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Sample records for mesenchymoma

  1. Rare Head and Neck Benign Mesenchymoma in Close Proximity to Submandibular Gland in a Pediatric Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric head and neck masses are commonly congenital in origin or of infectious etiology. We present a rare case of benign mesenchymoma in close proximity to the submandibular gland in an otherwise asymptomatic child. Computerized tomography (CT scan of the head and neck area revealed a benign lesion, which was later determined to be a benign mesenchymoma on histopathology. The child did well after surgery without any reported recurrence. We discuss the salient features of a benign mesenchymoma in a child and also discuss relevant imaging and management.

  2. MFH Mimic in Breast: A High-Grade Malignant Phyllodes Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Hemalatha, A. L.; Sindhuram, V. Sumana; Asha, U.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is usually diagnosed by the presence of benign duct-like epithelium and malignant mesenchymal tissue. In addition to the usual fibrosarcomatous features, the mesenchymal component may show areas resembling osteogenic sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, and, very rarely, malignant fibrous histiocytoma. We present one such rare case of malignant phyllodes tumor with malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like stromal ...

  3. MFH Mimic in Breast: A High-Grade Malignant Phyllodes Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Hemalatha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is usually diagnosed by the presence of benign duct-like epithelium and malignant mesenchymal tissue. In addition to the usual fibrosarcomatous features, the mesenchymal component may show areas resembling osteogenic sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, and, very rarely, malignant fibrous histiocytoma. We present one such rare case of malignant phyllodes tumor with malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like stromal differentiation.

  4. Mesenchymal neoplasia and congenital pulmonary cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.G.; Currarino, G.; Moore, G.C.; Votteler, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    A malignant mesenchymoma exibiting a varied spectrum of differentation developed within a congenital pulmonary cyst 6 1/2 years after the cyst was first recognized. Related tumors with a similar gross appearance have been previously described and have included rhabdomyosarcomas and so-called pulmonary blastomas. There is a low but distinct risk for the developement of mesenchymal sarcomas within congenital peripheral pulmonary cysts. (orig.) [de

  5. Unusual postirradiation sarcoma of chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, E.L.; Kreuther, A.; Young, T.; Gerald, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    A sarcoma of the chest wall following postoperative radiation therapy for breast carcinoma is reported. A total of 9346 rads was delivered at a 2-cm tissue depth from two treatment courses separated by a five-year interval. The sarcoma appeared 16 years following the initial radiation course. The existence of two mesenchymal elements in the lesion led to the final diagnosis of malignant mesenchymoma. Criteria for evaluating a possible radiation-induced malignancy are discussed

  6. Benign osseous metaplasia of the breast: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Alyami

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign Osseous metaplasia of the breast is rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Here we present a case of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as a breast lump. Case presentation: 38-year-old previously well woman presented with a one-year history of bilateral breast pain and a left-sided breast lump. Ultrasound and mammography suggested calcified fibroadenoma. An ultrasound-guided true cut biopsy revealed fibrous tissue containing foci of adenosis in the presence of a myoepithelial cell layer. Excision biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination showed bone matrix deposition occupying most of the nodule with peripheral hyalinized tissue but no evidence of malignancy. A diagnosis of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast was made, and the patient recovered well without recurrence after lump excision. Discussion: Only a few cases of osseous metaplasia are reported in the literature. Most reported cases are malignant, such as in fibrosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, osteoid sarcoma, osteogenic sarcoma, and osteochondrosarcoma.Very few cases of osseous sarcoma are reported in benign lesions such as fibroadenoma, pleomorphic adenoma, benign mesenchymoma, phyllodes tumor, and amyloid tumor of the breast. Joshi et al. first reported a case of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as breast lump in an HIV-positive patient [18]. We, therefore, consider this case to be the second case report of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as a breast lump, but the patient had no chronic illness. Conclusion: A breast lump can be the first presentation of benign osseous metaplasia. Keywords: Benign osseous metaplasia, Breast lump, Case report

  7. The primary intrathoracic tumor in pediatric group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kyoo Ok; Lee, Young Ho; Oh, Ki Keun; Park, Chang Yun

    1985-01-01

    The increased frequency with which intrathoracic masses have been discovered in the pediatric age group seems to correspond to the increased utilization a typical location and appearance, the range of possibilities is so great that the diagnosis is rarely made with any certainty before operation. For evaluation of clinical and radiological aspect of these tumors, we reviewed in pediatric age group 28 cases of primary intrathoracic tumor which were diagnosed pathologically at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine since 1971. The results: 1. The mediastinal tumors are predominant: 25 cases of mediastinal tumors and 3 cases of pulmonary tumor. 2. The incidence of tumors according to pathologic type is as follows: The malignant lymphoma is most common (12 cases, 45%), next is neurogenic tumor (7 cases, 25%), and Rhabdomyosarcoma 2 cases, benign teratoma 2 cases, thymoma 1 case, bronchogenic cyst of mediastinum 1 case. Pulmonary lesion as follow: 2 cases of mal. mesenchynoma, and 1 case of bronchogenic cyst lung. 3. The sex incidence in out series shows male predominence (22 : 6) under 6 years of age, neurogenic tumor and malignant mesenchymoma are predominant, between 11 to 15 years of age malignant lymphoma is predominant and between 6 to 10 years age variable types of tumor are observed. 4. The radiological findings are as follows; a. Malignant lymphoma are located at the anterior and/or mid mediastinum with unilateral or bilateral mediastinal widening. The majority show smooth margin and lobulations on their borders. b. Neurogenic tumors are located in posterior mediastinum. Their margin are sharp or ill-defined. Specimen radiolography found minimal calcification in 1 case. Rib erosion and intercostal widening are noted in 2 cases. c. Teratoma are all located in anterior mediastinum with well defined smooth margin. Curvilinear calcification in 1 case. d. Malignant mesenchymoma are manifested as irregular shaggy bordered mass in lung parenchyme. 1

  8. Radiation-induced chorioretinal degeneration: a clinicopathological report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefau, Suleiman O A; Dorey, Michael W; Brownstein, Seymour; Romanchuk, Ken; Little, John M; Chisholm, Ian A

    2003-02-01

    With the shift in radiotherapy toward the posterior segment and with the use of lead screens to shield the anterior segment, posterior segment lesions have become more readily recognized. The purpose of this study is to highlight the effects of ionizing radiation on the choroid and to demonstrate how this can result in visual loss, particularly if the macula is involved. Histopathological study of three enucleated eyes of three patients who had received ionizing radiation: a 27-year-old woman who had received radiation as a child for a hemangioma of the left side of the face, a 16-year-old girl who had received radiation at age 11 years for a malignant mesenchymoma of the right maxilla, and a 4-year-old girl who had received radiation at age 1 year for a retinoblastoma of the right eye. Histopathological examination of the three globes showed extensive chorioretinal degeneration, among other ocular findings. In all cases the fellow eye did not show similar chorioretinal lesions. As all three patients were relatively young, the degree of chorioretinal degeneration was considered to be secondary to radiation treatment. Vascular damage from ionizing radiation is not limited to the retina. It can also affect the choroid in the form of chorioretinal degeneration. Since most of the intraocular circulation arises from the uveal vessels, chorioretinal degenerative lesions may be extensive and may even involve the macula.

  9. Study on the correlation between extracellular matrix protein-1 and the growth, metastasis and angiogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xin-Yu; Liu, Juan; Lv, Feng; Liu, Ming-Qiu; Wan, Jing-Ming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between extracellular matrix protein-1 (ECM1) and the growth, metastasis and angiogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma. Forty-five samples with laryngeal benign and malignant tumors confirmed by pathology in Laiwu City People's Hospital from March 2006 to March 2011 were collected, in which there were 29 cases with laryngeal carcinoma and 16 with benign tumors. The expression of ECM1 and factor VIII-related antigens in patients with laryngeal carcinoma and those with benign tumors was respectively detected using immunohistochemical method, and the correlation between ECM1 staining grade and microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed. In laryngeal carcinoma tissue, ECM1 was mainly expressed in cytoplasm, less in cytomembrane or intercellular substance. With abundant expression in the tissue of laryngeal benign tumors (benign mesenchymoma and hemangioma), ECM1 was primarily expressed in the connective tissue, which was different from the expression in laryngeal carcinoma tissue. The proportion of positive ECM1 staining (++) in patients with laryngeal carcinoma was dramatically higher than those with benign tumors (pcorrelation analysis revealed that ECM1 staining grade in laryngeal carcinoma tissue had a significantly-positive correlation with MVD (r=0.866, p=0.000). ECM1 expression in laryngeal carcinoma is closely associated with tumor cell growth, metastasis and angiogenesis, which can be considered as an effective predictor in the occurrence and postoperative recurrence of laryngeal carcinoma.

  10. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souba, W.W.; McKenna, R.J. Jr.; Meis, J.; Benjamin, R.; Raymond, A.K.; Mountain, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen patients are presented who had sarcomas of the chest wall at a site where a prior malignancy had been irradiated. The first malignancies included breast cancer (ten cases), Hodgkin's disease (four cases), and others (two cases). Radiation doses varied from 4200 to 5500 R (mean, 4900 R). The latency period ranged from 5 to 28 years (mean, 13 years). The histologic types of the radiation-induced sarcomas were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma, nine cases; osteosarcoma, six cases; and malignant mesenchymoma, one case. The only long-term survivor is alive and well 12 years after resection of a clavicular chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Three cases were recently diagnosed. Despite aggressive multimodality treatment, the remaining 13 patients have all died from their sarcomas (mean survival, 13.5 months). All patients have apparently been cured of their first malignancies. Chemotherapy was ineffective. No treatment, including forequarter amputation, appeared to palliate the patients with supraclavicular soft tissue sarcomas. Major chest wall resection offered good palliation for seven of eight patients with sarcomas arising in the sternum or lateral chest wall. Close follow-up is needed to detect signs of these sarcomas in the ever-increasing number of patients receiving therapeutic irradiation