesture and speech found that the prominence in gesture coordinates with speech prominence. In this study, the authors investigated the anchoring regions in speech and pointing gesture that align with each other. The authors hypothesized that (a) in contrastive focus conditions, the…

  1. Longitudinal structure in temperate stream fish communities: evaluating conceptual models with temporal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Five conceptual models of longitudinal fish community organization in streams were examined: (1) niche diversity model (NDM), (2) stream continuum model (SCM), (3) immigrant accessibility model (IAM), (4) environmental stability model (ESM), and (5) adventitious stream model (ASM). We used differences among models in their predictions about temporal species turnover, along with five spatiotemporal fish community data sets, to evaluate model applicability. Models were similar in predicting a positive species richness–stream size relationship and longitudinal species nestedness, but differed in predicting either similar temporal species turnover throughout the stream continuum (NDM, SCM), higher turnover upstream (IAM, ESM), or higher turnover downstream (ASM). We calculated measures of spatial and temporal variation from spatiotemporal fish data in five wadeable streams in central and eastern North America spanning 34–68 years (French Creek [New York], Piasa Creek [Illinois], Spruce Run [Virginia], Little Stony Creek [Virginia], and Sinking Creek [Virginia]). All streams exhibited substantial species turnover (i.e., at least 27% turnover in stream-scale species pools), in contrast to the predictions of the SCM. Furthermore, community change was greater in downstream than upstream reaches in four of five streams. This result is most consistent with the ASM and suggests that downstream communities are strongly influenced by migrants to and from species pools outside the focal stream. In Sinking Creek, which is isolated from external species pools, temporal species turnover (via increased richness) was higher upstream than downstream, which is a pattern most consistent with the IAM or ESM. These results corroborate the hypothesis that temperate stream habitats and fish communities are temporally dynamic and that fish migration and environmental disturbances play fundamental roles in stream fish community organization.

  2. A general temporal data model and the structured population event history register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Samuel J

    2006-10-13

    At this time there are 37 demographic surveillance system sites active in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Central America, and this number is growing continuously. These sites and other longitudinal population and health research projects generate large quantities of complex temporal data in order to describe, explain and investigate the event histories of individuals and the populations they constitute. This article presents possible solutions to some of the key data management challenges associated with those data. The fundamental components of a temporal system are identified and both they and their relationships to each other are given simple, standardized definitions. Further, a metadata framework is proposed to endow this abstract generalization with specific meaning and to bind the definitions of the data to the data themselves. The result is a temporal data model that is generalized, conceptually tractable, and inherently contains a full description of the primary data it organizes. Individual databases utilizing this temporal data model can be customized to suit the needs of their operators without modifying the underlying design of the database or sacrificing the potential to transparently share compatible subsets of their data with other similar databases. A practical working relational database design based on this general temporal data model is presented and demonstrated. This work has arisen out of experience with demographic surveillance in the developing world, and although the challenges and their solutions are more general, the discussion is organized around applications in demographic surveillance. An appendix contains detailed examples and working prototype databases that implement the examples discussed in the text.

  3. A general temporal data model and the structured population event history register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Clark

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available At this time there are 37 demographic surveillance system sites active in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Central America, and this number is growing continuously. These sites and other longitudinal population and health research projects generate large quantities of complex temporal data in order to describe, explain and investigate the event histories of individuals and the populations they constitute. This article presents possible solutions to some of the key data management challenges associated with those data. The fundamental components of a temporal system are identified and both they and their relationships to each other are given simple, standardized definitions. Further, a metadata framework is proposed to endow this abstract generalization with specific meaning and to bind the definitions of the data to the data themselves. The result is a temporal data model that is generalized, conceptually tractable, and inherently contains a full description of the primary data it organizes. Individual databases utilizing this temporal data model can be customized to suit the needs of their operators without modifying the underlying design of the database or sacrificing the potential to transparently share compatible subsets of their data with other similar databases. A practical working relational database design based on this general temporal data model is presented and demonstrated. This work has arisen out of experience with demographic surveillance in the developing world, and although the challenges and their solutions are more general, the discussion is organized around applications in demographic surveillance. An appendix contains detailed examples and working prototype databases that implement the examples discussed in the text.

  4. Ancient sedimentary structures in the Mars, that resemble macroscopic morphology, spatial associations, and temporal succession in terrestrial microbialites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, Nora

    2015-02-01

    Sandstone beds of the Mars have been interpreted as evidence of an ancient playa lake environment. On Earth, such environments have been sites of colonization by microbial mats from the early Archean to the present time. Terrestrial microbial mats in playa lake environments form microbialites known as microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS). On Mars, three lithofacies of the Gillespie Lake Member sandstone display centimeter- to meter-scale structures similar in macroscopic morphology to terrestrial MISS that include "erosional remnants and pockets," "mat chips," "roll-ups," "desiccation cracks," and "gas domes." The microbially induced sedimentary-like structures identified in Curiosity rover mission images do not have a random distribution. Rather, they were found to be arranged in spatial associations and temporal successions that indicate they changed over time. On Earth, if such MISS occurred with this type of spatial association and temporal succession, they would be interpreted as having recorded the growth of a microbially dominated ecosystem that thrived in pools that later dried completely: erosional pockets, mat chips, and roll-ups resulted from water eroding an ancient microbial mat-covered sedimentary surface; during the course of subsequent water recess, channels would have cut deep into the microbial mats, leaving erosional remnants behind; desiccation cracks and gas domes would have occurred during a final period of subaerial exposure of the microbial mats. In this paper, the similarities of the macroscopic morphologies, spatial associations, and temporal succession of sedimentary structures on Mars to MISS preserved on Earth has led to the following hypothesis: The sedimentary structures in the Mars are ancient MISS produced by interactions between microbial mats and their environment. Proposed here is a strategy for detecting, identifying, confirming, and differentiating possible MISS during current and future Mars missions.

  5. Temporal and Spatial Impact of Human Cadaver Decomposition on Soil Bacterial and Arthropod Community Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baneshwar Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As vertebrate carrion decomposes, there is a release of nutrient-rich fluids into the underlying soil, which can impact associated biological community structure and function. How these changes alter soil biogeochemical cycles is relatively unknown and may prove useful in the identification of carrion decomposition islands that have long lasting, focal ecological effects. This study investigated the spatial (0, 1, and 5 m and temporal (3–732 days dynamics of human cadaver decomposition on soil bacterial and arthropod community structure and microbial function. We observed strong evidence of a predictable response to cadaver decomposition that varies over space for soil bacterial and arthropod community structure, carbon (C mineralization and microbial substrate utilization patterns. In the presence of a cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples, the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was greater, while the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia was lower when compared to samples at 1 and 5 m. Micro-arthropods were more abundant (15 to 17-fold in soils collected at 0 m compared to either 1 or 5 m, but overall, micro-arthropod community composition was unrelated to either bacterial community composition or function. Bacterial community structure and microbial function also exhibited temporal relationships, whereas arthropod community structure did not. Cumulative precipitation was more effective in predicting temporal variations in bacterial abundance and microbial activity than accumulated degree days. In the presence of the cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased significantly with cumulative precipitation. Furthermore, soil bacterial communities and C mineralization were sensitive to the introduction of human cadavers as they diverged from baseline levels and did not recover completely in approximately 2 years. These data are valuable for understanding

  6. The role of temporal structure in the investigation of sensory memory, auditory scene analysis, and speech perception: a healthy-aging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Johanna Maria; Sussman, Elyse; Poeppel, David

    2015-02-01

    Listening situations with multiple talkers or background noise are common in everyday communication and are particularly demanding for older adults. Here we review current research on auditory perception in aging individuals in order to gain insights into the challenges of listening under noisy conditions. Informationally rich temporal structure in auditory signals--over a range of time scales from milliseconds to seconds--renders temporal processing central to perception in the auditory domain. We discuss the role of temporal structure in auditory processing, in particular from a perspective relevant for hearing in background noise, and focusing on sensory memory, auditory scene analysis, and speech perception. Interestingly, these auditory processes, usually studied in an independent manner, show considerable overlap of processing time scales, even though each has its own 'privileged' temporal regimes. By integrating perspectives on temporal structure processing in these three areas of investigation, we aim to highlight similarities typically not recognized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatio-Temporal Video Object Segmentation via Scale-Adaptive 3D Structure Tensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yun Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To address multiple motions and deformable objects' motions encountered in existing region-based approaches, an automatic video object (VO segmentation methodology is proposed in this paper by exploiting the duality of image segmentation and motion estimation such that spatial and temporal information could assist each other to jointly yield much improved segmentation results. The key novelties of our method are (1 scale-adaptive tensor computation, (2 spatial-constrained motion mask generation without invoking dense motion-field computation, (3 rigidity analysis, (4 motion mask generation and selection, and (5 motion-constrained spatial region merging. Experimental results demonstrate that these novelties jointly contribute much more accurate VO segmentation both in spatial and temporal domains.

  8. The effect of STDP temporal kernel structure on the learning dynamics of single excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Luz

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP is characterized by a wide range of temporal kernels. However, much of the theoretical work has focused on a specific kernel - the "temporally asymmetric Hebbian" learning rules. Previous studies linked excitatory STDP to positive feedback that can account for the emergence of response selectivity. Inhibitory plasticity was associated with negative feedback that can balance the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here we study the possible computational role of the temporal structure of the STDP. We represent the STDP as a superposition of two processes: potentiation and depression. This allows us to model a wide range of experimentally observed STDP kernels, from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian, by varying a single parameter. We investigate STDP dynamics of a single excitatory or inhibitory synapse in purely feed-forward architecture. We derive a mean-field-Fokker-Planck dynamics for the synaptic weight and analyze the effect of STDP structure on the fixed points of the mean field dynamics. We find a phase transition along the Hebbian to anti-Hebbian parameter from a phase that is characterized by a unimodal distribution of the synaptic weight, in which the STDP dynamics is governed by negative feedback, to a phase with positive feedback characterized by a bimodal distribution. The critical point of this transition depends on general properties of the STDP dynamics and not on the fine details. Namely, the dynamics is affected by the pre-post correlations only via a single number that quantifies its overlap with the STDP kernel. We find that by manipulating the STDP temporal kernel, negative feedback can be induced in excitatory synapses and positive feedback in inhibitory. Moreover, there is an exact symmetry between inhibitory and excitatory plasticity, i.e., for every STDP rule of inhibitory synapse there exists an STDP rule for excitatory synapse, such that their dynamics is identical.

  9. Temporal dynamics of hot desert microbial communities reveal structural and functional responses to water input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Alacia; Valverde, Angel; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Jansson, Janet K.; Hopkins, David W.; Aspray, Thomas J.; Seely, Mary; Trindade, Marla I.; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-09-29

    The temporal dynamics of desert soil microbial communities are poorly understood. Given the implications for ecosystem functioning under a global change scenario, a better understanding of desert microbial community stability is crucial. Here, we sampled soils in the central Namib Desert on sixteen different occasions over a one-year period. Using Illumina-based amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that α-diversity (richness) was more variable at a given sampling date (spatial variability) than over the course of one year (temporal variability). Community composition remained essentially unchanged across the first 10 months, indicating that spatial sampling might be more important than temporal sampling when assessing β-diversity patterns in desert soils. However, a major shift in microbial community composition was found following a single precipitation event. This shift in composition was associated with a rapid increase in CO2 respiration and productivity, supporting the view that desert soil microbial communities respond rapidly to re-wetting and that this response may be the result of both taxon-specific selection and changes in the availability or accessibility of organic substrates. Recovery to quasi pre-disturbance community composition was achieved within one month after rainfall.

  10. Accurate and fast 3D surface measurement with temporal-spatial binary encoding structured illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiangping; Zhou, Pei; Su, Xianyu; You, Zhisheng

    2016-12-12

    Balancing the accuracy and speed for 3D surface measurement of object is crucial in many important applications. Binary encoding pattern utilizing the high-speed image switching rate of digital mirror device (DMD)-based projector could be used as the candidate for fast even high-speed 3D measurement, but current most schemes only enable the measurement speed, which limit their application scopes. In this paper, we present a binary encoding method and develop an experimental system aiming to solve such a situation. Our approach encodes one computer-generated standard 8 bit sinusoidal fringe pattern into multiple binary patterns (sequence) with designed temporal-spatial binary encoding tactics. The binary pattern sequence is then high-speed and in-focus projected onto the surface of tested object, and then captured by means of temporal-integration imaging to form one sinusoidal fringe image. Further the combination of phase-shifting technique and temporal phase unwrapping algorithm leads to fast and accurate 3D measurement. The systematic accuracy better than 0.08mm is achievable. The measurement results with mask and palm are given to confirm the feasibility.

  11. From indoor to outdoor: Behavioural response of fish to noise exposure of different temporal structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik Yaw Neo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human activities, such as shipping and pile driving, produce substantial amounts of man-made noise underwater. The noise may negatively affect fish, causing physical injuries, hearing loss, physiological stress, acoustic masking and behavioural changes. Among these effects, behavioural changes are most problematic, but are understudied, especially under well-controlled field conditions. Moreover, man-made noise varies widely in terms of acoustic characteristics. The influence of temporal patterns of noise on the impacts is largely unknown. We exposed groups of European seabass to sound treatments of different temporal patterns, varying in intermittency, interval regularity and presence of amplitude 'ramp-up'. The study took place in a large octagonal floating pen (⌀ = ~12.5m in Oosterschelde, a marine inlet in the Netherlands. We tracked the fish swimming trajectories with an acoustic 3D telemetry system and looked into the behavioural changes and recovery. Upon noise exposure, the fish swam to greater depths in tighter shoals, similar to previous studies conducted in a basin. Moreover, the fish swam away from the noise source, suggesting avoidance behaviour. The different temporal patterns seemed to differ in their impact strengths although the results were not significant. These findings may carry important scientific and management implications.

  12. Hierarchical temporal structure in music, speech and animal vocalizations: jazz is like a conversation, humpbacks sing like hermit thrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T; Bella, Simone Dalla; Médé, Butovens; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2017-10-01

    Humans talk, sing and play music. Some species of birds and whales sing long and complex songs. All these behaviours and sounds exhibit hierarchical structure-syllables and notes are positioned within words and musical phrases, words and motives in sentences and musical phrases, and so on. We developed a new method to measure and compare hierarchical temporal structures in speech, song and music. The method identifies temporal events as peaks in the sound amplitude envelope, and quantifies event clustering across a range of timescales using Allan factor (AF) variance. AF variances were analysed and compared for over 200 different recordings from more than 16 different categories of signals, including recordings of speech in different contexts and languages, musical compositions and performances from different genres. Non-human vocalizations from two bird species and two types of marine mammals were also analysed for comparison. The resulting patterns of AF variance across timescales were distinct to each of four natural categories of complex sound: speech, popular music, classical music and complex animal vocalizations. Comparisons within and across categories indicated that nested clustering in longer timescales was more prominent when prosodic variation was greater, and when sounds came from interactions among individuals, including interactions between speakers, musicians, and even killer whales. Nested clustering also was more prominent for music compared with speech, and reflected beat structure for popular music and self-similarity across timescales for classical music. In summary, hierarchical temporal structures reflect the behavioural and social processes underlying complex vocalizations and musical performances. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. The Spatio-temporal Statistical Structure and Ergodic Behaviour of Scalar Turbulence Within a Rod Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khaled; Poggi, Davide; Porporato, Amilcare; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-12-01

    Connections between the spatial and temporal statistics of turbulent flow, and their possible convergence to ensemble statistics as assumed by the ergodic hypothesis, are explored for passive scalars within a rod canopy. While complete ergodicity is not expected to apply over all the spatial domain within such heterogeneous flows, the fact that canopy turbulence exhibits self-similar characteristics at a given depth within the canopy encourages a discussion on necessary conditions for an `operational' ergodicity framework. Flows between roughness elements such as within canopies exhibit features that distinguish them from their well-studied classical boundary-layer counterparts. These differences are commonly attributed to short-circuiting of the energy cascade and the prevalence of intermittent von Kármán vortex streets in the deeper layers of the canopy. Using laser-induced fluorescence measurements at two different depths within a rod canopy situated in a large flume, the spatio-temporal statistical properties and concomitant necessary conditions for ergodicity of passive scalar turbulence statistics are evaluated. First, the integral time and length scales are analyzed and their corresponding maximum values are used to guide the construction of an ensemble of independent realizations from repeated spatio-temporal concentration measurements. As a statistical analysis for an operational ergodicity check, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on the distributions of temporal and spatial concentration series against the ensemble was conducted. The outcome of this test reveals that ergodicity is reasonably valid over the entire domain except close to the rod elements where wake-induced inhomogeneities and damped turbulence prevail. The spatial concentration statistics within a grid-cell (square domain formed by four corner rods) appear to be less ergodic than their temporal counterparts, which is not surprising given the periodicity and persistence of von Kármán vortices in

  14. Temporal bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Although pluridirectional tomography had been the standard method to evaluate the temporal bone, computed tomography has replaced it for nearly all applications. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate nonosseous temporal bone structures as well

  15. The temporal structure of resting-state brain activity in the medial prefrontal cortex predicts self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zirui; Obara, Natsuho; Davis, Henry Hap; Pokorny, Johanna; Northoff, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an overlap between the neural substrate of resting-state activity and self-related processing in the cortical midline structures (CMS). However, the neural and psychological mechanisms mediating this so-called "rest-self overlap" remain unclear. To investigate the neural mechanisms, we estimated the temporal structure of spontaneous/resting-state activity, e.g. its long-range temporal correlations or self-affinity across time as indexed by the power-law exponent (PLE). The PLE was obtained in resting-state activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in 47 healthy subjects by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We performed correlation analyses of the PLE and Revised Self-Consciousness Scale (SCSR) scores, which enabled us to access different dimensions of self-consciousness and specified rest-self overlap in a psychological regard. The PLE in the MPFC's resting-state activity correlated with private self-consciousness scores from the SCSR. Conversely, we found no correlation between the PLE and the other subscales of the SCSR (public, social) or between other resting-state measures, including functional connectivity, and the SCSR subscales. This is the first evidence for the association between the scale-free dynamics of resting-state activity in the CMS and the private dimension of self-consciousness. This finding implies the relationship of especially the private dimension of self with the temporal structure of resting-state activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...... are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects...

  17. A correlational method to concurrently measure envelope and temporal fine structure weights: effects of age, cochlear pathology, and spectral shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E

    2012-09-01

    The speech signal may be divided into spectral frequency-bands, each band containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. This study measured the perceptual weights for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials in young normal-hearing listeners, older normal-hearing listeners, aided older hearing-impaired listeners, and spectrally matched young normal-hearing listeners. The availability of each acoustic property was independently varied through noisy signal extraction. Thus, the full speech stimulus was presented with noise used to mask six different auditory channels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener's performance with the signal-to-noise ratio of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrate that temporal fine structure perceptual weights remain stable across the four listener groups. However, a different weighting typography was observed across the listener groups for envelope cues. Results suggest that spectral shaping used to preserve the audibility of the speech stimulus may alter the allocation of perceptual resources. The relative perceptual weighting of envelope cues may also change with age. Concurrent testing of sentences repeated once on a previous day demonstrated that weighting strategies for all listener groups can change, suggesting an initial stabilization period or susceptibility to auditory training.

  18. Protective Effects of Cannabidiol against Seizures and Neuronal Death in a Rat Model of Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Val-da Silva, Raquel A; Peixoto-Santos, Jose E; Kandratavicius, Ludmyla; De Ross, Jana B; Esteves, Ingrid; De Martinis, Bruno S; Alves, Marcela N R; Scandiuzzi, Renata C; Hallak, Jaime E C; Zuardi, Antonio W; Crippa, Jose A; Leite, Joao P

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuropathological effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotropic constituent of Cannabis sativa , in the intrahippocampal pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) rat model. CBD was administered before pilocarpine-induced SE (group SE+CBDp) or before and after SE (group SE+CBDt), and compared to rats submitted only to SE (SE group), CBD, or vehicle (VH group). Groups were evaluated during SE (behavioral and electrophysiological analysis), as well as at days one and three post-SE (exploratory activity, electrophysiological analysis, neuron density, and neuron degeneration). Compared to SE group, SE+CBD groups (SE+CBDp and SE+CBDt) had increased SE latency, diminished SE severity, increased contralateral afterdischarge latency and decreased relative powers in delta (0.5-4 Hz) and theta (4-10 Hz) bands. Only SE+CBDp had increased vertical exploratory activity 1-day post SE and decreased contralateral relative power in delta 3 days after SE, when compared to SE group. SE+CBD groups also showed decreased neurodegeneration in the hilus and CA3, and higher neuron density in granule cell layer, hilus, CA3, and CA1, when compared to SE group. Our findings demonstrate anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of CBD preventive treatment in the intrahippocampal pilocarpine epilepsy model, either as single or multiple administrations, reinforcing the potential role of CBD in the treatment of epileptic disorders.

  19. Acute diffusion abnormalities in the hippocampus of children with new-onset seizures: the development of mesial temporal sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Bergqvist, C.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Haselgrove, J.; Hunter, J.V.; Bilaniuk, L.T. [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2004-04-01

    We studied the role of early diffusion-weighted imaging DWI in the investigation of children with new-onset prolonged seizures which eventually result in unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We carried out MRI on five children aged 17 months to 7 years including conventional and diffusion-weighted sequences. We calculated apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) for the affected and the normal opposite hippocampus. Follow-up examinations were performed, including DWI and ADC measurements in four. We studied four children within 3 days of the onset of prolonged psychomotor seizures and showed increased signal on T2-weighted images, and DWI, indicating restricted diffusion, throughout the affected hippocampus. The ADC were reduced by a mean of 14.4% in the head and by 15% in the body of the hippocampus. In one child examined 15 days after the onset of seizures, the ADC were the same on both sides. All five patients showed hippocampal atrophy on follow-up 2-18 months later. In the four patients in whom ADC were obtained on follow-up, they were increased by 19% in the head and 17% in the body. DWI may represent a useful adjunct to conventional MRI for identifying acute injury to the hippocampus which results in sclerosis. (orig.)

  20. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Šroubek, J.; Lukavský, Jiří; Liščák, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 11 (2015), s. 2927-2932 ISSN 1178-2021 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : amygdalohippocampectomy * thermocoagulation * MRI * volumetry * neuro­psychology Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2015

  1. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Šroubek, J.; Lukavský, Jiří; Liščák, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 11 (2015), s. 2927-2932 ISSN 1178-2021 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : amygdalohippocampectomy * thermocoagulation * MRI * volumetry * neuro­psychology Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2015

  2. Temporal occurrence and community structure of helminth parasites in southern leopard frogs, Rana sphenocephala, from north central Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhora, M Suhail; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-03-01

    Currently, little information is available about the temporal recruitment of helminth communities in amphibian hosts. We examined the helminth community structure and temporal recruitment of helminth parasites in southern leopard frogs, Rana sphenocephala. Specifically, we were interested in how host life history such as habitat, age and/or size, diet, sex, and temporal variation in abiotic factors (precipitation and temperature) were important in determining monthly infection patterns of helminth populations and communities in southern leopard frogs. From May to September 2011, 74 southern leopard frogs were collected from Teal Ridge in Stillwater Payne County, OK, USA. Sixty-nine (93 %) of 74 frogs were infected with 1 or more helminth species. During our collecting period, the average monthly temperature was lowest in May and highest in July, and monthly precipitation was highest in May and lowest during the first week of September. The component community consisted of 11 species of helminth, including 1 larval and 1 adult cestode, 2 larval and 3 adult trematodes, and 1 juvenile and 3 adult nematodes. Of the 1790 helminths recovered, 51 % (911) were nematodes, 47 % (842) were cestodes, and 2 % (37) were trematodes. There were significant differences in the total abundance and mean species richness of helminths acquired by skin contact or through frog diet in monthly component communities of southern leopard frogs. A positive correlation existed for percentage of all helminths acquired by skin contact and monthly precipitation (r = 0.94, P < 0.01). Conversely, a negative correlation existed for monthly precipitation and percentage of helminths acquired by diet (r = -0.94, P < 0.01). Our results indicate that abiotic conditions such as precipitation have a major influence on the avenues for and constraints on the transmission of helminths with life cycles associated with water/moisture or terrestrial intermediate/paratenic hosts and are important in structuring

  3. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Perry, Alistair; Ridley, Ben; Proix, Timothée; Golos, Mathieu; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Breakspear, Michael; Jirsa, Viktor; Guye, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo structure-function relationship is key to understanding brain network reorganization due to pathologies. This relationship is likely to be particularly complex in brain network diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy, in which disturbed large-scale systems are involved in both transient electrical events and long-lasting functional and structural impairments. Herein, we estimated this relationship by analyzing the correlation between structural connectivity and functional connectivity in terms of analytical network communication parameters. As such, we targeted the gradual topological structure-function reorganization caused by the pathology not only at the whole brain scale but also both in core and peripheral regions of the brain. We acquired diffusion (dMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data in seven right-lateralized TLE (rTLE) patients and fourteen healthy controls and analyzed the structure-function relationship by using analytical network communication metrics derived from the structural connectome. In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information) in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures.

  4. Aberrant Wnt signaling pathway in medial temporal lobe structures of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riise, Jesper; Plath, Niels; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a cardinal feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) predominantly linked to synaptic failure, disrupted network connectivity and neurodegeneration. A large body of evidence associates the Wnt pathway with synaptic modulation and cognitive processes, suggesting a potential role...... for aberrant Wnt signaling in cognitive impairment. In fact, altered expression of key Wnt pathway components has been found in brains of AD patients as well as AD animal models supporting a deregulated pathway in AD. The evidence for deregulated Wnt signaling in AD, however, remains sparse and focused...... on isolated Wnt pathway components. Here, we provide the first comprehensive pathway-focused evaluation of the Wnt pathway in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of AD brains. Our data demonstrate altered Wnt pathway gene expression at all levels of the pathway in both medial temporal lobe regions...

  5. Vortex formation and stability analysis for shear flows over combined spatially and temporally structured walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riahi D. N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Benney's theory of evolution of disturbances in shear flows over smooth and flat boundary is extended to study for shear flows over combined spatially and temporally corrugated walls. Perturbation and multiple-scales analyses are employed for the case where both amplitude of the corrugations and the amplitude of wave motion are small. Analyses for instability of modulated mean shear flows with respect to spanwise-periodic disturbance rolls and for the subsequent vortex formation and vortex stability are presented, and the effects of the corrugated walls on the resulting flow and vortices are determined. It is found that particular corrugated walls can originate and control the longitudinal vortices, while some other types of corrugated walls can enhance instability of such vortices.

  6. Success of Anomia Treatment in Aphasia Is Associated With Preserved Architecture of Global and Left Temporal Lobe Structural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Nesland, Travis; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius

    2016-03-01

    Targeted speech therapy can lead to substantial naming improvement in some subjects with anomia following dominant-hemisphere stroke. We investigated whether treatment-induced improvement in naming is associated with poststroke preservation of structural neural network architecture. Twenty-four patients with poststroke chronic aphasia underwent 30 hours of speech therapy over a 2-week period and were assessed at baseline and after therapy. Whole brain maps of neural architecture were constructed from pretreatment diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to derive measures of global brain network architecture (network small-worldness) and regional network influence (nodal betweenness centrality). Their relationship with naming recovery was evaluated with multiple linear regressions. Treatment-induced improvement in correct naming was associated with poststroke preservation of global network small worldness and of betweenness centrality in temporal lobe cortical regions. Together with baseline aphasia severity, these measures explained 78% of the variability in treatment response. Preservation of global and left temporal structural connectivity broadly explains the variability in treatment-related naming improvement in aphasia. These findings corroborate and expand on previous classical lesion-symptom mapping studies by elucidating some of the mechanisms by which brain damage may relate to treated aphasia recovery. Favorable naming outcomes may result from the intact connections between spared cortical areas that are functionally responsive to treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Temporal and spatial variation in relative abundance and length structure of salmonids in reservoirs: Implications for monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, D.T.; Hubert, W.A.; Gangl, R.S.; Whaley, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in salmonid catch per unit effort (C/f) may affect monitoring efforts in lakes and reservoirs. This study evaluated the spatial and temporal variation in gill-net C/f and length structure of captured salmonids in nearshore (???7.6-m bottom depth) and offshore (>7.6-m bottom depth) areas of two Wyoming reservoirs. Floating experimental gill nets were set as nearshore and offshore pairs at 24 locations in both reservoirs during each of four sampling periods (spring, early summer, late summer, and fall). Salmonid C/f was significantly higher in nearshore areas than in offshore areas during all periods in one reservoir and during all periods except spring in the other reservoir. Mean C/f of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was not significantly different between nearshore and offshore areas when water temperatures were 10-13??C in both reservoirs. Length structure of salmonids differed significantly between nearshore and offshore locations and among periods in both reservoirs. These patterns should be considered in both the design and analysis phases of monitoring efforts that use floating experimental gill nets and other sampling gears. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  8. Method for the Analysis of Temporal Change of Physical Structure in the Instrumentation and Control Life-Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goering, Markus; Fay, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The design of computer-based instrumentation and control (I and C) systems is determined by the allocation of I and C functions to I and C systems and components. Due to the characteristics of computer-based technology, component failures can negatively affect several I and C functions, so that the reliability proof of the I and C systems requires the accomplishment of I and C system design analyses throughout the I and C life-cycle. On one hand, this paper proposes the restructuring of the sequential IEC 61513 I and C life-cycle according to the V-model, so as to adequately integrate the concept of verification and validation. On the other hand, based on a meta model for the modeling of I and C systems, this paper introduces a method for the modeling and analysis of the effects with respect to the superposition of failure combinations and event sequences on the I and C system design, i.e. the temporal change of physical structure is analyzed. In the first step, the method is concerned with the modeling of the I and C systems. In the second step, the method considers the analysis of temporal change of physical structure, which integrates the concepts of the diversity and defense-in-depth analysis, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis

  9. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Pedersen, Julie Hefting; Laugesen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or modera...... understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources.......This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate...... and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination...

  10. Temporal form in interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Winther, Morten Trøstrup; Mørch, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Interaction design is distinguished from most other design disciplines through its temporal form. Temporal form is the computational structure that enables and demands a temporal expression in the resulting design. Temporal form is what enables poetry. In music, temporal form is the composition o...

  11. Tau and β-Amyloid Are Associated with Medial Temporal Lobe Structure, Function, and Memory Encoding in Normal Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Shawn M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Lockhart, Samuel N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Baker, Suzanne L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging; Jagust, William J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging

    2017-03-22

    Normal aging is associated with a decline in episodic memory and also with aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins and atrophy of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures crucial to memory formation. Although some evidence suggests that Aβ is associated with aberrant neural activity, the relationships among these two aggregated proteins, neural function, and brain structure are poorly understood. Using in vivo human Aβ and tau imaging, we demonstrate that increased Aβ and tau are both associated with aberrant fMRI activity in the MTL during memory encoding in cognitively normal older adults. This pathological neural activity was in turn associated with worse memory performance and atrophy within the MTL. A mediation analysis revealed that the relationship with regional atrophy was explained by MTL tau. These findings broaden the concept of cognitive aging to include evidence of Alzheimer’s disease-related protein aggregation as an underlying mechanism of age-related memory impairment.

  12. The Temporal and Spatial Scales of Density Structures Released in the Slow Solar Wind During Solar Activity Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Diaz, E.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davies, J. A.; Lavraud, B.; Pinto, R. F.; Kilpua, E.

    2017-12-01

    In a recent study, we took advantage of a highly tilted coronal neutral sheet to show that density structures, extending radially over several solar radii (R s), are released in the forming slow solar wind approximately 4-5 R s above the solar surface. We related the signatures of this formation process to intermittent magnetic reconnection occurring continuously above helmet streamers. We now exploit the heliospheric imagery from the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory (STEREO) to map the spatial and temporal distribution of the ejected structures. We demonstrate that streamers experience quasi-periodic bursts of activity with the simultaneous outpouring of small transients over a large range of latitudes in the corona. This cyclic activity leads to the emergence of well-defined and broad structures. Derivation of the trajectories and kinematic properties of the individual small transients that make up these large-scale structures confirms their association with the forming slow solar wind (SSW). We find that these transients are released, on average, every 19.5 hr, simultaneously at all latitudes with a typical radial size of 12 R s. Their spatial distribution, release rate, and three-dimensional extent are used to estimate the contribution of this cyclic activity to the mass flux carried outward by the SSW. Our results suggest that, in interplanetary space, the global structure of the heliospheric current sheet is dominated by a succession of blobs and associated flux ropes. We demonstrate this with an example event using STEREO-A in situ measurements.

  13. The spatial structure and temporal synchrony of water quality in stream networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Benjamin; Gruau, Gerard; Zarneske, Jay; Barbe, Lou; Gu, Sen; Kolbe, Tamara; Thomas, Zahra; Jaffrezic, Anne; Moatar, Florentina; Pinay, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    To feed nine billion people in 2050 while maintaining viable aquatic ecosystems will require an understanding of nutrient pollution dynamics throughout stream networks. Most regulatory frameworks such as the European Water Framework Directive and U.S. Clean Water Act, focus on nutrient concentrations in medium to large rivers. This strategy is appealing because large rivers integrate many small catchments and total nutrient loads drive eutrophication in estuarine and oceanic ecosystems. However, there is growing evidence that to understand and reduce downstream nutrient fluxes we need to look upstream. While headwater streams receive the bulk of nutrients in river networks, the relationship between land cover and nutrient flux often breaks down for small catchments, representing an important ecological unknown since 90% of global stream length occurs in catchments smaller than 15 km2. Though continuous monitoring of thousands of small streams is not feasible, what if we could learn what we needed about where and when to implement monitoring and conservation efforts with periodic sampling of headwater catchments? To address this question we performed repeat synoptic sampling of 56 nested catchments ranging in size from 1 to 370 km2 in western France. Spatial variability in carbon and nutrient concentrations decreased non-linearly as catchment size increased, with thresholds in variance for organic carbon and nutrients occurring between 36 and 68 km2. While it is widely held that temporal variance is higher in smaller streams, we observed consistent temporal variance across spatial scales and the ranking of catchments based on water quality showed strong synchrony in the water chemistry response to seasonal variation and hydrological events. We used these observations to develop two simple management frameworks. The subcatchment leverage concept proposes that mitigation and restoration efforts are more likely to succeed when implemented at spatial scales expressing

  14. Preoperative amygdala fMRI in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Silvia B; Powell, Robert; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Thompson, Pamela J; Symms, Mark R; Koepp, Matthias J; Duncan, John S

    2009-02-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resections (ATLR) benefit 70% of patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but may be complicated by emotional disturbances. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of the amygdala in processing emotions in TLE and whether this may be a potential preoperative predictive marker for emotional disturbances following surgery. We studied 54 patients with refractory mesial TLE due to hippocampal sclerosis (28 right, 26 left) and 21 healthy controls using a memory encoding fMRI paradigm, which included viewing fearful and neutral faces. Twenty-one TLE patients (10 left, 11 right) subsequently underwent ATLR. Anxiety and depression were assessed preoperatively and 4 months postoperatively using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. On viewing fearful faces, healthy controls demonstrated left lateralized, while right TLE patients showed bilateral amygdala activation. Left TLE patients had significantly reduced activation in left and right amygdalae compared to controls and right TLE patients. In right TLE patients, left and right amygdala activation was significantly related to preoperative anxiety and depression levels, and preoperative right amygdala activation correlated significantly with postoperative change of anxiety and depression scores, characterized by greater increases in anxiety and depression in patients with greater preoperative activation. No such correlations were seen for left TLE patients. The fearful face fMRI paradigm is a reliable method for visualizing amygdala activation in controls and patients with mesial TLE. Activation of the right amygdala preoperatively was predictive of emotional disturbances following right ATLR.

  15. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structuring of Leishmania major in Tunisia by Microsatellite Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrabi, Myriam; Bettaieb, Jihène; Ghawar, Wissem; Toumi, Amine; Zaâtour, Amor; Yazidi, Rihab; Chaâbane, Sana; Chalghaf, Bilel; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Ben Salah, Afif

    2015-01-01

    In Tunisia, cases of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major are increasing and spreading from the south-west to new areas in the center. To improve the current knowledge on L. major evolution and population dynamics, we performed multi-locus microsatellite typing of human isolates from Tunisian governorates where the disease is endemic (Gafsa, Kairouan and Sidi Bouzid governorates) and collected during two periods: 1991-1992 and 2008-2012. Analysis (F-statistics and Bayesian model-based approach) of the genotyping results of isolates collected in Sidi Bouzid in 1991-1992 and 2008-2012 shows that, over two decades, in the same area, Leishmania parasites evolved by generating genetically differentiated populations. The genetic patterns of 2008-2012 isolates from the three governorates indicate that L. major populations did not spread gradually from the south to the center of Tunisia, according to a geographical gradient, suggesting that human activities might be the source of the disease expansion. The genotype analysis also suggests previous (Bayesian model-based approach) and current (F-statistics) flows of genotypes between governorates and districts. Human activities as well as reservoir dynamics and the effects of environmental changes could explain how the disease progresses. This study provides new insights into the evolution and spread of L. major in Tunisia that might improve our understanding of the parasite flow between geographically and temporally distinct populations.

  16. Phylogeographical structure and temporal complexity in American sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua; Altingiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ashley B; Ickert-Bond, Stefanie M; Brunson, D Burke; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2008-09-01

    Eastern North American plant biogeography has traditionally focused on two primary issues: (i) the location of temperate Pleistocene refugia and their proximity to the southern margin of the ice sheet during the last glacial maximum, and (ii) the origin of the temperate element of northern Latin America. While numerous population genetic and phylogeographical studies have focused on the first issue, few (if any) have considered the second. We addressed these issues by surveying 117 individuals from 24 populations of Liquidambar styraciflua (American sweetgum; Altingiaceae) across the southeastern USA, eastern Mexico, and Guatemala, using more than 2200 bp of chloroplast DNA sequence data. To specifically address the issue of timing, we estimated intraspecific divergence times on the basis of multiple fossil-based calibration points, using taxa from Altingiaceae (Liquidambar and Altingia) and Hammamelidaceae (Hamamelis) as outgroups. More than half of the sampled localities exhibited multiple haplotypes. Remarkably, the greatest variation was observed within the USA, with Mexico and Guatemala sharing widespread haplotypes with Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky, Ohio, and northern Virginia. This lack of differentiation suggests shared ancestral polymorphisms, and that the genetic signal we observed is older than the disjunction itself. Our data provide support for previously proposed hypotheses of Pleistocene refugia in peninsular Florida and along the eastern Atlantic, but also for deeper divergences (approximately 8 million years ago) within the USA. These patterns reflect a dynamic biogeographical history for eastern North American trees, and emphasize the importance of the inclusion of a temporal component in any phylogeographical study.

  17. Functional neuroimaging studies of episodic memory. Functional dissociation in the medial temporal lobe structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiura, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the critical role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions in the encoding and retrieval of episodic memory. It has also been shown that an emotional factor in human memory enhances episodic encoding and retrieval. However, there is little evidence regarding the specific contribution of each MTL region to the relational, contextual, and emotional processes of episodic memory. The goal of this review article is to identify differential activation patterns of the processes between MTL regions. Results from functional neuroimaging studies of episodic memory show that the hippocampus is involved in encoding the relation between memory items, whereas the entorhinal and perirhinal cortices (anterior parahippocampal gyrus) contribute to the encoding of a single item. Additionally, the parahippocampal cortex (posterior parahippocampal gyrus) is selectively activated during the processing of contextual information of episodic memory. A similar pattern of functional dissociation is found in episodic memory retrieval. Functional neuroimaging has also shown that emotional information of episodic memory enhances amygdala-MTL correlations and that this enhancement is observed during both the encoding and retrieval of emotional memories. These findings from pervious neuroimaging studies suggest that different MTL regions could organize memory for personally experienced episodes via the 'relation' and 'context' factors of episodic memory, and that the emotional factor of episodes could modulate the functional organization in the MTL regions. (author)

  18. Temporal Community Structure in Two Gregarines (Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima) Co-Infecting the Amphipod Gammarus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunberg, Rita L; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2017-02-01

    This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus , to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78% year 1 and 97% year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41% year 1 and 52% year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 ± 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 ± 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6%. When both gregarine species co-infected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.

  19. Temporal genetic structure of major dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Barbara Alessandra Alves; de Sousa, Adna Cristina Barbosa; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Scarpassa, Vera Margarete

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, high levels of Aedes aegypti infestation and several dengue outbreaks with fatal outcome cases have been reported in Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. This situation made it important to understand the genetic structure and gene flow patterns among the populations of this vector in Manaus, vital pieces of information for their management and development of new control strategies. In this study, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the effect of seasonality on the genetic structure and gene flow patterns in Ae. aegypti populations from four urban neighborhoods of Manaus, collected during the two main rainy and dry seasons. All loci were polymorphic in the eight samples from the two seasons, with a total of 41 alleles. The genetic structure analyses of the samples from the rainy season revealed genetic homogeneity and extensive gene flow, a result consistent with the abundance of breeding sites for this vector. However, the samples from the dry season were significantly structured, due to a reduction of Ne in two (Praça 14 de Janeiro and Cidade Nova) of the four samples analyzed, and this was the primary factor influencing structure during the dry season. Genetic bottleneck analyses suggested that the Ae. aegypti populations from Manaus are being maintained continuously throughout the year, with seasonal reduction rather than severe bottleneck or extinction, corroborating previous reports. These findings are of extremely great importance for designing new dengue control strategies in Manaus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Outbreeding and lack of temporal genetic structure in a drone congregation of the neotropical stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias Y; Moritz, Robin Fa; Kraus, F Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    Drone aggregations are a widespread phenomenon in many stingless bee species (Meliponini), but the ultimate and proximate causes for their formation are still not well understood. One adaptive explanation for this phenomenon is the avoidance of inbreeding, which is especially detrimental for stingless bees due to the combined effects of the complementary sex-determining system and the small effective population size caused by eusociality and monandry. We analyzed the temporal genetic dynamics of a drone aggregation of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana with microsatellite markers over a time window of four weeks. We estimated the drones of the aggregation to originate from a total of 55 colonies using sibship re-construction. There was no detectable temporal genetic differentiation or sub-structuring in the aggregation. Most important, we could exclude all colonies in close proximity of the aggregation as origin of the drones in the aggregation, implicating that they originate from more distant colonies. We conclude that the diverse genetic composition and the distant origin of the drones of the S. mexicana drone congregation provides an effective mechanism to avoid mating among close relatives.

  1. T-pattern analysis for the study of temporal structure of animal and human behavior: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubea, M; Jonsson, G K; Faulisi, F; Sorbera, F; Di Giovanni, G; Benigno, A; Crescimanno, G; Magnusson, M S

    2015-01-15

    A basic tenet in the realm of modern behavioral sciences is that behavior consists of patterns in time. For this reason, investigations of behavior deal with sequences that are not easily perceivable by the unaided observer. This problem calls for improved means of detection, data handling and analysis. This review focuses on the analysis of the temporal structure of behavior carried out by means of a multivariate approach known as T-pattern analysis. Using this technique, recurring sequences of behavioral events, usually hard to detect, can be unveiled and carefully described. T-pattern analysis has been successfully applied in the study of various aspects of human or animal behavior such as behavioral modifications in neuro-psychiatric diseases, route-tracing stereotypy in mice, interaction between human subjects and animal or artificial agents, hormonal-behavioral interactions, patterns of behavior associated with emesis and, in our laboratories, exploration and anxiety-related behaviors in rodents. After describing the theory and concepts of T-pattern analysis, this review will focus on the application of the analysis to the study of the temporal characteristics of behavior in different species from rodents to human beings. This work could represent a useful background for researchers who intend to employ such a refined multivariate approach to the study of behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant pathogens structure arthropod communities across multiple spatial and temporal scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, A.J.M.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens and herbivores frequently co-occur on the same host plants. Despite this, little is known about the impact of their interactions on the structure of plant-based ecological communities. Here, we synthesize evidence that indicates that plant pathogens may profoundly impact arthropod

  3. Spatial and temporal structure of a mesocarnivore guild in midwestern north America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon B. Lesmeister; Clayton K. Nielsen; Eric M. Schauber; Eric C. Hellgren

    2015-01-01

    Carnivore guilds play a vital role in ecological communities by cascading trophic effects, energy and nutrient transfer, and stabilizing or destabilizing food webs. Consequently, the structure of carnivore guilds can be critical to ecosystem patterns. Body size is a crucial influence on intraguild interactions, because it affects access to prey resources, effectiveness...

  4. Spatio-temporal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence and physiological and structural indices acquired from hyperspectral imagery as compared with carbon fluxes measured with eddy covariance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarco-Tejada, P.J.; Morales Sierra, A.; Testi, L.; Villalobos, F.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the assessment of the spatio-temporal trends of chlorophyll fluorescence, narrow-band physiological indices, and structural indices acquired with a hyperspectral imager flown over a flux tower in a canopy characterized by small seasonal structural changes and a

  5. Role of short-time acoustic temporal fine structure cues in sentence recognition for normal-hearing listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Limin; Xu, Li

    2018-02-01

    Short-time processing was employed to manipulate the amplitude, bandwidth, and temporal fine structure (TFS) in sentences. Fifty-two native-English-speaking, normal-hearing listeners participated in four sentence-recognition experiments. Results showed that recovered envelope (E) played an important role in speech recognition when the bandwidth was > 1 equivalent rectangular bandwidth. Removing TFS drastically reduced sentence recognition. Preserving TFS greatly improved sentence recognition when amplitude information was available at a rate ≥ 10 Hz (i.e., time segment ≤ 100 ms). Therefore, the short-time TFS facilitates speech perception together with the recovered E and works with the coarse amplitude cues to provide useful information for speech recognition.

  6. The temporal structure of the autistic voice: A cross-linguistic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Grossman, Ruth; Cantio, Cathriona

    , with patterns regularly repeated) in their pitch and pause structure and more irregular in speechrate. Conclusions: Non-linear recurrence analyses techniques suggest that there are quantifiable acoustic features in speech production of children with ASD that distinguish them from typically developing speakers...... and communication and socialization ratings in high functioning speakers with autism spectrum disorders, Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 35 (2005) 861–869. [5] R.B. Grossman, H. Tager-Flusberg, Quality matters! Differences between expressive and receptive non-verbal communication skills in children...... of adult Danish speakers with Asperger’s syndrome. Objectives: We systematically quantify and explore speech patterns in children with and without autism across two languages: Danish and American English. We employ traditional and non-linear techniques measuring the structure (regularity and complexity...

  7. Geometrical exposition of structural axiomatic economics (II): qualitative and temporal aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral assumptions are not solid enough to be eligible as first principles of theoretical economics. Hence all endeavors to lay the formal foundation on a new site and at a deeper level actually need no further vindication. Part (I) of the structural axiomatic analysis submits three nonbehavioral axioms as groundwork and applies them to the simplest possible case of the pure consumption economy. The geometrical analysis makes the interrelations between income, profit and...

  8. Pathological and Pathophysiological Alterations in Temporal Lobe Structures After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-31

    motif) ligand 7 TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor I serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A (alpha-I antiproteinase, antitrypsin). member 3 lipocalin 2...voltage-gated, type VII, alpha CD84 molecule ribonuclease T2 ubiquitin specific peptidase 18 fYN binding protein meiosis-specific nuclear structural I...containing 2 membrane-spanning 4-domains. subfamily A. member 6A receptor (chemosensory) transporter protein 4 CD180 molecule serpin peptidase

  9. MULTI-TEMPORAL ASSESSMENT OF LYCHEE TREE CROP STRUCTURE USING MULTI-SPECTRAL RPAS IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Johansen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The lychee tree is native to China and produce small fleshy fruit up to 5 cm in diameter. Lychee production in Australia is worth > $20 million annually. Pruning of trees encourages new growth, has a positive effect on fruiting of lychee, makes fruit-picking easier, and may increase yield, as it increases light interception and tree crown surface area. The objective of this research was to assess changes in tree structure, i.e. tree crown circumference, width, height and Plant Projective Cover (PPC using multi-spectral Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS imagery collected before and after pruning of a lychee plantation. A secondary objective was to assess any variations in the results as a function of various flying heights (30, 50 and 70 m. Pre- and post-pruning results showed significant differences in all measured tree structural parameters, including an average decrease in: tree crown circumference of 1.94 m; tree crown width of 0.57 m; tree crown height of 0.62 m; and PPC of 14.8 %. The different flying heights produced similar measurements of tree crown width and PPC, whereas tree crown circumference and height measurements decreased with increasing flying height. These results show that multi-spectral RPAS imagery can provide a suitable means of assessing pruning efforts undertaken by contractors based on changes in tree structure of lychee plantations and that it is important to collect imagery in a consistent manner, as varying flying heights may cause changes to tree structural measurements.

  10. Multi-Temporal Assessment of Lychee Tree Crop Structure Using Multi-Spectral Rpas Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, K.; Raharjo, T.

    2017-08-01

    The lychee tree is native to China and produce small fleshy fruit up to 5 cm in diameter. Lychee production in Australia is worth > 20 million annually. Pruning of trees encourages new growth, has a positive effect on fruiting of lychee, makes fruit-picking easier, and may increase yield, as it increases light interception and tree crown surface area. The objective of this research was to assess changes in tree structure, i.e. tree crown circumference, width, height and Plant Projective Cover (PPC) using multi-spectral Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) imagery collected before and after pruning of a lychee plantation. A secondary objective was to assess any variations in the results as a function of various flying heights (30, 50 and 70 m). Pre- and post-pruning results showed significant differences in all measured tree structural parameters, including an average decrease in: tree crown circumference of 1.94 m; tree crown width of 0.57 m; tree crown height of 0.62 m; and PPC of 14.8 %. The different flying heights produced similar measurements of tree crown width and PPC, whereas tree crown circumference and height measurements decreased with increasing flying height. These results show that multi-spectral RPAS imagery can provide a suitable means of assessing pruning efforts undertaken by contractors based on changes in tree structure of lychee plantations and that it is important to collect imagery in a consistent manner, as varying flying heights may cause changes to tree structural measurements.

  11. Structural Classification of Marshes with Polarimetric SAR Highlighting the Temporal Mapping of Marshes Exposed to Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Ramsey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Empirical relationships between field-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI and Leaf Angle Distribution (LAD and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR based biophysical indicators were created and applied to map S. alterniflora marsh canopy structure. PolSAR and field data were collected near concurrently in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in coastal marshes, and PolSAR data alone were acquired in 2009. Regression analyses showed that LAI correspondence with the PolSAR biophysical indicator variables equaled or exceeded those of vegetation water content (VWC correspondences. In the final six regressor model, the ratio HV/VV explained 49% of the total 77% explained LAI variance, and the HH-VV coherence and phase information accounted for the remainder. HV/HH dominated the two regressor LAD relationship, and spatial heterogeneity and backscatter mechanism followed by coherence information dominated the final three regressor model that explained 74% of the LAD variance. Regression results applied to 2009 through 2012 PolSAR images showed substantial changes in marsh LAI and LAD. Although the direct cause was not substantiated, following a release of freshwater in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the fairly uniform interior marsh structure of 2009 was more vertical and dense shortly after the oil spill cessation. After 2010, marsh structure generally progressed back toward the 2009 uniformity; however, the trend was more disjointed in oil impact marshes.

  12. Structure, Spatial and Temporal Distribution of the Culex pipiens Complex in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Xiong, Chenglong; Su, Fei; Cao, Hui; Zhou, Jianjun; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-11-17

    Culex pipiens molestus was first reported in Shanghai in 2010. The population structures and seasonal distributions of Culex pipiens subspecies C. p. molestus , Culex pipiens pallens , and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus are not well known. From late February to November 2013, we conducted daily field surveillance of mosquitoes at eight sites at two green lands and three residential areas in downtown Shanghai. Morphological comparison and DV/D ratios (DV/D is an indicator of mosquito taxonomy) were used to identify adult mosquitoes. The distribution curves of the Culex pipiens complex members indicated seasonal fluctuations. The temperature range of 20-25 °C was the most suitable for adult activity. Micro-environmental factors may differentiate the complex population structures. Hybridization between C. p. pallens and C. p. quinquefasciatus was common and neither "DV/D = 0.40" nor "DV/D = 0.50" can distinguish these subspecies and their hybrids. Conclusion : the population structure of the Culex pipiens complex is complex and characterized by significant hybridization. Measures other than DV/D ratios are needed for the discrimination of subspecies. The C. p. molestus invasion might result in the transmission of novel vector-borne diseases in Shanghai.

  13. Structure, Spatial and Temporal Distribution of the Culex pipiens Complex in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Xiong, Chenglong; Su, Fei; Cao, Hui; Zhou, Jianjun; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Culex pipiens molestus was first reported in Shanghai in 2010. The population structures and seasonal distributions of Culex pipiens subspecies C. p. molestus, Culex pipiens pallens, and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus are not well known. Methods: From late February to November 2013, we conducted daily field surveillance of mosquitoes at eight sites at two green lands and three residential areas in downtown Shanghai. Morphological comparison and DV/D ratios (DV/D is an indicator of mosquito taxonomy) were used to identify adult mosquitoes. Results: The distribution curves of the Culex pipiens complex members indicated seasonal fluctuations. The temperature range of 20–25 °C was the most suitable for adult activity. Micro-environmental factors may differentiate the complex population structures. Hybridization between C. p. pallens and C. p. quinquefasciatus was common and neither “DV/D = 0.40” nor “DV/D = 0.50” can distinguish these subspecies and their hybrids. Conclusion: the population structure of the Culex pipiens complex is complex and characterized by significant hybridization. Measures other than DV/D ratios are needed for the discrimination of subspecies. The C. p. molestus invasion might result in the transmission of novel vector-borne diseases in Shanghai. PMID:27869687

  14. Structural classification of marshes with Polarimetric SAR highlighting the temporal mapping of marshes exposed to oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical relationships between field-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Leaf Angle Distribution (LAD) and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) based biophysical indicators were created and applied to map S. alterniflora marsh canopy structure. PolSAR and field data were collected near concurrently in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in coastal marshes, and PolSAR data alone were acquired in 2009. Regression analyses showed that LAI correspondence with the PolSAR biophysical indicator variables equaled or exceeded those of vegetation water content (VWC) correspondences. In the final six regressor model, the ratio HV/VV explained 49% of the total 77% explained LAI variance, and the HH-VV coherence and phase information accounted for the remainder. HV/HH dominated the two regressor LAD relationship, and spatial heterogeneity and backscatter mechanism followed by coherence information dominated the final three regressor model that explained 74% of the LAD variance. Regression results applied to 2009 through 2012 PolSAR images showed substantial changes in marsh LAI and LAD. Although the direct cause was not substantiated, following a release of freshwater in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the fairly uniform interior marsh structure of 2009 was more vertical and dense shortly after the oil spill cessation. After 2010, marsh structure generally progressed back toward the 2009 uniformity; however, the trend was more disjointed in oil impact marshes.             

  15. Temporal slice registration and robust diffusion-tensor reconstruction for improved fetal brain structural connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marami, Bahram; Mohseni Salehi, Seyed Sadegh; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Rollins, Caitlin K; Yang, Edward; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, or DWI, is one of the most promising tools for the analysis of neural microstructure and the structural connectome of the human brain. The application of DWI to map early development of the human connectome in-utero, however, is challenged by intermittent fetal and maternal motion that disrupts the spatial correspondence of data acquired in the relatively long DWI acquisitions. Fetuses move continuously during DWI scans. Reliable and accurate analysis of the fetal brain structural connectome requires careful compensation of motion effects and robust reconstruction to avoid introducing bias based on the degree of fetal motion. In this paper we introduce a novel robust algorithm to reconstruct in-vivo diffusion-tensor MRI (DTI) of the moving fetal brain and show its effect on structural connectivity analysis. The proposed algorithm involves multiple steps of image registration incorporating a dynamic registration-based motion tracking algorithm to restore the spatial correspondence of DWI data at the slice level and reconstruct DTI of the fetal brain in the standard (atlas) coordinate space. A weighted linear least squares approach is adapted to remove the effect of intra-slice motion and reconstruct DTI from motion-corrected data. The proposed algorithm was tested on data obtained from 21 healthy fetuses scanned in-utero at 22-38 weeks gestation. Significantly higher fractional anisotropy values in fiber-rich regions, and the analysis of whole-brain tractography and group structural connectivity, showed the efficacy of the proposed method compared to the analyses based on original data and previously proposed methods. The results of this study show that slice-level motion correction and robust reconstruction is necessary for reliable in-vivo structural connectivity analysis of the fetal brain. Connectivity analysis based on graph theoretic measures show high degree of modularity and clustering, and short average

  16. Evaluation of isthmus prevalence, location, and types in mesial roots of mandibular molars in the Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Akhlagi, Nahid Mohammadzade; Khodaei, Fatemeh; Shojaee, Golnaz; Shirazi, Sara

    2014-03-01

    Management of canal isthmus is considered as an important factor for successful endodontic treatment. Accordingly, this study was designed to determine the prevalence, location, and types of isthmus in mesial root canals of extracted mandibular molars in a sample of Iranian population. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 60 extracted molars with two mesial canals were included. The samples were initially decoronated and then, roots were sectioned horizontally at 2, 4, and 6 mm levels from the apex via a low-speed handpiece with a thin metallic disk and finally prepared and stained with Indian ink. All sections were examined using a stereomicroscope at a magnification of ×30. Prevalence, location, and types of isthmus were evaluated based on the classifications by Kim and Teixeira and all data were statistically analyzed by the chi-squared test. The statistical significance level was established at 0.05. Eighty-three percent of extracted mandibular molars had an isthmus at the mesial root. This prevalence increased with distance from the apex, that is, 92% at 6 mm from the apex and 70% at 2 mm from the apex. A statistically significant difference was found between the sections at 2 and 6 mm from the apex (P 0.05). Isthmus is very common in the mesial roots of the mandibular permanent molars in the Iranian population, with the highest prevalence in the 6 mm distance from the root apex. Therefore, detection, cleaning, and filling of these apical 6 mm isthmuses are of great benefit in modern endodontics.

  17. Evaluation of isthmus prevalence, location, and types in mesial roots of mandibular molars in the Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Mehrvarzfar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of canal isthmus is considered as an important factor for successful endodontic treatment. Accordingly, this study was designed to determine the prevalence, location, and types of isthmus in mesial root canals of extracted mandibular molars in a sample of Iranian population. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 60 extracted molars with two mesial canals were included. The samples were initially decoronated and then, roots were sectioned horizontally at 2, 4, and 6 mm levels from the apex via a low-speed handpiece with a thin metallic disk and finally prepared and stained with Indian ink. All sections were examined using a stereomicroscope at a magnification of ×30. Prevalence, location, and types of isthmus were evaluated based on the classifications by Kim and Teixeira and all data were statistically analyzed by the chi-squared test. The statistical significance level was established at 0.05. Results: Eighty-three percent of extracted mandibular molars had an isthmus at the mesial root. This prevalence increased with distance from the apex, that is, 92% at 6 mm from the apex and 70% at 2 mm from the apex. A statistically significant difference was found between the sections at 2 and 6 mm from the apex (P 0.05. Conclusion: Isthmus is very common in the mesial roots of the mandibular permanent molars in the Iranian population, with the highest prevalence in the 6 mm distance from the root apex. Therefore, detection, cleaning, and filling of these apical 6 mm isthmuses are of great benefit in modern endodontics.

  18. Skeletally anchored mesialization of molars using digitized casts and two surface-matching approaches : Analysis of treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kathrin; Wilmes, Benedict; Grandjean, Chantal; Vasudavan, Sivabalan; Drescher, Dieter

    2018-01-01

    To (1) quantify the three-dimensional treatment effect of a Mesialslider appliance using superimposed digital models, (2) to evaluate anchorage loss (measured by incisor displacement), and (3) to assess agreement between two different matching approaches, i.e., control point (CP)-based and iterative closest point (ICP) matching. In a retrospective study, the effects of a skeletally anchored uni- and bilateral mesialization appliance (Mesialslider) as well as simultaneous mesialization and distalization appliance (Mesio-Distalslider) were evaluated in 48 subjects (aged 11-53 years). Pre- and posttreatment casts were digitized and superimposed with two different approaches, i.e., using ten manually selected control points located at the anterior palate and by means of an automated ICP-matching approach using a standardized palatal reference area. The treatment effects were evaluated using control points on the maxillary central incisors and maxillary molar teeth, and the methods were compared through the application of linear regression analyses and computation of alignment errors. Average upper molar mesialization was 6.3 ± 2.6 mm. Anchorage loss, designated as the mean amount of upper incisor displacement, was less than 0.5 mm in all dimensions investigated. Using the measurement method sufficient registration was possible using both approaches and corresponding tooth movements were significantly correlated (p < 0.01). Accurate measurements of tooth displacement can be performed using both CP- and ICP-based matching approaches. Within the limits of performing a retrospective study, a premolar width of molar mesialization appeared possible without clinically relevant anchorage loss.

  19. Identification and Endodontic Management of Middle Mesial Canal in Mandibular Second Molar Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatments are routinely done with the help of radiographs. However, radiographs represent only a two-dimensional image of an object. Failure to identify aberrant anatomy can lead to endodontic failure. This case report presents the use of three-dimensional imaging with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT as an adjunct to digital radiography in identification and management of mandibular second molar with three mesial canals.

  20. Analysis of the temporal variation of the structure of a montane forest with historical of fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bonillo Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the structural dynamic rates of an shrubs-tree component of a seasonal semideciduous upper montane forest, in Mantiqueira Mountain between 2002 and 2008. We calculated the rates of dynamic according to the number of surviving, dead individuals and recruits, as well as the rates of dynamic for gain and loss of basal area. We verified the spatial differences among the rates along the vegetation gradient parallel to ground elevation. We also studied the correlations between the rates and biotic (initial numbers of trees and initial basal area and abiotic parameters (altimetric quota. We verified that recruitment was higher than mortality, and the gain of basal area was higher than the loses. This result suggests that the forest is expanding, with gain in number of individuals and in basal area. Normally, this result characterizes forests in recuperation after some disturbance. The community sectors (basis, middle and top of hillside didn’t show any differences in terms of dynamic rates. In general, there were few significant correlations between biotic and abiotic parameters and the dynamic rates. The increase of density and basal area, the similarity of dynamic rates among the sectors and the low correlation between parameters and the dynamic of forest’s structure point out that the forest burning occurred in 90’s could be, nowadays, interfering directly in dynamic rates of forest.

  1. Aspects neuropsychologiques de l'epilepsie du lobe temporal droit : mémoire visuelle et perception

    OpenAIRE

    Wisniewski, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to advance the knowledge of diagnostic procedures for lateralizing visual memory deficits and to study the characteristics of perception in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The first study examined the appropriateness of four routinely used learning and reproduction visuo-spatial memory tests as an identification method for right mesial temporal lobe dysfunctions. Various statistical methods illustrate the tests poor capacity to lateralize the functional deficit...

  2. Description langugage for the modelling and analysis of temporal change of instrumentation and control system structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goering, Markus Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    The utilisation of computer-based I and C, as a result of the technological advancements in the computer industry, represents an up-to-date challenge for I and C engineers in nuclear power plants throughout the world. In comparison with the time-proven, hard-wired I and C, the engineering must consider the novel characteristics of computer-based technology during the implementation, these are primarily constituted by higher performance and the utilisation of software. On one hand, this allows for implementing more complex I and C functions and integrating several I and C functions on to single components, although on the other hand, the minimisation of the CCF probability is of high priority to the engineering. Furthermore, the engineering must take the implementation of the deterministic safety concept for the I and C design into consideration. This includes engineering the redundancy, diversity, physical separation, and independence design features, and is complemented by the analysis of the I and C design with respect to the superposition of pre-defined event sequences and postulated failure combinations, so as to secure the safe operation of the nuclear power plant. The focus of this thesis is on the basic principles of engineering, i.e. description languages and methods, which the engineering relies on for a highly qualitative and efficient computer-based I and C implementation. The analysis of the deterministic safety concept and computer-based I and C characteristics yields the relevant technical requirements for the engineering, these are combined with the general structuring principles of standard IEC 81346 and the extended description language evaluation criteria, which are based on the guideline VDI/VDE-3681, resulting in target criteria for evaluating description languages. The analysis and comparison of existing description languages reveals that no description language satisfactorily fulfils all target criteria, which is constituted in the

  3. Temporal coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals with cavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Zeidaabadi Nezhad, Abolghasem; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose the time-dependent coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals including one, two or multiple defect layers. The performance of the structures, namely the total transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity, is obtained using the proposed method. The results of the developed analytic approach are verified by comparing them to the results of the exact numerical transfer matrix method. Unlike the widely used numerical method, our proposed analytic method seems promising for the synthesis as well as the analysis purposes. Moreover, the proposed method has not the restrictions of the previously examined analytic methods. - Highlights: • A time-dependent coupled mode analysis is proposed for the cavity-type 1D MPCs. • Analytical formalism is presented for the single, double and multiple-defect MPCs. • Transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity are gained using the proposed method. • The proposed analytic method has advantages over the previously examined methods.

  4. The temporal structure of the autistic voice: A cross-linguistic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Grossman, Ruth; Cantio, Cathriona

    and communication and socialization ratings in high functioning speakers with autism spectrum disorders, Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 35 (2005) 861–869. [5] R.B. Grossman, H. Tager-Flusberg, Quality matters! Differences between expressive and receptive non-verbal communication skills in children......Background: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tend to have atypical modulation of speech and voice, often described as awkward, monotone, or sing-songy [1-3]. These anomalies may constitute one of the most robust and fast signals of social communication deficits in this population [4...... of adult Danish speakers with Asperger’s syndrome. Objectives: We systematically quantify and explore speech patterns in children with and without autism across two languages: Danish and American English. We employ traditional and non-linear techniques measuring the structure (regularity and complexity...

  5. Description langugage for the modelling and analysis of temporal change of instrumentation and control system structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goering, Markus Heinrich

    2013-10-25

    The utilisation of computer-based I and C, as a result of the technological advancements in the computer industry, represents an up-to-date challenge for I and C engineers in nuclear power plants throughout the world. In comparison with the time-proven, hard-wired I and C, the engineering must consider the novel characteristics of computer-based technology during the implementation, these are primarily constituted by higher performance and the utilisation of software. On one hand, this allows for implementing more complex I and C functions and integrating several I and C functions on to single components, although on the other hand, the minimisation of the CCF probability is of high priority to the engineering. Furthermore, the engineering must take the implementation of the deterministic safety concept for the I and C design into consideration. This includes engineering the redundancy, diversity, physical separation, and independence design features, and is complemented by the analysis of the I and C design with respect to the superposition of pre-defined event sequences and postulated failure combinations, so as to secure the safe operation of the nuclear power plant. The focus of this thesis is on the basic principles of engineering, i.e. description languages and methods, which the engineering relies on for a highly qualitative and efficient computer-based I and C implementation. The analysis of the deterministic safety concept and computer-based I and C characteristics yields the relevant technical requirements for the engineering, these are combined with the general structuring principles of standard IEC 81346 and the extended description language evaluation criteria, which are based on the guideline VDI/VDE-3681, resulting in target criteria for evaluating description languages. The analysis and comparison of existing description languages reveals that no description language satisfactorily fulfils all target criteria, which is constituted in the

  6. Spatio-temporal dynamics of ocean conditions and forage taxa reveal regional structuring of seabird–prey relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santora, Jarrod A; Schroeder, Isaac D; Field, John C; Wells, Brian K; Sydeman, William J

    Studies of predator–prey demographic responses and the physical drivers of such relationships are rare, yet essential for predicting future changes in the structure and dynamics of marine ecosystems. Here, we hypothesize that predator–prey relationships vary spatially in association with underlying physical ocean conditions, leading to observable changes in demographic rates, such as reproduction. To test this hypothesis, we quantified spatio-temporal variability in hydrographic conditions, krill, and forage fish to model predator (seabird) demographic responses over 18 years (1990–2007). We used principal component analysis and spatial correlation maps to assess coherence among ocean conditions, krill, and forage fish, and generalized additive models to quantify interannual variability in seabird breeding success relative to prey abundance. The first principal component of four hydrographic measurements yielded an index that partitioned “warm/weak upwelling” and “cool/strong upwelling” years. Partitioning of krill and forage fish time series among shelf and oceanic regions yielded spatially explicit indicators of prey availability. Krill abundance within the oceanic region was remarkably consistent between years, whereas krill over the shelf showed marked interannual fluctuations in relation to ocean conditions. Anchovy abundance varied on the shelf, and was greater in years of strong stratification, weak upwelling and warmer temperatures. Spatio-temporal variability of juvenile forage fish co-varied strongly with each other and with krill, but was weakly correlated with hydrographic conditions. Demographic responses between seabirds and prey availability revealed spatially variable associations indicative of the dynamic nature of “predator–habitat” relationships. Quantification of spatially explicit demographic responses, and their variability through time, demonstrate the possibility of delineating specific critical areas where the

  7. The community structure of macroscopic basidiomycetes (Fungi in Brazilian mangroves influenced by temporal and spatial variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgea Santos Nogueira-Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves are transitional ecosystems between terrestrial and marine environments, and are distinguished by a high abundance of animals, plants, and fungi. Although macrofungi occur in different types of habitat, including mangroves, little is known about their community structure and dynamic. Therefore the aim of this study was to analyze the diversity of macrofungi in a number of Brazilian mangroves, and the relationship between such diversity, precipitation and area of collection. A total of 32 field trips were undertaken from 2009 to 2010, and macrofungi were studied in four 250×40m transects: Timbó and Santa Cruz Channel on the Northern coast, and Maracaípe and Ariquindá on the Southern coast. All basidiomata found along the transects were placed in paper bags, air-dried and identified using existing literature. It was found that Northern areas predominantly featured Avicennia schaueriana mangroves, while Rhizophora mangle dominated in Southern transects. A total of 275 specimens were collected, and 33 species, 28 genera, 14 families and six orders were represented. Overall abundance and species richness did not vary significantly among areas, but varied according to time, being higher during the rainy season. Subtle differences in composition were observed over time and between areas, probably due to variations in plant species occurrence. Further studies with collections during months of greater precipitation in transects dominated by different mangrove species of the same ecosystem are suggested to assess the overall diversity of mycobiota in these ecosystems.

  8. Mitochondrial structure, function and dynamics are temporally controlled by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Anthony Graves

    Full Text Available Although the c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein controls mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, the coordination of these events and the mechanistic underpinnings of their regulation remain largely unexplored. We show here that re-expression of Myc in myc-/- fibroblasts is accompanied by a gradual accumulation of mitochondrial biomass and by increases in membrane polarization and mitochondrial fusion. A correction of OXPHOS deficiency is also seen, although structural abnormalities in electron transport chain complexes (ETC are not entirely normalized. Conversely, the down-regulation of Myc leads to a gradual decrease in mitochondrial mass and a more rapid loss of fusion and membrane potential. Increases in the levels of proteins specifically involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion support the idea that Myc affects mitochondrial mass by influencing both of these processes, albeit favoring the latter. The ETC defects that persist following Myc restoration may represent metabolic adaptations, as mitochondrial function is re-directed away from producing ATP to providing a source of metabolic precursors demanded by the transformed cell.

  9. Evaluation of the temporal structure of postural sway fluctuations based on a comprehensive set of analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M.; Schubert, P.; Schmidtbleicher, D.; Haas, C. T.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of postural control has a long history. Traditionally, the amount of body sway is solely used as an index of postural stability. Although this leads to some extent to an effective evaluation of balance performance, the control mechanisms involved have not yet been fully understood. The concept of nonlinear dynamics suggests that variability in the motor output is not randomness but structure, providing the stimulus to reveal the functionality of postural sway. The present work evaluates sway dynamics by means of COP excursions in a quiet standing task versus a dual-task condition in three different test times (30, 60, 300 s). Besides the application of traditional methods-which estimate the overall size of sway-the temporal pattern of body sway was quantified via wavelet transform, multiscale entropy and fractal analysis. We found higher sensitivity of the structural parameters to modulations of postural control strategies and partly an improved evaluation of sway dynamics in longer recordings. It could be shown that postural control modifications take place on different timescales corresponding to the interplay of the sensory systems. A continued application of nonlinear analysis can help to better understand postural control mechanisms.

  10. Spatial and temporal structure of the spider community in the clay semi-desert of western Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piterkina, Tatyana V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal structure of spider communities was studied in the clay semi-desert of the north-western Caspian Lowland, western Kazakhstan (49°23' N, 46°47' E. The soils and vegetation are complex, being composed of a mosaic of desert and steppe plant communities. Besides the native associations, there are plantations of different tree species. The ground-dwelling spider assemblages in the native habitats are the most diverse. The number of species inhabiting forest plantations is three times as small. Gnaphosidae is the leading family in the ground layer. They show high abundance and diversity levels during the whole season. Thomisidae, Lycosidae, Philodromidae, and Salticidae are abundant as well. The species diversity of herbage-dwelling spiders in different open native habitats is very similar. The spectrum of dominant families (Thomisidae, Oxyopidae, Araneidae, and Salticidae and the seasonal dynamics of their ratio in desert and steppe associations have much in common. Spider assemblages of native and artificial habitats are characterised by change from multispecies polydominant spring-summer communities to impoverished imbalanced autumn ones. Seasonal changes in the species structure of mature spider groupings in native habitats are well pronounced, while the impact of seasonal conditions is even stronger than between-habitat differences. Complexes of typical species with different levels of habitat preference are revealed.

  11. Relationships between default-mode network connectivity, medial temporal lobe structure, and age-related memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Andrew M; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Huijbers, Willem; Schultz, Aaron P; Hedden, Trey; Sperling, Reisa A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced aging negatively impacts memory performance. Brain aging has been associated with shrinkage in medial temporal lobe structures essential for memory--including hippocampus and entorhinal cortex--and with deficits in default-mode network connectivity. Yet, whether and how these imaging markers are relevant to age-related memory deficits remains a topic of debate. Using a sample of 182 older (age 74.6 ± 6.2 years) and 66 young (age 22.2 ± 3.6 years) participants, this study examined relationships among memory performance, hippocampus volume, entorhinal cortex thickness, and default-mode network connectivity across aging. All imaging markers and memory were significantly different between young and older groups. Each imaging marker significantly mediated the relationship between age and memory performance and collectively accounted for most of the variance in age-related memory performance. Within older participants, default-mode connectivity and hippocampus volume were independently associated with memory. Structural equation modeling of cross-sectional data within older participants suggest that entorhinal thinning may occur before reduced default-mode connectivity and hippocampal volume loss, which in turn lead to deficits in memory performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatial and temporal structure of fish assemblages in a hyperhaline coastal system: Ría Lagartos, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Peralta-Meixueiro

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal fish species assemblages were analyzed throughout two annual cycles (2004-2005 and 2007-2008 in the Ría Lagartos Lagoon system, Mexico, via non-parametric multivariate analyses. We compared density and biomass of fish species among five habitat types defined by combinations of structure and environmental characteristics (hyperhaline, rocky, seagrass, channel, and marine, and three climatic seasons (dry, rainy, and northerlies. A total of 11,187 individuals distributed in 32 families and 63 species were collected. The most numerically abundant species were Floridichthys polyommus and Cyprinodon artifrons, while Sphoeroides testudineus contributed to the greatest biomass. Species composition consisted mainly of estuarine and euryhaline marine species. Spatially, a saline gradient was observed with marine conditions in the mouth, and increasing to over 100 in the inner zone of the system. Species richness, diversity and biomass declined from the mouth to the inner zone, while density showed an inverse tendency, with the highest values in the inner zone. Thus the salinity was the variable that best explained the spatial fish assemblages" structure. The ichthyofauna composition did not change over time, but the dominant species varied with the years. The abundance of juvenile specimens, suggest that the different habitats are used as feeding and breeding zones; hence it is proposed that protection strategies be pursued not only for the lagoon system but also for the northern zone of the Yucatan Peninsula.

  13. Medial temporal structures and memory functions in adolescents with heavy cannabis use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari, Manzar; Avants, Brian; Cyckowski, Laura; Cervellione, Kelly L.; Roofeh, David; Cook, Philip; Gee, James; Sevy, Serge; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2011-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest an adverse effect of heavy cannabis use on adolescent brain development, particularly on the hippocampus. In this preliminary study, we compared hippocampal morphology in 14 “treatment-seeking” adolescents (aged 18-20) with a history of prior heavy-cannabis use (5.8 joints/day) after an average of 6.7 months of drug abstinence, and 14 demographically matched normal controls. Participants underwent a high-resolution 3D MRI as well as cognitive testing including the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT). Heavy-cannabis users showed significantly smaller volumes of the right (p< .04) and left (p< .02) hippocampus, but no significant differences in the amygdala region compared to controls. In controls, larger hippocampus volumes were observed to be significantly correlated with higher CVLT verbal learning and memory scores, but these relationships were not observed in cannabis users. In cannabis users, a smaller right hippocampus volume was correlated with a higher amount of cannabis use (r= - .57, p< .03). These data support a hypothesis that heavy-cannabis use may have an adverse effect on hippocampus development. These findings, after an average 6.7 month of supervised abstinence, lend support to a theory that cannabis use may impart long-term structural and functional damage. Alternatively, the observed hippocampal volumetric abnormalities may represent a risk factor for cannabis dependence. These data have potential significance for understanding the observed relationship between early cannabis exposure during adolescence and subsequent development of adult psychopathology reported in the literature for schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. PMID:21296361

  14. Adélie penguin survival: age structure, temporal variability and environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Louise; Southwell, Colin

    2011-12-01

    The driving factors of survival, a key demographic process, have been particularly challenging to study, especially for winter migratory species such as the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). While winter environmental conditions clearly influence Antarctic seabird survival, it has been unclear to which environmental features they are most likely to respond. Here, we examine the influence of environmental fluctuations, broad climatic conditions and the success of the breeding season prior to winter on annual survival of an Adélie penguin population using mark-recapture models based on penguin tag and resight data over a 16-year period. This analysis required an extension to the basic Cormack-Jolly-Seber model by incorporating age structure in recapture and survival sub-models. By including model covariates, we show that survival of older penguins is primarily related to the amount and concentration of ice present in their winter foraging grounds. In contrast, fledgling and yearling survival depended on other factors in addition to the physical marine environment and outcomes of the previous breeding season, but we were unable to determine what these were. The relationship between sea-ice and survival differed with penguin age: extensive ice during the return journey to breeding colonies was detrimental to survival for the younger penguins, whereas either too little or too much ice (between 15 and 80% cover) in the winter foraging grounds was detrimental for adults. Our results demonstrate that predictions of Adélie penguin survival can be improved by taking into account penguin age, prior breeding conditions and environmental features.

  15. Structural Neuroimaging in the Detection and Prognosis of Pre-Clinical and Early AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Fennema-Notestine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Current research supports the strong potential of structural MRI profiles, even within cross-sectional designs, as a promising method for the discrimination of Alzheimer's Disease (AD from normal controls and for the prediction of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI progression and conversion to AD. Findings suggest that measures of structural change in mesial and lateral temporal, cingulate, parietal and midfrontal areas may facilitate the assessment of a treatment's ability to halt the progressive structural loss that accompanies clinical decline in MCI. The performance of prediction is likely to continue to improve with the incorporation of measures from other neuroimaging modalities, clinical assessments, and neuromedical biomarkers, as the regional profile of individuals at risk for progression is refined.

  16. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) in Asturias (Spain), using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Results The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity). The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite) among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. Conclusions The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species. PMID:21794141

  17. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Luca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica in Asturias (Spain, using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus and red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Results The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity. The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. Conclusions The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species.

  18. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasaad, Samer; Oleaga, Álvaro; Casais, Rosa; Rossi, Luca; Min, Annarita Molinar; Soriguer, Ramón C; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-07-27

    Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) in Asturias (Spain), using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity). The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite) among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species. © 2011 Alasaad et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Ictal asystole: A rare cardiac manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy, treated with epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, Shreyas Hasmukh; Bhatti, Amit Ashok; Shah, Mansi Viraj; Muzumdar, Dattatraya P; Ravat, Sangeeta Hasmukh

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are associated with fascinatingly varied cardiac and autonomic manifestations, of which ictal tachycardia is common, and asystole and bradycardia are rare. Ictal asystole (IA), an often unsought autonomic phenomenon, occurs most commonly with temporal followed by frontal lobe seizures. Prolonged IA may lead to cerebral anoxic ischemia. As the mysteries of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy are unraveled, it is quite possible that the key to it lays within these seizure-induced cardiac rhythm abnormalities. We present a case of a young male with temporal lobe epilepsy due to left mesial temporal sclerosis with prolonged IA, which was successfully managed with epilepsy surgery.

  20. Cortical Actin Flow in T Cells Quantified by Spatio-temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy of Structured Illumination Microscopy Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashdown, George; Pandžić, Elvis; Cope, Andrew; Wiseman, Paul; Owen, Dylan

    2015-12-17

    Filamentous-actin plays a crucial role in a majority of cell processes including motility and, in immune cells, the formation of a key cell-cell interaction known as the immunological synapse. F-actin is also speculated to play a role in regulating molecular distributions at the membrane of cells including sub-membranous vesicle dynamics and protein clustering. While standard light microscope techniques allow generalized and diffraction-limited observations to be made, many cellular and molecular events including clustering and molecular flow occur in populations at length-scales far below the resolving power of standard light microscopy. By combining total internal reflection fluorescence with the super resolution imaging method structured illumination microscopy, the two-dimensional molecular flow of F-actin at the immune synapse of T cells was recorded. Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) was then applied, which generates quantifiable results in the form of velocity histograms and vector maps representing flow directionality and magnitude. This protocol describes the combination of super-resolution imaging and STICS techniques to generate flow vectors at sub-diffraction levels of detail. This technique was used to confirm an actin flow that is symmetrically retrograde and centripetal throughout the periphery of T cells upon synapse formation.

  1. Dynamic representation of the temporal and sequential structure of rhythmic movements in the primate medial premotor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, David A; Zarco, Wilbert; Bartolo, Ramon; Merchant, Hugo

    2014-09-03

    We determined the encoding properties of single cells and the decoding accuracy of cell populations in the medial premotor cortex (MPC) of Rhesus monkeys to represent in a time-varying fashion the duration and serial order of six intervals produced rhythmically during a synchronization-continuation tapping task. We found that MPC represented the temporal and sequential structure of rhythmic movements by activating small ensembles of neurons that encoded the duration or the serial order in rapid succession, so that the pattern of active neurons changed dramatically within each interval. Interestingly, the width of the encoding or decoding function for serial order increased as a function of duration. Finally, we found that the strength of correlation in spontaneous activity of the individual cells varied as a function of the timing of their recruitment. These results demonstrate the existence of dynamic representations in MPC for the duration and serial order of intervals produced rhythmically and suggest that this dynamic code depends on ensembles of interconnected neurons that provide a strong synaptic drive to the next ensemble in a consecutive chain of neural events. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411972-12$15.00/0.

  2. Temporal variability of biodiversity patterns and trophic structure of estuarine macrobenthic assemblages along a gradient of metal contamination

    KAUST Repository

    Piló, D.

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the response of macrobenthic assemblages along a gradient of metal contamination using a combination of uni- and multivariate methods focusing on their composition, structure and function. A total of six sites were established based on a preliminary survey, which identified three areas with different levels of contamination. These areas were defined as slightly contaminated (SC), moderately contaminated (MC) and highly contaminated (HC). Each area comprised two sites, sampled in four sampling surveys (September 2012, February, May and October of 2013). To investigate the response of the macrobenthic assemblages the number of individuals (N), number of taxa (S), Shannon-Weaver diversity (H\\'), Pielou\\'s equitability (J\\') and different distance-based multivariate measures of β-diversity (complementarity) were analysed. β-diversity as turnover was also analysed together with spatial and temporal changes in the trophic structure. A clear gradient of increasing contamination was consistently detected, but comparisons with available sediment quality guidelines indicated that adverse biological effects may be expected in all areas. This result suggests measuring concentrations of contaminants in the sediment per se may be insufficient to establish a clear link between ecological patterns and the contamination of the system. Also it highlights the difficulty of identifying reference areas in highly urbanized and industrialized estuaries. Only multivariate analysis (dbRDA; both using the taxonomic and trophic composition) and β-diversity as turnover showed a consistent response to metal contamination. Higher heterogeneity, mainly due to contribution of rare species (i.e. species present in a single sampling period), was observed in the least contaminated area (SC), decreasing towards the HC. In terms of the trophic function, a shift from a dominance of carnivores in the SC to the dominance of deposit-feeding organisms (and

  3. Brain morphological and microstructural features in cryptogenic late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy: a structural and diffusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Daichi; Sato, Noriko; Kimura, Yukio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2018-04-13

    Although epilepsy in the elderly has attracted attention recently, there are few systematic studies of neuroimaging in such patients. In this study, we used structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the morphological and microstructural features of the brain in late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We recruited patients with TLE and an age of onset > 50 years (late-TLE group) and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (control group). 3-Tesla MRI scans, including 3D T1-weighted images and 15-direction DTI, showed normal findings on visual assessment in both groups. We used Statistical Parametric Mapping 12 (SPM12) for gray and white matter structural normalization and comparison and used Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) for fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity comparisons of DTI. In both methods, p < 0.05 (family-wise error) was considered statistically significant. In total, 30 patients with late-onset TLE (mean ± SD age, 66.8 ± 8.4; mean ± SD age of onset, 63.0 ± 7.6 years) and 40 healthy controls (mean ± SD age, 66.6 ± 8.5 years) were enrolled. The late-onset TLE group showed significant gray matter volume increases in the bilateral amygdala and anterior hippocampus and significantly reduced mean diffusivity in the left temporofrontal lobe, internal capsule, and brainstem. No significant changes were evident in white matter volume or fractional anisotropy. Our findings may reflect some characteristics or mechanisms of cryptogenic TLE in the elderly, such as inflammatory processes.

  4. Tau and β-Amyloid Are Associated with Medial Temporal Lobe Structure, Function, and Memory Encoding in Normal Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Shawn M; Lockhart, Samuel N; Baker, Suzanne L; Jagust, William J

    2017-03-22

    Normal aging is associated with a decline in episodic memory and also with aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins and atrophy of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures crucial to memory formation. Although some evidence suggests that Aβ is associated with aberrant neural activity, the relationships among these two aggregated proteins, neural function, and brain structure are poorly understood. Using in vivo human Aβ and tau imaging, we demonstrate that increased Aβ and tau are both associated with aberrant fMRI activity in the MTL during memory encoding in cognitively normal older adults. This pathological neural activity was in turn associated with worse memory performance and atrophy within the MTL. A mediation analysis revealed that the relationship with regional atrophy was explained by MTL tau. These findings broaden the concept of cognitive aging to include evidence of Alzheimer's disease-related protein aggregation as an underlying mechanism of age-related memory impairment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alterations in episodic memory and the accumulation of Alzheimer's pathology are common in cognitively normal older adults. However, evidence of pathological effects on episodic memory has largely been limited to β-amyloid (Aβ). Because Aβ and tau often cooccur in older adults, previous research offers an incomplete understanding of the relationship between pathology and episodic memory. With the recent development of in vivo tau PET radiotracers, we show that Aβ and tau are associated with different aspects of memory encoding, leading to aberrant neural activity that is behaviorally detrimental. In addition, our results provide evidence linking Aβ- and tau-associated neural dysfunction to brain atrophy. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/373192-10$15.00/0.

  5. A temporal assessment of nematode community structure and diversity in the rhizosphere of cisgenic Phytophthora infestans-resistant potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vilma; Phelan, Sinead; Mullins, Ewen

    2016-12-01

    Nematodes play a key role in soil processes with alterations in the nematode community structure having the potential to considerably influence ecosystem functioning. As a result fluctuations in nematode diversity and/or community structure can be gauged as a 'barometer' of a soil's functional biodiversity. However, a deficit exists in regards to baseline knowledge and on the impact of specific GM crops on soil nematode populations and in particular in regard to the impact of GM potatoes on the diversity of nematode populations in the rhizosphere. The goal of this project was to begin to address this knowledge gap in regards to a GM potato line, cisgenically engineered for resistance to Phytophthora infestans (responsible organism of the Irish potato famine causing late blight disease). For this, a 3 year (2013, 2014, 2015) field experimental study was completed, containing two conventional genotypes (cvs. Desiree and Sarpo Mira) and a cisgenic genotype (cv. Desiree + Rpi-vnt1). Each potato genotype was treated with different disease management strategies (weekly chemical applications and corresponding no spray control). Hence affording the opportunity to investigate the temporal impact of potato genotype, disease management strategy (and their interaction) on the potato rhizosphere nematode community. Nematode structure and diversity were measured through established indices, accounts and taxonomy with factors recording a significant effect limited to the climatic conditions across the three seasons of the study and chemical applications associated with the selected disease management strategy. Based on the metrics studied, the cultivation of the cisgenic potato genotype exerted no significant effect (P > 0.05) on nematode community diversity or structure. The disease management treatments led to a reduction of specific trophic groups (e.g. Predacious c-p = 4), which of interest appeared to be counteracted by a potato genotype with vigorous growth phenotype

  6. The Family Pictures subtest of the WMS-III: relationship to verbal and visual memory following temporal lobectomy for intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Jessica S; Busch, Robyn M; Naugle, Richard I; Najm, Imad M

    2009-05-01

    This study examined the extent to which the Family Pictures (FP) subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) is related to verbal memory measures and right mesial temporal integrity. Epilepsy patients who underwent temporal lobectomy did not differ in the extent to which FP scores changed from before to after surgery, although postoperative FP performance was worse in those who underwent right temporal lobectomy than in those who underwent left temporal lobectomy. FP was most strongly related to the Logical Memory subtest from the WMS-III. Results suggest that FP measures both verbal and visual memory and is minimally sensitive to lateralization of temporal lobectomy.

  7. Determination of the spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton community structure in Daya Bay via HPLC-CHEMTAX pigment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longhua; Ou, Linjian; Huang, Kaixuan; Chai, Chao; Wang, Zhaohui; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community structure in Daya Bay, South China Sea, were identified by using HPLC-CHEMTAX analytical techniques. The highest chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations were observed during summer (with an average value of 0.84 μg/L) and lowest ones during winter (with an average value of 0.33 μg/L). CHEMTAX processing revealed the seasonal succession of phytoplankton species in Daya Bay. During winter, diatoms were the dominant phytoplankton species and contributed 41.5% to total Chl a. Based on Chl a concentration, the average ratio of dinoflagellates to total phytoplankton biomass substantially increased with increasing temperature and nitrogen to phosphorus (N/P) ratio, reaching 52.2% in spring. Nutrient limitation shifted from phosphorus to nitrogen during summer. Moreover, this period was associated with the predominance of diatoms, which accounted for 71.1% of Chl a. Prasinophytes and cryptophytes were the other two dominant groups and particularly dominated during winter. Cyanobacteria became an important group during summer and autumn. Canonical correspondence analysis suggested that chrysophytes, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes were strongly associated with high nitrate concentration, ammonium, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), and N/P ratio, and were negatively associated with temperature and phosphate. Diatoms and cyanobacteria were strongly associated with temperature, phosphate, and salinity, and are negatively influenced by nitrate, ammonium, DIN, and N/P ratio. Microscopic observations and pigment HPLC information were in good agreement for diatoms and dinoflagellates in the bay. This study demonstrated the usefulness of pigment analysis in investigating the distribution of phytoplankton groups in a complex physical environment, such as Daya Bay.

  8. Structural Changes of Desertified and Managed Shrubland Landscapes in Response to Drought: Spectral, Spatial and Temporal Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarin Paz-Kagan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought events cause changes in ecosystem function and structure by reducing the shrub abundance and expanding the biological soil crusts (biocrusts. This change increases the leakage of nutrient resources and water into the river streams in semi-arid areas. A common management solution for decreasing this loss of resources is to create a runoff-harvesting system (RHS. The objective of the current research is to apply geo-information techniques, including remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS, on the watershed scale, to monitor and analyze the spatial and temporal changes in response to drought of two source-sink systems, the natural shrubland and the human-made RHSs in the semi-arid area of the northern Negev Desert, Israel. This was done by evaluating the changes in soil, vegetation and landscape cover. The spatial changes were evaluated by three spectral indices: Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Crust Index (CI and landscape classification change between 2003 and 2010. In addition, we examined the effects of environmental factors on NDVI, CI and their clustering after successive drought years. The results show that vegetation cover indicates a negative ∆NDVI change due to a reduction in the abundance of woody vegetation. On the other hand, the soil cover change data indicate a positive ∆CI change due to the expansion of the biocrusts. These two trends are evidence for degradation processes in terms of resource conservation and bio-production. A considerable part of the changed area (39% represents transitions between redistribution processes of resources, such as water, sediments, nutrients and seeds, on the watershed scale. In the pre-drought period, resource redistribution mainly occurred on the slope scale, while in the post-drought period, resource redistribution occurred on the whole watershed scale. However, the RHS management is effective in reducing leakage, since these systems are located on the

  9. Linking temporal changes in the demographic structure and individual growth to the decline in the population of a tropical fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirot, Charlotte; Darnaude, Audrey M.; Guilhaumon, François; Ramos-Miranda, Julia; Flores-Hernandez, Domingo; Panfili, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    The exceptional biodiversity and productivity of tropical coastal lagoons can only be preserved by identifying the causes for the decline in the populations living in these vulnerable ecosystems. The Terminos lagoon in Mexico provided an opportunity for studying this issue as some of its fish populations, in particular the Silver Perch (Bairdiella chrysoura), have declined significantly since the 1980s. Fish sampling campaigns carried out over the whole lagoon area in 1979-81 and again in 2006-2011 revealed the mechanisms which may have been responsible for this decline. Based on biometrical data for 295 juveniles and adults from the two periods and on somatic growth derived from 173 otoliths, a study of the temporal changes in the demographic structure and life history traits (individual growth and body condition) made it possible to distinguish the causes of the decline in the B. chrysoura population. Growth models for the lagoon in 1980-1981 and 2006-2011 showed no significant change in the growth parameters of the population over the last 30 years with a logistic model giving an accurate estimate (R2 = 0.66) of the size-at-age for both periods. The decline in the B. chrysoura population could not be explained by an overall decrease in individual size and condition in the lagoon, the average standard length (SL) and Fulton index (FI) having increased slightly since 1980-1981 (4.6 mm and 0.02 for juveniles and 5.42 mm and 0.07 for adults). However, the size structure of the population in the lagoon has changed, with a significant shift in the size distribution of juveniles with a marked reduction in the proportion of juveniles ≤ 60 mm in the captures (90.9% fewer than in 1980-1981). As the otolith growth rate of fish during the first 4 months also decreased significantly between the two sampling periods (-15%), it is suggested that the main reason for the decline in the abundance and biomass of B. chrysoura within this system may be that its habitats are less

  10. Spatio-temporal variation of the structural organization of demersal communities in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Torruco

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural patterns of a sublittoral community were analyzed through a two-year series of samples in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. The groups involved in the study comprise fishes, molluscs, echinoderms and crustaceans. The time-space progressions of Second 0rder diversity values range between N2=5.3 and N2=9.8 at depths of 40 and 20 m respectively, through the first year of samples. In the second year the highest value (N2=22.2 was found at 30 m. The community ordination data through cluster and principal components analysis show five assemblages: benthic, benthic-demersal, demersal, mid water column, and temporary. There is a striking difference in trophic web structure between the dry season and rainy season. Fish community resource partitioning shows that the components are organized in three guilds: ichthyophagous, carcinophagous and omnivorous. However, a partial overlap of niches was commonly observed, and juvenile stages showed a narrower trophic spectrum than adults. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (2: 509-536. Epub 2007 June, 29.Se analizaron los patrones estructurales de la comunidad sublitoral a través de dos años de muestreo. Los grupos involucrados en el estudio fueron: peces, moluscos, equinodermos y crustáceos. Las progresiones espacio-temporales de la diversidad de segundo orden para el primer año se encuentran entre los intervalos de N2=5.3 y N2=9.8 en las profundidades de 40 y 20 m respectivamente. En el segundo periodo el valor más alto (N2=22.2 fue registrado a 30 m. La ordenación de la comunidad a través del análisis de agrupamientos y de Componentes Principales, muestran 5 ensamblajes: béntico, béntico-demersal, demersal, a media columna de agua y temporal. Hay una fuerte diferencia en la estructura de la red trófica entre las estaciones de secas y lluvias. La repartición de recursos en la comunidad de peces, muestran que sus componentes están organizados en tres gremios: Ictiófagos, Carcinófagos y Omnívoros. Sin

  11. Temporal and vertical variations in phythoplankton community structure and its relation to some morphometric parameters of four Colombian reservoirs Temporal and vertical variations in phythoplankton community structure and its relation to some morphometric parameters of four Colombian reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez R. John J.

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton samples were taken at three depths within the photie zone of eaeh of four reservoirs, Punehiná, Las Playas, El Peñol and San Lorenzo loeated in Antioquia department, Colombia. A total of 77 taxa were identified in the four reservoirs. Diatoms were not included. In all reservoirs, Chlorophyta was the dominant group. Botryococcus braunii was the dominant species at Punchiná, Las Playas and El Peñol reservoirs; Cosmarium sp. was the dominant at San Lorenzo. Temporal variation in phytoplankton showed two peaks of abundance, apparently related to precipitation. Taxonomic composition among samples from the same reservoir showed little variation. Community structure at different depths showed significant differences only at San Lorenzo reservoir. The inverse of β-diversity showed small values indicating high similarity among the reservoirs. Diversitv showed no significant assoeiation with any morphometric factor evaluated (area, retention time, altitude and age.Se efectuaron muestreos de fitoplaneton en tres profundidades de la zona fótica de los embalses Punchiná, Las Playas, El Peñol y San Lorenzo, localizados en el departamento de Antioquia, Colombia. Se identificaron un total de 77 taxones en los cuatro embalses. Las diatomeas no fueron incluídas. En todos los casos las Cholorophyta fueron el grupo dominante. Botryococcus braunii fue el taxón de mayor densidad en los embalses Punchiná, Las Playas y El Peñol; y Cosmarium sp. en el embalse San Lorenzo. La comunidad fitoplanctónica mostró dos picos de abundancia aparentemente relacionados con la precipitación. En cada embalse, la composición de taxones entre muestreos varió poco. La estructura de la comunidad a diferentes profundidades mostró diferencias significativas únicamente en el embalse San Lorenzo. El inverso de la β-diversidad presentó valores bajos que muestran la alta similaridad entre embalses. La diversidad no mostró asociación significativa con

  12. Epilepsia temporal: relato de caso = Temporal epilepsy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza, Taís Amara da Costa de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem o objetivo de divulgar um recurso terapêutico da epilepsia do lobo temporal por esclerose hipocampal: a cirurgia. Aproximadamente vinte e cinco mil pacientes com esta patologia são refratários aos tratamentos medicamentosos no sul do país e muitos chegam ao neurocirurgião com 30-40 anos de evolução, muitas vezes já mutilados em conseqüência das crises. Convulsões parciais originadas no lobo temporal são comuns, e grande parte originam-se em estruturas mesiais (esclerose mesial temporal – EMT. Como aí se encontram a sede de funções nobres do sistema nervoso – memória, aprendizagem, comportamento, entre outras –, os sintomas podem apresentar-se como alterações em qualquer uma delas. Ressaltamos a necessidade do correto diagnóstico e dos métodos para fazê-lo: através da anamnese, da ressonância magnética, do eletroencefalograma (EEG, do vídeo-EEG e por vezes através de sensores intracranianos (strips. Apesar de existirem métodos confiáveis para realizar o diagnóstico e tratamento cirúrgico com grande índice de sucesso, a desinformação dos profissionais que atendem pacientes com EMT acerca do assunto leva ao prolongamento de tratamentos clínico ineficiente e conseqüente seqüelas físicas, psicológicas e sociais

  13. Complete remission of epileptic psychosis after temporal lobectomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Renato Luiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient with refractory complex partial seizures since 15 years of age, recurrent postictal psychotic episodes since 35 which evolved to a chronic refractory interictal psychosis and MRI with right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. After a comprehensive investigation (video-EEG intensive monitoring, interictal and ictal SPECT, and a neuropsychological evaluation including WADA test she was submitted to a right temporal lobectomy. Since then, she has been seizure-free with remission of psychosis, although with some persistence of personality traits (hiperreligiosity, viscosity which had been present before surgery. This case supports the idea that temporal lobectomy can be a safe and effective therapeutic measure for patients with MTS, refractory epilepsy and recurrent postictal epileptic psychosis or interictal epileptic psychosis with postictal exacerbation.

  14. Temporal-spatial structure of magnetic merging at the magnetopause inferred from 557.7-nm all-sky images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Maynard

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that high-resolution 557.7-nm all-sky images are useful tools for investigating the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Analysis of ground and satellite measurements leads us to conclude that high-latitude merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 30s to 3min. Variations of 557.7nm emissions were observed at a 10s cadence at Ny-Ålesund on 19 December 2001, while significant changes in the IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. The optical patterns are consistent with a scenario in which merging occurs around the rim of the high-latitude cusp at positions dictated by the IMF clock angle. Electrons energized at merging sites represent plausible sources for 557.7nm emissions in the cusp. Polar observations at the magnetopause have directly linked enhanced fluxes of ≥0.5keV electrons with merging. Spectra of electrons responsible for some of the emissions, measured during a DMSP F15 overflight, exhibit "inverted-V" features, indicating further acceleration above the ionosphere. SuperDARN spectral width boundaries, characteristic of open-closed field line transitions, are located at the equatorward edge of the 557.7nm emissions. Optical data suggest that with IMF BY>0, the Northern Hemisphere cusp divides into three source regions. When the IMF clock angle was ~150° structured 557.7-nm emissions came from east of the 13:00 MLT meridian. At larger clock angles the emissions appeared between 12:00 and 13:00 MLT. No significant 557.7-nm emissions were detected in the prenoon MLT sector. MHD simulations corroborate our scenario, showing that with the observed large dipole-tilt and IMF clock angles, merging sites develop near the front and eastern portions of the high-altitude cusp rim in the Northern Hemisphere and near the western part of the cusp rim in the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. MRI segmentation in the diagnosis and clinical correlations of temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Huijin; Shen Tianzhen; Chen Xingrong; Feng Xiaoyuan; Jiang Chengchuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the different patterns of hippocampal atrophy by MRI segmental analysis and to investigate the etiology and pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: GE 1.5 T Signa Horizon LX MRI scanner was used. Oblique coronal T 1 weighted images perpendicular to the long axis of the hippocampus were obtained. The mesial temporal structures were divided into four parts: the amygdala, hippocampal head, body and tail. MRI patterns of atrophy in 50 patients with histologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis were investigated by MRI volumetric measurement and segmental analysis, and the differences of clinical features and surgical outcome in different groups were compared. Results: Diffuse hippocampal atrophy was found in 22 of 50 patients (44%), 5 of the 50 patients (10%) showed diffuse atrophy involving both the amygdala and hippocampus. 20 of the 50 patients (40%) had hippocampal focal atrophy and 8 of 50 patients (16%) had no obvious atrophy. 38 of 50 (76%) hippocampal sclerosis had atrophy in the hippocampal body, 29 of 50 (58%) had hippocampal head atrophy, 24 of 50 (48%) had hippocampal tail atrophy, and the least involved part was the amygdala (16%, 8/50). 10 patients who had normal hippocampal volume showed focal hippocampal atrophy by segmental analysis. Various patterns of hippocampal atrophy were found to be statistically related to the duration of epilepsy, the frequency of seizure and the outcome of surgery, respectively (P 0.05). Conclusion: MRI segmental analysis can improve the diagnostic sensitivity of temporal lobe epilepsy and help to investigate its etiology and pathogenesis. (author)

  16. In vivo diffusion tensor imaging and histopathology of the fimbria-fornix in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Luis; Livy, Daniel J; Beaulieu, Christian; Wheatley, B Matt; Gross, Donald W

    2010-01-20

    While diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been extensively used to infer micro-structural characteristics of cerebral white matter in human conditions, correlations between human in vivo DTI and histology have not been performed. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) have abnormal DTI parameters of the fimbria-fornix (relative to TLE patients without MTS) which are presumed to represent differences in axonal/myelin integrity. Medically intractable TLE patients who undergo temporal lobe resection including the fimbria-fornix provide a unique opportunity to study the anatomical correlates of water diffusion abnormalities in freshly excised tissue. Eleven patients with medically intractable TLE were recruited (six with and five without MTS) for presurgical DTI followed by surgical excision of a small specimen of the fimbria-fornix which was processed for electron microscopy. Blinded quantitative analysis of the microphotographs included axonal diameter, density and area, cumulative axon membrane circumference, and myelin thickness and area. As predicted by DTI the fimbria-fornix of TLE patients with MTS had increased extra-axonal fraction, and reduced cumulative axonal membrane circumference and myelin area. Consistent with the animal literature, water diffusion anisotropy over the crus of the fimbria-fornix was strongly correlated with axonal membranes (cumulative membrane circumference) within the surgical specimen (approximately 15% of what was analyzed with DTI). The demonstration of a correlation between histology and human in vivo DTI, in combination with the observation that in vivo DTI accurately predicted white matter abnormalities in a human disease condition, provides strong validation of the application of DTI as a noninvasive marker of white matter pathology.

  17. Auditory Temporal Structure Processing in Dyslexia: Processing of Prosodic Phrase Boundaries Is Not Impaired in Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Eveline; Kjelgaard, Margaret; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Cyr, Abigail; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Reading disability in children with dyslexia has been proposed to reflect impairment in auditory timing perception. We investigated one aspect of timing perception--"temporal grouping"--as present in prosodic phrase boundaries of natural speech, in age-matched groups of children, ages 6-8 years, with and without dyslexia. Prosodic phrase…

  18. Temporal changes in the genetic structure of the Daphnia species complex in Tjeukemeer, with evidence for backcrossing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaak, P.

    1996-01-01

    Temporal genetic variation was studied within the cyclic parthenogenetic Daphnia galeata-cucullata species complex in Lake Tjeukemeer (The Netherlands). During three successive years, three allozyme loci were studied in order to compare: the level of genetic variation in D. galeata (G), D. cucullata

  19. Spatial and temporal structure of fish assemblages in a hyperhaline coastal system: Ría Lagartos, Mexico

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    Miguel Angel Peralta-Meixueiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal fish species assemblages were analyzed throughout two annual cycles (2004-2005 and 2007-2008 in the Ría Lagartos Lagoon system, Mexico, via non-parametric multivariate analyses. We compared density and biomass of fish species among five habitat types defined by combinations of structure and environmental characteristics (hyperhaline, rocky, seagrass, channel, and marine, and three climatic seasons (dry, rainy, and northerlies. A total of 11,187 individuals distributed in 32 families and 63 species were collected. The most numerically abundant species were Floridichthys polyommus and Cyprinodon artifrons, while Sphoeroides testudineus contributed to the greatest biomass. Species composition consisted mainly of estuarine and euryhaline marine species. Spatially, a saline gradient was observed with marine conditions in the mouth, and increasing to over 100 in the inner zone of the system. Species richness, diversity and biomass declined from the mouth to the inner zone, while density showed an inverse tendency, with the highest values in the inner zone. Thus the salinity was the variable that best explained the spatial fish assemblages" structure. The ichthyofauna composition did not change over time, but the dominant species varied with the years. The abundance of juvenile specimens, suggest that the different habitats are used as feeding and breeding zones; hence it is proposed that protection strategies be pursued not only for the lagoon system but also for the northern zone of the Yucatan Peninsula.Los ensamblajes espacio temporales de peces fueron analizados a través de dos ciclos anuales (2004-2005 y 2007-2008 en el sistema lagunar Ría Lagartos, México, vía análisis multivariados no paramétricos. Se comparó la densidad y biomasa de peces entre los cinco tipos de hábitats definidos por la combinación de características estructurales y ambientales (hiperhalino, rocoso, pastos, canal y marino y tres temporadas

  20. Spatio-temporal variability in ontogenetic guild structure of an intertidal fish assemblage in central Chile Variabilidad espacio-temporal en la estructura de gremios ontogenéticos de un ensamble de peces intermareales de Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA A BERRÍOS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Species resource use can vary throughout ontogeny, potentially affecting community dynamics. This can be particularly important for species facing high variability in environmental conditions and going through several orders of magnitude in size, as intertidal fishes. However, the influence of the resulting ontogenetic changes in guild membership on the spatio-temporal structure of fish assemblages remains virtually unknown. Here we assessed the spatial and temporal variability in the ontogenetic feeding guild (OFG structure of the fish assemblage inhabiting the temperate rocky intertidal zone along central Chilean coast. This was done applying principal component analysis (PCA and randomization tests (R-test on the relative OFG composition of fish assemblages, obtained from seasonal samples from ten pools located at two heights in the intertidal zone in three localities between 33° and 34° S. Overall, the PCA and R-tests suggest that spatial variability dominated over temporal variability in OFG structure, mainly due to a higher representation of omnivore species at high intertidal pools in two of the three sampled localities. However, phenology-related changes in the representation of fish size-classes (i.e. carnivore recruitment in spring-summer along with ontogenetic differences in habitat selection (e.g., selection for low intertidal pools by bigger-sized carnivore OFG contributed to both spatial and temporal differentiation in OFG structure. Finally, the relative representation of each OFG correlated with that of their dominant species, without evidence for density compensation. This suggests low levels of functional redundancy among species in each OFG, highlighting the vulnerability of assemblage functioning to size-biased disturbances as fishing.El uso de los recursos puede variar a través de la ontogenia, afectando potencialmente las dinámicas comunitarias. Esto puede ser de particular importancia en especies que enfrentan alta

  1. Reflections of hunger and satiation in the structure of temporal organization of slow electrical and spike activities of fundal and antral stomach muscles in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromin, A A; Zenina, O Yu

    2012-11-01

    Manifestations of hunger and satiation in myoelectric activity patterns in different portions of the stomach were studied in chronic experiments. The state of hunger manifested in the structure of temporal organization of slow electric activity of muscles in the stomach body and antrum in the form of bimodal distributions of slow electric wave periods, while satiation as unimodal distribution. In hunger-specific bimodal distribution of slow electric wave periods generated by muscles of the stomach body and antrum, the position of the first maximum carries the information about oncoming food reinforcement, since this particular range of slow wave fluctuations determines temporal parameters of slow electric activity of muscles in all stomach regions in the course of subsequent successive food-procuring behavior. Under conditions of hunger, the pacemaker features of muscles in the lesser curvature are realized incompletely. Complete realization is achieved in the course of food intake and at the state of satiation.

  2. Combining qualitative and quantitative spatial and temporal information in a hierarchical structure: Approximate reasoning for plan execution monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebel, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of plan generation (PG) and the problem of plan execution monitoring (PEM), including updating, queries, and resource-bounded replanning, have different reasoning and representation requirements. PEM requires the integration of qualitative and quantitative information. PEM is the receiving of data about the world in which a plan or agent is executing. The problem is to quickly determine the relevance of the data, the consistency of the data with respect to the expected effects, and if execution should continue. Only spatial and temporal aspects of the plan are addressed for relevance in this work. Current temporal reasoning systems are deficient in computational aspects or expressiveness. This work presents a hybrid qualitative and quantitative system that is fully expressive in its assertion language while offering certain computational efficiencies. In order to proceed, methods incorporating approximate reasoning using hierarchies, notions of locality, constraint expansion, and absolute parameters need be used and are shown to be useful for the anytime nature of PEM.

  3. An evaluation of canal curvature at the apical one third in type II mesial canals of mandibular molars

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    Hye-Rim Yun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the buccolingual curvature at the apical one third in type II mesial canals of mandibular molars using the radius and angle of curvature. Materials and Methods Total 100 mandibular molars were selected. Following an endodontic access in the teeth, their distal roots were removed. #15 H- or K-files (Dentsply Maillefer were inserted into the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals of the teeth. Radiographs of the teeth were taken for the proximal view. Among them, type II canals were selected and divided into two subgroups, IIa and IIb. In type IIa, two separate canals merged into one canal before reaching the apex and in type IIb, two separate canals merged into one canal within the apical foramen. The radius and angle of curvature of specimens were examined. Results In type II, mean radius of curvature in mesiolingual and mesiobuccal canals were 2.82 mm and 3.58 mm, respectively. The radius of the curvature of mesiolingual canals were significantly smaller than that of mesiobuccal canals in type II, and especially in type IIa. However, there were no statistically significant differences in radius of curvature between mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals in type IIb and there were no significant differences in angle of curvature between type IIa and IIb. Conclusion In this study, type II mesial canals of mandibular molars showed severe curvature in the proximal view. Especially, mesiolingual canals of type IIa had more abrupt curvature than mesiobuccal canals at the apical one third.

  4. Evidence for brainstem network disruption in temporal lobe epilepsy and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy

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    Susanne G. Mueller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The symptoms witnessed in unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP suggest a breakdown of central autonomic control. Since the brainstem plays a crucial role in autonomic control, the objectives of this study were 1. To investigate if temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is associated with brainstem atrophy and to characterize it using graph Analysis 2. To compare the findings with those in two probable TLESUDEP. T1 images were obtained from 17 controls, 30 TLE (16 with mesial-temporal-sclerosis (TLE-MTS and 14 without (TLE-no and from 2 patients who died of SUDEP. The brainstem was extracted, warped onto a brainstem atlas and Jacobian determinants maps (JDM calculated. SPM8 was used to compare the JDMs at the group level, z-score maps were calculated for single subject analysis. Brainstem regions encompassing autonomic structures were identified based on macroscopic landmarks and mean z-scores from 5 × 5 × 5 voxel cubes extracted to calculate a new measure called atrophy-similarity index (ASI for graph analysis. TLE-MTS had volume loss in the dorsal mesencephalon. The SUDEP cases had severe and more extensive volume loss in the same region. Nodal degrees and participation coefficients were decreased and local efficiency increased in SUDEP compared to controls. TLE is associated with volume loss in brainstem regions involved in autonomic control. Structural damage in these regions might increase the risk for a fatal dysregulation during situations with increased demand such as following severe seizures.

  5. Perirhinal and hippocampal contributions to visual recognition memory can be distinguished from those of occipito-temporal structures based on conscious awareness of prior occurrence.

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    Danckert, S L; Gati, J S; Menon, R S; Köhler, S

    2007-01-01

    The ability of humans to distinguish consciously between new and previously encountered objects can be probed with visual recognition memory tasks that require explicit old-new discriminations. Medial temporal-lobe (MTL) lesions impair performance on such tasks. Within the MTL, both perirhinal cortex and the hippocampus have been implicated. Cognitive processes can also be affected by past object encounters in the absence of conscious recognition, as in repetition priming tasks. Past functional neuroimaging findings in healthy individuals suggest that even in tasks that require conscious recognition decisions for visual stimuli, posterior cortical structures in the ventral visual pathway distinguish between old and new objects at a nonconscious level. Conclusive evidence that differentiates the neural underpinnings of conscious from nonconscious processes in recognition memory, however, is still missing. In particular, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) findings for the MTL have been inconsistent towards this end. In the present fMRI study, we tested whether perirhinal and hippocampal contributions to recognition memory can be distinguished from those of occipito-temporal structures in the ventral visual pathway based on the participants' reported conscious awareness of prior occurrence. Images of objects with a large degree of feature overlap served as stimuli; they were selected to ensure an involvement of perirhinal cortex in the present recognition task, based on evidence from past lesion-based research. We found that both perirhinal cortex and occipito-temporal cortex showed a differential old-new response that reflected a repetition-related decrease in activity (i.e., new > old). Whereas in perirhinal cortex this decrease was observed with respect to whether subjects reported objects to be old or new, irrespective of the true item status, in occipito-temporal cortex it occurred in relation to whether objects were truly old or new, irrespective of

  6. Bostezo y epilepsia del lóbulo temporal Yawning and temporal lobe epilepsy

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    S. Muchnik

    2003-04-01

    particular de epilepsia temporal.Temporal lobe epilepsy is a partial epileptic disorder in which mesial structures are responsible for the principal ictal symptoms. Its characteristic feature is the recurrence of simple and complex partial seizures, associated with postictal confusion and amnesia of the event. The facilitating effect of NREM sleep on the propagation of the seizure, as well as the sleep abnormalities provoked by epilepsy were evident in our two patients. Yawning is a physiological reflex induced by arousal and drowsiness and may appear in different neurological conditions. Its relation with epilepsy of limbic origen has been rarely reported. We describe in a 95 year old male patient, the occurrence of yawning followed by complex partial seizure during a state of drowsiness. His EEG showed independent bilateral interictal foci of temporal sharp waves and after being medicated with carbamazepine 400mg/day, the episode did not recur. Another patient, a 17 year old female, displayed complex partial seizures and secondarily generalized seizures with yawning during the posictal period, after naps. The EEG was normal and her polysomnography showed bilateral synchronous temporal spikes and slow waves with secondarily generalization during stage 2 of NREM sleep that produce paroxysmal microarousals and increased stages 1 and 2 of NREM sleep and REM sleep diminished. After being medicated with divalproex sodium 750 mg/day, she suffered no futher seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy, sleep- wake cycles and yawning seem not only to share the same anatomic structures but also the same neurochemical mechanisms. The fact that endogenous opiods are considered as part of a protective system that stop and prevent seizures may allow us to postulate that yawning would be the expression of the endogenous opiods induced mechanisms that stop and prevent the recurrence of the temporal lobe epilepsy. Another hypothesis may be that this is only a particular form of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  7. Population Size Predicts Lexical Diversity, but so Does the Mean Sea Level --Why It Is Important to Correctly Account for the Structure of Temporal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplenig, Alexander; Müller-Spitzer, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    In order to demonstrate why it is important to correctly account for the (serial dependent) structure of temporal data, we document an apparently spectacular relationship between population size and lexical diversity: for five out of seven investigated languages, there is a strong relationship between population size and lexical diversity of the primary language in this country. We show that this relationship is the result of a misspecified model that does not consider the temporal aspect of the data by presenting a similar but nonsensical relationship between the global annual mean sea level and lexical diversity. Given the fact that in the recent past, several studies were published that present surprising links between different economic, cultural, political and (socio-)demographical variables on the one hand and cultural or linguistic characteristics on the other hand, but seem to suffer from exactly this problem, we explain the cause of the misspecification and show that it has profound consequences. We demonstrate how simple transformation of the time series can often solve problems of this type and argue that the evaluation of the plausibility of a relationship is important in this context. We hope that our paper will help both researchers and reviewers to understand why it is important to use special models for the analysis of data with a natural temporal ordering.

  8. Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

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    Mohammad Faraji-rad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT in localizing epileptic foci in children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. This prospective study was conducted on 12 patients including five males and seven females aged between 2 and 16 years old with a clinical diagnosis of TLE. All the patients underwent high-resolution MRI and if no abnormality was identified, SPECT was used for further assessment. In all the patients, visual inspection identified unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis, and the patients underwent craniotomy and lesionectomy.According to the results, eight patients were categorized in class I and two cases were classifies as class II, and all the patients survived. About 25% of the patients showed adequate memory function on the non-operated temporal lobe, and general intelligence quotient increased by 10% in 50% of the patients.According to the results, in patients with clinically suspected TLE, MRI alone is not able to localize the epileptic foci correctly, and SPECT can be helpful to localize these lesions.

  9. Memory in children with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Catarina A. Guimarães

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, memory deficit is not so well understood as it is in adults. The aim of this study was to identify and describe memory deficits in children with symptomatic TLE, and to verify the influence of epilepsy variables on memory. We evaluated 25 children with TLE diagnosed on clinical, EEG and MRI findings. Twenty-five normal children were compared with the patients. All children underwent a neuropsychological assessment to estimate intellectual level, attention, visual perception, handedness, and memory processes (verbal and visual: short-term memory, learning, and delayed recall. The results allowed us to conclude: besides memory deficits, other neuropsychological disturbances may be found in children with TLE such as attention, even in the absence of overall cognitive deficit; the earlier onset of epilepsy, the worse verbal stimuli storage; mesial lesions correlate with impairment in memory storage stage while neocortical temporal lesions correlate with retrieval deficits.

  10. Project Temporalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell; Justesen, Lise; Mouritsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    into account. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a qualitative case study of a project in the building industry. The authors use actor-network theory (ANT) to analyze the emergence of animal stakeholders, stakes and temporalities. Findings – The study shows how project temporalities can...... into account. This may require investments in new project management technologies. Originality/value – This paper adds to the literatures on project temporalities and stakeholder theory by connecting them to the question of non-human stakeholders and to project management technologies.......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how animals can become stakeholders in interaction with project management technologies and what happens with project temporalities when new and surprising stakeholders become part of a project and a recognized matter of concern to be taken...

  11. Three decades of farmed escapees in the wild: a spatio-temporal analysis of Atlantic salmon population genetic structure throughout Norway.

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    Kevin A Glover

    Full Text Available Each year, hundreds of thousands of domesticated farmed Atlantic salmon escape into the wild. In Norway, which is the world's largest commercial producer, many native Atlantic salmon populations have experienced large numbers of escapees on the spawning grounds for the past 15-30 years. In order to study the potential genetic impact, we conducted a spatio-temporal analysis of 3049 fish from 21 populations throughout Norway, sampled in the period 1970-2010. Based upon the analysis of 22 microsatellites, individual admixture, F(ST and increased allelic richness revealed temporal genetic changes in six of the populations. These changes were highly significant in four of them. For example, 76% and 100% of the fish comprising the contemporary samples for the rivers Vosso and Opo were excluded from their respective historical samples at P=0.001. Based upon several genetic parameters, including simulations, genetic drift was excluded as the primary cause of the observed genetic changes. In the remaining 15 populations, some of which had also been exposed to high numbers of escapees, clear genetic changes were not detected. Significant population genetic structuring was observed among the 21 populations in the historical (global F(ST =0.038 and contemporary data sets (global F(ST =0.030, although significantly reduced with time (P=0.008. This reduction was especially distinct when looking at the six populations displaying temporal changes (global F(ST dropped from 0.058 to 0.039, P=0.006. We draw two main conclusions: 1. The majority of the historical population genetic structure throughout Norway still appears to be retained, suggesting a low to modest overall success of farmed escapees in the wild; 2. Genetic introgression of farmed escapees in native salmon populations has been strongly population-dependent, and it appears to be linked with the density of the native population.

  12. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Jonathan Wirsich

    2016-01-01

    In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures.

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics in phytobenthos structural properties reveal insights into agricultural catchment dynamics and nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaney, S. M.; Snell, M. A.; Barker, P. A.; Aftab, A.; Barber, N. J.; Benskin, C.; Burke, S.; Cleasby, W.; Haygarth, P.; Jonczyk, J. C.; Owen, G. J.; Perks, M. T.; Quinn, P. F.; Surridge, B.

    2016-12-01

    Low order streams are spatially extensive, temporally dynamic, systems within the agricultural landscape. This dynamism extends to the aquatic communities within these streams, including the phytobentos, which demonstrates considerable resilience to diffuse anthropogenic nutrient pressures and changing climate dynamics. The phytobenthos community can substantially contribute to the food web, in particular diatoms, which dominate photo-autotrophic assemblages in low order streams. Diatoms are widely used in ecological monitoring because of their high sensitivity to environmental condition, but knowledge is limited on the ecological effects of winter disturbances and variance introduced by multiple and interacting pressures (N, P, sediment), introducing bias in understanding temporal dynamics in benthic diatom communities. Using the environmental time series data from long term monitoring within the River Eden Demonstration Test Catchment programme, we assess the impact of multiple hydro-chemical stressors on phytobenthic community resilience, and synthesize the impact of an extreme winter event. Monthly data from diatom communities collected in the Eden DTC from March 2011 to present show that river flow, strongly coupled to precipitation, is a key driver of these communities. Discharge has a direct effect on communities through scouring, but is also tightly correlated to nutrient delivery, such that 80% of the annual TP load arrives in 10% of the time. Trophic Diatom Index (TDI) values demonstrated considerable resilience by the stability of inter-monthly TDI scores over 5 seasonal cycles against the characterised highly variable hydrological regime. This research demonstrates that well characterised winter disturbances are critical to understanding drivers of aquatic dynamics. This has implications for catchment diffuse pollution policy, farm management and economics, given the climate projections of increases in frequency and intensity of extreme winter events

  14. Comparing CAT12 and VBM8 for Detecting Brain Morphological Abnormalities in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Farnaz Farokhian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the brain morphological alterations that play important roles in neurodegenerative/neurological diseases will contribute to our understanding of the causes of these diseases. Various automated software programs are designed to provide an automatic framework to detect brain morphological changes in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM analysis can also be used for the detection of brain volumetric abnormalities. Here, we compared gray matter (GM and white matter (WM abnormality results obtained by a VBM analysis using the Computational Anatomy Toolbox (CAT12 via the current version of Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM12 with the results obtained by a VBM analysis using the VBM8 toolbox implemented in the older software SPM8, in adult temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients with (n = 51 and without (n = 57 hippocampus sclerosis (HS, compared to healthy adult controls (n = 28. The VBM analysis using CAT12 showed that compared to the healthy controls, significant GM and WM reductions were located in ipsilateral mesial temporal lobes in the TLE-HS patients, and slight GM amygdala swelling was present in the right TLE-no patients (n = 27. In contrast, the VBM analysis via the VBM8 toolbox showed significant GM and WM reductions only in the left TLE-HS patients (n = 25 compared to the healthy controls. Our findings thus demonstrate that compared to VBM8, a VBM analysis using CAT12 provides a more accurate volumetric analysis of the brain regions in TLE. Our results further indicate that a VBM analysis using CAT12 is more robust and accurate against volumetric alterations than the VBM8 toolbox.

  15. Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children versus adults: from etiologies to outcomes

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    Yun-Jin Lee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common type of medically intractable epilepsy in adults and children, and mesial temporal sclerosis is the most common underlying cause of TLE. Unlike in the case of adults, TLE in infants and young children often has etiologies other than mesial temporal sclerosis, such as tumors, cortical dysplasia, trauma, and vascular malformations. Differences in seizure semiology have also been reported. Motor manifestations are prominent in infants and young children, but they become less obvious with increasing age. Further, automatisms tend to become increasingly complex with age. However, in childhood and especially in adolescence, the clinical manifestations are similar to those of the adult population. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy can lead to excellent postoperative seizure outcome in adults, but favorable results have been seen in children as well. Anterior temporal lobectomy may prove to be a more successful surgery than amygdalohippocampectomy in children with intractable TLE. The presence of a focal brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging is one of the most reliable independent predictors of a good postoperative seizure outcome. Seizure-free status is the most important predictor of improved psychosocial outcome with advanced quality of life and a lower proportion of disability among adults and children. Since the brain is more plastic during infancy and early childhood, recovery is promoted. In contrast, long epilepsy duration is an important risk factor for surgically refractory seizures. Therefore, patients with medically intractable TLE should undergo surgery as early as possible.

  16. Musical structure is processed in "language" areas of the brain: a possible role for Brodmann Area 47 in temporal coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, Daniel J; Menon, Vinod

    2003-12-01

    The neuroanatomical correlates of musical structure were investigated using functional magnetic neuroimaging (fMRI) and a unique stimulus manipulation involving scrambled music. The experiment compared brain responses while participants listened to classical music and scrambled versions of that same music. Specifically, the scrambled versions disrupted musical structure while holding low-level musical attributes constant, including the psychoacoustic features of the music such as pitch, loudness, and timbre. Comparing music to its scrambled counterpart, we found focal activation in the pars orbitalis region (Brodmann Area 47) of the left inferior frontal cortex, a region that has been previously closely associated with the processing of linguistic structure in spoken and signed language, and its right hemisphere homologue. We speculate that this particular region of inferior frontal cortex may be more generally responsible for processing fine-structured stimuli that evolve over time, not merely those that are linguistic.

  17. Spatio-temporal variation in age structure and abundance of the endangered snail kite: Pooling across regions masks a declining and aging population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Brian E.; Kendall, William L.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2016-01-01

    While variation in age structure over time and space has long been considered important for population dynamics and conservation, reliable estimates of such spatio-temporal variation in age structure have been elusive for wild vertebrate populations. This limitation has arisen because of problems of imperfect detection, the potential for temporary emigration impacting assessments of age structure, and limited information on age. However, identifying patterns in age structure is important for making reliable predictions of both short- and long-term dynamics of populations of conservation concern. Using a multistate superpopulation estimator, we estimated region-specific abundance and age structure (the proportion of individuals within each age class) of a highly endangered population of snail kites for two separate regions in Florida over 17 years (1997–2013). We find that in the southern region of the snail kite—a region known to be critical for the long-term persistence of the species—the population has declined significantly since 1997, and during this time, it has increasingly become dominated by older snail kites (> 12 years old). In contrast, in the northern region—a region historically thought to serve primarily as drought refugia—the population has increased significantly since 2007 and age structure is more evenly distributed among age classes. Given that snail kites show senescence at approximately 13 years of age, where individuals suffer higher mortality rates and lower breeding rates, these results reveal an alarming trend for the southern region. Our work illustrates the importance of accounting for spatial structure when assessing changes in abundance and age distribution and the need for monitoring of age structure in imperiled species.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Age Structure and Abundance of the Endangered Snail Kite: Pooling across Regions Masks a Declining and Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Brian E; Kendall, William L; Fletcher, Robert J; Kitchens, Wiley M

    While variation in age structure over time and space has long been considered important for population dynamics and conservation, reliable estimates of such spatio-temporal variation in age structure have been elusive for wild vertebrate populations. This limitation has arisen because of problems of imperfect detection, the potential for temporary emigration impacting assessments of age structure, and limited information on age. However, identifying patterns in age structure is important for making reliable predictions of both short- and long-term dynamics of populations of conservation concern. Using a multistate superpopulation estimator, we estimated region-specific abundance and age structure (the proportion of individuals within each age class) of a highly endangered population of snail kites for two separate regions in Florida over 17 years (1997-2013). We find that in the southern region of the snail kite-a region known to be critical for the long-term persistence of the species-the population has declined significantly since 1997, and during this time, it has increasingly become dominated by older snail kites (> 12 years old). In contrast, in the northern region-a region historically thought to serve primarily as drought refugia-the population has increased significantly since 2007 and age structure is more evenly distributed among age classes. Given that snail kites show senescence at approximately 13 years of age, where individuals suffer higher mortality rates and lower breeding rates, these results reveal an alarming trend for the southern region. Our work illustrates the importance of accounting for spatial structure when assessing changes in abundance and age distribution and the need for monitoring of age structure in imperiled species.

  19. Multi-temporal UAV based data for mapping crop type and structure in smallholder dominated Tanzanian agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagol, J. R.; Chung, C.; Dempewolf, J.; Maurice, S.; Mbungu, W.; Tumbo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Timely mapping and monitoring of crops like Maize, an important food security crop in Tanzania, can facilitate timely response by government and non-government organizations to food shortage or surplus conditions. Small UAVs can play an important role in linking the spaceborne remote sensing data and ground based measurement to improve the calibration and validation of satellite based estimates of in-season crop metrics. In Tanzania most of the growing season is often obscured by clouds. UAV data, if collected within a stratified statistical sampling framework, can also be used to directly in lieu of spaceborne data to infer mid-season yield estimates at regional scales.Here we present an object based approach to estimate crop metrics like crop type, area, and height using multi-temporal UAV based imagery. The methods were tested at three 1km2 plots in Kilosa, Njombe, and Same districts in Tanzania. At these sites both ground based and UAV based data were collected on a monthly time-step during the year 2015 growing season. SenseFly eBee drone with RGB and NIR-R-G camera was used to collect data. Crop type classification accuracies of above 85% were easily achieved.

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of the neutral polymorphisms in the last ZFX intron: analysis of the haplotype structure and genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruzelska, J; Zietkiewicz, E; Batzer, M; Cole, D E; Moisan, J P; Scozzari, R; Tavaré, S; Labuda, D

    1999-07-01

    With 10 segregating sites (simple nucleotide polymorphisms) in the last intron (1089 bp) of the ZFX gene we have observed 11 haplotypes in 336 chromosomes representing a worldwide array of 15 human populations. Two haplotypes representing 77% of all chromosomes were distributed almost evenly among four continents. Five of the remaining haplotypes were detected in Africa and 4 others were restricted to Eurasia and the Americas. Using the information about the ancestral state of the segregating positions (inferred from human-great ape comparisons), we applied coalescent analysis to estimate the age of the polymorphisms and the resulting haplotypes. The oldest haplotype, with the ancestral alleles at all the sites, was observed at low frequency only in two groups of African origin. Its estimated age of 740 to 1100 kyr corresponded to the time to the most recent common ancestor. The two most frequent worldwide distributed haplotypes were estimated at 550 to 840 and 260 to 400 kyr, respectively, while the age of the continentally restricted polymorphisms was 120 to 180 kyr and smaller. Comparison of spatial and temporal distribution of the ZFX haplotypes suggests that modern humans diverged from the common ancestral stock in the Middle Paleolithic era. Subsequent range expansion prevented substantial gene flow among continents, separating African groups from populations that colonized Eurasia and the New World.

  1. Evidence of Neuronal Injury Outside the Medial Temporal Lobe in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy:N-Acetylaspartate Concentration Reductions Detected with Multisection Proton MR Spectroscopic Imaging—Initial Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermathen, Peter; Laxer, Kenneth D.; Schuff, Norbert; Matson, Gerald B.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging reveals metabolic changes, especially decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) concentrations outside the medial temporal lobe in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), consistent with neuropathologic findings of extratemporal neuronal impairment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eleven patients with mesial TLE and 13 control subjects were examined with multisection MR spectroscopic imaging. Three MR spectroscopic imaging sections were acquired. Thirteen brain regions in each hemisphere and the midbrain were analyzed in each patient, and the NAA to creatine-phosphocreatine (Cr) plus choline-containing compounds (Ch) (NAA/[Cr + Ch]) ratios were determined. In addition, hemispheric and whole-brain values were calculated and statistically analyzed. RESULTS The NAA/(Cr + Ch) ratio in the ipsilateral hippocampus was significantly reduced, compared with that in the contralateral hippocampus (P < .002) and compared with that in control subjects (P < .03), confirming findings in previous studies. In patients, whole-brain NAA/(Cr + Ch) ratio outside the hippocampus was significantly lower than that in control subjects (P < .002). For the ipsilateral hemisphere in patients, NAA/(Cr + Ch) ratio was significantly lower than that in control subjects (P < .0002). Comparisons between individual brain regions revealed trends toward lower NAA/(Cr + Ch) ratios in many areas of the ipsilateral and, to a lesser extent, the contralateral hemisphere outside the hippocampus and temporal lobe, suggesting diffuse impairment. CONCLUSION Results suggest that repeated seizure activity damages neurons outside of the seizure focus. PMID:12511690

  2. Detectability of Middle Mesial Root Canal Orifices by Troughing Technique in Mandibular Molars: A Micro-computed Tomographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleş, Ali; Keskin, Cangül

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to measure the orifice depth of middle mesial canals (MMCs) and evaluate the detectability of orifices using troughing preparation. For this study, 85 mandibular molar teeth with MMCs were selected from the scanned micro-computed tomographic images. The MMCs were categorized, and the distances between the MMC orifices and the cementoenamel junctions (CEJ) were recorded as the depth of the orifice. Data were evaluated with frequency analysis and a chi-square test using SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL), and the results indicated a 5% significance level. It was found that 77.41% of the MMC orifices were at the CEJ level, whereas 5.38% and 9.69% of the MMC orifices were detectable within 1-mm and 2-mm depths from the CEJ, respectively. Of the specimens, 7.52% had MMC orifices deeper than 2 mm from the CEJ. Confluent anatomy was the most frequent configuration. No significant relation was detected between the orifice depth and MMC configuration (P > .05). It was concluded that 77.41% of the specimens did not require troughing preparation, the remaining 15.07% would require troughing, and 7.52% could not be accessed even with the troughing preparation. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of danger zone in mesial root of mandibular first molar by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoo Rhee; Choi, Yong Suk; Choi, Gi Woon; Park, Sang Hyuk [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To examine the danger zone of medial root of mandibular first molar of patient without extraction using CBCT (cone-beam computed tomography) to avoid the risk of root perforation. 20 mandibular first molars without caries and restorations were collected. CT images were obtained by CBCT (PSR9000N {sup T}M, Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan), reformed and analyzed by V-work 5.0 (CyberMed Inc., Korea). Distance between canal orifice and furcation was measured. In cross sectional images at 3, 4 and 5 mm below the canal office, distal wall thickness of central part (C-D), medial wall thickness of mesiobuccal canal (MB-M) and mesial wall thickness of mesiolongual canal (ML-M) were measured. The mean distance between the canal orifice and the furcation of the roots is 2.40 mm. Distal wall is found to be thinner than medial wall. Mean dentinal wall thickness of distal wall is about 1 mm. The wall thickness is thinner as the distance from the canal orifice is farther. But significant differences and not noted between 4 mm and 5 mm in MB-D and C-D. MB-D is thinner than ML-D although the differences is not significant. The present study confirmed the anatomical weakness of distal surface of the coronol part of the medial roots of mandibular first molar by CBCT and provided an anatomical guide line of wall thickness during endodontic treatment.

  4. 18F-FDG PET Reveals Fronto-temporal Dysfunction in Children with Fever-Induced Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzuca, M.; Dulac, O.; Chiron, C.; Jambaque, I.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Bouilleret, V.; Archambaud, F.; Rodrigo, S.; Dulac, O.; Chiron, C.; Jambaque, I.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Bouilleret, V.; Archambaud, F.; Rodrigo, S.; Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Rodrigo, S.; Dulac, O.; Chiron, C.; Caviness, V.

    2011-01-01

    Fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES) is a recently described epileptic entity whose etiology remains unknown. Brain abnormalities shown by MRI are usually limited to mesial-temporal structures and do not account for the catastrophic neuro-psychologic findings. Methods: We conducted FIRES studies in 8 patients, aged 6-13 y, using 18 F-FDG PET to disclose eventual neo-cortical dysfunction. Voxel-based analyses of cerebral glucose metabolism were performed using statistical parametric mapping and an age-matched control group. Results: Group analysis revealed a widespread inter-ictal hypo-metabolic network including the temporo-parietal and orbito-frontal cortices bilaterally. The individual analyses in patients identified hypo-metabolic areas corresponding to the predominant electroencephalograph foci and neuro-psychologic deficits involving language, behavior, and memory. Conclusion: Despite clinical heterogeneity, 18 F-FDG PET reveals a common network dysfunction in patients with sequelae due to fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy. (authors)

  5. Prevalence of the middle mesial canal in non surgical root canal treated mandibular first and second molars in a local military population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    dental denture. Implants are highly successful but a patient may still succumb to implant failure. Fixed partial denture preparations can cause an...Army Post Graduate Dental School Douglas D. Lancaster, COL, DC 3 August 2016 Prevalence of the middle mesial canal in non-surgical root canal...Methods: 7000 dental records were reviewed for non-surgical root canals performed from October 1970 to October 2015. The data collected included

  6. Comparative accuracy of the Clearing Technique, CBCT and Micro-CT methods in studying the mesial root canal configuration of mandibular first molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinola-Zapata, R; Bramante, C M; Versiani, M A; Moldauer, B I; Topham, G; Gutmann, J L; Nuñez, A; Duarte, M A Hungaro; Abella, F

    2017-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of the clearing technique and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the assessment of root canal configurations using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging system as the reference standard. Thirty-two mesial roots of mandibular first molars, selected on the basis of micro-CT scans (voxel size: 19.6 μm) and presenting several canal configurations, were evaluated using 2 CBCT scanners (voxels sizes: 120 μm and 150 μm) followed by the clearing technique. Two examiners analysed the data from each method and classified the anatomical configuration of the mesial canal according to Vertucci's system. Data were compared using Fisher's exact and chi-square tests. Reliability for each assessment was verified by the kappa test, and significance level was set at 5%. Kappa value indicated a high level of agreement between the examiners. Detection of type I configurations was significantly lower in cleared teeth (P canals were detected in all specimens by both tests (P > 0.05). In mesial roots with variable anatomical configurations, CBCT and the clearing method were significantly less accurate than the reference standard (P canal configuration was influenced greatly by the evaluation method and the type of anatomy. Detection of type I configurations in cleared teeth was significantly lower, whilst type II configurations were detected in all specimens by both methods. In mesial roots with variable anatomical configurations, neither CBCT nor clearing methods were accurate for detecting the actual root canal anatomy. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Ex vivo evaluation of four final irrigation protocols on the removal of hard-tissue debris from the mesial root canal system of mandibular first molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, G B; Versiani, M A; Silva-Sousa, Y T; Bruniera, J F B; Pécora, J D; Sousa-Neto, M D

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of four final irrigation protocols on the reduction of hard-tissue debris accumulated within the mesial root canal system of mandibular first molars using micro-CT analysis. Forty mesial roots of mandibular molars with a single and continuous isthmus connecting the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals (Vertucci's Type I configuration) were selected and scanned at a resolution of 8.6 μm. Canals were enlarged sequentially using WaveOne Small and Primary instruments activated in reciprocating motion without intracanal irrigation to allow debris to accumulate within the mesial root canal system. Then, specimens were anatomically matched and distributed into four groups (n = 10), according to the final irrigation protocol: apical positive pressure (APP), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), Self-adjusting File (SAF) and XP-endo Finisher (XPF). The final irrigation procedures were performed over 2 min using a total of 5.5 mL of 2.5% NaOCl per canal. Reconstructed data sets were coregistered, and the mean percentage reduction of accumulated hard-tissue debris after the final irrigation procedures was compared statistically between groups using the anovapost hoc Tukey test with a significance level set at 5%. Reduction of accumulated hard-tissue debris was observed in all groups after the final irrigation protocol. Overall, PUI and XPF groups had higher mean percentage reductions of accumulated hard-tissue debris (94.1% and 89.7%, respectively) than APP and SAF groups (45.7% and 41.3%, respectively) (P  0.05) or APP and SAF groups (P > 0.05). The PUI technique and XP-endo Finisher instrument were associated with significantly lower levels of AHTD compared with conventional irrigation and the modified SAF system protocol in mesial root canals of mandibular molars. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Presurgical language fMRI activation correlates with postsurgical verbal memory decline in left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudda, Kirsten; Mertens, Markus; Aengenendt, Joerg; Ebner, Alois; Woermann, Friedrich G

    2010-12-01

    We analysed the association of presurgical language fMRI activations and postsurgical verbal memory changes in 16 left-sided mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with initially intact memory. Patients with severe verbal memory decline after surgery (n = 9) had stronger presurgical fMRI activations within the left posterior temporal lobe, compared to those with no decline (n = 7). Language fMRI activation may predict verbal memory outcome, even in patients with a high risk of postsurgical memory deterioration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporal structure of an electric signal produced upon interaction of radiation from a HF laser with the bottom surface of a water column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, Sergei N; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Pashinin, Pavel P; Firsov, K N

    2009-01-01

    Generation of an electric signal is investigated when a HF-laser pulse interacts with the lower surface of a water column in a cell with a bottom transparent to laser radiation, while the upper surface of the water column remains open. The electric signal exhibits a temporal structure of two spikes spaced by time τ which is linearly dependent on the laser output energy. It is found that the value of τ (up to 1.3 ms) is an order of magnitude greater than the time during which the vapour pressure in a cavity produced due to the volume explosive boiling of water in the exposed area is greater than the atmospheric pressure. The second spike was determined to appear upon the collapse of the vapour cavity. A mathematical model is constructed that explains the motion of the water column above the vapour cavity taking into account the temporal evolution of the vapour pressure above it. It is shown that the prolonged lifetime of the vapour cavity after the decrease in the vapour pressure down to the atmospheric value is caused by the inertial motion of the water column acquiring the velocity at the initial stage of the cavity expansion. The calculated time of the water column motion agrees well with the experimental time interval between the spikes of an electric signal. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. BOLD fMRI deactivation of limbic and temporal brain structures and mood enhancing effect by transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T; Hösl, K; Kiess, O; Schanze, A; Kornhuber, J; Forster, C

    2007-01-01

    Direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has proved to be an effective treatment for seizure disorder and major depression. However, since this invasive technique implies surgery, with its side-effects and relatively high financial costs, a non-invasive method to stimulate vagal afferences would be a great step forward. We studied effects of non-invasive electrical stimulation of the nerves in the left outer auditory canal in healthy subjects (n = 22), aiming to activate vagal afferences transcutaneously (t-VNS). Short-term changes in brain activation and subjective well-being induced by t-VNS were investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and psychometric assessment using the Adjective Mood Scale (AMS), a self-rating scale for current subjective feeling. Stimulation of the ear lobe served as a sham control. fMRI showed that robust t-VNS induced BOLD-signal decreases in limbic brain areas, including the amygdala, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and the middle and superior temporal gyrus. Increased activation was seen in the insula, precentral gyrus and the thalamus. Psychometric assessment revealed significant improvement of well-being after t-VNS. Ear lobe stimulation as a sham control intervention did not show similar effects in either fMRI or psychometric assessment. No significant effects on heart rate, blood pressure or peripheral microcirculation could be detected during the stimulation procedure. Our study shows the feasibility and beneficial effects of transcutaneous nerve stimulation in the left auditory canal of healthy subjects. Brain activation patterns clearly share features with changes observed during invasive vagus nerve stimulation.

  11. Spatial and temporal genetic structure of Symbiodinium populations within a common reef-building coral on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Emily J; Willis, Bette L; Bay, Line K; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2013-07-01

    The dinoflagellate photosymbiont Symbiodinium plays a fundamental role in defining the physiological tolerances of coral holobionts, but little is known about the dynamics of these endosymbiotic populations on coral reefs. Sparse data indicate that Symbiodinium populations show limited spatial connectivity; however, no studies have investigated temporal dynamics for in hospite Symbiodinium populations following significant mortality and recruitment events in coral populations. We investigated the combined influences of spatial isolation and disturbance on the population dynamics of the generalist Symbiodinium type C2 (ITS1 rDNA) hosted by the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora in the central Great Barrier Reef. Using eight microsatellite markers, we genotyped Symbiodinium in a total of 401 coral colonies, which were sampled from seven sites across a 12-year period including during flood plume-induced coral bleaching. Genetic differentiation of Symbiodinium was greatest within sites, explaining 70-86% of the total genetic variation. An additional 9-27% of variation was explained by significant differentiation of populations among sites separated by 0.4-13 km, which is consistent with low levels of dispersal via water movement and historical disturbance regimes. Sampling year accounted for 6-7% of total genetic variation and was related to significant coral mortality following severe bleaching in 1998 and a cyclone in 2006. Only 3% of the total genetic variation was related to coral bleaching status, reflecting generally small (8%) reductions in allelic diversity within bleached corals. This reduction probably reflected a loss of genotypes in hospite during bleaching, although no site-wide changes in genetic diversity were observed. Combined, our results indicate the importance of disturbance regimes acting together with limited oceanographic transport to determine the genetic composition of Symbiodinium types within reefs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Eastern Mediterranean Sea Spatial and Temporal Variability of Thermohaline Structure and Circulation Identified from Observational (T, S) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    2012). 2 The Mediterranean Sea extends between the 30° and 46° north latitudes; 5°50′ west and 36° east longitudes ( Boxer , 2014). The Western...www.ancientportsantiques.com/ancient-port-structures/design-waves/] Boxer , B., 2014: Mediterranean Sea. Accessed 14 September 2015. [Available online at http

  13. Analyses of the temporal and spatial structures of heavy rainfall from a catalog of high-resolution radar rainfall fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Smith, James A.; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2014-01-01

    that relate to size, structure and evolution of heavy rainfall. Extreme rainfall is also linked with severe weather (tornados, large hail and damaging wind). The diurnal cycle of rainfall for heavy rain days is characterized by an early peak in the largest rainfall rates, an afternoon-evening peak in rain...

  14. Mapping landslide displacements using Structure from Motion (SfM) and image correlation of multi-temporal UAV photography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucieer, A.; de Jong, S.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120221306; Turner, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a flexible, cost-effective, and accurate method to monitor landslides using a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to collect aerial photography. In the first part, we apply a Structure from Motion (SfM) workflow to derive a 3D model of a landslide in southeast Tasmania from

  15. Exploring the determinants of phylogenetic diversity and assemblage structure in conifers across temporal, spatial, and taxonomic scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Borchsenius, Finn; Sandel, Brody Steven

    Composition, diversity, structure and function of modern plant communities are strongly related to the current environment, but they may also depend on past eco-evolutionary dynamics. For example, climate change can exert a strong influence on lineage diversification and niche evolution, and thus...

  16. The Structure of Research Methodology Competency in Higher Education and the Role of Teaching Teams and Course Temporal Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Karl; Steinwascher, Merle; Moosbrugger, Helfried; Reiss, Siegbert

    2011-01-01

    The development of research methodology competency is a major aim of the psychology curriculum at universities. Usually, three courses concentrating on basic statistics, advanced statistics and experimental methods, respectively, serve the achievement of this aim. However, this traditional curriculum-based course structure gives rise to the…

  17. Study of the lateral and temporal structure of the shower front in KASCADE-Grande at large distances from the shower core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, G.; Badea, A.F.; Haungs, A.; Rebel, H.; Thouw, T.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain information about the temporal and spatial structure of the shower front at KASKADE-Grande distances. For such a purpose, temporal observables (global arrival times of particles) and lateral particle densities in the shower front have been analyzed. The analysis concentrated only on simulated events. The analysis concentrated exclusively on the data contained in 150 simulated showers, 50 showers for each kind of the following primary particles: p, C and Fe. The showers were simulated for the same energy of the primary particle (10 16 eV) and for the same angle of incidence theta = 0 (vertical showers). Also the study has been performed for different components of the shower front: muonic, electronic, electromagnetic and hadronic. The results show that the arrival time distributions are different for the same EAS component at different threshold energies. As the scattering cross section decreases with energy, higher energy particles will be less scattered so will take a shorter time to reach detector level, thus inducing an overall decrease of arrival time. Also the cuartile times that have been calculated proved to be primary mass sensitive. The second stage of the study focused on the analysis of the lateral structure of the shower front. The lateral density of the added muon - electron components was fitted with a modified NKG formula containing two parameters (a and h) of which one also proved to be primary mass sensitive. A future step of the study will be to consider the interaction between shower front and detectors in order to obtain a much realistic estimate of the KASCADE Grande array response. (authors)

  18. Temporal changes in species composition, diversity, and woody vegetation structure of savannas in the Cerrado-Amazon transition zone

    OpenAIRE

    Maracahipes-Santos, Leonardo; Santos, Josias Oliveira dos; Reis, Simone Matias; Lenza, Eddie

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vegetation in the transition between tropical forest and savanna is hyperdynamic and there is evidence that in the absence of fire, forest advances over savanna. Between 2008 and 2013 we evaluated changes in species composition and diversity and in the structure of the woody vegetation of savanna physiognomies in the transition between the Cerrado and Amazon biomes that were fire free for 11 years. The physiognomies form a gradient from savanna woodland (Typical Cerrado - TC), to low...

  19. Structure and Function of the Superior Temporal Plane in Adult Males with Cleft Lip and Palate: Pathologic Enlargement with No Relationship to Childhood Hearing Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, A. S.; Canady, J.; Richman, L.; Andreasen, N. C.; Nopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In a previous study from our lab, adult males with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCLP) were shown to have significantly lower temporal lobe gray matter volume than matched controls. The current study was designed to begin a regional analysis of specific subregions of the temporal lobe. The superior temporal plane (STP) is a…

  20. Examining the evolution towards turbulence through spatio-temporal analysis of multi-dimensional structures formed by instability growth along a shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Loomis, Eric; Flippo, Kirk; Devolder, Barbara; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James; Kline, John

    2014-10-01

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence relevant to mix in ICF capsules. Experimental platforms on both OMEGA and NIF use anti-symmetric flows about a shear interface to examine isolated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. Measurements of interface (an Al or Ti tracer layer) dynamics are used to benchmark the LANL RAGE hydrocode with BHR turbulence model. The tracer layer does not expand uniformly, but breaks up into multi-dimensional structures that are initially quasi-2D due to the target geometry. We are developing techniques to analyze the multi-D structure growth along the tracer surface with a focus on characterizing the time-dependent structures' spectrum of scales in order to appraise a transition to turbulence in the system and potentially provide tighter constraints on initialization schemes for the BHR model. To this end, we use a wavelet based analysis to diagnose single-time radiographs of the tracer layer surface (w/low and amplified roughness for random noise seeding) with observed spatially non-repetitive features, in order to identify spatial and temporal trends in radiographs taken at different times across several experimental shots. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  1. Temporal changes in secondary production of a population of the subtidal sand snail Umbonium costatum in Hakodate Bay, northern Japan: importance of annual change in age structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takashi

    1997-05-01

    Year-to-year changes in age structure, biomass ( B), annual secondary production ( P) and {P}/{overlineB} ratio are described of a population of the subtidal snail Umbonium costatum in Hakodate Bay, northern Japan, during a 6-y period (1982-1988). Population structure and values of biomass and production were highly variable from year to year; the ranges of the annual mean biomass, annual production and {P}/{overlineB} ratio were 3.71-9.22 g dry tissue m -2, 1.01-4.92 g dry tissue m -2 y -1 and 0.13-1.33 y -1 respectively. Change in the age structure was the most important single factor affecting temporal changes in annual production in this population. The annual production of the population was high when young individuals, which have a small body size and high growth rate, dominated the population. While annual {P}/{overlineB} ratios in 1983 and 1984 fell within the range of values reported for various other gastropods, those in 1985, 1986, 1987 and 1988 were markedly lower, if the relation between the population {P}/{overlineB} ratio and life span is taken into account. This demonstrates that production estimates from annual biomass and life-span values may lead to incorrect results in a recruitment-limited population.

  2. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E.; Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J.; Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K.; Boon, P.; Troost, J.; Vermeulen, J.; Aldenkamp, A.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  3. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E. [MRI Department -1 K12, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K. [Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boon, P. [Department of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Troost, J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J. [S.E.I.N Heemstede, Psychological Laboratory, Achterweg 5, 2103 SW Heemstede (Netherlands); Aldenkamp, A. [Epilepsy Center ' Kempenhaeghe' , Postbus 61, 5900 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  4. Interpretation and mathematical modeling of temporal changes of temperature observed in borehole Yaxcopoil-1 within the Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafanda, Jan; Wilhelm, H.; Heidinger, P.; Čermák, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 372, č. 1-4 (2009), s. 9-16 ISSN 0022-1694 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1181 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) W1 687/17-1,2,3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : repeated borehole temperature logging * karstic environment * Yucatan * groundwater convection * heat transport numerical simulation * fluid dynamics Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.433, year: 2009

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community structure in the North Water Polynya, investigated using pigment biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidussi, F.; Roy, S.; Lovejoy, C.

    2004-01-01

    . The contribution of the different phytoplankton groups to Chl a inferred using a factorization program (CHEMTAX) indicated that the bloom was diatom-dominated (maximum 94% diatoms). The phytoplankton community structure was influenced by the water mass characteristics and the surface circulation pattern....... Autotrophic flagellates dominated in April and May along the Canadian coast, where cold Arctic waters with relatively deep mixed layers were found. In contrast, diatoms dominated in May along the Greenland coast in warmer water masses of Atlantic origin and during June in the whole polynya, except...

  6. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  7. Pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy modifies histamine turnover and H3 receptor function in the human hippocampus and temporal neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Cuéllar-Herrera, Manola; Velasco, Ana Luisa; Velasco, Francisco; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Carmona, Francia; Guevara, Rosalinda; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio; Rocha, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the tissue content of tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA) and histamine as well as H3 receptor (H3 Rs) binding and activation of the heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding αi/o proteins (Gαi/o) coupled to these receptors in the hippocampus and temporal neocortex of patients (n = 10) with pharmacoresistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Patients with MTLE showed elevated tissue content of t-MeHA in the hippocampus. Analyses revealed that a younger age at seizure onset was correlated with a higher tissue content of t-MeHA, lower H3 R binding, and lower efficacy of Gαi/o protein activation in the hippocampus. We conclude that the hippocampus shows a reduction in the H3 R function associated with enhanced histamine. In contrast, the temporal neocortex displayed a high efficacy of H3 Rs Gαi/o protein activation that was associated with low tissue contents of histamine and t-MeHA. These results indicate an overactivation of H3 Rs leading to decreased histamine in the temporal neocortex. However, this situation was lessened in circumstances such as a longer duration of epilepsy or higher seizure frequency. It is concluded that decrease in H3 Rs function and enhanced levels of histamine may contribute to the epileptic activity in the hippocampus and temporal neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant MTLE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Temporal distribution of bacterial community structure in the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia area and the adjacent East China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Huang Huiqin; Bao Shixiang; Xiao Tian; Zhang Wuchang; Wu Ying; Zhou Feng

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial community structure and the effects of environmental factors on the microbial community distribution were investigated in the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia area and its adjacent area in the East China Sea (ECS) in June, August and October, 2006. Profiles of bacterial communities were generated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes followed by DNA sequence analysis. The dominant bacterial groups were affiliated to Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophaga–Flavobacteria–Bacteroides (CFB), Deltaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes, which were mostly from the marine seawater ecosystem. Effects of environmental factors on the bacterial community distribution were analyzed by the ordination technique of canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The environmental factors significantly influencing bacterial community structure were different in the three months; dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and temperature in June and nitrite in August. No environmental variables displayed significant influence on the bacterial community at the 5% level in October. The seasonal environmental heterogeneity in the Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent ECS, such as seasonal hydrodynamic conditions and riverine input of nutrients, might be the reason for the difference in the key environmental factors determining the bacterial community in the three months. (letter)

  9. Temporal network epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in epidemic process models and related data on temporally varying networks. It is widely recognized that contact networks are indispensable for describing, understanding, and intervening to stop the spread of infectious diseases in human and animal populations; “network epidemiology” is an umbrella term to describe this research field. More recently, contact networks have been recognized as being highly dynamic. This observation, also supported by an increasing amount of new data, has led to research on temporal networks, a rapidly growing area. Changes in network structure are often informed by epidemic (or other) dynamics, in which case they are referred to as adaptive networks. This volume gathers contributions by prominent authors working in temporal and adaptive network epidemiology, a field essential to understanding infectious diseases in real society.

  10. Ex vivo study of dentate gyrus neurogenesis in human pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, M; Fernández, M; Del Vecchio, G; Lizzo, G; Marucci, G; Giulioni, M; Pozzati, E; Antonelli, T; Lanzoni, G; Bagnara, G P; Giardino, L; Calzà, L

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenesis in adult humans occurs in at least two areas of the brain, the subventricular zone of the telencephalon and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampal formation. We studied dentate gyrus subgranular layer neurogenesis in patients subjected to tailored antero-mesial temporal resection including amygdalohippocampectomy due to pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using the in vitro neurosphere assay. Sixteen patients were enrolled in the study; mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was present in eight patients. Neurogenesis was investigated by ex vivo neurosphere expansion in the presence of mitogens (epidermal growth factor + basic fibroblast growth factor) and spontaneous differentiation after mitogen withdrawal. Growth factor synthesis was investigated by qRT-PCR in neurospheres. We demonstrate that in vitro proliferation of cells derived from dentate gyrus of TLE patients is dependent on disease duration. Moreover, the presence of MTS impairs proliferation. As long as in vitro proliferation occurs, neurogenesis is maintained, and cells expressing a mature neurone phenotype (TuJ1, MAP2, GAD) are spontaneously formed after mitogen withdrawal. Finally, formed neurospheres express mRNAs encoding for growth (vascular endothelial growth factor) as well as neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor). We demonstrated that residual neurogenesis in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus in TLE is dependent on diseases duration and absent in MTS. © 2010 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2010 British Neuropathological Society.

  11. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  12. Temporal changes in species composition, diversity, and woody vegetation structure of savannas in the Cerrado-Amazon transition zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Maracahipes-Santos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vegetation in the transition between tropical forest and savanna is hyperdynamic and there is evidence that in the absence of fire, forest advances over savanna. Between 2008 and 2013 we evaluated changes in species composition and diversity and in the structure of the woody vegetation of savanna physiognomies in the transition between the Cerrado and Amazon biomes that were fire free for 11 years. The physiognomies form a gradient from savanna woodland (Typical Cerrado - TC, to low woodland (Dense Cerrado - DC, to woodland (locally called Cerradão - CO. We hypothesise that: 1 the more open physiognomies (TC and DC are more dynamic compared to the closed physiognomy (CO; and 2 in the absence of fire vegetation tends to become more forested. We found that: 1 TC was more dynamic (e.g. greater increases in richness, diversity, and abundance of plants and basal area than CO and DC; 2 The three physiognomies experienced an increase in basal area and abundance of individuals, but only certain key species contributed to these increases. These results indicate that the open physiognomies were more dynamic than the closed physiognomies, and in the absence of fire the savanna physiognomies became more forested and accumulated biomass.

  13. Spatio-temporal population structuring and genetic diversity retention in depleted Atlantic Bluefin tuna of the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccioni, Giulia; Landi, Monica; Ferrara, Giorgia; Milano, Ilaria; Cariani, Alessia; Zane, Lorenzo; Sella, Massimo; Barbujani, Guido; Tinti, Fausto

    2010-01-01

    Fishery genetics have greatly changed our understanding of population dynamics and structuring in marine fish. In this study, we show that the Atlantic Bluefin tuna (ABFT, Thunnus thynnus), an oceanic predatory species exhibiting highly migratory behavior, large population size, and high potential for dispersal during early life stages, displays significant genetic differences over space and time, both at the fine and large scales of variation. We compared microsatellite variation of contemporary (n = 256) and historical (n = 99) biological samples of ABFTs of the central-western Mediterranean Sea, the latter dating back to the early 20th century. Measures of genetic differentiation and a general heterozygote deficit suggest that differences exist among population samples, both now and 96–80 years ago. Thus, ABFTs do not represent a single panmictic population in the Mediterranean Sea. Statistics designed to infer changes in population size, both from current and past genetic variation, suggest that some Mediterranean ABFT populations, although still not severely reduced in their genetic potential, might have suffered from demographic declines. The short-term estimates of effective population size are straddled on the minimum threshold (effective population size = 500) indicated to maintain genetic diversity and evolutionary potential across several generations in natural populations. PMID:20080643

  14. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon radiography: a calibration experiment using a water tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; de Bremond d'Ars, Jean; Gardien, Serge; Girerd, Claude; Ianigro, Jean-Christophe

    2016-03-14

    Usage of secondary cosmic muons to image the geological structures density distribution significantly developed during the past ten years. Recent applications demonstrate the method interest to monitor magma ascent and volcanic gas movements inside volcanoes. Muon radiography could be used to monitor density variations in aquifers and the critical zone in the near surface. However, the time resolution achievable by muon radiography monitoring remains poorly studied. It is biased by fluctuation sources exterior to the target, and statistically affected by the limited number of particles detected during the experiment. The present study documents these two issues within a simple and well constrained experimental context: a water tower. We use the data to discuss the influence of atmospheric variability that perturbs the signal, and propose correction formulas to extract the muon flux variations related to the water level changes. Statistical developments establish the feasibility domain of muon radiography monitoring as a function of target thickness (i.e. opacity). Objects with a thickness comprised between ≈50 ± 30 m water equivalent correspond to the best time resolution. Thinner objects have a degraded time resolution that strongly depends on the zenith angle, whereas thicker objects (like volcanoes) time resolution does not.

  15. Structural and temporal evolution of a reactivated brittle-ductile fault - Part I: Fault architecture, strain localization mechanisms and deformation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, E.; Viola, G.

    2014-12-01

    Faults are by nature dynamic, as their architecture and composition evolve progressively in space and through time steered by the interplay between strain weakening and hardening mechanisms. This study combines structural analysis, geochemistry and chlorite geothermometry to investigate deformation and strain localization mechanisms of the Kvenklubben fault, a Paleozoic brittle-ductile thrust in northern Norway, with the goal to constrain their temporal variations and the consequences thereof on fault architecture development and rheological behavior. The fault evolved from an initially discrete brittle feature slipping mainly by seismogenic ruptures to a wide brittle-ductile phyllonite deforming by aseismic creep. The formation of mechanically weak phyllosilicates by decarbonation of footwall dolostones and carbonation of hanging wall metabasalts was the main weakening mechanism, whereas partitioning of fluid flow and fracture sealing following transient high pore pressure-driven embrittlement caused episodic and localized strain hardening. The interplay between strain weakening and hardening mechanisms caused the fault core to widen. We suggest that the ability for carbonate-hosted faults to slip by seismogenic rupture is also a function of the faults' structural-evolutionary stage, and that it decreases progressively with fault maturity. This study demonstrates the importance of calibrating the present-day fault anatomy against the dynamic character of faults, which evolve geometrically, compositionally and mechanically in space and through time.

  16. Temporal bone imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmerling, Marc [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Sint-Lucas, Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Foer, Bert de (ed.) [Sint-Augustinus Ziekenhuis, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. Straightforward structure to facilitate learning. Detailed consideration of newer imaging techniques, including the hot topic of diffusion-weighted imaging. Includes a chapter on anatomy that will be of great help to the novice interpreter of imaging findings. Excellent illustrations throughout. This book provides a complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. After description of indications for imaging and the cross-sectional imaging anatomy of the area, subsequent chapters address the various diseases and conditions that affect the temporal bone and are likely to be encountered regularly in clinical practice. The classic imaging methods are described and discussed in detail, and individual chapters are included on newer techniques such as functional imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging. There is also a strong focus on postoperative imaging. Throughout, imaging findings are documented with the aid of numerous informative, high-quality illustrations. Temporal Bone Imaging, with its straightforward structure based essentially on topography, will prove of immense value in daily practice.

  17. Temporal contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial and temporal genetic structure of a river-resident Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) after millennia of isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Odd Terje; Karlsson, Sten; Thorstad, Eva B; Berg, Ole Kristian; Kent, Matthew P; Norum, Ine C J; Hindar, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    The river-resident Salmo salar (“småblank”) has been isolated from other Atlantic salmon populations for 9,500 years in upper River Namsen, Norway. This is the only European Atlantic salmon population accomplishing its entire life cycle in a river. Hydropower development during the last six decades has introduced movement barriers and changed more than 50% of the river habitat to lentic conditions. Based on microsatellites and SNPs, genetic variation within småblank was only about 50% of that in the anadromous Atlantic salmon within the same river. The genetic differentiation (FST) between småblank and the anadromous population was 0.24. This is similar to the differentiation between anadromous Atlantic salmon in Europe and North America. Microsatellite analyses identified three genetic subpopulations within småblank, each with an effective population size Ne of a few hundred individuals. There was no evidence of reduced heterozygosity and allelic richness in contemporary samples (2005–2008) compared with historical samples (1955–56 and 1978–79). However, there was a reduction in genetic differentiation between sampling localities over time. SNP data supported the differentiation of småblank into subpopulations and revealed downstream asymmetric gene flow between subpopulations. In spite of this, genetic variation was not higher in the lower than in the upper areas. The meta-population structure of småblank probably maintains genetic variation better than one panmictic population would do, as long as gene flow among subpopulations is maintained. Småblank is a unique endemic island population of Atlantic salmon. It is in a precarious situation due to a variety of anthropogenic impacts on its restricted habitat area. Thus, maintaining population size and avoiding further habitat fragmentation are important. PMID:24967074

  19. Spatial and temporal genetic structure of a river-resident Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) after millennia of isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Odd Terje; Karlsson, Sten; Thorstad, Eva B; Berg, Ole Kristian; Kent, Matthew P; Norum, Ine C J; Hindar, Kjetil

    2014-05-01

    The river-resident Salmo salar ("småblank") has been isolated from other Atlantic salmon populations for 9,500 years in upper River Namsen, Norway. This is the only European Atlantic salmon population accomplishing its entire life cycle in a river. Hydropower development during the last six decades has introduced movement barriers and changed more than 50% of the river habitat to lentic conditions. Based on microsatellites and SNPs, genetic variation within småblank was only about 50% of that in the anadromous Atlantic salmon within the same river. The genetic differentiation (F ST) between småblank and the anadromous population was 0.24. This is similar to the differentiation between anadromous Atlantic salmon in Europe and North America. Microsatellite analyses identified three genetic subpopulations within småblank, each with an effective population size Ne of a few hundred individuals. There was no evidence of reduced heterozygosity and allelic richness in contemporary samples (2005-2008) compared with historical samples (1955-56 and 1978-79). However, there was a reduction in genetic differentiation between sampling localities over time. SNP data supported the differentiation of småblank into subpopulations and revealed downstream asymmetric gene flow between subpopulations. In spite of this, genetic variation was not higher in the lower than in the upper areas. The meta-population structure of småblank probably maintains genetic variation better than one panmictic population would do, as long as gene flow among subpopulations is maintained. Småblank is a unique endemic island population of Atlantic salmon. It is in a precarious situation due to a variety of anthropogenic impacts on its restricted habitat area. Thus, maintaining population size and avoiding further habitat fragmentation are important.

  20. Informing disease models with temporal and spatial contact structure among GPS-collared individuals in wild populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Williams

    Full Text Available Contacts between hosts are essential for transmission of many infectious agents. Understanding how contacts, and thus transmission rates, occur in space and time is critical to effectively responding to disease outbreaks in free-ranging animal populations. Contacts between animals in the wild are often difficult to observe or measure directly. Instead, one must infer contacts from metrics such as proximity in space and time. Our objective was to examine how contacts between white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus vary in space and among seasons. We used GPS movement data from 71 deer in central New York State to quantify potential direct contacts between deer and indirect overlap in space use across time and space. Daily probabilities of direct contact decreased from winter (0.05-0.14, to low levels post-parturition through summer (0.00-0.02, and increased during the rut to winter levels. The cumulative distribution for the spatial structure of direct and indirect contact probabilities around a hypothetical point of occurrence increased rapidly with distance for deer pairs separated by 1,000 m-7,000 m. Ninety-five percent of the probabilities of direct contact occurred among deer pairs within 8,500 m of one another, and 99% within 10,900 m. Probabilities of indirect contact accumulated across greater spatial extents: 95% at 11,900 m and 99% at 49,000 m. Contacts were spatially consistent across seasons, indicating that although contact rates differ seasonally, they occur proportionally across similar landscape extents. Distributions of contact probabilities across space can inform management decisions for assessing risk and allocating resources in response.

  1. Spatio-temporal structure and influence of environmental parameters on the Tipuloidea (Insecta: Diptera) assemblage of Neotropical salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lucas; Carrasco, Daiane; Proietti, Maíra

    2017-10-01

    Estuaries and salt marshes are important coastal ecosystems that present unique characteristics in terms of nutrient cycling, salinity, habitats, flora and fauna. Despite their ecological importance, there is scarce knowledge on the occupation, distribution and ecology of insects, including Tipuloidea, in these environments. This study aimed to evaluate the composition, seasonality and effect of abiotic factors on the abundance, diversity and structure of a Tipuloidea assemblage at the Patos Lagoon salt marshes, located at the south of the Neotropical region. We sampled crane-flies from three zones along the estuary by installing two Malaise traps at the low and high vegetation strata of each zone. Sampling was conducted uninterruptedly every fifteen days between August/2015 and July/2016, and collected insects were identified morphologically based on specific literature. 5248 crane-flies were identified covering six species and twenty-five morphospecies. Abundance and frenquency of occurrence of species revealed a gap in the presence of constant species at the middle estuary. Dicranomyia, Gonomyia, Teucholabis and Zelandotipula species were additional (accessory) species only in the upper estuary, while Symplecta cana only in the lower estuary. This shows that different species prefer distinct points along the estuary. Higher abundance of crane-flies was correlated with elevated temperature and humidity. Symplecta pilipes was an exception, presenting increase in abundance under lower temperatures. Seasonal change in Tipuloidea species composition was observed, with higher evenness of Dicranomyia, Geranomyia, Rhipidia domestica and Symplecta cana (15-20%) during summer, and dominance of Symplecta pilipes in winter (80%). The gap at the middle estuary can possibly be due to stress caused by large fluctuations in salinity in the zone. In addition, the seasonal differences can have significant ecological consequences such as the modification of the Tipuloid species

  2. Stability and spatio-temporal structure in fish assemblages of two floodplain lagoons of the lower Orinoco River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirson González

    Full Text Available Fish assemblage structure and variability were analyzed in two floodplain lagoons (Las Arhuacas and Los Cardonales along the lower Orinoco over a hydrological cycle. Every three months during continuous three-day sampling, experimental gill nets (5 to 12.5 cm of mesh opening and 1 mm-mesh seine nets were utilized according to the types of habitats presents. A total of 133 fish species were found in Las Arhuacas and 95 species in Cardonales. Fifty five and 17 species were exclusive to Las Arhuacas and Los Cardonales respectively, and 77 were common to both lagoons. In Las Arhuacas, the most speciesrich orders were Characiformes, Siluriformes, Perciformes and Gymnotiformes and in Los Cardonales, the most species-rich orders were Characiformes, Siluriformes, Clupeiformes and Perciformes. The richness, abundance and biomass were significantly higher (p < 0.001 in Arhuacas than in Cardonales. In general, the fishes assemblage was highly variable during the high water phase and moderately stable during low water phase in both lagoons, with more stability or less variability in Cardonales than Arhuacas. Also, there were significant differences in the fish assemblages between the two lagoons, mainly during low waters (ANOSIM; p < 0.001. The species that contributed most to the mean dissimilarity between the lagoons were Hypostomus argus, Aphanotorulus ammophilus, Potamorhina altamazonica, Prochilodus mariae, Loricaria gr. cataphracta, Oxydoras sifontesi, Hydrolycus armatus, Hyphopthalmus edentatus and Pterodoras rivasi. The last four species were more commonly collected in Los Cardonales. Also, the species of small size (mainly SL < 5 cm such as Rhinosardinia amazonica, Moenkhausia sp. 1 "lepidura", Moenkhausia sp. 2, Aphyocharax alburnus, Characidium sp. 1, Moenkhausia sp. 3, Exodon paradoxus and Roeboides dientonito contributed to the mean dissimilarity among the beach and aquatic vegetation habitats. The patterns of the species assemblage

  3. Effects of food web structure and resource subsidies on the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coherence in a tropical coastal lagoon: an experimental mesocosm approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Silva Carneiro

    Full Text Available AIM: The study of the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coherence of ecological variables among lakes has become an important area of limnology. However, no study to date has experimentally tested whether and how resource subsidies and food web configuration affect the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coherence of limnological variables. We conducted a field mesocosm experiment to test the following hypotheses: (i nutrient enrichment would reduce the temporal coherence of system variables; (ii fish predation would enhance the temporal coherence of system variables; and (iii the strength of temporal coherence decreases from physical (water transparency, to chemical (dissolved oxygen concentration [DO] to biological variables (total zooplankton biomass. METHODS: For 11 weeks, we manipulated fish presence and nutrient (N and P concentration in a 2 × 2 factorial design in sixteen within-lake enclosures installed in a tropical coastal lagoon. Coherence was estimated by pair-to-pair Pearson's moment correlations of the temporal trajectories of each response variable among enclosures of the same treatment. RESULTS: Fish presence only enhanced the temporal coherence of zooplankton biomass, whereas contrary to our expectations, nutrient addition enhanced the temporal coherence of [DO]. The strength of the individual effects of fish and nutrients on temporal coherence was affected by variable identity, but this variation did not occur in a consistent pattern across variables. However, the interactive effects of fish and nutrients on the temporal coherence of the three variables monitored were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that local factors, such as fish presence and nutrient availability, may affect the temporal coherence of several system variables, but these effects are better predicted by the strength of direct interactions between the local factor and the variable than by the identity of the variable itself

  4. Qualitative and temporal aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral assumptions, rational or otherwise, are not solid enough to be eligible as first principles of theoretical economics. Hence all endeavors to lay the formal foundation on a new site and at a deeper level actually need no further vindication. The present paper suggests three non-behavioral axioms as groundwork and applies them to the analysis of qualitative and temporal aggregation in the pure consumption economy. It turns out that the structural axiom set is self-similar with regard...

  5. Temporal Glare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias; Ihrke, Matthias; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2009-01-01

    and attractive renderings of bright light sources. Based on the anatomy of the human eye, we propose a model that enables real-time simulation of dynamic glare on a GPU. This allows an improved depiction of HDR images on LDR media for interactive applications like games, feature films, or even by adding movement......Glare is a consequence of light scattered within the human eye when looking at bright light sources. This effect can be exploited for tone mapping since adding glare to the depiction of high-dynamic range (HDR) imagery on a low-dynamic range (LDR) medium can dramatically increase perceived contrast....... Even though most, if not all, subjects report perceiving glare as a bright pattern that fluctuates in time, up to now it has only been modeled as a static phenomenon. We argue that the temporal properties of glare are a strong means to increase perceived brightness and to produce realistic...

  6. The role of spatial and temporal heterogeneity and competition in structuring trematode communities in the great pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Kuris, Armand M.; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed how spatial and temporal heterogeneity and competition structure larval trematode communities in the pulmonate snail Lymnaea stagnalis. To postulate a dominance hierarchy, mark-release-recapture was used to monitor replacements of trematode species within snails over time. In addition, we sampled the trematode community in snails in different ponds in 3 consecutive years. A total of 7,623 snails (10,382 capture events) was sampled in 7 fishponds in the Jindřichův Hradec and Třeboň areas in South Bohemia (Czech Republic) from August 2006 to October 2008. Overall, 39% of snails were infected by a community of 14 trematode species; 7% of snails were infected with more than 1 trematode species (constituting 16 double- and 4 triple-species combinations). Results of the null-model analyses suggested that spatial heterogeneity in recruitment among ponds isolated trematode species from each other, whereas seasonal pulses in recruitment increased species interactions in some ponds. Competitive exclusion among trematodes led to a rarity of multiple infections compared to null-model expectations. Competitive relationships among trematode species were hypothesized as a dominance hierarchy based on direct evidence of replacement and invasion and on indirect evidence. Seven top dominant species with putatively similar competitive abilities (6 rediae and 1 sporocyst species) reduced the prevalence of the other trematode species developing in sporocysts only.

  7. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javiera N Benavente

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions-a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline-is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia's freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between "pure" naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might

  8. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Javiera N; Seeb, Lisa W; Seeb, James E; Arismendi, Ivan; Hernández, Cristián E; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Cádiz, Maria I; Musleh, Selim S; Gomez-Uchida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions-a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline-is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia's freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal) genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial) genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between "pure" naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb) were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might experience substantial

  9. Post-processing of structural MRI for individualized diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Benjamin; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, a relevant proportion of all histopathologically proven focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) escape visual detection; this shows the need for additional improvements in analyzing MRI data. A positive MRI is still the strongest prognostic factor for postoperative freedom of seizures. Among several post-processing methods voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of T1- and T2-weighted sequences and T2 relaxometry are routinely applied in pre-surgical diagnostics of cryptogenic epilepsy in epilepsy centers. VBM is superior to conventional visual analysis with 9-15% more identified epileptogenic foci, while T2 relaxometry has its main application in (mesial) temporal lobe epilepsy. Further methods such as surface-based morphometry (SBM) or diffusion tensor imaging are promising but there is a lack of current studies comparing their individual diagnostic value. Post-processing methods represent an important addition to conventional visual analysis but need to be interpreted with expertise and experience so that they should be apprehended as a complementary tool within the context of the multi-modal evaluation of epilepsy patients. This review will give an overview of existing post-processing methods of structural MRI and outline their clinical relevance in detection of epileptogenic structural changes. PMID:25853079

  10. Spatio-temporal analysis of the urban–rural gradient structure: an application in a Mediterranean mountainous landscape (Serra San Bruno, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Fazio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent and significant transformations of European landscapes have occurred as a consequence of a series of diffused, varied and often connected phenomena: urban growth and sprawl, agricultural intensification in the most suitable areas and agricultural abandonment in marginal areas. These phenomena can affect dramatically ecosystems' structure and functioning, since certain modifications cause landscape fragmentation while others tend to increase homogeneity. Thus, a thorough comprehension of the evolution trends of landscapes, in particular those linked to urban-rural relations, is crucial for a sustainable landscape planning. In this framework, the main objectives of the present paper are: (a to investigate Land Use/Land Cover (LULC transformations and dynamics that occurred over the period 1955–2006 in the municipality of Serra San Bruno (Calabria, Italy, an area particularly representative of the Mediterranean mountainous landscape; (b to compare the settlement growth with the urban planning tools in charge in the study area; (c to examine the relationship between urban–rural gradient, landscape metrics, demographic and physical variables; (d to investigate the evolution of urban–rural gradient composition and configuration along significant axes of landscape changes. Data with a high level of detail (minimum mapping unit 0.2 ha were obtained through the digitisation of historical aerial photographs and digital orthophotos identifying LULC classes according to the Corine Land Cover legend. The investigated period was divided into four significant time intervals, which were specifically analysed to detect LULC changes. Differently from previous studies, in the present research the spatio-temporal analysis of urban–rural gradient was performed through three subsequent steps: (1 kernel density analysis of settlements; (2 analysis of landscape structure by means of metrics calculated using a moving window method; (3 analysis of

  11. Spatio-temporal analysis of the urban-rural gradient structure: an application in a Mediterranean mountainous landscape (Serra San Bruno, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modica, G.; Vizzari, M.; Pollino, M.; Fichera, C. R.; Zoccali, P.; Di Fazio, S.

    2012-12-01

    The most recent and significant transformations of European landscapes have occurred as a consequence of a series of diffused, varied and often connected phenomena: urban growth and sprawl, agricultural intensification in the most suitable areas and agricultural abandonment in marginal areas. These phenomena can affect dramatically ecosystems' structure and functioning, since certain modifications cause landscape fragmentation while others tend to increase homogeneity. Thus, a thorough comprehension of the evolution trends of landscapes, in particular those linked to urban-rural relations, is crucial for a sustainable landscape planning. In this framework, the main objectives of the present paper are: (a) to investigate Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) transformations and dynamics that occurred over the period 1955-2006 in the municipality of Serra San Bruno (Calabria, Italy), an area particularly representative of the Mediterranean mountainous landscape; (b) to compare the settlement growth with the urban planning tools in charge in the study area; (c) to examine the relationship between urban-rural gradient, landscape metrics, demographic and physical variables; (d) to investigate the evolution of urban-rural gradient composition and configuration along significant axes of landscape changes. Data with a high level of detail (minimum mapping unit 0.2 ha) were obtained through the digitisation of historical aerial photographs and digital orthophotos identifying LULC classes according to the Corine Land Cover legend. The investigated period was divided into four significant time intervals, which were specifically analysed to detect LULC changes. Differently from previous studies, in the present research the spatio-temporal analysis of urban-rural gradient was performed through three subsequent steps: (1) kernel density analysis of settlements; (2) analysis of landscape structure by means of metrics calculated using a moving window method; (3) analysis of composition and

  12. Síndrome de personalidade interictal na epilepsia do lobo temporal não-dominante: relato de caso Interictal personality syndrome in temporal lobe epilepsy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO C. TREVISOL-BITTENCOURT

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de personalidade interictal na epilepsia do lobo temporal não-dominante consiste de hipossexualidade, hiperreligiosidade, alteração do humor e hipergrafia. Sua descrição, em 1974, foi seguida de extensa busca por estes sinais em uma vasta população de pacientes epilépticos. No entanto, estes estudos científicos fracassaram em encontrar este síndrome na epilepsia do lobo temporal em geral. Sua existência foi, por conseguinte, posta em dúvida. Apresentamos o caso de um senhor de 35 anos cuja peculiaridade hipergráfica é o desenho de plantas de construção civil em grande quantidade, além de hiperreligiosidade, hipossexualidade e circunstancialidade. É o primeiro relato deste tipo de expressão gráfica associada à epilepsia parcial complexa e esclerose mesial temporal. Dentre os mecanismos fisiopatológicos propostos, o mais coerente é o da hiperconexão temporal. Embora as crises possam ser controladas em grande parte dos casos com tratamento clínico ou cirúrgico, a sintomatologia comportamental é refratária ao tratamento psicoterápico.The syndrome of interictal personality in non-dominant temporal lobe epilepsy consists of hyposexuality, hyperreligiosity, humorlessness and hypergraphia. Its notification, in 1974, was followed by an extensive search for these traits in broad epileptic populations. Nevertheless, these statistical studies failed to match this syndrome in general temporal lobe epileptics, and its existence became then target of doubt. We report the case of a 35 year-old man presenting partial complex epilepsy, whose singularity lies in his sophisticated drawing abilities. The large amount of buildings and houses he paints expresses his hypergraphia. He also presents hyposexuality and hyperreligiosity. MRI shows right mesial temporal sclerosis. Temporal hyperconnection, caused by a basal temporal irritative focus, is the most probable pathophysiological mechanism. Epileptic fits can be controlled

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Carbon Dioxide Using Structure Functions in Urban Areas: Insights for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan A.; Browell, Edward V.; DiGangi, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaigns during July 2011 over Washington DC/Baltimore, MD; January-February 2013 over the San Joaquin Valley, CA; September 2013 over Houston, TX; and July-August 2014 over Denver, CO. Each of these campaigns have approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 kilometers) at 6-8 different sites in each of the urban areas. In this study, we used structure function analysis, which is a useful way to quantify spatial and temporal variability, by displaying differences with average observations, to evaluate the variability of CO2 in the 0-2 kilometers range (representative of the planetary boundary layer). These results can then be used to provide guidance in the development of science requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission to measure near-surface CO2 variability in different urban areas. We also compare the observed in-situ CO2 variability with the variability of the CO2 column-averaged optical depths in the 0-1 kilometer and 0-3.5 kilometers altitude ranges in the four geographically different urban areas, using vertical weighting functions for potential future ASCENDS lidar CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57 and 2.05 millimeter measurement regions. In addition to determining the natural variability of CO2 near the surface and in the column, radiocarbon method using continuous CO2 and CO measurements are used to examine the variation of emission quantification between anthropogenic and biogenic sources in the DC/Maryland urban site.

  14. The role of temporal abundance structure and habitat preferences in the survival of conodonts during the mid-early Silurian Ireviken mass extinction event.

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    Andrej Spiridonov

    Full Text Available The Ireviken event was one of the most intense extinction episodes that occurred during the mid-Paleozoic era. It had a strong global effect on a range of clades, with conodonts, graptolites and chitinozoans affected most. Using geophysical proxies and conodont species parameters of their temporal abundance structure we investigate how they affected the selectivity of conodont species survival during this calamity. After performing bivariate logistic analyses on 34 species of conodonts, we find three variables that were statistically significantly associated with their odds of survival. These namely include spectral exponents that describe degrees of autocorrelation in a time series, the skewness of species abundance distribution, and average environmental preferences, which are mostly determined by ancient water depths at sampling sites. Model selection of multivariate logistic models found the best model includes species local abundance skewness and substrate preference. A similar pattern is revealed through the regression tree analysis. The apparent extinction selectivity points to a possible causes of environmental deterioration during the Ireviken event. The significant positive relationship between extinction risk and preferential existence in deeper environments suggests the open ocean causal mechanisms of biotic stress that occurred during the Ireviken event. Marine regressions, which were previously suggested as a causal factor in this extinction episode, on theoretical grounds should have had higher impact on species living in near-shore environments, through the processes of habitat loss which are associated with decreases of shelfal areas. In addition, the significant positive correlations found between skewness of abundance distributions and spectral exponent values and the probability of species survival suggest that community and ecosystem processes (which controlled species abundance fluctuation patterns were significantly

  15. Legal Sentience and the Problem of the Instant: A Critical Assessment of the Temporal Structure of Precedent and its Implications for Legal Authority

    OpenAIRE

    Wargan, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the authority of precedent from a phenomenological standpoint. Phenomenology distinguishes between two temporal models. One describes time in an idealised form, as a divisible chain of instants or events. The other looks at lived temporality as fluid and indivisible duration. In the system of precedent, we witness an interaction of both models. The legal order is constructed from slices in time that become the building blocks of future judgments. Precedents are binding for...

  16. A cross-sectional MRI study of brain regional atrophy and clinical characteristics of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Applying a cross-sectional design, we set out to further characterize the significance of extrahippocampal brain atrophy in a large sample of \\'sporadic\\' mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE+HS). By evaluating the influence of epilepsy chronicity on structural atrophy, this work represents an important step towards the characterization of MRI-based volumetric measurements as genetic endophenotypes for this condition. METHODS: Using an automated brain segmentation technique, MRI-based volume measurements of several brain regions were compared between 75 patients with \\'sporadic\\' MTLE+HS and 50 healthy controls. Applying linear regression models, we examined the relationship between structural atrophy and important clinical features of MTLE+HS, including disease duration, lifetime number of partial and generalized seizures, and history of initial precipitating insults (IPIs). RESULTS: Significant volume loss was detected in ipsilateral hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, and cerebral white matter (WM). In addition, contralateral hippocampal and bilateral cerebellar grey matter (GM) volume loss was observed in left MTLE+HS patients. Hippocampal, amygdalar, and cerebral WM volume loss correlated with duration of epilepsy. This correlation was stronger in patients with prior IPIs history. Further, cerebral WM, cerebellar GM, and contralateral hippocampal volume loss correlated with lifetime number of generalized seizures. CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that multiple brain regions beyond the hippocampus are involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE+HS. IPIs are an important factor influencing the rate of regional atrophy but our results also support a role for processes related to epilepsy chronicity. The consequence of epilepsy chronicity on candidate brain regions has important implications on their application as genetic endophenotypes.

  17. Effect of a major highway on the spatial and temporal variation in the structure and diversity of the avifauna of a tropical premontane rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Gerardo; Bermúdez, Esteban

    2016-12-01

    Roads immersed in conservation areas will increase in number, size, and traffic over the next decade, and thus, understanding their effects on forest-dependent wildlife is crucial for improving current management practices and reducing the negative impacts of roads on sensitive species. We examined the influence of route 32 (a.k.a. Guápiles Highway) on temporal and spatial changes in the structure of the avifauna of Braulio Carrillo National Park, Costa Rica, a site crossed by this road along 25 km. The highway connects the capital city of San José with the Harbor of Limón in the Caribbean Sea (142 km). Although the road is narrow (12 m in width and comprised by two lanes along most of the route) it services over 1.5 million motor vehicles per year, 12 % are heavy trucks and trailers. We expected the highway to divide the avifauna, and thus to observe significant differences in species structure on opposite sides of the road. We described changes in bird diversity between wet and dry seasons at Las Palmas and Ceibo trails located on opposite sides of the highway (14 point counts per trail), and evaluated how abundance and diversity varied with road distance. Censuses took place during wet and dry seasons from 2002 to 2005. We listed 245 species and 6 035 observations during the 4-yr survey. Rare species dominated the avifauna (65 % of species avifauna remained homogeneous on both sides of the road, which did not support the fragmentation hypothesis, the highway reduced the abundance and diversity of specialized understory insectivores associated with primary forests near the road. This highway will expand outside the National Park (from 2 to 4 lanes along 107 km from Río Frío to Limón) in the next years, which will increase traffic volume and road impacts within the Park. Roads are increasing across highly diverse tropical areas justifying the need for management practices based on the identification of sensitive groups.

  18. Dysfunctional Brain Networking among Autonomic Regulatory Structures in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients at High Risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Luke A; Harper, Ronald M; Kumar, Rajesh; Guye, Maxime; Ogren, Jennifer A; Lhatoo, Samden D; Lemieux, Louis; Scott, Catherine A; Vos, Sjoerd B; Rani, Sandhya; Diehl, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is common among young people with epilepsy. Individuals who are at high risk of SUDEP exhibit regional brain structural and functional connectivity (FC) alterations compared with low-risk patients. However, less is known about network-based FC differences among critical cortical and subcortical autonomic regulatory brain structures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients at high risk of SUDEP. 32 TLE patients were risk-stratified according to the following clinical criteria: age of epilepsy onset, duration of epilepsy, frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and presence of nocturnal seizures, resulting in 14 high-risk and 18 low-risk cases. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) signal time courses were extracted from 11 bilateral cortical and subcortical brain regions involved in autonomic and other regulatory processes. After computing all pairwise correlations, FC matrices were analyzed using the network-based statistic. FC strength among the 11 brain regions was compared between the high- and low-risk patients. Increases and decreases in FC were sought, using high-risk > low-risk and low-risk > high-risk contrasts (with covariates age, gender, lateralization of epilepsy, and presence of hippocampal sclerosis). High-risk TLE patients showed a subnetwork with significantly reduced FC ( t  = 2.5, p  = 0.029) involving the thalamus, brain stem, anterior cingulate, putamen and amygdala, and a second subnetwork with significantly elevated FC ( t  = 2.1, p  = 0.031), which extended to medial/orbital frontal cortex, insula, hippocampus, amygdala, subcallosal cortex, brain stem, thalamus, caudate, and putamen. TLE patients at high risk of SUDEP showed widespread FC differences between key autonomic regulatory brain regions compared to those at low risk. The altered FC revealed here may help to shed light on the functional correlates of autonomic disturbances in epilepsy

  19. Phenotypes and Genotypes of Old and Contemporary Porcine Strains Indicate a Temporal Change in the S. aureus Population Structure in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Moodley, Arshnee; Lipinska, Urszula; Broens, Els M.; Hermans, Katleen; Butaye, Patrick; Devriese, Luc A.; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Guardabassi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus sequence type ST398 has recently gained attention due to the spread of methicillin-resistant strains among people exposed to livestock. The aim of this study was to explore temporal changes in the population structure of S. aureus in pigs over the last 40 years with particular reference to the occurrence of ST398. Methods We analysed a unique collection of 91 porcine strains isolated in six countries between 1973 and 2009 using a biotyping scheme described in the 1970's in combination with spa typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The collection comprised 32 historical isolates from 1973–1974 (n = 19) and from 1991–2003 (n = 13), and 59 contemporary isolates from 2004–2009. The latter isolates represented the most common MLST types (ST1, ST9, ST97 and ST433) and spa types isolated from pigs in Europe. Results and Discussion S. aureus sequence type ST398 was not found among old isolates from the 1970's or from 1991–2003, suggesting that this lineage was absent or present at low frequencies in pigs in the past. This hypothesis is supported by the observed association of ST398 with the ovine ecovar, which was not described in pigs by studies carried out in the 1970's. In addition, various phenotypic and genotypic differences were observed between old and contemporary isolates. Some biotypes commonly reported in pigs in the 1970's were either absent (human ecovar) or rare (biotype A) among contemporary isolates. Nine clonal lineages found among old porcine isolates are occasionally reported in pigs today (ST8, ST30, ST97, ST387, ST1092, ST2468) or have never been described in this animal host (ST12, ST133, ST1343). These results indicate that the population structure of porcine S. aureus has changed over the last 40 years and confirm the current theory that S. aureus ST398 does not originate from pigs. PMID:25000530

  20. Surgical and postmortem pathology studies: contribution for the investigation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Hamad, Ana Paula Andrade; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Lancellotti, Carmen Lucia Penteado; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki

    2012-12-01

    Pathology studies in epilepsy patients bring useful information for comprehending the physiopathology of various forms of epilepsy, as well as aspects related to response to treatment and long-term prognosis. These studies are usually restricted to surgical specimens obtained from patients with refractory focal epilepsies. Therefore, most of them pertain to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and malformations of cortical development (MCD), thus providing information of a selected group of patients and restricted regions of the brain. Postmortem whole brain studies are rarely performed in epilepsy patients, however they may provide extensive information on brain pathology, allowing the analysis of areas beyond the putative epileptogenic zone. In this article, we reviewed pathology studies performed in epilepsy patients with emphasis on neuropathological findings in TLE with MTS and MCD. Furthermore, we reviewed data from postmortem studies and discussed the importance of performing these studies in epilepsy populations.

  1. Surgical and postmortem pathology studies: contribution for the investigation of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira Caboclo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathology studies in epilepsy patients bring useful information for comprehending the physiopathology of various forms of epilepsy, as well as aspects related to response to treatment and long-term prognosis. These studies are usually restricted to surgical specimens obtained from patients with refractory focal epilepsies. Therefore, most of them pertain to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and malformations of cortical development (MCD, thus providing information of a selected group of patients and restricted regions of the brain. Postmortem whole brain studies are rarely performed in epilepsy patients, however they may provide extensive information on brain pathology, allowing the analysis of areas beyond the putative epileptogenic zone. In this article, we reviewed pathology studies performed in epilepsy patients with emphasis on neuropathological findings in TLE with MTS and MCD. Furthermore, we reviewed data from postmortem studies and discussed the importance of performing these studies in epilepsy populations.

  2. Quantum Temporal Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01

    The concept of quantum temporal imaging is proposed to manipulate the temporal correlation of entangled photons. In particular, we show that time correlation and anticorrelation can be converted to each other using quantum temporal imaging.

  3. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Commensal Escherichia coli in Zimbabwean Cows Evidence Temporal Fluctuations within a Host-Specific Population Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Couffignal, Camille; Clermont, Olivier; D'Humières, Camille; Chatel, Jérémie; Plault, Nicolas; Andremont, Antoine; Mentré, France

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To get insights into the temporal pattern of commensal Escherichia coli populations, we sampled the feces of four healthy cows from the same herd in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe daily over 25 days. The cows had not received antibiotic treatment during the previous 3 months. We performed viable E. coli counts and characterized the 326 isolates originating from the 98 stool samples at a clonal level, screened them for stx and eae genes, and tested them for their antibiotic susceptibilities. We observed that E. coli counts and dominant clones were different among cows, and very few clones were shared. No clone was shared by three or four cows. Clone richness and evenness were not different between cows. Within each host, the variability in the E. coli count was evidenced between days, and no clone was found to be dominant during the entire sampling period, suggesting the existence of clonal interference. Dominant clones tended to persist longer than subdominant ones and were mainly from phylogenetic groups A and B1. Five E. coli clones were found to contain both the stx1 and stx2 genes, representing 6.3% of the studied isolates. All cows harbored at least one Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strain. Resistance to tetracycline, penicillins, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides was rare and observed in three clones that were shed at low levels in two cows. This study highlights the fact that the commensal E. coli population, including the STEC population, is host specific, is highly dynamic over a short time frame, and rarely carries antibiotic resistance determinants in the absence of antibiotic treatment. IMPORTANCE The literature about the dynamics of commensal Escherichia coli populations is very scarce. Over 25 days, we followed the total E. coli counts daily and characterized the sampled clones in the feces of four cows from the same herd living in the Hwange District of Zimbabwe. This study deals with the day-to-day dynamics of both quantitative and

  4. Day-to-Day Dynamics of Commensal Escherichia coli in Zimbabwean Cows Evidence Temporal Fluctuations within a Host-Specific Population Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Méril; Couffignal, Camille; Clermont, Olivier; D'Humières, Camille; Chatel, Jérémie;