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Sample records for mesenchymoma

  1. Fibrocartilaginous mesenchymoma with low-grade malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, D.C.; Bertoni, F.; Beabout, J.W.; Campanacci, M.

    1984-01-01

    In a review of cases of fibrous cartilaginous dysplasia of bone, five of fibrocartilaginous lesions were found to be different in clinical behavior and radiographic and morphologic features from the others. We have named these previously undescribed tumors ''fibrocartilaginous mesenchymomas with low-grade malignancy in the fibrous elements.'' (orig.)

  2. Use of cisplatin for control of metastatic malignant mesenchymoma and hypertrophic osteopathy in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.A.; Richardson, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum) treatment induced partial remission of pulmonary metastatic malignant mesenchymoma and nearly complete radiographic remission of hypertrophic osteopathy in a 14-year-old Beagle. Cisplatin was given once every 3 weeks. Clinical signs of hypertrophic osteopathy resolved one week after initiation of treatment. Partial remission of pulmonary metastases and partial radiographic remission of hypertrophic osteopathy was seen 6 weeks after initiation of treatment. Previous treatment of neoplasia-related hypertrophic osteopathy has consisted of removal of the initiating mass or vagotomy. In this case, appropriate chemotherapy was used to control clinical signs and progression of hypertrophic osteopathy

  3. Rare Head and Neck Benign Mesenchymoma in Close Proximity to Submandibular Gland in a Pediatric Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Priyanka Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric head and neck masses are commonly congenital in origin or of infectious etiology. We present a rare case of benign mesenchymoma in close proximity to the submandibular gland in an otherwise asymptomatic child. Computerized tomography (CT scan of the head and neck area revealed a benign lesion, which was later determined to be a benign mesenchymoma on histopathology. The child did well after surgery without any reported recurrence. We discuss the salient features of a benign mesenchymoma in a child and also discuss relevant imaging and management.

  4. Fibrous dysplasia with cartilaginous differentiation (''fibrocartilaginous dysplasia''): a review, with an illustrative case followed for 18 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakos, Michael; McDonald, Douglas J.; Sundaram, Murali

    2004-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with an 18-year history of progressive, and deforming, monomelic fibrous dysplasia with massive cartilaginous differentiation (fibrocartilaginous dysplasia) is described. A review is made of all prior reported examples of this entity in the English language medical literature. The radiologic and histologic differential diagnoses are described, distinguishing the lesion from chondrosarcoma and from fibrocartilaginous mesenchymoma. (orig.)

  5. Fibrous dysplasia with cartilaginous differentiation (''fibrocartilaginous dysplasia''): a review, with an illustrative case followed for 18 years

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    Kyriakos, Michael [Division of Surgical Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8118, MO 63110, St. Louis (United States); McDonald, Douglas J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2004-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with an 18-year history of progressive, and deforming, monomelic fibrous dysplasia with massive cartilaginous differentiation (fibrocartilaginous dysplasia) is described. A review is made of all prior reported examples of this entity in the English language medical literature. The radiologic and histologic differential diagnoses are described, distinguishing the lesion from chondrosarcoma and from fibrocartilaginous mesenchymoma. (orig.)

  6. MFH Mimic in Breast: A High-Grade Malignant Phyllodes Tumor

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    A. L. Hemalatha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is usually diagnosed by the presence of benign duct-like epithelium and malignant mesenchymal tissue. In addition to the usual fibrosarcomatous features, the mesenchymal component may show areas resembling osteogenic sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, and, very rarely, malignant fibrous histiocytoma. We present one such rare case of malignant phyllodes tumor with malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like stromal differentiation.

  7. Mesenchymal neoplasia and congenital pulmonary cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.G.; Currarino, G.; Moore, G.C.; Votteler, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    A malignant mesenchymoma exibiting a varied spectrum of differentation developed within a congenital pulmonary cyst 6 1/2 years after the cyst was first recognized. Related tumors with a similar gross appearance have been previously described and have included rhabdomyosarcomas and so-called pulmonary blastomas. There is a low but distinct risk for the developement of mesenchymal sarcomas within congenital peripheral pulmonary cysts. (orig.) [de

  8. Ultrasonographic findings of benign soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Sung; Oh, Dong Heon; Jung, Tae Gun; Kim, Yong Kil; Kwon, Jung Hyeok

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the characteristic sonographic features of benign soft tissue tumors and to evaluate the usefulness of sonographic imaging. We retrospectively reviewed ultrasonographic images of 70 cases in 68 patients with histologically proved benign soft tissue tumors. The tumors include 33 lipomas, 11 hemangiomas, 11 lymphangiomas, 7 neurilemmomas, 4 epidermoid cysts, 2 fibromas, 1 mesenchymoma, and 1 myxoma. The sonographic appearances of the lesions were mainly solid in 53 cases(33 lipomas, 8 hemangiomas, 2 lymphangiomas, 7 neurilemmomas, 2 fibromas and 1 mesenchymoma), mainly cystic in 14 cases(1 hemangioma, 8 lymphangiomas, 4 epidermoid cysts, and 1 myxomal), and mixed in 3 cases(2 hemangiomas and 1 lymphangioma). Although an accurate histologic prediction could not be made in most cases, certain patterns appeared to be characteristic of specific tumor types. 26 cases(78%) of lipoma were seen as lentiform, iso- or hyperechoic, solid mass. Hemangioma had variable appearance and characteristic calcifications were seen in 3 cases. Unicameral or multiseptated cystic mass with variable thickness of echogenic septa and solid portion was the characteristic finding of lymhangioma. Neurilemmoma showed lobulated, oval to round , relatively hypoechoic mass or with without internal cystic portion. Sonographic evaluation of benign soft tissue tumors is useful in demonstrating the location, size, extent, and internal characteristic of the mass. A relatively confident diagnosis can made when the characteristic features of the benign soft tissue tumor are present on sonographic imaging

  9. Ultrasonographic findings of benign soft tissue tumors

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    Kim, Ki Sung; Oh, Dong Heon; Jung, Tae Gun; Kim, Yong Kil; Kwon, Jung Hyeok [Dongkang Genernal Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To clarify the characteristic sonographic features of benign soft tissue tumors and to evaluate the usefulness of sonographic imaging. We retrospectively reviewed ultrasonographic images of 70 cases in 68 patients with histologically proved benign soft tissue tumors. The tumors include 33 lipomas, 11 hemangiomas, 11 lymphangiomas, 7 neurilemmomas, 4 epidermoid cysts, 2 fibromas, 1 mesenchymoma, and 1 myxoma. The sonographic appearances of the lesions were mainly solid in 53 cases(33 lipomas, 8 hemangiomas, 2 lymphangiomas, 7 neurilemmomas, 2 fibromas and 1 mesenchymoma), mainly cystic in 14 cases(1 hemangioma, 8 lymphangiomas, 4 epidermoid cysts, and 1 myxomal), and mixed in 3 cases(2 hemangiomas and 1 lymphangioma). Although an accurate histologic prediction could not be made in most cases, certain patterns appeared to be characteristic of specific tumor types. 26 cases(78%) of lipoma were seen as lentiform, iso- or hyperechoic, solid mass. Hemangioma had variable appearance and characteristic calcifications were seen in 3 cases. Unicameral or multiseptated cystic mass with variable thickness of echogenic septa and solid portion was the characteristic finding of lymhangioma. Neurilemmoma showed lobulated, oval to round , relatively hypoechoic mass or with without internal cystic portion. Sonographic evaluation of benign soft tissue tumors is useful in demonstrating the location, size, extent, and internal characteristic of the mass. A relatively confident diagnosis can made when the characteristic features of the benign soft tissue tumor are present on sonographic imaging.

  10. Gingival leiomyomatous hamartoma of the maxilla: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Vandana; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Al-Thobaiti, Yasser

    2016-05-09

    Hamartoma is a tumour-like malformation appearing as a focal overgrowth of normal cells. Leiomyomatous hamartomas (LHs) are rare in the oral cavity and commonly seen in the Japanese and less than 40 cases have been reported in the Japanese and English literature. The clinical differential diagnoses are irritational (traumatic) fibroma and congenital epulis. It has to be differentiated histopathologically from its neoplastic counterparts and mesenchymomas. Hence, we report such a case of LHs, which presented as a sessile gingival growth occurring in the midline in a 15-year-old girl. The final diagnosis was based on the histopathological appearance which was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of various markers. A review of the literature of previous cases was also carried out. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Benign osseous metaplasia of the breast: Case report

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    Hassan Alyami

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign Osseous metaplasia of the breast is rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Here we present a case of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as a breast lump. Case presentation: 38-year-old previously well woman presented with a one-year history of bilateral breast pain and a left-sided breast lump. Ultrasound and mammography suggested calcified fibroadenoma. An ultrasound-guided true cut biopsy revealed fibrous tissue containing foci of adenosis in the presence of a myoepithelial cell layer. Excision biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination showed bone matrix deposition occupying most of the nodule with peripheral hyalinized tissue but no evidence of malignancy. A diagnosis of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast was made, and the patient recovered well without recurrence after lump excision. Discussion: Only a few cases of osseous metaplasia are reported in the literature. Most reported cases are malignant, such as in fibrosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, osteoid sarcoma, osteogenic sarcoma, and osteochondrosarcoma.Very few cases of osseous sarcoma are reported in benign lesions such as fibroadenoma, pleomorphic adenoma, benign mesenchymoma, phyllodes tumor, and amyloid tumor of the breast. Joshi et al. first reported a case of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as breast lump in an HIV-positive patient [18]. We, therefore, consider this case to be the second case report of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as a breast lump, but the patient had no chronic illness. Conclusion: A breast lump can be the first presentation of benign osseous metaplasia. Keywords: Benign osseous metaplasia, Breast lump, Case report

  12. Study on the correlation between extracellular matrix protein-1 and the growth, metastasis and angiogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma.

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    Meng, Xin-Yu; Liu, Juan; Lv, Feng; Liu, Ming-Qiu; Wan, Jing-Ming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between extracellular matrix protein-1 (ECM1) and the growth, metastasis and angiogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma. Forty-five samples with laryngeal benign and malignant tumors confirmed by pathology in Laiwu City People's Hospital from March 2006 to March 2011 were collected, in which there were 29 cases with laryngeal carcinoma and 16 with benign tumors. The expression of ECM1 and factor VIII-related antigens in patients with laryngeal carcinoma and those with benign tumors was respectively detected using immunohistochemical method, and the correlation between ECM1 staining grade and microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed. In laryngeal carcinoma tissue, ECM1 was mainly expressed in cytoplasm, less in cytomembrane or intercellular substance. With abundant expression in the tissue of laryngeal benign tumors (benign mesenchymoma and hemangioma), ECM1 was primarily expressed in the connective tissue, which was different from the expression in laryngeal carcinoma tissue. The proportion of positive ECM1 staining (++) in patients with laryngeal carcinoma was dramatically higher than those with benign tumors (pcorrelation analysis revealed that ECM1 staining grade in laryngeal carcinoma tissue had a significantly-positive correlation with MVD (r=0.866, p=0.000). ECM1 expression in laryngeal carcinoma is closely associated with tumor cell growth, metastasis and angiogenesis, which can be considered as an effective predictor in the occurrence and postoperative recurrence of laryngeal carcinoma.

  13. [Tumor and tumor-like benign mesenchymal lesions of the breast].

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    Bisceglia, M; Nirchio, V; Carosi, I; Cappucci, U; Decata, A; Paragone, T; Di Mattia, A L

    1995-02-01

    All the spectrum is encompassed of those miscellaneous pathologic entities occurring in the mammary stroma which are on record up to date other than "mixed fibroepithelial" tumors (fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors) and tumors both "pure" and "mixed" originating from myoepithelium (adenomyoepitheliomas and pleomorphic adenomas). Also they were excluded those dysreactive-autoimmune diseases (sarcoidosis, sclerosing lymphocytic lobulitis, lobular granulomatous mastitis) and those inflammatory-infectious conditions (tuberculosis, actinomycosis, foreign body reactions, Mondor's disease) which can mimick breast tumors clinically or on image analysis, but on the contrary not evoking the idea of a tumor on histology. Specifically, inflammatory pseudotumor, myofibroblastoma, leiomyoma, neurinoma/neurofibroma, benign fibrous histiocytoma, hemangiopericytoma, fibromatosis, nodular fascitis, variants of lipoma, mesenchymoma, amartoma and its variants, hemangiomas, pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of stroma, amyloid tumor, granular cell tumor, are consecutively described and discussed, with a large list of references enclosed to each rubric. Most of the pictures are taken from personally observed lesions of the breast. Only few pictures referred to are from their analogue lesions which occurred in soft parts of other locations, with specific mention of that when it was the case. Of note after reviewing the literature the fact that no glomus tumor, nor Kaposi's sarcoma either sporadic or in the context of any immunodeficiency, nor myelolipoma has been recorded yet.

  14. Postradiotherapeutic changes and their evolution in MRI in children with aggressive soft tissue tumors.

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    Jastrzębska, Małgorzata; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Romaniuk-Doroszewska, Anna; Brągoszewska, Hanna; Iwanowska, Beata; Uliasz, Maria; Szkudlińska-Pawlak, Sylwia; Mądzik, Jarosław

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a commonly used method of monitoring of soft tissue tumours. The aim of the work was to describe precisely the typical changes within soft tissues and bones occurring after radiotherapy in children treated for sarcomas and other soft tissue tumours. With time, the changes undergo evolution and their characteristics and comparison with previous examinations help in a difficult differentiation between tumour lesions and posttherapeutic changes. Fifteen children and young adolescents (9 boys and 6 girls) aged between 2 and 22 years (mean age of 13.4 years) with diagnosed aggressive soft tissue tumours, were treated with radiotherapy. There were 102 MRI examinations analysed in the period from February 2004 to February 2008. The examinations were performed with a 1.5T MRI scanner in the following sequences: SE T1, SE T1+fatsat, before and after gadolinium administration (Gd), FSE T2 and STIR in three planes, and, in some selected cases, a dynamic gadolinium-enhanced (DCE MRI) examination with FAME sequence. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS SHOWED: rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in 8 cases, synovial sarcoma - 3, agressive desmoid fibroma - 3, mesenchymoma mal. - 1. MRI examinations were performed at different postradiotherapeutic stages, several times in one patient (12 times at the most). Every postirradiation stage revealed a typical picture of posttherapeutic changes. We distinguished four stages and described changes in different sequences within soft tissues and bones, as well as features of contrast enhancement and enhancement curves in a dynamic study. The stages included: I stage - early, up to 3 months after rth, II stage - chronic, from 3 months to 12 months after rth, with some differences between the following periods: • 3-9 months; 9-12 months; III stage - late, from 1 to 3 years after rth, IV stage - distant, more than 3 years after rth. In the early stage, there were 2 cases with a suspicious, equivocal image of postradiotherapeutic