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Sample records for mesial temporal structures

  1. Functional connectivity between right and left mesial temporal structures.

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    Lacuey, Nuria; Zonjy, Bilal; Kahriman, Emine S; Kaffashi, Farhad; Miller, Jonathan; Lüders, Hans O

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate functional connectivity between right and left mesial temporal structures using cerebrocerebral evoked potentials. We studied seven patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy who were explored with stereotactically implanted depth electrodes in bilateral hippocampi. In all patients cerebrocerebral evoked potentials evoked by stimulation of the fornix were evaluated as part of a research project assessing fornix stimulation for control of hippocampal seizures. Stimulation of the fornix elicited responses in the ipsilateral hippocampus in all patients with a mean latency of 4.6 ms (range 2-7 ms). Two patients (29 %) also had contralateral hippocampus responses with a mean latency of 7.5 ms (range 5-12 ms) and without involvement of the contralateral temporal neocortex or amygdala. This study confirms the existence of connections between bilateral mesial temporal structures in some patients and explains seizure discharge spreading between homotopic mesial temporal structures without neocortical involvement.

  2. Verbal memory after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children: Do only mesial structures matter?

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    Law, Nicole; Benifla, Mony; Rutka, James; Smith, Mary Lou

    2017-02-01

    Previous findings have been mixed regarding verbal memory outcome after left temporal lobectomy in children, and there are few studies comparing verbal memory change after lateral versus mesial temporal lobe resections. We compared verbal memory outcome associated with sparing or including the mesial structures in children who underwent left or right temporal lobe resection. We also investigated predictors of postsurgical verbal memory change. We retrospectively assessed verbal memory change approximately 1 year after unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy surgery using a list learning task. Participants included 23 children who underwent temporal lobe surgery with sparing of the mesial structures (13 left), and 40 children who had a temporal lobectomy that included resection of mesial structures (22 left). Children who underwent resection from the left lateral and mesial temporal lobe were the only group to show decline in verbal memory. Furthermore, when we considered language representation in the left temporal resection group, patients with left language representation and spared mesial structures showed essentially no change in verbal memory from preoperative to follow-up, whereas those with left language representation and excised mesial structures showed a decline. Postoperative seizure status had no effect on verbal memory change in children after left temporal lobe surgery. Finally, we found that patients with intact preoperative verbal memory experienced a significant decline compared to those with below average preoperative verbal memory. Our findings provide evidence of significant risk factors for verbal memory decline in children, specific to left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Children who undergo left temporal lobe surgery that includes mesial structures may be most vulnerable for verbal memory decline, especially when language representation is localized to the left hemisphere and when preoperative verbal memory is intact. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Â

  3. Surgical Considerations of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Boling, Warren W.

    2018-01-01

    Surgery of temporal lobe epilepsy is the best opportunity for seizure freedom in medically intractable patients. The surgical approach has evolved to recognize the paramount importance of the mesial temporal structures in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who have a seizure origin in the mesial temporal structures. For those individuals with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, a selective amygdalohippocampectomy surgery can be done that provides an excellent opportunity for seizure freedom and limits the resection to temporal lobe structures primarily involved in seizure genesis. PMID:29461485

  4. Surgical Considerations of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Warren W. Boling

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of temporal lobe epilepsy is the best opportunity for seizure freedom in medically intractable patients. The surgical approach has evolved to recognize the paramount importance of the mesial temporal structures in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who have a seizure origin in the mesial temporal structures. For those individuals with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, a selective amygdalohippocampectomy surgery can be done that provides an excellent opportunity for seizure freedom and limits the resection to temporal lobe structures primarily involved in seizure genesis.

  5. Carbamazepine reduces memory induced activation of mesial temporal lobe structures: a pharmacological fMRI-study

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    Okujava Michael

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose It is not known whether carbamazepine (CBZ; a drug widely used in neurology and psychiatry influences the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast changes induced by neuronal activation and measured by functional MRI (fMRI. We aimed to investigate the influence of CBZ on memory induced activation of the mesial temporal lobes in patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Material and Methods Twenty-one individual patients with refractory symptomatic TLE with different CBZ serum levels and 20 healthy controls were studied using BOLD fMRI. Mesial temporal lobe (MTL activation was induced by a task that is based on the retrieval of individually familiar visuo-spatial knowledge. The extent of significant MTL fMRI activation was measured and correlated with the CBZ serum level. Results In TLE patients, the extent of significant fMRI activation over both MTL was negatively correlated to the CBZ serum level (Spearman r = -0.654, P Conclusions In TLE patients, carbamazepine reduces the fMRI-detectable changes within the mesial temporal lobes as induced by effortful memory retrieval. FMRI appears to be suitable to study the effects of chronic drug treatment in patients with epilepsy.

  6. Radiosurgery in the Management of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Peñagarícano, José; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) describes recurrent seizure activity originating from the depths of the temporal lobe. MTLE patients who fail two trials of medication now require testing for surgical candidacy at an epilepsy center. For these individuals, temporal lobectomy offers the greatest likelihood for seizure-freedom (up to 80-90%); unfortunately, this procedure remains largely underutilized. Moreover, for select patients unable to tolerate open surgery, novel techniques are emerging for selective ablation of the mesial temporal structures, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We present here a review of SRS as a potential therapy for MTLE, when open surgery is not an option.

  7. Thalamic changes with mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

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    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S. [Department of Neuroradiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Elwes, R.C.D. [Department of Neurology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Polkey, C.E. [Department of Neurosurgery, King' s College and Maudsley Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    We reviewed the preoperative images of 28 patients with pathologically proven mesial temporal sclerosis, to assess thalamic asymmetry and signal change. A further 25 nonsurgical patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and unequivocal, unilateral changes of mesial temporal sclerosis, and 20 controls, were also reviewed. None of the control group had unequivocal asymmetry of the thalamus. There was an ipsilateral asymmetrically small thalamus in five (18 %) of the surgical group and in three (12 %) of the nonsurgical patients. In four cases there was thalamic signal change. In three patients with thalamic volume loss there was ipsilateral hemiatrophy. All patients with an asymmetrically small thalamus had an asymmetrically small fornix and all but one a small ipsilateral mamillary body. (orig.)

  8. Distinctive Structural and Effective Connectivity Changes of Semantic Cognition Network across Left and Right Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

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    Xiaotong Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of language impairment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE patients is common and left mTLE patients always exhibit a primary problem with access to names. To explore different neuropsychological profiles between left and right mTLE patients, the study investigated both structural and effective functional connectivity changes within the semantic cognition network between these two groups and those from normal controls. We found that gray matter atrophy of left mTLE patients was more severe than that of right mTLE patients in the whole brain and especially within the semantic cognition network in their contralateral hemisphere. It suggested that seizure attacks were rather targeted than random for patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS in the dominant hemisphere. Functional connectivity analysis during resting state fMRI revealed that subregions of the anterior temporal lobe (ATL in the left HS patients were no longer effectively connected. Further, we found that, unlike in right HS patients, increased causal linking between ipsilateral regions in the left HS epilepsy patients cannot make up for their decreased contralateral interaction. It suggested that weakened contralateral connection and disrupted effective interaction between subregions of the unitary, transmodal hub of the ATL may be the primary cause of anomia in the left HS patients.

  9. Distinctive Structural and Effective Connectivity Changes of Semantic Cognition Network across Left and Right Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

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    Fan, Xiaotong; Shang, Kun; Wang, Xiaocui; Wang, Peipei; Shan, Yongzhi; Lu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of language impairment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients is common and left mTLE patients always exhibit a primary problem with access to names. To explore different neuropsychological profiles between left and right mTLE patients, the study investigated both structural and effective functional connectivity changes within the semantic cognition network between these two groups and those from normal controls. We found that gray matter atrophy of left mTLE patients was more severe than that of right mTLE patients in the whole brain and especially within the semantic cognition network in their contralateral hemisphere. It suggested that seizure attacks were rather targeted than random for patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in the dominant hemisphere. Functional connectivity analysis during resting state fMRI revealed that subregions of the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in the left HS patients were no longer effectively connected. Further, we found that, unlike in right HS patients, increased causal linking between ipsilateral regions in the left HS epilepsy patients cannot make up for their decreased contralateral interaction. It suggested that weakened contralateral connection and disrupted effective interaction between subregions of the unitary, transmodal hub of the ATL may be the primary cause of anomia in the left HS patients. PMID:28018680

  10. MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho [School of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging findings of 116 patients diagnosed by MRI as suffering from mesial temporal sclerosis. In 18 of these, the condition was also histologically proven. Among the 116 patients, volume loss of the hippocampus was found in 95 (81.9%) and signal changes of the hippocampus in 53 (45.7%). Decreased signal intensity in the hippocampus on T1-weighted images was found in 13 (11.2%) and increased signal on T2-weighted images in 50 (43.1%). Signal abnormality in the hippocampus on both T1- and T2-weighted images was found in ten, and associated extrahippocampal abnormalities, as follows, in 20 (17.2%): atrophy of fornix (n=3D10), atrophy of the mammillary body (n=3D8), atrophy of the amygdala (n=3D10), atrophy or increased T2 signal intensity of the anterior thalamic nuclei (n=3D2), atrophy of the cingulate gyrus (n=3D2), atrophy or increased signal intensity of the anterior temporal lobe (n=3D8), and cerebral hemiatrophy (n=3D4). A high T2 signal and atrophy of the hippocampus are the most common and important MRI findings of mesial temporal sclerosis. Other abnormal findings, if any, which may be found in extrahippocampal structures such as the fornix, mammillary body and temporal lobe, should, however, also be carefully observed. (author)

  11. Mesial temporal sclerosis in children Esclerose mesial temporal em crianças

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    Eliana Maria Domingues Brandão

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis is the most frequent cause of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy but has a satisfactory response to surgery, and is considered infrequent in children. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrographic and radiological spectrum of the disease in children. METHOD: Retrospective study by review of charts of 44 children with a diagnosis of mesial temporal sclerosis on magnetic resonance imaging, attended at the "Hospital das Clínicas" of the University of São Paulo Faculty of Medicine. RESULTS: Febrile seizure was identified in the history of 54% of the patients. Injuries at the left side predominated in patients with schooling difficulties (p=0.049, in those with the first seizures between six months and five years (p=0.021 and in those with complex febrile seizure (p=0.032. Thirteen patients were submitted to surgery and of these, eight remained without seizures. CONCLUSION: Febrile seizure may be related in a more direct way to the presence of left-side mesial temporal sclerosis.Em adultos, esclerose mesial temporal é a causa mais freqüente de epilepsia do lobo temporal intratável por medicamentos e que responde satisfatoriamente a cirurgia, sendo considerada pouco freqüente em criança. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o espectro clínico, eletrográfico e radiológico desta patologia em crianças. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo, por revisão de prontuário de 44 crianças com diagnóstico de esclerose mesial temporal na ressonância magnética, atendidos no Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de São Paulo. RESULTADO: Foi identificado que 54% dos pacientes apresentaram antecedente de crise febril. Lesão no lado esquerdo predominou nos pacientes com dificuldade escolar (p=0.049, naqueles com primeiras crises entre seis meses e cinco anos (p=0,021 e naqueles com crise febril complicada (p=0,032. Treze pacientes foram operados, dos quais oito ficaram livres de crises. CONCLUSÃO: Crise febril pode estar

  12. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy - An overview of surgical techniques.

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    Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Patil, Manoj; Goel, Atul; Ravat, Sangeeta; Sawant, Nina; Shah, Urvashi

    2016-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the commonest indications for epilepsy surgery. Presurgical evaluation for drug resistant epilepsy and identification of appropriate candidates for surgery is essential for optimal seizure freedom. The anatomy of mesial temporal lobe is complex and needs to be understood in the context of the advanced imaging, ictal and interictal Video_EEG monitoring, neuropsychology and psychiatric considerations. The completeness of disconnection of epileptogenic neural networks is paramount and is correlated with the extent of resection of the mesial temporal structures. In the Indian subcontinent, a standard but extended anterior temporal lobectomy is a viable option in view of the diverse socioeconomic, cultural and pathological considerations. The maximum utilization of epilepsy surgery services in this region is also a challenge. There is a need for regional comprehensive epilepsy care teams in a tertiary care academic hospital to form centers of excellence catering to a large population. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinants of brain metabolism changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Chassoux, Francine; Artiges, Eric; Semah, Franck; Desarnaud, Serge; Laurent, Agathe; Landre, Elisabeth; Gervais, Philippe; Devaux, Bertrand; Helal, Ourkia Badia

    2016-06-01

    To determine the main factors influencing metabolic changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We prospectively studied 114 patients with MTLE (62 female; 60 left HS; 15- to 56-year-olds) with (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and correlated the results with the side of HS, structural atrophy, electroclinical features, gender, age at onset, epilepsy duration, and seizure frequency. Imaging processing was performed using statistical parametric mapping. Ipsilateral hypometabolism involved temporal (mesial structures, pole, and lateral cortex) and extratemporal areas including the insula, frontal lobe, perisylvian regions, and thalamus, more extensively in right HS (RHS). A relative increase of metabolism (hypermetabolism) was found in the nonepileptic temporal lobe and in posterior areas bilaterally. Voxel-based morphometry detected unilateral hippocampus atrophy and gray matter concentration decrease in both frontal lobes, more extensively in left HS (LHS). Regardless of the structural alterations, the topography of hypometabolism correlated strongly with the extent of epileptic networks (mesial, anterior-mesiolateral, widespread mesiolateral, and bitemporal according to the ictal spread), which were larger in RHS. Notably, widespread perisylvian and bitemporal hypometabolism was found only in RHS. Mirror hypermetabolism was grossly proportional to the hypometabolic areas, coinciding partly with the default mode network. Gender-related effect was significant mainly in the contralateral frontal lobe, in which metabolism was higher in female patients. Epilepsy duration correlated with the contralateral temporal metabolism, positively in LHS and negatively in RHS. Opposite results were found with age at onset. High seizure frequency correlated negatively with the contralateral metabolism in LHS. Epileptic networks, as assessed by electroclinical correlations, appear to be the main determinant of

  14. Atypical handedness in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Doležalová, Irena; Schachter, Steven; Chrastina, Jan; Hemza, Jan; Hermanová, Markéta; Rektor, Ivan; Pažourková, Marta; Brázdil, Milan

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of our study was to investigate the handedness of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We also sought to identify clinical variables that correlated with left-handedness in this population. Handedness (laterality quotient) was assessed in 73 consecutive patients with MTLE associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Associations between right- and left-handedness and clinical variables were investigated. We found that 54 (74.0%) patients were right-handed, and 19 (26%) patients were left-handed. There were 15 (36.6%) left-handed patients with left-sided seizure onset compared to 4 (12.5%) left-handed patients with right-sided seizure onset (p=0.030). Among patients with left-sided MTLE, age at epilepsy onset was significantly correlated with handedness (8years of age [median; min-max 0.5-17] in left-handers versus 15years of age [median; min-max 3-30] in right-handers (p<0.001). Left-sided MTLE is associated with atypical handedness, especially when seizure onset occurs during an active period of brain development, suggesting a bi-hemispheric neuroplastic process for establishing motor dominance in patients with early-onset left-sided MTLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A structural MRI study: gray matter changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with different seizure types

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    Jun-hao XIAO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe gray matter volume changes and evaluate the relation between gray matter changes and duration of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE patients with different seizure types. Methods A total of 40 patients with mTLE, including 20 with partial seizures (mTLE-PS group and 20 with secondarily generalized seizures (mTLE-sGS group, and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (control group were recruited. T1-three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (T1-3D-MPRAGE was scanned for voxel.based morphometry (VBM. Bilateral frontal lobes and thalami were selected as regions of interest (ROIs to compare gray matter volume of brain regions among 3 groups. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between gray matter volume of brain regions and duration. Results There were significant differences in gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, right middle frontal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right middle temproral gyrus, right hippocampus, bilateral thalami and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres among 3 groups (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Compared with control group, gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, right middle temproral gyrus, right hippocampus and right thalamus in mTLE-PS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Compared with control group, gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral thalami, bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, right angular gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus and right hippocampus in mTLE-sGS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Compared with mTLE-PS group, gray matter volumes in bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral thalami, right medial frontal gyrus and right gyrus rectus in mTLE-sGS group were significantly reduced (P < 0.01, for all; FWE correction. Gray matter volumes in left

  16. Radiosurgery for Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Resulting from Mesial Temporal Sclerosis.

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    Gianaris, Thomas; Witt, Thomas; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is perhaps the most well-defined epilepsy syndrome that is responsive to structural interventions such as surgery. Several minimally invasive techniques have arisen that provide additional options for the treatment of MTS while potentially avoiding many of open surgery's associated risks. By evading these risks, they also open up treatment options to patients who otherwise are poor surgical candidates. Radiosurgery is one of the most intensively studied of these alternatives and has found a growing role in the treatment of medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complications after mesial temporal lobe surgery via inferiortemporal gyrus approach.

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    Vale, Fernando L; Reintjes, Stephen; Garcia, Hermes G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the complications associated with the inferior temporal gyrus approach to anterior mesial temporal lobe resection for temporal lobe epilepsy. This retrospective study examined complications experienced by 483 patients during the 3 months after surgery. All surgeries were performed during 1998-2012 by the senior author (F.L.V.). A total of 13 complications (2.7%) were reported. Complications were 8 delayed subdural hematomas (1.6%), 2 superficial wound infections (0.4%), 1 delayed intracranial hemorrhage (0.2%), 1 small lacunar stroke (0.2%), and 1 transient frontalis nerve palsy (0.2%). Three patients with subdural hematoma (0.6%) required readmission and surgical intervention. One patient (0.2%) with delayed intracranial hemorrhage required readmission to the neuroscience intensive care unit for observation. No deaths or severe neurological impairments were reported. Among the 8 patients with subdural hematoma, 7 were older than 40 years (87.5%); however, this finding was not statistically significant (p = 0.198). The inferior temporal gyrus approach to mesial temporal lobe resection is a safe and effective method for treating temporal lobe epilepsy. Morbidity and mortality rates associated with this procedure are lower than those associated with other neurosurgical procedures. The finding that surgical complications seem to be more common among older patients emphasizes the need for early surgical referral of patients with medically refractory epilepsy.

  18. Intact information sampling in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Zamarian, Laura; Trinka, Eugen; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bodner, Thomas; Unterberger, Iris; Luef, Gerhard; Delazer, Margarete

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have reported deficits in decision making under ambiguity for patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). It is unknown whether mTLE is also associated with alterations at a predecisional stage. This study aimed to gain insight into predecisional processing of patients with mTLE. We compared performance of patients with mTLE (n = 25) with that of healthy controls (n = 75) on the information sampling task (IST), a task assessing reflection-impulsivity and predecisional information sampling. Patients and healthy controls showed a similar performance pattern in both conditions of the IST as indicated by the amount of information gathered, the degree of uncertainty tolerated, and the number of decision errors made. They both also demonstrated a significant sensitivity to the different reward characteristics of the task. For the patient group, we found no significant effects on performance on the IST of epilepsy lateralization, abnormality side, structural abnormality (hippocampus vs. amygdala), and medication (monotherapy vs. polytherapy). Reflection processes and predecisional information sampling as tested by the IST are intact in mTLE. Patients collect as much information as healthy individuals and adapt their behavior according to the changing reward conditions. Our findings indicate that in well-defined risk situations, where memory demands are sufficiently minimized, patients with mTLE should be able to gather sufficient information, weight risks and benefits, and make advantageous decisions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. The circuit of Papez in mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI

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    Oikawa, H.; Sasaki, M.; Tamakawa, Y.; Kamei, A.

    2001-01-01

    We looked at abnormalities in the circuit of Papez in patients with the mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). We reviewed the MRI studies of 15 patients with probable MTS, seeking changes in the fornix, mamillary body, mamillothalamic tract, thalamus and cingulate and parahippocampal gyri. We correlated any abnormalities with each other and with clinical severity. Atrophy and/or signal change in one or more structures in the circuit of Papez were found in five patients. They involved the parahippocampal gyri in all five, the fornices in four, mamillary bodies in three, the thalamus in two and the cingulate gyrus in one. Changes in the fornix, mamillary body, thalamus or cingulate gyrus were always accompanied by hippocampal and parahippocampal atrophy. The patients with abnormalities of the circuit of Papez did not have more severe epilepsy than those without. Changes in the parahippocampal gyrus, including the entorhinal cortex and subiculum, in which forniceal fibres originate, may be crucial in causing abnormalities more distally in the circuit. (orig.)

  20. Correlation between memory, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and interictal epileptiform discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy related to mesial temporal sclerosis.

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    Mantoan, Marcele Araújo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; de Figueiredo Ferreira Guilhoto, Laura Maria; Lin, Katia; da Silva Noffs, Maria Helena; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Belzunces, Erich; Carrete, Henrique; Bussoletti, Renato Tavares; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study described here was to examine the relationship between memory function, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) abnormalities, and interictal epileptiform discharge (IED) lateralization in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) related to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis. We assessed performance on tests of memory function and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 29 right-handed outpatients and 24 controls. IEDs were assessed on 30-minute-awake and 30-minute-sleep EEG samples. Patients had (1)H-MRS at 1.5 T. There was a negative correlation between IQ (P=0.031) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test results (P=0.022) and epilepsy duration; between(1)H-MRS findings and epilepsy duration (P=0.027); and between N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels and IEDs (P=0.006) in contralateral mesial temporal structures in the left MTS group. (1)H-MRS findings, IEDs, and verbal function were correlated. These findings suggest that IEDs and NAA/(Cho+Cr) ratios reflecting neural metabolism are closely related to verbal memory function in mesial temporal sclerosis. Higher interictal activity on the EEG was associated with a decline in total NAA in contralateral mesial temporal structures.

  1. Neuropsychology Outcomes Following Trephine Epilepsy Surgery: The Inferior Temporal Gyrus Approach for Amygdalohippocampectomy in Medically Refractory Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Schoenberg, Mike R; Clifton, William E; Sever, Ryan W; Vale, Fernando L

    2017-06-08

    Surgery is indicated in cases of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy(MTLE) that are refractory to medical management. The inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) approach provides access to the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) structures with minimal tissue disruption. Reported neuropsychology outcomes following this approach are limited. To report neuropsychological outcomes using an ITG approach to amygdalohippocampectomy (AH) in patients with medically refractory MTLE based on a prospective design. Fifty-four participants had Engel class I/II outcome following resection of MTL using the ITG approach. All participants had localization-related epilepsy confirmed by long-term surface video-electroencephalography and completed pre/postsurgical evaluations that included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Wada test or functional MRI, and neuropsychology assessment. Clinical semiology/video-electroencephalography indicated that of the 54 patients, 28 (52%) had left MTLE and 26 (48%) had right MTLE. Dominant hemisphere resections were performed on 23 patients (43%), nondominant on 31(57%). Twenty-nine (29) had pathology-confirmed mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Group level analyses found declines in verbal memory for patients with language-dominant resections ( P .05). Neuropsychology outcomes of an ITG approach for selective mesial temporal resection are comparable to other selective AH techniques showing minimal adverse cognitive effects. These data lend support to the ITG approach for selective AH as an option for MTLE. © Congress of Neurological Surgeons 2017.

  2. Temporal lobe volume predicts Wada memory test performance in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis.

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    Ding, Kan; Gong, Yunhua; Modur, Pradeep N; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Agostini, Mark; Gupta, Puneet; McColl, Roderick; Hays, Ryan; Van Ness, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Wada test is widely used in the presurgical evaluation of potential temporal lobectomy patients to predict postoperative memory function. Expected asymmetry (EA), defined as Wada memory lateralized to the nonsurgical hemisphere, or a higher score after injection of the surgical hemisphere would be considered favorable in terms of postoperative memory outcome. However, in some cases, nonlateralized memory (NM) results, with no appreciable asymmetry, may occur because of impaired scores after both injections, often leading to denial of surgery. The reason for such nonlateralized Wada memory in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains unclear. Given that quantitative morphometric magnetic resonance imaging studies in TLE patients have shown bilateral regional atrophy in temporal and extratemporal structures, we hypothesized that the volume loss in contralateral temporal structures could contribute to nonlateralized Wada memory performance. To investigate this, we examined the relationship between the volume changes of temporal structures and Wada memory scores in patients with intractable TLE with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) using an age- and gender-matched control group. Memory was considered nonlateralized if the absolute difference in the total correct recall scores between ipsilateral and contralateral injections was memory was lateralized in 15 and nonlateralized in 6 patients, with all the nonlateralized scores being observed in left TLE. The recall scores after ipsilateral injection were significantly lower in patients with an NM profile than an EA profile (23 ± 14% vs. 59 ± 18% correct recall, p ≤ 0.001). However, the recall scores after contralateral injection were low but similar between the two groups (25 ± 17% vs. 25 ± 15% correct recall, p=0.97). Compared to controls, all the patients showed greater volume loss in the temporal regions. However, patients with a NM profile showed significantly more volume loss than those

  3. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy diminishes functional connectivity during emotion perception.

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    Steiger, Bettina K; Muller, Angela M; Spirig, Esther; Toller, Gianina; Jokeit, Hennric

    2017-08-01

    Unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been associated with impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions. Correspondingly, imaging studies showed decreased activity of the amygdala and cortical face processing regions in response to emotional faces. However, functional connectivity among regions involved in emotion perception has not been studied so far. To address this, we examined intrinsic functional connectivity (FC) modulated by the perception of dynamic fearful faces among the amygdala and limbic, frontal, temporal and brainstem regions. Regions of interest were identified in an activation analysis by presenting a block-design with dynamic fearful faces and dynamic landscapes to 15 healthy individuals. This led to 10 predominately right-hemispheric regions. Functional connectivity between these regions during the perception of fearful faces was examined in drug-refractory patients with left- (n=16) or right-sided (n=17) MTLE, epilepsy patients with extratemporal seizure onset (n=15) and a second group of 15 healthy controls. Healthy controls showed a widespread functional network modulated by the perception of fearful faces that encompassed bilateral amygdalae, limbic, cortical, subcortical and brainstem regions. In patients with left MTLE, a downsized network of frontal and temporal regions centered on the right amygdala was present. Patients with right MTLE showed almost no significant functional connectivity. A maintained network in the epilepsy control group indicates that findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy could not be explained by clinical factors such as seizures and antiepileptic medication. Functional networks underlying facial emotion perception are considerably changed in left and right MTLE. Alterations are present for both hemispheres in either MTLE group, but are more pronounced in right MTLE. Disruption of the functional network architecture possibly contributes to deficits in facial emotion recognition frequently

  4. Atypical febrile seizures, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, and dual pathology.

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    Sanon, Nathalie T; Desgent, Sébastien; Carmant, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    Febrile seizures occurring in the neonatal period, especially when prolonged, are thought to be involved in the later development of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) in children. The presence of an often undetected, underlying cortical malformation has also been reported to be implicated in the epileptogenesis process following febrile seizures. This paper highlights some of the various animal models of febrile seizures and of cortical malformation and portrays a two-hit model that efficiently mimics these two insults and leads to spontaneous recurrent seizures in adult rats. Potential mechanisms are further proposed to explain how these two insults may each, or together, contribute to network hyperexcitability and epileptogenesis. Finally the clinical relevance of the two-hit model is briefly discussed in light of a therapeutic and preventive approach to mTLE.

  5. Electroencephalography in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidan, Manouchehr

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) has an important role in the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy. It can provide information for predicting the response to antiseizure drugs and to identify the surgically remediable epilepsies. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures could originate in the medial or lateral neocortical temporal region, and many of these patients are refractory to medical treatment. However, majority of patients have had excellent results after surgery and this often relies on the EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in presurgical evaluation. If the scalp EEG data is insufficient or discordant, invasive EEG recording with placement of intracranial electrodes could identify the seizure focus prior to surgery. This paper highlights the general information regarding the use of EEG in epilepsy, EEG patterns resembling epileptiform discharges, and the interictal, ictal and postictal findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using scalp and intracranial recordings prior to surgery. The utility of the automated seizure detection and computerized mathematical models for increasing yield of non-invasive localization is discussed. This paper also describes the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of EEG for seizure recurrence after withdrawal of medications following seizure freedom with medical and surgical therapy. PMID:22957235

  6. Differentiation of cryptogenic lateral from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using regional asymmetric index of F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H. C.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, S. K.; Jeong, J. M.; Jeong, Z. K.; Lee, M. C.; Ko, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    We tried to find the possibility of utilization of F-18-FDG PET to differentiate lateral (neocortical) from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy(TLE) if we adopted quantitative comparison of regional metabolic activities using asymmetric index. We studied 22 pathologically proven mesial TLE(group C in Figure), and 27 lateral TLE patients. Lateral TLE patients were normal on MR(cryptogenic: 15; group A) or had structural lesions (12: group B). Asymmetric index (AI) was calculated as (ipsilateral -contralateral) / (ipsilateral + contralateral ) x 200. AI of medial lobe of cryptogenic lateral TLE was not decreased (-4.66.2, > 0.05) and AI of medial lobe of cryptogenic lateral TLE was not decreased (-4.66.2, >0.05) and AI of lateral lobe was decreased (-13.68.9). AI of medial and lateral lobes of mesial TLE was decreased (-3.44.7 and -16.58.9, respectively). AI of medial lobe of lesional lateral TLE was -7.39.1 (p<0.05 compared with mesial TEL). It was evident that lateral lobe of lesional lateral TLE had metabolic defect or decrease (AI: -21.410.4). While we could not find difference of metabolic activity in lateral temporal lobes between cryptogenic lateral TLE and mesial TLE patients, the difference of metabolic activity was significant in medial temporal lobes which was revealed by AI quantitation. An AI value larger than -10 (cutoff: AI) predicted positively for lateral TLE(PPV:80%) and negatively for mesial TLE(NPV:77%). Asymmetry of metabolic activity in medial and not in lateral lobe of temporal lobe could give hints about whether the epileptogenic zones were mesial or lateral

  7. Episodic and semantic memory in children with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzezak, Patricia; Guimarães, Catarina; Fuentes, Daniel; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Valente, Kette Dualibi Ramos

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze semantic and episodic memory deficits in children with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and their correlation with clinical epilepsy variables. For this purpose, 19 consecutive children and adolescents with MTS (8 to 16 years old) were evaluated and their performance on five episodic memory tests (short- and long-term memory and learning) and four semantic memory tests was compared with that of 28 healthy volunteers. Patients performed worse on tests of immediate and delayed verbal episodic memory, visual episodic memory, verbal and visual learning, mental scanning for semantic clues, object naming, word definition, and repetition of sentences. Clinical variables such as early age at seizure onset, severity of epilepsy, and polytherapy impaired distinct types of memory. These data confirm that children with MTS have episodic memory deficits and add new information on semantic memory. The data also demonstrate that clinical variables contribute differently to episodic and semantic memory performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exome sequencing identifies SUCO mutations in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Sha, Zhiqiang; Sha, Longze; Li, Wenting; Dou, Wanchen; Shen, Yan; Wu, Liwen; Xu, Qi

    2015-03-30

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is the main type and most common medically intractable form of epilepsy. Severity of disease-based stratified samples may help identify new disease-associated mutant genes. We analyzed mRNA expression profiles from patient hippocampal tissue. Three of the seven patients had severe mTLE with generalized-onset convulsions and consciousness loss that occurred over many years. We found that compared with other groups, patients with severe mTLE were classified into a distinct group. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing validation in all seven patients identified three novel SUN domain-containing ossification factor (SUCO) mutations in severely affected patients. Furthermore, SUCO knock down significantly reduced dendritic length in vitro. Our results indicate that mTLE defects may affect neuronal development, and suggest that neurons have abnormal development due to lack of SUCO, which may be a generalized-onset epilepsy-related gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, E-S; Sui, C-B; Wang, T-X; Sun, G-L

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) is a potential option for some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the pooled seizure-free rate and the time interval to seizure cessation in patients with lesions in the mesial temporal lobe, and who were eligible for either stereotactic or gamma knife RS. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases using combinations of the following terms: RS, stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife, and TLE. We screened 103 articles and selected 13 for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Significant study heterogeneity was detected; however, the included studies displayed an acceptable level of quality. We show that approximately half of the patients were seizure free over a follow-up period that ranged from 6 months to 9 years [pooled estimate: 50.9% (95% confidence interval: 0.381-0.636)], with an average of 14 months to seizure cessation [pooled estimate: 14.08 months (95% confidence interval: 11.95-12.22 months)]. Nine of 13 included studies reported data for adverse events (AEs), which included visual field deficits and headache (the two most common AEs), verbal memory impairment, psychosis, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and dysphasia. Patients in the individual studies experienced AEs at rates that ranged from 8%, for non-epileptic seizures, to 85%, for headache. Our findings indicate that RS may have similar or slightly less efficacy in some patients compared with invasive surgery. Randomized controlled trials of both treatment regimens should be undertaken to generate an evidence base for patient decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Neuronal autoantibodies in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanli-Yavuz, Ebru Nur; Erdag, Ece; Tuzun, Erdem; Ekizoglu, Esme; Baysal-Kirac, Leyla; Ulusoy, Canan; Peach, Sian; Gundogdu, Gokcen; Sencer, Serra; Sencer, Altay; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen; Baykan, Betul

    2016-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of neuronal autoantibodies (NAbs) in a large consecutive series with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) and to elucidate the clinical and laboratory clues for detection of NAbs in this prototype of frequent, drug-resistant epilepsy syndrome. Consecutive patients diagnosed with MTLE fulfilling the MRI criteria for HS were enrolled. The sera of patients and various control groups (80 subjects) were tested for eight NAbs after ethical approval and signed consents. Brain tissues obtained from surgical specimens were also investigated by immunohistochemical analysis for the presence of inflammatory infiltrates. The features of seropositive versus seronegative groups were compared and binary logistic regression analysis was performed to explore the differentiating variables. We found antibodies against antigens, contactin-associated protein-like 2 in 11 patients, uncharacterised voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antigens in four patients, glycine receptor (GLY-R) in 5 patients, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in 4 patients and γ-aminobutyric acid receptor A in 1 patient of 111 patients with MTLE-HS and none of the control subjects. The history of status epilepticus, diagnosis of psychosis and positron emission tomography or single-photon emission CT findings in temporal plus extratemporal regions were found significantly more frequently in the seropositive group. Binary logistic regression analysis disclosed that status epilepticus, psychosis and cognitive dysfunction were statistically significant variables to differentiate between the VGKC-complex subgroup versus seronegative group. This first systematic screening study of various NAbs showed 22.5% seropositivity belonging mostly to VGKC-complex antibodies in a large consecutive series of patients with MTLE-HS. Our results indicated a VGKC-complex autoimmunity-related subgroup in the syndrome of MTLE-HS. Published by the BMJ

  11. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Y; Wu, Chengyuan; Tracy, Joseph; Lorenzo, Matthew; Evans, James; Nei, Maromi; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Sharan, Ashwini D; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    To describe mesial temporal lobe ablated volumes, verbal memory, and surgical outcomes in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) treated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT). We prospectively tracked seizure outcome in 20 patients at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with drug-resistant mTLE who underwent MRI-guided LiTT from December 2011 to December 2014. Surgical outcome was assessed at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and at the most recent visit. Volume-based analysis of ablated mesial temporal structures was conducted in 17 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and results were compared between the seizure-free and not seizure-free groups. Following LiTT, proportions of patients who were free of seizures impairing consciousness (including those with auras only) are as follows: 8 of 15 patients (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 30.1-75.2%) after 6 months, 4 of 11 patients (36.4%, 95% CI 14.9-64.8%) after 1 year, 3 of 5 patients (60%, 95% CI 22.9-88.4%) at 2-year follow-up. Median follow-up was 13.4 months after LiTT (range 1.3 months to 3.2 years). Seizure outcome after LiTT suggests an all or none response. Four patients had anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) after LiTT; three are seizure-free. There were no differences in total ablated volume of the amygdalohippocampus complex or individual volumes of hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus between seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients. Contextual verbal memory performance was preserved after LiTT, although decline in noncontextual memory task scores were noted. We conclude that MRI-guided stereotactic LiTT is a safe alternative to ATL in patients with medically intractable mTLE. Individualized assessment is warranted to determine whether the reduced odds of seizure freedom are worth the reduction in risk, discomfort, and recovery time. Larger prospective

  12. Hippocampal Atrophy Is Associated with Altered Hippocampus-Posterior Cingulate Cortex Connectivity in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Hippocampal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Y C; Tseng, C E; Lin, F-H; Liou, H H; Tseng, W Y I

    2017-03-01

    Unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis have structural and functional abnormalities in the mesial temporal regions. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of the epileptic network in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, we aimed to clarify the relationships between hippocampal atrophy and the altered connection between the hippocampus and the posterior cingulate cortex in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Fifteen patients with left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 15 healthy controls were included in the study. Multicontrast MR imaging, including high-resolution T1WI, diffusion spectrum imaging, and resting-state fMRI, was performed to measure the hippocampal volume, structural connectivity of the inferior cingulum bundle, and intrinsic functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the posterior cingulate cortex, respectively. Compared with controls, patients had decreased left hippocampal volume (volume ratio of the hippocampus and controls, 0.366% ± 0.029%; patients, 0.277% ± 0.063%, corrected P = .002), structural connectivity of the bilateral inferior cingulum bundle (generalized fractional anisotropy, left: controls, 0.234 ± 0.020; patients, 0.193 ± 0.022, corrected P = .0001, right: controls, 0.226 ± 0.022; patients, 0.208 ± 0.017, corrected P = .047), and intrinsic functional connectivity between the left hippocampus and the left posterior cingulate cortex (averaged z-value: controls, 0.314 ± 0.152; patients, 0.166 ± 0.062). The left hippocampal volume correlated with structural connectivity positively (standardized β = 0.864, P = .001), but it had little correlation with intrinsic functional connectivity (standardized β = -0.329, P = .113). On the contralesional side, the hippocampal volume did not show any significant correlation with structural connectivity or intrinsic functional connectivity ( F 2,12 = 0.284, P = .757, R 2

  13. Age-Dependent Mesial Temporal Lobe Lateralization in Language FMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepeta, Leigh N.; Berl, Madison M.; Wilke, Marko; You, Xiaozhen; Mehta, Meera; Xu, Benjamin; Inati, Sara; Dustin, Irene; Khan, Omar; Austermuehle, Alison; Theodore, William H.; Gaillard, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective FMRI activation of the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) may be important for epilepsy surgical planning. We examined MTL activation and lateralization during language fMRI in children and adults with focal epilepsy. Methods 142 controls and patients with left hemisphere focal epilepsy (Pediatric: epilepsy, n = 17, mean age = 9.9 ± 2.0; controls, n = 48; mean age = 9.1 ± 2.6; Adult: epilepsy, n = 20, mean age = 26.7 ± 5.8; controls, n = 57, mean age = 26.2 ± 7.5) underwent 3T fMRI using a language task (auditory description decision task). Image processing and analyses were conducted in SPM8; ROIs included MTL, Broca’s area, and Wernicke’s area. We assessed group and individual MTL activation, and examined degree of lateralization. Results Patients and controls (pediatric and adult) demonstrated group and individual MTL activation during language fMRI. MTL activation was left lateralized for adults but less so in children (p’s < 0.005). Patients did not differ from controls in either age group. Stronger left-lateralized MTL activation was related to older age (p = 0.02). Language lateralization (Broca’s and Wernicke’s) predicted 19% of the variance in MTL lateralization for adults (p = 0.001), but not children. Significance Language fMRI may be used to elicit group and individual MTL activation. The developmental difference in MTL lateralization and its association with language lateralization suggests a developmental shift in lateralization of MTL function, with increased left lateralization across the age span. This shift may help explain why children have better memory outcomes following resection compared to adults. PMID:26696589

  14. Neuropsychological outcomes after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, Mark; Broshek, Donna K; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Ward, Mariann M; Laxer, Kenneth D; Yan, Guofen; Lamborn, Kathleen

    2011-05-01

    To assess outcomes of language, verbal memory, cognitive efficiency and mental flexibility, mood, and quality of life (QOL) in a prospective, multicenter pilot study of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (RS) for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). RS, randomized to 20 Gy or 24 Gy comprising 5.5-7.5 ml at the 50% isodose volume, was performed on mesial temporal structures of patients with unilateral MTLE. Neuropsychological evaluations were performed at preoperative baseline, and mean change scores were described at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. QOL data were also available at 36 months. Thirty patients were treated and 26 were available for the final 24-month neuropsychological evaluation. Language (Boston Naming Test), verbal memory (California Verbal Learning Test and Logical Memory subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised), cognitive efficiency and mental flexibility (Trail Making Test), and mood (Beck Depression Inventory) did not differ from baseline. QOL scores improved at 24 and 36 months, with those patients attaining seizure remission by month 24s accounting for the majority of the improvement. The serial changes in cognitive outcomes, mood, and QOL are unremarkable following RS for MTLE. RS may provide an alternative to open surgery, especially in those patients at risk of cognitive impairment or who desire a noninvasive alternative to open surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy impairs empathy-related brain responses to dynamic fearful faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Grunwald, Thomas; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Rankin, Katherine P; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-03-01

    Unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been associated with reduced amygdala responsiveness to fearful faces. However, the effect of unilateral MTLE on empathy-related brain responses in extra-amygdalar regions has not been investigated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured empathy-related brain responses to dynamic fearful faces in 34 patients with unilateral MTLE (18 right sided), in an epilepsy (extra-MTLE; n = 16) and in a healthy control group (n = 30). The primary finding was that right MTLE (RMTLE) was associated with decreased activity predominantly in the right amygdala and also in bilateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) but normal activity in the right anterior insula. The results of the extra-MTLE group demonstrate that these reduced amygdala and PAG responses go beyond the attenuation caused by antiepileptic and antidepressant medication. These findings clearly indicate that RMTLE affects the function of mesial temporal and midbrain structures that mediate basic interoceptive input necessary for the emotional awareness of empathic experiences of fear. Together with the decreased empathic concern found in the RMTLE group, this study provides neurobehavioral evidence that patients with RMTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and sheds new light on the nature of social-cognitive impairments frequently accompanying MTLE.

  16. Small calcified lesions suggestive of neurocysticercosis are associated with mesial temporal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos C. B. Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested a possible relationship between temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and neurocysticercosis (NC. We performed a case-control study to evaluate the association of NC and MTS. Method: We randomly selected patients with different epilepsy types, including: MTS, primary generalized epilepsy (PGE and focal symptomatic epilepsy (FSE. Patients underwent a structured interview, followed by head computed tomography (CT. A neuroradiologist evaluated the scan for presence of calcified lesions suggestive of NC. CT results were matched with patients’ data. Results: More patients in the MTS group displayed calcified lesions suggestive of NC than patients in the other groups (p=0.002. On multivariate analysis, MTS was found to be an independent predictor of one or more calcified NC lesions (p=0.033. Conclusion: After controlling for confounding factors, we found an independent association between NC calcified lesions and MTS.

  17. Hipometabolismo cerebral em pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal demonstrado pelo FDG-PET Brain hypometabolism in patients with mesial-temporal sclerosis demonstrated by FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO S. DUARTE

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a extensão do hipometabolismo cerebral em pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal (EMT. MÉTODO: Este estudo retrospectivo incluiu 21 pacientes que apresentavam epilepsia parcial complexa refrataria à terapia e que foram selecionados para cirurgia após análise extensa que incluía: EEG de superfície e estudos de neuroimagem (PET, SPECT e ressonância magnética. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a intervenção cirúrgica e tiveram confirmação histológica de EMT. Uma análise semi-quantitativa foi realizada, utilizando regiões de interesse (ROIs nas seguintes estruturas: lobos frontais, parietais e occipitais, gânglios da base, tálamos, cerebelo e três diferentes regiões nos lobos temporais, que compreendiam o córtex medial, inferior e lateral. Um índice de assimetria (IA foi calculado, comparando as contagens por pixel nas estruturas homólogas em ambos os hemisférios cerebrais. Os IAs das diferentes estruturas foram então correlacionados. RESULTADOS: Uma correlação significativa foi demonstrada entre os IAs do córtex medial dos lobos temporais e aqueles dos lobos frontais, dos lobos parietais, dos gânglios da base e dos tálamos (r = 0,72, 0,62, 0,47 e 0,47 respectivamente com p The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of brain hypometabolism in patients with mesial-temporal sclerosis (MTS. METHOD: This retrospective study included 21 patients who had medically refractory complex partial seizures and were selected for surgical therapy after a comprehensive evaluation which included surface EEG recordings and neuroimaging studies (PET, SPECT and MRI. All patients were subjected to surgical intervention and had an histopathological confirmation of MTS. A semi-quantitative analysis of the PET images was performed using regions of interest in the following structures: frontal, parietal and occipital lobes, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellum and three different regions in the

  18. Temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis: hippocampal neuronal loss as a predictor of surgical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaclara Prada Jardim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze retrospectively a series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS, and the association of patterns of hippocampal sclerosis with clinical data and surgical prognosis. METHOD: Sixty-six patients with medically refractory TLE with unilateral MTS after anterior temporal lobectomy were included. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patient's clinical data and surgical outcome were reviewed. RESULTS: Occurrence of initial precipitating insult (IPI, as well as better postoperative seizure control (i.e. Engel class 1, were associated with classical and severe patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (MTS type 1a and 1b, respectively. CONCLUSION: Quantitative evaluation of hippocampal neuronal loss patterns predicts surgical outcome in patients with TLE-MTS.

  19. Temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis: hippocampal neuronal loss as a predictor of surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen Lucia Penteado; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-05-01

    To analyze retrospectively a series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), and the association of patterns of hippocampal sclerosis with clinical data and surgical prognosis. Sixty-six patients with medically refractory TLE with unilateral MTS after anterior temporal lobectomy were included. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patient's clinical data and surgical outcome were reviewed. Occurrence of initial precipitating insult (IPI), as well as better postoperative seizure control (i.e. Engel class 1), were associated with classical and severe patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (MTS type 1a and 1b, respectively). Quantitative evaluation of hippocampal neuronal loss patterns predicts surgical outcome in patients with TLE-MTS.

  20. Time reversibility of intracranial human EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, M. J.; Diks, C.; Pijn, J. P. M.; Velis, D. N.

    1996-02-01

    Intracranial electroencephalograms from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy were tested for time reversibility. If the recorded time series is irreversible, the input of the recording system cannot be a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. We confirmed experimentally that the measurement equipment did not introduce irreversibility in the recorded output when the input was a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. In general, the non-seizure recordings are reversible, whereas the seizure recordings are irreversible. These results suggest that time reversibility is a useful property for the characterisation of human intracranial EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  1. Nonvisual spatial navigation fMRI lateralizes mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in a patient with congenital blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Grunwald, Thomas; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; König, Kristina; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-01-01

    Nonvisual spatial navigation functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may help clinicians determine memory lateralization in blind individuals with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report on an exceptional case of a congenitally blind woman with late-onset left MTLE undergoing presurgical memory fMRI. To activate mesial temporal structures despite the lack of visual memory, the patient was requested to recall familiar routes using nonvisual multisensory and verbal cues. Our findings demonstrate the diagnostic value of a nonvisual fMRI task to lateralize MTLE despite congenital blindness and may therefore contribute to the risk assessment for postsurgical amnesia in rare cases with refractory MTLE and accompanying congenital blindness.

  2. Fluoxetine Restores Spatial Learning but Not Accelerated Forgetting in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, Lisa; Redhead, Edward; Taylor, Matthew; Shtaya, Anan; Hamilton, Derek A.; Gray, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Learning and memory dysfunction is the most common neuropsychological effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, and because the underlying neurobiology is poorly understood, there are no pharmacological strategies to help restore memory function in these patients. We have demonstrated impairments in the acquisition of an allocentric spatial task,…

  3. Improved Cerebral Function in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy after Subtemporal Amygdalohippocampectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Mitsueda, Takahiro; Satow, Takeshi; Taki, Junya; Kinoshita, Masako; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Ikeda, Akio; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2009-01-01

    The functional changes that occur throughout the human brain after the selective removal of an epileptogenic lesion remain unclear. Subtemporal selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) has been advocated as a minimally invasive surgical procedure for patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We evaluated the effects…

  4. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  5. MR imaging findings in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Sperling, M.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; O'Connor, M.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Gonatas, N.

    1987-01-01

    Eleven patients (aged 19-37) with temporal lobe epilepsy were evaluated by 1.5-T MR imaging. The MR imaging followed a negative CT examination. All patients underwent ictal and interictal, depth electrode EEG recording, carotid arteriography with amytol test, neuropsychological testing, subsequent unilateral temporal lobectomy, and pathologic correlation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed and correlated. MR images in ten patients showed a small temporal lobe on the abnormal side. Abnormal signal intensity was not found within the temporal lobe despite the use of coronal and axial long TR (2,500 msec) and short and long TE(30 and 80 msec) studies

  6. Persistent Interictal Musical Hallucination in a Patient With Mesial Temporal Sclerosis-Related Epilepsy: First Case Report and Etiopathological Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Paolo; Vedovello, Marcella; Braga, Massimiliano; Pederzoli, Massimo; Beretta, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Musical hallucination is a disorder of complex sound processing of instrumental music, songs, choirs, chants, etc. The underlying pathologies include moderate to severe acquired hearing loss (the auditory equivalent of Charles Bonnet syndrome), psychiatric illnesses (depression, schizophrenia), drug intoxication (benzodiazepines, salicylate, pentoxifylline, propranolol), traumatic lesions along the acoustic pathways, and epilepsy. The hallucinations are most likely to begin late in life; 70% of patients are women. Musical hallucination has no known specific therapy. Treating the underlying cause is the most effective approach; neuroleptic and antidepressant medications have only rarely succeeded.Musical hallucination in epilepsy typically presents as simple partial seizures originating in the lateral temporal cortex. To our knowledge, no formal report of musical hallucination in the interictal state has been published before. In contrast, other interictal psychotic features are a relatively common complication, especially in patients with long-standing drug-resistant epilepsy.We describe a 62-year-old woman with a long history of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy whose musical hallucination was solely interictal. We speculate on the possible link between temporal epilepsy and her hallucination. We hypothesize that, as a result of her epileptic activity-induced damage, an imbalance developed between the excitatory and inhibitory projections connecting the mesial temporal cortex to the other auditory structures. These structures may have generated hyperactivity in the lateral temporal cortex through a "release" mechanism that eventually resulted in musical hallucination.

  7. EEG-fMRI Evaluation of Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avesani, Mirko; Giacopuzzi, Silvia; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Borelli, Paolo; Cerini, Roberto; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Summary This preliminary study sought more information on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation, especially contralateral temporal/extratemporal spread, during continuous EEG-fMRI recordings in four patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In two patients, EEG showed unilateral focal activity during the EEG-fMRI session concordant with the interictal focus previously identified with standard and video-poly EEG. In the other two patients EEG demonstrated a contralateral diffusion of the irritative focus. In the third patient (with the most drug-resistant form and also extratemporal clinical signs), there was an extratemporal diffusion over frontal regions, ipsilateral to the irritative focus. fMRI analysis confirmed a single activation in the mesial temporal region in two patients whose EEG showed unilateral focal activity, while it demonstrated a bilateral activation in the mesial temporal regions in the other two patients. In the third patient, fMRI demonstrated an activation in the supplementary motxor area. This study confirms the most significant activation with a high firing rate of the irritative focus, but also suggests the importance of using new techniques (such as EEG-fMRI to examine cerebral blood flow) to identify the controlateral limbic activation, and any other extratemporal activations, possible causes of drug resistance in MTS that may require a more precise pre-surgical evaluation with invasive techniques. PMID:24571833

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy: a study comparing patients with mesial temporal sclerosis and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Gerardo Maria de Araújo; Rosa, Vivianne Pellegrino; Lin, Katia; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2008-07-01

    We evaluated the frequency of psychiatric disorders (PDs) in a homogenous series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS), as compared with patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), aiming to determine possible differences in psychiatric diagnoses between these two epileptic syndromes. Data from 170 patients with refractory TLE-MTS and from 100 patients with JME were reviewed and compared. The prevalence of PDs was high in both groups of patients with epilepsy: PDs were present in 85 patients with TLE-MTS (50%) and 49 patients with JME (49%). Among the TLE-MTS group, mood (25.8%), psychotic (15.8%), and anxiety (14.1%) disorders were the most frequent diagnoses, whereas anxiety and mood disorders (23 and 19%, respectively) were the most common among patients with JME. Psychoses were significantly associated with MTS (P<0.01) and anxiety disorders with JME (P<0.05). These findings suggest the existence of an anatomic correlation between PDs and brain structures involved in both epilepsy syndromes.

  9. Neuropsychological results after gamma knife radiosurgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtěch, Zdeněk; Krámská, Lenka; Malíková, Hana; Stará, Michaela; Liščák, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to summarize our experience with neuropsychological changes after radiosurgical treatment for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and subsequent surgery due to insufficient seizure control. Between November 1995 and May 1999, 14 patients underwent radiosurgical entorhinoamygdalohippocampectomy with a marginal dose of 18, 20 or 25 Gy to the 50% isodose. 9 of these patients subsequently underwent surgery. We compared Memory Quotients and Intelligence Quotients before and after the interventions. We found a slight, but nonsignificant decline in intelligence and memory quotients one year after GKRS. Two years after radiosurgery there were no significant changes in any of the quotients. After surgery, we found significant increase in Global and Visual MQ, (pmemory and intelligence performance after surgery. Epilepsy surgery after unsuccessful radiosurgery could lead to improvements in cognitive functions in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  10. A pediatric patient with refractory seizures and a mesial temporal lobe lesion

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    Marisa eMcGinley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 12 year old adolescent presented with refractory seizures and was found to have a mesial temporal lobe lesion. The patient underwent biopsy and was diagnosed with an arteriorvenous malformation. Supratentorial lesions in the pediatric population can have a large variety of underlying etiologies and it can challenging to differentiate on neuroimaging. In this report we discuss the key features on MRI of several neoplastic, vascular, and infectious processes that can aide in the diagnosis.

  11. Uso da sequência FLAIR-EPI na análise da esclerose mesial temporal EPI-FLAIR sequence in the evaluation of mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Marcos Alberto da Costa Machado Júnior

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar as alterações morfológicas e de intensidade de sinal das regiões hipocampais em pacientes, com epilepsia temporal fármaco-resistente. Para tal, estudamos 8 pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal, utilizando aparelhagem de RM de 1,5T, com sequências Spin Eco - SE, Fast Spin Eco - FSE, Fluid Atenuation Inversion Recovery, com Eco Planar Imaging - FLAIR-EPI. Observamos a superioridade da sequência FLAIR na detecção do aumento da intensidade de sinal da região hipocampal, particularmente com cortes coronais, em relação às sequências SE e FSE, com a vantagem de ser uma técnica de rápida execução. A sequência STIR evidenciou adelgaçamento da cortical do hipocampo, na metade dos casos que apresentavam alteração de sinal.The purpose of this study is to evaluate morpholologycal and signal intensity changes in the hippocampus in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. We studied 8 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis using a 1.5 -T MR and the following sequences Spin Eco- SE, Fast Spin Echo- FSE, Fluid Atenuation Inversion Recovery Echo Planar Imaging - FLAIR-EPI. We noticed a sensitive increase signal intensity on FLAIR- EPI sequences, particularly, in coronal images, than on SE and FSE sequences. The STIR sequence showed a cortical hippocampus atrophy in half of the cases, in whom signal abnormalities were present.

  12. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis; Diagnostico por imagen con resonancia magnetica de la esclerosis temporal mesial

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    Pastor, E; Sanchez, J C; Rodriguez, I; Altuzarra, A; Machado, F [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain); Aguilar, D [Hospital Clinico Universitario San Cecilio. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean{+-} 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings), 4 with tumors and 1 with a ballooned

  13. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis; Diagnostico por imagen con resonancia magnetica de la esclerosis temporal mesial

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    Pastor, E.; Sanchez, J. C.; Rodriguez, I.; Altuzarra, A.; Machado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain); Aguilar, D. [Hospital Clinico Universitario San Cecilio. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean{+-} 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings

  14. [Two cases of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with old intracerebral hemorrhage in the lateral temporal lobe without "dual pathology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T; Nishio, S; Hisada, K; Muraishi, M; Ishibashi, H; Mamiya, K; Ohfu, M; Fukui, M

    1998-05-01

    Two cases of intractable temporal lobe epilepsy associated with old intracerebral hemorrhage in the lateral temporal lobe were reported. Although preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) failed to reveal hippocampal atrophy with T2 hyperintensity, electrocorticographic (ECoG) recording with chronic invasive subdural electrodes indicated the mesial temporal lobe to be an ictal onset zone. After anterior temporal lobectomy involving the lesion and hippocampectomy, the patients became seizure-free. Hippocampal sclerosis, namely "dual pathology", was not noted on histological examination. Careful ECoG recording with chronic subdural electrodes is mandatory even when the preoperative MRI does not demonstrate the radiological hippocampal sclerosis.

  15. Granule cell dispersion is not a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Lancellotti, Carmen; Marinho, Taissa Ferrari; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Targas Yacubian, Elza Márcia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was to analyze the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with surgical prognosis, patterns of MTS and clinical data. Hippocampal specimens from 66 patients with MTLE and unilateral MTS and from 13 controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patients' clinical data, types of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 45.5% of cases and was not correlated with clinical variable. More severe neuronal loss was observed in patients with GCD. Except for MTS Type 2 - observed only in four no- GCD patients - groups did not differ with respect to the types of MTS. Surgical outcome was similar in both groups. In conclusion, GCD was associated with the degree of hippocampal cell loss, but was not a predictor of surgical outcome.

  16. Triple pathological findings in a surgically amenable patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Fumin Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS is a well-recognized cause of intractable epilepsy; however, coexistence with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD is less common. Middle fossa epidermoid cysts are rare and may involve the temporal lobe. Most epidermoids are clinically silent, slow-growing, and seldom associated with overt symptomatology, including seizures. We describe a patient with multiple comorbidities including left MTS and a large epidermoid cyst involving the left quadrigeminal plate cistern compressing upon the cerebellar vermis and tail of the left hippocampus, resulting in refractory left temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy. The surgical pathology demonstrated a third pathological finding of left temporal FCD type Ia. The patient has been seizure-free since the surgery. This case provides additional information with regard to the understanding of epileptogenicity and surgical planning in patients with MTS and epidermoid cysts.

  17. Morphometric MRI features are associated with surgical outcome in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria Teresa Fernandes Castilho; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Sandim, Gabriel Barbosa; Assunção Leme, Idaiane Batista; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sato, João Ricardo; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2017-05-01

    Corticoamygdalohippocampectomy (CAH) improves seizure control, quality of life, and decreases mortality for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). One-third of patients continue having seizures, and it is pivotal to determine structural abnormalities that might influence the postoperative outcome. Studies indicate that nonhippocampal regions may play a role in the epileptogenic network in MTLE-HS and could generate seizures postoperatively. The aim of this study is to analyze areas of atrophy, not always detected on routine MRI, comparing patients who became seizure free (SF) with those non seizure free (NSF) after CAH, in an attempt to establish possible predictors of surgical outcome. 105 patients with refractory MTLE-HS submitted to CAH (59 left MTLE; 46 males) and 47 controls were enrolled. FreeSurfer was performed for cortical thickness and volume estimation comparing patients to controls and SF versus NSF patients. The final sample after post processing procedures resulted in 99 patients. Cortical thickness analyses showed reductions in left insula in NSF patients compared to those SF. Significant volume reductions in SF patients were present in bilateral thalami, hippocampi and pars opercularis, left parahippocampal gyrus and right temporal pole. In NSF patients reductions were present bilaterally in thalami, hippocampi, entorhinal cortices, superior frontal and supramarginal gyri; on the left: superior and middle temporal gyri, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, pars opercularis and middle frontal gyrus; and on the right: precentral, superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri. Comparison between SF and NSF patients showed ipsilateral gray matter reductions in the right entorhinal cortex (p=0.003) and contralateral parahippocampal gyrus (p=0.05) in right MTLE-HS. Patients NSF had a longer duration of epilepsy than those SF (p=0.028). NSF patients exhibited more extensive areas of atrophy than SF ones. As entorhinal

  18. Large-scale brain networks are distinctly affected in right and left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Brunno Machado; Coan, Ana Carolina; Lin Yasuda, Clarissa; Casseb, Raphael Fernandes; Cendes, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampus sclerosis (HS) is associated with functional and structural alterations extending beyond the temporal regions and abnormal pattern of brain resting state networks (RSNs) connectivity. We hypothesized that the interaction of large-scale RSNs is differently affected in patients with right- and left-MTLE with HS compared to controls. We aimed to determine and characterize these alterations through the analysis of 12 RSNs, functionally parceled in 70 regions of interest (ROIs), from resting-state functional-MRIs of 99 subjects (52 controls, 26 right- and 21 left-MTLE patients with HS). Image preprocessing and statistical analysis were performed using UF(2) C-toolbox, which provided ROI-wise results for intranetwork and internetwork connectivity. Intranetwork abnormalities were observed in the dorsal default mode network (DMN) in both groups of patients and in the posterior salience network in right-MTLE. Both groups showed abnormal correlation between the dorsal-DMN and the posterior salience, as well as between the dorsal-DMN and the executive-control network. Patients with left-MTLE also showed reduced correlation between the dorsal-DMN and visuospatial network and increased correlation between bilateral thalamus and the posterior salience network. The ipsilateral hippocampus stood out as a central area of abnormalities. Alterations on left-MTLE expressed a low cluster coefficient, whereas the altered connections on right-MTLE showed low cluster coefficient in the DMN but high in the posterior salience regions. Both right- and left-MTLE patients with HS have widespread abnormal interactions of large-scale brain networks; however, all parameters evaluated indicate that left-MTLE has a more intricate bihemispheric dysfunction compared to right-MTLE. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3137-3152, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by

  19. Brain-responsive neurostimulation in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Eric B; Skarpaas, Tara L; Gross, Robert E; Goodman, Robert R; Barkley, Gregory L; Bazil, Carl W; Berg, Michael J; Bergey, Gregory K; Cash, Sydney S; Cole, Andrew J; Duckrow, Robert B; Edwards, Jonathan C; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Goldman, Alicia M; Gwinn, Ryder P; Heck, Christianne; Herekar, Aamar; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Jobst, Barbara C; King-Stephens, David; Labar, Douglas R; Leiphart, James W; Marsh, W Richard; Meador, Kimford J; Mizrahi, Eli M; Murro, Anthony M; Nair, Dileep R; Noe, Katherine H; Park, Yong D; Rutecki, Paul A; Salanova, Vicenta; Sheth, Raj D; Shields, Donald C; Skidmore, Christopher; Smith, Michael C; Spencer, David C; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Tatum, William; Van Ness, Paul C; Vossler, David G; Wharen, Robert E; Worrell, Gregory A; Yoshor, Daniel; Zimmerman, Richard S; Cicora, Kathy; Sun, Felice T; Morrell, Martha J

    2017-06-01

    Evaluate the seizure-reduction response and safety of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) brain-responsive stimulation in adults with medically intractable partial-onset seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin. Subjects with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) were identified from prospective clinical trials of a brain-responsive neurostimulator (RNS System, NeuroPace). The seizure reduction over years 2-6 postimplantation was calculated by assessing the seizure frequency compared to a preimplantation baseline. Safety was assessed based on reported adverse events. There were 111 subjects with MTLE; 72% of subjects had bilateral MTL onsets and 28% had unilateral onsets. Subjects had one to four leads placed; only two leads could be connected to the device. Seventy-six subjects had depth leads only, 29 had both depth and strip leads, and 6 had only strip leads. The mean follow-up was 6.1 ± (standard deviation) 2.2 years. The median percent seizure reduction was 70% (last observation carried forward). Twenty-nine percent of subjects experienced at least one seizure-free period of 6 months or longer, and 15% experienced at least one seizure-free period of 1 year or longer. There was no difference in seizure reduction in subjects with and without mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), bilateral MTL onsets, prior resection, prior intracranial monitoring, and prior vagus nerve stimulation. In addition, seizure reduction was not dependent on the location of depth leads relative to the hippocampus. The most frequent serious device-related adverse event was soft tissue implant-site infection (overall rate, including events categorized as device-related, uncertain, or not device-related: 0.03 per implant year, which is not greater than with other neurostimulation devices). Brain-responsive stimulation represents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy, including patients with unilateral or bilateral MTLE who are not candidates for

  20. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikova, Hana; Kramska, Lenka; Vojtech, Zdenek; Sroubek, Jan; Lukavsky, Jiri; Liscak, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal structures play an important role in human memory. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), seizure activity is generated from the same structures. Surgery is the definitive treatment for medically intractable MTLE. In addition to standard temporal lobe microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy (SAHE) is used as an alternative MTLE treatment. While memory impairments after standard epilepsy surgery are well known, it has been shown that memory decline is not a feature of SAHE. The aim of the present study was to correlate the volume of the remnant hippocampus and amygdala in patients treated by SAHE with changes in memory parameters. Thirty-seven MTLE patients treated by SAHE (ten right, 27 left) were included. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations including hippocampal and amygdalar volumetry and neuropsychological evaluation preoperatively and 1 year after surgery. Using Spearman correlation analyses, larger left-sided hippocampal reductions were associated with lower verbal memory performance (ρ=-0.46; P=0.02). On the contrary, improvement of global memory quotient (MQ) was positively correlated with larger right-sided hippocampal reduction (ρ=0.66; P=0.04). Similarly, positive correlations between the extent of right amygdalar reduction and verbal MQ (ρ=0.74; P=0.02) and global MQ change (ρ=0.69; P=0.03) were found. Thus, larger right hippocampal and amygdalar reduction was associated with higher global and verbal MQ change after SAHE. Larger left-sided hippocampal reductions were associated with lower verbal memory performance. This finding is in accordance with the material-specific model of human memory, which states that the dominant hemisphere is specialized for the learning and recall of verbal information. We hypothesize that larger right-sided ablations enable the left temporal lobe to support memory more effectively, perhaps as a consequence of epileptiform discharges spreading

  1. Benign mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: A clinical cohort and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQassmi, Amal; Burneo, Jorge G; McLachlan, Richard S; Mirsattari, Seyed M

    2016-12-01

    We present a single-center retrospective study of benign mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (bMTLE) between 1995 and 2014. Hospital records and clinic charts were reviewed. The clinical, Eelectroencephalographic (EEG), imaging features, and response to treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were documented. Patients were included in this study if they were seizure-free for a minimum of 24months with or without an AED. Twenty-seven patients were identified. There were 19 (70%) females, mean age at first seizure was 32.2 (range: 15-80years). In all patients, seizures were mild, and seizure freedom was readily achieved with the initiation of AED therapy. Sixteen patients (59%) had mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In three patients, we attempted to discontinue AED therapy after a prolonged period of remission (5-8years), but all had seizure recurrence within 2 to 4weeks. Not all temporal lobe epilepsy is refractory to medication, despite the presence of MTS. Until clinical trials indicate otherwise, surgery is not indicated but life-long medical treatment is advocated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Confiabilidade de medidas volumétricas de estruturas temporais mesiais Reliability of mesial temporal lobe volumetric measures

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    Renato L. Marchetti

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available MOTIVO DO ESTUDO: O desenvolvimento de técnicas confiáveis para a realização de medidas volumétricas de estruturas temporais mesiais (amígdala, hipocampo e giro para-hipocampal em exames de ressonância magnética (RM pode fornecer dados para o estudo de vários transtornos neuropsiquiátricos, particularmente epilepsia do lobo temporal, doença de Alzheimer e esquizofrenia. MÉTODO: Investigamos essas técnicas realizando estudo de confiabilidade intra-observador (IO e entre-observador (EO, envolvendo controles normais, pacientes com epilepsia e pacientes com doença de Alzheimer, através do coeficiente de correlação intra-classe (CCI. RESULTADOS: A confiabilidade IO para as estruturas analisadas variou de 0,93 a 0,99 (pRATIONALE: The development of reliable techniques for volumetric measurement of mesial temporal structures (amygdala, hypocampus and parahypocampal gyrus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can provide data for the study of neuropsychiatric disorders, mainly temporal lobe epilepsy, Alzheimer´s disease and schizophrenia. METHOD: We investigated these techniques performing intraobserver and interobserver reliability study concerning normal controls, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease patients using the intra-class correlation coefficient. RESULTS: Intra-observer reliability of evaluated structures ranged from 0.93 to 0.99 (p<0.001. Inter-observer reliability ranged from 0.70 to 0.95 (p <= 0.001. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the technique of MRI morphometry of mesial temporal regions can be considered a reliable tool which may help in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders, since used by adequately trained clinicians and researchers.

  3. Granule cell dispersion is associated with memory impairment in right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen; Ferrari-Marinho, Taíssa; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    We analyzed the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with memory performance, clinical data and surgical outcome in a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Hippocampal specimens from 54 patients with MTLE (27 patients with right MTLE and 27 with left MTLE) and unilateral MTS, who were separated into GCD and no-GCD groups and thirteen controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed using hippocampal sections stained with NeuN. Patients' neuropsychological measures, clinical data, type of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 28 (51.9%) patients. No correlation between GCD and MTS pattern, clinical data or surgical outcome was found. The presence of GCD was correlated with worse visuospatial memory performance in right MTLE, but not with memory performance in left MTLE. GCD may be related to memory impairment in right MTLE-MTS patients. However, the role of GCD in memory function is not precisely defined. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decision making under ambiguity and under risk in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delazer, Margarete; Zamarian, Laura; Bonatti, Elisabeth; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Koppelstätter, Florian; Bodner, Thomas; Benke, Thomas; Trinka, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Decision making is essential in everyday life. Though the importance of the mesial temporal lobe in emotional processing and feedback learning is generally recognized, decision making in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is almost unexplored so far. Twenty-eight consecutive epilepsy patients with drug resistant mTLE and fifty healthy controls performed decision tasks under initial ambiguity (participants have to learn by feedback to make advantageous decisions) and under risk (advantageous choices may be made by estimating risks and by rational strategies). A subgroup analysis compared the performance of patients affected by MRI-verified abnormalities of the hippocampus or amygdala. The effect of lesion side was also assessed. In decision under ambiguity, mTLE patients showed marked deficits and did not improve over the task. Patients with hippocampus abnormality and patients with amygdala abnormality showed comparable deficits. No difference was found between right and left TLE groups. In decision under risk, mTLE patients performed at the same level as controls. Results suggest that mTLE patients have difficulties in learning from feedback and in making decisions in uncertain, ambiguous situations. By contrast, they are able to make advantageous decisions when full information is given and risks, possible gains and losses are exactly defined.

  5. Magnetic resonance in the diagnostic imaging study of mesial temporal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, E.; Sanchez, J. C.; Rodriguez, I.; Altuzarra, A.; Machado, F.; Aguilar, D.

    2001-01-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) consists of hippocampal atrophy and gliosis and is the most common cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. The objective of the authors was to establish a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for its diagnosis. A prospective study was carried out in 72 patients with drug resistant complex partial seizures (42 women and 30 men ranging in age from 6 to 66 year: mean: 30 years). Using a 1.5-Tesla magnet, paracoronal sections were made in hippocampi for T1-weighted inversion-recovery images and volume measurements, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2 relaxometry. A control group of 30 health volunteers was included in the study. MTS was considered to be indicated by the presence of atrophy and hyperintensity in hippocampi on T2-weighted images. There were no differences among the hippocampi of the healthy individuals. The confidence intervals (mean± 1.96 SD) were 4169 mm''3-5911 mm''3 for volume of right side, 4097 mm''3-5940 mm''3 for volume of left side and 98-113 ms for T2 relaxation time. MTS was detected in 40 patients (55.5%): 23 cases involving the left side, 13 involving the right and 4 cases of bilateral asymmetric involvement. The 95% confidence intervals for the diagnostic validity of the results (sensitivity/specificity) were (88.8%-97.2%)/(87.6%-96.4%) for T1 volumetry, (88.8%-97.2%)(95.7%-100.3%) for FLAIR and (85.4%-96.6%)/(85.4%-96.6%) for T2 relaxometry. In 5 cases of MTS, astrophy of other extra hippocampal structures was also observed, and MTS was associated with an extra hippocampal lesion (dual pathology), especially neurona migration disorders, in 8 patients. Seventeen patients (23.5%) presented lesions without MTS (tumors, cortical dysplasias and heterotopias) and there was no MRI evidence of anomalies in 15 (21%). Twenty-five patients underwent surgical treatment: 20 with MTS (19 diagnosed according to MRI and one in whom there had been no abnormal findings), 4 with tumors and 1 with a ballooned cell

  6. Topographical, autobiographical and semantic memory in a patient with bilateral mesial temporal and retrosplenial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepner, Ilana J; Mohamed, Armin; Fulham, Michael J; Miller, Laurie A

    2007-04-01

    According to Consolidation Theory (Squire, 1992, Psychological Review, 99, 195; Squire & Alvarez, 1995, Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 5, 169), the mesial temporal lobes have a time-limited role in the maintenance, storage and retrieval of retrograde declarative memories, such that they are not necessary for recalling remote memories. In contrast, proponents of the Multiple Trace Theory (Fuji, Moscovitch, & Nadel, 2000, Handbook of neuropsychology, 2nd ed., p 223, Amsterdam, New York: Elsevier; Nadel & Moscovitch, 1999, Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 7, 217) posit that the mesial temporal lobe (MTL) is necessary for remembering detailed autobiographical and topographical material from all time periods. A third theory of hippocampal function, the Cognitive Map Theory (O'Keefe & Nadel, 1978, The hippocampus as a cognitive map. Oxford: Clarendon), states that the hippocampus is involved in the processing of allocentric spatial representations. The precise role of the MTL in remote memory has been difficult to elucidate, as the majority of studies present cases with widespread brain damage that often occurred many years prior to testing. We investigated retrograde autobiographical, semantic and topographical memories in a subject (SG) who had recently sustained infarctions confined to the MTL and retrosplenial region bilaterally. Inconsistent with the predictions of Cognitive Map Theory, memory for spatial maps that were learned in the past was preserved. Additional testing indicated that SG suffered from a landmark agnosia, which affected remotely and recently acquired information equally. SG was also poor at imagining which direction he would have to turn his body to move from one landmark to another. In accordance with Consolidation Theory, SG performed similarly to control subjects for remote time periods on various measures of retrograde autobiographical memory and demonstrated intact knowledge regarding famous faces and vocabulary terms that were acquired in

  7. Spatial memory for asymmetrical dot locations predicts lateralization among patients with presurgical mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Spencer, Dennis D

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the ability of an asymmetrical dot location memory test (Brown Location Test, BLT) and two verbal memory tests (Verbal Selective Reminding Test (VSRT) and California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II)) to correctly lateralize left (LTLE) or right (RTLE) mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that was confirmed with video-EEG. Subjects consisted of 16 patients with medically refractory RTLE and 13 patients with medically refractory LTLE who were left hemisphere language dominant. Positive predictive values for lateralizing TLE correctly were 87.5% for the BLT, 72.7% for the VSRT, and 80% for the CVLT-II. Binary logistic regression indicated that the BLT alone correctly classified 76.9% of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and 87.5% of patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. Inclusion of the verbal memory tests improved this to 92.3% of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and 100% correct classification of patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. Though of a limited sample size, this study suggests that the BLT alone provides strong laterality information which improves with the addition of verbal memory tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [A surgical case of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis and traumatic neocortical lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Yu; Jin, Kazutaka; Iwasaki, Masaki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Nakasato, Nobukazu

    2017-11-25

    A 26-year-old right-handed woman, with a history of left temporal lobe contusion caused by a fall at the age of 9 months, started to have complex partial seizures with oral automatism at the age of 7 years. The seizures occurred once or twice a month despite combination therapy with several antiepileptic agents. Her history and imaging studies suggested the diagnosis of epilepsy arising from traumatic neocortical temporal lesion. Comprehensive assessment including long-term video EEG monitoring, MRI, FDG-PET, MEG, and neuropsychological evaluation was performed at the age of 26 years. The diagnosis was left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal atrophy and traumatic temporal cortical lesion. The patient was readmitted for surgical treatment at the age of 27 years. Intracranial EEG monitoring showed that ictal discharges started in the left hippocampus and spread to the traumatic lesion in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus 10 seconds after the onset. This case could not be classified as dual pathology exactly, because the traumatic left temporal cortical lesion did not show independent epileptogenicity. However, the traumatic lesion was highly likely to be the source of the epileptogenicity, and she had right hemispheric dominance for language and functional deterioration in the whole temporal cortex. Therefore, left amygdalo-hippocampectomy and left temporal lobectomy including the traumatic lesion were performed according to the diagnosis of dual pathology. Subsequently, she remained seizure-free for 3 years. Comprehensive assessment of seizure semiology, neurophysiology, neuroradiology, and neuropsychology is important to determine the optimum therapeutic strategies for drug-resistant epilepsy.

  9. Survival of mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in humans with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seress, László; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Klemm, Joyce; Byrne, Richard; Bakay, Roy A E

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis can be identified in most patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Surgical removal of the sclerotic hippocampus is widely performed to treat patients with drug-resistant mesial TLE. In general, both epilepsy-prone and epilepsy-resistant neurons are believed to be in the hippocampal formation. The hilar mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are usually considered one of the most vulnerable types of neurons. The aim of this study was to clarify the fate of mossy cells in the hippocampus in epileptic humans. Of the 19 patients included in this study, 15 underwent temporal lobe resection because of drug-resistant TLE. Four patients were used as controls because they harbored tumors that had not invaded the hippocampus and they had experienced no seizures. Histological evaluation of resected hippocampal tissues was performed using immunohistochemistry. Mossy cells were identified in the control as well as the epileptic hippocampi by using cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide immunohistochemistry. In most cases the number of mossy cells was reduced and thorny excrescences were smaller in the epileptic hippocampi than in controls; however, there was a significant loss of pyramidal cells and a partial loss of granule cells in the same epileptic hippocampi in which mossy cell loss was apparent. The loss of mossy cells could be correlated with the extent of hippocampal sclerosis, patient age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and frequency of seizures. In many cases large numbers of mossy cells were present in the hilus of the dentate gyrus when most pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and CA3 areas of the Ammon's horn were lost, suggesting that mossy cells may not be more vulnerable to epileptic seizures than the hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  10. Uncinate fasciculus fiber tracking in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Initial findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, S.; Oppenheim, C.; Meder, J.F.; Chassoux, F.; Golestani, N.; Cointepas, Y.; Poupon, C.; Semah, F.; Mangin, J.F.; Le Bihan, D.

    2007-01-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS), ictal discharge spread to the frontal and insulo-perisylvian cortex is commonly observed. The implication of white matter pathways in this propagation has not been investigated. We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements along the uncinate fasciculus (UF), a major tract connecting the frontal and temporal lobes, in patients and controls. Ten right-handed patients referred for intractable TLE due to a right HS were investigated on a 1.5-T MR scanner including a DTI sequence. All patients had interictal fluorodeoxyglucose PET showing an ipsilateral temporal hypometabolism associated with insular and frontal or perisylvian hypometabolism. The controls consisted of ten right-handed healthy subjects. UF fiber tracking was performed, and its fractional anisotropy (FA) values were compared between patients and controls, separately for the right and left UF. The left-minus-right FA UF asymmetry index was computed to test for intergroup differences. Asymmetries were found in the control group with right-greater-than-left FA. This asymmetrical pattern was lost in the patient group. Right FA values were lower in patients with right HS versus controls. Although preliminary, these findings may be related to the preferential pathway of seizure spread from the mesial temporal lobe to frontal and insulo-perisylvian areas. (orig.)

  11. Uncinate fasciculus fiber tracking in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Initial findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo, S.; Oppenheim, C.; Meder, J.F. [Universite Paris-Descartes, Faculte de Medecine, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Departement d' Imagerie Morphologique et Fonctionnelle, Paris (France); Chassoux, F. [Universite Paris-Descartes, Faculte de Medecine, Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris (France); Golestani, N.; Cointepas, Y.; Poupon, C.; Semah, F.; Mangin, J.F.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France)

    2007-07-15

    In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS), ictal discharge spread to the frontal and insulo-perisylvian cortex is commonly observed. The implication of white matter pathways in this propagation has not been investigated. We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements along the uncinate fasciculus (UF), a major tract connecting the frontal and temporal lobes, in patients and controls. Ten right-handed patients referred for intractable TLE due to a right HS were investigated on a 1.5-T MR scanner including a DTI sequence. All patients had interictal fluorodeoxyglucose PET showing an ipsilateral temporal hypometabolism associated with insular and frontal or perisylvian hypometabolism. The controls consisted of ten right-handed healthy subjects. UF fiber tracking was performed, and its fractional anisotropy (FA) values were compared between patients and controls, separately for the right and left UF. The left-minus-right FA UF asymmetry index was computed to test for intergroup differences. Asymmetries were found in the control group with right-greater-than-left FA. This asymmetrical pattern was lost in the patient group. Right FA values were lower in patients with right HS versus controls. Although preliminary, these findings may be related to the preferential pathway of seizure spread from the mesial temporal lobe to frontal and insulo-perisylvian areas. (orig.)

  12. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikova H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hana Malikova,1,2,* Lenka Kramska,3,* Zdenek Vojtech,4,5 Jan Sroubek,6 Jiri Lukavsky,7 Roman Liscak8 1Department of Radiology, Na Homolce Hospital, 2Institute of Anatomy, Second Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 3Department of Clinical Psychology, Na Homolce Hospital, 4Department of Neurology, Na Homolce Hospital, 5Department of Neurology, 3rd Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, 6Department of Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, 7Institute of Psychology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 8Department of Radiation and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Mesial temporal structures play an important role in human memory. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, seizure activity is generated from the same structures. Surgery is the definitive treatment for medically intractable MTLE. In addition to standard temporal lobe microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy (SAHE is used as an alternative MTLE treatment. While memory impairments after standard epilepsy surgery are well known, it has been shown that memory decline is not a feature of SAHE. The aim of the present study was to correlate the volume of the remnant hippocampus and amygdala in patients treated by SAHE with changes in memory parameters.Materials and methods: Thirty-seven MTLE patients treated by SAHE (ten right, 27 left were included. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations including hippocampal and amygdalar volumetry and neuropsychological evaluation preoperatively and 1 year after surgery.Results: Using Spearman correlation analyses, larger left-sided hippocampal reductions were associated with lower verbal memory performance (ρ=-0.46; P=0.02. On the contrary, improvement of global memory quotient (MQ was positively correlated with larger right-sided hippocampal reduction (ρ=0.66; P=0

  13. Navigation-assisted trans-inferotemporal cortex selective amygdalohippocampectomy for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy; preserving the temporal stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Haruhiko; Kato, Amami; Oshino, Satoru; Tani, Naoki; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Khoo, Hui Ming; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Edakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Maki; Tanaka, Masataka; Hosomi, Koichi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2017-03-01

    Selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) can be used to obtain satisfactory seizure control in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Several SAH procedures have been reported to achieve satisfactory outcomes for seizure control, but none yield fully satisfactory outcomes for memory function. We hypothesized that preserving the temporal stem might play an important role. To preserve the temporal stem, we developed a minimally invasive surgical procedure, 'neuronavigation-assisted trans-inferotemporal cortex SAH' (TITC-SAH). TITC-SAH was performed in 23 patients with MTLE (MTLE on the language-non-dominant hemisphere, n = 11). The inferior horn of the lateral ventricle was approached via the inferior or middle temporal gyrus along the inferior temporal sulcus under neuronavigation guidance. The hippocampus was dissected in a subpial manner and resected en bloc together with the parahippocampal gyrus. Seizure control at one year and memory function at 6 months postoperatively were evaluated. One year after TITC-SAH, 20 of the 23 patients were seizure-free (ILAE class 1), 2 were class 2, and 1 was class 3. Verbal memory improved significantly in 13 patients with a diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis, for whom WMS-R scores were available both pre- and post-operatively. Improvements were seen regardless of whether the SAH was on the language-dominant or non-dominant hemisphere. No major complication was observed. Navigation-assisted TITC-SAH performed for MTLE offers a simple, minimally invasive procedure that appears to yield excellent outcomes in terms of seizure control and preservation of memory function, because this procedure does not damage the temporal stem. TITC-SAH should be one of the feasible surgical procedures for MTLE. SAH: Amygdalohippocampectomy; MTLE: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); TITC-SAH: Ttrans-inferotemporal cortex SAH; ILAE: International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE); MRI: Magnetic resonance imaging; EEG

  14. 1H MR spectroscopy in histopathological subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika; Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Marusic, Petr; Tomasek, Martin; Krijtova, Hana; Zamecnik, Josef; Kyncl, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the lateralizing value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) in histopathologically different subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE) and to correlate results with clinical, MRI and seizure outcome data. A group of 35 patients who underwent resective epilepsy surgery was retrospectively studied. Hippocampal 1 H MR spectra were evaluated. Metabolite concentrations were obtained using LCModel and NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, NAA/(Cr+Cho), Cho/Cr ratios and coefficients of asymmetry were calculated. MRI correctly lateralized 89% of subjects and 1 H MRS 83%. MRI together with 1 H MRS correctly lateralized 100% of patients. Nineteen subjects had ''classical'' hippocampal sclerosis (HS), whereas the remaining 16 patients had ''mild'' HS. Nineteen patients had histopathologically proven malformation of cortical development (MCD) in the temporal pole; 16 subjects had only HS. No difference in 1 H MRS findings was found between patients in different histopathological subgroups of MTLE. Our results support the hypothesis that 1 H MRS abnormalities do not directly reflect histopathological changes in MTLE patients. Subjects with non-lateralized 1 H MRS abnormalities did not have a worse postoperative seizure outcome. We found no significant impact of contralateral 1 H MRS abnormality on post-surgical seizure outcome. (orig.)

  15. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo, E-mail: juarezbarbara@hotmail.co [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Neurology

    2010-04-15

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  16. Pathophysiogenesis of Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Is Prevention of Damage Antiepileptogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curia, G.; Lucchi, C.; Vinet, J.; Gualtieri, F.; Marinelli, C.; Torsello, A.; Costantino, L.; Biagini*,, G.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis, possibly caused by a primary brain injury that occurred a long time before the appearance of neurological symptoms. This type of epilepsy is characterized by refractoriness to drug treatment, so to require surgical resection of mesial temporal regions involved in seizure onset. Even this last therapeutic approach may fail in giving relief to patients. Although prevention of hippocampal damage and epileptogenesis after a primary event could be a key innovative approach to TLE, the lack of clear data on the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to TLE does not allow any rational therapy. Here we address the current knowledge on mechanisms supposed to be involved in epileptogenesis, as well as on the possible innovative treatments that may lead to a preventive approach. Besides loss of principal neurons and of specific interneurons, network rearrangement caused by axonal sprouting and neurogenesis are well known phenomena that are integrated by changes in receptor and channel functioning and modifications in other cellular components. In particular, a growing body of evidence from the study of animal models suggests that disruption of vascular and astrocytic components of the blood-brain barrier takes place in injured brain regions such as the hippocampus and piriform cortex. These events may be counteracted by drugs able to prevent damage to the vascular component, as in the case of the growth hormone secretagogue ghrelin and its analogues. A thoroughly investigation on these new pharmacological tools may lead to design effective preventive therapies. PMID:24251566

  17. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy in histopathological subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir [Charles University, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Marusic, Petr; Tomasek, Martin; Krijtova, Hana [Charles University, Department of Neurology, Prague (Czech Republic); Zamecnik, Josef [Charles University, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Kyncl, Martin [Charles University, Department of Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of the study was to analyze the lateralizing value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) in histopathologically different subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE) and to correlate results with clinical, MRI and seizure outcome data. A group of 35 patients who underwent resective epilepsy surgery was retrospectively studied. Hippocampal {sup 1}H MR spectra were evaluated. Metabolite concentrations were obtained using LCModel and NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, NAA/(Cr+Cho), Cho/Cr ratios and coefficients of asymmetry were calculated. MRI correctly lateralized 89% of subjects and {sup 1}H MRS 83%. MRI together with {sup 1}H MRS correctly lateralized 100% of patients. Nineteen subjects had 'classical' hippocampal sclerosis (HS), whereas the remaining 16 patients had 'mild' HS. Nineteen patients had histopathologically proven malformation of cortical development (MCD) in the temporal pole; 16 subjects had only HS. No difference in {sup 1}H MRS findings was found between patients in different histopathological subgroups of MTLE. Our results support the hypothesis that {sup 1}H MRS abnormalities do not directly reflect histopathological changes in MTLE patients. Subjects with non-lateralized {sup 1}H MRS abnormalities did not have a worse postoperative seizure outcome. We found no significant impact of contralateral {sup 1}H MRS abnormality on post-surgical seizure outcome. (orig.)

  18. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  19. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: fcendes@unicamp.br

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  20. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  1. Does the patient's hand hold the key to preventing secondary generalization in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Carina Gonçalves Pedroso; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of ictal dystonic posturing (DP) in postoperative seizure outcome and to assess the influence of DP in generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS) occurrence during video-EEG monitoring of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis. The impact of DP on surgical outcome remains controversial. Moreover, DP has been recently associated with brain networks avoiding GTCS occurrence. Five hundred twenty-seven seizures of 171 patients who were submitted to standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) between 2002 and 2010, with at least one year of post-surgical follow-up, were retrospectively analyzed and classified as with or without DP and as evolving or not to GTCS. The ictal semiologic correlates of DP, timing elapsed since precedent seizure and antiepileptic drug (AED) intake before each seizure were evaluated. Seizure outcome after ATL was assessed according to Engel's scale. Fifty-eight out of 171 patients (34%) exhibited ictal DP, of which 91.5% were always unilateral and contralateral to the operated side. DP was related to shorter seizures (p=0.007) and a much lower likelihood of the seizure evolving to GTCS (p=0.001), even during AED withdrawal (p=0.002). There was no association between DP and prognosis regarding seizure control as the result of the surgical resection, either in patients with shorter or in those with longer period of follow-up. Our data support the hypothesis that DP reflects a brain network activation that helps avoid GTCS, even during AED withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Widespread extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) abnormalities in TLE with and without mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Susanne G; Ebel, Andreas; Barakos, Jerome; Scanlon, Cathy; Cheong, Ian; Finlay, Daniel; Garcia, Paul; Weiner, Michael W; Laxer, Kenneth D

    2011-04-01

    MR spectroscopy has demonstrated extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) reductions in medial temporal lobe epilepsy with (TLE-MTS) and without (TLE-no) mesial temporal sclerosis. Because of the limited brain coverage of those previous studies, it was, however, not possible to assess differences in the distribution and extent of these abnormalities between TLE-MTS and TLE-no. This study used a 3D whole brain echoplanar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence to address the following questions: (1) Do TLE-MTS and TLE-no differ regarding severity and distribution of extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) reductions? (2) Do extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) reductions provide additional information for focus lateralization? Forty-three subjects (12 TLE-MTS, 13 TLE-no, 18 controls) were studied with 3D EPSI. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) was used to identify regions of significantly decreased NAA/(Cr+Cho) in TLE groups and in individual patients. TLE-MTS and TLE-no had widespread extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) reductions. NAA/(Cr+Cho) reductions had a bilateral fronto-temporal distribution in TLE-MTS and a more diffuse, less well defined distribution in TLE-no. Extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) decreases in the single subject analysis showed a large inter-individual variability and did not provide additional focus lateralizing information. Extrahippocampal NAA/(Cr+Cho) reductions in TLE-MTS and TLE-no are neither focal nor homogeneous. This reduces their value for focus lateralization and suggests a heterogeneous etiology of extrahippocampal spectroscopic metabolic abnormalities in TLE.

  3. Serious adverse effects of gamma knife radiosurgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Tetsuro; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kohda, Yukihiko; Hirose, Genjiro

    2012-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been proposed as an alternative to surgical resection. We report serious adverse effects of the treatment after follow-up periods over 9 years in 11 patients treated with GKRS between 1997 and 2000. The target volume of the entorhinoamygdalohippocampectomy area was 4.8-17.1 ml. Marginal dose of 20-25 Gy to the 50% isodose was delivered. One patient was drowned after suffering seizure 7 months after GKRS. Two patients did not show any reduction in seizure frequency over 9 and 18 months. Both patients requested open surgery and became seizure-free postoperatively. Four of the other eight patients were classified as Engel's class I within 4 years after GKRS. One of the four patients experienced symptomatic radiation-induced cerebral edema transiently, one developed radiation necrosis and required surgery 5 years after GKRS, and one developed cognitive impairment with hemiparesis 10 years after GKRS. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a large cyst in the irradiated temporal lobe. This patient recovered fully after the cyst excision. Only one patient became seizure-free and antiepileptic drug-free without symptomatic radiation-induced complications. However, MR imaging revealed abnormal enhancement, cyst formation, and diffuse white matter change in the irradiated temporal lobe 9 years after GKRS. GKRS for MTLE causes adverse effects of delayed seizure remission and symptomatic radiation-induced complications. Therefore, GKRS cannot be considered as an ideal alternative to surgery for MTLE. Long-term follow-up studies including MR imaging with contrast medium are required for the patients even after successful control of seizures. (author)

  4. Assessment of working memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudesco, Ivanda de Souza Silva; Vaz, Leonardo José; Mantoan, Marcele Araújo Silva; Belzunces, Erich; Noffs, Maria Helena; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether working memory is impaired in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), a controversial and largely unexplored matter. Twenty subjects with left MTLE-HS, 19 with right MTLE-HS, and 21 control right-handed subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment of episodic and semantic memory, executive functions, and specific working memory components. Left and right epileptogenic foci resulted in impairment of verbal and nonverbal episodic memory (verbal memory deficit greater in left MTLE-HS than in right MTLE-HS). In addition, patients with left MTLE-HS were impaired in learning paired associates, verbal fluency, and Trail Making. No differences were seen in the tests carried out to evaluate the working memory components (except visuospatial short-term memory in right MTLE-HS). In this study we did not detect reliable working memory impairment in patients with MTLE-HS with either a left or right focus in most tasks considered as tests of working memory components. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of seizure on hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy: an MRS study

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    Lee, S.K.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, K.K.; Chung, C.K.; Song, I.C.; Chang, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of seizures on the bilateral hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and neocortical epilepsy by single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Forty-one patients with mTLE having unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and 43 patients with a neocortical epilepsy who underwent subsequent epilepsy surgery were recruited. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios in 20 healthy control subjects were used as threshold values to determine abnormal NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr. NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly lower in the ipsilateral hippocampus of mTLE and neocortical epilepsy. Using asymmetry indices for patients with bilaterally abnormal ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr in addition to using unilateral abnormal ratio, the seizure focus was correctly lateralized in 65.9% of patients with mTLE and 48.8% of neocortical epilepsy patients. Bilateral NAA/Cho abnormality was significantly related to a poor surgical outcome in mTLE. No significant relationship was found between the results of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr and surgical outcome in neocortical epilepsy. The mean contralateral NAA/Cr ratio of the hippocampus in mTLE was significantly lower in patients with a history of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizure (SGTCS) than in those without. (orig.)

  6. Scale invariance properties of intracerebral EEG improve seizure prediction in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Kais Gadhoumi

    Full Text Available Although treatment for epilepsy is available and effective for nearly 70 percent of patients, many remain in need of new therapeutic approaches. Predicting the impending seizures in these patients could significantly enhance their quality of life if the prediction performance is clinically practical. In this study, we investigate the improvement of the performance of a seizure prediction algorithm in 17 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy by means of a novel measure. Scale-free dynamics of the intracerebral EEG are quantified through robust estimates of the scaling exponents--the first cumulants--derived from a wavelet leader and bootstrap based multifractal analysis. The cumulants are investigated for the discriminability between preictal and interictal epochs. The performance of our recently published patient-specific seizure prediction algorithm is then out-of-sample tested on long-lasting data using combinations of cumulants and state similarity measures previously introduced. By using the first cumulant in combination with state similarity measures, up to 13 of 17 patients had seizures predicted above chance with clinically practical levels of sensitivity (80.5% and specificity (25.1% of total time under warning for prediction horizons above 25 min. These results indicate that the scale-free dynamics of the preictal state are different from those of the interictal state. Quantifiers of these dynamics may carry a predictive power that can be used to improve seizure prediction performance.

  7. Effect of seizure on hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy: an MRS study

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    Lee, S.K.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, K.K. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea); Chung, C.K. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea); Song, I.C.; Chang, K.H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of seizures on the bilateral hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and neocortical epilepsy by single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Forty-one patients with mTLE having unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and 43 patients with a neocortical epilepsy who underwent subsequent epilepsy surgery were recruited. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios in 20 healthy control subjects were used as threshold values to determine abnormal NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr. NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly lower in the ipsilateral hippocampus of mTLE and neocortical epilepsy. Using asymmetry indices for patients with bilaterally abnormal ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr in addition to using unilateral abnormal ratio, the seizure focus was correctly lateralized in 65.9% of patients with mTLE and 48.8% of neocortical epilepsy patients. Bilateral NAA/Cho abnormality was significantly related to a poor surgical outcome in mTLE. No significant relationship was found between the results of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr and surgical outcome in neocortical epilepsy. The mean contralateral NAA/Cr ratio of the hippocampus in mTLE was significantly lower in patients with a history of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizure (SGTCS) than in those without. (orig.)

  8. Asymmetrical hippocampal connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence from resting state fMRI

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    Castellano Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, the most common type of focal epilepsy in adults, is often caused by hippocampal sclerosis (HS. Patients with HS usually present memory dysfunction, which is material-specific according to the hemisphere involved and has been correlated to the degree of HS as measured by postoperative histopathology as well as by the degree of hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Verbal memory is mostly affected by left-sided HS, whereas visuo-spatial memory is more affected by right HS. Some of these impairments may be related to abnormalities of the network in which individual hippocampus takes part. Functional connectivity can play an important role to understand how the hippocampi interact with other brain areas. It can be estimated via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI resting state experiments by evaluating patterns of functional networks. In this study, we investigated the functional connectivity patterns of 9 control subjects, 9 patients with right MTLE and 9 patients with left MTLE. Results We detected differences in functional connectivity within and between hippocampi in patients with unilateral MTLE associated with ipsilateral HS by resting state fMRI. Functional connectivity resulted to be more impaired ipsilateral to the seizure focus in both patient groups when compared to control subjects. This effect was even more pronounced for the left MTLE group. Conclusions The findings presented here suggest that left HS causes more reduction of functional connectivity than right HS in subjects with left hemisphere dominance for language.

  9. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy lateralization using SPHARM-based features of hippocampus and SVM

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    Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh

    2012-02-01

    This paper improves the Lateralization (identification of the epileptogenic hippocampus) accuracy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (mTLE). In patients with this kind of epilepsy, usually one of the brain's hippocampi is the focus of the epileptic seizures, and resection of the seizure focus is the ultimate treatment to control or reduce the seizures. Moreover, the epileptogenic hippocampus is prone to shrinkage and deformation; therefore, shape analysis of the hippocampus is advantageous in the preoperative assessment for the Lateralization. The method utilized for shape analysis is the Spherical Harmonics (SPHARM). In this method, the shape of interest is decomposed using a set of bases functions and the obtained coefficients of expansion are the features describing the shape. To perform shape comparison and analysis, some pre- and post-processing steps such as "alignment of different subjects' hippocampi" and the "reduction of feature-space dimension" are required. To this end, first order ellipsoid is used for alignment. For dimension reduction, we propose to keep only the SPHARM coefficients with maximum conformity to the hippocampus shape. Then, using these coefficients of normal and epileptic subjects along with 3D invariants, specific lateralization indices are proposed. Consequently, the 1536 SPHARM coefficients of each subject are summarized into 3 indices, where for each index the negative (positive) value shows that the left (right) hippocampus is deformed (diseased). Employing these indices, the best achieved lateralization accuracy for clustering and classification algorithms are 85% and 92%, respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to the conventional volumetric method.

  10. Electrophysiological resting-state biomarker for diagnosing mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to evaluate whether resting-state functional connectivity of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals can differentiate patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) from healthy controls (HC) and can differentiate between right and left MTLE as a diagnostic biomarker. To this end, a support vector machine (SVM) method among various machine learning algorithms was employed. We compared resting-state functional networks between 46 MTLE (right MTLE=23; left MTLE=23) patients with histologically proven HS who were free of seizure after surgery, and 46 HC. The optimal SVM group classifier distinguished MTLE patients with a mean accuracy of 95.1% (sensitivity=95.8%; specificity=94.3%). Increased connectivity including the right posterior cingulate gyrus and decreased connectivity including at least one sensory-related resting-state network were key features reflecting the differences between MTLE patients and HC. The optimal SVM model distinguished between right and left MTLE patients with a mean accuracy of 76.2% (sensitivity=76.0%; specificity=76.5%). We showed the potential of electrophysiological resting-state functional connectivity, which reflects brain network reorganization in MTLE patients, as a possible diagnostic biomarker to differentiate MTLE patients from HC and differentiate between right and left MTLE patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Perspectives on treatment options for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Coppola, Antonietta; Citraro, Rita; Del Gaudio, Luigi; Striano, Salvatore; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is a syndrome that is often refractory to drug treatment. The effects on specific syndromes are not currently available from the pre-marketing clinical development of new AEDs; this does not allow the prediction of whether new drugs will be more effective in the treatment of some patients. We have reviewed all the existing literature relevant to the understanding of a potential effectiveness in MTLE-HS patients for the latest AEDs, namely brivaracetam, eslicarbazepine, lacosamide, perampanel and retigabine also including the most relevant clinical data and a brief description of their pharmacological profile. Records were identified using predefined search criteria using electronic databases (e.g., PubMed, Cochrane Library Database of Systematic Reviews). Primary peer-reviewed articles published up to the 15 June 2015 were included. All the drugs considered have the potential to be effective in the treatment of MTLE-HS; in fact, they possess proven efficacy in animal models; currently considered valuable tools for predicting drug efficacy in TLE. Furthermore, for some of these (e.g., lacosamide and eslicarbazepine) data are already available from post-marketing studies while brivaracetam acting on SV2A like levetiracetam might have the same potential effectiveness with the possibility to be more efficacious considering its ability to inhibit voltage gated sodium channels; finally, perampanel and retigabine are very effective drugs in animal models of TLE.

  12. Differential gene expression in dentate granule cells in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nicole G; Wang, Yu; Hulette, Christine M; Halvorsen, Matt; Cronin, Kenneth D; Walley, Nicole M; Haglund, Michael M; Radtke, Rodney A; Skene, J H Pate; Sinha, Saurabh R; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common neuropathologic finding in cases of medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis to show that next-generation sequencing methods can produce interpretable genomic data from RNA collected from small homogenous cell populations, and to shed light on the transcriptional changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis. RNA was extracted, and complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared and amplified from dentate granule cells that had been harvested by laser capture microdissection from surgically resected hippocampi from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Sequencing libraries were sequenced, and the resulting sequencing reads were aligned to the reference genome. Differential expression analysis was used to ascertain expression differences between patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Greater than 90% of the RNA-Seq reads aligned to the reference. There was high concordance between transcriptional profiles obtained for duplicate samples. Principal component analysis revealed that the presence or absence of hippocampal sclerosis was the main determinant of the variance within the data. Among the genes up-regulated in the hippocampal sclerosis samples, there was significant enrichment for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells from surgically resected hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, we have demonstrated the utility of next-generation sequencing methods for producing biologically relevant results from small populations of homogeneous cells, and have provided insight on the transcriptional changes associated with this pathology. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  13. Clinico-pathological factors influencing surgical outcome in drug resistant epilepsy secondary to mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitr Sastri, B V; Arivazhagan, A; Sinha, Sanjib; Mahadevan, Anita; Bharath, R D; Saini, J; Jamuna, R; Kumar, J Keshav; Rao, S L; Chandramouli, B A; Shankar, S K; Satishchandra, P

    2014-05-15

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is the most common cause of drug resistant epilepsy amenable for surgical treatment and seizure control. This study analyzed the outcome of patients with MTS following anterior temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy (ATL-AH) over 10 years and correlated the electrophysiological and radiological factors with the post operative seizure outcome. Eighty seven patients were included in the study. Sixty seven (77.2%) patients had an Engel Class 1 outcome, 9 (11.4%) had Class 2 outcome. Engel's class 1 outcome was achieved in 89.9% at 1 year, while it reduced slightly to 81.9% at 2 years and 76.2% at 5 year follow up. Seventy seven (88.5%) patients had evidence of hippocampal sclerosis on histopathology. Dual pathology was observed in 19 of 77 specimens with hippocampal sclerosis, but did not influence the outcome. Factors associated with an unfavorable outcome included male gender (p=0.04), and a higher frequency of pre-operative seizures (p=0.005), whereas the presence of febrile seizures (p=0.048) and loss of hippocampal neurons in CA4 region on histopathology (p=0.040) were associated with favorable outcome. The effect of CA4 loss on outcome is probably influenced by neuronal loss in other subfields as well since isolated CA4 loss was rare. Abnormal post operative EEG at the end of 1 week was found to be a significant factor predicting unfavorable outcome (p=0.005). On multivariate analysis, the pre-operative seizure frequency was the only significant factor affecting outcome. The present study observed excellent seizure free outcome in a carefully selected cohort of patients with MTS with refractory epilepsy. The presence of dual pathology did not influence the outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging of odor perception delineates functional disintegration of the limbic circuits in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciumas, Carolina; Lindström, Per; Aoun, Bernard; Savic, Ivanka

    2008-01-15

    Metabolic and neuro-receptor abnormalities within the extrafocal limbic circuits are established in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, very little is known about how these circuits process external stimuli. We tested whether odor activation can help delineate limbic functional disintegration in MTLE, and measured cerebral blood flow with PET during birhinal smelling of familiar and unfamiliar odors, using smelling of odorless air as the baseline condition. Patients with MTLE (13 left-sided, 10 right-sided) and 21 controls were investigated. In addition to odor activation, the analysis included functional connectivity, using right and left piriform cortex as seed regions. Healthy controls activated the amygdala, piriform, anterior insular, and cingulate cortices on both sides. Smelling of familiar odors engaged, in addition, the right parahippocampus, and the left Brodmann Area (BA) 44, 45, 47. Patients failed to activate the amygdala, piriform and the anterior insular cortex in the epileptogenic hemisphere. Furthermore, those with left MTLE did not activate the left BA 44, 45 and 47 with familiar odors, which they perceived as less familiar than controls. Congruent with the activation data each seed region was in patients functionally disconnected with the contralateral amygdala+piriform+insular cortex. The functional disintegration in patients exceeded the reduced activation, and included the contralateral temporal neocortex, and in subjects with right MTLE also the right orbitofrontal cortex. Imaging of odor perception may be used to delineate functional disintegration of the limbic networks in MTLE. It shows an altered response in several regions, which may underlie some interictal behavioral problems associated with this condition.

  15. Parahippocampal Involvement in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Hippocampal Sclerosis: A Proof of Concept from Memory-Guided Saccades

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    Silvia Colnaghi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS may involve extrahippocampal areas of structural damage and dysfunction. The accuracy of medium-term spatial memory can be tested by memory-guided saccades (MGS to evaluate a functional impairment of the parahippocampal cortex (PHC, while voxel-based morphometry (VBM analysis can be used to detect a structural damage of the latter region.MethodsMGS with 3- and 30-s memorization delays were compared between 7 patients affected by right MTLE-HS (r-MTLE-HS, 6 patients affected by left MTLE-HS, and 13 healthy controls. The same subjects underwent brain MRI for a VBM analysis. Correlation analysis was performed between the results of VBM and MGS and with patients’ clinical data.ResultsRight MTLE-HS patients showed impaired accuracy of leftward MGS with a 30-s memorization delay; their gray-matter volume was reduced in the right hippocampus and inferior temporal gyrus, and bilaterally in the cerebellum. Left MTLE-HS patients had normal MGS accuracy; their gray-matter volume was reduced in the left hippocampus, in the right-inferior temporal gyrus and corpus callosus, and bilaterally in the insular cortex and in the cerebellum. The difference between right and left parahippocampal volumes correlated with MGS accuracy, while right and left hippocampal volumes did not. Hippocampal and parahippocampal volume did not correlate with clinical variables such as febrile seizures, age at disease onset, disease duration, and seizure frequency.ConclusionMGS abnormalities suggested the functional involvement of the right PHC in patients with r-MTLE-HS, supporting a right lateralization of spatial memory control and showing a relation between functional impairment and degree of atrophy.

  16. Hippocampal CA3 transcriptome signature correlates with initial precipitating injury in refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Silvia Y Bando

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prolonged febrile seizures constitute an initial precipitating injury (IPI commonly associated with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (RMTLE. In order to investigate IPI influence on the transcriptional phenotype underlying RMTLE we comparatively analyzed the transcriptomic signatures of CA3 explants surgically obtained from RMTLE patients with (FS or without (NFS febrile seizure history. Texture analyses on MRI images of dentate gyrus were conducted in a subset of surgically removed sclerotic hippocampi for identifying IPI-associated histo-radiological alterations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA microarray analysis revealed that CA3 global gene expression differed significantly between FS and NFS subgroups. An integrative functional genomics methodology was used for characterizing the relations between GO biological processes themes and constructing transcriptional interaction networks defining the FS and NFS transcriptomic signatures and its major gene-gene links (hubs. Co-expression network analysis showed that: i CA3 transcriptomic profiles differ according to the IPI; ii FS distinctive hubs are mostly linked to glutamatergic signalization while NFS hubs predominantly involve GABAergic pathways and neurotransmission modulation. Both networks have relevant hubs related to nervous system development, what is consistent with cell genesis activity in the hippocampus of RMTLE patients. Moreover, two candidate genes for therapeutic targeting came out from this analysis: SSTR1, a relevant common hub in febrile and afebrile transcriptomes, and CHRM3, due to its putative role in epilepsy susceptibility development. MRI texture analysis allowed an overall accuracy of 90% for pixels correctly classified as belonging to FS or NFS groups. Histological examination revealed that granule cell loss was significantly higher in FS hippocampi. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CA3 transcriptional signatures and dentate gyrus morphology fairly

  17. Multivariate pattern analysis reveals anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Peng Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated differences of clinical signs and functional brain network organizations between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, but the anatomical connectivity differences underlying functional variance between the left and right mTLE remain uncharacterized. We examined 43 (22 left, 21 right mTLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis and 39 healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. After the whole-brain anatomical networks were constructed for each subject, multivariate pattern analysis was applied to classify the left mTLE from the right mTLE and extract the anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mTLE patients. The classification results reveal 93.0% accuracy for the left mTLE versus the right mTLE, 93.4% accuracy for the left mTLE versus controls and 90.0% accuracy for the right mTLE versus controls. Compared with the right mTLE, the left mTLE exhibited a different connectivity pattern in the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum. The majority of the most discriminating anatomical connections were located within or across the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum, thereby indicating that these disease-related anatomical network alterations may give rise to a portion of the complex of emotional and memory deficit between the left and right mTLE. Moreover, the orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which exhibit high discriminative power in classification, may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of mTLE. The current study demonstrated that anatomical connectivity differences between the left mTLE and the right mTLE may have the potential to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker to guide personalized diagnosis of the left and right mTLE.

  18. Low and High Frequency Hippocampal Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew-Na; Lee, Ching-Yi; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Tu, Po-Hsun; Chang, Bao-Luen; Lee, Chih-Hong; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Chang, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Wei-En Johnny; Hsieh, Hsiang-Yao; Chiang, Hsing-I; Wu, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hippocampus offers the possibility to treat patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who are not surgical candidates. We report long-term follow-up results in five patients receiving low or high frequency hippocampal stimulation for drug-resistant MTLE. The patients underwent stereotactic implantation of quadripolar stimulating electrodes in the hippocampus. Two of the patients received unilateral electrode implantation, while the other three received bilateral implantation. Stimulation of the hippocampal electrodes was turned ON immediately after the implantation of an implantable pulse generator, with initial stimulation parameters: 1 V, 90-150 μs, 5 or 145 Hz. The frequency of seizures was monitored and compared with preimplantation baseline data. Two men and three women, aged 27-61 years were studied, with a mean follow-up period of 38.4 months (range, 30-42 months). The baseline seizure frequency was 2.0-15.3/month. The five patients had an average 45% (range 22-72%) reduction in the frequency of seizures after hippocampal stimulation over the study period. Low frequency hippocampal stimulation decreased the frequency of seizures in two patients (by 54% and 72%, respectively). No implantation- or stimulation-related side effects were reported. Electrical stimulation of the hippocampus is a minimally invasive and reversible method that can improve seizure outcomes in patients with drug-resistant MTLE. The optimal frequency of stimulation varied from patient to patient and therefore required individual setting. These experimental results warrant further controlled studies with a large patient population to evaluate the long-term effect of hippocampal stimulation with different stimulation parameters. © 2016 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  19. Familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and the borderland of déjà vu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Piero; Crompton, Douglas E; Bellows, Susannah T; McIntosh, Anne M; Kalincik, Tomas; Newton, Mark R; Vajda, Frank J E; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Kwan, Patrick; O'Brien, Terence J; Tan, K Meng; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2017-08-01

    The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is often unknown. We ascertained to what extent newly diagnosed nonlesional MTLE actually represents familial MTLE (FMTLE). We identified all consecutive patients presenting to the Austin Health First Seizure Clinic with MTLE and normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI evidence of hippocampal sclerosis over a 10-year period. Patients' first-degree relatives and pairwise age- and sex-matched controls underwent a comprehensive epilepsy interview. Each interview transcript was reviewed independently by 2 epileptologists, blinded to relative or control status. Reviewers classified each subject as follows: epilepsy, specifying if MTLE; manifestations suspicious for epilepsy; or unaffected. Physiological déjà vu was noted. Forty-four patients were included. At the Clinic, MTLE had been recognized to be familial in 2 patients only. Among 242 subjects interviewed, MTLE was diagnosed in 9 of 121 relatives versus 0 of 121 controls (p = 0.008). All affected relatives had seizures with intense déjà vu and accompanying features; 6 relatives had not been previously diagnosed. Déjà vu experiences that were suspicious, but not diagnostic, of MTLE occurred in 6 additional relatives versus none of the controls (p = 0.04). Physiological déjà vu was common, and did not differ significantly between relatives and controls. After completing the relatives' interviews, FMTLE was diagnosed in 8 of 44 patients (18.2%). FMTLE accounts for almost one-fifth of newly diagnosed nonlesional MTLE, and it is largely unrecognized without direct questioning of relatives. Relatives of patients with MTLE may experience déjà vu phenomena that clinically lie in the "borderland" between epileptic seizures and physiological déjà vu. Ann Neurol 2017;82:166-176. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  20. Multivariate pattern analysis reveals anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Wensheng; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated differences of clinical signs and functional brain network organizations between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), but the anatomical connectivity differences underlying functional variance between the left and right mTLE remain uncharacterized. We examined 43 (22 left, 21 right) mTLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis and 39 healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. After the whole-brain anatomical networks were constructed for each subject, multivariate pattern analysis was applied to classify the left mTLE from the right mTLE and extract the anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mTLE patients. The classification results reveal 93.0% accuracy for the left mTLE versus the right mTLE, 93.4% accuracy for the left mTLE versus controls and 90.0% accuracy for the right mTLE versus controls. Compared with the right mTLE, the left mTLE exhibited a different connectivity pattern in the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum. The majority of the most discriminating anatomical connections were located within or across the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum, thereby indicating that these disease-related anatomical network alterations may give rise to a portion of the complex of emotional and memory deficit between the left and right mTLE. Moreover, the orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which exhibit high discriminative power in classification, may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of mTLE. The current study demonstrated that anatomical connectivity differences between the left mTLE and the right mTLE may have the potential to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker to guide personalized diagnosis of the left and right mTLE.

  1. Immunogenetic predisposing factors for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Bárbara; Chaves, João; Carvalho, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Andreia; Brito, Cláudia; Boleixa, Daniela; Freitas, Joel; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, João; Ramalheira, João; Costa, Paulo P; da Silva, Berta Martins; da Silva, António Martins

    2018-04-01

    Neuroinflammation appears as an important epileptogenic mechanism. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated an upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). Expression of these cytokines can be modulated by polymorphisms such as rs16944 and rs1800629, respectively, both of which have been associated with febrile seizures (FS) and MTLE-HS development. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has also been implicated in diverse epileptic entities, suggesting a variable role of this system in epilepsy. Our aim was to analyse the association between immunogenetic factors and MTLE-HS development. For that rs16944 (-511 T>C, IL-1β), rs1800629 (-308 G>A, TNF-α) polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1 locus were genotyped in a Portuguese Population. We studied 196 MTLE-HS patients (108 females, 88 males, 44.7 ± 12.0 years, age of onset = 13.6 ± 10.3 years, 104 with FS antecedents) and 282 healthy controls in a case-control study. The frequency of rs16944 TT genotype was higher in MTLE-HS patients compared to controls (14.9% in MTLE-HS vs. 7.7% in controls, p = 0.021, OR [95% CI] = 2.20 [1.13-4.30]). This association was independent of FS antecedents. No association was observed between rs1800629 genotypes or HLA-DRB1 alleles and MTLE-HS susceptibility. Also, no correlation was observed between the studied polymorphisms and disease age of onset. The rs16944 TT genotype is associated with MTLE-HS development what may be explained by the higher IL-1β levels produced by this genotype. High IL-1β levels may have neurotoxic effects or imbalance neurotransmission leading to seizures.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androsova, Ganna; Krause, Roland; Borghei, Mojgansadat; Wassenaar, Merel; Auce, Pauls; Avbersek, Andreja; Becker, Felicitas; Berghuis, Bianca; Campbell, Ellen; Coppola, Antonietta; Francis, Ben; Wolking, Stefan; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Craig, John; Delanty, Norman; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Kunz, Wolfram S; Lerche, Holger; Marson, Anthony G; Sander, Josemir W; Sills, Graeme J; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Depondt, Chantal

    2017-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is a common epilepsy syndrome that is often poorly controlled by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Comparative AED effectiveness studies in this condition are lacking. We report retention, efficacy, and tolerability in a cohort of patients with MTLE-HS. Clinical data were collected from a European database of patients with epilepsy. We estimated retention, 12-month seizure freedom, and adverse drug reaction (ADR) rates for the 10 most commonly used AEDs in patients with MTLE-HS. Seven hundred sixty-seven patients with a total of 3,249 AED trials were included. The highest 12-month retention rates were observed with carbamazepine (85.9%), valproate (85%), and clobazam (79%). Twelve-month seizure freedom rates varied from 1.2% for gabapentin and vigabatrin to 11% for carbamazepine. Response rates were highest for AEDs that were prescribed as initial treatment and lowest for AEDs that were used in a third or higher instance. ADRs were reported in 47.6% of patients, with the highest rates observed with oxcarbazepine (35.7%), topiramate (30.9%), and pregabalin (27.4%), and the lowest rates with clobazam (6.5%), gabapentin (8.9%), and lamotrigine (16.6%). The most commonly reported ADRs were lethargy and drowsiness, dizziness, vertigo and ataxia, and blurred vision and diplopia. Our results did not demonstrate any clear advantage of newer versus older AEDs. Our results provide useful insights into AED retention, efficacy, and ADR rates in patients with MTLE-HS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Abnormalities of hippocampal signal intensity in patients with familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Coan A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is associated with hippocampal atrophy and hippocampal signal abnormalities. In our series of familial MTLE (FMTLE, we found a high proportion of hippocampal abnormalities. To quantify signal abnormalities in patients with FMTLE we studied 152 individuals (46 of them asymptomatic with FMTLE. We used NIH-Image® for volumetry and signal quantification in coronal T1 inversion recovery and T2 for all cross-sections of the hippocampus. Values diverging by 2 or more SD from the control mean were considered abnormal. T2 hippocampal signal abnormalities were found in 52% of all individuals: 54% of affected subjects and 48% of asymptomatic subjects. T1 hippocampal signal changes were found in 34% of all individuals: 42.5% of affected subjects and 15% of asymptomatic subjects. Analysis of the hippocampal head (first three slices revealed T2 abnormalities in 73% of all individuals (74% of affected subjects and 72% of asymptomatic subjects and T1 abnormalities in 59% (67% of affected subjects and 41% of asymptomatic subjects. Affected individuals had smaller volumes than controls (P < 0.0001. There was no difference in hippocampal volumes between asymptomatic subjects and controls, although 39% of asymptomatic patients had hippocampal atrophy. Patients with an abnormal hippocampal signal (133 individuals had smaller ipsilateral volume, but no linear correlation could be determined. Hippocampal signal abnormalities in FMTLE were more frequently found in the hippocampal head in both affected and asymptomatic family members, including those with normal volumes. These results indicate that subtle abnormalities leading to an abnormal hippocampal signal in FMTLE are not necessarily related to seizures and may be determined by genetic factors.

  4. Correlation of neuropsychological and metabolic changes after epilepsy surgery in patients with left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Güvenç, Canan; Dupont, Patrick; Van den Stock, Jan; Seynaeve, Laura; Porke, Kathleen; Dries, Eva; Van Bouwel, Karen; van Loon, Johannes; Theys, Tom; Goffin, Karolien E; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2018-04-12

    Epilepsy surgery often causes changes in cognition and cerebral glucose metabolism. Our aim was to explore relationships between pre- and postoperative cerebral metabolism as measured with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and neuropsychological test scores in patients with left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), who were rendered seizure-free after epilepsy surgery. Thirteen patients were included. All had neuropsychological testing and an interictal FDG-PET scan of the brain pre- and postoperative. Correlations between changes in neuropsychological test scores and metabolism were examined using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). There were no significant changes in the neuropsychological test scores pre- and postoperatively at the group level. Decreased metabolism was observed in the left mesial temporal regions and occipital lobe. Increased metabolism was observed in the bi-frontal and right parietal lobes, temporal lobes, occipital lobes, thalamus, cerebellum, and vermis. In these regions, we did not find a correlation between changes in metabolism and neuropsychological test scores. A significant negative correlation, however, was found between metabolic changes in the precuneus and Boston Naming Test (BNT) scores. There are significant metabolic decreases in the left mesial temporal regions and increases in the bi-frontal lobes; right parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes; right thalamus; cerebellum; and vermis in patients with left MTLE-HS who were rendered seizure-free after epilepsy surgery. We could not confirm that these changes translate into significant cognitive changes. A significant negative correlation was found between changes in confrontation naming and changes in metabolism in the precuneus. We speculate that the precuneus may play a compensatory role in patients with postoperative naming difficulties after left TLE surgery. Understanding of these neural mechanisms may aid in

  5. Age at onset in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis: impact on clinical manifestations and postsurgical outcome.

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    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the demographic and clinical manifestations and postsurgical outcome of childhood-onset mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy (MTS-TLE) and establishing the potential differences as compared to the patients with adult-onset MTS-TLE. In this retrospective study all patients with a clinical diagnosis of medically refractory TLE due to mesial temporal sclerosis, who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson comprehensive epilepsy center, were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups; seizure-free or relapsed. Clinical manifestations and outcome were compared between patients with childhood-onset MTS-TLE (i.e., age at onset of the first afebrile habitual seizure below 10 years) and those with adult-onset MTS-TLE (i.e., age at onset of the first afebrile habitual seizure 20 years or above). One hundred and twelve patients had childhood-onset MTS-TLE and 76 had adult-onset MTS-TLE. Demographic, clinical, EEG and MRI characteristics of these two groups were similar. Postoperative outcome was not statistically different between these two groups of patients (P=0.9). Temporal lobe epilepsy due to mesial temporal sclerosis is a common cause of epilepsy that can start from early childhood to late adulthood. The etiology of MTS-TLE may be different in various age groups, but it seems that when mesial temporal sclerosis is the pathological substrate of TLE, clinical manifestations and response to surgical treatment of patients are very similar in patients with childhood-onset MTS-TLE compared to those with adult-onset disease. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Automated volumetry of hippocampus is useful to confirm unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis in patients with radiologically positive findings.

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    Silva, Guilherme; Martins, Cristina; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Vieira, Duarte; Costa, Dias; Rego, Ricardo; Fonseca, José; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2017-08-01

    Background and purpose We evaluated two methods to identify mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS): visual inspection by experienced epilepsy neuroradiologists based on structural magnetic resonance imaging sequences and automated hippocampal volumetry provided by a processing pipeline based on the FMRIB Software Library. Methods This retrospective study included patients from the epilepsy monitoring unit database of our institution. All patients underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging in 1.5T and 3T scanners with protocols that included thin coronal T2, T1 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and isometric T1 acquisitions. Two neuroradiologists with experience in epilepsy and blinded to clinical data evaluated magnetic resonance images for the diagnosis of MTS. The diagnosis of MTS based on an automated method included the calculation of a volumetric asymmetry index between the two hippocampi of each patient and a threshold value to define the presence of MTS obtained through statistical tests (receiver operating characteristics curve). Hippocampi were segmented for volumetric quantification using the FIRST tool and fslstats from the FMRIB Software Library. Results The final cohort included 19 patients with unilateral MTS (14 left side): 14 women and a mean age of 43.4 ± 10.4 years. Neuroradiologists had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 73.3% to detect MTS (gold standard, k = 0.755). Automated hippocampal volumetry had a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity of 86.7% (k = 0.704). Combined, these methods had a sensitivity of 84.2% and a specificity of 100% (k = 0.825). Conclusions Automated volumetry of the hippocampus could play an important role in temporal lobe epilepsy evaluation, namely on confirmation of unilateral MTS diagnosis in patients with radiological suggestive findings.

  7. Remote infarct of the temporal lobe with coexistent hippocampal sclerosis in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Gales, Jordan M; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    In patients undergoing surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis remains the most commonly observed pathology. In addition to hippocampal sclerosis, 5% to 30% of these resections on magnetic resonance imaging contain a second independently epileptogenic lesion, commonly referred to as dual pathology. A second etiology of seizure activity, as seen in dual pathology, may serve as an important cause of treatment failure in striving for post-operative seizure control. Dual pathology, consisting of hippocampal sclerosis and a remote infarct of the adjacent cortex, has been rarely reported. Cases of pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis diagnosed between January 2000 and December 2012 (n = 349) were reviewed, and 7 cases of coexistent infarct (2%) formed the study group. Seven individuals (mean age, 29years; range, 5-47 years) with a mean epilepsy duration of 12.5years (3.3-25 years) and a mean pre-surgery frequency of 15 seizures per week (range, 0.5-56 seizures/week) were followed up postoperatively for a mean duration of 64months (range, 3-137 months). Pathologically, the most common form of hippocampal sclerosis observed was International League against Epilepsy type Ib or severe variant (n = 4). Four of the six individuals with post-surgery follow-up were seizure free at last encounter. The reported incidence of dual pathology, including hippocampal sclerosis and remote infarct, is low (2% in the present study) but may indicate a slightly increased risk of developing hippocampal sclerosis in the setting of a remote infarct. Surgical intervention for such cases anecdotally appears effective in achieving seizure control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A locus identified on chromosome18p11.31 is associated with hippocampal abnormalities in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Claudia Vianna Maurer-Morelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the region harboring a putative candidate gene associated with hippocampal abnormalities (HAb in a family with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Genome-wide scan was performed in one large kindred with MTLE using a total of 332 microsatellite markers at ~12cM intervals. An additional 13 markers were genotyped in the candidate region. Phenotypic classes were defined according to the presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or hyperintense hippocampal T2 signal detected on magnetic resonance imaging. We identified a significant positive LOD score on chromosome 18p11.31 with a Zmax of 3.12 at D18S452. Multipoint LOD scores and haplotype analyses localized the candidate locus within a 6cM interval flanked by D18S976 and D18S967. We present here evidence that HAb, which were previously related mainly to environmental risk factors, may be influenced by genetic predisposition. This finding may have major impact in the study of the mechanisms underlying abnormalities in mesial temporal lobe structures and their relationship with MTLE.

  9. Hippocampal atrophy on MRI is predictive of histopathological patterns and surgical prognosis in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Corso, Jeana Torres; Garcia, Maria Teresa Fernandes Castilho; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Comper, Sandra Mara; Lancellotti, Carmen Lúcia Penteado; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2016-12-01

    To correlate hippocampal volumes obtained from brain structural imaging with histopathological patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (HS), in order to predict surgical outcome. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with HS were selected. Clinical data were assessed pre-operatively and surgical outcome in the first year post surgery. One block of mid hippocampal body was selected for HS classification according to ILAE criteria. NeuN-immunoreactive cell bodies were counted within hippocampal subfields, in four randomly visual fields, and cell densities were transformed into z-score values. FreeSurfer processing of 1.5T brain structural images was used for subcortical and cortical volumetric estimation of the ipsilateral hippocampus. Univariate analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation test were applied for statistical analyses. Sixty-two cases (31 female, 32 right HS) were included. ILAE type 1 HS was identified in 48 patients, type 2 in eight, type 3 in two, and four had no-HS. Better results regarding seizure control, i.e. ILAE 1, were achieved by patients with type 1 HS (58.3%). Patients with types 1 and 2 had smaller hippocampal volumes compared to those with no-HS (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Positive correlation was encountered between hippocampal volumes and CA1, CA3, CA4, and total estimated neuronal densities. CA2 was the only sector which did not correlate its neuronal density with hippocampal volume (p=0.390). This is the first study correlating hippocampal volume on MRI submitted to FreeSurfer processing with ILAE patterns of HS and neuronal loss within each hippocampal subfield, a fundamental finding to anticipate surgical prognosis for patients with drug-resistant MTLE and HS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Declarative long-term memory and the mesial temporal lobe: Insights from a 5-year postsurgery follow-up study on refractory temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Salvato, Gerardo; Scarpa, Pina; Francione, Stefano; Mai, Roberto; Tassi, Laura; Scarano, Elisa; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Bottini, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    It is largely recognized that the mesial temporal lobe and its substructure support declarative long-term memory (LTM). So far, different theories have been suggested, and the organization of declarative verbal LTM in the brain is still a matter of debate. In the current study, we retrospectively selected 151 right-handed patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, with a homogeneous (seizure-free) clinical outcome. We analyzed verbal memory performance within a normalized scores context, by means of prose recall and word paired-associate learning tasks. Patients were tested at presurgical baseline, 6months, 2 and 5years after anteromesial temporal lobe surgery, using parallel versions of the neuropsychological tests. Our main finding revealed a key involvement of the left temporal lobe and, in particular, of the left hippocampus in prose recall rather than word paired-associate task. We also confirmed that shorter duration of epilepsy, younger age, and withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs would predict a better memory outcome. When individual memory performance was taken into account, data showed that females affected by left temporal lobe epilepsy for longer duration were more at risk of presenting a clinically pathologic LTM at 5years after surgery. Taken together, these findings shed new light on verbal declarative memory in the mesial temporal lobe and on the behavioral signature of the functional reorganization after the surgical treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unilateral mesial temporal atrophy after a systemic insult as a possible etiology of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy: case report Esclerose mesial temporal unilateral após insulto sistêmico como possível etiologia de epilepsia refratária do lobo temporal: relato de caso

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    Arthur Cukiert

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis is the main pathological substrate present in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and its presence is often related to the occurrence of febrile seizures in infancy. There is an on-going discussion on the nature of mesial temporal sclerosis as it related to epilepsy: cause or consequence. A previously normal child developed hyperosmolar coma after abdominal surgery at the age of 6. Three months afterwards he developed simple and complex partial seizures with an increasing frequency and refractory to multiple mono-and polytherapic drug regimens. He was evaluated for surgery at the age of 13. Ictal and interictal recordings showed left temporal lobe abnormalities. Early CT scaning suggested left temporal atrophy. MRI showed mesial temporal sclerosis. Neuropsichological testing showed verbal memory deficits and he passed a left carotid artery amytal injection. He was submitted to a cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy and has been seizure-free since then. The clinical data obtained from this patient suggest that at least in this case mesial temporal sclerosis would be related to the cause of epilepsy and not resultant from repeated seizure activity.A esclerose mesial temporal é o principal substrato anatomo-patológico envolvido na epilepsia refratária do lobo temporal e está frequentemente associada à ocorrência de convulsões febris na infância. Persiste até o momento intensa discussão se a esclerose mesial seria causa ou consequência da síndrome epiléptica. Uma criança previamente normal, desenvolveu coma hiperosmolar após intercorrência em cirurgia abdominal aos 6 anos de idade. Após 3 meses iniciaram-se crises parciais simples e complexas em frequência ascendente e refratárias a múltiplos esquemas terapêuticos em mono- e politerapia. Ele realizou investigação pré-operatória para epilepsia aos 13 anos de idade. Registros eletrencefalográficos de superfície ictais e interictais mostraram anormalidades

  12. Sign of the Cross (Signum Crucis): observation of an uncommon ictal manifestation of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Katia; Marx, Catherine; Caboclo, Luis O S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Sakamoto, Américo C; Yacubian, Elza M T

    2009-02-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the clinical characteristics and determine the lateralizing value of ictal Sign of the Cross (SC) as a complex hand automatism (CHA) in patients evaluated by video/EEG monitoring in a comprehensive epilepsy unit. We reviewed video/EEG data of 530 patients with epilepsy recorded in a tertiary epilepsy center from 2002 to 2008. Four patients were found to have manifested a CHA similar to the SC at least once during their complex partial seizures. All patients had unilateral right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) refractory to medical treatment. The limbic system is often suggested as the critical site of religious experience. Moreover, it may be localized predominantly to the temporal regions of the right hemisphere. However, this rare and peculiar ictal manifestation may be related not only to the neural substrate and personality characteristics of TLE, but also to the general religious convictions of Brazilians.

  13. Interictal SPECT in the pre surgical evaluation in epileptic patients with normal MRI or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Marques, Lucia H.N.; Ferraz-Filho, Jose R.L.; Lins-Filho, Mario L.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of interictal compared to ictal SPECT in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients that present with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Thirty patients with TLE, for whom MRI examinations were normal or who presented with bilateral MTS, were retrospectively studied. Using a confidence interval of 95% and a level of significance for p-value <0.05, an estimated agreement rate of 73% with a minimum agreement rate of 57% was calculated comparing interictal and ictal SPECTs. In conclusion the interictal SPECT is only useful when associated with the ictal SPECT and does not substitute it in the localization of epileptogenic areas in patients with normal MRI or bilateral MTS. (author)

  14. Interictal SPECT in the pre surgical evaluation in epileptic patients with normal MRI or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis

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    Marques, Lucia H.N. [Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia. Centro Cirurgico de Epilepsia; Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Ferraz-Filho, Jose R.L. [Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Lins-Filho, Mario L.M. [Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Maciel, Marina G.; Yoshitake, Rafael; Filetti, Sarah V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of interictal compared to ictal SPECT in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients that present with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Thirty patients with TLE, for whom MRI examinations were normal or who presented with bilateral MTS, were retrospectively studied. Using a confidence interval of 95% and a level of significance for p-value <0.05, an estimated agreement rate of 73% with a minimum agreement rate of 57% was calculated comparing interictal and ictal SPECTs. In conclusion the interictal SPECT is only useful when associated with the ictal SPECT and does not substitute it in the localization of epileptogenic areas in patients with normal MRI or bilateral MTS. (author)

  15. The role of histopathologic subtype in the setting of hippocampal sclerosis-associated mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Gales, Jordan M; Jehi, Lara; Nowacki, Amy; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are among the most common neuropathological findings in those undergoing surgery for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Existing data regarding differences among the most recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) HS subtypes remain limited. This study sought to characterize the roles of HS subtype and coexistent FCD. Epilepsy surgery pathologic specimens in 307 cases of temporal lobe epilepsy with HS were reviewed (mean age±SD, 37±15years; 56% women). HS and coexistent FCD were classified according to ILAE guidelines. Medical records were reviewed for data on seizure recurrence and seizure burden (clinical follow-up mean duration ± SD, 5±4years). Cases of typical HS (ILAE type I) predominated (ILAE type Ia: 41%, Ib: 47%, II: 11%, and III: 0.7%]. The HS subtypes shared similar demographic and etiologic characteristics, as well as associated pathology and postoperative seizure outcomes. Individuals with type Ib HS were more likely to remain seizure free at long-term follow-up when compared with other subtypes, and they had a later age of seizure onset. Two hundred forty-three cases (79%) demonstrated FCD within the adjacent temporal lobe. Its presence was associated with a significantly decreased risk of seizure recurrence (P=.02). When present, FCD was predominantly type I (98%). HS subtype does not appear to affect epilepsy surgery outcomes despite some clinical differences between the subgroups. FCD is often observed in association with HS in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy; the finding of FCD was associated with better postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Linkage study of voltage-gated potassium channels in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy Análise de ligação dos canais de potássio voltagem-dependente na epilepsia de lobo temporal mesial familiar

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    Cláudia Vianna Maurer-Morelli

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs play a critical role in the regulation of neuronal excitability and have been implicated in some types of epilepsies. Recently, autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE was associated with antibodies against VGKC. In addition, patients with LE showed partial epilepsy and increased T2 signal abnormalities in limbic structures. We have reported familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (FMTLE associated with hippocampal atrophy (HA and other signs of mesial temporal sclerosis detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In order to investigate whether VGKC may be associated to HA present in FMTLE, we perform linkage study in these candidate genes. Seventy-three microsatellites markers were genotyped in different human autosomal chromosome. Two-point LOD scores did not show evidence for linkage with any of the microsatellite markers genotyped (Zmax ranging from 0.11to-9.53 at theta=0.00. In the present study, linkage data showed no evidence that VGKC are involved in the determination of HA in FMTLE.Canais de potássio voltagem-dependentes (CPVD desempenham importante papel na excitabilidade neuronal e estão associados a determinados tipos de epilepsia. Recentemente, um tipo de encefalite límbica autoimune (EL foi associado com anticorpos contra CPVD. Além disso, há relatos de pacientes com EL e epilepsia parcial, além de hipersinal em regiões límbicas detectadas em imagens de ressonância magnética (IRM. Nós temos descrito a epilepsia de lobo temporal mesial familial (ELTMF associada à atrofia hipocampal (AH e outros sinais de esclerose mesial temporal observadas em IRM. Para investigar se os CPVD podem estar associados com a AH identificada na ELTMF, empregamos o estudo de ligação genética nesses genes candidatos. Setenta e três marcadores microssatélites foram genotipados e o LOD score de dois pontos mostrou Zmax variando de 0.11 a -9.53 para teta=0.00. No presente estudo, os dados obtidos com a an

  17. Facial paresis in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis: clinical and quantitative MRI-based evidence of widespread disease.

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    Lin, Katia; Carrete, Henrique; Lin, Jaime; de Oliveira, Pedro Alessandro Leite; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2007-08-01

    To assess the frequency and significance of facial paresis (FP) in a well-defined cohort of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients. One hundred consecutive patients with MRI findings consistent with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and concordant electroclinical data underwent facial motor examination at rest, with voluntary expression, and with spontaneous smiling. Hippocampal, amygdaloid, and temporopolar (TP) volumetric measures were acquired. Thirty healthy subjects, matched according to age and sex, were taken as controls. Central-type FP was found in 46 patients. In 41 (89%) of 46, it was visualized at rest, with voluntary and emotional expression characterizing true facial motor paresis. In 33 (72%) of 46 patients, FP was contralateral to the side of MTS. By using a 2-SD cutoff from the mean of normal controls, we found reduction in TP volume ipsilateral to MTS in 61% of patients with FP and in 33% of those without (p = 0.01). Febrile seizures as initial precipitating injury (IPI) were observed in 34% of the patients and were classified as complex in 12 (26%) of 46 of those with FP and in five (9%) of 54 of those without (p = 0.02). The presence of FP was significantly associated with a shorter latent period and younger age at onset of habitual seizures, in particular, with secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Facial paresis is a reliable lateralizing sign in MTLE and was associated with history of complex febrile seizures as IPI, younger age at onset of disease, and atrophy of temporal pole ipsilateral to MTS, indicating more widespread disease.

  18. Application of T2 relaxometry in lateralization and localization of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and corresponding comparison with MR volumetry.

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    Chen, Hui; Yu, Guilian; Wang, Jiangtao; Li, Feng; Li, Guangming

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry is insensitive to subtle mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), while T2 relaxometry is potential useful in detecting MTS, especially MTS in early course. To explore and compare the feasibility of T2 relaxometry and MR volumetry in evaluation of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and lateralization of the epileptogenic zone, so as to optimize and enhance lesion depiction. For the 17 unilateral MTLE patients and 14 normal participants, the hippocampus and amygdala were contoured on axial T2-weighted (T2W) images and then co-registered onto T2 relaxation maps. Abnormal is defined as an elevated asymmetric ratio of larger than 2 SD. Visual and quantitative volumetric assessment were combined as outcomes of MR volumetry to distinguish MR-positive and MR-negative lesions. Operative and pathological findings were used as gold standard. T2 values of lesions were significantly elevated. In lateralizing the epileptogenic zones, T2 relaxometry yielded an overall accuracy of 94.1% (sensitivity 92.6%, specificity 100%), and MR volumetry yielded an overall accuracy of 82.4% (sensitivity 88.9%, specificity 57.1%), meaning a better performance of T2 relaxometry (P volumetry. MR volumetry wrongly discerned three normal regions as MTS, while one MR-negative sclerotic hippocampus was detected by T2 relaxometry. T2 relaxometry is feasible in non-invasive lateralization of epileptogenic zone, and more advantaged than MR volumetry in detecting MR-negative lesions, facilitating prompt diagnosis and longitudinal disease monitoring. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  19. Functional substrate for memory function differences between patients with left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the functional substrate for memory function differences in patients with left or right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) from an electrophysiological perspective. To characterize these differences, we hypothesized that hippocampal theta connectivity in the resting-state might be different between patients with left and right mTLE with HS and be correlated with memory performance. Resting-state hippocampal theta connectivity, identified via whole-brain magnetoencephalography, was evaluated. Connectivity and memory function in 41 patients with mTLE with HS (left mTLE=22; right mTLE=19) were compared with those in 46 age-matched healthy controls and 28 patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) but without HS. Connectivity between the right hippocampus and the left middle frontal gyrus was significantly stronger in patients with right mTLE than in patients with left mTLE. Moreover, this connectivity was positively correlated with delayed verbal recall and recognition scores in patients with mTLE. Patients with left mTLE had greater delayed recall impairment than patients with right mTLE and FCD. Similarly, delayed recognition performance was worse in patients with left mTLE than in patients with right mTLE and FCD. No significant differences in memory function between patients with right mTLE and FCD were detected. Patients with right mTLE showed significantly stronger hippocampal theta connectivity between the right hippocampus and left middle frontal gyrus than patients with FCD and left mTLE. Our results suggest that right hippocampal-left middle frontal theta connectivity could be a functional substrate that can account for differences in memory function between patients with left and right mTLE. This functional substrate might be related to different compensatory mechanisms against the structural hippocampal lesions in left and right mTLE groups. Given the positive correlation between

  20. Can intraoperative electrocorticography patterns predict surgical outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy secondary to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis?

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    Oliveira, Pedro A L; Garzon, Eliana; Caboclo, Luís O S F; Sousa, Patrícia S; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo S; Costa, José M P; Machado, Hélio R; Yacubian, Elza M T; Bianchin, Marino M; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2006-10-01

    Intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) can be performed in cases of temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). However, its significance and correlation with surgical outcome are still controversial. To analyze the electrophysiological characteristics of temporal lobe structures during ECoG of patients with TLE-HS, with emphasis on the comparison between pre- and post-resection recordings and surgical outcome. Seventeen patients with refractory TLE-HS submitted to corticoamigdalohipocampectomy were included in the study. Clinical variables included age at the onset, duration of epilepsy and seizure outcome. The post-operative follow-up ranged from 24 to 36 months. According to outcome subjects were divided in two subgroups: (A) individuals free of seizures (Engel 1A), and (B) individuals not-free of seizures (Engel 1B-IV). Four patterns of ECoG findings were identified: isolated discharges; high frequency spikes (HFS); continuous discharges; combination of isolated discharges and HFS. According to predominant topography ECoG was classified as mediobasal, lateral (or neocortical), mediobasal and lateral. The progressive removal of the temporal pole and the hippocampus was associated with significant decrease of neocortical spikes. No correlation between clinical variables and seizure outcome was observed. Patients who only had isolated spikes on intraoperative ECoG presented a statistical trend for excellent surgical control. Patients who presented temporal pole blurring on MRI also had better post-surgical seizure outcome. This study showed that out of diverse clinical and laboratory variables, only isolated discharges on intraoperative ECoG and temporal pole blurring on MRI predicted excellent post-surgical seizure outcome. However, other studies with larger number of patients are still necessary to confirm these findings.

  1. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion on ictal Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT: clinical significance for differentiation of mesial or lateral temporal lobe epilepsy and related factors for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soon Ah; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Gun; Kim, Seok Ki; Jang, Myoung Jin; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion (CCH) was helpful in discriminating mesial from lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and what other factors were related in the development of CCH on ictal brain SPECT. We conducted retrospective analysis in 59 patients with TLE (M:41, F:18; 27.4±7.8 years old; mesial TLE: 51, lateral TLE: 8), which was confirmed by invasive EEG and surgical outcome (Engel class 1, 2). All the patients underwent ictal Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT and their injection time from ictal EEG onset on video EEG monitoring ranged from 11 sec to 75 sec (32.6±19.5 sec) in 39 patients. Multiple factors including age, TLE subtype (mesial TLE or lateral TLE), propatation pattern (hyperperfusion localized to temporal lobes, spread to adjacent lobes or contralateral hemisphere) and injection time were evaluated for their relationship with CCH using multiple logistic regression analysis CCH was observed in 18 among 59 patients. CCH developed in 29% (15/51) of mesial TLE patients and 38% (3/8) of lateral TLE patients. CCH was associated with propagation pattern; no CCH (0/13) in patients with hyperperfusion localized to temporal lobe, 30% (7/23) in patients with propagation to adjacent lobes, 48% (11/23) to contralateral hemisphere. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that propagation pattern (p=3D0.01) and age (p=3D0.02) were related to the development of CCH. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in ictal brain SPECT did not help differentiate mesial from lateral remporal lobe epilepsy. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion was associated with propagation pattern of temporal lobe epilepsy and age.=20

  2. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion on ictal Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT: clinical significance for differentiation of mesial or lateral temporal lobe epilepsy and related factors for development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae [Chonbuk National Univ. School of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Gun; Kim, Seok Ki; Jang, Myoung Jin; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion (CCH) was helpful in discriminating mesial from lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and what other factors were related in the development of CCH on ictal brain SPECT. We conducted retrospective analysis in 59 patients with TLE (M:41, F:18; 27.4{+-}7.8 years old; mesial TLE: 51, lateral TLE: 8), which was confirmed by invasive EEG and surgical outcome (Engel class 1, 2). All the patients underwent ictal Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT and their injection time from ictal EEG onset on video EEG monitoring ranged from 11 sec to 75 sec (32.6{+-}19.5 sec) in 39 patients. Multiple factors including age, TLE subtype (mesial TLE or lateral TLE), propatation pattern (hyperperfusion localized to temporal lobes, spread to adjacent lobes or contralateral hemisphere) and injection time were evaluated for their relationship with CCH using multiple logistic regression analysis CCH was observed in 18 among 59 patients. CCH developed in 29% (15/51) of mesial TLE patients and 38% (3/8) of lateral TLE patients. CCH was associated with propagation pattern; no CCH (0/13) in patients with hyperperfusion localized to temporal lobe, 30% (7/23) in patients with propagation to adjacent lobes, 48% (11/23) to contralateral hemisphere. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that propagation pattern (p=3D0.01) and age (p=3D0.02) were related to the development of CCH. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion in ictal brain SPECT did not help differentiate mesial from lateral remporal lobe epilepsy. Crossed cerebellar hyperperfusion was associated with propagation pattern of temporal lobe epilepsy and age.

  3. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Carrete, Henrique; Higa, Elisa Mieko Suemitsu; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Castro Neto, Eduardo Ferreira de; Canzian, Mauro; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2011-02-01

    We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO) levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10) were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) -MTS group (p<0.001), suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05) demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  4. Historical Risk Factors Associated with Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the possible influence of risk factors on seizure outcome after surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). This retrospective study recruited patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and were followed for a minimum of 1 year. Patients had been prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. After surgery outcome was classified into 2 groups: seizure-free or relapsed. The possible risk factors influencing long-term outcome after surgery were investigated. A total of 275 patients with MTS-TLE were studied. Two thirds of the patients had Engel's class 1 outcome and 48.4% of the patients had sustained seizure freedom, with no seizures since surgery. Patients with a history of tonic-clonic seizures in the year preceding surgery were more likely to experience seizure recurrence (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval 1.19-4.80; P = 0.01). Gender, race, family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizure, history of status epilepticus, duration of disease before surgery, intelligence quotient, and seizure frequency were not predictors of outcome. Many patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE respond favorably to surgery. It is critical to distinguish among different types and etiologies of TLE when predicting outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term outcome characteristics in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without associated cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeiser, B; Hammen, T; Steinhoff, B J; Zentner, J; Schulze-Bonhage, A

    2016-10-01

    patients of group B ipsilateral temporal seizure onset and strictly unilateral IEDs in EEG as well as complete resection were predictors for favorable seizure outcome. Furthermore, absence of early postoperative seizures and of spikes in EEG were predictive factors for long-term seizure-freedom in both subgroups. The running down phenomenon was found in 33 (7.2%) patients. None of the parameters evaluated demonstrated significant predictive power. Only late seizure onset and neoplastic lesions showed a trend for postoperative gradual seizure reduction in multivariate analyses. Depending on the presence or absence of focal cortical dysplasia in addition to mesiotemporal structural alterations, predictors of long-term seizure control differed regarding the relevant clinical and electrophysiological features. This is important for specific patient counseling in respective groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Decline in word-finding: The objective cognitive finding most relevant to patients after mesial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carla; de Oliveira Thais, Maria Emilia Rodrigues; Guarnieri, Ricardo; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Ben, Juliana; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Markowitsch, Hans Joachim; Wolf, Peter; Wiebe, Samuel; Lin, Katia; Walz, Roger

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the following: i) the objective impairment in neuropsychological tests that were associated with the subjective perception of cognitive function decline in Brazilian patients who underwent mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) surgery and ii) the predictive variables for those impaired objective neuropsychological tests. Forty-eight adults with MTLE (27 right HS and 23 male) were divided according to their perception of changes (Decline or No-decline) of cognitive function domain of the QOLIE-31 questionnaire applied before and 1year after the ATL. The mean (SD) of changes in the raw score difference of the neuropsychological tests before and after the ATL was compared between Decline and No-decline groups. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were used to assess the optimum cutoff points of neuropsychological test score changes to predict patient-reported subjective cognitive decline. Six (12.5%) patients reported a perception of cognitive function decline after ATL. Among the 25 cognitive tests analyzed, only changes in the Boston Naming Test (BNT) were associated with subjective cognitive decline reported by patients. A reduction of ≥8 points in the raw score of BNT after surgery had 91% of sensitivity and 45% specificity for predicting subjective perception of cognitive function decline by the patient. Left side surgery and age older than 40years were more associated with an important BNT reduction with overall accuracy of 91.7%, 95% predictive ability for no impairment, and 75% for impairment of cognitive function. Impairment in word-finding seems to be the objective cognitive finding most relevant to Brazilian patients after mesial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Similar to American patients, the side of surgery and age are good predictors for no decline in the BNT, but shows a lower accuracy to predict its decline. If replicated in other populations, the

  7. Trans-middle temporal gyrus selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in adults: seizure response rates, complications, and neuropsychological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandt, S Kathleen; Werner, Nicole; Dines, Jennifer; Rashid, Samiya; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Hogan, R Edward; Leuthardt, Eric C; Dowling, Joshua

    2013-07-01

    Selective amygdalohippocampectomy (AHC) has evolved to encompass a variety of techniques to resect the mesial temporal lobe. To date, there have been few large-scale evaluations of trans-middle temporal gyrus selective AHC. The authors examine a large series of patients who have undergone the trans-middle temporal gyrus AHC and assess its clinical and neuropsychological impact. A series of 76 adult patients underwent selective AHC via the trans-middle temporal gyrus approach over a 10-year period, 19 of whom underwent pre- and postoperative neuropsychological evaluations. Favorable seizure response rates were achieved (92% Engel class I or II), with very low surgical morbidity and no mortality. Postoperative neuropsychological assessment revealed a decline in verbal memory for the left AHC group. No postoperative memory decline was identified for the right AHC group, but rather some improvements were noted within this group. The trans-middle temporal gyrus selective AHC is a safe and effective choice for management of medically refractory epilepsy in adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Different Surgical Approaches for Mesial Temporal Epilepsy: Resection Extent, Seizure, and Neuropsychological Outcomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Liščák, R.; Šroubek, J.; Lukavský, Jiří; Druga, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 6 (2014), s. 372-380 ISSN 1011-6125 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : temporal lobe epilepsy * stereotactic surgery * neuropsychology outcome Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 2.019, year: 2014

  9. Major vault protein (MVP) gene polymorphisms and drug resistance in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Radhab, Saradalekshmi Koramannil; Radha, Koramannil; Sathyan, Sanish; Vijai, Joseph; Banerjee, Moinak; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath

    2013-09-10

    The human major vault protein (MVP) has been implicated in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Over expression of MVP has also been reported in brain tissue samples from antiepileptic drug (AED)-resistant human focal epilepsies. To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involving the MVP gene and AED-resistance, we compared the distribution of three SNPs in the MVP gene, rs4788187, rs3815824 and rs3815823, among 220 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype of AED-resistant epilepsy syndrome), 201 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype of AED-responsive epilepsy syndrome) and 213 ethnically matched non-epilepsy controls. All the patients and controls were residents of the South Indian state of Kerala for more than three generations. We did not find any significant difference in allele and genotypic frequencies of the studied SNPs between AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts, and between AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts independently and pooled together when compared with the controls. We conclude that rs4788187, rs3815824, rs3815823 variants of the MVP gene are associated neither with predisposition for epilepsy nor with AED-resistance in the population that we have studied. Our results suggest the need for further research into the link between MVP and AED-resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ripples on spikes show increased phase-amplitude coupling in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy seizure onset zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shennan A; Orosz, Iren; Salamon, Noriko; Moy, Stephanie; Wei, Linqing; Van ’t Klooster, Maryse A; Knight, Robert T; Harper, Ronald M; Bragin, Anatol; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ripples (80–150 Hz) recorded from clinical macroelectrodes have been shown to be an accurate biomarker of epileptogenic brain tissue. We investigated coupling between epileptiform spike phase and ripple amplitude to better understand the mechanisms that generate this type of pathological ripple (pRipple) event. Methods We quantified phase amplitude coupling (PAC) between epileptiform EEG spike phase and ripple amplitude recorded from intracranial depth macroelectrodes during episodes of sleep in 12 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. PAC was determined by 1) a phasor transform that corresponds to the strength and rate of ripples coupled with spikes, and a 2) ripple-triggered average to measure the strength, morphology, and spectral frequency of the modulating and modulated signals. Coupling strength was evaluated in relation to recording sites within and outside the seizure onset zone (SOZ). Results Both the phasor transform and ripple-triggered averaging methods showed ripple amplitude was often robustly coupled with epileptiform EEG spike phase. Coupling was more regularly found inside than outside the SOZ, and coupling strength correlated with the likelihood a macroelectrode’s location was within the SOZ (pripples coupled with EEG spikes inside the SOZ to rates of coupled ripples in non-SOZ was greater than the ratio of rates of ripples on spikes detected irrespective of coupling (pripple amplitude (pripple spectral frequency (pripple amplitude. The changes in excitability reflected as epileptiform spikes may also cause clusters of pathologically interconnected bursting neurons to grow and synchronize into aberrantly large neuronal assemblies. PMID:27723936

  11. Five-Year Neuropsychological Outcome after Stereotactic Radiofrequency Amygdalohippocampectomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Longitudinal Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Lukavský, Jiří; Stará, M.; Malíková, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 3 (2017), s. 149-157 ISSN 1011-6125 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : Cognitive outcome * Memory * Temporal lobe epilepsy * Stereotactic surgery Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 1.692, year: 2016

  12. Clinical value of scatter correction for interictal brain 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Catasus, C.; Morales, L.; Aguila, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: It is well known that some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) show normal perfusion during interictal SPECT study. The aim of this research was to evaluate if the scatter radiation has some influence on this kind of result. Materials and Methods: We studied 15 patients with TLE by clinical diagnosis and by video-EEG monitoring with surface electrodes (11 left TLE, 4 right TLE), which showed normal perfusion during interictal brain 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT. The SPECT data were reconstructed by filtered backprojection without scatter correction (A). The same SPECT data were reconstructed after the projections were corrected by dual energy window method of scatter correction (B). Attenuation was corrected in all cases using first order Chang Method. For A and B images groups, cerebellum perfusion ratios were calculated on irregular regions of interest (ROI) drawn on anterior (ATL), lateral (LTL), mesial (MTL) and whole temporal lobe (WTL). To evaluate the influence of scatter radiation, the cerebellum perfusion ratios of each subject were compared with a normal database of 10 normal subjects, with and without scatter correction, using z-score analysis. Results: In group A, the z-score was less than 2 in all cases. In group B, the z-score was more than 2 in 6 cases, 4 in MTL (3 left, 1 right) and 2 in left LTL, which were coincident with the EEG localization. All images of group B showed better contrast than images of group A. Conclusions: These results suggest that scatter correction could improve the sensitivity of interictal brain SPECT to identify epileptic focus in patients with TLE

  13. Clinical and electrophysiological findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, based on the recent histopathological classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, F Irsel; Xasiyev, Farid; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Bilginer, Burcak; Oguz, Kader Karli; Saygi, Serap

    2016-11-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is a common pathology in MTLE, patients may show different surgical outcomes and clinical features. The 2013 ILAE classification subdivides HS into 3 types (HS type 1: severe neuronal loss and gliosis predominantly in CA1 and CA4 regions; - HS type 2: CA1 predominant; HS type 3: CA4 predominant) and includes "gliosis only, as no-HS". The association of clinical and electrophysiological findings with different HS types has not been reported previously in detail. 48 patients who had undergone temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy due to mesial TLE-HS between February 2014 and February 2016 were included. The patients were divided into five groups: patients with HS ILAE type 1, HS ILAE type 2, HS ILAE type 3, FCD type IIIa, or gliosis/no HS. The correlation between HS ILAE types and clinical/EEG findings in patients with MTLE due to HS was investigated. Of the 48 patients 30 were male. In 23 patients, the resection was on the left side (48%). Three patients had only gliosis, 25 patients had HS ILAE type 1, 7 had HS ILAE type 2, and 4 had HS ILAE type 3. Nine of the 48 patients had cortical lamination abnormalities in the temporal lobe associated with HS (FCD type IIIa). All patients were seizure free for early follow up. There was no association between type of HS in terms of duration of epilepsy, onset age of epilepsy, lateralized or localized semiological findings, or interictal/ictal EEG findings. Family history of epilepsy or SGTCSs were statistically more frequent in patients with types 2 and 3 HS and status epilepticus was more frequent in patients with HS-FCD type IIIa. The patients with HS types 2 and 3 have more frequent SGTCS or status epilepticus as well as increased family history of epilepsy. These findings can be helpful in understanding the epileptogenicity-prognoses of HS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cavernomas de la región temporal mesial: Anatomía microquirúrgica y abordajes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campero, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Describir la anatomía microquirúrgica y los abordajes a la región temporal mesial (RTM), en relación a cavernomas de dicho sector. Materiales y Método: Cinco cabezas de cadáveres adultos, fijadas en formol e inyectadas con silicona coloreada, fueron estudiadas. Además, desde enero de 2007 a junio de 2014, 7 pacientes con cavernomas localizados en la RTM fueron operados por el autor. Resultados: Anatomia: La RTM fue dividida en 3 sectores: Anterior, medio y posterior. Pacientes: 7 enfermos con cavernomas de la RTM fueron operados por el autor. De acuerdo a la ubicacion en la RTM, 4 cavernomas se ubicaron en el sector anterior, 2 cavernomas se localizaron en el sector medio y 1 cavernoma se ubico en el sector posterior. Para el sector anterior de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje transsilviano-transinsular; para el sector medio de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje transtemporal (lobectomia temporal anterior); y para el sector posterior de la RTM se utilizo un abordaje supracerebeloso-transtentorial. Conclusión: Dividir la RTM en 3 sectores nos permite adecuar el abordaje en función a la localización de la lesión. Así, el sector anterior es bien abordable a través de la fisura silviana; el sector medio a través de una vía transtemporal; y el sector posterior por un abordaje supracerebeloso. PMID:26600986

  15. Correlation between temporal pole MRI abnormalities and surface ictal EEG patterns in patients with unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Garzon, Eliana; Oliveira, Pedro A L; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo S; Bianchin, Marino M; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study is to analyze ictal patterns observed during continuous Video-EEG monitoring in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS), and to correlate these EEG patterns to temporal pole abnormalities observed on magnetic resonance imaging exams. We analyzed 147 seizures from 35 patients with TLE and unilateral HS. Ictal patterns were classified and correlated to signal abnormalities and volumetric measures of the temporal poles. Volume differences over 10% were considered abnormal. The most frequent type of ictal pattern was rhythmic theta activity (RTA), encountered in 65.5% of the seizures. Rhythmic beta activity (RBA) was observed in 11% of the seizures, localized attenuation in 8%, interruption of epileptiform discharges in 6%, repetitive discharges in 5.5%, and rhythmic delta activity (RDA) in 4%. Sixty-six percent of the patients presented signal abnormalities in the temporal pole that were always ipsilateral to the HS. Sixty percent presented significant asymmetry of the temporal poles consisting of reduced volume that was also always ipsilateral to HS. Although patients with RTA as the predominant ictal pattern tended to present asymmetry of temporal poles (p=0.305), the ictal EEG pattern did not correlate with temporal pole asymmetry or signal abnormalities. RTA is the most frequent initial ictal pattern in patients with TLE due to unilateral HS. Temporal pole signal changes and volumetric reduction were commonly found in this group of patients, both abnormalities appearing always ipsilateral to the HS. However, neither temporal pole volume reduction nor signal abnormalities correlated with the predominant ictal pattern, suggesting that the temporal poles are not crucially involved in the process of epileptogenesis.

  16. Social cognition in neuropsychiatric populations: a comparison of theory of mind in schizophrenia and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okruszek, Łukasz; Bala, Aleksandra; Wordecha, Małgorzata; Jarkiewicz, Michał; Wysokiński, Adam; Szczepocka, Ewa; Piejka, Aleksandra; Zaborowska, Oliwia; Szantroch, Marta; Rysz, Andrzej; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-03-28

    Social cognition deficits are observed both in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) and in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This may be due to dysfunction of the amygdala network, which is a common feature of both diseases. In this study, SCZ (n = 48) or MTLE (n = 31) and healthy controls (HC, n = 47) completed assessments of mentalising (Reading Mind in the Eyes Test, RMET) and basic cognitive processing, e.g., working memory, executive functions and psychomotor speed (Trail-Making Test B and Digit Symbol). SCZ were also assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). We found that the RMET scores of the two clinical groups were similar (p > 0.05) and lower than in the HCs (SCZ: p < 0.05; MTLE: p < 0.001). In the next step, SCZ were split into two groups with respect to the level of symptoms. Analysis of the RMET scores revealed no differences between the HC (M = 25.7 ± 4.1) and POS-LO (M = 25.3 ± 4.8); both groups outperformed the POS-HI group (M = 21.3 ± 5.2) and the MTLE group (M = 20.8 ± 4.6). No differences were found for the median-split with regard to negative symptoms. In SCZ, the mind-reading deficit appears to be associated with the level of positive symptoms. Both POS-HI and MTLE patients present significant mentalising deficits compared to healthy controls.

  17. Features of amygdala in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis: An MRI volumetric and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoko; Masuda, Hiroshi; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Ito, Yosuke; Higashijima, Takefumi; Kitaura, Hiroki; Fujii, Yukihiko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    It is well-known that there is a correlation between the neuropathological grade of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and neuroradiological atrophy of the hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients. However, there is no strict definition or criterion regarding neuron loss and atrophy of the amygdala neighboring the hippocampus. We examined the relationship between HS and neuronal loss in the amygdala. Nineteen mTLE patients with neuropathological proof of HS were assigned to Group A, while seven mTLE patients without HS were assigned to Group B. We used FreeSurfer software to measure amygdala volume automatically based on pre-operation magnetic resonance images. Neurons observed using Klüver-Barrera (KB) staining in resected amygdala tissue were counted. and the extent of immunostaining with stress marker antibodies was semiquantitatively evaluated. There was no significant difference in amygdala volume between the two groups (Group A: 1.41±0.24; Group B: 1.41±0.29cm 3 ; p=0.98), nor in the neuron cellularity of resected amygdala specimens (Group A: 3.98±0.97; Group B: 3.67±0.67 10× -4 number of neurons/μm 2 ; p=0.40). However, the HSP70 level, representing acute stress against epilepsy, in Group A patients was significantly larger than that in Group B. There was no significant difference in the level of Bcl-2, which is known as a protein that inhibits cell death, between the two groups. Neuronal loss and volume loss in the amygdala may not necessarily follow hippocampal sclerosis. From the analysis of stress proteins, epileptic attacks are as likely to damage the amygdala as the hippocampus but do not lead to neuronal death in the amygdala. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of hippocampal subfield histopathology in episodic memory impairment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comper, Sandra Mara; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Corso, Jeana Torres; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Noffs, Maria Helena Silva; Lancellotti, Carmen Lúcia Penteado; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze preoperative visual and verbal episodic memories in a homogeneous series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) submitted to corticoamygdalohippocampectomy and its association with neuronal cell density of each hippocampal subfield. The hippocampi of 72 right-handed patients were collected and prepared for histopathological examination. Hippocampal sclerosis patterns were determined, and neuronal cell density was calculated. Preoperatively, two verbal and two visual memory tests (immediate and delayed recalls) were applied, and patients were divided into two groups, left and right MTLE (36/36). There were no statistical differences between groups regarding demographic and clinical data. Cornu Ammonis 4 (CA4) neuronal density was significantly lower in the right hippocampus compared with the left (p=0.048). The groups with HS presented different memory performance - the right HS were worse in visual memory test [Complex Rey Figure, immediate (p=0.001) and delayed (p=0.009)], but better in one verbal task [RAVLT delayed (p=0.005)]. Multiple regression analysis suggested that the verbal memory performance of the group with left HS was explained by CA1 neuronal density since both tasks were significantly influenced by CA1 [Logical Memory immediate recall (p=0.050) and Logical Memory and RAVLT delayed recalls (p=0.004 and p=0.001, respectively)]. For patients with right HS, both CA1 subfield integrity (p=0.006) and epilepsy duration (p=0.012) explained Complex Rey Figure immediate recall performance. Ultimately, epilepsy duration also explained the performance in the Complex Rey Figure delayed recall (pepilepsy duration were associated with visual memory performance in patients with right HS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MicroRNA hsa-miR-134 is a circulating biomarker for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoni H Avansini

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is misdiagnosed in up to 25% of patients, leading to serious and long-lasting consequences. Recently, circulating microRNAs have emerged as potential biomarkers in a number of clinical scenarios. The purpose of this study was to identify and to validate circulating microRNAs that could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure plasma levels of three candidate microRNAs in two phases of study: an initial discovery phase with 14 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, 13 with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and 16 controls; and a validation cohort constituted of an independent cohort of 65 patients with MTLE and 83 controls. We found hsa-miR-134 downregulated in patients with MTLE (p = 0.018 but not in patients with FCD, when compared to controls. Furthermore, hsa-miR-134 expression could be used to discriminate MTLE patients with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.75. To further assess the robustness of hsa-miR-134 as a biomarker for MTLE, we studied an independent cohort of 65 patients with MTLE, 27 of whom MTLE patients were responsive to pharmacotherapy, and 38 patients were pharmacoresistant and 83 controls. We confirmed that hsa-miR-134 was significantly downregulated in the plasma of patients with MTLE when compared with controls (p < 0.001. In addition, hsa-miR-134 identified patients with MTLE regardless of their response to pharmacotherapy or the presence of MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis. We revealed that decreased expression of hsa-miR-134 could be a potential non-invasive biomarker to support the diagnosis of patients with MTLE.

  20. Validation of suitable reference genes for expression studies in different pilocarpine-induced models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Ewellyn Batista Sales Marques

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that the reference gene in a RT-qPCR should be properly validated to ensure that gene expression is unaffected by the experimental condition. We investigated eight potential reference genes in two different pilocarpine PILO-models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE performing a stability expression analysis using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKepeer softwares. Then, as a validation strategy, we conducted a relative expression analysis of the Gfap gene. Our results indicate that in the systemic PILO-model Actb, Gapdh, Rplp1, Tubb2a and Polr1a mRNAs were highly stable in hippocampus of rats from all experimental and control groups, whereas Gusb revealed to be the most variable one. In fact, we observed that using Gusb for normalization, the relative mRNA levels of the Gfap gene differed from those obtained with stable genes. On the contrary, in the intrahippocampal PILO-model, all softwares included Gusb as a stable gene, whereas B2m was indicated as the worst candidate gene. The results obtained for the other reference genes were comparable to those observed for the systemic Pilo-model. The validation of these data by the analysis of the relative expression of Gfap showed that the upregulation of the Gfap gene in the hippocampus of rats sacrificed 24 hours after status epilepticus (SE was undetected only when B2m was used as the normalizer. These findings emphasize that a gene that is stable in one pathology model may not be stable in a different experimental condition related to the same pathology and therefore, the choice of reference genes depends on study design.

  1. Relationship between fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR signal intensity and inflammatory mediator's levels in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos Varella

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a relationship between the FLAIR signal found in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and inflammation. Twenty nine patients were selected through clinical and MRI analysis and submitted to cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy to seizure control. Glutamate, TNFα, IL1, nitric oxide (NO levels and immunostaining against IL1β and CD45 was performed. Control tissues (n=10 were obtained after autopsy of patients without neurological disorders. The glutamate was decreased in the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE -MTS group (p<0.001, suggesting increased release of this neurotransmitter. The IL1β and TNFα were increased in the hippocampus (p<0.05 demonstrating an active inflammatory process. A positive linear correlation between FLAIR signal and NO and IL1β levels and a negative linear correlation between FLAIR signal and glutamate concentration was found. Lymphocytes infiltrates were present in hippocampi of TLE patients. These data showed an association between hippocampal signal alteration and increased inflammatory markers in TLE-MTS.

  2. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies treated with Gamma knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Cell Therapy and Tissue Repair, V Uvalu 84, 150 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Liscak, Roman; Vymazal, Josef; Vladyka, Vilibald [Department of Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Hospital Na Homolce, 151 19, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2003-05-01

    Proton MR spectroscopy was used to observe long-term post-irradiation metabolic changes in epileptogenic tissue and in the contralateral parts of the brain which are not available with conventional imaging methods. We studied these changes in the temporal lobe in six patients, following radiosurgery on the amygdala and hippocampus. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T with short and long echo times (TE=10 and 135 ms) were used together with standard MR imaging sequences (T1-, T2-weighted). The treatment was performed by Leksell Gamma Knife with a dose of 50 Gy to the center and a 50% isodose to the margin of the target, represented by the mean volume of approximately 7.5 ml. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR spectroscopy examinations were performed at least once per year for 3 years. The most significant changes in spectra were observed approximately 1 year after the irradiation when edema in irradiated area was observed and strong signal of lipids was identified. Later, edema and lipid signals disappeared and follow-up was characterized by a decrease of NAA, Cr, and Cho concentrations in the ipsilateral region of the brain to the irradiation (LCModel calculation from voxel of interest 3.8-4.5 ml positioned into the centrum of target volume). The concentration of NAA, Cr, and Cho after radiosurgery was significantly different from control values (p<0.05) and also from concentrations in the contralateral part of the brain (p<0.05). In the contralateral part, the concentration of NAA was significantly increased (p<0.05) (NAA: before treatment 8.81, after treatment 11.33 mM). No radiotoxic changes were observed in the contralateral part of the brain or behind the area of target volume. The MR spectroscopy findings precluded MRI observation and MRS results completed data about the development of radiotoxic changes in the target volume. (orig.)

  3. Mesial temporal lobe morphology in intractable pediatric epilepsy: so-called hippocampal malrotation, associated findings, and relevance to presurgical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, James L; Awwad, Reem; Greiner, Hansel M; Vannest, Jennifer J; Miles, Lili; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Diagnostic criteria for hippocampal malrotation (HIMAL) on brain MRI typically include a rounded hippocampus, vertical collateral sulcus, and architectural blurring. Relationship to epileptogenesis remains speculative, and usefulness for surgical guidance is unknown. The study was performed to determine the prevalence of hippocampal rotational anomalies in a cohort of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy undergoing evaluation for surgery and to determine the significance of this finding in the context of surgical planning. METHODS Forty-eight surgically treated children with intractable epilepsy were compared with matched healthy subjects; reviewers were blinded to surgical side. Each temporal lobe was evaluated for rounded hippocampus, blurring, vertical collateral sulcus, wide choroidal fissure, enlarged temporal horn, low fornix, hippocampal signal, and findings of hippocampal sclerosis. A mesial temporal lobe (MTL) score was calculated by summing the number of features, and the collateral sulcus angle (CSA) was measured in each temporal lobe. Surgical side, pathological diagnosis, and imaging findings elsewhere in the brain were tabulated. Presence of HIMAL, associated imaging features, and MTL score were compared between sides, between epilepsy and control groups, in relationship to side of surgery, and in relationship to postoperative outcome. RESULTS Only 3 epilepsy patients (6.2%) and no controls exhibited all 3 features of HIMAL (p = 0.12). Eight of 48 (16.7%) epilepsy versus 2 of 48 (4.6%) control subjects had both a rounded hippocampus and vertical collateral sulcus (suggesting HIMAL) (p = 0.045). In control and epilepsy subjects, most findings were more prevalent on the left, and the left CSA was more vertical (p Epilepsy subjects had higher MTL scores (z = -2.95, p = 0.002) and more acute CSAs (p = 0.04) than controls. Only lateralizing raw MTL score had a significant association with surgical side (p = 0.03, OR 7.33); however, this

  4. Mesial temporal sclerosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    2005-07-29

    Jul 29, 2005 ... The case under discussion involved a 42-year-old woman. She had had numerous previous admis- sions related to her alcoholism, but presented on this occasion with new onset partial complex seizures and secondary generalisation. On clinical examination she had impaired short- term memory, however ...

  5. MicroRNA and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: Whole miRNome profiling of human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencurova, Petra; Baloun, Jiri; Musilova, Katerina; Radova, Lenka; Tichy, Boris; Pail, Martin; Zeman, Martin; Brichtova, Eva; Hermanova, Marketa; Pospisilova, Sarka; Mraz, Marek; Brazdil, Milan

    2017-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a severe neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. mTLE is frequently accompanied by neurodegeneration in the hippocampus resulting in hippocampal sclerosis (HS), the most common morphological correlate of drug resistance in mTLE patients. Incomplete knowledge of pathological changes in mTLE+HS complicates its therapy. The pathological mechanism underlying mTLE+HS may involve abnormal gene expression regulation, including posttranscriptional networks involving microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNA expression deregulation has been reported in various disorders, including epilepsy. However, the miRNA profile of mTLE+HS is not completely known and needs to be addressed. Here, we have focused on hippocampal miRNA profiling in 33 mTLE+HS patients and nine postmortem controls to reveal abnormally expressed miRNAs. In this study, we significantly reduced technology-related bias (the most common source of false positivity in miRNA profiling data) by combining two different miRNA profiling methods, namely next generation sequencing and miRNA-specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These methods combined have identified and validated 20 miRNAs with altered expression in the human epileptic hippocampus; 19 miRNAs were up-regulated and one down-regulated in mTLE+HS patients. Nine of these miRNAs have not been previously associated with epilepsy, and 19 aberrantly expressed miRNAs potentially regulate the targets and pathways linked with epilepsy (such as potassium channels, γ-aminobutyric acid, neurotrophin signaling, and axon guidance). This study extends current knowledge of miRNA-mediated gene expression regulation in mTLE+HS by identifying miRNAs with altered expression in mTLE+HS, including nine novel abnormally expressed miRNAs and their putative targets. These observations further encourage the potential of microRNA-based biomarkers or therapies. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against

  6. Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-Convergence on axonal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaalund, Sanne S; Venø, Morten T; Bak, Mads

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown...... to be dysregulated in epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, and we hypothesized that miRNAs could be involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS. METHODS: miRNA expression was quantified in hippocampal specimens from human patients using miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction RT...

  7. Pre-surgical predictors for psychiatric disorders following epilepsy surgery in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Gerardo Maria de Araújo; Mazetto, Lenon; Gomes, Francinaldo Lobato; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Tavares, Igor Melo; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    Psychiatric outcomes of patients submitted to epilepsy surgery have gained particular interest given the high prevalence of pre-surgical psychiatric disorders (PD) in this population. The present study aimed to verify the possible pre-surgical predictors for psychiatric disorders following epilepsy surgery in a homogeneous series of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Data from 115 TLE-MTS patients (65 females; 56.5%) who underwent cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy were included. Pre- and post-surgical psychiatric evaluations were performed using DSM-IV criteria. Pre-surgical PD - particularly mood, anxiety and psychotic disorders - were diagnosed in 47 patients (40.8%). Twenty-seven patients (54% of those with pre-surgical PD) demonstrated a remission of psychiatric symptoms on post-surgical psychiatric evaluation. Eleven patients (9.6%) developed de novo PD. The presence of pre-surgical depression (OR=3.32; p=0.008), pre-surgical interictal psychosis (OR=4.39; p=0.009) and epileptiform discharges contralateral to the epileptogenic zone (OR=2.73; p=0.01) were risk factors associated with post-surgical PD. Although epilepsy surgery is considered to be the best treatment option for patients with refractory TLE-MTS, the relatively high psychiatric comorbidities observed in surgical candidates and their possible negative impact on post-surgical outcomes require a careful pre-surgical evaluation of clinical, sociodemographic and psychiatric factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Major depressive disorder as a predictor of a worse seizure outcome one year after surgery in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Gomes, Francinaldo Lobato; Mazetto, Lenon; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Tavares, Igor Melo; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Centeno, Ricardo Silva

    2012-10-01

    The association between pre-surgical psychiatric disorders (PDs) and worse seizure outcome in patients with refractory epilepsy submitted to surgery has been increasingly recognized in the literature. The present study aimed to verify the impact of pre- and post-surgical PD on seizure outcome in a series of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Data from 115 TLE-MTS patients (65 females; 56.5%) who underwent cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy (CAH) were analyzed. Pre- and post-surgical psychiatric evaluations were performed using DSM-IV and ILAE criteria. The outcome subcategory Engel IA was considered as corresponding to a favorable prognosis. A multivariate logistic regression model was applied to identify possible risk factors associated with a worse seizure outcome. Pre-surgical PDs, particularly major depressive disorder (MDD), anxiety and psychotic disorders, were common, being found in 47 patients (40.8%). Fifty-six patients (48.7%) were classified as having achieved an Engel IA one year after CAH. According to the logistic regression model, the presence of pre-surgical MDD (OR=5.23; p=0.003) appeared as the most important risk factor associated with a non-favorable seizure outcome. Although epilepsy surgery may be the best treatment option for patients with refractory TLE-MTS, our findings emphasize the importance of performing a detailed psychiatric examination as part of the pre-surgical evaluation protocol. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and eeg analysis of mesial and lateral temporal lobe seizures Análise clínica e eletrencefalográfica de crises epilépticas temporais de origem mesial e lateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FÁBIO GALVÃO DANTAS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the temporal lobe seizures through video-EEG systems shows that they often consist of a sequence of clinical and EEG features which may suggest the localization and the lateralization of the epileptogenic lobe. We analyzed clinical and EEG features of 50 temporal lobe seizures which were separated in group 1 with 25 patients (related to mesial temporal sclerosis and group 2 with 25 patients (other neocortical temporal lesions. Among the auras, the epigastric type was the most frequent and predominated in group 1. There were differences between the two groups, considering dystonic and tonic posturing and versive head and eye movements. Dystonic posturing was always contralateral to the ictal onset and was considered the most useful lateralizing clinical feature. Ictal speech, spitting and blinking automatisms, prolonged disorientation for place and a greatest percentage of postictal language preservation occurred in right temporal seizures. Postictal aphasia and global disorientation predominated in left temporal seizures. EEG was important for lateralizing the epileptogenic lobe, specially considering rhythmic ictal activity and postictal findings.As crises epilépticas do lobo temporal tendem a seguir uma sequência previsível de eventos clínicos e eletrencefalográficos, cuja análise, preferencialmente através de sistemas de vídeo-EEG, sugere a localização e a lateralização do lobo epileptogênico. Para este estudo, foram analisadas 50 crises epilépticas do lobo temporal, do ponto de vista clínico e eletrencefalográfico, sendo 25 relacionadas a esclerose mesial (grupo 1 e 25 a patologias neocorticais (grupo 2. Auras abdominais foram as mais frequentes, predominando no grupo 1. Houve diferenças entre os dois grupos, quanto à instalação e duração da postura distônica, à postura tônica e à versão oculocefálica. Postura distônica unilateral foi o mais importante fenômeno clínico lateralizatório, sempre

  10. Modifications of EEG power spectra in mesial temporal lobe during n-back tasks of increasing difficulty. A sLORETA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Claudio; Farina, Benedetto; Brunetti, Riccardo; Gnoni, Valentina; Testani, Elisa; Quintiliani, Maria I; Del Gatto, Claudia; Indraccolo, Allegra; Contardi, Anna; Speranza, Anna M; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The n-back task is widely used to investigate the neural basis of Working Memory (WM) processes. The principal aim of this study was to explore and compare the EEG power spectra during two n-back tests with different levels of difficulty (1-back vs. 3-back). Fourteen healthy subjects were enrolled (seven men and seven women, mean age 31.21 ± 7.05 years, range: 23-48). EEG was recorded while performing the N-back test, by means of 19 surface electrodes referred to joint mastoids. EEG analysis were conducted by means of the standardized Low Resolution brain Electric Tomography (sLORETA) software. The statistical comparison between EEG power spectra in the two conditions was performed using paired t-statistics on the coherence values after Fisher's z transformation available in the LORETA program package. The frequency bands considered were: delta (0.5-4 Hz); theta (4.5-7.5 Hz); alpha (8-12.5 Hz); beta (13-30 Hz); gamma (30.5-100 Hz). Significant changes occurred in the delta band: in the 3-back condition an increased delta power was localized in a brain region corresponding to the Brodmann Area (BA) 28 in the left posterior entorhinal cortex (T = 3.112; p < 0.05) and in the BA 35 in the left perirhinal cortex in the parahippocampal gyrus (T = 2.876; p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the right hemisphere and in the alpha, theta, beta, and gamma frequency bands. Our results indicate that the most prominent modification induced by the increased complexity of the task occur in the mesial left temporal lobe structures.

  11. Modifications of EEG Power Spectra in Mesial Temporal Lobe during n-back tasks of increasing difficulty. A sLORETA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eImperatori

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The n-back task is widely used to investigate the neural basis of Working Memory (WM processes. The principal aim of this study was to explore and compare the EEG power spectra during two n-back tests with different levels of difficulty (1-back vs 3-back.Fourteen healthy subjects were enrolled (7 men and 7 women, mean age 31.21±7.05 years, range: 23-48. EEG was recorded while performing the N-back test, by means of 19 surface electrodes referred to joint mastoids. EEG analysis were conducted by means of the standardized LOw Resolution brain Electric Tomography (sLORETA software. The statistical comparison between EEG power spectra in the two conditions was performed using paired t-statistics on the coherence values after Fisher’s z transformation available in the LORETA program package. The frequency bands considered were: delta (0.5-4 Hz; theta (4.5–7.5 Hz; alpha (8–12.5 Hz; beta (13–30 Hz; gamma (30.5–100 Hz. Significant changes occurred in the delta band: in the 3-back condition an increased delta power was localized in a brain region corresponding to the Brodmann Area (BA 28 in the left posterior entorhinal cortex (T = 3.112; p<0.05 and in the BA 35 in the left peririnhal cortex in the parahippocampal gyrus (T = 2.876; p<0.05. No significant differences were observed in the right hemisphere and in the alpha, theta, beta and gamma frequency bands. Our results indicate that the most prominent modification induced by the increased complexity of the task occur in the mesial left temporal lobe structures.

  12. An fMRI study of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with different pathological basis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WEI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the distinction of abnormal brain activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS or other pathogical basis, and to discuss their underlying pathophysiological mechanism in mTLE.  Methods Thirty mTLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS and 30 mTLE patients with occupying lesion in unilateral temporal lobe (mTLE-OL were investigated by comparing with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. MRI data were collected using a Siemens 3.0T scanner, and all of the participants were studied using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF analysis of resting state fMRI. A cost-function modification was used for image preprocessing, then the difference of extratemporal mALFF changes between the two groups of mTLE patients were analyzed with two-sample t test, and the correlation between mALFF and epilepsy duration of mTLE were also investigated.  Results In the resting state, mTLE-HS patients and mTLE-OL patients all showed significant changes in mALFF in extratemporal structures, but the distribution patterns of changes in brain were different. Compared with mTLE-HS, the mTLE-OL patients showed increased mALFF in bilateral inferior parietal lobes, precuneus, angular gyrus, middle and posterior cingulate gyrus and contralateral middle temporal gyrus, while mALFF reducing was observed in contralateral postcentral gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus and cerebellum (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected, that is to say, the default mode network (DMN in mTLE-HS were inhibited more seriously than in mTLE-OL patients. Correlation analysis showed that no significant correlation was found between mALFF and epilepsy duration in mTLE-HS patients; mALFF in bilateral middle and posterior cingulate gyrus was positively correlated with epilepsy duration in mTLE-OL patients (r = 0.687, P = 0.000, while mALFF in bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus was negatively correlated with epilepsy duration (r

  13. Decrease of NAA with aging outside the seizure focus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy--a proton-MRS study at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Franz; Bittsanský, Michal; Lehner-Baumgartner, Eva; Baumgartner, Christoph; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Gruber, Stephan; Moser, Ewald; Kaya, Marihan; Serles, Wolfgang

    2007-11-07

    There is evidence that chronic pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a progressive disorder accompanied by mental deterioration. We investigated effects of aging on cerebral N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) concentrations in the temporal lobe of 12 patients with pharmacoresistant mesial TLE (mTLE) and 22 healthy controls by means of proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3 T. Furthermore, we calculated correlations between NAA concentrations and measures of verbal and figural memory in patients. In mTLE patients but not in healthy controls the concentration of NAA in the lateral temporal lobe was negatively correlated with age. In patients with mTLE NAA in left lateral temporal voxels correlated with verbal memory. NAA in medial temporal voxels did not correlate with age or neuropsychological measures. Significant decrease of NAA with age in the lateral temporal lobe of patients with mTLE provides evidence for progressive neuronal dysfunction with aging. NAA is a marker of neuronal integrity since it correlates with verbal memory.

  14. Correlação entre atrofia hipocampal e déficit de memória em pacientes com epilepsia de lobo temporal mesial

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Pacagnella

    2012-01-01

    Resumo: A Epilepsia de Lobo Temporal Mesial (ELTM) é a forma mais frequente de epilepsia focal em adultos e geralmente está associada à atrofia hipocampal (AH) identificável pela ressonância magnética (RM) de alta resolução. Consiste em uma síndrome frequentemente refratária ao tratamento clínico e os pacientes podem apresentar déficits de memória devido a danos no sistema hipocampal, porém pouco se sabe a respeito do impacto da frequência de crises sobre a memória. Portanto, os objetivos do ...

  15. Clinical Study White Matter Atrophy in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Voxel-Based Morphometry Analysis of T1- and T2-Weighted MR Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, B.; Yasuda, C.L.; Cendes, F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis is highly refractory to clinical treatment. MRI voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of T1-weighted images has revealed a widespread pattern of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) atrophy in MTLE. Few studies have investigated the role of T2-weighted images in revealing WM atrophy using VBM. Objectives. To compare the results of WM atrophy between T1- and T2-weighted images through VBM. Methods. We selected 28 patients with left and 27 with right MTLE and 60 normal controls. We analyzed T1- and T2- weighted images with SPM8, using VBM/DARTEL algorithm to extract maps of GM and WM. The second level of SPM was used to investigate areas of WM atrophy among groups. Results. Both acquisitions showed bilateral widespread WM atrophy. T1-weighted images showed higher sensibility to detect areas of WM atrophy in both groups of MTLE. T2-weighted images also showed areas of WM atrophy in a more restricted pattern, but still bilateral and with a large area of superposition with T1-weighted images. Conclusions. In MTLE, T1-weighted images are more sensitive to detect subtle WM abnormalities using VBM, compared to T2 images, although both present a good superposition of statistical maps. 1. Introduction The mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is highly refractory to pharmacological treatment [1], and it is the main group of epilepsy referred to the tertiary care hospitals for surgical treatment [2]. MTLE shows a good surgical prognosis, with satisfactory seizures control in 60-80% of the patients [3]. In approximately 65%

  16. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Hasboun, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France); Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M. [Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France)

    1999-07-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  17. Factores de Riesgo para Recurrencia de Convulsiones y Pronóstico a Corto Plazo en Cirugía de Epilepsia para Esclerosis Mesial Temporal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Jaramillo Betancur

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Objetivo: Determinar los factores de riesgo para recurrencia de convulsiones y la clasificación posquirúrgica a corto plazo en pacientes operados por esclerosis mesial temporal (EMT.

    Métodos: Estudio de casos y controles anidado en la cohorte de pacientes con EMT diagnosticados por resonancia magnética con dos años de seguimiento posquirúrgico; se excluyeron pacientes con EMT bilateral. Se evaluaron características clínicas prequirúrgicas, foco epileptogénico en video-EEG y variables quirúrgicas con respecto a recurrencia de convulsiones en los primeros dos años posquirúrgicos y clasificación de Engel en el primer y segundo aniversario de la cirugía.

    Resultados: Entre octubre de 2001 y junio de 2008 se han evaluado 144 pacientes con EMT candidatos a cirugía de epilepsia; a junio de 2007, se han operado 89 pacientes, 51.7% con EMT izquierda. 35.8% de los pacientes presentaron recurrencia de convulsiones antes del segundo año posquirúrgico; el factor de riesgo prequirúrgico asociado a recurrencia fue foco bitemporal o temporal único con diseminación contralateral por video-EEG (OR: 6.32; IC95% 1.64-26.41, y posquirúrgico, la presencia de convulsiones durante el primer mes posoperatorio (p:0.0004; no se encontró asociación con recurrencia para: género, convulsiones tónico-clónicas generalizadas prequirúrgicas, lado de la EMT ni tiempo de evolución prequirúrgica de la epilepsia. 66.3% y 75.8% de los pacientes estaban en Engel I al primer y segundo aniversario de la cirugía, respectivamente. 91% de los pacientes intervenidos estaban en buen pronóstico posquirúrgico a los dos años.

    Conclusión: La localización del foco epileptogénico por electrofisiología es factor determinante en el pronóstico posquirúrgico a corto plazo en EMT.

    Palabras clave

    Cirugía de epilepsia, convulsiones, epilepsia del lóbulo temporal

  18. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Hasboun, D.; Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  19. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  20. Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with and without Psychiatric Comorbidities and Their Relation with Granular Cell Layer Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmyla Kandratavicius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite strong association between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities, biological substrates are unknown. We have previously reported decreased mossy fiber sprouting in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE patients with psychosis and increased in those with major depression. Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs are essentially involved in dendritic and synaptic sprouting. Methods. MTLE hippocampi of subjects without psychiatric history, MTLE + major depression, and MTLE + interictal psychosis derived from epilepsy surgery and control necropsies were investigated for neuronal density, granular layer dispersion, and MAP2 and tau immunohistochemistry. Results. Altered MAP2 and tau expression in MTLE and decreased tau expression in MTLE with psychosis were found. Granular layer dispersion correlated inversely with verbal memory scores, and with MAP2 and tau expression in the entorhinal cortex. Patients taking fluoxetine showed increased neuronal density in the granular layer and those taking haloperidol decreased neuronal density in CA3 and subiculum. Conclusions. Our results indicate relations between MAPs, granular layer dispersion, and memory that have not been previously investigated. Differential MAPs expression in human MTLE hippocampi with and without psychiatric comorbidities suggests that psychopathological states in MTLE rely on differential morphological and possibly neurochemical backgrounds. This clinical study was approved by our institution’s Research Ethics Board (HC-FMRP no. 1270/2008 and is registered under the Brazilian National System of Information on Ethics in Human Research (SISNEP no. 0423.0.004.000-07.

  1. SCOPE-mTL: A non-invasive tool for identifying and lateralizing mesial temporal lobe seizures prior to scalp EEG ictal onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alice D; Maus, Douglas; Zafar, Sahar F; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2017-09-01

    In mesial temporal lobe (mTL) epilepsy, seizure onset can precede the appearance of a scalp EEG ictal pattern by many seconds. The ability to identify this early, occult mTL seizure activity could improve lateralization and localization of mTL seizures on scalp EEG. Using scalp EEG spectral features and machine learning approaches on a dataset of combined scalp EEG and foramen ovale electrode recordings in patients with mTL epilepsy, we developed an algorithm, SCOPE-mTL, to detect and lateralize early, occult mTL seizure activity, prior to the appearance of a scalp EEG ictal pattern. Using SCOPE-mTL, 73% of seizures with occult mTL onset were identified as such, and no seizures that lacked an occult mTL onset were identified as having one. Predicted mTL seizure onset times were highly correlated with actual mTL seizure onset times (r=0.69). 50% of seizures with early mTL onset were lateralizable prior to scalp ictal onset, with 94% accuracy. SCOPE-mTL can identify and lateralize mTL seizures prior to scalp EEG ictal onset, with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Quantitative analysis of scalp EEG can provide important information about mTL seizures, even in the absence of a visible scalp EEG ictal correlate. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dentate gyrus and hilus transection blocks seizure propagation and granule cell dispersion in a mouse model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Häussler, Ute; Langlois, Mélanie; Hamelin, Sophie; Devaux, Bertrand; Deransart, Colin; Depaulis, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    Epilepsy-associated changes of the anatomical organization of the dentate gyrus and hilus may play a critical role in the initiation and propagation of seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This study evaluated the role of longitudinal projections in the propagation of hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPD) in dorsal hippocampus by performing a selective transection in a mouse model for MTLE obtained by a single unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA). Full transections of the dentate gyrus and hilus were performed in the transverse axis at 22 days after KA injection when spontaneous HPD were fully developed. They: (i) significantly reduced the occurrence of HPD; (ii) increased their duration at the KA injection site; (iii) abolished their spread along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampal formation and; (iv) limited granule cell dispersion (GCD) of the dentate gyrus posterior to the transection. These data suggest that: (i) longitudinal projections through the dentate gyrus and hilus are involved in HPD spread; (ii) distant hippocampal circuits participate in the generation and cessation of HPD and; (iii) GCD requires continuous HPD to develop, even when seizures are established. Our data reveal a critical role for longitudinal projections in the generation and spread of hippocampal seizures. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Parahippocampectomy as a New Surgical Approach to Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Caused By Hippocampal Sclerosis: A Pilot Randomized Comparative Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Vanegas, Mario Arturo; Freire Carlier, Iván D; San-Juan, Daniel; Martínez, Alma Rosa; Trenado, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    The parahippocampal gyrus plays an important role in the epileptogenic pathways of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy caused by hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS); its resection could prevent epileptic seizures with fewer complications. This study evaluates the initial efficacy and safety of anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL), selective amygdalohipppocampectomy (SAH), and parahippocampectomy (PHC) surgical approaches in mTLE-HS. A randomized comparative pilot clinical trial (2008-2011) was performed that included patients with mTLE-HS who underwent ATL, trans-T3 SAH, and trans-T3 PHC. Their sociodemographic characteristics, visual field profiles, verbal and visual memory profiles, and Engel scale outcome at baseline and at 1 and 5 years are described, using descriptive statistics along with parametric and nonparametric tests. Forty-three patients with a mean age of 35.2 years (18-56 years), 65% female, were analyzed: 14 underwent PHC, 14 ATL, and 15 SAH. The following percentages refer to those patients who were seizure free (Engel class IA) at 1-year and 5-year follow-up, respectively: 42.9% PHC, 71.4% ATL, and 60% SAH (P = 0.304); 28.6% PHC, 50% ATL, and 53.3% SAH (P = 0.353). Postoperative visual field deficits were 0% PHC, 85.7% ATL, and 46.7% SAH (P = 0.001). Verbal and/or visual memory worsening were present in 21.3% PHC, 42.8% ATL, and 33.4% SAH (P = 0.488) and preoperative and postoperative visual memory scores were significantly different in the SAH group only (P = 0.046). PHC, ALT, and SAH show a preliminary similar efficacy in short-term seizure-free rates in patients with mTLE-HS. However, PHC efficacy in the long-term decreases compared with the other surgical techniques. PHC does not produce postoperative visual field deficits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical efficacy of gamma knife and surgery treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and their effects on EF-Tumt and EF-Tsmt expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-Q; Zhang, X-D; Han, Y-M; Shi, X-F; Lan, Z-B; Men, X-X; Pan, Y-W

    2017-04-01

    To study the clinical efficacy of gamma knife and surgery treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and their effects on EF-Tumt and EF-Tsmt expression. The data of 78 cases of MTLE patients treated in our hospital from April 2011 to March 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the treatment methods: the surgery group (including 41 cases) and the gamma knife group (including 37 cases). The clinical efficacy, the occurrence and recurrence of complications were evaluated, respectively; meanwhile, the expression of the EF-Tumt protein and EF-Tsmt protein in brain tissue were analyzed. The difference between the efficacy rate of the two groups showed no statistical significance (χ2=0.960, p>0.05). The complication rate of the gamma knife group was significantly lower than that of the control group (χ2=6.430, pknife group was significantly lower than that of the patients in the surgery group (p>0.05). Within the two groups, the positive expression granum of EF-Tsmt protein and EF-Tumt protein of the two groups after treatment were significantly lower than that before treatment (pknife group was obviously more than that of the patients in the surgery group (p0.05). Before and after treatment within the group, the positive cell of EF-Tsmt protein and EF-Tumt protein of the two groups of patients after treatment were significantly lower than that before treatment (p0.05). Both surgery and gamma knife could treat MTLE effectively, and the efficacy may be related to the ability to reduce the expression of EF-Tsmt protein and EF-Tumt protein in brain tissue.

  5. How do people with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy sleep? A clinical and video-EEG with EOG and submental EMG for sleep staging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Vieira Scarlatelli-Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess subjective and objective sleep parameters in a homogeneous group of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE patients through internationally validated clinical questionnaires, video-electroencephalographic (VEEG and polysomnographic (PSG studies. Fifty-six patients with definite diagnosis of MTLE who were candidates for epilepsy surgery underwent a detailed clinical history, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS, neurological examination, 1.5 T brain magnetic resonance imaging, VEEG and PSG. Sixteen percent of patients reported significant daytime sleepiness as measured by ESS and 27% reported low levels of sleep quality as measured by PSQI. Patients with medically resistant epilepsy by MTLE showed increased wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO with mean ± standard deviation of 17.4 ± 15.6, longer non-rapid eye movement (NREM 1 (7.5 ± 4.6% and NREM3 sleep (26.6 ± 11.8%, abnormal rapid eye movement (REM latency in 30/56 patients, shorter REM sleep (16.7 ± 6.6%, and abnormal alpha delta patterns were observed in 41/56 patients. The analysis of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs evidenced highest spiking rate during NREM3 sleep and higher concordance with imaging data when IEDs were recorded in sleep, mainly during REM sleep. We concluded that patients with MTLE showed disrupted sleep architecture that may result in daytime dysfunction and sleep complaints. Furthermore, NREM sleep activated focal IEDs and them - when recorded during sleep - had higher localizing value.

  6. Usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) image in mesial temporal sclerosis : comparison with turbo spin-echo T2-weighted image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Chang, Seung Kuk; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    To determine the usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) imaging for the in detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), compared with that of turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging. Two neuroradiologists independently analyzed randomly mixed MR images of 20 lesions of 17 patients in whom MTS had been diagnosed, and ten normal controls. All subjects underwent both who performed both FLAIR and turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, in a blind fashion. In order to determine hippocampal morphology, oblique coronal images perpendicular to the long axis of the hippocampus were obtained. The detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, the radiologists' preferred imaging sequence, and intersubject consistency of detection were evaluated. Signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala was considered high if substantially higher than signal intensity in the cortex of adjacent temporo-parietal lobe. In all normal controls, FLAIR and spin-echo T2-weighted images showed normal signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala. In MTS, the mean detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, as seen on FLAIR images was 93%, compared with 43% on spin-echo T2-weighted images. In all cases in which signal intensity on FLAIR images was normal, signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images was also normal. The radiologists preferred the contrast properties of FLAIR to those of spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS using MRI, FLAIR images are more useful for the detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala than are spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS, FLAIR imaging is therefore a suitable alternative to spin-echo T2-weighted imaging.

  7. Usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) image in mesial temporal sclerosis : comparison with turbo spin-echo T2-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Chang, Seung Kuk; Eun, Choong Ki

    1999-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of fluid attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR) imaging for the in detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala in mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), compared with that of turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging. Two neuroradiologists independently analyzed randomly mixed MR images of 20 lesions of 17 patients in whom MTS had been diagnosed, and ten normal controls. All subjects underwent both who performed both FLAIR and turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, in a blind fashion. In order to determine hippocampal morphology, oblique coronal images perpendicular to the long axis of the hippocampus were obtained. The detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, the radiologists' preferred imaging sequence, and intersubject consistency of detection were evaluated. Signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala was considered high if substantially higher than signal intensity in the cortex of adjacent temporo-parietal lobe. In all normal controls, FLAIR and spin-echo T2-weighted images showed normal signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala. In MTS, the mean detection rate of high signal intensity in hippocampus or amygdala, as seen on FLAIR images was 93%, compared with 43% on spin-echo T2-weighted images. In all cases in which signal intensity on FLAIR images was normal, signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images was also normal. The radiologists preferred the contrast properties of FLAIR to those of spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS using MRI, FLAIR images are more useful for the detection of high signal intensity of hippocampus or amygdala than are spin-echo T2-weighted images. In the diagnosis of MTS, FLAIR imaging is therefore a suitable alternative to spin-echo T2-weighted imaging

  8. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgery Failures: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harroud, Adil; Bouthillier, Alain; Weil, Alexander G.; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2012-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are refractory to antiepileptic drugs in about 30% of cases. Surgical treatment has been shown to be beneficial for the selected patients but fails to provide a seizure-free outcome in 20–30% of TLE patients. Several reasons have been identified to explain these surgical failures. This paper will address the five most common causes of TLE surgery failure (a) insufficient resection of epileptogenic mesial temporal structures, (b) relapse on the contralateral mesial temporal lobe, (c) lateral temporal neocortical epilepsy, (d) coexistence of mesial temporal sclerosis and a neocortical lesion (dual pathology); and (e) extratemporal lobe epilepsy mimicking TLE or temporal plus epilepsy. Persistence of epileptogenic mesial structures in the posterior temporal region and failure to distinguish mesial and lateral temporal epilepsy are possible causes of seizure persistence after TLE surgery. In cases of dual pathology, failure to identify a subtle mesial temporal sclerosis or regions of cortical microdysgenesis is a likely explanation for some surgical failures. Extratemporal epilepsy syndromes masquerading as or coexistent with TLE result in incomplete resection of the epileptogenic zone and seizure relapse after surgery. In particular, the insula may be an important cause of surgical failure in patients with TLE. PMID:22934162

  9. Thalamotemporal impairment in temporal lobe epilepsy: a combined MRI analysis of structure, integrity, and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simon S; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Traynor, Catherine; Towgood, Karren; Barker, Gareth J; Richardson, Mark P

    2014-02-01

    Thalamic abnormality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is well known from imaging studies, but evidence is lacking regarding connectivity profiles of the thalamus and their involvement in the disease process. We used a novel multisequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol to elucidate the relationship between mesial temporal and thalamic pathology in TLE. For 23 patients with TLE and 23 healthy controls, we performed T1 -weighted (for analysis of tissue structure), diffusion tensor imaging (tissue connectivity), and T1 and T2 relaxation (tissue integrity) MRI across the whole brain. We used connectivity-based segmentation to determine connectivity patterns of thalamus to ipsilateral cortical regions (occipital, parietal, prefrontal, postcentral, precentral, and temporal). We subsequently determined volumes, mean tractography streamlines, and mean T1 and T2 relaxometry values for each thalamic segment preferentially connecting to a given cortical region, and of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. As expected, patients had significant volume reduction and increased T2 relaxation time in ipsilateral hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. There was bilateral volume loss, mean streamline reduction, and T2 increase of the thalamic segment preferentially connected to temporal lobe, corresponding to anterior, dorsomedial, and pulvinar thalamic regions, with no evidence of significant change in any other thalamic segments. Left and right thalamotemporal segment volume and T2 were significantly correlated with volume and T2 of ipsilateral (epileptogenic), but not contralateral (nonepileptogenic), mesial temporal structures. These convergent and robust data indicate that thalamic abnormality in TLE is restricted to the area of the thalamus that is preferentially connected to the epileptogenic temporal lobe. The degree of thalamic pathology is related to the extent of mesial temporal lobe damage in TLE. © 2014 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  10. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

  11. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris eBernhardt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy.

  12. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Hong, Seokjun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-10-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy.

  13. Temporal structures in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, F.

    2001-01-01

    The intermittent dynamics of the turbulent Gledzer, Ohkitani, and Yamada shell-model is completely characterized by a single type of burstlike structure, which moves through the shells like a front. This temporal structure is described by the dynamics of the instantaneous configuration of the shell...

  14. Autobiographical memory in temporal lobe epilepsy: role of hippocampal and temporal lateral structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfurth, Kirsten; Kasper, Burkhard; Schwarz, Michael; Stefan, Hermann; Pauli, Elisabeth

    2010-11-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the impact of hippocampal and temporal cortical lesions on remote autobiographical memories in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Episodic specificity, episodic richness, and personal semantic memory from different life periods were assessed using a modified version of the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) (M.D. Kopelman, A.E. Wilson, A. Baddeley, The autobiographical memory interview. Bury St. Edmunds: Thames Valley Test Co.; 1990) in 47 patients with unilateral mesial or lateral TLE and 38 healthy controls. Patients with TLE performed significantly more poorly than controls. Patients with left and right mTLE were equally moderately impaired, but patients with left lateral TLE had the most severe episodic memory deficits, particularly for childhood memories. With respect to personal semantic memory, patients with left TLE were significantly more impaired than those with right TLE, most pronounced for childhood memories. Both autobiographical memory aspects, episodic and personal semantic memory, were significantly intercorrelated, but both did not correlate with anterograde memory, indicating a structural dissociation between both functions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Memória de orientação espacial: avaliação em pacientes com doença de Alzheimer e com epilepsia mesial temporal refratária Spatial orientation memory: evaluation in patents with Alzheimer disease and temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Tuon

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos experimentais identificaram células piramidais no hipocampo de ratos com participação na memória de orientação espacial (MOE, denominadas células de localização. O objetivo deste estudo foi adaptar um teste baseado nesses experimentos para verificar o desempenho de MOE e a participação do hipocampo na MOE em pacientes com esclerose mesial temporal (EMT. Dividiu-se a pesquisa em dois estudos: no primeiro adaptou-se o teste e visando verificar sua capacidade de investigação de déficits de MOE aplicou-se em grupos de 10 indivíduos, um com doença de Alzheimer (DA e outro de idosos saudáveis (pExperimental studies have identified pyramidal cells in hippocampus in rats with participation in the spatial orientation memory (SOM, which are named location cells. This study had the purpose to adapt a test based in these experiments in order to check the performance of SOM and the participation of hippocampus into SOM in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. The research was divided into two studies: the first one the test was adapted, and in order to check its capacity to investigate the deficits of SOM, it has applied in groups of 10 (ten subjects, one group with patients that have Alzheimer disease and the other one with healthy elderly (p<0.001. The second study has evaluated the participation of hippocampus into SOM in 43 patients (23 with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and 20 submitted to selective amygdala hippocampectomy (SAH and 23 healthy volunteers with p<0,05 between MTS and SAH and between controled and SAH. It was shown that the test of SOM is suitable to evaluate deficits, but it seems the SOM is not a specific function of human hippocampus.

  16. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study on patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senzaki, Akira; Okubo, Yoshiro; Matsuura, Masato; Toru, Michio; Abe, Tetsuo; Asai, Kunihiko; Moriiwa, Motoi.

    1993-01-01

    In 30 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who had no visual abnormality on either CT or MRI, cerebral changes especially in the mesial temporal region were examined. The findings were compared with those in 20 normal volunteers. In epileptic patients, the mesial temporal region was significantly smaller and T1-weighted values in this region were significantly higher, as compared with the controls. In the group of epilepsy, atrophy especially in the hippocampal and tonsillar regions and increased water content were suggested. Regarding the bilateral difference in the size of the mesial temporal region, there was no significant difference between the group of epilepsy and the control group. The group of epilepsy seemed to have bilateral changes in the mesial temporal region. In 9 patients with the present or past history of organic delusional (schizophrenia-like) disorder, the coronal section of the third ventricle was significantly large, suggesting the likelihood of structural changes surrounding the third ventricle. (N.K.)

  17. Gender, apolipoprotein E genotype, and mesial temporal atrophy: 2-year follow-up in patients with stable mild cognitive impairment and with progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, M.V.; Patrick, K.E.; Collins, H.; Langdon, B.R.; Parker, R.O.; Pravata', E.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between gender, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, and mesial temporal atrophy in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with and without progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated 236 MCI patients with (n = 121) and without (n = 115) AD progression. Longitudinal MRI-based hippocampal volumes (HV) and entorhinal cortex (ERC) thickness were obtained. The Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) score was used to assess disease severity. We found a significant effect of APOE, gender, and clinical course (stable MCI versus MCI-AD progression) on HV. There was a significant effect of clinical course and APOE, but not gender, on ERC. Baseline HV and APOE4 status predicted MCI-AD progression in women. Baseline ERC and APOE4 status predicted MCI-AD progression in men. There were significant differences in CDR-SB scores between patients with and without MCI-AD progression, but not between males and females, or APOE4 carriers and non-carriers. HV, but not ERC, is strongly influenced by gender in MCI. The effects of gender and APOE4 on neuroimaging biomarkers have potentially important implications in the prediction of MCI-AD progression and should be taken into account in clinical trials. (orig.)

  18. Gender, apolipoprotein E genotype, and mesial temporal atrophy: 2-year follow-up in patients with stable mild cognitive impairment and with progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, M.V.; Patrick, K.E.; Collins, H. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Langdon, B.R. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Internal Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Parker, R.O. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Anesthesiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Pravata' , E. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Department of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Collaboration: For the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-11-15

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between gender, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, and mesial temporal atrophy in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with and without progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated 236 MCI patients with (n = 121) and without (n = 115) AD progression. Longitudinal MRI-based hippocampal volumes (HV) and entorhinal cortex (ERC) thickness were obtained. The Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) score was used to assess disease severity. We found a significant effect of APOE, gender, and clinical course (stable MCI versus MCI-AD progression) on HV. There was a significant effect of clinical course and APOE, but not gender, on ERC. Baseline HV and APOE4 status predicted MCI-AD progression in women. Baseline ERC and APOE4 status predicted MCI-AD progression in men. There were significant differences in CDR-SB scores between patients with and without MCI-AD progression, but not between males and females, or APOE4 carriers and non-carriers. HV, but not ERC, is strongly influenced by gender in MCI. The effects of gender and APOE4 on neuroimaging biomarkers have potentially important implications in the prediction of MCI-AD progression and should be taken into account in clinical trials. (orig.)

  19. Longitudinal positron emission tomography imaging of glial cell activation in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: Toward identification of optimal treatment windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc-Loc; Wimberley, Catriona; Truillet, Charles; Jego, Benoit; Caillé, Fabien; Pottier, Géraldine; Boisgard, Raphaël; Buvat, Irène; Bouilleret, Viviane

    2018-06-01

    Mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy is the most common type of drug-resistant partial epilepsy, with a specific history that often begins with status epilepticus due to various neurological insults followed by a silent period. During this period, before the first seizure occurs, a specific lesion develops, described as unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS). It is still challenging to determine which drugs, administered at which time point, will be most effective during the formation of this epileptic process. Neuroinflammation plays an important role in pathophysiological mechanisms in epilepsy, and therefore brain inflammation biomarkers such as translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) can be potent epilepsy biomarkers. TSPO is associated with reactive astrocytes and microglia. A unilateral intrahippocampal kainate injection mouse model can reproduce the defining features of human temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral HS and the pattern of chronic pharmacoresistant temporal seizures. We hypothesized that longitudinal imaging using TSPO positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-DPA-714 could identify optimal treatment windows in a mouse model during the formation of HS. The model was induced into the right dorsal hippocampus of male C57/Bl6 mice. Micro-PET/computed tomographic scanning was performed before model induction and along the development of the HS at 7 days, 14 days, 1 month, and 6 months. In vitro autoradiography and immunohistofluorescence were performed on additional mice at each time point. TSPO PET uptake reached peak at 7 days and mostly related to microglial activation, whereas after 14 days, reactive astrocytes were shown to be the main cells expressing TSPO, reflected by a continuing increased PET uptake. TSPO-targeted PET is a highly potent longitudinal biomarker of epilepsy and could be of interest to determine the therapeutic windows in epilepsy and to monitor response to treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. The Voronoi spatio-temporal data structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioc, Darka

    2002-04-01

    Current GIS models cannot integrate the temporal dimension of spatial data easily. Indeed, current GISs do not support incremental (local) addition and deletion of spatial objects, and they can not support the temporal evolution of spatial data. Spatio-temporal facilities would be very useful in many GIS applications: harvesting and forest planning, cadastre, urban and regional planning, and emergency planning. The spatio-temporal model that can overcome these problems is based on a topological model---the Voronoi data structure. Voronoi diagrams are irregular tessellations of space, that adapt to spatial objects and therefore they are a synthesis of raster and vector spatial data models. The main advantage of the Voronoi data structure is its local and sequential map updates, which allows us to automatically record each event and performed map updates within the system. These map updates are executed through map construction commands that are composed of atomic actions (geometric algorithms for addition, deletion, and motion of spatial objects) on the dynamic Voronoi data structure. The formalization of map commands led to the development of a spatial language comprising a set of atomic operations or constructs on spatial primitives (points and lines), powerful enough to define the complex operations. This resulted in a new formal model for spatio-temporal change representation, where each update is uniquely characterized by the numbers of newly created and inactivated Voronoi regions. This is used for the extension of the model towards the hierarchical Voronoi data structure. In this model, spatio-temporal changes induced by map updates are preserved in a hierarchical data structure that combines events and corresponding changes in topology. This hierarchical Voronoi data structure has an implicit time ordering of events visible through changes in topology, and it is equivalent to an event structure that can support temporal data without precise temporal

  1. Temporal lobe epilepsy in patients with nonlesional MRI and normal memory: an SEEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Suraj; Sweet, Jennifer; Fastenau, Philip S; Lüders, Hans; Landazuri, Patrick; Miller, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in the absence of MRI abnormalities and memory deficits is often presumed to have an extramesial or even extratemporal source. In this paper the authors report the results of a comprehensive stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) analysis in patients with TLE with normal MRI images and memory scores. Eighteen patients with medically refractory epilepsy who also had unremarkable MR images and normal verbal and visual memory scores on neuropsychological testing were included in the study. All patients had seizure semiology and video electroencephalography (EEG) findings suggestive of TLE. A standardized SEEG investigation was performed for each patient with electrodes implanted into the mesial and lateral temporal lobe, temporal tip, posterior temporal neocortex, orbitomesiobasal frontal lobe, posterior cingulate gyrus, and insula. This information was used to plan subsequent surgical management. Interictal SEEG abnormalities were observed in the mesial temporal structures in 17 patients (94%) and in the temporal tip in 6 (33%). Seizure onset was exclusively from mesial structures in 13 (72%), exclusively from lateral temporal cortex and/or temporal tip structures in 2 (11%), and independently from mesial and neocortical foci in 3 (17%). No seizure activity was observed arising from any extratemporal location. All patients underwent surgical intervention targeting the temporal lobe and tailored to the SEEG findings, and all experienced significant improvement in seizure frequency with a postoperative follow-up observation period of at least 1 year. This study demonstrates 3 important findings: 1) normal memory does not preclude mesial temporal seizure onset; 2) onset of seizures exclusively from mesial temporal structures without early neocortical involvement is common, even in the absence of memory deficits; and 3) extratemporal seizure onset is rare when video EEG and semiology are consistent with focal TLE.

  2. Microsurgical techniques in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Vanegas, Mario A; Lew, Sean M; Morino, Michiharu; Sarmento, Stenio A

    2017-04-01

    Temporal lobe resection is the most prevalent epilepsy surgery procedure. However, there is no consensus on the best surgical approach to treat temporal lobe epilepsy. Complication rates are low and efficacy is very high regarding seizures after such procedures. However, there is still ample controversy regarding the best surgical approach to warrant maximum seizure control with minimal functional deficits. We describe the most frequently used microsurgical techniques for removal of both the lateral and mesial temporal lobe structures in the treatment of medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to mesial temporal sclerosis (corticoamygdalohippocampectomy and selective amygdalohippocampectomy). The choice of surgical technique appears to remain a surgeon's preference for the near future. Meticulous surgical technique and thorough three-dimensional microsurgical knowledge are essentials for obtaining the best results. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Memory for fearful faces across development: specialization of amygdala nuclei and medial temporal lobe structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinabiaux, Charlotte; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Chiron, Catherine; Rodrigo, Sébastian; Jambaqué, Isabelle; Noulhiane, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced memory for emotional faces is a significant component of adaptive social interactions, but little is known on its neural developmental correlates. We explored the role of amygdaloid complex (AC) and medial temporal lobe (MTL) in emotional memory recognition across development, by comparing fMRI activations of successful memory encoding of fearful and neutral faces in children (n = 12; 8-12 years) and adolescents (n = 12; 13-17 years). Memory for fearful faces was enhanced compared with neutral ones in adolescents, as opposed to children. In adolescents, activations associated with successful encoding of fearful faces were centered on baso-lateral AC nuclei, hippocampus, enthorhinal and parahippocampal cortices. In children, successful encoding of fearful faces relied on activations of centro-mesial AC nuclei, which was not accompanied by functional activation of MTL memory structures. Successful encoding of neutral faces depended on activations in anterior MTL region (hippocampal head and body) in adolescents, but more posterior ones (hippocampal tail and parahippocampal cortex) in children. In conclusion, two distinct functional specializations emerge from childhood to adolescence and result in the enhancement of memory for these particular stimuli: the specialization of baso-lateral AC nuclei, which is associated with the expertise in processing emotional facial expression, and which is intimately related to the specialization of MTL memory network. How the interplay between specialization of AC nuclei and of MTL memory structures is fundamental for the edification of social interactions remains to be elucidated.

  4. Memory for fearful faces across development: specialization of amygdala nuclei and medial temporal lobe structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte ePinabiaux

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced memory for emotional faces is a significant component of adaptive social interactions, but little is known on its neural developmental correlates. We explored the role of amygdaloid complex (AC and medial temporal lobe (MTL in emotional memory recognition across development, by comparing fMRI activations of successful memory encoding of fearful and neutral faces in children (n=12; 8-12 years and adolescents (n=12; 13-17 years. Memory for fearful faces was enhanced compared with neutral ones in adolescents, as opposed to children. In adolescents, activations associated with successful encoding of fearful faces were centered on baso-lateral AC nuclei, hippocampus, enthorhinal and parahippocampal cortices. In children, successful encoding of fearful faces relied on activations of centro-mesial AC nuclei, which was not accompanied by functional activation of MTL memory structures. Successful encoding of neutral faces depended on activations in anterior MTL region (hippocampal head and body in adolescents, but more posterior ones (hippocampal tail and parahippocampal cortex in children. In conclusion, two distinct functional specializations emerge from childhood to adolescence and result in the enhancement of memory for these particular stimuli: the specialization of baso-lateral AC nuclei, which is associated with the expertise in processing emotional facial expression, and which is intimately related to the specialization of MTL memory network. How the interplay between specialization of AC nuclei and of MTL memory structures is fundamental for the edification of social interactions remains to be elucidated.

  5. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy via trans-superior temporal gyrus keyhole approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathon, Bertrand; Clemenceau, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common cause of drug-resistant epilepsy amenable for surgical treatment and seizure control. The rationale of the selective amygdalohippocampectomy is to spare cerebral tissue not included in the seizure generator. Describe the selective amygdalohippocampectomy through the trans-superior temporal gyrus keyhole approach. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy for temporal lobe epilepsy is performed when the data (semiology, neuroimaging, electroencephalography) point to the mesial temporal structures. The trans-superior temporal gyrus keyhole approach is a minimally invasive and safe technique that allows disconnection of the temporal stem and resection of temporomesial structures.

  6. Middle Temporal Gyrus Versus Inferior Temporal Gyrus Transcortical Approaches to High-Grade Astrocytomas in the Mediobasal Temporal Lobe: A Comparison of Outcomes, Functional Restoration, and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Raza, Shaan M; Ahmed, Ishrat; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Chaichana, Kaisorn; Olivi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    High-grade astrocytomas of the mesial temporal lobe may pose surgical challenges. Several approaches (trans-sylvian, subtemporal, and transcortical) have been designed to circumnavigate the critical neurovascular structures and white fiber tracts that surround this area. Considering the paucity of literature on the transcortical approach for these lesions, we describe our institutional experience with transcortical approaches to Grade III/IV astrocytomas in the mesial temporal lobe. Between 1999 and 2009, 23 patients underwent surgery at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions for Grade III/IV astrocytomas involving the mesial temporal lobe (without involvement of the temporal neocortex). Clinical notes, operative records, and imaging were reviewed. Thirteen patients had tumors in the dominant hemisphere. All patients underwent surgery via a transcortical approach (14 via the inferior temporal gyrus and 9 via the middle temporal gyrus). Gross total resection was obtained in 92 % of the cohort. Neurological outcomes were: clinically significant stroke (2 patients), new visual deficits (2 patients), new speech deficit (1 patient); seizure control (53 %). In comparison to reported results in the literature for the transylvian and subtemporal approaches, the transcortical approach may provide the access necessary for a gross total resection with minimal neurological consequences. In our series of patients, there was no statistically significant difference in outcomes between the middle temporal gyrus versus the inferior temporal gyrus trajectories.

  7. Asymmetry of medial and lateral temporal regional glucose metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy by F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Yeo, Jeong Seok; Song, Ho Cheon; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Hyun Jip; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the difference of glucose metabolism of medial and lateral temporal lobes of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) utilizing quantitative comparison of regional metabolic activities using asymmetric index. We studied 19 pathologically proven mesial TLE and 25 lateral TLE patients. Lateral TLE patients were either normal on magnetic resonance imaging (cryptogenic: n=14) or had structural lesions (lesional: n=11). Asymmetric index (ASI) was calculated as [(ipsilateral contralateral)/(ipsilateral + contralateral )]x200. ASI of medial and lateral lobes of mesial TLE was decreased (-16.4±8.3 and -12.7± 5.5, respectively). In cryptogenic lateral TLE, ASI of lateral temporal lobe was decreased (-11.8± 4.7), whereas that of medial temporal lobe was not decreased (-4.6±6.3). ASI of medial lobe of lesional lateral TLE was -7.3±9.1, which was significantly different from that of mesial TLE (p<0.05). Patients with lesional lateral TLE had evident metabolic defects or decrease (ASI: -22±10.5) in lateral temporal lobe. While we could not find the difference of metabolic activity in lateral temporal lobes between cryptogenic lateral TLE and mesial TLE patients, the difference of metabolic activity was significant in medial temporal lobes which was revealed by ASI quantitation. Asymmetric decrease of metabolic activity in both medial and lateral temporal lobes indicates medial temporal epilepsy. Symmetry of metabolic activity in medial temporal lobe combined with asymmetry of that in lateral temporal lobe may give hints that the epileptogenic zone is lateral

  8. Chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, W.J.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.; Singleton, G.T.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen patients with chemodectomas arising in temporal bone structures were evaluated and treated at the University of Florida. Seventeen patients have each been followed a minimum of 3 years. Patients were retrospectively staged as having ''local'' or ''advanced'' disease, depending on the presence or absence of bone destruction and/or cranial nerve involvement. Fourteen of the patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their therapy; 6 patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 3 patients were irradiated immediately postoperatively for residual disease, and 5 patients had radiation therapy for recurrence after operation. They were treated with cobalt-60 radiation with doses ranging from 3760 to 5640 rad. All irradiated patients demonstrated evidence of tumor regression, and none have had tumor recurrence with followup of 3-12 years. Of the 8 patients with cranial nerve paralysis prior to therapy, 5 had return of function of 1 or more cranial nerves. One of 6 patients treated initially with radiation therapy had a complication, while 6 of 8 patients irradiated postoperatively had complications. None of the complications were fatal. Three patients treated by operation for early disease limited to the hypotympanum had the disease controlled for 11-12 years. Guidelines for the selection of initial therapy are discussed

  9. Sensitivity to Temporal Reward Structure in Amygdala Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bermudez, Maria A.; Göbel, Carl; Schultz, Wolfram

    2012-01-01

    Summary The time of reward and the temporal structure of reward occurrence fundamentally influence behavioral reinforcement and decision processes [1–11]. However, despite knowledge about timing in sensory and motor systems [12–17], we know little about temporal mechanisms of neuronal reward processing. In this experiment, visual stimuli predicted different instantaneous probabilities of reward occurrence that resulted in specific temporal reward structures. Licking behavior demonstrated that...

  10. Temporal and Statistical Information in Causal Structure Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Teresa; Frosch, Caren; Patrick, Fiona; Lagnado, David

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examined children's and adults' abilities to use statistical and temporal information to distinguish between common cause and causal chain structures. In Experiment 1, participants were provided with conditional probability information and/or temporal information and asked to infer the causal structure of a 3-variable mechanical…

  11. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change......-point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights...

  12. The Temporal Organization of Syllabic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation develops analytical tools which enable rigorous evaluation of competing syllabic parses on the basis of temporal patterns in speech production data. The data come from the articulographic tracking of fleshpoints on target speech organs, e.g., tongue, lips, jaw, in experiments with native speakers of American English and Moroccan…

  13. Balancing Structural and Temporal Constraints in Multitasking Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Salvucci, Dario D.; Kujala, Tuomo

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that when people multitask, both the subtask structure and the temporal constraints of the component tasks strongly influence people’s task-switching behavior. In this paper, we propose an integrated theoretical account and associated computational model that aims to quantify how people balance structural and temporal constraints in everyday multitasking. We validate the theory using data from an empirical study in which drivers performed a vi...

  14. Temporal lobe sclerosis associated with hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: neuropathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Maria; Eriksson, Sofia; Martinian, Lillian; Caboclo, Luis O; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2009-08-01

    Widespread changes involving neocortical and mesial temporal lobe structures can be present in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. The incidence, pathology, and clinical significance of neocortical temporal lobe sclerosis (TLS) are not well characterized. We identified TLS in 30 of 272 surgically treated cases of hippocampal sclerosis. Temporal lobe sclerosis was defined by variable reduction of neurons from cortical layers II/III and laminar gliosis; it was typically accompanied by additional architectural abnormalities of layer II, that is, abnormal neuronal orientation and aggregation. Quantitative analysis including tessellation methods for the distribution of layer II neurons supported these observations. In 40% of cases, there was a gradient of TLS with more severe involvement toward the temporal pole, possibly signifying involvement of hippocampal projection pathways. There was a history of a febrile seizure as an initial precipitating injury in 73% of patients with TLS compared with 36% without TLS; no other clinical differences between TLS and non-TLS cases were identified. Temporal lobe sclerosis was not evident preoperatively by neuroimaging. No obvious effect of TLS on seizure outcome was noted after temporal lobe resection; 73% became seizure-free at 2-year follow-up. In conclusion, approximately 11% of surgically treated hippocampal sclerosis is accompanied by TLS. Temporal lobe sclerosis is likely an acquired process with accompanying reorganizational dysplasia and an extension of mesial temporal sclerosis rather than a separate pathological entity.

  15. Relation of callosal structure to cognitive abilities in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchneider

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to analyse the influence of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE on the morphology of the corpus callosum (CC and its relation to cognitive abilities. More specifically, we investigated correlations between intellectual abilities and callosal morphology, while additionally exploring the modulating impact of (a side of seizure onset (b age of disease onset.For this reason a large representative sample of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (n=79; 35 males; 44 females; age: 18-63 years with disease onset ranging from 0 to 50 years of age, and consisting of 46 left and 33 right TLE patients was recruited. Intelligence was measured using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R.To get localizations of correlations with high anatomic precision, callosal morphology was examined using computational mesh-based modeling methods, applied to anatomical brain MRI scans.Intellectual performance was positively associated with callosal thickness in anterior and midcallosal callosal regions, with anterior parts being slightly more affected by age of disease onset and side of seizure onset than posterior parts. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with lower thickness in anterior and midcallosal regions. In addition, laterality of seizure onset had a significant influence on anterior CC morphology, with left hemispheric origin having stronger effects.We found that in TLE, anterior and midcallosal CC morphology are related to cognitive performance. The findings support recent findings of detrimental effects of early onset mTLE on anterior brain regions and of a distinct effect particularly of left TLE on frontal lobe functioning and structure. The causal nature of the relationship remains an open question, i.e., whether CC morphology impacts IQ development or whether IQ development impacts CC morphology, or both.

  16. Temporal Dependency and the Structure of Early Looking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Daniel S; Mattson, Whitney I; Todd, James Torrence; Gangi, Devon N; Myers, Nicholas D; Bahrick, Lorraine E

    2017-01-01

    Although looking time is used to assess infant perceptual and cognitive processing, little is known about the temporal structure of infant looking. To shed light on this temporal structure, 127 three-month-olds were assessed in an infant-controlled habituation procedure and presented with a pre-recorded display of a woman addressing the infant using infant-directed speech. Previous individual look durations positively predicted subsequent look durations over a six look window, suggesting a temporal dependency between successive infant looks. The previous look duration continued to predict the subsequent look duration after accounting for habituation-linked declines in look duration, and when looks were separated by an inter-trial interval in which no stimulus was displayed. Individual differences in temporal dependency, the strength of associations between consecutive look durations, are distinct from individual differences in mean infant look duration. Nevertheless, infants with stronger temporal dependency had briefer mean look durations, a potential index of stimulus processing. Temporal dependency was evident not only between individual infant looks but between the durations of successive habituation trials (total looking within a trial). Finally, temporal dependency was evident in associations between the last look at the habituation stimulus and the first look at a novel test stimulus. Thus temporal dependency was evident across multiple timescales (individual looks and trials comprised of multiple individual looks) and persisted across conditions including brief periods of no stimulus presentation and changes from a familiar to novel stimulus. Associations between consecutive look durations over multiple timescales and stimuli suggest a temporal structure of infant attention that has been largely ignored in previous work on infant looking.

  17. Structural controllability and controlling centrality of temporal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yujian; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Temporal networks are such networks where nodes and interactions may appear and disappear at various time scales. With the evidence of ubiquity of temporal networks in our economy, nature and society, it's urgent and significant to focus on its structural controllability as well as the corresponding characteristics, which nowadays is still an untouched topic. We develop graphic tools to study the structural controllability as well as its characteristics, identifying the intrinsic mechanism of the ability of individuals in controlling a dynamic and large-scale temporal network. Classifying temporal trees of a temporal network into different types, we give (both upper and lower) analytical bounds of the controlling centrality, which are verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and empirical temporal networks. We find that the positive relationship between aggregated degree and controlling centrality as well as the scale-free distribution of node's controlling centrality are virtually independent of the time scale and types of datasets, meaning the inherent robustness and heterogeneity of the controlling centrality of nodes within temporal networks.

  18. The role of temporal structure in human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2005-03-01

    Gestalt psychologists identified several stimulus properties thought to underlie visual grouping and figure/ground segmentation, and among those properties was common fate: the tendency to group together individual objects that move together in the same direction at the same speed. Recent years have witnessed an upsurge of interest in visual grouping based on other time-dependent sources of visual information, including synchronized changes in luminance, in motion direction, and in figure/ ground relations. These various sources of temporal grouping information can be subsumed under the rubric temporal structure. In this article, the authors review evidence bearing on the effectiveness of temporal structure in visual grouping. They start with an overview of evidence bearing on temporal acuity of human vision, covering studies dealing with temporal integration and temporal differentiation. They then summarize psychophysical studies dealing with figure/ground segregation based on temporal phase differences in deterministic and stochastic events. The authors conclude with a brief discussion of neurophysiological implications of these results.

  19. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Visual paired-associate learning: in search of material-specific effects in adult patients who have undergone temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lou; Bigel, Marla; Miller, Laurie A

    2011-02-01

    The mesial temporal lobes are important for learning arbitrary associations. It has previously been demonstrated that left mesial temporal structures are involved in learning word pairs, but it is not yet known whether comparable lesions in the right temporal lobe impair visually mediated associative learning. Patients who had undergone left (n=16) or right (n=18) temporal lobectomy for relief of intractable epilepsy and healthy controls (n=13) were administered two paired-associate learning tasks assessing their learning and memory of pairs of abstract designs or pairs of symbols in unique locations. Both patient groups had deficits in learning the designs, but only the right temporal group was impaired in recognition. For the symbol location task, differences were not found in learning, but again a recognition deficit was found for the right temporal group. The findings implicate the mesial temporal structures in relational learning. They support a material-specific effect for recognition but not for learning and recall of arbitrary visual and visual-spatial associative information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Auras and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy: a new approach on the basis of voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Teresa Castilho Garcia; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; da Silva, Henrique Hattori; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2010-05-01

    MRI investigations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) have demonstrated structural abnormalities extending beyond ipsilateral hippocampus which may be studied through voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We investigated brain morphology related to clinical features in patients with refractory TLE with MTS using VBM. One hundred patients with unilateral TLE with MTS (59 left) and 30 controls were enrolled. VBM5 was employed to analyze (1) hemispheric damage, (2) influence of initial precipitating injury (IPI): 23 patients with febrile seizures and 19 with status epilepticus, and (3) types of auras classified as: mesial, including psychic auras (19 patients); anterior mesio-lateral, as autonomic symptoms, specially epigastric auras (27 patients) and neocortical, which included auditory, vertiginous, somatosensory and visual auras (16 patients). (1) Left TLE patients presented more widespread gray matter volume (GMV) reductions affecting ipsilateral hippocampus, temporal neocortex, insula and also left uncus, precentral gyrus, thalamus, parietal lobule, cuneus and bilateral cingulum. (2) Febrile seizures group presented ipsilateral GMV reductions in hippocampus, neocortical temporal, frontal and occipital cortices, insula and cingulum. Status epilepticus group presented more widespread GMV reductions involving temporal and extratemporal lobes. (3) Patients with mesial auras showed significant ipsilateral GMV reductions in hippocampus and amygdala, particularly right TLE group, who presented greater extension of GMV reduction in the entorhinal cortex. Significant reductions in hippocampus, amygdala and insula were seen in patients with anterior mesio-lateral auras. This study evaluated a large number of TLE-MTS patients showing structural damage extending beyond hippocampus, and different types of IPI associated with the extension of brain damage. Subtypes of auras are related to different clusters of areas of GMV reductions in

  2. Phylogenetic community structure: temporal variation in fish assemblage

    OpenAIRE

    Santorelli, Sergio; Magnusson, William; Ferreira, Efrem; Caramaschi, Erica; Zuanon, Jansen; Amadio, Sidnéia

    2014-01-01

    Hypotheses about phylogenetic relationships among species allow inferences about the mechanisms that affect species coexistence. Nevertheless, most studies assume that phylogenetic patterns identified are stable over time. We used data on monthly samples of fish from a single lake over 10 years to show that the structure in phylogenetic assemblages varies over time and conclusions depend heavily on the time scale investigated. The data set was organized in guild structures and temporal scales...

  3. The temporal structure of pollution levels in developed cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrigón Morillas, Juan Miguel; Ortiz-Caraballo, Carmen; Prieto Gajardo, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Currently, the need for mobility can cause significant pollution levels in cities, with important effects on health and quality of life. Any approach to the study of urban pollution and its effects requires an analysis of spatial distribution and temporal variability. It is a crucial dilemma to obtain proven methodologies that allow an increase in the quality of the prediction and the saving of resources in the spatial and temporal sampling. This work proposes a new analytical methodology in the study of temporal structure. As a result, a model for estimating annual levels of urban traffic noise was proposed. The average errors are less than one decibel in all acoustics indicators. A new working methodology of urban noise has begun. Additionally, a general application can be found for the study of the impacts of pollution associated with traffic, with implications for urban design and possibly in economic and sociological aspects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Task activation and functional connectivity show concordant memory laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideman, Noah; Chaitanya, Ganne; He, Xiaosong; Doucet, Gaelle; Kim, Na Young; Sperling, Michael R; Sharan, Ashwini D; Tracy, Joseph I

    2018-04-01

    In epilepsy, asymmetries in the organization of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) functions help determine the cognitive risk associated with procedures such as anterior temporal lobectomy. Past studies have investigated the change/shift in a visual episodic memory laterality index (LI) in mesial temporal lobe structures through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task activations. Here, we examine whether underlying task-related functional connectivity (FC) is concordant with such standard fMRI laterality measures. A total of 56 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (Left TLE [LTLE]: 31; Right TLE [RTLE]: 25) and 34 matched healthy controls (HC) underwent fMRI scanning during performance of a scene encoding task (SET). We assessed an activation-based LI of the hippocampal gyrus (HG) and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) during the SET and its correspondence with task-related FC measures. Analyses involving the HG and PHG showed that the patients with LTLE had a consistently higher LI (right-lateralized) than that of the HC and group with RTLE, indicating functional reorganization. The patients with RTLE did not display a reliable contralateral shift away from the pathology, with the mesial structures showing quite distinct laterality patterns (HG, no laterality bias; PHG, no evidence of LI shift). The FC data for the group with LTLE provided confirmation of reorganization effects, revealing that a rightward task LI may be based on underlying connections between several left-sided regions (middle/superior occipital and left medial frontal gyri) and the right PHG. The FCs between the right HG and left anterior cingulate/medial frontal gyri were also observed in LTLE. Importantly, the data demonstrate that the areas involved in the LTLE task activation shift to the right hemisphere showed a corresponding increase in task-related FCs between the hemispheres. Altered laterality patterns based on mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) pathology manifest as several

  5. Did Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R; Novikov, Vladimir P I; Regard, Marianne; Siegel, Adrian M

    2005-07-01

    Many scientific authors--among them famous names such as Henri Gastaut or Sigmund Freud--dealt with the question from what kind of epilepsy Fyodor Mikhailovitch Dostoevsky (1821-1881) might had suffered. Because of the tight interplay between Dostoevsky's literary work and his own disease we throw light on the author's epilepsy against the background of his epileptic fictional characters. Moreover, we attempt to classify Dostoevsky's epilepsy on the basis of his bibliography, language, and literary work.

  6. Biofilm diatom community structure: Influence of temporal and substratum variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    ). The structure and composition of the fouling com- munity exhibit wide temporal and regional varia- tions, which are also influenced by the substratum. Dona Paula Bay, the site of this investigation, is highly dynamic in terms of its physico...-off and nutrient loading in coastal environments. In general, the waters are highly disturbed during the monsoon (June–September) and calm during the pre-monsoon (February–May) and post-monsoon (October–January) periods. Such changes are instrumental...

  7. [The role of temporal fine structure in tone recognition and music perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Gu, X; Liu, B

    2017-11-07

    The sound signal can be decomposed into temporal envelope and temporal fine structure information. The temporal envelope information is crucial for speech perception in quiet environment, and the temporal fine structure information plays an important role in speech perception in noise, Mandarin tone recognition and music perception, especially the pitch and melody perception.

  8. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alexander G; Schlichting, Peter E; Billerman, Shawn M; Jesmer, Brett R; Micheletti, Steven; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Funk, W Chris; Hapeman, Paul; Muths, Erin; Murphy, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  9. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, P; Billerman, S; Jesmer, B; Micheletti, S; Fortin, M.-J.; Funk, W.C.; Hapeman, P; Muths, Erin L.; Murphy, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  10. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    with simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering...... of individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...

  11. Generating spatial precipitation ensembles: impact of temporal correlation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovec, O.; Hazenberg, P.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Weerts, A. H.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-09-01

    Sound spatially distributed rainfall fields including a proper spatial and temporal error structure are of key interest for hydrologists to force hydrological models and to identify uncertainties in the simulated and forecasted catchment response. The current paper presents a temporally coherent error identification method based on time-dependent multivariate spatial conditional simulations, which are conditioned on preceding simulations. A sensitivity analysis and real-world experiment are carried out within the hilly region of the Belgian Ardennes. Precipitation fields are simulated for pixels of 10 km × 10 km resolution. Uncertainty analyses in the simulated fields focus on (1) the number of previous simulation hours on which the new simulation is conditioned, (2) the advection speed of the rainfall event, (3) the size of the catchment considered, and (4) the rain gauge density within the catchment. The results for a sensitivity analysis show for typical advection speeds >20 km h-1, no uncertainty is added in terms of across ensemble spread when conditioned on more than one or two previous hourly simulations. However, for the real-world experiment, additional uncertainty can still be added when conditioning on a larger number of previous simulations. This is because for actual precipitation fields, the dynamics exhibit a larger spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, by thinning the observation network with 50%, the added uncertainty increases only slightly and the cross-validation shows that the simulations at the unobserved locations are unbiased. Finally, the first-order autocorrelation coefficients show clear temporal coherence in the time series of the areal precipitation using the time-dependent multivariate conditional simulations, which was not the case using the time-independent univariate conditional simulations. The presented work can be easily implemented within a hydrological calibration and data assimilation framework and can be used as an

  12. Generating spatial precipitation ensembles: impact of temporal correlation structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rakovec

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound spatially distributed rainfall fields including a proper spatial and temporal error structure are of key interest for hydrologists to force hydrological models and to identify uncertainties in the simulated and forecasted catchment response. The current paper presents a temporally coherent error identification method based on time-dependent multivariate spatial conditional simulations, which are conditioned on preceding simulations. A sensitivity analysis and real-world experiment are carried out within the hilly region of the Belgian Ardennes. Precipitation fields are simulated for pixels of 10 km × 10 km resolution. Uncertainty analyses in the simulated fields focus on (1 the number of previous simulation hours on which the new simulation is conditioned, (2 the advection speed of the rainfall event, (3 the size of the catchment considered, and (4 the rain gauge density within the catchment. The results for a sensitivity analysis show for typical advection speeds >20 km h−1, no uncertainty is added in terms of across ensemble spread when conditioned on more than one or two previous hourly simulations. However, for the real-world experiment, additional uncertainty can still be added when conditioning on a larger number of previous simulations. This is because for actual precipitation fields, the dynamics exhibit a larger spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, by thinning the observation network with 50%, the added uncertainty increases only slightly and the cross-validation shows that the simulations at the unobserved locations are unbiased. Finally, the first-order autocorrelation coefficients show clear temporal coherence in the time series of the areal precipitation using the time-dependent multivariate conditional simulations, which was not the case using the time-independent univariate conditional simulations. The presented work can be easily implemented within a hydrological calibration and data assimilation

  13. The patient had a normal magnetic resonance imaging and temporal lobe epilepsy secondary to a porencephalic cyst but showed structural lesions (hippocampal sclerosis)☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Teppei; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Aoki, Tsukasa; Fujiomto, Ayataka; Osuka, Satoru; Matsumura, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Patients with a porencephalic cyst frequently develop intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We report a surgically-treated male patient with intractable mesial TLE (mTLE) secondary to a porencephalic cyst. Although magnetic resonance imaging showed no hippocampal abnormalities, long-term video-electrocorticography revealed seizure onset discharges in the hippocampus. Temporal lobectomy brought an end to the patient's seizures. Hippocampal sclerosis was histopathologically confirmed (dual pathology). Careful evaluation of hippocampal epileptogenicity is required, and temporal lobectomy, which is less invasive than hemispherectomy, can be a treatment of choice for patients with mTLE secondary to a porencephalic cyst. PMID:25667851

  14. Influence of musical training on sensitivity to temporal fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R; Raj, Swapna

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to extend the findings that temporal fine structure encoding is altered in musicians by examining sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) in an alternative (non-Western) musician model that is rarely adopted--Indian classical music. The sensitivity to TFS was measured by the ability to discriminate two complex tones that differed in TFS but not in envelope repetition rate. Sixteen South Indian classical (Carnatic) musicians and 28 non-musicians with normal hearing participated in this study. Musicians have significantly lower relative frequency shift at threshold in the TFS task compared to non-musicians. A significant negative correlation was observed between years of musical experience and relative frequency shift at threshold in the TFS task. Test-retest repeatability of thresholds in the TFS tasks was similar for both musicians and non-musicians. The enhanced performance of the Carnatic-trained musicians suggests that the musician advantage for frequency and harmonicity discrimination is not restricted to training in Western classical music, on which much of the previous research on musical training has narrowly focused. The perceptual judgments obtained from non-musicians were as reliable as those of musicians.

  15. Extracting the Textual and Temporal Structure of Supercomputing Logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, S; Singh, I; Chandra, A; Zhang, Z; Bronevetsky, G

    2009-05-26

    Supercomputers are prone to frequent faults that adversely affect their performance, reliability and functionality. System logs collected on these systems are a valuable resource of information about their operational status and health. However, their massive size, complexity, and lack of standard format makes it difficult to automatically extract information that can be used to improve system management. In this work we propose a novel method to succinctly represent the contents of supercomputing logs, by using textual clustering to automatically find the syntactic structures of log messages. This information is used to automatically classify messages into semantic groups via an online clustering algorithm. Further, we describe a methodology for using the temporal proximity between groups of log messages to identify correlated events in the system. We apply our proposed methods to two large, publicly available supercomputing logs and show that our technique features nearly perfect accuracy for online log-classification and extracts meaningful structural and temporal message patterns that can be used to improve the accuracy of other log analysis techniques.

  16. Temporal structure of neuronal population oscillations with empirical model decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoli

    2006-01-01

    Frequency analysis of neuronal oscillation is very important for understanding the neural information processing and mechanism of disorder in the brain. This Letter addresses a new method to analyze the neuronal population oscillations with empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Following EMD of neuronal oscillation, a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are obtained, then Hilbert transform of IMFs can be used to extract the instantaneous time frequency structure of neuronal oscillation. The method is applied to analyze the neuronal oscillation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats in vivo, the results show the neuronal oscillations have different descriptions during the pre-ictal, seizure onset and ictal periods of the epileptic EEG at the different frequency band. This new method is very helpful to provide a view for the temporal structure of neural oscillation

  17. Recognition memory is improved by a structured temporal framework during encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathesan eThavabalasingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to function optimally within our environment, we continuously extract temporal patterns from our experiences and formulate expectations that facilitate adaptive behavior. Given that our memories are embedded within spatiotemporal contexts, an intriguing possibility is that mnemonic processes are sensitive to the temporal structure of events. To test this hypothesis, in a series of behavioral experiments we manipulated the regularity of interval durations at encoding to create temporally structured and unstructured frameworks. Our findings revealed enhanced recognition memory (d’ for stimuli that were explicitly encoded within a temporally structured versus unstructured framework. Encoding information within a temporally structured framework was also associated with a reduction in the negative effects of proactive interference and was linked to greater recollective recognition memory. Furthermore, rhythmic temporal structure was found to enhance recognition memory for incidentally encoded information. Collectively, these results support the possibility that we possess a greater capacity to learn and subsequently remember temporally structured information.

  18. MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fobben, E.S.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Sperling, M.R.; Kohn, M.I.; Atlas, S.W.; Hackney, D.B.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging examinations of 31 patients undergoing temporal lobe resection for refractory partial epilepsy were reviewed retrospectively for the presence of signal abnormalities as well as atrophy. High-signal abnormalities were present in only two of the described 31 patients (6.5%). Pathologically, these represented mesial temporal sclerosis and a hamartoma. Of the remaining 29 cases, 13 showed pathologically varying degrees of mesial temporal sclerosis and gliosis and 16 were pathologically normal. Atrophy, as determined by gross asymmetry, sulcal and temporal horn enlargement, and computer volume measurements, was observed in 23 of 31 patients, correlating with the clinically affected side in 20 and the contralateral side in three. In this series, in contrast to others reported, focal MR signal abnormalities were not detected in the vast majority of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

  19. The Structural Plasticity of White Matter Networks Following Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Duncan, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy…

  20. Aspects of second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and for inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming spatio......-temporal separability of the intensity function, we clarify different meanings of second-order spatio-temporal separability. One is second-order spatio-temporal independence and relates to log-Gaussian Cox processes with an additive covariance structure of the underlying spatio-temporal Gaussian process. Another...... concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data....

  1. Second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for first general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and second inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming...... spatio-temporal separability of the intensity function, we clarify different meanings of second-order spatio-temporal separability. One is second-order spatio-temporal independence and relates e.g. to log-Gaussian Cox processes with an additive covariance structure of the underlying spatio......-temporal Gaussian process. Another concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data (the UK 2001 epidemic foot and mouth disease data)....

  2. Diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography(PET) was performed in 18 temporal lobe epileptics. About 20 mCi of 11 C-glucose was perorally administered to the patients and 30 minutes later scanning was started when the transport of 11 C-glucose from blood to the brain tissue reached equilibrium. At the level of 25mm above orbitomeatal line, the slice image of the temporal lobe shows a relatively high metabolic oval ring involving the amygdala, hippocapal formation and the hippocampal gyrus medially and the T 1 , T 2 and T 3 neocortices laterally in normal subjects. The epileptic focus, when detected on PET images, was observed as a defect in this oval ring. In 15(83.3%) out of 18 cases, the location of epileptic focus was confirmed as a low metabolic defect. This diagnosis rate was higher than that of other focal epilepsy by PET study. The locations of foci were devided into three types: mesial (5 cases), lateral (4 cases) and combined (6 cases). The seizure symptoms of the patients were analyzed in terms of the correspondence to the focus types. The results showed that automatism and pseudoabsence had a close relation to the mesial and combined types and psychical, vertiginous or visual seizures correlated to the combined and lateral types. Visceral or motor seizures were induced equally by any focus types. These facts suggested that automatism and pseudoabsence were correlated with the mesial organs such as the amygdala and hippocampus and psychical, vertiginous or visual seizures had origin in lateral neocortices. Visceral or motor seizures were supposed to be the results of the spread from the temporal focus to the adjacent structures. It was concluded that PET was very useful in localization diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. In surgical treatment of epilepsy, in which the knowledge of the exact extent of epileptic foci is strongly demanded, PET study will offer invaluable data to the strategy of operation and foreseeing its prognosis. (author)

  3. STABILITY AND DYNAMICS OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann Riecke

    2005-10-21

    This document constitutes the final report for the grant. It provides a complete list of publications and presentations that arose from the project as well as a brief description of the highlights of the research results. The research funded by this grant has provided insights into the spontaneous formation of structures of increasing complexity in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium. A classic example of such a system is thermally driven convection in a horizontal fluid layer. Highlights of the research are: (1) explanation of the localized traveling wave pulses observed in binary-mixture convection, (2) explanation of the localized waves in electroconvection, (3) introduction of a new diagnostics for spatially and temporally chaotic states, which is based on the statistics of defect trajectories, (4) prediction of complex states in thermally driven convection in rotating systems. Additional contributions provided insight into the localization mechanism for oscillons, the prediction of a new localization mechanism for traveling waves based on a resonant periodic forcing, and an analysis of the stability of quasi-periodic patterns.

  4. Microencephaloceles: another dual pathology of intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Kristian; Clarke, Dave F; Wheless, James W; Boop, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Temporal lobe encephaloceles can be associated with temporal lobe epilepsy. The authors report on the case of an adolescent with multiple microencephaloceles, in the anterolateral middle fossa floor, identified at surgery (temporal lobectomy) for intractable partial-onset seizures of temporal origin. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed only hippocampal atrophy. Subdural electrodes demonstrated ictal activity arising primarily from the anterior and lateral temporal lobe, close to the microencephaloceles, spreading to the anterior and posterior mesial structures. Pathological examination revealed diffuse temporal gliosis involving the hippocampus, together with microdysgenesis of the amygdala. The literature on epilepsy secondary to encephaloceles is reviewed and the contribution of the microencephaloceles to the seizure disorder in this patient is discussed.

  5. Transcortical selective amygdalohippocampectomy technique through the middle temporal gyrus revisited: An anatomical study laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Baran; da Silva Centeno, Ricardo; Chaddad-Neto, Feres; da Costa, Marcos Devanir Silva; Goiri, Marcelo Augusto Acosta; Karadag, Ali; Tugcu, Bekir; Ovalioglu, Talat Cem; Tanriover, Necmettin; Kaya, Serdar; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Grande, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) and selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SelAH) have been used for surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We examined the comprehensive white matter tract anatomy of the temporal lobe to gain an insight into the trans-middle temporal gyrus, a lateral approach which has been commonly used. The transmiddle temporal gyrus approach was performed in a stepwise manner on cadaveric human heads to examine the traversing white matter pathways through it and the structures located in the temporal horn. We reviewed the literature to compare the trans-middle temporal gyrus approach with other SelAH techniques based on surgical outcomes. There does not appear to be a significant difference in seizure outcome between SelAH and ATL. However, the SelAH provides a better neuropsychological outcomes than the ATL in selected patients. Each SelAH approach has individual advantages and disadvantages. Based on our anatomical study, in the transcortical amygdalohippocampectomy technique through the middle temporal gyrus the white matter pathways to be encountered. In the temporal horn, the collateral eminence, hippocampus, lateral ventricular sulcus, choroidal fissure, inferior choroidal point, choroid plexus, fimbria of the fornix, and amygdala are exposed. The subpial dissection is performed along the lateral ventricular sulcus from the collateral eminence on lateral side and from the choroidal fissure on medial side by microdissector for en bloc resection of the hippocampus proper. The trans-middle temporal gyrus approach is commonly used in treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients. A better anatomical and functional understanding of the structures of the temporal lobe is crucial for safer and more accurate surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  7. Temporal lobe epilepsy: analysis of patients with dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, V; Markand, O; Worth, R

    2004-02-01

    To determine the frequency and types of dual pathology in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to analyze the clinical manifestations and surgical outcome. A total of 240 patients with TLE underwent temporal resections following a comprehensive pre-surgical evaluation. Thirty-seven (15.4%) of these had hippocampal sclerosis (HS) or temporal lobe gliosis in association with another lesion (dual pathology). Eighteen of 37 patients with dual pathology had heterotopia of the temporal lobe, nine had cortical dysplasia, four had cavernous angiomas or arteriovenous malformations, one had a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, one had a contusion and four patients had cerebral infarctions in childhood. 68.5% had abnormal head magnetic resonance imagings, 91.3% had abnormal positron emission tomography scans, and 96% had abnormal ictal SPECT. The intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) showed impaired memory of the epileptogenic side in 72% of the patients. Twenty patients had left and 17 had right-sided en bloc temporal resections, including the lesion and mesial temporal structures. Twenty-six (70.2%) became seizure-free, eight (21.6%) had rare seizures, two (5.4%) had worthwhile seizure reduction and one (2.7%) had no improvement (range of follow-up 1-16 years, mean = 7.4 years). 15.4% had dual pathology. The dual pathology was almost exclusively seen in patients whose lesions were congenital, or occurred early in life, suggesting that the hippocampus is more vulnerable and more readily develops HS in early childhood. Resections, including the lateral and mesial temporal structures led to a favorable outcome with no mortality and little morbidity.

  8. The predictive value of FDG-PET with 3D-SSP for surgical outcomes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Takuma; Sugano, Hidenori; Nakajima, Madoka; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Iimura, Yasushi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sato, Kiyoshi; Arai, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the diagnostic value of (18)F-2-fluorodeoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) with statistical analysis for the foci detection and predictive utility for postsurgical seizure outcome of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). We evaluated 40 patients who were diagnosed mTLE and underwent selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) or anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) in our institute. Preoperative interictal FDG-PET with statistical analysis using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) was detected with several clinical data including seizure semiology, MRI, scalp electroencephalography, surgical procedure with SAH or ATL and postsurgical outcome. The region of interest (ROI) was defined on 'Hippocampus & Amygdala', 'Parahippocampal gyrus & Uncus', 'T1 & T2', and 'T3 & Fusiform gyrus'. We obtained the ratio of hypometabolism difference (RHD) by 3D-SSP, and evaluated the relation among hypometabolic extent, surgical outcome and surgical procedure. The RHD in each ROIs ipsilateral to operative side was significantly higher than that of contralateral side in good outcome group. Hypometabolism of 'Hippocampus & Amygdala' was most reliable prognostic factor. Patients of discordant with presurgical examinations hardly showed obvious lateralized hypometabolism. Nevertheless, when they have significantly high RHD in mesial temporal lobe, good surgical outcome was expected. There was not significant difference of RHD distribution between SAH and ATL in good outcome group. Significant hypometabolism in mesial temporal lobe on FDG-PET with 3D-SSP is useful to predict good surgical outcome for patients with mTLE, particularly in discordant patients with hypometabolism in mesial temporal structure. However, FDG-PET is not indicative of surgical procedure. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Early seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures and its surgical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2008-12-01

    Intracranial EEG documentation of seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures is relatively rare. We retrospectively analyzed intracranial EEG recorded with electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe in patients who underwent occipital lobe surgery. Four patients with occipital lesions, who underwent intracranial EEG monitoring with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe prior to occipital lobe surgery, were studied. Subdural electrodes were placed over the occipital lobe and adjacent areas. Intracerebral electrodes were implanted into bilateral hippocampi and the amygdala in three patients, and in the hippocampus and amygdala ipsilateral to the lesion in one. In light of the intracranial EEG findings, the occipital lobe was resected but the medial temporal lobe was spared in all patients. The follow-up period ranged from six to 16 years, and seizure outcome was Engel Class I in all patients. Sixty six seizures were analyzed. The majority of the seizures originated from the occipital lobe. In complex partial seizures, ictal discharges propagated to the medial temporal lobe. No seizures originating from the temporal lobe were documented. In some seizures, the ictal-onset zone could not be identified. In these seizures, very early propagation to the medial temporal lobe was observed. Interictal spikes were recorded in the medial temporal lobe in all cases. Intracranial EEG revealed very early involvement of the medial temporal lobe in some seizures. Seizure control was achieved without resection of the medial temporal structures.

  10. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semah, F.

    2006-01-01

    structural abnormalities outside of the mesial formations were detected in 65% of the cases. Neither the severity of HS nor temporal atrophy appeared related to the topography of hypo-metabolism. However, temporal hypo-metabolism was more extended when temporo-polar signal changes were detected. Among operated patients (n=43), a seizure-free outcome was obtained in 82%. A positive surgical outcome appeared more favorable in the mesial group, however the difference between the 4 groups was not significant. Our results suggest that hypo-metabolism in MTLE may be related to ictal discharge generation and spread pathways, even though structural changes and epilepsy duration may also play a role. The role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizures is suggested by studies in animal models and epileptic patients. It is suggested that circuits of the basal ganglia may control epileptic seizures and that striatal dopaminergic transmission plays a key role in seizure interruption. We first studied patients with ring chromosome 20 (r(20) ) epilepsy which is a very homogenous type of epilepsy and that is clinically characterized by long-lasting seizures suggesting a dysfunction in the seizure control system. The hypothesis that these long-lasting seizures are associated with a reduction of striatal dopamine was addressed in our study. We used [ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA PET in 14 patients with r(20) epilepsy. We found that [ 18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA uptake was significantly decreased bilaterally in the putamen and in the caudate nucleus of patients. This reduction was equal for both nuclei and was not correlated with the percentage of cells with r(20) (Biraben, 2004). This study suggested that dysfunction of this neurotransmission may impair the mechanisms which interrupt seizures. This study was followed by a pilot study in patients with MTLE and in patients with the absence of medically refractory seizures to investigate if this abnormality could be related with the ring chromosome 20

  11. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DSV-CEA, 91 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    structural abnormalities outside of the mesial formations were detected in 65% of the cases. Neither the severity of HS nor temporal atrophy appeared related to the topography of hypo-metabolism. However, temporal hypo-metabolism was more extended when temporo-polar signal changes were detected. Among operated patients (n=43), a seizure-free outcome was obtained in 82%. A positive surgical outcome appeared more favorable in the mesial group, however the difference between the 4 groups was not significant. Our results suggest that hypo-metabolism in MTLE may be related to ictal discharge generation and spread pathways, even though structural changes and epilepsy duration may also play a role. The role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizures is suggested by studies in animal models and epileptic patients. It is suggested that circuits of the basal ganglia may control epileptic seizures and that striatal dopaminergic transmission plays a key role in seizure interruption. We first studied patients with ring chromosome 20 (r(20) ) epilepsy which is a very homogenous type of epilepsy and that is clinically characterized by long-lasting seizures suggesting a dysfunction in the seizure control system. The hypothesis that these long-lasting seizures are associated with a reduction of striatal dopamine was addressed in our study. We used [{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA PET in 14 patients with r(20) epilepsy. We found that [ {sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA uptake was significantly decreased bilaterally in the putamen and in the caudate nucleus of patients. This reduction was equal for both nuclei and was not correlated with the percentage of cells with r(20) (Biraben, 2004). This study suggested that dysfunction of this neurotransmission may impair the mechanisms which interrupt seizures. This study was followed by a pilot study in patients with MTLE and in patients with the absence of medically refractory seizures to investigate if this abnormality could be related with the ring chromosome

  12. The Relative Importance of Spatial Versus Temporal Structure in the Perception of Biological Motion: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Masahiro; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how the spatiotemporal structure of animations of biological motion (BM) affects brain activity. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during the perception of BM under four conditions: normal spatial and temporal structure; scrambled spatial and normal temporal structure; normal spatial and scrambled temporal structure; and…

  13. Abstract Linguistic Structure Correlates with Temporal Activity during Naturalistic Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan R.; Stabler, Edward P.; Van Wagenen, Sarah E.; Luh, Wen-Ming; Hale, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Neurolinguistic accounts of sentence comprehension identify a network of relevant brain regions, but do not detail the information flowing through them. We investigate syntactic information. Does brain activity implicate a computation over hierarchical grammars or does it simply reflect linear order, as in a Markov chain? To address this question, we quantify the cognitive states implied by alternative parsing models. We compare processing-complexity predictions from these states against fMRI timecourses from regions that have been implicated in sentence comprehension. We find that hierarchical grammars independently predict timecourses from left anterior and posterior temporal lobe. Markov models are predictive in these regions and across a broader network that includes the inferior frontal gyrus. These results suggest that while linear effects are wide-spread across the language network, certain areas in the left temporal lobe deal with abstract, hierarchical syntactic representations. PMID:27208858

  14. Temporal lobe structures and facial emotion recognition in schizophrenia patients and nonpsychotic relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goghari, Vina M; Macdonald, Angus W; Sponheim, Scott R

    2011-11-01

    Temporal lobe abnormalities and emotion recognition deficits are prominent features of schizophrenia and appear related to the diathesis of the disorder. This study investigated whether temporal lobe structural abnormalities were associated with facial emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia and related to genetic liability for the disorder. Twenty-seven schizophrenia patients, 23 biological family members, and 36 controls participated. Several temporal lobe regions (fusiform, superior temporal, middle temporal, amygdala, and hippocampus) previously associated with face recognition in normative samples and found to be abnormal in schizophrenia were evaluated using volumetric analyses. Participants completed a facial emotion recognition task and an age recognition control task under time-limited and self-paced conditions. Temporal lobe volumes were tested for associations with task performance. Group status explained 23% of the variance in temporal lobe volume. Left fusiform gray matter volume was decreased by 11% in patients and 7% in relatives compared with controls. Schizophrenia patients additionally exhibited smaller hippocampal and middle temporal volumes. Patients were unable to improve facial emotion recognition performance with unlimited time to make a judgment but were able to improve age recognition performance. Patients additionally showed a relationship between reduced temporal lobe gray matter and poor facial emotion recognition. For the middle temporal lobe region, the relationship between greater volume and better task performance was specific to facial emotion recognition and not age recognition. Because schizophrenia patients exhibited a specific deficit in emotion recognition not attributable to a generalized impairment in face perception, impaired emotion recognition may serve as a target for interventions.

  15. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornholdt, S. [Heidelberg Univ., (Germany). Inst., fuer Theoretische Physik; Graudenz, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback.

  16. General asymmetric neutral networks and structure design by genetic algorithms: A learning rule for temporal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornholdt, S.

    1993-07-01

    A learning algorithm based on genetic algorithms for asymmetric neural networks with an arbitrary structure is presented. It is suited for the learning of temporal patterns and leads to stable neural networks with feedback

  17. Telicity as a Cue to Temporal and Discourse Structure in Chinese-English Machine Translation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olsen, Mari; Traum, David; Van Ess-Dykema, Carol; Weinberg, Amy; Dolan, Ron

    2000-01-01

    ...) that must be explicit in English (e.g., by means of a discourse marker). Perfective and imperfective grammatical aspect markers can provide cues to temporal structure, but such information is not present in every sentence...

  18. Dispersal Ability Determines the Role of Environmental, Spatial and Temporal Drivers of Metacommunity Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padial, André A.; Ceschin, Fernanda; Declerck, Steven A. J.; De Meester, Luc; Bonecker, Cláudia C.; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio A.; Rodrigues, Liliana; Rodrigues, Luzia C.; Train, Sueli; Velho, Luiz F. M.; Bini, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, community ecologists are focusing on the relative importance of local environmental factors and proxies to dispersal limitation to explain spatial variation in community structure. Albeit less explored, temporal processes may also be important in explaining species composition variation in

  19. Characteristics of Spatial Structural Patterns and Temporal Variability of Annual Precipitation in Ningxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    无

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the characteristics of the spatial structural patterns and temporal variability of annual precipitation in Ningxia.[Method] Using rotated empirical orthogonal function,the precipitation concentration index,wavelet analysis and Mann-Kendall rank statistic method,the characteristics of precipitation on the spatial-temporal variability and trend were analyzed by the monthly precipitation series in Ningxia during 1951-2008.[Result] In Ningxia,the spatial structural patterns of a...

  20. Community Structure Analysis of Transcriptional Networks Reveals Distinct Molecular Pathways for Early- and Late-Onset Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Childhood Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Iamashita, Priscila; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Castro, Luiz Henrique Martins; Wen, Hung-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS) constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI) commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E) or late (L) disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i) the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE) and complete (CO) - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii) the study of interactions between all the system’s constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions) while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less able to

  1. Effect of Temporal Neocortical Pathology on Seizure Freeness in Adult Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerdere, Rahsan; Ahmedov, Merdin Lyutviev; Alizada, Orkhan; Yeni, Seher Naz; Oz, Buge; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2018-05-23

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsy. Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common dual pathology found in association with the hippocampal sclerosis. In this study, the effect of dual pathology on freedom from seizure was sought in patients with TLE. This study performed a retrospective analysis of patients with TLE who underwent surgery between 2010 and 2017. Histopathologic analysis was performed on patients with and without dual pathology in the temporal neocortex. Seizure outcomes were compared. A total of 54 patients with TLE were included. The rate of overall favorable seizure outcome was found to be 96.3%. In 53.7%, dual pathology was present in the temporal cortices in addition to the hippocampal sclerosis. Patients without dual pathology showed significantly greater freedom from seizure (P = 0.02). Patients without dual pathology had a significantly higher seizure-free rate after anterior temporal resection than patients with dual pathology. Resection of the temporal cortex in addition to mesial temporal structures seems to be reasonable for better seizure outcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal change in biological community structure in the Fountain Creek basin, Colorado, 2001-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Bruce, James F.; Stogner, Sr., Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Springs City Engineering, began a study to better understand the relations between environmental characteristics and biological communities in the Fountain Creek basin in order to aide water-resource management and guide future monitoring activities. To accomplish this task, environmental (streamflow, habitat, and water chemistry) and biological (fish and macroinvertebrate) data were collected annually at 24 sites over a 6- or 8-year period (fish, 2003 to 2008; macroinvertebrates, 2001 to 2008). For this report, these data were first analyzed to determine the presence of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure among years using nonparametric multivariate statistics. Where temporal change in the biological communities was found, these data were further analyzed using additional nonparametric multivariate techniques to determine which subset of selected streamflow, habitat, or water-chemistry variables best described site-specific changes in community structure relative to a gradient of urbanization. This study identified significant directional patterns of temporal change in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure at 15 of 24 sites in the Fountain Creek basin. At four of these sites, changes in environmental variables were significantly correlated with the concurrent temporal change identified in macroinvertebrate and fish community structure (Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Monument Creek at Bijou Street at Colorado Springs, Colo.; Bear Creek near Colorado Springs, Colo.; Fountain Creek at Security, Colo.). Combinations of environmental variables describing directional temporal change in the biota appeared to be site specific as no single variable dominated the results; however, substrate composition variables (percent substrate composition composed of sand, gravel, or cobble) collectively were present in 80 percent of the environmental

  3. Spectral properties of the temporal evolution of brain network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yong; Lin, Pan; Wu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution properties of the brain network are crucial for complex brain processes. In this paper, we investigate the differences in the dynamic brain network during resting and visual stimulation states in a task-positive subnetwork, task-negative subnetwork, and whole-brain network. The dynamic brain network is first constructed from human functional magnetic resonance imaging data based on the sliding window method, and then the eigenvalues corresponding to the network are calculated. We use eigenvalue analysis to analyze the global properties of eigenvalues and the random matrix theory (RMT) method to measure the local properties. For global properties, the shifting of the eigenvalue distribution and the decrease in the largest eigenvalue are linked to visual stimulation in all networks. For local properties, the short-range correlation in eigenvalues as measured by the nearest neighbor spacing distribution is not always sensitive to visual stimulation. However, the long-range correlation in eigenvalues as evaluated by spectral rigidity and number variance not only predicts the universal behavior of the dynamic brain network but also suggests non-consistent changes in different networks. These results demonstrate that the dynamic brain network is more random for the task-positive subnetwork and whole-brain network under visual stimulation but is more regular for the task-negative subnetwork. Our findings provide deeper insight into the importance of spectral properties in the functional brain network, especially the incomparable role of RMT in revealing the intrinsic properties of complex systems.

  4. Gender and hemispheric differences in temporal lobe epilepsy: a VBM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria Teresa Castilho Garcia; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Britto, Fernanda Dos Santos; Sandim, Gabriel Barbosa; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    Gender differences are recognized in the functional and anatomical organization of the human brain. Differences between genders are probably expressed early in life, when differential rates of cerebral maturation occur. Sexual dimorphism has been described in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Several voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have shown that TLE-MTS extends beyond mesial temporal structures, and that there are differences in the extent of anatomical damage between hemispheres, although none have approached gender differences. Our aim was to investigate gender differences and anatomical abnormalities in TLE-MTS. VBM5 was employed to analyze gender and hemispheric differences in 120 patients with TLE-MTS and 50 controls. VBM abnormalities were more widespread in left-TLE; while in women changes were mostly seen in temporal areas, frontal regions were more affected in men. Our study confirmed that gender and laterality are important factors determining the nature and severity of brain damage in TLE-MTS. Differential rates of maturation between gender and hemispheres may explain the distinct areas of anatomical damage in men and women. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal structure of consciousness and minimal self in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice eMartin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the minimal self refers to the consciousness of oneself as an immediate subject of experience. According to recent studies, disturbances of the minimal self may be a core feature of schizophrenia. They are emphasized in classical psychiatry literature and in phenomenological work. Impaired minimal self experience may be defined as a distortion of one’s first-person experiential perspective as, for example, an ‘altered presence’ during which the sense of the experienced self (‘mineness’ is subtly affected, or ‘altered sense of demarcation’, i.e. a difficulty discriminating the self from the non-self. Little is known, however, about the cognitive basis of these disturbances. In fact, recent work indicates that disorders of the self are not correlated with cognitive impairments commonly found in schizophrenia such as working-memory and attention disorders. In addition, a major difficulty with exploring the minimal self experimentally lies in its definition as being non self-reflexive, and distinct from the verbalized, explicit awareness of an ‘I’.In this paper we shall discuss the possibility that disturbances of the minimal self observed in patients with schizophrenia are related to alterations in time processing. We shall review the literature on schizophrenia and time processing that lends support to this possibility. In particular we shall discuss the involvement of temporal integration windows on different time scales (implicit time processing as well as duration perception disturbances (explicit time processing in disorders of the minimal self. We argue that a better understanding of the relationship between time and the minimal self as well of issues of embodiment require research that looks more specifically at implicit time processing. Some methodological issues will be discussed.

  6. Correlations of External Landmarks With Internal Structures of the Temporal Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piromchai, Patorn; Wijewickrema, Sudanthi; Smeds, Henrik; Kennedy, Gregor; O'Leary, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The internal anatomy of a temporal bone could be inferred from external landmarks. Mastoid surgery is an important skill that ENT surgeons need to acquire. Surgeons commonly use CT scans as a guide to understanding anatomical variations before surgery. Conversely, in cases where CT scans are not available, or in the temporal bone laboratory where residents are usually not provided with CT scans, it would be beneficial if the internal anatomy of a temporal bone could be inferred from external landmarks. We explored correlations between internal anatomical variations and metrics established to quantify the position of external landmarks that are commonly exposed in the operating room, or the temporal bone laboratory, before commencement of drilling. Mathematical models were developed to predict internal anatomy based on external structures. From an operating room view, the distances between the following external landmarks were observed to have statistically significant correlations with the internal anatomy of a temporal bone: temporal line, external auditory canal, mastoid tip, occipitomastoid suture, and Henle's spine. These structures can be used to infer a low lying dura mater (p = 0.002), an anteriorly located sigmoid sinus (p = 0.006), and a more lateral course of the facial nerve (p external landmarks. The distances between these two landmarks and the operating view external structures were able to further infer the laterality of the facial nerve (p internal structures with a high level of accuracy: the distance from the sigmoid sinus to the posterior external auditory canal (p external landmarks found on the temporal bone. These relationships could be used as a guideline to predict challenges during drilling and choosing appropriate temporal bones for dissection.

  7. Differentiation of medial or lateral temporal lobe epilepsy by F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography: comparative study with magnetic resonance imaging in 113 surgically and pathologically proven patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Kun; Chang, Ki Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Choi, Ki Young; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    1999-01-01

    As mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) shows hypometabolism of medial and lateral temporal lobe, we investigated whether symmetric uptake of F-18-FDG in medial temporal lobes can differentiate mesial from lateral TLE. In 113 patients (83 mesial TLE, 30 lateral TLE) who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy and/or corticectomy with good surgical outcome, we performed F-18-FDG PET and compared F-18-FDG uptake of medial and lateral temporal lobes. All the patients with mesial TLE had hippocampal sclerosis except one congenital abnormal hippocampus. Patients with lateral TLE revealed cerebromalacia, microdysgenesis, arteriovenous malformation, old contusion, and cortical dysplasia. Sensitivity of F-18-FDG PET and MR for mesial TLE was 84% (70/83) and 73% (62/83), respectively. Sensitivity of F-18-FDG PET and MR for lateral TLE was 90% (27/30) and 66% (20/30), respectively. Twelve patients were normal on F-18-FDG PET. 101 patients had hypometabolism of lateral temporal lobe. Among 88 patients who showed hypometabolism of medial temporal lobe as well as lateral temporal lobe, 70 were mesial TLE patients and 18 were lateral TLE on pathologic examination. Positive predictive value of medial temporal hypometabolism for mesial TLE was 80%. Among 13 patients who showed hypometabolism of only lateral temporal lobe, 4 were mesial TLE and 9 were lateral TLE. Positive predictive value of hypometabolism of lateral temporal lobe for the diagnosis of lateral TLE was 69% (9/ 13). Normal MR findings stood against medial TLE, whose negative predictive value was 66%. Lateral temporal lobe epilepsy should be suspected when there is decreased F-18-FDG uptake in lateral temporal lobe with normal uptake in medial temporal lobe

  8. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-05-10

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants' neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants' neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants' neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants' ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing.

  9. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  10. Deciphering structural and temporal interplays during the architectural development of mango trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambreville, Anaëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Trottier, Catherine; Guédon, Yann; Normand, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    Plant architecture is commonly defined by the adjacency of organs within the structure and their properties. Few studies consider the effect of endogenous temporal factors, namely phenological factors, on the establishment of plant architecture. This study hypothesized that, in addition to the effect of environmental factors, the observed plant architecture results from both endogenous structural and temporal components, and their interplays. Mango tree, which is characterized by strong phenological asynchronisms within and between trees and by repeated vegetative and reproductive flushes during a growing cycle, was chosen as a plant model. During two consecutive growing cycles, this study described vegetative and reproductive development of 20 trees submitted to the same environmental conditions. Four mango cultivars were considered to assess possible cultivar-specific patterns. Integrative vegetative and reproductive development models incorporating generalized linear models as components were built. These models described the occurrence, intensity, and timing of vegetative and reproductive development at the growth unit scale. This study showed significant interplays between structural and temporal components of plant architectural development at two temporal scales. Within a growing cycle, earliness of bud burst was highly and positively related to earliness of vegetative development and flowering. Between growing cycles, flowering growth units delayed vegetative development compared to growth units that did not flower. These interplays explained how vegetative and reproductive phenological asynchronisms within and between trees were generated and maintained. It is suggested that causation networks involving structural and temporal components may give rise to contrasted tree architectures.

  11. Middle mesial canals in mandibular molars: incidence and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Ali; Deschenes, Raney J; Tordik, Patricia A; Hicks, M Lamar; Fouad, Ashraf F

    2015-01-01

    Although the internal anatomy of mandibular molars has been extensively studied, information about middle mesial (MM) canals is limited. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence of MM canals in mandibular first and second molars. The secondary aim was to correlate the incidence of MM canals with variables of molar type, sex, age, ethnicity, and presence of a second distal canal. All mature permanent first and second mandibular molars treated from August 2012 to May 2014 were included in the analysis. After completion of root canal instrumentation in all main canals, the clinician inspected the isthmus area of the mesial root using the dental operating microscope. If there was a catch point in this area with a file or explorer, the operator spent more time attempting to negotiate an MM canal. Seventy-five mandibular first and second molars were treated during the specified period. Fifteen (20%) teeth had negotiable MM canals. The incidence of MM canals was 32.1% in patients ≤ 20 years old, 23.8% in patients 21-40 years old, and 3.8% in patients > 40 years. Analysis of data revealed a significant difference in the distribution of MM canals among different age groups (P molar type, and presence of a second distal canal were not significant. The incidence of negotiable MM canals overall and their frequency of identification in younger patients were higher than in previous reports. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hierarchical organization in the temporal structure of infant-direct speech and song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Simone; Kello, Christopher T

    2017-06-01

    Caregivers alter the temporal structure of their utterances when talking and singing to infants compared with adult communication. The present study tested whether temporal variability in infant-directed registers serves to emphasize the hierarchical temporal structure of speech. Fifteen German-speaking mothers sang a play song and told a story to their 6-months-old infants, or to an adult. Recordings were analyzed using a recently developed method that determines the degree of nested clustering of temporal events in speech. Events were defined as peaks in the amplitude envelope, and clusters of various sizes related to periods of acoustic speech energy at varying timescales. Infant-directed speech and song clearly showed greater event clustering compared with adult-directed registers, at multiple timescales of hundreds of milliseconds to tens of seconds. We discuss the relation of this newly discovered acoustic property to temporal variability in linguistic units and its potential implications for parent-infant communication and infants learning the hierarchical structures of speech and language. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mandibular second molar with 3 mesial canals and a radix paramolaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ragavendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular first molar commonly has two roots, the mesial and the distal root. Surprisingly in some mandibular first molar has an unusual extra third root in between mesial and distal root. This extra root is the most commonly seen in lingual side and is called as radix entomolaris. If this extra root is seen on the buccal side, it is termed as radix paramolaris (RP, which is a very rare phenomenon. Recently, various case report studies has shown the presence of third canal in the mesial and distal roots of mandibular molars. They are named as middle mesial and middle distal canal, respectively. Here, we present a case report of mandibular second molar showing three canals in the mesial root and a RP.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Extent of Ion Spectral Structures at the Inner Edge of the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Reeves, G. D.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-12-01

    Several ion spectral structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift and loss in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. Their study helps us understand ion access and losses in this region. Several studies have found that these structures vary with geomagnetic activity, local time, and ion species, but their spatial and temporal extent remain undetermined. We use data from the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometers onboard the Van Allen Probes to analyze the spectral structures in the energy range of 1- 50 keV. HOPE measurements on both Van Allen Probes spacecraft enable us to resolve the extent of these ion structures in space and time. As the structures respond to changes in the convection electric field on a variety of time scales, the lapping of the two spacecraft on time scales of minutes to hours helps determine their spatial and temporal evolution.

  15. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Tomography and Purification of the Temporal-Mode Structure of Quantum Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Vahid; Donohue, John M.; Allgaier, Markus; Sansoni, Linda; Brecht, Benjamin; Roslund, Jonathan; Treps, Nicolas; Harder, Georg; Silberhorn, Christine

    2018-05-01

    High-dimensional quantum information processing promises capabilities beyond the current state of the art, but addressing individual information-carrying modes presents a significant experimental challenge. Here we demonstrate effective high-dimensional operations in the time-frequency domain of nonclassical light. We generate heralded photons with tailored temporal-mode structures through the pulse shaping of a broadband parametric down-conversion pump. We then implement a quantum pulse gate, enabled by dispersion-engineered sum-frequency generation, to project onto programmable temporal modes, reconstructing the quantum state in seven dimensions. We also manipulate the time-frequency structure by selectively removing temporal modes, explicitly demonstrating the effectiveness of engineered nonlinear processes for the mode-selective manipulation of quantum states.

  17. On the relationship between multi-channel envelope and temporal fine structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel; Decorsiere, Remi Julien Blaise; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The envelope of a signal is broadly defined as the slow changes in time of the signal, where as the temporal fine structure (TFS) are the fast changes in time, i.e. the carrier wave(s) of the signal. The focus of this paper is on envelope and TFS in multi-channel systems. We discuss the differenc...

  18. Syntactic Structure Building in the Anterior Temporal Lobe during Natural Story Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan; Nir, Yuval; Hasson, Uri; Malach, Rafael; Heeger, David J.; Pylkkanen, Liina

    2012-01-01

    The neural basis of syntax is a matter of substantial debate. In particular, the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), or Broca's area, has been prominently linked to syntactic processing, but the anterior temporal lobe has been reported to be activated instead of IFG when manipulating the presence of syntactic structure. These findings are difficult to…

  19. Preoperative MR imaging-based volume measurements of the hippocampal formation and anterior temporal lobe in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack, C.R.; Sharbrough, F.W.; Twomey, C.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Cascino, G.D.; Hirschorn, K.A.; Marsh, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    MR-based volume measurements of the anterior temporal lobe and hippocampal formation were performed in 36 patients who subsequently underwent surgery for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure lateralization was based on standard clinical and electroencephalographic criteria. No surgical pathologic specimens contained structural lesions; epilepsy in these patients was therefore presumably due to mesial sclerosis. The right-minus-left hippocampal formation volume difference was greater than 0 in all 20 patients operated on the left side and less than 0 in all 16 patients operated on the right side. This difference completely separated the two surgical groups, while the same measurement in a group of 35 normal controls fell between the two surgical groups. Measurements of the anterior temporal to be showed a similar trend but incompletely separated controls, right- and left-sided epileptics. These results suggest that in a significant percentage of cases, MR-based volume measurements correctly identify the unilateral hippocampal atrophy that is known to occur in cases of mesial temporal sclerosis

  20. Temporal event structure and timing in schizophrenia: preserved binding in a longer "now".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brice; Giersch, Anne; Huron, Caroline; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia experience a loss of temporal continuity or subjective fragmentation along the temporal dimension. Here, we develop the hypothesis that impaired temporal awareness results from a perturbed structuring of events in time-i.e., canonical neural dynamics. To address this, 26 patients and their matched controls took part in two psychophysical studies using desynchronized audiovisual speech. Two tasks were used and compared: first, an identification task testing for multisensory binding impairments in which participants reported what they heard while looking at a speaker's face; in a second task, we tested the perceived simultaneity of the same audiovisual speech stimuli. In both tasks, we used McGurk fusion and combination that are classic ecologically valid multisensory illusions. First, and contrary to previous reports, our results show that patients do not significantly differ from controls in their rate of illusory reports. Second, the illusory reports of patients in the identification task were more sensitive to audiovisual speech desynchronies than those of controls. Third, and surprisingly, patients considered audiovisual speech to be synchronized for longer delays than controls. As such, the temporal tolerance profile observed in a temporal judgement task was less of a predictor for sensory binding in schizophrenia than for that obtained in controls. We interpret our results as an impairment of temporal event structuring in schizophrenia which does not specifically affect sensory binding operations but rather, the explicit access to timing information associated here with audiovisual speech processing. Our findings are discussed in the context of curent neurophysiological frameworks for the binding and the structuring of sensory events in time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Grasping the mechanisms of narratives' incoherence in schizophrenia: an analysis of the temporal structure of patients' life story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allé, M C; Gandolphe, M-C; Doba, K; Köber, C; Potheegadoo, J; Coutelle, R; Habermas, T; Nandrino, J-L; Danion, J-M; Berna, F

    2016-08-01

    Life narratives of patients with schizophrenia are characterized by impaired coherence so that the listener has often difficulties to grasp the life trajectory of the patients. In order to better understand what causes this reduced temporal coherence, we investigated the temporal structure of patients' life narratives through different temporal narrative elements (elaboration of beginnings and endings, local temporal indicators and temporal deviations from a linear order), across two complementary studies. Life narratives were collected by means of two different methods; a free recall in study 1 and a more structured protocol, aiming at reducing the cognitive task demands in study 2. All narratives from the two studies were analyzed using the same validated method. Both studies showed that global temporal coherence is significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia (ps.02). This is mainly due to their stronger tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order without marking the deviation as such. We also observed significant correlations in the patient groups between global temporal coherence and executive dysfunction (p=.008) or their higher tendency to temporally deviate from a linear temporal order in their life narratives (p<.001). These results shed light on narrative correlates of temporal narrative incoherence in schizophrenia and highlight the central role of executive dysfunction in this incoherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal plus epilepsy: Anatomo-electroclinical subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Machado, René; Benjumea-Cuartas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a remediable epileptic syndrome. About 40% of patients continue to have seizures after standard temporal lobectomy. It has been suggested that some of these patients could actually suffer from a more complex epileptogenic network. Because a few papers have been dedicated to this topic, we decided to write an article updating this theme. Methods: We performed a literature search using the following terminology: “temporal plus epilepsy and networks,” “temporal plus epilepsy,” “orbito-temporal epilepsy,” “temporo-insular epilepsy,” “temporo-parieto-occipital (TPO) epilepsy,” “parieto-temporal epilepsy,” “intracortical evoked potential and temporal plus epilepsy,” “temporal lobe connectivity and epilepsy,” “intracortical evoked potential and epilepsy surgery,” “role of extratemporal structures in TLE,” “surgical failure after temporal lobectomy,” “Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and temporal epilepsy,” and “positron emission tomography (PET) in temporal plus lobe epilepsy” in the existing PubMed databases. We searched only English and Spanish literature. Only papers that fit with the above-mentioned descriptors were included as part of the evidence. Other articles were used to reference some aspects of the temporal plus epilepsy. Results: A total of 48 papers from 2334 were revised. The most frequently reported auras in these groups of patients are gustatory hallucinations, vestibular illusions, laryngeal and throat constriction, atypical distribution of somatosensory symptoms (perioral and hands, bilaterally hands paresthesias, trunk and other). The most common signs are tonic posturing, hemifacial twist, and frequent bilateral clonic movements. Interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns exhibit regional and frequently bilateral spikes and/or slow waves. The first ictal electrographic change is mostly regional. It is important to note that the evidence is

  3. Dispersal Ability Determines the Role of Environmental, Spatial and Temporal Drivers of Metacommunity Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial, André A.; Ceschin, Fernanda; Declerck, Steven A. J.; De Meester, Luc; Bonecker, Cláudia C.; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio A.; Rodrigues, Liliana; Rodrigues, Luzia C.; Train, Sueli; Velho, Luiz F. M.; Bini, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, community ecologists are focusing on the relative importance of local environmental factors and proxies to dispersal limitation to explain spatial variation in community structure. Albeit less explored, temporal processes may also be important in explaining species composition variation in metacommunities occupying dynamic systems. We aimed to evaluate the relative role of environmental, spatial and temporal variables on the metacommunity structure of different organism groups in the Upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil). We used data on macrophytes, fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton, periphyton, and phytoplankton collected in up to 36 habitats during a total of eight sampling campaigns over two years. According to variation partitioning results, the importance of predictors varied among biological groups. Spatial predictors were particularly important for organisms with comparatively lower dispersal ability, such as aquatic macrophytes and fish. On the other hand, environmental predictors were particularly important for organisms with high dispersal ability, such as microalgae, indicating the importance of species sorting processes in shaping the community structure of these organisms. The importance of watercourse distances increased when spatial variables were the main predictors of metacommunity structure. The contribution of temporal predictors was low. Our results emphasize the strength of a trait-based analysis and of better defining spatial variables. More importantly, they supported the view that “all-or- nothing” interpretations on the mechanisms structuring metacommunities are rather the exception than the rule. PMID:25340577

  4. Dream recall frequency and content in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Costa, João; Peralta, Rita; Pires, Joana; Sousa, Paula; Paiva, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate morning dream recall frequency and content in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Fifty-two patients with pharmacoresistant TLE submitted to a written dream diary during five consecutive days and continuous video-electroencephalographic (video-EEG) monitoring. A matched control group of 41 healthy subjects completed the same diary at home. The number of recalled dreams (including long dreams) and nonrecalled dream mentation were collected, and the Dream Recall Rate (DRR) was calculated. Hall and Van de Castle dream content analysis was performed. Greater than 70% of patients with TLE (37 of 52) recall their dreams, but DRR rate in these patients is lower than in controls (p ≤ 0.001). Dream recall does not appear to be influenced by the presence of neuropsychological deficits nor seizure frequency. In dreams descriptions, TLE patients (vs. controls) have a higher percentage of familiarity in settings and fewer dreams with at least one success. Onirical activity of patients with TLE is different from that of healthy subjects. Our results support the role of mesial and neocortical temporal structures in dream experience. The selective activation of dysfunctional mesial structures may be responsible for some of the observed variability. However, dream content changes can also mirror social and psychological comorbidities of patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Segregation of Brain Structural Networks Supports Spatio-Temporal Predictive Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Ciullo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to generate probabilistic expectancies regarding when and where sensory stimuli will occur, is critical to derive timely and accurate inferences about updating contexts. However, the existence of specialized neural networks for inferring predictive relationships between events is still debated. Using graph theoretical analysis applied to structural connectivity data, we tested the extent of brain connectivity properties associated with spatio-temporal predictive performance across 29 healthy subjects. Participants detected visual targets appearing at one out of three locations after one out of three intervals; expectations about stimulus location (spatial condition or onset (temporal condition were induced by valid or invalid symbolic cues. Connectivity matrices and centrality/segregation measures, expressing the relative importance of, and the local interactions among specific cerebral areas respect to the behavior under investigation, were calculated from whole-brain tractography and cortico-subcortical parcellation.Results: Response preparedness to cued stimuli relied on different structural connectivity networks for the temporal and spatial domains. Significant covariance was observed between centrality measures of regions within a subcortical-fronto-parietal-occipital network -comprising the left putamen, the right caudate nucleus, the left frontal operculum, the right inferior parietal cortex, the right paracentral lobule and the right superior occipital cortex-, and the ability to respond after a short cue-target delay suggesting that the local connectedness of such nodes plays a central role when the source of temporal expectation is explicit. When the potential for functional segregation was tested, we found highly clustered structural connectivity across the right superior, the left middle inferior frontal gyrus and the left caudate nucleus as related to explicit temporal orienting. Conversely, when the interaction between

  6. Segregation of Brain Structural Networks Supports Spatio-Temporal Predictive Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciullo, Valentina; Vecchio, Daniela; Gili, Tommaso; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Piras, Federica

    2018-01-01

    The ability to generate probabilistic expectancies regarding when and where sensory stimuli will occur, is critical to derive timely and accurate inferences about updating contexts. However, the existence of specialized neural networks for inferring predictive relationships between events is still debated. Using graph theoretical analysis applied to structural connectivity data, we tested the extent of brain connectivity properties associated with spatio-temporal predictive performance across 29 healthy subjects. Participants detected visual targets appearing at one out of three locations after one out of three intervals; expectations about stimulus location (spatial condition) or onset (temporal condition) were induced by valid or invalid symbolic cues. Connectivity matrices and centrality/segregation measures, expressing the relative importance of, and the local interactions among specific cerebral areas respect to the behavior under investigation, were calculated from whole-brain tractography and cortico-subcortical parcellation. Results: Response preparedness to cued stimuli relied on different structural connectivity networks for the temporal and spatial domains. Significant covariance was observed between centrality measures of regions within a subcortical-fronto-parietal-occipital network -comprising the left putamen, the right caudate nucleus, the left frontal operculum, the right inferior parietal cortex, the right paracentral lobule and the right superior occipital cortex-, and the ability to respond after a short cue-target delay suggesting that the local connectedness of such nodes plays a central role when the source of temporal expectation is explicit. When the potential for functional segregation was tested, we found highly clustered structural connectivity across the right superior, the left middle inferior frontal gyrus and the left caudate nucleus as related to explicit temporal orienting. Conversely, when the interaction between explicit and

  7. Contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure across lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M; Thomas, Michael S C; Filippi, Roberto; Harth, Helen; Price, Cathy J

    2010-05-01

    Using behavioral, structural, and functional imaging techniques, we demonstrate contrasting effects of vocabulary knowledge on temporal and parietal brain structure in 47 healthy volunteers who ranged in age from 7 to 73 years. In the left posterior supramarginal gyrus, vocabulary knowledge was positively correlated with gray matter density in teenagers but not adults. This region was not activated during auditory or visual sentence processing, and activation was unrelated to vocabulary skills. Its gray matter density may reflect the use of an explicit learning strategy that links new words to lexical or conceptual equivalents, as used in formal education and second language acquisition. By contrast, in left posterior temporal regions, gray matter as well as auditory and visual sentence activation correlated with vocabulary knowledge throughout lifespan. We propose that these effects reflect the acquisition of vocabulary through context, when new words are learnt within the context of semantically and syntactically related words.

  8. AN INVESTIGATION OF IMPLICIT MEMORY THROUGH LEFT TEMPORAL LOBECTOMY FOR EPILEPSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Joseph I.; Osipowicz, Karol; Godofsky, Samuel; Shah, Atif; Khan, Waseem; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy patients have demonstrated a relative preservation in the integrity of implicit memory procedures. We examined performance in a verbal implicit and explicit memory task in left anterior temporal lobectomy patients (LATL) and healthy normal controls (NC) while undergoing fMRI. We hypothesized that despite the relative integrity of implicit memory in both the LATL patients and normal controls, the two groups would show distinct functional neuroanatomic profiles during implicit memory. LATLs and NCs performed Jacoby’s Process Dissociation Process (PDP) procedure during fMRI, requiring completion of word stems based on the previously studied words or new/unseen words. Measures of automaticity and recollection provided uncontaminated indices of implicit and explicit memory, respectively. The behavioral data showed that in the face of temporal lobe pathology implicit memory can be carried out, suggesting implicit verbal memory retrieval is non-mesial temporal in nature. Compared to NCs, the LATL patients showed reliable activation, not deactivation, during implicit (automatic) responding. The regions mediating this response were cortical (left medial frontal and precuneus) and striatal. The active regions in LATL patients have the capacity to implement associative, conditioned responses that might otherwise be carried out by a healthy temporal lobe, suggesting this represented a compensatory activity. Because the precuneus has also been implicated in explicit memory, the data suggests this structure may have a highly flexible functionality, capable of supporting implementation of either explicit memory, or automatic processes such as implicit memory retrieval. Our data suggest that a healthy mesial/anterior temporal lobe may be needed for generating the posterior deactivation perceptual priming response seen in normals. PMID:22981890

  9. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Brian C. J.; S?k, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated h...

  10. Decreased functional connectivity and structural deficit in alertness network with right-sided temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yujun; Zheng, Jinou; Li, Yaping; Guo, Danni; Wang, Mingli; Cui, Xiangxiang; Ye, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) often suffer from alertness alterations. However, specific regions connected with alertness remain controversial, and whether these regions have structural impairment is also elusive. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics and neural mechanisms underlying the functions and structures of alertness network in patients with right-sided temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE) by performing the attentional network test (ANT), resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-SfMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).A total of 47 patients with rTLE and 34 healthy controls underwent ANT, R-SfMRI, and DTI scan. The seed-based functional connectivity (FC) method and deterministic tractography were used to analyze the data.Patients with rTLE had longer reaction times in the no-cue and double-cue conditions. However, no differences were noted in the alertness effect between the 2 groups. The patient group had lower FC compared with the control group in the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), amygdala, and insula. Structural deficits were found in the right parahippocampal gyrus, superior temporal pole, insula, and amygdala in the patient group compared with the control group. Also significantly negative correlations were observed between abnormal fractional anisotropy (between the right insula and the superior temporal pole) and illness duration in the patients with rTLE.The findings of this study suggested abnormal intrinsic and phasic alertness, decreased FC, and structural deficits within the alerting network in the rTLE. This study provided new insights into the mechanisms of alertness alterations in rTLE.

  11. Visualization of subtle temporal bone structures. Comparison of cone beam CT and MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pein, M.K.; Plontke, S.K.; Brandt, S.; Koesling, S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the visualization of subtle, non-pathological temporal bone structures on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in vivo. Temporal bone studies of images from 38 patients archived in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) were analyzed (slice thickness MDCT 0.6 mm and CBCT 0.125 mm) of which 23 were imaged by MDCT and 15 by CBCT using optimized standard protocols. Inclusion criteria were normal radiological findings, absence of previous surgery and anatomical variants. Images were evaluated blind by three trained observers. Using a five-point scale the visualization of ten subtle structures of the temporal bone was analyzed. Subtle middle ear structures showed a tendency to be more easily distinguishable by CBCT with significantly better visualization of the tendon of the stapedius muscle and the crura of the stapes on CBCT (p = 0.003 and p = 0.033, respectively). In contrast, inner ear components, such as the osseus spiral lamina and the modiolus tended to be better detectable on MDCT, showing significant differences for the osseous spiral lamina (p = 0.001). The interrater reliability was 0.73 (Cohen's kappa coefficient) and intraobserver reliability was 0.89. The use of CBCT and MDCT allows equivalent and excellent imaging results if optimized protocols are chosen. With both imaging techniques subtle temporal bone structures could be visualized with a similar degree of definition. In vivo differences do not seem to be as large as suggested in several previous studies. (orig.) [de

  12. Spatio-Temporal Story Mapping Animation Based On Structured Causal Relationships Of Historical Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Y.; Tsuruoka, K.; Arikawa, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we proposed a user interface that displays visual animations on geographic maps and timelines for depicting historical stories by representing causal relationships among events for time series. We have been developing an experimental software system for the spatial-temporal visualization of historical stories for tablet computers. Our proposed system makes people effectively learn historical stories using visual animations based on hierarchical structures of different scale timelines and maps.

  13. A mandibular third molar with three mesial roots: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca

    2008-02-01

    Although its most common configuration is 2 roots and 3 root canals, mandibular molars might have many different combinations. A case of unusual root canal morphology is presented to demonstrate anatomic variations in mandibular molars. Endodontic therapy was performed in a mandibular third molar with 3 separate mesial roots. The appearance of the pulp chamber floor revealed 4 separate canal orifices. Radiographically the 4 root canals ended in their own distinct foramen. Many reports deal with 3 orifices or 3 independent canals in the mesial root, but none described 3 mesial canals in 3 separate mesial roots, indicating a rare anatomic configuration. This report points out the importance of looking for additional canals and unusual canal morphology, because knowledge of their existence might occasionally enable clinicians to treat a case successfully that otherwise might have ended in failure.

  14. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  15. A study using computerized tomography in the clinical practice of temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kunimitsu

    1982-01-01

    The author has studied about analysis of clinical data and CT findings examined conventional method for 50 cases of temporal lobe epilepsy and how to assess the foci of temporal lobe by CT. According to the examination of conventional neuroradiologic technique and routine work of CT for temporal lobe epilepsy, an extreme space occuping lesions were detected and marked cerebral atrophy, low density area in temporal lobe were found out, but, most of them were not able to detect foci of the temporal lobe and yet, the study of CT number based on the print out data did not give any precise informations about epileptogenic lesions of temporal lobe epilepsy. The method of reversed axial section CT was designed to photograph inferior horn of lateral ventricles with the purpose to delineate the hippocampus and amygdata, and precise pictures from autopsy brain and clinical cases were obtained by that method about scanning angle of reversed axial section CT, various angles are made an experiment on scanning, such as reversed 15 0 , 20 0 , 25 0 , 30 0 , 35 0 . Among them, it is proved that the reversed angle of almost 25 0 is most suitable to delineate mesial temporal structure, so as to say, foci of the temporal lobe. (J.P.N.)

  16. Analysis in temporal regime of dispersive invisible structures designed from transformation optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralak, B.; Arismendi, G.; Avril, B.; Diatta, A.; Guenneau, S.

    2016-03-01

    A simple invisible structure made of two anisotropic homogeneous layers is analyzed theoretically in temporal regime. The frequency dispersion is introduced and analytic expression of the transient part of the field is derived for large times when the structure is illuminated by a causal excitation. This expression shows that the limiting amplitude principle applies with transient fields decaying as the power -3 /4 of the time. The quality of the cloak is then reduced at short times and remains preserved at large times. The one-dimensional theoretical analysis is supplemented with full-wave numerical simulations in two-dimensional situations which confirm the effect of dispersion.

  17. Structured spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable fo...... dataset consisting of 2796 days and 5834 spatial locations of fires. The model is compared with a spatio-temporal log-Gaussian Cox point process model, and likelihood-based methods are discussed to some extent....

  18. Temporal genetic population structure and interannual variation in migration behavior of Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin J.; Wyss, Lance A.; McCoun, Rebecca; Courter, Ian; Schwabe, Lawrence; Peery, Christopher; Schreck, Carl B.; Spice, Erin K.; Docker, Margaret F.

    2017-01-01

    Studies using neutral loci suggest that Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, lack strong spatial genetic population structure. However, it is unknown whether temporal genetic population structure exists. We tested whether adult Pacific lamprey: (1) show temporal genetic population structure; and (2) migrate different distances between years. We non-lethally sampled lamprey for DNA in 2009 and 2010 and used eight microsatellite loci to test for genetic population structure. We used telemetry to record the migration behaviors of these fish. Lamprey were assignable to three moderately differentiated genetic clusters (FST = 0.16–0.24 for all pairwise comparisons): one cluster was composed of individuals from 2009, and the other two contained individuals from 2010. The FST value between years was 0.13 and between genetic clusters within 2010 was 0.20. A total of 372 (72.5%) fish were detected multiple times during their migrations. Most fish (69.9%) remained in the mainstem Willamette River; the remaining 30.1% migrated into tributaries. Eighty-two lamprey exhibited multiple back-and-forth movements among tributaries and the mainstem, which may indicate searching behaviors. All migration distances were significantly greater in 2010, when the amplitude of river discharge was greater. Our data suggest genetic structuring between and within years that may reflect different cohorts.

  19. Temporal and spatial influences incur reconfiguration of Arctic heathland soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard; Saetnan, Eli R; Scullion, John; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Ostle, Nick; Edwards, Arwyn

    2016-06-01

    Microbial responses to Arctic climate change could radically alter the stability of major stores of soil carbon. However, the sensitivity of plot-scale experiments simulating climate change effects on Arctic heathland soils to potential confounding effects of spatial and temporal changes in soil microbial communities is unknown. Here, the variation in heathland soil bacterial communities at two survey sites in Sweden between spring and summer 2013 and at scales between 0-1 m and, 1-100 m and between sites (> 100 m) were investigated in parallel using 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP and amplicon sequencing. T-RFLP did not reveal spatial structuring of communities at scales structuring effects may not confound comparison between plot-scale treatments, temporal change is a significant influence. Moreover, the prominence of two temporally exclusive keystone taxa suggests that the stability of Arctic heathland soil bacterial communities could be disproportionally influenced by seasonal perturbations affecting individual taxa. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Detecting the Community Structure and Activity Patterns of Temporal Networks: A Non-Negative Tensor Factorization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Panisson, André; Cattuto, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of temporal network data is calling for more research on extracting and characterizing mesoscopic structures in temporal networks and on relating such structure to specific functions or properties of the system. An outstanding challenge is the extension of the results achieved for static networks to time-varying networks, where the topological structure of the system and the temporal activity patterns of its components are intertwined. Here we investigate the use of a latent factor decomposition technique, non-negative tensor factorization, to extract the community-activity structure of temporal networks. The method is intrinsically temporal and allows to simultaneously identify communities and to track their activity over time. We represent the time-varying adjacency matrix of a temporal network as a three-way tensor and approximate this tensor as a sum of terms that can be interpreted as communities of nodes with an associated activity time series. We summarize known computational techniques for tensor decomposition and discuss some quality metrics that can be used to tune the complexity of the factorized representation. We subsequently apply tensor factorization to a temporal network for which a ground truth is available for both the community structure and the temporal activity patterns. The data we use describe the social interactions of students in a school, the associations between students and school classes, and the spatio-temporal trajectories of students over time. We show that non-negative tensor factorization is capable of recovering the class structure with high accuracy. In particular, the extracted tensor components can be validated either as known school classes, or in terms of correlated activity patterns, i.e., of spatial and temporal coincidences that are determined by the known school activity schedule. PMID:24497935

  1. Near equilibrium dynamics and one-dimensional spatial—temporal structures of polar active liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiao-Gang; Wang Qi; Forest, M. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We systematically explore near equilibrium, flow-driven, and flow-activity coupled dynamics of polar active liquid crystals using a continuum model. Firstly, we re-derive the hydrodynamic model to ensure the thermodynamic laws are obeyed and elastic stresses and forces are consistently accounted. We then carry out a linear stability analysis about constant steady states to study near equilibrium dynamics around the steady states, revealing long-wave instability inherent in this model system and how active parameters in the model affect the instability. We then study model predictions for one-dimensional (1D) spatial—temporal structures of active liquid crystals in a channel subject to physical boundary conditions. We discuss the model prediction in two selected regimes, one is the viscous stress dominated regime, also known as the flow-driven regime, while the other is the full regime, in which all active mechanisms are included. In the viscous stress dominated regime, the polarity vector is driven by the prescribed flow field. Dynamics depend sensitively on the physical boundary condition and the type of the driven flow field. Bulk-dominated temporal periodic states and spatially homogeneous states are possible under weak anchoring conditions while spatially inhomogeneous states exist under strong anchoring conditions. In the full model, flow-orientation interaction generates a host of planar as well as out-of-plane spatial—temporal structures related to the spontaneous flows due to the molecular self-propelled motion. These results provide contact with the recent literature on active nematic suspensions. In addition, symmetry breaking patterns emerge as the additional active viscous stress due to the polarity vector is included in the force balance. The inertia effect is found to limit the long-time survival of spatial structures to those with small wave numbers, i.e., an asymptotic coarsening to long wave structures. A rich set of mechanisms for generating

  2. Impaired perception of temporal fine structure and musical timbre in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Joseph; Cantarero, Gabriela; Elhilali, Mounya; Limb, Charles J

    2011-10-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users demonstrate severe limitations in perceiving musical timbre, a psychoacoustic feature of sound responsible for 'tone color' and one's ability to identify a musical instrument. The reasons for this limitation remain poorly understood. In this study, we sought to examine the relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure for timbre judgments, in light of the fact that speech processing strategies employed by CI systems typically employ envelope extraction algorithms. We synthesized "instrumental chimeras" that systematically combined variable amounts of envelope and fine structure in 25% increments from two different source instruments with either sustained or percussive envelopes. CI users and normal hearing (NH) subjects were presented with 150 chimeras and asked to determine which instrument the chimera more closely resembled in a single-interval two-alternative forced choice task. By combining instruments with similar and dissimilar envelopes, we controlled the valence of envelope for timbre identification and compensated for envelope reconstruction from fine structure information. Our results show that NH subjects utilize envelope and fine structure interchangeably, whereas CI subjects demonstrate overwhelming reliance on temporal envelope. When chimeras were created from dissimilar envelope instrument pairs, NH subjects utilized a combination of envelope (p = 0.008) and fine structure information (p = 0.009) to make timbre judgments. In contrast, CI users utilized envelope information almost exclusively to make timbre judgments (p < 0.001) and ignored fine structure information (p = 0.908). Interestingly, when the value of envelope as a cue was reduced, both NH subjects and CI users utilized fine structure information to make timbre judgments (p < 0.001), although the effect was quite weak in CI users. Our findings confirm that impairments in fine structure processing underlie poor perception of musical timbre in CI

  3. Stability and dynamics of spatio-temporal structures. Progress report, September 15, 1993--September 14, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riecke, H.

    1994-05-01

    Goal is to contribute to understanding of localized spatial and spatio-temporal structures far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we report on our progress in the study of three classes of systems. (1) We have studied cellular flame structures arising in a circular burner. Using numerical computations we have found a number of traveling-wave structures in which different cells undergo different motion. Most strikingly, we have found a localized wave traveling through the array of steady cells. Results are interpreted using various asymptotic approaches. They are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. (2) We have continued our investigation of localized waves in binary-mixture convection. Starting from the extended Ginzburg-Landau equations introduced earlier, we have derived equations of motion for interacting fronts connecting the conductive and the convective state. These equations reveal a repulsive interaction between the fronts which implies a new localization mechanism for waves. It is solely due to the long-wavelength mode specific to the extended Ginzburg-Landau equations. The stability properties of the resulting localized waves are in qualitative agreement with very recent experiments. (3) We have extended our investigation of domain structures to include their temporal evolution.

  4. Electrographic waveform structure predicts laminar focus location in a model of temporal lobe seizures in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Adams

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of partial-onset epilepsy and accounts for the majority of adult epilepsy cases in most countries. A critical role for the hippocampus (and to some extent amygdala in the pathology of these epilepsies is clear, with selective removal of these regions almost as effective as temporal lobectomy in reducing subsequent seizure risk. However, there is debate about whether hippocampus is 'victim' or 'perpetrator': The structure is ideally placed to 'broadcast' epileptiform activity to a great many other brain regions, but removal often leaves epileptiform events still occurring in cortex, particularly in adjacent areas, and recruitment of the hippocampus into seizure-like activity has been shown to be difficult in clinically-relevant models. Using a very simple model of acute epileptiform activity with known, single primary pathology (GABAA Receptor partial blockade, we track the onset and propagation of epileptiform events in hippocampus, parahippocampal areas and neocortex. In this model the hippocampus acts as a potential seizure focus for the majority of observed events. Events with hippocampal focus were far more readily propagated throughout parahippocampal areas and into neocortex than vice versa. The electrographic signature of events of hippocampal origin was significantly different to those of primary neocortical origin - a consequence of differential laminar activation. These data confirm the critical role of the hippocampus in epileptiform activity generation in the temporal lobe and suggest the morphology of non-invasive electrical recording of neocortical interictal events may be useful in confirming this role.

  5. Temporal structure in neuronal activity during working memory in Macaque parietal cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Pesaran, B; Sahami, M; Mitra, P; Andersen, R A

    2000-01-01

    A number of cortical structures are reported to have elevated single unit firing rates sustained throughout the memory period of a working memory task. How the nervous system forms and maintains these memories is unknown but reverberating neuronal network activity is thought to be important. We studied the temporal structure of single unit (SU) activity and simultaneously recorded local field potential (LFP) activity from area LIP in the inferior parietal lobe of two awake macaques during a memory-saccade task. Using multitaper techniques for spectral analysis, which play an important role in obtaining the present results, we find elevations in spectral power in a 50--90 Hz (gamma) frequency band during the memory period in both SU and LFP activity. The activity is tuned to the direction of the saccade providing evidence for temporal structure that codes for movement plans during working memory. We also find SU and LFP activity are coherent during the memory period in the 50--90 Hz gamma band and no consisten...

  6. Spatial and temporal variation in population genetic structure of wild Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus across Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezault Etienne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of a species is challenging. It often depends not only on the past biogeographic and climatic events but also the contemporary and ecological factors, such as current connectivity and habitat heterogeneity. In fact, these factors might interact with each other and shape the current species distribution. However, to what extent the current population genetic structure reflects the past and the contemporary factors is largely unknown. Here we investigated spatio-temporal genetic structures of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus populations, across their natural distribution in Africa. While its large biogeographic distribution can cause genetic differentiation at the paleo-biogeographic scales, its restricted dispersal capacity might induce a strong genetic structure at micro-geographic scales. Results Using nine microsatellite loci and 350 samples from ten natural populations, we found the highest genetic differentiation among the three ichthyofaunal provinces and regions (Ethiopian, Nilotic and Sudano-Sahelian (RST = 0.38 - 0.69. This result suggests the predominant effect of paleo-geographic events at macro-geographic scale. In addition, intermediate divergences were found between rivers and lakes within the regions, presumably reflecting relatively recent interruptions of gene flow between hydrographic basins (RST = 0.24 - 0.32. The lowest differentiations were observed among connected populations within a basin (RST = 0.015 in the Volta basin. Comparison of temporal sample series revealed subtle changes in the gene pools in a few generations (F = 0 - 0.053. The estimated effective population sizes were 23 - 143 and the estimated migration rate was moderate (m ~ 0.094 - 0.097 in the Volta populations. Conclusions This study revealed clear hierarchical patterns of the population genetic structuring of O. niloticus in Africa. The effects of paleo-geographic and climatic events were

  7. On the genesis of spatio-temporal self-organized structures in plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talasman, S.J.; Sanduloviciu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The genesis of luminous sharply defined nearly spherical space charges structures formed in an Argon plasma column was experimental investigated. The results reveal spatio-temporal characteristics proper to systems resulting after a self-organization process. Their phenomenology involves electrical charges separation produced by symmetry breaking and spatial separation of the excitation and ionization cross sections functions in a region where electrons are accelerated and, as a result, the appearance of electrostatic forces that, acting as long range correlations, assures, together with dissipative effects, its stability. (Author) 8 Figs., 31 Refs

  8. Deviations of Mesial Root Canals of Mandibular First Molar Teeth at the Apical Third: A Micro-computed Tomographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Ali; Keskin, Cangül

    2018-04-19

    The present study aimed to quantitatively analyze apical foramen deviations of mesial root canals of mandibular first molar teeth by means of micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging. Micro-CT images of the mesial roots of 109 mandibular first molar teeth with independent mesiobuccal (MB) and mesiolingual (ML) root canals were analyzed. The deviations of the apical foramina of the MB, ML, and middle mesial root canals from the anatomic apex were measured. The vertical distance between the apical foramina of each mesial root canal in relation to each other was also calculated. The distances from the apical foramina of the MB, ML, and middle mesial root canals to the anatomic apex of the mesial root were up to 2.51 mm, 3.21 mm, and 5.67 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference between the deviations of MB and ML root canals from each other (P > .05). The middle mesial root canal showed the greatest deviation compared with the MB and ML canals (P < .05). The apical foramina of mesial root canals of mandibular first molar teeth showed greater variations from each other and anatomic apices than previously reported. Clinically, the use of electronic apex locators for the detection of minor apical foramen of each mesial root canal is of the utmost important. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The spatio-temporal structure of electrostatic turbulence in the WEGA stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsen, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The main object of this work is to provide a detailed characterisation of electrostatic turbulence in WEGA and to identify the underlying instability mechanism driving turbulence. The spatio-temporal structure of turbulence is studied using multiple Langmuir probes providing a sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolution. Turbulence in WEGA is dominated by drift wave dynamics. The phase shift between density and potential fluctuations is close to zero, fluctuations are mainly driven by the density gradient, and the phase velocity of turbulent structures points in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift. The structure of turbulence is studied mainly in the plasma edge region inside the last closed flux surface. WEGA can be operated in two regimes differing in the magnetic field strength by almost one order of magnitude (57 mT and 500 mT, respectively). At 57 mT large structures with a poloidal extent comparable to the machine dimensions are observed, whereas at 500 mT turbulent structures are much smaller. The poloidal structure size scales nearly linearly with the inverse magnetic field strength. This scaling may be argued to be related to the drift wave dispersion scale, ρ s =√(m i k B T e )/(qB). However, the structure size remains unchanged when the ion mass is changed by using different discharge gases. Inside the last closed flux surface the poloidal E x B drift in WEGA is negligible. The three-dimensional structure is studied in detail using probes which are toroidally separated but aligned along connecting magnetic field lines. A small but finite parallel wavenumber is found. The ratio between the average parallel and perpendicular wavenumber is in the order of anti κ parallel / anti κ θ ∼ 10 -2 . The parallel phase velocity of turbulent structures is in-between the ion sound velocity and the Alfven velocity. In the parallel dynamics a fundamental difference between the two operational regimes at different magnetic field strength is

  10. Temporal Control over Transient Chemical Systems using Structurally Diverse Chemical Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack L-Y; Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Prins, Leonard J

    2017-08-25

    The next generation of adaptive, intelligent chemical systems will rely on a continuous supply of energy to maintain the functional state. Such systems will require chemical methodology that provides precise control over the energy dissipation process, and thus, the lifetime of the transiently activated function. This manuscript reports on the use of structurally diverse chemical fuels to control the lifetime of two different systems under dissipative conditions: transient signal generation and the transient formation of self-assembled aggregates. The energy stored in the fuels is dissipated at different rates by an enzyme, which installs a dependence of the lifetime of the active system on the chemical structure of the fuel. In the case of transient signal generation, it is shown that different chemical fuels can be used to generate a vast range of signal profiles, allowing temporal control over two orders of magnitude. Regarding self-assembly under dissipative conditions, the ability to control the lifetime using different fuels turns out to be particularly important as stable aggregates are formed only at well-defined surfactant/fuel ratios, meaning that temporal control cannot be achieved by simply changing the fuel concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Relationship Between the Wada Test and Preoperative/Postoperative Memory in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu POLAT

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the correlation between Wada memory test and neuropsychometric tests which were applied preoperatively to mesialtemporal lobe epilepsy patients associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS who had undergone selective amygdalohippocampectomyand find out the effects of early onset epileptic seizures on atypical memory dominance.Methods: Drug-resistant 27 patients (16 left, 11 right MTLE-HS had video EEG, cranial MRI and Wada test preoperatively. Weschler visualsubtest and verbal memory processing tests were applied to all patients before surgery and the first year after the operation.Results: The number of left hemisphere memory dominant patients was 6 (22.2% and the number of atypical memory dominant patientswas 21 (77.8% according to the Wada test. There was a significant difference between the two groups when compared for epileptic seizureonset age; (p=0.042, and also a significant diffference when compared for HS (right/left side (p=0.002. When we analyzed the correlationbetween preoperative and postoperative verbal and nonverbal tests and left memory Wada dominance; in verbal memory processing tests‘delayed recall’ scores between groups were significant (p=0.042, on the other hand in patients with atypical memory dominance ‘total learning’ scores between groups were significant (p<0.001.Conclusion: As a result, we found that the earlier the onset of seizures, the more atypical the memory dominance (right or bilateral. The Wada test was effective for assessing verbal memory; on the other hand, it was inadequate for assessing visual memory dominance. If the scores of ‘delayed recall’ in verbal memory were high in the patients with typical verbal dominance and ‘total learning’ scores in the patients with atypical verbal dominance, the scores also tended to rise after the operation.

  12. Impaired hippocampal rhythmogenesis in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dugladze, T.; Vida, I.; Tort, A.B.; Gross, A.; Otáhal, Jakub; Heinemann, U.; Kopell, N.J.; Gloveli, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 44 (2007), s. 17530-17535 ISSN 0027-8424 Grant - others:-(BR) 201038/2005-6; -(XE) FP6Epicure; -(DE) TR3/B5; -(US) R01NS46058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : interneurons * oscillations * patch-clamp Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 9.598, year: 2007

  13. Neurotrophin receptor immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozbas-Gerceker, F.; Gorter, J.A.; Redeker, S.; Ramkema, M.; van der Valk, P.; Baayen, J.C.; Ozguc, M.; Saygi, S.; Soylemezoglu, F.; Akalin, N.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a critical role of neurotrophins in the regulation of both neuronal survival and synaptic transmission during epileptogenesis. We have examined the immunohistochemical expression of high- (tyrosine kinase receptors, trk) and low-affinity (p75) neurotrophin receptors (NTRs)

  14. Pharmacodynamics of remifentanil. Induced intracranial spike activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Hogenhaven, Hans; Lee, Andrea P

    2017-01-01

    that remifentanil potentiates spike activity is in agreement with previous findings from smaller studies. Furthermore, we were able to describe the pharmacodynamics of the remifentanil effect on spike activity. Peri-operative provocation with remifentanil may play a future role in guiding neurosurgical intervention...

  15. Felder-Soloman's Index of Learning Styles: internal consistency, temporal stability, and factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford, Charles C; Siders, William A

    2010-10-01

    Strategies to facilitate learning include using knowledge of students' learning style preferences to inform students and their teachers. Aims of this study were to evaluate the factor structure, internal consistency, and temporal stability of medical student responses to the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) and determine its appropriateness as an instrument for medical education. The ILS assesses preferences on four dimensions: sensing/intuitive information perceiving, visual/verbal information receiving, active/reflective information processing, and sequential/global information understanding. Students entering the 2002-2007 classes completed the ILS; some completed the ILS again after 2 and 4 years. Analyses of responses supported the ILS's intended structure and moderate reliability. Students had moderate preferences for sensing and visual learning. This study provides evidence supporting the appropriateness of the ILS for assessing learning style preferences in medical students.

  16. Stability of modularity and structural keystone species in temporal cumulative plant- flower-visitor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Modularity is a structural property of ecological networks, which has received much interest, but has been poorly explored. Modules are distinct subsets of species interacting strongly with each other, but sparsely with species outside the subset. Using a series of temporal cumulative networks, we...... all flowering plants and flower-visiting insect species throughout the flowering season at three dry heathland sites in Denmark. For each site, we constructed cumulative networks every 0.5 months, resulting in series of 10–12 networks per site. Numbers of interactions, and plant and insect species...... around one or two hubs. These hub species encompassed a small number of plant species, many of which acted as hubs at several study sites and throughout most of their flowering season. Thus, these plants become of key importance in maintaining the structure of their pollination network. We conclude...

  17. Aberrant topological patterns of brain structural network in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Chen, Zhang; Beltramini, Guilherme Coco; Coan, Ana Carolina; Morita, Marcia Elisabete; Kubota, Bruno; Bergo, Felipe; Beaulieu, Christian; Cendes, Fernando; Gross, Donald William

    2015-12-01

    Although altered large-scale brain network organization in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has been shown using morphologic measurements such as cortical thickness, these studies, have not included critical subcortical structures (such as hippocampus and amygdala) and have had relatively small sample sizes. Here, we investigated differences in topological organization of the brain volumetric networks between patients with right TLE (RTLE) and left TLE (LTLE) with unilateral hippocampal atrophy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 86 LTLE patients, 70 RTLE patients, and 116 controls. RTLE and LTLE groups were balanced for gender (p = 0.64), seizure frequency (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.94), age (p = 0.39), age of seizure onset (p = 0.21), and duration of disease (p = 0.69). Brain networks were constructed by thresholding correlation matrices of volumes from 80 cortical/subcortical regions (parcellated with Freesurfer v5.3 https://surfer.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/) that were then analyzed using graph theoretical approaches. We identified reduced cortical/subcortical connectivity including bilateral hippocampus in both TLE groups, with the most significant interregional correlation increases occurring within the limbic system in LTLE and contralateral hemisphere in RTLE. Both TLE groups demonstrated less optimal topological organization, with decreased global efficiency and increased local efficiency and clustering coefficient. LTLE also displayed a more pronounced network disruption. Contrary to controls, hub nodes in both TLE groups were not distributed across whole brain, but rather found primarily in the paralimbic/limbic and temporal association cortices. Regions with increased centrality were concentrated in occipital lobes for LTLE and contralateral limbic/temporal areas for RTLE. These findings provide first evidence of altered topological organization of the whole brain volumetric network in TLE, with disruption of the coordinated patterns of

  18. Structural alterations of the superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia: Detailed subregional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, K; Matsuda, Y; Shimada, T; Yasuyama, T; Oshima, K; Sawai, K; Kihara, H; Nitta, Y; Okubo, H; Uehara, T; Kawasaki, Y

    2016-05-01

    Reduced gray matter volumes in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) have been reported in patients with schizophrenia. Such volumetric abnormalities might denote alterations in cortical thickness, surface area, local gyrification or all of these factors. The STG can be anatomically divided into five subregions using automatic parcellation in FreeSurfer: lateral aspect of the STG, anterior transverse temporal gyrus of Heschl gyrus (HG), planum polare (PP) of the STG, planum temporale (PT) of the STG and transverse temporal sulcus. We acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3T scans from 40 age- and sex-matched patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy subjects, and the scans were automatically processed using FreeSurfer. General linear models were used to assess group differences in regional volumes and detailed thickness, surface area and local gyrification. As expected, patients with schizophrenia had significantly smaller bilateral STG volumes than healthy subjects. Of the five subregions in the STG, patients with schizophrenia showed significantly and marginally reduced volumes in the lateral aspect of the STG and PT of the STG bilaterally compared with healthy subjects. The volumetric alteration in bilateral lateral STG was derived from both the cortical thickness and surface area but not local gyrification. There was no significant laterality of the alteration in the lateral STG between patients and controls and no correlation among the structures and clinical characteristics. These findings suggest that of five anatomical subregions in the STG, the lateral STG is one of the most meaningful regions for brain pathophysiology in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Monitoring Temporal Variation to Assess Changes in the Structure of Subtropical Atlantic Forest Butterfly Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserhard, Cristiano Agra; Romanowski, Helena Piccoli; Richter, Aline; Mendonça, Milton de Souza

    2017-08-01

    The study of fauna through long-term surveys is important in unveiling how temporal patterns shape the structure of communities in tropical habitats. The butterfly assemblage of the subtropical Atlantic Forest may be considered highly diverse and shows changes in diversity and composition over time, highlighting the importance of long-term inventories. This work assessed temporal diversity patterns in the distribution and composition of butterfly assemblages in an Atlantic Forest site in southern Brazil using combined data from three years of standardized sampling with entomological nets, increasing the knowledge on this group in the Neotropics for monitoring and conservation. The butterfly fauna was analyzed in terms of richness, abundance, and composition. The inventories reached 401 species, with 14,442 butterfly individuals sampled. All the diversity parameters evaluated show significant differences between the first year of sampling compared to the second and third years. The latter had higher values of richness and abundance, followed by the first and second years. Hesperiidae was the richest family, followed by Nymphalidae and Lycaenidae, indicating a good representation of the assemblage as a whole. The results of this work are important for developing conservation programs in the Atlantic Forest and other forested environments in the neotropics, especially concerning reliable diversity assessments for the monitoring and management of protected areas. Decision making and public policy might also benefit from knowledge on temporal patterns of diversity regarding the maintenance of native habitats and integrity of biomes and their associated fauna. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Spatio-temporal structure, path characteristics and perceptual grouping in immediate serial spatial recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo De Lillo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immediate serial spatial recall measures the ability to retain sequences of locations in short-term memory and is considered the spatial equivalent of digit span. It is tested by requiring participants to reproduce sequences of movements performed by an experimenter or displayed on a monitor. Different organizational factors dramatically affect serial spatial recall but they are often confounded or underspecified. Untangling them is crucial for the characterization of working-memory models and for establishing the contribution of structure and memory capacity to spatial span. We report five experiments assessing the relative role and independence of factors that have been reported in the literature. Experiment 1 disentangled the effects of spatial clustering and path-length by manipulating the distance of items displayed on a touchscreen monitor. Long-path sequences segregated by spatial clusters were compared with short-path sequences not segregated by clusters. Recall was more accurate for sequences segregated by clusters independently from path-length. Experiment 2 featured conditions where temporal pauses were introduced between or within cluster boundaries during the presentation of sequences with the same paths. Thus, the temporal structure of the sequences was either consistent or inconsistent with a hierarchical representation based on segmentation by spatial clusters but the effect of structure could not be confounded with effects of path-characteristics. Pauses at cluster boundaries yielded more accurate recall, as predicted by a hierarchical model. In Experiment 3, the systematic manipulation of sequence structure, path-length and presence of path-crossings of sequences showed that structure explained most of the variance, followed by the presence/absence of path-crossings, and path-length. Experiments 4 and 5 replicated the results of the previous experiments in immersive virtual reality navigation tasks where the viewpoint of the

  1. A clinical approach to the successful management of variations of middle mesial canals: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Penukonda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible variations of anatomical and morphological characteristics of the teeth are very important especially for the endodontic practitioners for successful treatment. Mandibular molars are most commonly affected by dental caries and require endodontic treatment. Mandibular molars exhibit variations in its internal anatomy; one among those is the presence of an extra canal in the mesial root called as middle mesial (MM canal. Detection of these minute canals requires a proper clinical knowledge and radiographic examination. This article presents the treatment of three cases of mandibular first molars with MM canals without the aid of any magnification devices.

  2. The role of temporal fine structure information for the low pitch of high-frequency complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The fused low pitch evoked by complex tones containing only unresolved high-frequency components demonstrates the ability of the human auditory system to extract pitch using a temporal mechanism in the absence of spectral cues. However, the temporal features used by such a mechanism have been...... amplitude fluctuations, or temporal fine structure (TFS), of the conveyed signal can be processed. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, the present study found that the low pitch of inharmonic transposed tones with unresolved components was consistent with the timing between the most prominent TFS maxima...... coding as such, and that TFS representation might persist at higher frequencies than previously thought....

  3. Structured Spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable fo...... data set consisting of 2796 days and 5834 spatial locations of fires. The model is compared with a spatio-temporal log-Gaussian Cox point process model, and likelihood-based methods are discussed to some extent....

  4. Sequential {sup 123}I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Armin [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Comprehensive Epilepsy Service, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eberl, Stefan; Henderson, David; Beveridge, Scott; Constable, Chris [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Fulham, Michael J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, Michael [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Department of Pharmacology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Zaman, Aysha [University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lo, Sing Kai [University of Sydney, Institute of International Health, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-02-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 123}I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; {kappa}=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; {kappa}=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; {kappa}=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; {kappa}=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  5. Sequential 123I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and 18F-FDG PET imaging)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Armin; Eberl, Stefan; Henderson, David; Beveridge, Scott; Constable, Chris; Fulham, Michael J.; Kassiou, Michael; Zaman, Aysha; Lo, Sing Kai

    2005-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123 I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; κ=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; κ=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; κ=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; κ=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  6. Intraglomerular inhibition shapes the strength and temporal structure of glomerular output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C; Liu, Shaolin; Shipley, Michael T

    2012-08-01

    Odor signals are transmitted to the olfactory bulb by olfactory nerve (ON) synapses onto mitral/tufted cells (MCs) and external tufted cells (ETCs). ETCs, in turn, provide feedforward excitatory input to MCs. MC and ETCs are also regulated by inhibition: intraglomerular and interglomerular inhibitory circuits act at MC and ETC apical dendrites; granule cells (GCs) inhibit MC lateral dendrites via the MC→GC→MC circuit. We investigated the contribution of intraglomerular inhibition to MC and ETCs responses to ON input. ON input evokes initial excitation followed by early, strongly summating inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in MCs; this is followed by prolonged, intermittent IPSCs. The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist dl-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid, known to suppress GABA release by GCs, reduced late IPSCs but had no effect on early IPSCs. In contrast, selective intraglomerular block of GABA(A) receptors eliminated all early IPSCs and caused a 5-fold increase in ON-evoked MC spiking and a 10-fold increase in response duration. ETCs also receive intraglomerular inhibition; blockade of inhibition doubled ETC spike responses. By reducing ETC excitatory drive and directly inhibiting MCs, intraglomerular inhibition is a key factor shaping the strength and temporal structure of MC responses to sensory input. Sensory input generates an intraglomerular excitation-inhibition sequence that limits MC spike output to a brief temporal window. Glomerular circuits may dynamically regulate this input-output window to optimize MC encoding across sniff-sampled inputs.

  7. Locomotor Sensory Organization Test: How Sensory Conflict Affects the Temporal Structure of Sway Variability During Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung Hung; Mukherjee, Mukul; Siu, Ka-Chun; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    When maintaining postural stability temporally under increased sensory conflict, a more rigid response is used where the available degrees of freedom are essentially frozen. The current study investigated if such a strategy is also utilized during more dynamic situations of postural control as is the case with walking. This study attempted to answer this question by using the Locomotor Sensory Organization Test (LSOT). This apparatus incorporates SOT inspired perturbations of the visual and the somatosensory system. Ten healthy young adults performed the six conditions of the traditional SOT and the corresponding six conditions on the LSOT. The temporal structure of sway variability was evaluated from all conditions. The results showed that in the anterior posterior direction somatosensory input is crucial for postural control for both walking and standing; visual input also had an effect but was not as prominent as the somatosensory input. In the medial lateral direction and with respect to walking, visual input has a much larger effect than somatosensory input. This is possibly due to the added contributions by peripheral vision during walking; in standing such contributions may not be as significant for postural control. In sum, as sensory conflict increases more rigid and regular sway patterns are found during standing confirming the previous results presented in the literature, however the opposite was the case with walking where more exploratory and adaptive movement patterns are present.

  8. Understanding structure of urban traffic network based on spatial-temporal correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfang; Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong; Han, Shixiu; Dong, Honghui

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the structural characteristics of urban traffic network comprehensively can provide references for improving road utilization rate and alleviating traffic congestion. This paper focuses on the spatial-temporal correlations between different pairs of traffic series and proposes a complex network-based method of constructing the urban traffic network. In the network, the nodes represent road segments, and an edge between a pair of nodes is added depending on the result of significance test for the corresponding spatial-temporal correlation. Further, a modified PageRank algorithm, named the geographical weight-based PageRank algorithm (GWPA), is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of important segments in the road network. Finally, experiments are conducted by using three kinds of traffic series collected from the urban road network in Beijing. Experimental results show that the urban traffic networks constructed by three traffic variables all indicate both small-world and scale-free characteristics. Compared with the results of PageRank algorithm, GWPA is proved to be valid in evaluating the importance of segments and identifying the important segments with small degree.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Changes in Structure for a Mediterranean Urban Forest: Santiago, Chile 2002 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Escobedo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on how urban forest ecosystems in South America and Mediterranean climates change across both space and time. This study statistically and spatially analyzed the spatio-temporal dynamics of Santiago, Chile’s urban forest using tree and plot-level data from permanent plots from 2002 to 2014. We found mortality, ingrowth, and tree cover remained stable over the analysis period and similar patterns were observed for basal area (BA and biomass. However, tree cover increased, and was greater in the highest socioeconomic stratum neighborhoods while it dropped in the medium and low strata. Growth rates for the five most common tree species averaged from 0.12 to 0.36 cm·year−1. Spatially, tree biomass and BA were greater in the affluent, northeastern sections of the city and in southwest peri-urban areas. Conversely, less affluent central, northwest, and southern areas showed temporal losses in BA and biomass. Overall, we found that Santiago’s urban forest follows similar patterns as in other parts of the world; affluent areas tend to have more and better managed urban forests than poorer areas, and changes are primarily influenced by social and ecological drivers. Nonetheless, care is warranted when comparing urban forest structural metrics measured with similar sampling-monitoring approaches across ecologically disparate regions and biomes.

  10. Visual cortex responses reflect temporal structure of continuous quasi-rhythmic sensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Christian; Thut, Gregor; Gross, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Neural processing of dynamic continuous visual input, and cognitive influences thereon, are frequently studied in paradigms employing strictly rhythmic stimulation. However, the temporal structure of natural stimuli is hardly ever fully rhythmic but possesses certain spectral bandwidths (e.g. lip movements in speech, gestures). Examining periodic brain responses elicited by strictly rhythmic stimulation might thus represent ideal, yet isolated cases. Here, we tested how the visual system reflects quasi-rhythmic stimulation with frequencies continuously varying within ranges of classical theta (4-7Hz), alpha (8-13Hz) and beta bands (14-20Hz) using EEG. Our findings substantiate a systematic and sustained neural phase-locking to stimulation in all three frequency ranges. Further, we found that allocation of spatial attention enhances EEG-stimulus locking to theta- and alpha-band stimulation. Our results bridge recent findings regarding phase locking ("entrainment") to quasi-rhythmic visual input and "frequency-tagging" experiments employing strictly rhythmic stimulation. We propose that sustained EEG-stimulus locking can be considered as a continuous neural signature of processing dynamic sensory input in early visual cortices. Accordingly, EEG-stimulus locking serves to trace the temporal evolution of rhythmic as well as quasi-rhythmic visual input and is subject to attentional bias. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Can temporal fine structure represent the fundamental frequency of unresolved harmonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenham, Andrew J; Micheyl, Christophe; Keebler, Michael V

    2009-04-01

    At least two modes of pitch perception exist: in one, the fundamental frequency (F0) of harmonic complex tones is estimated using the temporal fine structure (TFS) of individual low-order resolved harmonics; in the other, F0 is derived from the temporal envelope of high-order unresolved harmonics that interact in the auditory periphery. Pitch is typically more accurate in the former than in the latter mode. Another possibility is that pitch can sometimes be coded via the TFS from unresolved harmonics. A recent study supporting this third possibility [Moore et al. (2006a). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 480-490] based its conclusion on a condition where phase interaction effects (implying unresolved harmonics) accompanied accurate F0 discrimination (implying TFS processing). The present study tests whether these results were influenced by audible distortion products. Experiment 1 replicated the original results, obtained using a low-level background noise. However, experiments 2-4 found no evidence for the use of TFS cues with unresolved harmonics when the background noise level was raised, or the stimulus level was lowered, to render distortion inaudible. Experiment 5 measured the presence and phase dependence of audible distortion products. The results provide no evidence that TFS cues are used to code the F0 of unresolved harmonics.

  12. A glimpsing account of the role of temporal fine structure information in speech recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoux, Frédéric; Healy, Eric W

    2013-01-01

    Many behavioral studies have reported a significant decrease in intelligibility when the temporal fine structure (TFS) of a sound mixture is replaced with noise or tones (i.e., vocoder processing). This finding has led to the conclusion that TFS information is critical for speech recognition in noise. How the normal -auditory system takes advantage of the original TFS, however, remains unclear. Three -experiments on the role of TFS in noise are described. All three experiments measured speech recognition in various backgrounds while manipulating the envelope, TFS, or both. One experiment tested the hypothesis that vocoder processing may artificially increase the apparent importance of TFS cues. Another experiment evaluated the relative contribution of the target and masker TFS by disturbing only the TFS of the target or that of the masker. Finally, a last experiment evaluated the -relative contribution of envelope and TFS information. In contrast to previous -studies, however, the original envelope and TFS were both preserved - to some extent - in all conditions. Overall, the experiments indicate a limited influence of TFS and suggest that little speech information is extracted from the TFS. Concomitantly, these experiments confirm that most speech information is carried by the temporal envelope in real-world conditions. When interpreted within the framework of the glimpsing model, the results of these experiments suggest that TFS is primarily used as a grouping cue to select the time-frequency regions -corresponding to the target speech signal.

  13. Familiarity and recollection vs representational models of medial temporal lobe structures: A single-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacot, Emilie; Vautier, Stéphane; Kőhler, Stefan; Pariente, Jérémie; Martin, Chris B; Puel, Michèle; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Barbeau, Emmanuel J

    2017-09-01

    Although it is known that medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures support declarative memory, the fact these structures have different architectonics and circuitry suggests they may also play different functional roles. Selective lesions of MTL structures offer an opportunity to understand these roles. We report, in this study, on JMG, a patient who presents highly unusual lesions that completely affected all MTL structures except for the right hippocampus and parts of neighbouring medial parahippocampal cortex. We first demonstrate that JMG shows preserved recall for visual material on 5 experimental tasks. This finding suggests that his right hippocampus is functional, even though it appears largely disconnected from most of its MTL afferents. In contrast, JMG performed very poorly, as compared to control subjects, on 7 tasks of visual recognition memory for single items. Although he sometimes performed above chance, neither familiarity nor recollection appeared fully preserved. These results indicate that extrahippocampal structures, damaged bilaterally in JMG, perform critical operations for item recognition; and that the hippocampus cannot take over that role, including recollection, when these structures are largely damaged. Finally, in a set of 3 recognition memory tasks with scenes as stimuli, JMG performed at the level of control participants and obtained normal indices of familiarity and recollection. Overall, our findings suggest that the right hippocampus and remnants of parahippocampal cortex can support recognition memory for scenes in the absence of preserved item-recognition memory. The patterns of dissociations, which we report in the present study, provide support for a representational account of the functional organization of MTL structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporal Evolution of Ion Spectral Structures During a Geomagnetic Storm: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2018-01-01

    Using the Van Allen Probes/Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron mass spectrometer, we perform a case study of the temporal evolution of ion spectral structures observed in the energy range of 1 to 50 keV throughout the geomagnetic storm of 2 October 2013. The ion spectral features are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and are signatures of fresh transport from the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. We find that the characteristics of the ion structures are determined by the intensity of the convection electric field. Prior to the beginning of the storm, the plasma sheet inner edge exhibits narrow nose spectral structures that vary little in energy across L values. Ion access to the inner magnetosphere during these times is limited to the nose energy bands. As convection is enhanced and large amounts of plasma are injected from the plasma sheet during the main phase of the storm, ion access occurs at a wide energy range, as no nose structures are observed. As the magnetosphere recovers from the storm, single noses and then multiple noses are observed once again. We use a model of ion drift and losses due to charge exchange to simulate the ion spectra and gain insight into the main observed features.

  15. MRI-based brain structure volumes in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and their unaffected siblings: a preliminary study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scanlon, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the heritability of brain structure may be useful in simplifying complicated genetic studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). A preliminary study is presented to determine if volume deficits of candidate brain structures present at a higher rate in unaffected siblings than controls subjects.

  16. A Separation Algorithm for Sources with Temporal Structure Only Using Second-order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike conventional blind source separation (BSS deals with independent identically distributed (i.i.d. sources, this paper addresses the separation from mixtures of sources with temporal structure, such as linear autocorrelations. Many sequential extraction algorithms have been reported, resulting in inevitable cumulated errors introduced by the deflation scheme. We propose a robust separation algorithm to recover original sources simultaneously, through a joint diagonalizer of several average delayed covariance matrices at positions of the optimal time delay and its integers. The proposed algorithm is computationally simple and efficient, since it is based on the second-order statistics only. Extensive simulation results confirm the validity and high performance of the algorithm. Compared with related extraction algorithms, its separation signal-to-noise rate for a desired source can reach 20dB higher, and it seems rather insensitive to the estimation error of the time delay.

  17. Prediction of the Dynamic Yield Strength of Metals Using Two Structural-Temporal Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selyutina, N. S.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2018-02-01

    The behavior of the yield strength of steel and a number of aluminum alloys is investigated in a wide range of strain rates, based on the incubation time criterion of yield and the empirical models of Johnson-Cook and Cowper-Symonds. In this paper, expressions for the parameters of the empirical models are derived through the characteristics of the incubation time criterion; a satisfactory agreement of these data and experimental results is obtained. The parameters of the empirical models can depend on some strain rate. The independence of the characteristics of the incubation time criterion of yield from the loading history and their connection with the structural and temporal features of the plastic deformation process give advantage of the approach based on the concept of incubation time with respect to empirical models and an effective and convenient equation for determining the yield strength in a wider range of strain rates.

  18. POTENTIAL OF MULTI-TEMPORAL OBLIQUE AIRBORNE IMAGERY FOR STRUCTURAL DAMAGE ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vetrivel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quick post-disaster actions demand automated, rapid and detailed building damage assessment. Among the available technologies, post-event oblique airborne images have already shown their potential for this task. However, existing methods usually compensate the lack of pre-event information with aprioristic assumptions of building shapes and textures that can lead to uncertainties and misdetections. However, oblique images have been already captured over many cities of the world, and the exploitation of pre- and post-event data as inputs to damage assessment is readily feasible in urban areas. In this paper, we investigate the potential of multi-temporal oblique imagery for detailed damage assessment focusing on two methodologies: the first method aims at detecting severe structural damages related to geometrical deformation by combining the complementary information provided by photogrammetric point clouds and oblique images. The developed method detected 87% of damaged elements. The failed detections are due to varying noise levels within the point cloud which hindered the recognition of some structural elements. We observed, in general that the façade regions are very noisy in point clouds. To address this, we propose our second method which aims to detect damages to building façades using the oriented oblique images. The results show that the proposed methodology can effectively differentiate among the three proposed categories: collapsed/highly damaged, lower levels of damage and undamaged buildings, using a computationally light-weight approach. We describe the implementations of the above mentioned methods in detail and present the promising results achieved using multi-temporal oblique imagery over the city of L’Aquila (Italy.

  19. Theoretical analysis of the spatio-temporal structure of bone multicellular units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenzli, P R; Pivonka, P; Gardiner, B S; Smith, D W; Dunstan, C R; Mundy, G R

    2010-01-01

    Bone multicellular units (BMUs) maintain the viability of the skeletal tissue by coordinating locally the sequence of bone resorption and bone formation performed by cells of the osteoclastic and osteoblastic lineage. Understanding the emergence and the net bone balance of such structured microsystems out of the complex network of biochemical interactions between bone cells is fundamental for many bone-related diseases and the evaluation of fracture risk. Based on current experimental knowledge, we propose a spatio-temporal continuum model describing the interactions of osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. We show that this model admits travelling-wave-like solutions with well-confined cell profiles upon specifying external conditions mimicking the environment encountered in cortical bone remodelling. The shapes of the various cell concentration profiles within this travelling structure are intrinsically linked to the parameters of the model such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis rates of bone cells. The internal structure of BMUs is reproduced, allowing for experimental calibration. The spatial distribution of the key regulatory factors can also be exhibited, which in diseased states could give hints as to the biochemical agent most accountable for the disorder.

  20. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  1. The spatio-temporal structure of electrostatic turbulence in the WEGA stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsen, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    The main object of this work is to provide a detailed characterisation of electrostatic turbulence in WEGA and to identify the underlying instability mechanism driving turbulence. The spatio-temporal structure of turbulence is studied using multiple Langmuir probes providing a sufficiently high spatial and temporal resolution. Turbulence in WEGA is dominated by drift wave dynamics. The phase shift between density and potential fluctuations is close to zero, fluctuations are mainly driven by the density gradient, and the phase velocity of turbulent structures points in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift. The structure of turbulence is studied mainly in the plasma edge region inside the last closed flux surface. WEGA can be operated in two regimes differing in the magnetic field strength by almost one order of magnitude (57 mT and 500 mT, respectively). At 57 mT large structures with a poloidal extent comparable to the machine dimensions are observed, whereas at 500 mT turbulent structures are much smaller. The poloidal structure size scales nearly linearly with the inverse magnetic field strength. This scaling may be argued to be related to the drift wave dispersion scale, {rho}{sub s}={radical}(m{sub i}k{sub B}T{sub e})/(qB). However, the structure size remains unchanged when the ion mass is changed by using different discharge gases. Inside the last closed flux surface the poloidal E x B drift in WEGA is negligible. The three-dimensional structure is studied in detail using probes which are toroidally separated but aligned along connecting magnetic field lines. A small but finite parallel wavenumber is found. The ratio between the average parallel and perpendicular wavenumber is in the order of anti {kappa} {sub parallel} / anti {kappa}{sub {theta}} {approx} 10{sup -2}. The parallel phase velocity of turbulent structures is in-between the ion sound velocity and the Alfven velocity. In the parallel dynamics a fundamental difference between the two

  2. Predicting Surgery Targets in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy through Structural Connectome Based Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Hutchings

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is a prevalent neurological disorder resulting in disruptive seizures. In the case of drug resistant epilepsy resective surgery is often considered. This is a procedure hampered by unpredictable success rates, with many patients continuing to have seizures even after surgery. In this study we apply a computational model of epilepsy to patient specific structural connectivity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI of 22 individuals with left TLE and 39 healthy controls. We validate the model by examining patient-control differences in simulated seizure onset time and network location. We then investigate the potential of the model for surgery prediction by performing in silico surgical resections, removing nodes from patient networks and comparing seizure likelihood post-surgery to pre-surgery simulations. We find that, first, patients tend to transit from non-epileptic to epileptic states more often than controls in the model. Second, regions in the left hemisphere (particularly within temporal and subcortical regions that are known to be involved in TLE are the most frequent starting points for seizures in patients in the model. In addition, our analysis also implicates regions in the contralateral and frontal locations which may play a role in seizure spreading or surgery resistance. Finally, the model predicts that patient-specific surgery (resection areas chosen on an individual, model-prompted, basis and not following a predefined procedure may lead to better outcomes than the currently used routine clinical procedure. Taken together this work provides a first step towards patient specific computational modelling of epilepsy surgery in order to inform treatment strategies in individuals.

  3. Geostatistical investigation into the temporal evolution of spatial structure in a shallow water table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Lyon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow water tables near-streams often lead to saturated, overland flow generating areas in catchments in humid climates. While these saturated areas are assumed to be principal biogeochemical hot-spots and important for issues such as non-point pollution sources, the spatial and temporal behavior of shallow water tables, and associated saturated areas, is not completely understood. This study demonstrates how geostatistical methods can be used to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the shallow water table for the near-stream region. Event-based and seasonal changes in the spatial structure of the shallow water table, which influences the spatial pattern of surface saturation and related runoff generation, can be identified and used in conjunction to characterize the hydrology of an area. This is accomplished through semivariogram analysis and indicator kriging to produce maps combining soft data (i.e., proxy information to the variable of interest representing general shallow water table patterns with hard data (i.e., actual measurements that represent variation in the spatial structure of the shallow water table per rainfall event. The area used was a hillslope in the Catskill Mountains region of New York State. The shallow water table was monitored for a 120 m×180 m near-stream region at 44 sampling locations on 15-min intervals. Outflow of the area was measured at the same time interval. These data were analyzed at a short time interval (15 min and at a long time interval (months to characterize the changes in the hydrologic behavior of the hillslope. Indicator semivariograms based on binary-transformed ground water table data (i.e., 1 if exceeding the time-variable median depth to water table and 0 if not were created for both short and long time intervals. For the short time interval, the indicator semivariograms showed a high degree of spatial structure in the shallow water table for the spring, with increased range

  4. Temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saramäki, Jari

    2013-01-01

    The concept of temporal networks is an extension of complex networks as a modeling framework to include information on when interactions between nodes happen. Many studies of the last decade examine how the static network structure affect dynamic systems on the network. In this traditional approach  the temporal aspects are pre-encoded in the dynamic system model. Temporal-network methods, on the other hand, lift the temporal information from the level of system dynamics to the mathematical representation of the contact network itself. This framework becomes particularly useful for cases where there is a lot of structure and heterogeneity both in the timings of interaction events and the network topology. The advantage compared to common static network approaches is the ability to design more accurate models in order to explain and predict large-scale dynamic phenomena (such as, e.g., epidemic outbreaks and other spreading phenomena). On the other hand, temporal network methods are mathematically and concept...

  5. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  6. Spatio-temporal structure and cycle to cycle variations of an in-cylinder tumbling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisine, M.; Thomas, L.; Borée, J.; Rey, P.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to make use of PIV and high-speed PIV in a research engine of moderate tumbling ratio in order to analyze both the spatial structure of the flow and its temporal evolution during series of consecutive cycles. Appropriate analyzing tools are introduced, and four different points are addressed: (1) the chain of events driving the generation of the three-dimensional mean tumbling motion is investigated; (2) a Lagrangian analysis of the roll-up of the tumbling jet in individual cycles demonstrates a strong cycle to cycle variation during the compression phase (the rms of the position of the jet front being approximately 10% of the piston stroke); (3) focussing on the "breakdown" phase, phase invariant proper orthogonal decomposition enables us to distinguish cycles according to their structure near top dead center (TDC). We show that when the coherent energy of the flow is conserved, there is no increase in the fluctuating kinetic energy; (4) finally, the phase-averaged Reynolds stresses is decomposed into a contribution of the in-cycle coherence and the turbulence carried by the flow states. Approximately 30% of the fluctuating kinetic energy is due to cycle to cycle fluctuations in this chamber near TDC.

  7. Spatio-temporal structure of turbulent Reynolds stress zonal flow drive in 3D magnetic configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, B; Ramisch, M; Manz, P; Stroth, U

    2017-01-01

    The poloidal dependence of the zonal flow drive and the underlying Reynolds stress structure are studied at the stellarator experiment TJ-K by means of a poloidal Langmuir-probe array. This gives the unique possibility to study the locality of the Reynolds stress in a complex toroidal magnetic geometry. It is found that the Reynolds stress is not homogeneously distributed along the flux surface but has a strong poloidal asymmetry where it is concentrated on the outboard side with a maximum above the midplane. The average tilt of the turbulent structures is thereby reflected in the anisotropy of the bivariant velocity distribution. Using a conditional averaging technique the temporal dynamics reveal that the zonal flow drive is also maximal in this particular region. The results suggest an influence of the magnetic field line curvature, which controls the underlying plasma turbulence. The findings are a basis for further comparison with turbulence simulations in 3D geometry and demonstrate the need for a global characterisation of plasma turbulence. (paper)

  8. A longitudinal genetic survey identifies temporal shifts in the population structure of Dutch house sparrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousseau, L; Husemann, M; Foppen, R; Vangestel, C; Lens, L

    2016-01-01

    Dutch house sparrow (Passer domesticus) densities dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1980s, and similar collapses in population sizes have been reported across Europe. Whether, and to what extent, such relatively recent demographic changes are accompanied by concomitant shifts in the genetic population structure of this species needs further investigation. Therefore, we here explore temporal shifts in genetic diversity, genetic structure and effective sizes of seven Dutch house sparrow populations. To allow the most powerful statistical inference, historical populations were resampled at identical locations and each individual bird was genotyped using nine polymorphic microsatellites. Although the demographic history was not reflected by a reduction in genetic diversity, levels of genetic differentiation increased over time, and the original, panmictic population (inferred from the museum samples) diverged into two distinct genetic clusters. Reductions in census size were supported by a substantial reduction in effective population size, although to a smaller extent. As most studies of contemporary house sparrow populations have been unable to identify genetic signatures of recent population declines, results of this study underpin the importance of longitudinal genetic surveys to unravel cryptic genetic patterns. PMID:27273323

  9. Thalamic glucose metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy measured with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N; Leenders, KL; Hajek, M; Maguire, P; Missimer, J; Wieser, HG

    1997-01-01

    Thalamic glucose metabolism has been studied in 24 patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using interictal F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). A total of 17 patients had a unilateral TL seizure onset, 11 of these patients had a mesial temporal lobe

  10. Localization of musicogenic epilepsy to Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal plane: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Yasunori; Kovach, Christopher K; Ciliberto, Michael; Joshi, Charuta; Rhone, Ariane E; Vesole, Adam; Gander, Phillip E; Nourski, Kirill V; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Dlouhy, Brian J

    2017-09-15

    Musicogenic epilepsy (ME) is an extremely rare form of the disorder that is provoked by listening to or playing music, and it has been localized to the temporal lobe. The number of reported cases of ME in which intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) has been used for seizure focus localization is extremely small, especially with coverage of the superior temporal plane (STP) and specifically, Heschl's gyrus (HG). The authors describe the case of a 17-year-old boy with a history of medically intractable ME who underwent iEEG monitoring that involved significant frontotemporal coverage as well as coverage of the STP with an HG depth electrode anteriorly and a planum temporale depth electrode posteriorly. Five seizures occurred during the monitoring period, and a seizure onset zone was localized to HG and the STP. The patient subsequently underwent right temporal neocortical resection, involving the STP and including HG, with preservation of the mesial temporal structures. The patient remains seizure free 1 year postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of ME in which the seizure focus has been localized to HG and the STP with iEEG monitoring. The authors review the literature on iEEG findings in ME, explain their approach to HG depth electrode placement, and discuss the utility of STP depth electrodes in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  11. Control of periodic surface structures on silicon by combined temporal and polarization shaping of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraggelakis, F.; Stratakis, E.; Loukakos, P. A.

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate the capability to exercise advanced control on the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on silicon by combining the effect of temporal shaping, via tuning the interpulse temporal delay between double femtosecond laser pulses, along with the independent manipulation of the polarization state of each of the individual pulses. For this, cross-polarized (CP) as well as counter-rotating (CR) double circularly polarized pulses have been utilized. The pulse duration was 40 fs and the central wavelength of 790 nm. The linearly polarized double pulses are generated by a modified Michelson interferometer allowing the temporal delay between the pulses to vary from Δτ = -80 ps to Δτ = +80 ps with an accuracy of 0.2 fs. We show the significance of fluence balance between the two pulse components and its interplay with the interpulse delay and with the order of arrival of the individually polarized pulse components of the double pulse sequence on the final surface morphology. For the case of CR pulses we found that when the pulses are temporally well separated the surface morphology attains no axial symmetry. But strikingly, when the two CP pulses temporally overlap, we demonstrate, for the first time in our knowledge, the detrimental effect that the phase delay has on the ripple orientation. Our results provide new insight showing that temporal pulse shaping in combination with polarization control gives a powerful tool for drastically controlling the surface nanostructure morphology.

  12. Quadratic temporal finite element method for linear elastic structural dynamics based on mixed convolved action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Dong Keon

    2016-01-01

    A common approach for dynamic analysis in current practice is based on a discrete time-integration scheme. This approach can be largely attributed to the absence of a true variational framework for initial value problems. To resolve this problem, a new stationary variational principle was recently established for single-degree-of-freedom oscillating systems using mixed variables, fractional derivatives and convolutions of convolutions. In this mixed convolved action, all the governing differential equations and initial conditions are recovered from the stationarity of a single functional action. Thus, the entire description of linear elastic dynamical systems is encapsulated. For its practical application to structural dynamics, this variational formalism is systemically extended to linear elastic multidegree- of-freedom systems in this study, and a corresponding weak form is numerically implemented via a quadratic temporal finite element method. The developed numerical method is symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to a time step for the underlying conservative system. For the forced-damped vibration, a three-story shear building is used as an example to investigate the performance of the developed numerical method, which provides accurate results with good convergence characteristics

  13. The Low Pitch of High-Frequency Complex Tones Relies on Temporal Fine Structure Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency complex tones containing only unresolved harmonic components with a frequency spacing Δf usually evoke a low pitch equal to Δf. However, for inharmonic components, the low pitch is often found to deviate slightly from Δf. Whether this pitch shift relies exclusively on temporal fine...... structure (TFS) cues has been a matter of debate. It is also controversial up to which frequency TFS information remains available, and to what extent envelope cues become dominant as frequency increases. Using a pitch-matching paradigm, this study investigated whether the pitch of transposed tones.......5]. All stimuli were presented at 50 dB SPL in broadband pink-noise (13.5 dB/Hz at 1 kHz), and 40 matches per condition were obtained. For fenv = fc/11.5, the results favored hypothesis A for all values of fc, indicating that TFS cues are available and used for pitch extraction, up to at least 7 k...

  14. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-09-07

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN THE RED GROUPER, EPINEPHELUS MORIO, DEMOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE FROM SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralice Caballero-Arango

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the demographic structure of red grouper Epinephelus morio from the southern part of the Gulf of Mexico, were evaluated during periods when total catches, CPUE and annual yields of the specie decreased. Fishery-dependent samples (n = 1887 were obtained between August 1989 and February 2004 from the Campeche Bank, and size-frequency distributions by sex, sex ratios and sizes of sexual maturation and sex change were compared between three periods: P11989-1992 (n = 886; P21996-1998 (n = 413; and P32003-2004 (n = 588. The temporal stability of size-frequency distribution by sex, with males always being larger than females, and the sex ratios always biased towards females, were consistent with this species’ type of sexuality. Size for females and males, as well as sizes at first sexual maturity and at sex reversal all decreased from the oldest period to the more recent one and could be a consequence of the fishing intensity applied to this stock. The reductions in size of females and males associated with a relatively stable sex ratio and the lack of any drastic decrease in the number of males can be explained by this species’ reproductive ecology. Results are discussed regarding the capacity for reproductive resilience of red grouper in response to fishing pressure like that currently experienced by the Campeche Bank stock.

  16. Structure and temporal variation of the phytoplankton of a macrotidal beach from the Amazon coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Jislene B; Oliveira, Suellen M O DE; Pereira, Luci C C; Costa, Rauquírio M DA

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the structure and the temporal variation of the phytoplankton of Ajuruteua beach (Bragança, Pará) and to investigate the influence of environmental variables on the dynamics of this community to provide a basis about the trophic state of this environment. Biological, hydrological and hydrodynamic samplings were performed during a nyctemeral cycle in the months of November/08, March/09, June/09 and September/09. We identified 110 taxa, which were distributed among the diatoms (87.3%), dinoflagellates (11.8%) and cyanobacteria (0.9%), with the predominance of neritic species, followed by the tychoplankton species. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were the highest during the rainy period (24.5 mg m-3), whereas total phytoplankton density was higher in the dry period (1,255 x 103 cell L-1). However, phytoflagellates density was significantly higher during the rainy period. Cluster Analysis revealed the formation of four groups, which were influenced by the monthly differences in the environmental variables. The Principal Component Analysis indicated salinity and chlorophyll-a as the main variables that explained the components. Spearman correlation analysis supported the influence of these variables on the local phytoplankton community. Overall, the results obtained suggest that rainfall and strong local hydrodynamics play an important role in the dynamic of the phytoplankton of Ajuruteua beach, by influencing both environmental and biological variables.

  17. Cognitive impairment and medial temporal lobe structure in young adults with a depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donix, Markus; Haussmann, Robert; Helling, Franziska; Zweiniger, Anne; Lange, Jan; Werner, Annett; Donix, Katharina L; Brandt, Moritz D; Linn, Jennifer; Bauer, Michael; Buthut, Maria

    2018-09-01

    Cognitive deficits are common in patients with a depressive episode although the predictors for their development and severity remain elusive. We investigated whether subjective and objective cognitive impairment in young depressed adults would be associated with cortical thinning in medial temporal subregions. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, cortical unfolding data analysis, and comprehensive assessments of subjective and objective cognitive abilities were performed on 27 young patients with a depressive episode (mean age: 29.0 ± 5.8 years) and 23 older participants without a history of a depressive disorder but amnestic mild cognitive impairment (68.5 ± 6.6 years) or normal cognition (65.2 ± 8.7 years). Thickness reductions in parahippocampal, perirhinal and fusiform cortices were associated with subjective memory deficits only among young patients with a depressive episode and a measurable cognitive impairment. Long-term longitudinal data would be desirable to determine the trajectories of cognitive impairment associated with depression in patients with or without cortical structure changes. The presence of clinically significant cognitive deficits in young people with a depressive episode may identify a patient population with extrahippocampal cortical thinning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Temporal change in the electromechanical properties of dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, G.; Hauser, B.; Jakoby, B.; Hilber, W.; Schoeftner, J.; Bauer, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES) are soft electronic transducers and energy harvesters with potential for consumer goods. The temporal change in their electromechanical properties is of major importance for engineering tasks. Therefore, we study acrylic DEMES by impedance spectroscopy and by optical methods for a total time period of approx. 4.5 months. We apply either compliant electrodes from carbon black particles only or fluid electrodes from a mixture of carbon black particles and silicone oil. From the measurement data, the equivalent series capacitances and resistances as well as the bending angles of the transducers are obtained. We find that the equivalent series capacitances change in average between −12 %/1000 h and −4.0 %/1000 h, while the bending angles decrease linearly with slopes ranging from −15 %/1000 h to −7 %/1000 h. Transducers with high initial bending angles and electrodes from carbon black particles show the smallest changes of the electromechanical characteristics. The capacitances decrease faster for DEMES with fluid electrodes. Some DEMES of this type reveal huge and unpredictable fluctuations of the resistances over time due to the ageing of the contacts. Design guidelines for DEMES follow directly from the observed transient changes of their electromechanical performance.

  19. Quadratic temporal finite element method for linear elastic structural dynamics based on mixed convolved action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu [School of Architecture and Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Keon [Dept. of Architectural Engineering, Dong A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    A common approach for dynamic analysis in current practice is based on a discrete time-integration scheme. This approach can be largely attributed to the absence of a true variational framework for initial value problems. To resolve this problem, a new stationary variational principle was recently established for single-degree-of-freedom oscillating systems using mixed variables, fractional derivatives and convolutions of convolutions. In this mixed convolved action, all the governing differential equations and initial conditions are recovered from the stationarity of a single functional action. Thus, the entire description of linear elastic dynamical systems is encapsulated. For its practical application to structural dynamics, this variational formalism is systemically extended to linear elastic multidegree- of-freedom systems in this study, and a corresponding weak form is numerically implemented via a quadratic temporal finite element method. The developed numerical method is symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to a time step for the underlying conservative system. For the forced-damped vibration, a three-story shear building is used as an example to investigate the performance of the developed numerical method, which provides accurate results with good convergence characteristics.

  20. Whole-tree distribution and temporal variation of non-structural carbohydrates in broadleaf evergreen trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merryn G; Miller, Rebecca E; Arndt, Stefan K; Kasel, Sabine; Bennett, Lauren T

    2018-04-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) form a fundamental yet poorly quantified carbon pool in trees. Studies of NSC seasonality in forest trees have seldom measured whole-tree NSC stocks and allocation among organs, and are not representative of all tree functional types. Non-structural carbohydrate research has primarily focussed on broadleaf deciduous and coniferous evergreen trees with distinct growing seasons, while broadleaf evergreen trees remain under-studied despite their different growth phenology. We measured whole-tree NSC allocation and temporal variation in Eucalyptus obliqua L'Hér., a broadleaf evergreen tree species typically occurring in mixed-age temperate forests, which has year-round growth and the capacity to resprout after fire. Our overarching objective was to improve the empirical basis for understanding the functional importance of NSC allocation and stock changes at the tree- and organ-level in this tree functional type. Starch was the principal storage carbohydrate and was primarily stored in the stem and roots of young (14-year-old) trees rather than the lignotuber, which did not appear to be a specialized starch storage organ. Whole-tree NSC stocks were depleted during spring and summer due to significant decreases in starch mass in the roots and stem, seemingly to support root and crown growth but potentially exacerbated by water stress in summer. Seasonality of stem NSCs differed between young and mature trees, and was not synchronized with stem basal area increments in mature trees. Our results suggest that the relative magnitude of seasonal NSC stock changes could vary with tree growth stage, and that the main drivers of NSC fluctuations in broadleaf evergreen trees in temperate biomes could be periodic disturbances such as summer drought and fire, rather than growth phenology. These results have implications for understanding post-fire tree recovery via resprouting, and for incorporating NSC pools into carbon models of mixed

  1. Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward F.; Englot, Dario J.; Vadera, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60–80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease. PMID:26017774

  2. Middle mesial canal of the permanent mandibular first molars: an anatomical challenge directly related to the outcome of endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlea, Paula; Nistor, Cristina Coralia; Imre, Marina; Gheorghiu, Irina Maria; Iliescu, Alexandru Andrei

    2017-01-01

    To effectively clean and shape the mandibular permanent first molars it is mandatory to understand in detail their complex internal anatomy. The middle mesial canal is an additional canal located between the usual mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals in the mesial root of mandibular first molars. The incidence of the middle mesial canal, its relationship with main canals of the mesial root and the possibility for it to be negotiated is an important practical issue in endodontics. To identify the presence of this canal is mandatory. Accordingly, a modified endodontic access, the use of the operating microscope and periapical radiographs in two different horizontal projections are indicated to enhance the long-term favorable outcome of the endodontic treatment.

  3. Hyper-temporal c-band SAR for baseline woody structural assessments in deciduous savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathieu, Renaud SA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available deciduous savanna environment. Results showed that: the temporal filter reduced image variance; the random forest model out-performed the linear model; while the TCV metric consistently showed marginally higher accuracies than the TCC metric. Combinations...

  4. Differential participation of temporal structures in the consolidation and reconsolidation of taste aversion extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Delatorre, Paola; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Balderas, Israela; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2010-09-01

    The extinction process has been described as the decline in the frequency or intensity of the conditioned response following the withdrawal of reinforcement. Hence, experimental extinction does not reflect loss of the original memory, but rather reflects new learning, which in turn requires consolidation in order to be maintained in the long term. During extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), a taste previously associated with aversive consequences acquires a safe status through continuous presentations of the flavor with no aversive consequence. In addition, reconsolidation has been defined as the labile state of a consolidated memory after its reactivation by the presentation of relevant information. In this study, we analyzed structures from the temporal lobe that could be involved in consolidation and reconsolidation of extinction of CTA by means of new protein synthesis. Our results showed that protein synthesis in the hippocampus (HC), the perirhinal cortex (PR) and the insular cortex (IC) of rats participate in extinction consolidation, whereas the basolateral amygdala plays no part in this phenomenon. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of protein synthesis in the IC in a third extinction trial had an effect on reconsolidation of extinction. The participation of the HC in taste memory has been described as a downmodulator for CTA consolidation, and has been related to a context-taste association. Altogether, these data suggest that extinction of aversive taste memories are subserved by the IC, HC and PR, and that extinction can undergo reconsolidation, a process depending only on the IC. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Comparison of the spatial and temporal structure of type-I ELMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, A; Beurskens, M; Counsell, G F; Fundamenski, W; Lisgo, S; Asakura, N; Kamada, Y; Oyama, N; Boedo, J A; Eich, T; Herrmann, A; Schmid, A; Leonard, A W; Loarte, A; Pitts, R A; Wilson, H R

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of the spatial and temporal evolution of the filamentary structures observed during type I ELMs is presented from a variety of diagnostics and machines. There is evidence that these filaments can be detected inside the LCFS prior to ELMs. The filaments do not have a circular cross section instead they are elongated in the perpendicular (poloidal) direction and this size appears to increase linearly with the minor radius of the machine. The filaments start off rotating toroidally/poloidally with velocities close to that of the pedestal. This velocity then decreases as the filaments propagate radially. By comparing the results from all measurements and from comparison with models it is most likely that the filaments have at least their initial radial velocity when they are far out into the SOL and before they have interacted with the nearest limiter surface. There is a general consensus that the dominant loss mechanism in the separated filaments is through parallel transport and that the transport to the wall is through the radial propagation of these filaments. Measurements of the filament energy content show that each filament contains up to 2.5% of the energy released by the ELM at the time it separates from the LCFS, assuming Ti = Te. The parallel flux e-folding length measured on DIII-D, AUG and MAST has a weaker scaling with normalised ELM size than appears to be necessary to explain the deficit in the ELM energy arriving in the divertor on JET, assuming a purely exponential decay of the filament energy with time

  6. Instability Mechanisms of Water-in-Oil Nanoemulsions with Phospholipids: Temporal and Morphological Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerling, Jan-Hendrik; de Matos, Maria B C; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Dessy, Alberto; Kok, Robbert Jan; Nirschl, Hermann; Leneweit, Gero

    2018-01-16

    Many food preparations, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics use water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions stabilized by phospholipids. Moreover, recent technological developments try to produce liposomes or lipid coated capsules from W/O emulsions, but are faced with colloidal instabilities. To explore these instability mechanisms, emulsification by sonication was applied in three cycles, and the sample stability was studied for 3 h after each cycle. Clearly identifiable temporal structures of instability provide evidence about the emulsion morphology: an initial regime of about 10 min is shown to be governed by coalescence after which Ostwald ripening dominates. Transport via molecular diffusion in Ostwald ripening is commonly based on the mutual solubility of the two phases and is therefore prohibited in emulsions composed of immiscible phases. However, in the case of water in oil emulsified by phospholipids, these form water-loaded reverse micelles in oil, which enable Ostwald ripening despite the low solubility of water in oil, as is shown for squalene. As is proved for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), concentrations below the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) form monolayers at the interfaces and smaller droplet sizes. In contrast, phospholipid concentrations above the CAC create complex multilayers at the interface with larger droplet sizes. The key factors for stable W/O emulsions in classical or innovative applications are first, the minimization of the phospholipids' capacity to form reversed micelles, and second, the adaption of the initial phospholipid concentration to the water content to enable an optimized coverage of phospholipids at the interfaces for the intended drop size.

  7. Spatial and temporal structure of fish assemblages in an ''inverse estuary'', the Sine Saloum system (Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simier, M.; Blanc, L.; Aliaume, C.; Diouf, P. S.; Albaret, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    As a consequence of the Sahelian drought, the Sine Saloum, a large estuarine system located in Senegal (West Africa), has become an "inverse estuary" since the late sixties, i.e. salinity increases upstream and reaches 100 in some places. To study the fish assemblages of such a modified system, a survey was conducted in 1992, collecting fish every two months with a purse seine at eight sites spread over the three main branches of the estuary. A total of 73 species belonging to 35 families were identified. Eight species comprised 97% of the total numbers of fish. The predominant species was a small clupeid, Sardinella maderensis, representing more than half of the total biomass and nearly 70% of the total number of fish. The spatio-temporal structure of the fish assemblages was studied using the STATIS-CoA method, which combines the multitable approach with the correspondence analysis method. Whatever the season, a strong spatial organization of fish assemblages was observed, mainly related to depth and salinity. Three types of assemblages were identified. In shallow water areas, fish assemblages were dominated by Mugilidae, Gerreidae and Cichlidae and were stable with time. In open water areas, large fluctuations in the species composition were observed, due to the occasional presence of large schools of pelagic species: in the southern area, where salinity and water transparency were the lowest, the main species were Ilisha africana, Brachydeuterus auritus and Chloroscombrus chrysurus, associated with a few Sciaenidae and Tetraodontidae, while the poorest areas were characterized by only two dominant species, S. maderensis and Scomberomorus tritor.

  8. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor's hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects that distinguish these measurements from previous work in the field: (1) The measurements are conducted using laser Doppler anemometry and are therefore not contaminated by directional ambiguity (in contrast to, e.g., frequently employed hot-wire anemometers); (2) the measurement data are extracted using a correctly and transparently functioning processor and are analysed using methods derived from first principles to provide unbiased estimates of the velocity statistics; (3) the exact mapping proposed herein has been applied to the high turbulence intensity flows investigated to avoid the significant distortions caused by Taylor's hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed jet. The proposed mapping is successfully validated using corresponding directly measured spatial statistics in the fully developed jet, even in the difficult outer regions of

  9. Volumetric analysis of medial temporal lobe structures in brain development from childhood to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiyan; Pruessner, Jens C; Coupé, Pierrick; Collins, D Louis

    2013-07-01

    Puberty is an important stage of development as a child's sexual and physical characteristics mature because of hormonal changes. To better understand puberty-related effects on brain development, we investigated the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 306 subjects from 4 to 18 years of age. Subjects were grouped into before and during puberty groups according to their sexual maturity levels measured by the puberty scores. An appearance model-based automatic segmentation method with patch-based local refinement was employed to segment the MRI data and extract the volumes of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures including the amygdala (AG), the hippocampus (HC), the entorhinal/perirhinal cortex (EPC), and the parahippocampal cortex (PHC). Our analysis showed age-related volumetric changes for the AG, HC, right EPC, and left PHC but only before puberty. After onset of puberty, these volumetric changes then correlate more with sexual maturity level, as measured by the puberty score. When normalized for brain volume, the volumes of the right HC decrease for boys; the volumes of the left HC increase for girls; and the volumes of the left and right PHC decrease for boys. These findings suggest that the rising levels of testosterone in boys and estrogen in girls might have opposite effects, especially for the HC and the PHC. Our findings on sex-specific and sexual maturity-related volumes may be useful in better understanding the MTL developmental differences and related learning, memory, and emotion differences between boys and girls during puberty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Independent and Confluent Middle Mesial Root Canals in Mandibular First Molars: A Report of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanavelu Deepalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable variations with respect to number of roots and root canals. The possibility of additional root canals should be considered even in teeth with a low frequency of abnormal root canal anatomy. This paper discusses the endodontic management of the rare anatomical complexity middle mesial canals in mandibular first molar and also serves to remind the clinicians that such anatomical variations should be taken into account during the endodontic treatment of the mandibular molars.

  11. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    OpenAIRE

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina; IMPERADOR Cristina Aparecida; SOUZA Luiz Gustavo de

    1999-01-01

    The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  12. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  13. Network Analysis of Foramen Ovale Electrode Recordings in Drug-resistant Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Pastor, Jesús; Torres, Cristina V.; Sola, Rafael G.; Ortega, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% of epilepsy patients are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. In these cases, surgery is the only alternative to eliminate/control seizures. However, a significant minority of patients continues to exhibit post-operative seizures, even in those cases in which the suspected source of seizures has been correctly localized and resected. The protocol presented here combines a clinical procedure routinely employed during the pre-operative evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with a novel technique for network analysis. The method allows for the evaluation of the temporal evolution of mesial network parameters. The bilateral insertion of foramen ovale electrodes (FOE) into the ambient cistern simultaneously records electrocortical activity at several mesial areas in the temporal lobe. Furthermore, network methodology applied to the recorded time series tracks the temporal evolution of the mesial networks both interictally and during the seizures. In this way, the presented protocol offers a unique way to visualize and quantify measures that considers the relationships between several mesial areas instead of a single area. PMID:28060326

  14. Secondary bilateral synchrony due to fronto-mesial lesions: an invasive recording study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUKIERT ARTHUR

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontal lobe epilepsies may present difficulties in focus localization in the pre-operative work-up for epilepsy surgery. This is specially true in patients with normal MRIs. We report on a 16 years-old girl that started with seizures by the age of 8 years. They were brief nocturnal episodes with automatisms such as bicycling and boxing. Seizure frequency ranged from 4-10 per night. Scalp EEG showed few right frontal convexity spiking and intense secondary bilateral syncrhony (SBS. High resolution MRI directed to the frontal lobes was normal. Ictal SPECT suggested a right fronto-lateral focus. Ictal video-EEG showed no focal onset. She was submitted to invasive recordings after subdural plates implantation. Electrodes covered all the frontal convexity and mesial surface bilaterally. Ictal recordings disclosed stereotyped seizures starting from the right mesial frontal. Using a high-resolution tool to measure intra and interhemispheric latencies, the timing and direction of seizure spread from the right fronto-mesial region were studied. Motor strip mapping was performed by means of electrical stimulation. She was submitted to a right frontal lobe resection, 1.5 cm ahead of the motor strip and has been seizure free since surgery (8 months. Pathological examination found a 4 mm area of cortical dysplasia. Invasive studies are needed to allow adequate localization in patients with non-localizatory non-invasive work-up and may lead to excellent results in relation to seizures after surgery.

  15. A Nonlinear Transmission Line Model of the Cochlea With Temporal Integration Accounts for Duration Effects in Threshold Fine Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Mauermann, Manfred; Epp, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    For normal-hearing listeners, auditory pure-tone thresholds in quiet often show quasi periodic fluctuations when measured with a high frequency resolution, referred to as threshold fine structure. Threshold fine structure is dependent on the stimulus duration, with smaller fluctuations for short...... than for long signals. The present study demonstrates how this effect can be captured by a nonlinear and active model of the cochlear in combination with a temporal integration stage. Since this cochlear model also accounts for fine structure and connected level dependent effects, it is superior...

  16. Epilepsy surgery in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy associated with neuronal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Mar; Bien, Christian G; Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael; Marusic, Petr; Elisak, Martin; Pimentel, Jose; Wehner, Tim; Mohanraj, Rajiv; Uranga, Juan; Gómez-Ibáñez, Asier; Villanueva, Vicente; Gil, Francisco; Donaire, Antonio; Bargalló, Nuria; Rumià, Jordi; Roldán, Pedro; Setoain, Xavier; Pintor, Luis; Boget, Teresa; Bailles, Eva; Falip, Mercè; Aparicio, Javier; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the outcome of patients with drug resistant epilepsy and neuronal antibodies who underwent epilepsy surgery. Retrospective study, information collected with a questionnaire sent to epilepsy surgery centers. Thirteen patients identified, with antibodies to GAD (8), Ma2 (2), Hu (1), LGI1 (1) or CASPR2 (1). Mean age at seizure onset: 23 years. Five patients had an encephalitic phase. Three had testicular tumors and five had autoimmune diseases. All had drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (median: 20 seizures/month). MRI showed unilateral temporal lobe abnormalities (mainly hippocampal sclerosis) in 9 patients, bilateral abnormalities in 3, and was normal in 1. Surgical procedures included anteromesial temporal lobectomy (10 patients), selective amygdalohippocampectomy (1), temporal pole resection (1) and radiofrequency ablation of mesial structures (1). Perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates were seen in 7/12 patients. One year outcome available in all patients, at 3 years in 9. At last visit 5/13 patients (38.5%) (with Ma2, Hu, LGI1, and 2 GAD antibodies) were in Engel's classes I or II. Epilepsy surgery may be an option for patients with drug resistant seizures associated with neuronal antibodies. Outcome seems to be worse than that expected in other etiologies, even in the presence of unilateral HS. Intracranial EEG may be required in some patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Outcome of intracranial electroencephalography monitoring and surgery in magnetic resonance imaging-negative temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ricky W; Hoogs, Marietta M; Burkholder, David B; Trenerry, Max R; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Shih, Jerry J; Doll, Karey E; Tatum, William O; Cascino, Gregory D; Marsh, W Richard; Wirrell, Elaine C; Worrell, Gregory A; So, Elson L

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the outcomes of intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recording and subsequent resective surgery in patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Thirty-two patients were identified from the Mayo Clinic Epilepsy Surgery Database (Arizona, Florida, and Minnesota). Eight (25.0%) had chronic iEEG monitoring that recorded neocortical temporal seizure onsets; 12 (37.5%) had mesial temporal seizure onsets; 5 (15.6%) had independent neocortical and mesial temporal seizure onsets; and 7 (21.9%) had simultaneous neocortical and mesial seizure onsets. Neocortical temporal lobe seizure semiology was the only factor significantly associated with neocortical temporal seizure onsets on iEEG. Only 33.3% of patients who underwent lateral temporal neocorticectomy had an Engel class 1 outcome, whereas 76.5% of patients with iEEG-guided anterior temporal lobectomy that included the amygdala and the hippocampus had an Engel class 1 outcome. Limitations in cohort size precluded statistical analysis of neuropsychological test data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frigeri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohippocampectomy (AH for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE. Method The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. Conclusion The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  19. Cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point as a reliable landmark to place the corticectomy and reach the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Thomas; Rhoton, Albert; Paglioli, Eliseu; Azambuja, Ney

    2014-10-01

    To establish preoperatively the localization of the cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point (ICP) and use it as a reliable landmark when approaching the temporal horn through a middle temporal gyrus access. To review relevant anatomical features regarding selective amigdalohippocampectomy (AH) for treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). The cortical projection of the inferior choroidal point was used in more than 300 surgeries by one authors as a reliable landmark to reach the temporal horn. In the laboratory, forty cerebral hemispheres were examined. The cortical projection of the ICP is a reliable landmark for reaching the temporal horn.

  20. METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TEMPORAL CHANGE OF PHYSICAL STRUCTURE IN THE INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL LIFE-CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKUS GÖRING

    2013-10-01

    On one hand, this paper proposes the restructuring of the sequential IEC 61513 I&C life-cycle according to the V-model, so as to adequately integrate the concept of verification and validation. On the other hand, based on a metamodel for the modeling of I&C systems, this paper introduces a method for the modeling and analysis of the effects with respect to the superposition of failure combinations and event sequences on the I&C system design, i.e. the temporal change of physical structure is analyzed. In the first step, the method is concerned with the modeling of the I&C systems. In the second step, the method considers the analysis of temporal change of physical structure, which integrates the concepts of the diversity and defense-in-depth analysis, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis.

  1. Augmenting Bag-of-Words: Data-Driven Discovery of Temporal and Structural Information for Activity Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Bettadapura, Vinay; Schindler, Grant; Plotz, Thomaz; Essa, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    We present data-driven techniques to augment Bag of Words (BoW) models, which allow for more robust modeling and recognition of complex long-term activities, especially when the structure and topology of the activities are not known a priori. Our approach specifically addresses the limitations of standard BoW approaches, which fail to represent the underlying temporal and causal information that is inherent in activity streams. In addition, we also propose the use of randomly sampled regular ...

  2. Marine protected areas increase temporal stability of community structure, but not density or diversity, of tropical seagrass fish communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Alonso Aller

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs have been shown to increase long-term temporal stability of fish communities and enhance ecosystem resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. Yet, the potential ability of MPAs to buffer effects of environmental variability at shorter time scales remains widely unknown. In the tropics, the yearly monsoon cycle is a major natural force affecting marine organisms in tropical regions, and its timing and severity are predicted to change over the coming century, with potentially severe effects on marine organisms, ecosystems and ecosystem services. Here, we assessed the ability of MPAs to buffer effects of monsoon seasonality on seagrass-associated fish communities, using a field survey in two MPAs (no-take zones and two unprotected (open-access sites around Zanzibar (Tanzania. We assessed the temporal stability of fish density and community structure within and outside MPAs during three monsoon seasons in 2014-2015, and investigated several possible mechanisms that could regulate temporal stability. Our results show that MPAs did not affect fish density and diversity, but that juvenile fish densities were temporally more stable within MPAs. Second, fish community structure was more stable within MPAs for juvenile and adult fish, but not for subadult fish or the total fish community. Third, the observed effects may be due to a combination of direct and indirect (seagrass-mediated effects of seasonality and, potentially, fluctuating fishing pressure outside MPAs. In summary, these MPAs may not have the ability to enhance fish density and diversity and to buffer effects of monsoon seasonality on the whole fish community. However, they may increase the temporal stability of certain groups, such as juvenile fish. Consequently, our results question whether MPAs play a general role in the maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning under changing environmental conditions in tropical seagrass fish communities.

  3. Temporal dynamics and population genetic structure of Fusarium graminearum in the upper Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J M; Xayamongkhon, H; Broz, K; Dong, Y; McCormick, S P; Abramova, S; Ward, T J; Ma, Z H; Kistler, H C

    2014-12-01

    Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat and barley, and contaminates grains with several trichothecene mycotoxins, causing destructive yield losses and economic impact in the United States. Recently, a F. graminearum strain collected from Minnesota (MN) was determined to produce a novel trichothecene toxin, called NX-2. In order to determine the spatial and temporal dynamics of NX-2 producing strains in MN, North Dakota (ND) and South Dakota (SD), a total of 463 F. graminearum strains were collected from three sampling periods, 1999-2000, 2006-2007 and 2011-2013. A PCR-RFLP based diagnostic test was developed and validated for NX-2 producing strains based on polymorphisms in the Tri1 gene. Trichothecene biosynthesis gene (Tri gene)-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays and ten PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers were used to genotype all strains. NX-2 strains were detected in each sampling period but with a very low overall frequency (2.8%) and were mainly collected near the borders of MN, ND and SD. Strains with the 3ADON chemotype were relatively infrequent in 1999-2000 (4.5%) but increased to 29.4% in 2006-2007 and 17.2% in 2011-2013. The distribution of 3ADON producing strains also expanded from a few border counties between ND and MN in 1999-2000, southward toward the border between SD and MN in 2006-2007 and westward in 2011-2013. Genetic differentiation between 2006-2007 and 2011-2013 populations (3%) was much lower than that between 1999-2000 and 2006-2007 (22%) or 1999-2000 and 2011-2013 (20%) suggesting that most change to population genetic structure of F. graminearum occurred between 1999-2000 and 2006-2007. This change was associated with the emergence of a new population consisting largely of individuals with a 3ADON chemotype. A Bayesian clustering analysis suggested that NX-2 chemotype strains are part of a previously described Upper Midwestern population. However, these analyses

  4. Anatomic variations of the cochlea and relations to other temporal bone structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, P.; Muren, C. (Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Sabbatsberg' s Sjukhus, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-09-01

    The size and shape of the human cochlea and the normal ranges of variation of its dimensions were evaluated in 95 plastic casts, prepared from temporal bone specimens. The normal range of variation is fairly small, and is not age-dependent. Obvious digression from this range, associated with pertinent clinical symptoms, indicates an abnormality. (orig./MG).

  5. Temporal structure of aggregate power fluctuations in large-eddy simulations of extended wind-farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations represent a major challenge for the incorporation of electric power from large wind-farms into power grids. Wind-farm power output fluctuates strongly in time, over various time scales. Understanding these fluctuations, especially their spatio-temporal characteristics, is particularly

  6. Spatio-temporal map generalizations with the hierarchical Voronoi data structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Gold, Christopher M.

    implemented in commercial GIS systems. In this research, we used the Voronoi spatial data model for map generalizations. We were able to demonstrate that the map generalization does not affect only spatial objects (points, lines or polygons), but also the events corresponding to the creation and modification...... their spatio-temporal characteristics and their dynamic behaviour....

  7. Probabilistic M/EEG source imaging from sparse spatio-temporal event structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai T.; Wipf, David

    While MEG and EEG source imaging methods have to tackle a severely ill-posed problem their success can be stated as their ability to constrain the solutions using appropriate priors. In this paper we propose a hierarchical Bayesian model facilitating spatio-temporal patterns through the use of bo...

  8. Modeling Temporal Structure in Music for Emotion Prediction using Pairwise Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Larsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    such as emotions, genre, and similarity. This paper addresses the specific hypothesis whether temporal information is essential for predicting expressed emotions in music, as a prototypical example of a cognitive aspect of music. We propose to test this hypothesis using a novel processing pipeline: 1) Extracting...

  9. Temporal genetic structure in a poecilogonous polychaete: the interplay of developmental mode and environmental stochasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Kesäniemi, Jenni E; Mustonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    elegans, a poecilogonous polychaete with within-species variation in developmental mode. P. elegans produces either planktonic, benthic, or intermediate larvae, varying both among and within populations, providing a within-species test of the generality of a relationship between temporal genetic variation...

  10. The Importance of Temporal and Spatial Vegetation Structure Information in Biotope Mapping Schemes: A Case Study in Helsingborg, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian; Qiu, Ling; Hammer, MÃ¥rten; Gunnarsson, Allan

    2012-02-01

    Temporal and spatial vegetation structure has impact on biodiversity qualities. Yet, current schemes of biotope mapping do only to a limited extend incorporate these factors in the mapping. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of a modified biotope mapping scheme that includes temporal and spatial vegetation structure. A refined scheme was developed based on a biotope classification, and applied to a green structure system in Helsingborg city in southern Sweden. It includes four parameters of vegetation structure: continuity of forest cover, age of dominant trees, horizontal structure, and vertical structure. The major green structure sites were determined by interpretation of panchromatic aerial photographs assisted with a field survey. A set of biotope maps was constructed on the basis of each level of modified classification. An evaluation of the scheme included two aspects in particular: comparison of species richness between long-continuity and short-continuity forests based on identification of woodland continuity using ancient woodland indicators (AWI) species and related historical documents, and spatial distribution of animals in the green space in relation to vegetation structure. The results indicate that (1) the relationship between forest continuity: according to verification of historical documents, the richness of AWI species was higher in long-continuity forests; Simpson's diversity was significantly different between long- and short-continuity forests; the total species richness and Shannon's diversity were much higher in long-continuity forests shown a very significant difference. (2) The spatial vegetation structure and age of stands influence the richness and abundance of the avian fauna and rabbits, and distance to the nearest tree and shrub was a strong determinant of presence for these animal groups. It is concluded that continuity of forest cover, age of dominant trees, horizontal and vertical structures of vegetation

  11. Pollination Biology and Spatio-Temporal Structuring of Some Major Acacia Species (Leguminosae) of the Arabian Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adgaba, N.; Alghamidi, A.; Tadesse, Y.; Getachew, A.; Ansari, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Acacias are the dominant woody plant species distributed over the vast tracts of land throughout the Arabian Peninsula. However, information on spatio-temporal structuring and pollination biology of the species is not precisely available. To determine whether any variations exist among the Acacia species in their temporal distribution, their flowering period was determined through monitoring the commencing, peaking and ending of flowering of each species. Moreover, if any variations exist in release of floral rewards among the different co-existing and co-flowering species as mechanisms of partitioning of pollinators, to minimize competition for pollination, the progress of their anthesis over time was recorded by scoring polyads to anthers ratio at different hours of a day. In addition, the amount and dynamics of nectar sugar per inflorescence (N =225/species) was determined following flower nectar sugar washing technique. Types and frequencies of flower visitors and their preferences were determined by recording the visitors 6 times a day. The current study revealed that the Acacia species of the Arabian Peninsula are spatio-temporally structured: some species co-exist yet have different flowering seasons, whereas others co-exist, flowering concurrently yet exhibit a shift in their time of peak flowering and in the time at which the peak pollen is released during the day. This study demonstrates that all Acacia species examined secrete a considerable amount of nectar (2.24+-1.72 -10.02+-4.0mg/inflorescence) which serves as a floral reward for pollinators. Insects of the Order Hymenoptera are the most prevalent visitors to Acacia species in the region. The variations in spatio-temporal structuring of the Acaciaspecies could be due to their adaptation of reducing competition for pollinators and minimizing hetero-specific pollen transfer. (author)

  12. Longitudinal structure in temperate stream fish communities: evaluating conceptual models with temporal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Five conceptual models of longitudinal fish community organization in streams were examined: (1) niche diversity model (NDM), (2) stream continuum model (SCM), (3) immigrant accessibility model (IAM), (4) environmental stability model (ESM), and (5) adventitious stream model (ASM). We used differences among models in their predictions about temporal species turnover, along with five spatiotemporal fish community data sets, to evaluate model applicability. Models were similar in predicting a positive species richness–stream size relationship and longitudinal species nestedness, but differed in predicting either similar temporal species turnover throughout the stream continuum (NDM, SCM), higher turnover upstream (IAM, ESM), or higher turnover downstream (ASM). We calculated measures of spatial and temporal variation from spatiotemporal fish data in five wadeable streams in central and eastern North America spanning 34–68 years (French Creek [New York], Piasa Creek [Illinois], Spruce Run [Virginia], Little Stony Creek [Virginia], and Sinking Creek [Virginia]). All streams exhibited substantial species turnover (i.e., at least 27% turnover in stream-scale species pools), in contrast to the predictions of the SCM. Furthermore, community change was greater in downstream than upstream reaches in four of five streams. This result is most consistent with the ASM and suggests that downstream communities are strongly influenced by migrants to and from species pools outside the focal stream. In Sinking Creek, which is isolated from external species pools, temporal species turnover (via increased richness) was higher upstream than downstream, which is a pattern most consistent with the IAM or ESM. These results corroborate the hypothesis that temperate stream habitats and fish communities are temporally dynamic and that fish migration and environmental disturbances play fundamental roles in stream fish community organization.

  13. Temporal and Spatial Impact of Human Cadaver Decomposition on Soil Bacterial and Arthropod Community Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baneshwar; Minick, Kevan J.; Strickland, Michael S.; Wickings, Kyle G.; Crippen, Tawni L.; Tarone, Aaron M.; Benbow, M. Eric; Sufrin, Ness; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.; Pechal, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    As vertebrate carrion decomposes, there is a release of nutrient-rich fluids into the underlying soil, which can impact associated biological community structure and function. How these changes alter soil biogeochemical cycles is relatively unknown and may prove useful in the identification of carrion decomposition islands that have long lasting, focal ecological effects. This study investigated the spatial (0, 1, and 5 m) and temporal (3–732 days) dynamics of human cadaver decomposition on soil bacterial and arthropod community structure and microbial function. We observed strong evidence of a predictable response to cadaver decomposition that varies over space for soil bacterial and arthropod community structure, carbon (C) mineralization and microbial substrate utilization patterns. In the presence of a cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples), the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was greater, while the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia was lower when compared to samples at 1 and 5 m. Micro-arthropods were more abundant (15 to 17-fold) in soils collected at 0 m compared to either 1 or 5 m, but overall, micro-arthropod community composition was unrelated to either bacterial community composition or function. Bacterial community structure and microbial function also exhibited temporal relationships, whereas arthropod community structure did not. Cumulative precipitation was more effective in predicting temporal variations in bacterial abundance and microbial activity than accumulated degree days. In the presence of the cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples), the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased significantly with cumulative precipitation. Furthermore, soil bacterial communities and C mineralization were sensitive to the introduction of human cadavers as they diverged from baseline levels and did not recover completely in approximately 2 years. These data are valuable for understanding ecosystem

  14. Ancient sedimentary structures in the Mars, that resemble macroscopic morphology, spatial associations, and temporal succession in terrestrial microbialites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, Nora

    2015-02-01

    Sandstone beds of the Mars have been interpreted as evidence of an ancient playa lake environment. On Earth, such environments have been sites of colonization by microbial mats from the early Archean to the present time. Terrestrial microbial mats in playa lake environments form microbialites known as microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS). On Mars, three lithofacies of the Gillespie Lake Member sandstone display centimeter- to meter-scale structures similar in macroscopic morphology to terrestrial MISS that include "erosional remnants and pockets," "mat chips," "roll-ups," "desiccation cracks," and "gas domes." The microbially induced sedimentary-like structures identified in Curiosity rover mission images do not have a random distribution. Rather, they were found to be arranged in spatial associations and temporal successions that indicate they changed over time. On Earth, if such MISS occurred with this type of spatial association and temporal succession, they would be interpreted as having recorded the growth of a microbially dominated ecosystem that thrived in pools that later dried completely: erosional pockets, mat chips, and roll-ups resulted from water eroding an ancient microbial mat-covered sedimentary surface; during the course of subsequent water recess, channels would have cut deep into the microbial mats, leaving erosional remnants behind; desiccation cracks and gas domes would have occurred during a final period of subaerial exposure of the microbial mats. In this paper, the similarities of the macroscopic morphologies, spatial associations, and temporal succession of sedimentary structures on Mars to MISS preserved on Earth has led to the following hypothesis: The sedimentary structures in the Mars are ancient MISS produced by interactions between microbial mats and their environment. Proposed here is a strategy for detecting, identifying, confirming, and differentiating possible MISS during current and future Mars missions.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Impact of Human Cadaver Decomposition on Soil Bacterial and Arthropod Community Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baneshwar Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As vertebrate carrion decomposes, there is a release of nutrient-rich fluids into the underlying soil, which can impact associated biological community structure and function. How these changes alter soil biogeochemical cycles is relatively unknown and may prove useful in the identification of carrion decomposition islands that have long lasting, focal ecological effects. This study investigated the spatial (0, 1, and 5 m and temporal (3–732 days dynamics of human cadaver decomposition on soil bacterial and arthropod community structure and microbial function. We observed strong evidence of a predictable response to cadaver decomposition that varies over space for soil bacterial and arthropod community structure, carbon (C mineralization and microbial substrate utilization patterns. In the presence of a cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples, the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was greater, while the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia was lower when compared to samples at 1 and 5 m. Micro-arthropods were more abundant (15 to 17-fold in soils collected at 0 m compared to either 1 or 5 m, but overall, micro-arthropod community composition was unrelated to either bacterial community composition or function. Bacterial community structure and microbial function also exhibited temporal relationships, whereas arthropod community structure did not. Cumulative precipitation was more effective in predicting temporal variations in bacterial abundance and microbial activity than accumulated degree days. In the presence of the cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased significantly with cumulative precipitation. Furthermore, soil bacterial communities and C mineralization were sensitive to the introduction of human cadavers as they diverged from baseline levels and did not recover completely in approximately 2 years. These data are valuable for understanding

  16. The role of temporal structure in the investigation of sensory memory, auditory scene analysis, and speech perception: a healthy-aging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Johanna Maria; Sussman, Elyse; Poeppel, David

    2015-02-01

    Listening situations with multiple talkers or background noise are common in everyday communication and are particularly demanding for older adults. Here we review current research on auditory perception in aging individuals in order to gain insights into the challenges of listening under noisy conditions. Informationally rich temporal structure in auditory signals--over a range of time scales from milliseconds to seconds--renders temporal processing central to perception in the auditory domain. We discuss the role of temporal structure in auditory processing, in particular from a perspective relevant for hearing in background noise, and focusing on sensory memory, auditory scene analysis, and speech perception. Interestingly, these auditory processes, usually studied in an independent manner, show considerable overlap of processing time scales, even though each has its own 'privileged' temporal regimes. By integrating perspectives on temporal structure processing in these three areas of investigation, we aim to highlight similarities typically not recognized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure in Mandarin Lexical Tone Perception in Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    Full Text Available Temporal information in a signal can be partitioned into temporal envelope (E and fine structure (FS. Fine structure is important for lexical tone perception for normal-hearing (NH listeners, and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL have an impaired ability to use FS in lexical tone perception due to the reduced frequency resolution. The present study was aimed to assess which of the acoustic aspects (E or FS played a more important role in lexical tone perception in subjects with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD and to determine whether it was the deficit in temporal resolution or frequency resolution that might lead to more detrimental effects on FS processing in pitch perception. Fifty-eight native Mandarin Chinese-speaking subjects (27 with ANSD, 16 with SNHL, and 15 with NH were assessed for (1 their ability to recognize lexical tones using acoustic E or FS cues with the "auditory chimera" technique, (2 temporal resolution as measured with temporal gap detection (TGD threshold, and (3 frequency resolution as measured with the Q(10dB values of the psychophysical tuning curves. Overall, 26.5%, 60.2%, and 92.1% of lexical tone responses were consistent with FS cues for tone perception for listeners with ANSD, SNHL, and NH, respectively. The mean TGD threshold was significantly higher for listeners with ANSD (11.9 ms than for SNHL (4.0 ms; p < 0.001 and NH (3.9 ms; p < 0.001 listeners, with no significant difference between SNHL and NH listeners. In contrast, the mean Q(10dB for listeners with SNHL (1.8 ± 0.4 was significantly lower than that for ANSD (3.5 ± 1.0; p < 0.001 and NH (3.4 ± 0.9; p < 0.001 listeners, with no significant difference between ANSD and NH listeners. These results suggest that reduced temporal resolution, as opposed to reduced frequency selectivity, in ANSD subjects leads to greater degradation of FS processing for pitch perception.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Video Object Segmentation via Scale-Adaptive 3D Structure Tensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yun Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To address multiple motions and deformable objects' motions encountered in existing region-based approaches, an automatic video object (VO segmentation methodology is proposed in this paper by exploiting the duality of image segmentation and motion estimation such that spatial and temporal information could assist each other to jointly yield much improved segmentation results. The key novelties of our method are (1 scale-adaptive tensor computation, (2 spatial-constrained motion mask generation without invoking dense motion-field computation, (3 rigidity analysis, (4 motion mask generation and selection, and (5 motion-constrained spatial region merging. Experimental results demonstrate that these novelties jointly contribute much more accurate VO segmentation both in spatial and temporal domains.

  19. Musical intervention enhances infants’ neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, T. Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians show enhanced musical pitch and meter processing, effects that generalize to speech. Yet potential differences between musicians and nonmusicians limit conclusions. We examined the effects of a randomized laboratory-controlled music intervention on music and speech processing in 9-mo-old infants. The Intervention exposed infants to music in triple meter (the waltz) in a social environment. Controls engaged in similar social play without music. After 12 sessions, infants’ temporal in...

  20. The effect of STDP temporal kernel structure on the learning dynamics of single excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Luz

    Full Text Available Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP is characterized by a wide range of temporal kernels. However, much of the theoretical work has focused on a specific kernel - the "temporally asymmetric Hebbian" learning rules. Previous studies linked excitatory STDP to positive feedback that can account for the emergence of response selectivity. Inhibitory plasticity was associated with negative feedback that can balance the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here we study the possible computational role of the temporal structure of the STDP. We represent the STDP as a superposition of two processes: potentiation and depression. This allows us to model a wide range of experimentally observed STDP kernels, from Hebbian to anti-Hebbian, by varying a single parameter. We investigate STDP dynamics of a single excitatory or inhibitory synapse in purely feed-forward architecture. We derive a mean-field-Fokker-Planck dynamics for the synaptic weight and analyze the effect of STDP structure on the fixed points of the mean field dynamics. We find a phase transition along the Hebbian to anti-Hebbian parameter from a phase that is characterized by a unimodal distribution of the synaptic weight, in which the STDP dynamics is governed by negative feedback, to a phase with positive feedback characterized by a bimodal distribution. The critical point of this transition depends on general properties of the STDP dynamics and not on the fine details. Namely, the dynamics is affected by the pre-post correlations only via a single number that quantifies its overlap with the STDP kernel. We find that by manipulating the STDP temporal kernel, negative feedback can be induced in excitatory synapses and positive feedback in inhibitory. Moreover, there is an exact symmetry between inhibitory and excitatory plasticity, i.e., for every STDP rule of inhibitory synapse there exists an STDP rule for excitatory synapse, such that their dynamics is identical.

  1. Medial temporal lobe structure and cognition in individuals with schizophrenia and in their non-psychotic siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik-Henry, Meghana S; Wang, Lei; Barch, Deanna M; Harms, Michael P; Campanella, Carolina; Csernansky, John G

    2012-07-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures play a central role in episodic memory. Prior studies suggest that individuals with schizophrenia have deficits in episodic memory as well as structural abnormalities of the medial temporal lobe (MTL). While correlations have been reported between MTL volume loss and episodic memory deficits in such individuals, it is not clear whether such correlations reflect the influence of the disease state or of underlying genetic influences that might contribute to risk. We used high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and probabilistic algorithms for image analysis to determine whether MTL structure, episodic memory performance and the relationship between the two differed among groups of 47 healthy control subjects, 50 control siblings, 39 schizophrenia subjects, and 33 siblings of schizophrenia subjects. High-dimensional large deformation brain mapping was used to obtain volume measures of the hippocampus. Cortical distance mapping was used to obtain volume and thickness measures of the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and its substructures: the entorhinal cortex (ERC), the perirhinal cortex (PRC), and the parahippocampal cortex (PHC). Neuropsychological data was used to establish an episodic memory domain score for each subject. Both schizophrenia subjects and their siblings displayed abnormalities in episodic memory performance. Siblings of individuals with schizophrenia, and to a lesser extent, individuals with schizophrenia themselves, displayed abnormalities in measures of MTL structure (volume loss or cortical thinning) as compared to control groups. Further, we observed correlations between structural measures and memory performance in both schizophrenia subjects and their siblings, but not in their respective control groups. These findings suggest that disease-specific genetic factors present in both patients and their relatives may be responsible for correlated abnormalities of MTL structure and memory impairment. The observed

  2. From indoor to outdoor: Behavioural response of fish to noise exposure of different temporal structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik Yaw Neo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human activities, such as shipping and pile driving, produce substantial amounts of man-made noise underwater. The noise may negatively affect fish, causing physical injuries, hearing loss, physiological stress, acoustic masking and behavioural changes. Among these effects, behavioural changes are most problematic, but are understudied, especially under well-controlled field conditions. Moreover, man-made noise varies widely in terms of acoustic characteristics. The influence of temporal patterns of noise on the impacts is largely unknown. We exposed groups of European seabass to sound treatments of different temporal patterns, varying in intermittency, interval regularity and presence of amplitude 'ramp-up'. The study took place in a large octagonal floating pen (⌀ = ~12.5m in Oosterschelde, a marine inlet in the Netherlands. We tracked the fish swimming trajectories with an acoustic 3D telemetry system and looked into the behavioural changes and recovery. Upon noise exposure, the fish swam to greater depths in tighter shoals, similar to previous studies conducted in a basin. Moreover, the fish swam away from the noise source, suggesting avoidance behaviour. The different temporal patterns seemed to differ in their impact strengths although the results were not significant. These findings may carry important scientific and management implications.

  3. Temporal dynamics of hot desert microbial communities reveal structural and functional responses to water input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Alacia; Valverde, Angel; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Jansson, Janet K; Hopkins, David W; Aspray, Thomas J; Seely, Mary; Trindade, Marla I; Cowan, Don A

    2016-09-29

    The temporal dynamics of desert soil microbial communities are poorly understood. Given the implications for ecosystem functioning under a global change scenario, a better understanding of desert microbial community stability is crucial. Here, we sampled soils in the central Namib Desert on sixteen different occasions over a one-year period. Using Illumina-based amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that α-diversity (richness) was more variable at a given sampling date (spatial variability) than over the course of one year (temporal variability). Community composition remained essentially unchanged across the first 10 months, indicating that spatial sampling might be more important than temporal sampling when assessing β-diversity patterns in desert soils. However, a major shift in microbial community composition was found following a single precipitation event. This shift in composition was associated with a rapid increase in CO 2 respiration and productivity, supporting the view that desert soil microbial communities respond rapidly to re-wetting and that this response may be the result of both taxon-specific selection and changes in the availability or accessibility of organic substrates. Recovery to quasi pre-disturbance community composition was achieved within one month after rainfall.

  4. Temporal dynamics of hot desert microbial communities reveal structural and functional responses to water input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Alacia; Valverde, Angel; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Jansson, Janet K.; Hopkins, David W.; Aspray, Thomas J.; Seely, Mary; Trindade, Marla I.; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-09-29

    The temporal dynamics of desert soil microbial communities are poorly understood. Given the implications for ecosystem functioning under a global change scenario, a better understanding of desert microbial community stability is crucial. Here, we sampled soils in the central Namib Desert on sixteen different occasions over a one-year period. Using Illumina-based amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that α-diversity (richness) was more variable at a given sampling date (spatial variability) than over the course of one year (temporal variability). Community composition remained essentially unchanged across the first 10 months, indicating that spatial sampling might be more important than temporal sampling when assessing β-diversity patterns in desert soils. However, a major shift in microbial community composition was found following a single precipitation event. This shift in composition was associated with a rapid increase in CO2 respiration and productivity, supporting the view that desert soil microbial communities respond rapidly to re-wetting and that this response may be the result of both taxon-specific selection and changes in the availability or accessibility of organic substrates. Recovery to quasi pre-disturbance community composition was achieved within one month after rainfall.

  5. Hierarchical temporal structure in music, speech and animal vocalizations: jazz is like a conversation, humpbacks sing like hermit thrushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T; Bella, Simone Dalla; Médé, Butovens; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2017-10-01

    Humans talk, sing and play music. Some species of birds and whales sing long and complex songs. All these behaviours and sounds exhibit hierarchical structure-syllables and notes are positioned within words and musical phrases, words and motives in sentences and musical phrases, and so on. We developed a new method to measure and compare hierarchical temporal structures in speech, song and music. The method identifies temporal events as peaks in the sound amplitude envelope, and quantifies event clustering across a range of timescales using Allan factor (AF) variance. AF variances were analysed and compared for over 200 different recordings from more than 16 different categories of signals, including recordings of speech in different contexts and languages, musical compositions and performances from different genres. Non-human vocalizations from two bird species and two types of marine mammals were also analysed for comparison. The resulting patterns of AF variance across timescales were distinct to each of four natural categories of complex sound: speech, popular music, classical music and complex animal vocalizations. Comparisons within and across categories indicated that nested clustering in longer timescales was more prominent when prosodic variation was greater, and when sounds came from interactions among individuals, including interactions between speakers, musicians, and even killer whales. Nested clustering also was more prominent for music compared with speech, and reflected beat structure for popular music and self-similarity across timescales for classical music. In summary, hierarchical temporal structures reflect the behavioural and social processes underlying complex vocalizations and musical performances. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Endodontic treatment of a mandibular first molar with three mesial canals and broken instrument removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Farhad; Fakhri, Hamidreza; Fakri, Hamidreza; Javaheri, Homan H

    2010-04-01

    To succeed in any dental procedure, the clinician's awareness of the patient's dental anatomy and its variations is crucial. In endodontic therapy, obtaining full information about the root canals' variations can affect the outcome substantially. This case report presents the endodontic treatment of a mandibular first molar exhibiting three mesial root canals with 4 mm of a separated K-file in the coronal third of the mesiolingual canal on an 18-year-old female patient. This case demonstrates the importance of locating additional canals in any roots undergoing endodontic treatment and how the clinician's awareness of aberrant internal anatomy may change the treatment results.

  7. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root’s apical third

    OpenAIRE

    FRÖNER, Izabel Cristina; IMPERADOR, Cristina Aparecida; SOUZA, Luiz Gustavo de

    1999-01-01

    The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy. A presente pesquisa analisa in vitro as alterações anatômicas dos 4 mm apic...

  8. Experimentally induced thyrotoxicosis leads to increased connectivity in temporal lobe structures: a resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttlich, Martin; Heldmann, Marcus; Göbel, Anna; Dirk, Anna-Luise; Brabant, Georg; Münte, Thomas F

    2015-06-01

    Adult onset hyperthyroidism may impact on different cognitive domains, including attention and concentration, memory, perceptual function, language and executive function. Previous PET studies implicated changed functionality of limbic regions, the temporal and frontal lobes in hyperthyroidism, whereas it is unknown whether cognitive effects of hyperthyroidism may be due to changed brain connectivity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of experimentally induced short-term hyperthyroidism thyrotoxicosis on resting-state functional connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-nine healthy male right-handed subjects were examined twice, once prior and once after 8 weeks of oral administration of 250 μg levothyroxine per day. Resting-state fMRI was subjected to graph-theory based analysis methods to investigate whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity. Despite a lack of subjective changes noticed by the subjects significant thyrotoxicosis was confirmed in all subjects. This induced a significant increase in resting-state functional connectivity specifically in the rostral temporal lobes (0.05 FDR corrected at the cluster level), which is caused by an increased connectivity to the cognitive control network. The increased connectivity between temporal poles and the cognitive control network shown here under experimental conditions supports an important function of thyroid hormones in the regulation of paralimbic structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Disease and community structure: white-nose syndrome alters spatial and temporal niche partitioning in sympatric bat species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachowski, David S.; Dobony, Christopher A.; Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Britzke, Eric R.; Rodrigue, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    AimEmerging infectious diseases present a major perturbation with apparent direct effects such as reduced population density, extirpation and/or extinction. Comparatively less is known about the potential indirect effects of disease that likely alter community structure and larger ecosystem function. Since 2006, white-nose syndrome (WNS) has resulted in the loss of over 6 million hibernating bats in eastern North America. Considerable evidence exists concerning niche partitioning in sympatric bat species in this region, and the unprecedented, rapid decline in multiple species following WNS may provide an opportunity to observe a dramatic restructuring of the bat community.LocationWe conducted our study at Fort Drum Army Installation in Jefferson and Lewis counties, New York, USA, where WNS first impacted extant bat species in winter 2007–2008.MethodsAcoustical monitoring during 2003–2011 allowed us to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal niche partitioning by bats was relaxed post-WNS.ResultsWe detected nine bat species pre- and post-WNS. Activity for most bat species declined post-WNS. Dramatic post-WNS declines in activity of little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus, MYLU), formerly the most abundant bat species in the region, were associated with complex, often species-specific responses by other species that generally favoured increased spatial and temporal overlap with MYLU.Main conclusionsIn addition to the obvious direct effects of disease on bat populations and activity levels, our results provide evidence that disease can have cascading indirect effects on community structure. Recent occurrence of WNS in North America, combined with multiple existing stressors, is resulting in dramatic shifts in temporal and spatial niche partitioning within bat communities. These changes might influence long-term population viability of some bat species as well as broader scale ecosystem structure and function.

  10. The temporal structure of resting-state brain activity in the medial prefrontal cortex predicts self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zirui; Obara, Natsuho; Davis, Henry Hap; Pokorny, Johanna; Northoff, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an overlap between the neural substrate of resting-state activity and self-related processing in the cortical midline structures (CMS). However, the neural and psychological mechanisms mediating this so-called "rest-self overlap" remain unclear. To investigate the neural mechanisms, we estimated the temporal structure of spontaneous/resting-state activity, e.g. its long-range temporal correlations or self-affinity across time as indexed by the power-law exponent (PLE). The PLE was obtained in resting-state activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in 47 healthy subjects by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We performed correlation analyses of the PLE and Revised Self-Consciousness Scale (SCSR) scores, which enabled us to access different dimensions of self-consciousness and specified rest-self overlap in a psychological regard. The PLE in the MPFC's resting-state activity correlated with private self-consciousness scores from the SCSR. Conversely, we found no correlation between the PLE and the other subscales of the SCSR (public, social) or between other resting-state measures, including functional connectivity, and the SCSR subscales. This is the first evidence for the association between the scale-free dynamics of resting-state activity in the CMS and the private dimension of self-consciousness. This finding implies the relationship of especially the private dimension of self with the temporal structure of resting-state activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Temporal and spatial characteristics of ecological risk in Shunyi, Beijing, China based on landscape structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Feng Ting; Peng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Based on the remote sensing data in 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009 and 2013, this article classified the landscape types of Shunyi, and the ecological risk index was built based on landscape disturbance index and landscape fragility. The spatial auto-correlation and geostatistical analysis by GS + and ArcGIS was used to study temporal and spatial changes of ecological risk. The results showed that eco-risk degree in the study region had positive spatial correlation which decreased with the increasing grain size. Within a certain grain range (landscape, such as the banks of Chaobai River.

  12. Aberrant Wnt signaling pathway in medial temporal lobe structures of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riise, Jesper; Plath, Niels; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    alterations of the intracellular Wnt pathway signaling components β-catenin, Gsk3β and Tcf7l1/Tcf3 and the phosphorylation state of β-catenin and Gsk3β in the hippocampus suggestive of a link between AD and aberrant canonical activity. Alterations in Gsk3β co-appeared with hippocampal kinase...... on isolated Wnt pathway components. Here, we provide the first comprehensive pathway-focused evaluation of the Wnt pathway in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of AD brains. Our data demonstrate altered Wnt pathway gene expression at all levels of the pathway in both medial temporal lobe regions...

  13. A correlational method to concurrently measure envelope and temporal fine structure weights: effects of age, cochlear pathology, and spectral shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E

    2012-09-01

    The speech signal may be divided into spectral frequency-bands, each band containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. This study measured the perceptual weights for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials in young normal-hearing listeners, older normal-hearing listeners, aided older hearing-impaired listeners, and spectrally matched young normal-hearing listeners. The availability of each acoustic property was independently varied through noisy signal extraction. Thus, the full speech stimulus was presented with noise used to mask six different auditory channels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener's performance with the signal-to-noise ratio of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrate that temporal fine structure perceptual weights remain stable across the four listener groups. However, a different weighting typography was observed across the listener groups for envelope cues. Results suggest that spectral shaping used to preserve the audibility of the speech stimulus may alter the allocation of perceptual resources. The relative perceptual weighting of envelope cues may also change with age. Concurrent testing of sentences repeated once on a previous day demonstrated that weighting strategies for all listener groups can change, suggesting an initial stabilization period or susceptibility to auditory training.

  14. Importance of the temporal structure of movement sequences on the ability of monkeys to use serial order information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffains, Marc; Legallet, Eric; Apicella, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The capacity to acquire motor skills through repeated practice of a sequence of movements underlies many everyday activities. Extensive research in humans has dealt with the importance of spatial and temporal factors on motor sequence learning, standing in contrast to the few studies available in animals, particularly in nonhuman primates. In the present experiments, we studied the effect of the serial order of stimuli and associated movements in macaque monkeys overtrained to make arm-reaching movements in response to spatially distinct visual targets. Under different conditions, the temporal structure of the motor sequence was varied by changing the duration of the interval between successive target stimuli or by adding a cue that reliably signaled the onset time of the forthcoming target stimulus. In each condition, the extent to which the monkeys are sensitive to the spatial regularities was assessed by comparing performance when stimulus locations follow a repeating sequence, as opposed to a random sequence. We observed no improvement in task performance on repeated sequence blocks, compared to random sequence blocks, when target stimuli are relatively distant from each other in time. On the other hand, the shortening of the time interval between successive target stimuli or, more efficiently, the addition of a temporal cue before the target stimulus yielded a performance advantage under repeated sequence, reflected in a decrease in the latency of arm and saccadic eye movements accompanied by an increased tendency for eye movements to occur in an anticipatory manner. Contrary to the effects on movement initiation, the serial order of stimuli and movements did not markedly affect the execution of movement. Moreover, the location of a given target in the random sequence influenced task performance based on the location of the preceding target, monkeys being faster in responding as a result of familiarity caused by extensive practice with some target transitions

  15. Surgical Management and Long-Term Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Fan; Pei, Jia-Sheng; Jia, Yan-Zeng; Lin, Qiao; Xiao, Hui; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhong, Zhong-Hui

    2018-02-01

    Operative strategies for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM)-associated temporal lobe epilepsy and timing of surgical intervention continue to be debated. This study aimed to establish an algorithm to evaluate the efficacy of surgical intervention strategies, to maximize positive surgical outcomes and minimize postsurgical neurologic deficits. 47 patients having undergone operation for CCM-associated temporal lobe epilepsy were retrospectively reviewed. They had received a diagnostic series for seizure localization, including long-term video electroencephalography (vEEG), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). In patients with mesial temporal lobe CCMs, the involved structures (amygdala, hippocampus, or parahippocampal gyrus) were resected in addition to the lesions. Patients with neocortical epileptogenic CCM underwent extended lesionectomy guided by intraoperative electrocorticography; further performance of amygdalohippocampectomy depended on the extent of hippocampal epileptogenicity. The study cohort contained 28 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE), 12 with chronic epilepsy (CE), and 7 with sporadic seizure (SS). Normal temporal lobe metabolism was seen in 7/7 patients of the SS group. Hypometabolism was found in all patients with chronic disease except for those with posterior inferior and middle temporal gyrus cavernous malformations (CMs). Of the 31 patients with superficial neocortical CCM, 7 had normal PET without hippocampal sclerosis, 14 had ipsilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism without hippocampal sclerosis, and 10 had obvious hippocampal sclerosis and hypometabolism. Seizure freedom in DRE, CE, and SS was 82.1%, 75%, and 100%, respectively. A significant difference was found between lesion laterality and postoperative seizure control; the rate was lower in left-sided cases because of less aggressive resection. Our study demonstrates that the data from the

  16. One declarative memory system or two? The relationship between episodic and semantic memory in children with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lou; Lah, Suncica

    2011-09-01

    This study explored verbal semantic and episodic memory in children with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy to determine whether they had impairments in both or only 1 aspect of memory, and to examine relations between performance in the 2 domains. Sixty-six children and adolescents (37 with seizures of left temporal lobe onset, 29 with right-sided onset) were given 4 tasks assessing different aspects of semantic memory (picture naming, fluency, knowledge of facts, knowledge of word meanings) and 2 episodic memory tasks (story recall, word list recall). High rates of impairments were observed across tasks, and no differences were found related to the laterality of the seizures. Individual patient analyses showed that there was a double dissociation between the 2 aspects of memory in that some children were impaired on episodic but not semantic memory, whereas others showed intact episodic but impaired semantic memory. This double dissociation suggests that these 2 memory systems may develop independently in the context of temporal lobe pathology, perhaps related to differential effects of dysfunction in the lateral and mesial temporal lobe structures. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Pulses of movement across the sea ice: population connectivity and temporal genetic structure in the arctic fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norén, Karin; Carmichael, Lindsey; Fuglei, Eva; Eide, Nina E; Hersteinsson, Pall; Angerbjörn, Anders

    2011-08-01

    Lemmings are involved in several important functions in the Arctic ecosystem. The Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) can be divided into two discrete ecotypes: "lemming foxes" and "coastal foxes". Crashes in lemming abundance can result in pulses of "lemming fox" movement across the Arctic sea ice and immigration into coastal habitats in search for food. These pulses can influence the genetic structure of the receiving population. We have tested the impact of immigration on the genetic structure of the "coastal fox" population in Svalbard by recording microsatellite variation in seven loci for 162 Arctic foxes sampled during the summer and winter over a 5-year period. Genetic heterogeneity and temporal genetic shifts, as inferred by STRUCTURE simulations and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, respectively, were recorded. Maximum likelihood estimates of movement as well as STRUCTURE simulations suggested that both immigration and genetic mixture are higher in Svalbard than in the neighbouring "lemming fox" populations. The STRUCTURE simulations and AMOVA revealed there are differences in genetic composition of the population between summer and winter seasons, indicating that immigrants are not present in the reproductive portion of the Svalbard population. Based on these results, we conclude that Arctic fox population structure varies with time and is influenced by immigration from neighbouring populations. The lemming cycle is likely an important factor shaping Arctic fox movement across sea ice and the subsequent population genetic structure, but is also likely to influence local adaptation to the coastal habitat and the prevalence of diseases.

  18. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Perry, Alistair; Ridley, Ben; Proix, Timothée; Golos, Mathieu; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Breakspear, Michael; Jirsa, Viktor; Guye, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo structure-function relationship is key to understanding brain network reorganization due to pathologies. This relationship is likely to be particularly complex in brain network diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy, in which disturbed large-scale systems are involved in both transient electrical events and long-lasting functional and structural impairments. Herein, we estimated this relationship by analyzing the correlation between structural connectivity and functional connectivity in terms of analytical network communication parameters. As such, we targeted the gradual topological structure-function reorganization caused by the pathology not only at the whole brain scale but also both in core and peripheral regions of the brain. We acquired diffusion (dMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data in seven right-lateralized TLE (rTLE) patients and fourteen healthy controls and analyzed the structure-function relationship by using analytical network communication metrics derived from the structural connectome. In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information) in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures.

  19. Rapid visual grouping and figure-ground processing using temporally structured displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Samuel; Usher, Marius; Müller, Hermann J

    2010-08-23

    We examine the time course of visual grouping and figure-ground processing. Figure (contour) and ground (random-texture) elements were flickered with different phases (i.e., contour and background are alternated), requiring the observer to group information within a pre-specified time window. It was found this grouping has a high temporal resolution: less than 20ms for smooth contours, and less than 50ms for line conjunctions with sharp angles. Furthermore, the grouping process takes place without an explicit knowledge of the phase of the elements, and it requires a cumulative build-up of information. The results are discussed in relation to the neural mechanism for visual grouping and figure-ground segregation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatial Structure and Temporal Variation of Fish Communities in the Upper Mississippi River System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chick, John H; Ickes, Brian S; Pegg, Mark A; Barko, Valerie A; Hrabik, Robert A; Herzog, David P

    2005-01-01

    Variation in community composition (presence/absence data) and structure (relative abundance) of Upper Mississippi River fishes was assessed using data from the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program...

  1. Success of Anomia Treatment in Aphasia Is Associated With Preserved Architecture of Global and Left Temporal Lobe Structural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Nesland, Travis; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius

    2016-03-01

    Targeted speech therapy can lead to substantial naming improvement in some subjects with anomia following dominant-hemisphere stroke. We investigated whether treatment-induced improvement in naming is associated with poststroke preservation of structural neural network architecture. Twenty-four patients with poststroke chronic aphasia underwent 30 hours of speech therapy over a 2-week period and were assessed at baseline and after therapy. Whole brain maps of neural architecture were constructed from pretreatment diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to derive measures of global brain network architecture (network small-worldness) and regional network influence (nodal betweenness centrality). Their relationship with naming recovery was evaluated with multiple linear regressions. Treatment-induced improvement in correct naming was associated with poststroke preservation of global network small worldness and of betweenness centrality in temporal lobe cortical regions. Together with baseline aphasia severity, these measures explained 78% of the variability in treatment response. Preservation of global and left temporal structural connectivity broadly explains the variability in treatment-related naming improvement in aphasia. These findings corroborate and expand on previous classical lesion-symptom mapping studies by elucidating some of the mechanisms by which brain damage may relate to treated aphasia recovery. Favorable naming outcomes may result from the intact connections between spared cortical areas that are functionally responsive to treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Method for the Analysis of Temporal Change of Physical Structure in the Instrumentation and Control Life-Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goering, Markus [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Energy GmbH, Hamburg, (Germany); Fay, Alexander [Helmut Schmidt Univ., Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The design of computer-based instrumentation and control (I and C) systems is determined by the allocation of I and C functions to I and C systems and components. Due to the characteristics of computer-based technology, component failures can negatively affect several I and C functions, so that the reliability proof of the I and C systems requires the accomplishment of I and C system design analyses throughout the I and C life-cycle. On one hand, this paper proposes the restructuring of the sequential IEC 61513 I and C life-cycle according to the V-model, so as to adequately integrate the concept of verification and validation. On the other hand, based on a meta model for the modeling of I and C systems, this paper introduces a method for the modeling and analysis of the effects with respect to the superposition of failure combinations and event sequences on the I and C system design, i.e. the temporal change of physical structure is analyzed. In the first step, the method is concerned with the modeling of the I and C systems. In the second step, the method considers the analysis of temporal change of physical structure, which integrates the concepts of the diversity and defense-in-depth analysis, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis.

  3. Method for the Analysis of Temporal Change of Physical Structure in the Instrumentation and Control Life-Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goering, Markus; Fay, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The design of computer-based instrumentation and control (I and C) systems is determined by the allocation of I and C functions to I and C systems and components. Due to the characteristics of computer-based technology, component failures can negatively affect several I and C functions, so that the reliability proof of the I and C systems requires the accomplishment of I and C system design analyses throughout the I and C life-cycle. On one hand, this paper proposes the restructuring of the sequential IEC 61513 I and C life-cycle according to the V-model, so as to adequately integrate the concept of verification and validation. On the other hand, based on a meta model for the modeling of I and C systems, this paper introduces a method for the modeling and analysis of the effects with respect to the superposition of failure combinations and event sequences on the I and C system design, i.e. the temporal change of physical structure is analyzed. In the first step, the method is concerned with the modeling of the I and C systems. In the second step, the method considers the analysis of temporal change of physical structure, which integrates the concepts of the diversity and defense-in-depth analysis, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis

  4. Tau and β-Amyloid Are Associated with Medial Temporal Lobe Structure, Function, and Memory Encoding in Normal Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Shawn M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Lockhart, Samuel N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Baker, Suzanne L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging; Jagust, William J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging

    2017-03-22

    Normal aging is associated with a decline in episodic memory and also with aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins and atrophy of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures crucial to memory formation. Although some evidence suggests that Aβ is associated with aberrant neural activity, the relationships among these two aggregated proteins, neural function, and brain structure are poorly understood. Using in vivo human Aβ and tau imaging, we demonstrate that increased Aβ and tau are both associated with aberrant fMRI activity in the MTL during memory encoding in cognitively normal older adults. This pathological neural activity was in turn associated with worse memory performance and atrophy within the MTL. A mediation analysis revealed that the relationship with regional atrophy was explained by MTL tau. These findings broaden the concept of cognitive aging to include evidence of Alzheimer’s disease-related protein aggregation as an underlying mechanism of age-related memory impairment.

  5. Temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  6. Multi-temporal LiDAR and Landsat quantification of fire-induced changes to forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarley, T. Ryan; Kolden, Crystal A.; Vaillant, Nicole M.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Smith, Alistair M.S.; Wing, Brian M.; Kellogg, Bryce; Kreitler, Jason R.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring post-fire effects at landscape scales is critical to an ecological understanding of wildfire effects. Predominantly this is accomplished with either multi-spectral remote sensing data or through ground-based field sampling plots. While these methods are important, field data is usually limited to opportunistic post-fire observations, and spectral data often lacks validation with specific variables of change. Additional uncertainty remains regarding how best to account for environmental variables influencing fire effects (e.g., weather) for which observational data cannot easily be acquired, and whether pre-fire agents of change such as bark beetle and timber harvest impact model accuracy. This study quantifies wildfire effects by correlating changes in forest structure derived from multi-temporal Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) acquisitions to multi-temporal spectral changes captured by the Landsat Thematic Mapper and Operational Land Imager for the 2012 Pole Creek Fire in central Oregon. Spatial regression modeling was assessed as a methodology to account for spatial autocorrelation, and model consistency was quantified across areas impacted by pre-fire mountain pine beetle and timber harvest. The strongest relationship (pseudo-r2 = 0.86, p LiDAR-derived estimate of canopy cover change. Relationships between percentage of LiDAR returns in forest strata and spectral indices generally increased in strength with strata height. Structural measurements made closer to the ground were not well correlated. The spatial regression approach improved all relationships, demonstrating its utility, but model performance declined across pre-fire agents of change, suggesting that such studies should stratify by pre-fire forest condition. This study establishes that spectral indices such as d74 and dNBR are most sensitive to wildfire-caused structural changes such as reduction in canopy cover and perform best when that structure has not been reduced pre-fire.

  7. Evaluation of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy of nontumorous origin with qualitative and quantitative MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanna, N.K.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Sperling, M.R.; Kohn, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that although MR imaging is superior to CT in the detection of focal lesions in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), its role in the detection of mesial temporal sclerosis remains controversial. This is significant, as the latter represents a frequent cause of TLE and manifests with only subtle atrophic changes and occasional high signal abnormalities. PReoperative MR images of 47 patients who had undergone temporal lobectomy for nontumoral TLE and of 20 control subjects were valuated for focal atrophy and hippocampal high signal abnormalities. Quantitative measurements were performed in 33 patients and 20 control subjects with use of a new brain volumetric analysis program to determine volumes of temporal lobes

  8. Radiation tolerance of normal temporal bone structures: implications for gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linskey, Mark E.; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Popular current thought states that hearing loss and facial weakness after radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas is a function of cranial nerve damage. Although this may be true in some cases, the middle and inner ear contain rich networks of other sensitive structures that are at risk after radiotherapy and that may contribute to toxicity afterward. We reviewed the limited reported data regarding radiation tolerance of external, middle, and inner ear structures, and perspectives for therapy with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery are addressed

  9. Functional neuroimaging studies of episodic memory. Functional dissociation in the medial temporal lobe structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiura, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the critical role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions in the encoding and retrieval of episodic memory. It has also been shown that an emotional factor in human memory enhances episodic encoding and retrieval. However, there is little evidence regarding the specific contribution of each MTL region to the relational, contextual, and emotional processes of episodic memory. The goal of this review article is to identify differential activation patterns of the processes between MTL regions. Results from functional neuroimaging studies of episodic memory show that the hippocampus is involved in encoding the relation between memory items, whereas the entorhinal and perirhinal cortices (anterior parahippocampal gyrus) contribute to the encoding of a single item. Additionally, the parahippocampal cortex (posterior parahippocampal gyrus) is selectively activated during the processing of contextual information of episodic memory. A similar pattern of functional dissociation is found in episodic memory retrieval. Functional neuroimaging has also shown that emotional information of episodic memory enhances amygdala-MTL correlations and that this enhancement is observed during both the encoding and retrieval of emotional memories. These findings from pervious neuroimaging studies suggest that different MTL regions could organize memory for personally experienced episodes via the 'relation' and 'context' factors of episodic memory, and that the emotional factor of episodes could modulate the functional organization in the MTL regions. (author)

  10. The temporal structure of intergenerational exchange: a within-family analysis of parent-child reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Thomas; Raab, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies of parent-child reciprocity have focused either on the long term (generalized exchange over the life course) or on the short term (concurrent exchange in later life). The purpose of this research was to investigate the linkage between both temporal patterns of reciprocity within an integrative conceptual framework. We assessed whether long-term and short-term reciprocity operated as interdependent mechanisms that initially selected and subsequently relieved intergenerational caregiving relationships. We used data from the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old study (AHEAD) provided by frail, single-living parents of at least two children (N=1010 respondents comprising 3768 parent-child dyads). Fixed-effects conditional logit models estimated between-sibling differences in assistance provided to parents, measured by instrumental help (i.e., assistance with IADLs) and hands-on care (i.e., assistance with ADLs). Key predictors were two measures of financial transfers given to children referring to longer and shorter recall periods. Receiving earlier and current financial transfers increased adult children's propensity to support their parents in later life. The effect of earlier transfers pertained to help rather than care whereas the reverse was true for the effect of current transfers. We found no evidence for a linkage between long-term and short-term reciprocity. Overall, the results indicate that adult children might balance long-term support accounts relative to their siblings, suggesting an intra-generational orientation on equity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Outbreeding and lack of temporal genetic structure in a drone congregation of the neotropical stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias Y; Moritz, Robin Fa; Kraus, F Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    Drone aggregations are a widespread phenomenon in many stingless bee species (Meliponini), but the ultimate and proximate causes for their formation are still not well understood. One adaptive explanation for this phenomenon is the avoidance of inbreeding, which is especially detrimental for stingless bees due to the combined effects of the complementary sex-determining system and the small effective population size caused by eusociality and monandry. We analyzed the temporal genetic dynamics of a drone aggregation of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana with microsatellite markers over a time window of four weeks. We estimated the drones of the aggregation to originate from a total of 55 colonies using sibship re-construction. There was no detectable temporal genetic differentiation or sub-structuring in the aggregation. Most important, we could exclude all colonies in close proximity of the aggregation as origin of the drones in the aggregation, implicating that they originate from more distant colonies. We conclude that the diverse genetic composition and the distant origin of the drones of the S. mexicana drone congregation provides an effective mechanism to avoid mating among close relatives.

  12. T-pattern analysis for the study of temporal structure of animal and human behavior: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubea, M; Jonsson, G K; Faulisi, F; Sorbera, F; Di Giovanni, G; Benigno, A; Crescimanno, G; Magnusson, M S

    2015-01-15

    A basic tenet in the realm of modern behavioral sciences is that behavior consists of patterns in time. For this reason, investigations of behavior deal with sequences that are not easily perceivable by the unaided observer. This problem calls for improved means of detection, data handling and analysis. This review focuses on the analysis of the temporal structure of behavior carried out by means of a multivariate approach known as T-pattern analysis. Using this technique, recurring sequences of behavioral events, usually hard to detect, can be unveiled and carefully described. T-pattern analysis has been successfully applied in the study of various aspects of human or animal behavior such as behavioral modifications in neuro-psychiatric diseases, route-tracing stereotypy in mice, interaction between human subjects and animal or artificial agents, hormonal-behavioral interactions, patterns of behavior associated with emesis and, in our laboratories, exploration and anxiety-related behaviors in rodents. After describing the theory and concepts of T-pattern analysis, this review will focus on the application of the analysis to the study of the temporal characteristics of behavior in different species from rodents to human beings. This work could represent a useful background for researchers who intend to employ such a refined multivariate approach to the study of behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial and temporal changes in sulphate-reducing groundwater bacterial community structure in response to Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D A; Toze, S; Chang, B

    2008-01-01

    The population dynamics of bacterial able to be cultured under sulphate reducing condition was studied in conjunction with changes in aquifer geochemistry using multivariate statistics for two contrasting Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) techniques at two different geographical locations (Perth, Western Australia and Adelaide, South Australia). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate spatial and temporal changes in the overall chemical signature of the aquifers using an array of chemical analytes which demonstrated a migrating geochemical plume. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) using DNA from sulphate-reducing bacteria cultures was used to detect spatial and temporal changes in population dynamics. Bacterial and geochemical evidence suggested that groundwater at greatest distance from the nutrient source was least affected by treated effluent recharge. The results suggested that bacterial populations that were able to be cultured in sulphate reducing media responded to the migrating chemical gradient and to the changes in aquifer geochemistry. Most noticeably, sulphate-reducing bacterial populations associated with the infiltration galleries were stable in community structure over time. Additionally, the biodiversity of these culturable bacteria was restored when aquifer geochemistry returned to ambient conditions during the recovery phase at the Adelaide Aquifer Storage and Recovery site. Copyright CSIRO 2008.

  14. Spatial and temporal repeatability in parasite community structure of tropical fish hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Martínez, V M; Poulin, R

    2003-10-01

    An assessment is made of the repeatability of parasite community structure in space for a marine fish, and in space and time for a freshwater fish from south-eastern Mexico. The marine fish species was the red grouper, Epinephelus morio (collected from 9 localities), and the freshwater species was the cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus (collected from 6 localities: including monthly at 2 localities for 1 year, and bimonthly at 1 locality in 1990 and 1999). Pairwise interspecific associations and analyses of nested patterns in the distributions of parasite species among hosts were used in both fish species, with comparisons over time made only with the cichlid. Positive interspecific associations, and nested patterns were noted in some localities for both fish species, and/or at some sampling times for the cichlid fish. However, non-random patterns in the structure of parasite communities in these 2 host species only were observed sporadically. When present, nestedness in both fish species was apparently linked with a positive association between total infection intensities and fish size. Additionally, adjacent localities were more likely to display similar parasite community structure than distant ones. This preliminary result suggests that distance between localities is an important determinant of predictability in parasite community structure.

  15. Plant pathogens structure arthropod communities across multiple spatial and temporal scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, A.J.M.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens and herbivores frequently co-occur on the same host plants. Despite this, little is known about the impact of their interactions on the structure of plant-based ecological communities. Here, we synthesize evidence that indicates that plant pathogens may profoundly impact arthropod

  16. Spatial and temporal structure of a mesocarnivore guild in midwestern north America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon B. Lesmeister; Clayton K. Nielsen; Eric M. Schauber; Eric C. Hellgren

    2015-01-01

    Carnivore guilds play a vital role in ecological communities by cascading trophic effects, energy and nutrient transfer, and stabilizing or destabilizing food webs. Consequently, the structure of carnivore guilds can be critical to ecosystem patterns. Body size is a crucial influence on intraguild interactions, because it affects access to prey resources, effectiveness...

  17. Clinical characteristics, surgical and neuropsychological outcomes in drug resistant tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, Sangeeta; Iyer, Vivek; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Shah, Urvashi; Pradhan, Pranjali; Jain, Neeraj; Godge, Yogesh

    2016-12-01

    Glioneuronal tumors are found in nearly one third patients who undergo surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy with temporal lobe being the most common location. Few studies, however have concentrated on the neurological and neuropsychological outcomes after surgery, hitherto none from India. We studied 34 patients with temporal lobe tumors and drug resistant epilepsy. These patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy or lesionectomy based on the involvement of the hippocampus and mesial temporal structures. The clinical history, EEG, neuropsychology profile and MRI were compared. Seizure outcome was categorized using Engel's classification. At a mean follow up of 62 months, 85.29% of the patients were seizure free (Engel's Class I). All 8 patients with intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) guided resection were seizure free. Presence of a residual lesion was significantly associated with persistence of seizures post surgery (p = 0.002). Group analysis revealed no significant shifts in IQ and memory scores postoperatively. There was a significant improvement in the quality of life scores (total and across all subdomains) in all patients (p temporal lobe tumors and refractory epilepsy offers complete seizure freedom in majority. Complete surgical excision of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in achieving seizure freedom. Intraoperative electrocorticography (EcoG) is a useful adjunct to ensure complete removal of epileptogenic zone, thus achieving optimal seizure freedom. There is a significant improvement in the quality of life scores (p < 0.001) with no negative impact of surgery on memory and intelligence. Even the patients who are not seizure free can achieve worthwhile improvement post surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatio-temporal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence and physiological and structural indices acquired from hyperspectral imagery as compared with carbon fluxes measured with eddy covariance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarco-Tejada, P.J.; Morales Sierra, A.; Testi, L.; Villalobos, F.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the assessment of the spatio-temporal trends of chlorophyll fluorescence, narrow-band physiological indices, and structural indices acquired with a hyperspectral imager flown over a flux tower in a canopy characterized by small seasonal structural changes and a

  19. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Pedersen, Julie Hefting; Laugesen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate...... hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear...... threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech...

  20. Role of short-time acoustic temporal fine structure cues in sentence recognition for normal-hearing listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Limin; Xu, Li

    2018-02-01

    Short-time processing was employed to manipulate the amplitude, bandwidth, and temporal fine structure (TFS) in sentences. Fifty-two native-English-speaking, normal-hearing listeners participated in four sentence-recognition experiments. Results showed that recovered envelope (E) played an important role in speech recognition when the bandwidth was > 1 equivalent rectangular bandwidth. Removing TFS drastically reduced sentence recognition. Preserving TFS greatly improved sentence recognition when amplitude information was available at a rate ≥ 10 Hz (i.e., time segment ≤ 100 ms). Therefore, the short-time TFS facilitates speech perception together with the recovered E and works with the coarse amplitude cues to provide useful information for speech recognition.

  1. MULTI-TEMPORAL ASSESSMENT OF LYCHEE TREE CROP STRUCTURE USING MULTI-SPECTRAL RPAS IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Johansen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The lychee tree is native to China and produce small fleshy fruit up to 5 cm in diameter. Lychee production in Australia is worth > $20 million annually. Pruning of trees encourages new growth, has a positive effect on fruiting of lychee, makes fruit-picking easier, and may increase yield, as it increases light interception and tree crown surface area. The objective of this research was to assess changes in tree structure, i.e. tree crown circumference, width, height and Plant Projective Cover (PPC using multi-spectral Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS imagery collected before and after pruning of a lychee plantation. A secondary objective was to assess any variations in the results as a function of various flying heights (30, 50 and 70 m. Pre- and post-pruning results showed significant differences in all measured tree structural parameters, including an average decrease in: tree crown circumference of 1.94 m; tree crown width of 0.57 m; tree crown height of 0.62 m; and PPC of 14.8 %. The different flying heights produced similar measurements of tree crown width and PPC, whereas tree crown circumference and height measurements decreased with increasing flying height. These results show that multi-spectral RPAS imagery can provide a suitable means of assessing pruning efforts undertaken by contractors based on changes in tree structure of lychee plantations and that it is important to collect imagery in a consistent manner, as varying flying heights may cause changes to tree structural measurements.

  2. Structural classification of marshes with Polarimetric SAR highlighting the temporal mapping of marshes exposed to oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical relationships between field-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Leaf Angle Distribution (LAD) and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) based biophysical indicators were created and applied to map S. alterniflora marsh canopy structure. PolSAR and field data were collected near concurrently in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in coastal marshes, and PolSAR data alone were acquired in 2009. Regression analyses showed that LAI correspondence with the PolSAR biophysical indicator variables equaled or exceeded those of vegetation water content (VWC) correspondences. In the final six regressor model, the ratio HV/VV explained 49% of the total 77% explained LAI variance, and the HH-VV coherence and phase information accounted for the remainder. HV/HH dominated the two regressor LAD relationship, and spatial heterogeneity and backscatter mechanism followed by coherence information dominated the final three regressor model that explained 74% of the LAD variance. Regression results applied to 2009 through 2012 PolSAR images showed substantial changes in marsh LAI and LAD. Although the direct cause was not substantiated, following a release of freshwater in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the fairly uniform interior marsh structure of 2009 was more vertical and dense shortly after the oil spill cessation. After 2010, marsh structure generally progressed back toward the 2009 uniformity; however, the trend was more disjointed in oil impact marshes.             

  3. Structural Classification of Marshes with Polarimetric SAR Highlighting the Temporal Mapping of Marshes Exposed to Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Ramsey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Empirical relationships between field-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI and Leaf Angle Distribution (LAD and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR based biophysical indicators were created and applied to map S. alterniflora marsh canopy structure. PolSAR and field data were collected near concurrently in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in coastal marshes, and PolSAR data alone were acquired in 2009. Regression analyses showed that LAI correspondence with the PolSAR biophysical indicator variables equaled or exceeded those of vegetation water content (VWC correspondences. In the final six regressor model, the ratio HV/VV explained 49% of the total 77% explained LAI variance, and the HH-VV coherence and phase information accounted for the remainder. HV/HH dominated the two regressor LAD relationship, and spatial heterogeneity and backscatter mechanism followed by coherence information dominated the final three regressor model that explained 74% of the LAD variance. Regression results applied to 2009 through 2012 PolSAR images showed substantial changes in marsh LAI and LAD. Although the direct cause was not substantiated, following a release of freshwater in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the fairly uniform interior marsh structure of 2009 was more vertical and dense shortly after the oil spill cessation. After 2010, marsh structure generally progressed back toward the 2009 uniformity; however, the trend was more disjointed in oil impact marshes.

  4. Acute diffusion abnormalities in the hippocampus of children with new-onset seizures: the development of mesial temporal sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Bergqvist, C.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Haselgrove, J.; Hunter, J.V.; Bilaniuk, L.T. [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2004-04-01

    We studied the role of early diffusion-weighted imaging DWI in the investigation of children with new-onset prolonged seizures which eventually result in unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We carried out MRI on five children aged 17 months to 7 years including conventional and diffusion-weighted sequences. We calculated apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) for the affected and the normal opposite hippocampus. Follow-up examinations were performed, including DWI and ADC measurements in four. We studied four children within 3 days of the onset of prolonged psychomotor seizures and showed increased signal on T2-weighted images, and DWI, indicating restricted diffusion, throughout the affected hippocampus. The ADC were reduced by a mean of 14.4% in the head and by 15% in the body of the hippocampus. In one child examined 15 days after the onset of seizures, the ADC were the same on both sides. All five patients showed hippocampal atrophy on follow-up 2-18 months later. In the four patients in whom ADC were obtained on follow-up, they were increased by 19% in the head and 17% in the body. DWI may represent a useful adjunct to conventional MRI for identifying acute injury to the hippocampus which results in sclerosis. (orig.)

  5. Relationship between remnant hippocampus and amygdala and memory outcomes after stereotactic surgery for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Šroubek, J.; Lukavský, Jiří; Liščák, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 11 (2015), s. 2927-2932 ISSN 1178-2021 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : amygdalohippocampectomy * thermocoagulation * MRI * volumetry * neuro­psychology Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2015

  6. Temporal slice registration and robust diffusion-tensor reconstruction for improved fetal brain structural connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marami, Bahram; Mohseni Salehi, Seyed Sadegh; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Rollins, Caitlin K; Yang, Edward; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, or DWI, is one of the most promising tools for the analysis of neural microstructure and the structural connectome of the human brain. The application of DWI to map early development of the human connectome in-utero, however, is challenged by intermittent fetal and maternal motion that disrupts the spatial correspondence of data acquired in the relatively long DWI acquisitions. Fetuses move continuously during DWI scans. Reliable and accurate analysis of the fetal brain structural connectome requires careful compensation of motion effects and robust reconstruction to avoid introducing bias based on the degree of fetal motion. In this paper we introduce a novel robust algorithm to reconstruct in-vivo diffusion-tensor MRI (DTI) of the moving fetal brain and show its effect on structural connectivity analysis. The proposed algorithm involves multiple steps of image registration incorporating a dynamic registration-based motion tracking algorithm to restore the spatial correspondence of DWI data at the slice level and reconstruct DTI of the fetal brain in the standard (atlas) coordinate space. A weighted linear least squares approach is adapted to remove the effect of intra-slice motion and reconstruct DTI from motion-corrected data. The proposed algorithm was tested on data obtained from 21 healthy fetuses scanned in-utero at 22-38 weeks gestation. Significantly higher fractional anisotropy values in fiber-rich regions, and the analysis of whole-brain tractography and group structural connectivity, showed the efficacy of the proposed method compared to the analyses based on original data and previously proposed methods. The results of this study show that slice-level motion correction and robust reconstruction is necessary for reliable in-vivo structural connectivity analysis of the fetal brain. Connectivity analysis based on graph theoretic measures show high degree of modularity and clustering, and short average

  7. Analysis of the temporal variation of the structure of a montane forest with historical of fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bonillo Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the structural dynamic rates of an shrubs-tree component of a seasonal semideciduous upper montane forest, in Mantiqueira Mountain between 2002 and 2008. We calculated the rates of dynamic according to the number of surviving, dead individuals and recruits, as well as the rates of dynamic for gain and loss of basal area. We verified the spatial differences among the rates along the vegetation gradient parallel to ground elevation. We also studied the correlations between the rates and biotic (initial numbers of trees and initial basal area and abiotic parameters (altimetric quota. We verified that recruitment was higher than mortality, and the gain of basal area was higher than the loses. This result suggests that the forest is expanding, with gain in number of individuals and in basal area. Normally, this result characterizes forests in recuperation after some disturbance. The community sectors (basis, middle and top of hillside didn’t show any differences in terms of dynamic rates. In general, there were few significant correlations between biotic and abiotic parameters and the dynamic rates. The increase of density and basal area, the similarity of dynamic rates among the sectors and the low correlation between parameters and the dynamic of forest’s structure point out that the forest burning occurred in 90’s could be, nowadays, interfering directly in dynamic rates of forest.

  8. Temporal and spatial scaling of the genetic structure of a vector-borne plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Francisco, Carolina S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-02-01

    The ecology of plant pathogens of perennial crops is affected by the long-lived nature of their immobile hosts. In addition, changes to the genetic structure of pathogen populations may affect disease epidemiology and management practices; examples include local adaptation of more fit genotypes or introduction of novel genotypes from geographically distant areas via human movement of infected plant material or insect vectors. We studied the genetic structure of Xylella fastidiosa populations causing disease in sweet orange plants in Brazil at multiple scales using fast-evolving molecular markers (simple-sequence DNA repeats). Results show that populations of X. fastidiosa were regionally isolated, and that isolation was maintained for populations analyzed a decade apart from each other. However, despite such geographic isolation, local populations present in year 2000 were largely replaced by novel genotypes in 2009 but not as a result of migration. At a smaller spatial scale (individual trees), results suggest that isolates within plants originated from a shared common ancestor. In summary, new insights on the ecology of this economically important plant pathogen were obtained by sampling populations at different spatial scales and two different time points.

  9. A Multi-temporal Analysis of Logging Impacts on Tropical Forest Structure Using Airborne Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M. M.; Pinagé, E. R.; Duffy, P.; Longo, M.; dos-Santos, M. N.; Leitold, V.; Morton, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    The long-term impacts of selective logging on carbon cycling and ecosystem function in tropical-forests are still uncertain. Despite improvements in selective logging detection using satellite data, quantifying changes in forest structure from logging and recovery following logging is difficult using orbital data. We analyzed the dynamics of forest structure comparing logged and unlogged forests in the Eastern Brazilian Amazon (Paragominas Municipality, Pará State) using small footprint discrete return airborne lidar data acquired in 2012 and 2014. Logging operations were conducted at the 1200 ha study site from 2006 through 2013 using reduced impact logging techniques—management practices that minimize canopy and ground damage compared to more common conventional logging. Nevertheless, logging still reduced aboveground biomass by 10% to 20% in logged areas compared to intact forests. We aggregated lidar point-cloud data at spatial scales ranging from 50 m to 250 m and developed a binomial classification model based on the height distribution of lidar returns in 2012 and validated the model against the 2014 lidar acquisition. We accurately classified intact and logged forest classes compared with field data. Classification performance improved as spatial resolution increased (AUC = 0.974 at 250 m). We analyzed the differences in canopy gaps, understory damage (based on a relative density model), and biomass (estimated from total canopy height) of intact and logged classes. As expected, logging greatly increased both canopy gap formation and understory damage. However, while the area identified as canopy gap persisted for at least 8 years (from the oldest logging treatments in 2006 to the most recent lidar acquisition in 2014), the effects of ground damage were mostly erased by vigorous understory regrowth after about 5 years. The rate of new gap formation was 6 to 7 times greater in recently logged forests compared to undisturbed forests. New gaps opened at a

  10. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    distortions caused by Taylor’s hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...... and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method...

  11. Description langugage for the modelling and analysis of temporal change of instrumentation and control system structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goering, Markus Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    The utilisation of computer-based I and C, as a result of the technological advancements in the computer industry, represents an up-to-date challenge for I and C engineers in nuclear power plants throughout the world. In comparison with the time-proven, hard-wired I and C, the engineering must consider the novel characteristics of computer-based technology during the implementation, these are primarily constituted by higher performance and the utilisation of software. On one hand, this allows for implementing more complex I and C functions and integrating several I and C functions on to single components, although on the other hand, the minimisation of the CCF probability is of high priority to the engineering. Furthermore, the engineering must take the implementation of the deterministic safety concept for the I and C design into consideration. This includes engineering the redundancy, diversity, physical separation, and independence design features, and is complemented by the analysis of the I and C design with respect to the superposition of pre-defined event sequences and postulated failure combinations, so as to secure the safe operation of the nuclear power plant. The focus of this thesis is on the basic principles of engineering, i.e. description languages and methods, which the engineering relies on for a highly qualitative and efficient computer-based I and C implementation. The analysis of the deterministic safety concept and computer-based I and C characteristics yields the relevant technical requirements for the engineering, these are combined with the general structuring principles of standard IEC 81346 and the extended description language evaluation criteria, which are based on the guideline VDI/VDE-3681, resulting in target criteria for evaluating description languages. The analysis and comparison of existing description languages reveals that no description language satisfactorily fulfils all target criteria, which is constituted in the

  12. Temporal coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals with cavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Zeidaabadi Nezhad, Abolghasem; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose the time-dependent coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals including one, two or multiple defect layers. The performance of the structures, namely the total transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity, is obtained using the proposed method. The results of the developed analytic approach are verified by comparing them to the results of the exact numerical transfer matrix method. Unlike the widely used numerical method, our proposed analytic method seems promising for the synthesis as well as the analysis purposes. Moreover, the proposed method has not the restrictions of the previously examined analytic methods. - Highlights: • A time-dependent coupled mode analysis is proposed for the cavity-type 1D MPCs. • Analytical formalism is presented for the single, double and multiple-defect MPCs. • Transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity are gained using the proposed method. • The proposed analytic method has advantages over the previously examined methods.

  13. Description langugage for the modelling and analysis of temporal change of instrumentation and control system structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goering, Markus Heinrich

    2013-10-25

    The utilisation of computer-based I and C, as a result of the technological advancements in the computer industry, represents an up-to-date challenge for I and C engineers in nuclear power plants throughout the world. In comparison with the time-proven, hard-wired I and C, the engineering must consider the novel characteristics of computer-based technology during the implementation, these are primarily constituted by higher performance and the utilisation of software. On one hand, this allows for implementing more complex I and C functions and integrating several I and C functions on to single components, although on the other hand, the minimisation of the CCF probability is of high priority to the engineering. Furthermore, the engineering must take the implementation of the deterministic safety concept for the I and C design into consideration. This includes engineering the redundancy, diversity, physical separation, and independence design features, and is complemented by the analysis of the I and C design with respect to the superposition of pre-defined event sequences and postulated failure combinations, so as to secure the safe operation of the nuclear power plant. The focus of this thesis is on the basic principles of engineering, i.e. description languages and methods, which the engineering relies on for a highly qualitative and efficient computer-based I and C implementation. The analysis of the deterministic safety concept and computer-based I and C characteristics yields the relevant technical requirements for the engineering, these are combined with the general structuring principles of standard IEC 81346 and the extended description language evaluation criteria, which are based on the guideline VDI/VDE-3681, resulting in target criteria for evaluating description languages. The analysis and comparison of existing description languages reveals that no description language satisfactorily fulfils all target criteria, which is constituted in the

  14. Self-Organization of Temporal Structures — A Possible Solution for the Intervention Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lucadou, Walter

    2006-10-01

    -local correlations. The structure of the data, however, allows the conclusion, that all observed correlations can be considered as entanglement-correlations. The number of entanglement-correlations was significantly higher for the highly motivated group (data set 2) than for the unselected group of the exhibition participants (data set 3). The latter, however, where not completely unsuccessful: A subgroup who showed "innovative" behavior also showed significant entanglement-correlations. It could further be shown, that the structure of the matrix of entanglement-correlations is not stable in time and changes if the experiment is repeated. In comparison with previous correlation-experiments, no decline of the effect size was observed. These results are in agreement with the predictions of the "Weak Quantum Theory (WQT)" and the "Model of Pragmatic Information (MPI)". These models interpret the measured correlations as entanglement-correlations within a self-organizing, organizationally closed, psycho-physical system that exist during a certain time-interval (as long as the system is active). The entanglement-correlations cannot be considered as a causal influence (in the sense of a PK-Influence) and thus are called "micro-synchronicity". After a short introduction (1.), the question is discussed how non-local correlations can be created in psycho-physical systems (2.). In chapter (3.) the description of the experimental setting is given and the apparatus (4.) and randomness test of the random event generator (5.) are described. Additionally, an overview of the structure of the data is given (6.) and the analysis methods are described (7.). In chapter (8.) the experimental hypotheses are formulated and the results are reported (9.). After the discussion of the results (10.) the conclusions (11).) of the study are presented.

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamics of ocean conditions and forage taxa reveal regional structuring of seabird–prey relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santora, Jarrod A; Schroeder, Isaac D; Field, John C; Wells, Brian K; Sydeman, William J

    Studies of predator–prey demographic responses and the physical drivers of such relationships are rare, yet essential for predicting future changes in the structure and dynamics of marine ecosystems. Here, we hypothesize that predator–prey relationships vary spatially in association with underlying physical ocean conditions, leading to observable changes in demographic rates, such as reproduction. To test this hypothesis, we quantified spatio-temporal variability in hydrographic conditions, krill, and forage fish to model predator (seabird) demographic responses over 18 years (1990–2007). We used principal component analysis and spatial correlation maps to assess coherence among ocean conditions, krill, and forage fish, and generalized additive models to quantify interannual variability in seabird breeding success relative to prey abundance. The first principal component of four hydrographic measurements yielded an index that partitioned “warm/weak upwelling” and “cool/strong upwelling” years. Partitioning of krill and forage fish time series among shelf and oceanic regions yielded spatially explicit indicators of prey availability. Krill abundance within the oceanic region was remarkably consistent between years, whereas krill over the shelf showed marked interannual fluctuations in relation to ocean conditions. Anchovy abundance varied on the shelf, and was greater in years of strong stratification, weak upwelling and warmer temperatures. Spatio-temporal variability of juvenile forage fish co-varied strongly with each other and with krill, but was weakly correlated with hydrographic conditions. Demographic responses between seabirds and prey availability revealed spatially variable associations indicative of the dynamic nature of “predator–habitat” relationships. Quantification of spatially explicit demographic responses, and their variability through time, demonstrate the possibility of delineating specific critical areas where the

  16. Mitochondrial structure, function and dynamics are temporally controlled by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Anthony Graves

    Full Text Available Although the c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein controls mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, the coordination of these events and the mechanistic underpinnings of their regulation remain largely unexplored. We show here that re-expression of Myc in myc-/- fibroblasts is accompanied by a gradual accumulation of mitochondrial biomass and by increases in membrane polarization and mitochondrial fusion. A correction of OXPHOS deficiency is also seen, although structural abnormalities in electron transport chain complexes (ETC are not entirely normalized. Conversely, the down-regulation of Myc leads to a gradual decrease in mitochondrial mass and a more rapid loss of fusion and membrane potential. Increases in the levels of proteins specifically involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion support the idea that Myc affects mitochondrial mass by influencing both of these processes, albeit favoring the latter. The ETC defects that persist following Myc restoration may represent metabolic adaptations, as mitochondrial function is re-directed away from producing ATP to providing a source of metabolic precursors demanded by the transformed cell.

  17. Spatial and temporal structure of the spider community in the clay semi-desert of western Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piterkina, Tatyana V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal structure of spider communities was studied in the clay semi-desert of the north-western Caspian Lowland, western Kazakhstan (49°23' N, 46°47' E. The soils and vegetation are complex, being composed of a mosaic of desert and steppe plant communities. Besides the native associations, there are plantations of different tree species. The ground-dwelling spider assemblages in the native habitats are the most diverse. The number of species inhabiting forest plantations is three times as small. Gnaphosidae is the leading family in the ground layer. They show high abundance and diversity levels during the whole season. Thomisidae, Lycosidae, Philodromidae, and Salticidae are abundant as well. The species diversity of herbage-dwelling spiders in different open native habitats is very similar. The spectrum of dominant families (Thomisidae, Oxyopidae, Araneidae, and Salticidae and the seasonal dynamics of their ratio in desert and steppe associations have much in common. Spider assemblages of native and artificial habitats are characterised by change from multispecies polydominant spring-summer communities to impoverished imbalanced autumn ones. Seasonal changes in the species structure of mature spider groupings in native habitats are well pronounced, while the impact of seasonal conditions is even stronger than between-habitat differences. Complexes of typical species with different levels of habitat preference are revealed.

  18. Spatial and temporal structure of fish assemblages in a hyperhaline coastal system: Ría Lagartos, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Peralta-Meixueiro

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal fish species assemblages were analyzed throughout two annual cycles (2004-2005 and 2007-2008 in the Ría Lagartos Lagoon system, Mexico, via non-parametric multivariate analyses. We compared density and biomass of fish species among five habitat types defined by combinations of structure and environmental characteristics (hyperhaline, rocky, seagrass, channel, and marine, and three climatic seasons (dry, rainy, and northerlies. A total of 11,187 individuals distributed in 32 families and 63 species were collected. The most numerically abundant species were Floridichthys polyommus and Cyprinodon artifrons, while Sphoeroides testudineus contributed to the greatest biomass. Species composition consisted mainly of estuarine and euryhaline marine species. Spatially, a saline gradient was observed with marine conditions in the mouth, and increasing to over 100 in the inner zone of the system. Species richness, diversity and biomass declined from the mouth to the inner zone, while density showed an inverse tendency, with the highest values in the inner zone. Thus the salinity was the variable that best explained the spatial fish assemblages" structure. The ichthyofauna composition did not change over time, but the dominant species varied with the years. The abundance of juvenile specimens, suggest that the different habitats are used as feeding and breeding zones; hence it is proposed that protection strategies be pursued not only for the lagoon system but also for the northern zone of the Yucatan Peninsula.

  19. Large structures and temporal change in the Azores Front during the SEMAPHORE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychensky, A.; Le Traon, P.-Y.; Hernandez, F.; Jourdan, D.

    1998-10-01

    The Structure des Echanges Mer-Atmosphere, Proprietes des Heterogeneites Oceaniques: Recherche Experimentale (SEMAPHORE) mesoscale experiment took place from July to November 1993 in the northern Canary Basin, where the circulation is dominated by the eastward flowing Azores Current (AC). A large data set was acquired from three hydrographic arrays (phases 1, 2, 3), current meter moorings, surface drifters drogued at 150 m, and 2000 m deep RAFOS floats. The analysis confirmed the large-scale observations previously made in this region but also provided new insights into fine-scale dynamics of the AC. The front was observed over the 6-month period. It was narrow (100 km) and mostly surface intensified (velocities reaching 40-50 cm s-1). Whereas at the beginning of the experiment (phase 1) the AC was mainly zonal with weak oscillations, large meridional meanders were observed from phase 2 until the end of the experiment. They seem to be related to the arrival of two Mediterranean eddies (Meddies), which interacted with the AC [Käse and Zenk, 1996; Tychensky and Carton, this issue]. The front had a deep dynamical signature (down to 2000 m), with a 16-18 sverdrup (Sv) volume transport (0-2000 m depth integrated). The southward recirculation branch of the AC near 22°-23°W [Klein and Siedler, 1989] corresponds to meridional transport of 5-6 Sv. Then, 4.5 Sv of these waters are recirculating westward (along 31°-32°N). Some interesting new oceanographic results were obtained by examining the RAFOS float trajectories over the abyssal plain. The circulation is similar to that observed at the surface, with mean velocities of about 1-3 cm s-1 and eddy kinetic energy <4 cm2 s-2. In agreement with the analysis of current meter data this reveals a significant barotropic component in the Azores-Madeira flow field of roughly 3-3.5 cm s-1.

  20. Adélie penguin survival: age structure, temporal variability and environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Louise; Southwell, Colin

    2011-12-01

    The driving factors of survival, a key demographic process, have been particularly challenging to study, especially for winter migratory species such as the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). While winter environmental conditions clearly influence Antarctic seabird survival, it has been unclear to which environmental features they are most likely to respond. Here, we examine the influence of environmental fluctuations, broad climatic conditions and the success of the breeding season prior to winter on annual survival of an Adélie penguin population using mark-recapture models based on penguin tag and resight data over a 16-year period. This analysis required an extension to the basic Cormack-Jolly-Seber model by incorporating age structure in recapture and survival sub-models. By including model covariates, we show that survival of older penguins is primarily related to the amount and concentration of ice present in their winter foraging grounds. In contrast, fledgling and yearling survival depended on other factors in addition to the physical marine environment and outcomes of the previous breeding season, but we were unable to determine what these were. The relationship between sea-ice and survival differed with penguin age: extensive ice during the return journey to breeding colonies was detrimental to survival for the younger penguins, whereas either too little or too much ice (between 15 and 80% cover) in the winter foraging grounds was detrimental for adults. Our results demonstrate that predictions of Adélie penguin survival can be improved by taking into account penguin age, prior breeding conditions and environmental features.

  1. Temporal variability of neustonic ichthyoplankton assemblages of the eastern Pacific warm pool: Can community structure be linked to climate variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio Vilchis, L.; Ballance, Lisa T.; Watson, William

    2009-01-01

    Considerable evidence exists, showing an accelerated warming trend on earth during the past 40-50 years, attributed mainly to anthropogenic factors. Much of this excess heat is stored in the world's oceans, likely resulting in increased environmental variability felt by marine ecosystems. The long-term effects of this phenomenon on oceanic tropical ecosystems are largely unknown, and our understanding of its effects could be facilitated by long-term studies of how species compositions change with time. Ichthyoplankton, in particular, can integrate physical, environmental and ecological factors making them excellent model taxa to address this question. While on eight (1987-1990, 1992 and 1998-2000) NOAA Fisheries cruises to the eastern Pacific warm pool, we characterized the thermal and phytoplankton pigment structure of the water column, as well as the neustonic ichthyoplankton community using CTD casts and Manta (surface) net tows. Over the 13-year period, 852 CTD and Manta tow stations were completed. We divided the study area into three regions based on regional oceanography, thermocline depth and productivity, as well as a longitudinal gradient in species composition among stations. We then analyzed temporal trends of ichthyoplankton species composition within each region by pooling stations by region and year and making pairwise comparisons of community similarity between all combinations of the eight cruises within each region. We also identified environment-specific species assemblages and station groupings using hierarchical clustering and non-metric multi-dimensional scaling (MDS). Our analyses revealed a longitudinal gradient in community structure and temporal stability of ichthyoplankton species composition. Over the 13 years ichthyoplankton assemblages in the two westernmost regions varied less than in the eastern region. MDS and cluster analyses identified five ichthyoplankton assemblages that corresponded to oceanographic habitats and a gradient in

  2. Childhood temporal lobe epilepsy: correlation between electroencephalography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham Fa; Sherief, Laila M; Saleh, Safaa H; Elshafeiy, Mona M; Siam, Ahmed G; Elsaeed, Wafaa F; Arafa, Mohamed A; Bendary, Eman A; Sherbiny, Hanan S; Elbehedy, Rabab M; Aziz, Khalid A

    2015-04-18

    The diagnosis of epilepsy should be made as early as possible to give a child the best chance for treatment success and also to decrease complications such as learning difficulties and social and behavioral problems. In this study, we aimed to assess the ability of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in detecting the lateralization side in patients with Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in correlation with EEG and MRI findings. This was a case-control study including 40 patients diagnosed (clinically and by EEG) as having temporal lobe epilepsy aged 8 to 14 years (mean, 10.4 years) and 20 healthy children with comparable age and gender as the control group. All patients were subjected to clinical examination, interictal electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic examination (MRS) was performed to the patients and the controls. According to the findings of electroencephalography, our patients were classified to three groups: Group 1 included 20 patients with unitemporal (lateralized) epileptic focus, group 2 included 12 patients with bitemporal (non-lateralized) epileptic focus and group 3 included 8 patients with normal electroencephalography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy could lateralize the epileptic focus in 19 patients in group 1, nine patients in group2 and five patients in group 3 with overall lateralization of (82.5%), while electroencephalography was able to lateralize the focus in (50%) of patients and magnetic resonance imaging detected lateralization of mesial temporal sclerosis in (57.5%) of patients. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a promising tool in evaluating patients with epilepsy and offers increased sensitivity to detect temporal pathology that is not obvious on structural MRI imaging.

  3. Micro-computed tomography study of the internal anatomy of mesial root canals of mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas-Bôas, Marcelo Haas; Bernardineli, Norberti; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Marciano, Marina; Del Carpio-Perochena, Aldo; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Duarte, Marco H; Bramante, Clovis M; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mesiodistal and buccolingual diameter, apical volume, and the presence of isthmuses at the apical level of mesial root canals of mandibular molars. Sixty extracted first and second mandibular molars were scanned by using a SkyScan 1076 micro-computed tomography system with a voxel size of 18 μm. The apical thirds of the samples were reconstructed to allow a perpendicular section of the apical third by using the multiplanar reconstruction tool of the OsiriX software. The mesiodistal and the buccolingual distances of root canals were measured between the 1- to 4-mm levels. The type of root canal isthmuses present at these levels was classified by using modified criteria of Hsu and Kim. The volume of the root canal anatomy between the 1- to 3-mm apical levels was obtained by using the CTAN-CTVOL software. The medians of the mesiodistal diameter at the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-mm levels in the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals were 0.22 and 0.23 mm, 0.27 and 0.27 mm, 0.30 and 0.30 mm, and 0.36 and 0.35 mm, respectively. The buccolingual lengths at the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-mm levels were 0.37-0.35 mm, 0.55-0.41 mm, 0.54-0.49 mm, and 0.54 and 0.60 mm, respectively. The presence of isthmuses was more prevalent at the 3- to 4-mm level. However, 27 cases presented complete or incomplete isthmuses at the 1-mm apical level. The mean of the volume of the apical third was 0.83 mm(3), with a minimum value of 0.02 and a maximum value of 2.4 mm(3). Mesial root canals of mandibular molars do not present a consistent pattern. A high variability of apical diameters exists. The presence of isthmuses at the apical third was not uncommon even at the 1-mm apical level. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporal stability in the genetic structure of Sarcoptes scabiei under the host-taxon law: empirical evidences from wildlife-derived Sarcoptes mite in Asturias, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Luca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implicitly, parasite molecular studies assume temporal genetic stability. In this study we tested, for the first time to our knowledge, the extent of changes in genetic diversity and structure of Sarcoptes mite populations from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica in Asturias (Spain, using one multiplex of 9 microsatellite markers and Sarcoptes samples from sympatric Pyrenean chamois, red deer (Cervus elaphus, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus and red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Results The analysis of an 11-years interval period found little change in the genetic diversity (allelic diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity. The temporal stability in the genetic diversity was confirmed by population structure analysis, which was not significantly variable over time. Population structure analysis revealed temporal stability in the genetic diversity of Sarcoptes mite under the host-taxon law (herbivore derived- and carnivore derived-Sarcoptes mite among the sympatric wild animals from Asturias. Conclusions The confirmation of parasite temporal genetic stability is of vital interest to allow generalizations to be made, which have further implications regarding the genetic structure, epidemiology and monitoring protocols of the ubiquitous Sarcoptes mite. This could eventually be applied to other parasite species.

  5. Identification and Endodontic Management of Middle Mesial Canal in Mandibular Second Molar Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatments are routinely done with the help of radiographs. However, radiographs represent only a two-dimensional image of an object. Failure to identify aberrant anatomy can lead to endodontic failure. This case report presents the use of three-dimensional imaging with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT as an adjunct to digital radiography in identification and management of mandibular second molar with three mesial canals.

  6. Cortical Actin Flow in T Cells Quantified by Spatio-temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy of Structured Illumination Microscopy Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashdown, George; Pandžić, Elvis; Cope, Andrew; Wiseman, Paul; Owen, Dylan

    2015-12-17

    Filamentous-actin plays a crucial role in a majority of cell processes including motility and, in immune cells, the formation of a key cell-cell interaction known as the immunological synapse. F-actin is also speculated to play a role in regulating molecular distr