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Sample records for mesencephalon

  1. [Relations of aqueduct with some structures of mesencephalon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Gordana; Nikolić, Valentina; Puskas, Nela; Filipović, Branislav; Puskas, Laslo; Krivokuća, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Aqueductus mesencephali is the biggest part of the ventricular system and that is why it is the most common place of intraventricular obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid. This study was done in order to study topographic characteristics of aqueduct more thoroughly. Transversal sections of mesencephalon were made in three levels. The first section was made caudally immediately from the posterior commissure. The second section was made in the middle part of the superior colliculi, and the third section was made in the rostral parts of the caudal sections of the superior colliculi. Distances of the aqueduct from structures of mesencephalon, obtained on the second section, are: 1. The distance of the aqueduct from the superior colliculi - 6.96 mm; 2. The distance of the aqueduct from the red nucleus - 6.02 mm; 3. The distance of the aqueduct from the substantia nigra - 12.29 mm; 4. The distance of the aqueduct from the interpeduncular fossa - 10.22 mm. Knowledge of the anatomy of the aqueductus mesencephali is very important because of interpretation of patogenesis of hidrocefalus as well as of other syndromes that occure in some pathological processes in the system of ventricles.

  2. Respiratory Neuron Activity in the Mesencephalon, Diencephalon and Cerebellum of the Carp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballintijn, C.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Jüch, P.J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The functional properties, localization and connections of neurons with a respiratory-rhythmic firing pattern in the mesencephalon, diencephalon and cerebellum of the carp were studied. Some neurons acquire respiratory rhythm only as a side effect of respiration via sensory stimulation by movements

  3. Neurotropin®inhibits calpain activity upregulated by specific alternation of rhythm in temperature in the mesencephalon of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Hiroki; Numazawa, Takumi; Kawamura, Minoru; Naiki, Mitsuru

    2017-02-15

    Neurotropin® (NTP), an analgesic for chronic pain, has antihyperalgesic effects in specific alternation of rhythm in temperature (SART)-stressed rats. Previous studies have shown that SART stress induces hyperalgesia, as well as post-translational modification of proteins (including substrates for calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease) in the mesencephalon of rats. To better understand the mechanism of action of NTP, we investigated whether SART stress activates calpain in the mesencephalon of rats and whether NTP inhibits this activation. Wistar rats were exposed to SART stress for 5days. NTP (200NU/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally every day from the onset of SART stress. The mechanical pain threshold was measured using the Randall-Selitto test on the 6th day. Thereafter, the rat mesencephalon was immediately collected and calpain activity was examined using western blot analysis with a calpain cleavage site-specific antibody. SART stress induced hyperalgesia and increased the calpain activity in the mesencephalon of rats. In contrast, NTP treatment attenuated the hyperalgesia and prevented the increase in calpain activity in the mesencephalon of SART-stressed rats. Interestingly, a negative correlation was identified between calpain activity and mechanical pain threshold in SART-stressed rats treated with or without NTP. Furthermore, NTP inhibited calpain activity on mammalian uncoordinated-18 in rat mesencephalon homogenate and Ac-LLY-AFC as substrates in an in vitro cell-free system. Our data demonstrate that NTP treatment prevents SART stress-induced calpain activation in the mesencephalon of rats and suggests that NTP-mediated antihyperalgesia is associated with an inhibition of calpain activity in the mesencephalon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity matters - heterogeneity of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral mesencephalon and its relation to Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt Weisenhorn, Daniela Maria; Giesert, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral mesencephalon (the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex) are known for their role in a multitude of behaviors, including cognition, reward, addiction and voluntary movement. Dysfunctions of these neurons are the underlying cause of various neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression, addiction and schizophrenia. In addition, Parkinson's disease (PD), which is the second most common degenerative disease in developed countries, is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, leading to the core motor symptoms of the disease. However, only a subset of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral mesencephalon is highly vulnerable to the disease process. Indeed, research over several decades revealed that the neurons in the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex do not form a homogeneous group with respect to anatomy, physiology, function, molecular identity or vulnerability/dysfunction in different diseases. Here, we review how the concept of dopaminergic neuron diversity, assisted by the advent and application of new technologies, evolved and was refined over time and how it shaped our understanding of PD pathogenesis. Understanding this diversity of neurons in the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex at all levels is imperative for the development of new and more selective drugs for both PD and various other neuropsychiatric diseases. Several decades of research revealed that the neurons in the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex do not form a homogeneous group in respect to anatomy, physiology, function, molecular identity or vulnerability/dysfunction in diseases like Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we review how this concept evolved and was refined over time and how it shaped our understanding of the pathogenesis of PD. Source of the midbrain image: www.wikimd.org/wiki/index.php/The_Midbrain_or_Mesencephalon; downloaded 28.01.2016. See also Figures and of the paper. This article is part of a

  5. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DOPAMINERGIC AND NONDOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN ORGANOTYPIC SLICE CULTURES OF THE RAT VENTRAL MESENCEPHALON

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    STEENSEN, BH; NEDERGAARD, S; OSTERGAARD, K

    1995-01-01

    -old organotypic slice cultures of the ventral mesencephalon prepared from newborn rats. Dopaminergic neurones were distinguished from non-dopaminergic neurones by staining with the autofluorescent serotonin analogue 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine and briefly viewing the preparation with short exposures to ultraviolet...... 81 M Omega), were silent or fired spontaneously at a low frequency (0-9 Hz), and no spontaneous GABA(A)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials or inward rectification were present. In contrast, non-dopaminergic neurones had fast action potentials (0.6-3.2 ms), low input resistance (mean 32 M Omega...

  6. Catecholaminergic development of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon : Characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection and immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomasini, R; Kema, IP; Muskiet, FAJ; Meiborg, G; Staal, MJ; Go, KG

    We determined dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and adrenaline (A), as well as immunohistochemically stained tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DA in dissected rat ventral mesencephalon (VM) tissue from Embryonic Day (ED) 14 to Postnatal Day (P) 17. Whole VM tissue DA, NA, and A contents increased with

  7. Expression of TRPM8 in the distal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the brain mesencephalon of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Licai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that distal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (dCSF-CNs exist near the ventral midline of the midbrain aqueduct and also in the grey matter of the inferior third ventricle and the fourth ventricle floor in the superior segment of the pons. The dCSF-CNs communicate between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the brain parenchyma and may participate in the transduction and regulation of pain signals. The cold sensation receptor channel, TRPM8 is involved in analgesia for neuropathic pain, but whether the TRPM8 receptor exists on dCSF-CNs remains unknown. However, there is preliminary evidence that TRPM8 is expressed in dCSF-CNs and may participate in the transmission and regulation of sensory information between brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in rats. Methods Retrograde tracing of the cholera toxin subunit B labeled with horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP injected into the lateral ventricle was used to identify dCSF-CNs. A double-labeled immunofluorescent technique and laser scanning confocal microscopy were used to identify the expression of TRPM8 in dCSF-CNs. Software Image-Pro Plus was used to count the number of neurons in three sections where CB-HRP positive neurons were located in the mesencephalon of six rats. Results The cell bodies of CB-HRP-positive dCSF-CNs were found in the brain parenchyma near the midline of the ventral Aq, also in the grey of the 3V, and the 4V floor in the superior segment of the pons. In the mesencephalon their processes extended into the CSF. TRPM8 labeled neurons were also found in the same area as were CB-HRP/TRPM8 double-labeled neurons. CB-HRP/TRPM8 double-labeled neurons were found in 42.9 ± 2.3% of neurons labeled by TRPM8, and all CB-HRP-labeled neurons were also labeled with TPRM8. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that the cold sensation receptor channel, TRPM8, is localised within the dCSF-CNs of the mesencephalon. TRPM8 acts as receptor of d

  8. GDNF family ligands display distinct action profiles on cultured GABAergic and serotonergic neurons of rat ventral mesencephalon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducray, Angélique; Krebs, Sandra H:; Schaller, Benoft

    2006-01-01

    the effects of GFLs on other neuronal populations in the VM is essential for their potential application as therapeutic molecules for Parkinson's disease. Hence, in a comparative study, we investigated the effects of GFLs on cell densities and morphological differentiation of gamma-aminobutyric acid......Glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin (NRTN), artemin (ARTN) and persephin (PSPN), known as the GDNF family ligands (GFLs), influence the development, survival and differentiation of cultured dopaminergic neurons from ventral mesencephalon (VM). Detailed knowledge about......-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) and serotonin-ir (5-HT-ir) neurons in primary cultures of E14 rat VM. We observed that all GFLs [10 ng/ml] significantly increased GABA-ir cell densities (1.6-fold) as well as neurite length/neuron. However, only GDNF significantly increased the number of primary neurites/neuron, and none...

  9. Glutamate stimulation of (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from dissociated cell cultures of rat ventral mesencephalon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, H.; Welner, S.; Quirion, R.; Boksa, P.

    1989-04-01

    In dissociated cell cultures of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon preloaded with (3H)dopamine, glutamate (10(-5)-10(-3) M) stimulated the release of (3H)dopamine. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was Ca2+ dependent and was blocked by the glutamate antagonist, cis-2,3-piperidine dicarboxylic acid. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was not due to glutamate neurotoxicity because (1) glutamate did not cause release of a cytosolic marker, lactate dehydrogenase, and (2) preincubation of cultures with glutamate did not impair subsequent ability of the cells to take up or release (3H)dopamine. Thus, these dissociated cell cultures appear to provide a good model system to characterize glutamate stimulation of dopamine release. Release of (3H)dopamine from these cultures was stimulated by veratridine, an activator of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels, and this stimulation was blocked by tetrodotoxin. However, glutamate-stimulated (3H)dopamine release was not blocked by tetrodotoxin or Zn2+. Substitution of NaCl in the extracellular medium by sucrose, LiCl, or Na2SO4 had no effect on glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release; however, release was inhibited when NaCl was replaced by choline chloride or N-methyl-D-glucamine HCl. Glutamate-stimulated (3H)-dopamine release was well maintained (60-82% of control) in the presence of Co2+, which blocks Ca2+ action potentials, and was unaffected by the local anesthetic, lidocaine. These results are discussed in terms of the receptor and ionic mechanisms involved in the stimulation of dopamine release by excitatory amino acids.

  10. Perinatal asphyxia leads to PARP-1 overactivity, p65 translocation, IL-1β and TNF-α overexpression, and apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonatal rats: prevention by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Peña, T; Rojas-Mancilla, E; Munoz-Vio, V; Perez, R; Gutierrez-Hernandez, M; Bustamante, D; Morales, P; Hermoso, M A; Gebicke-Haerter, P; Herrera-Marschitz, M

    2015-05-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a leading cause of neuronal damage in newborns, resulting in long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, in part due to impairment of mesostriatal and mesolimbic neurocircuitries. The insult can be as severe as to menace the integrity of the genome, triggering the overactivation of sentinel proteins, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 overactivation implies increased energy demands, worsening the metabolic failure and depleting further NAD(+) availability. Using a global PA rat model, we report here evidence that hypoxia increases PARP-1 activity, triggering a signalling cascade leading to nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65, modulating the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α, pro-inflammatory molecules, increasing apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonate rats, monitored with Western blots, qPCR, TUNEL and ELISA. PARP-1 activity increased immediately after PA, reaching a maximum 1-8 h after the insult, while activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway was observed 8 h after the insult, with a >twofold increase of p65 nuclear translocation. IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA levels were increased 24 h after the insult, together with a >twofold increase in apoptotic-like cell death. A single dose of the PARP-1 inhibitor nicotinamide (0.8 mmol/kg, i.p.), 1 h post delivery, prevented the effect of PA on PARP-1 activity, p65 translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and apoptotic-like cell death. The present study demonstrates that PA leads to PARP-1 overactivation, increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death in mesencephalon, effects prevented by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration, supporting the idea that PARP-1 inhibition represents a therapeutic target against the effects of PA.

  11. Rat fetal ventral mesencephalon grown as solid tissue cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglinger, G U; Sautter, J; Meyer, Morten

    1998-01-01

    in vitro (DIV) in the presence or absence (controls) of BDNF [100 ng/ml]. The dopamine content in the culture medium, analyzed by HPLC, was significantly higher (4-5 fold) in the BDNF group at DIV 8 and DIV 12 compared to the corresponding control levels (40 pg/ml). The number of tyrosine hydroxylase...

  12. Comparison of gene expression profile in embryonic mesencephalon and neuronal primary cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Greco

    Full Text Available In the mammalian central nervous system (CNS an important contingent of dopaminergic neurons are localized in the substantia nigra and in the ventral tegmental area of the ventral midbrain. They constitute an anatomically and functionally heterogeneous group of cells involved in a variety of regulatory mechanisms, from locomotion to emotional/motivational behavior. Midbrain dopaminergic neuron (mDA primary cultures represent a useful tool to study molecular mechanisms involved in their development and maintenance. Considerable information has been gathered on the mDA neurons development and maturation in vivo, as well as on the molecular features of mDA primary cultures. Here we investigated in detail the gene expression differences between the tissue of origin and ventral midbrain primary cultures enriched in mDA neurons, using microarray technique. We integrated the results based on different re-annotations of the microarray probes. By using knowledge-based gene network techniques and promoter sequence analysis, we also uncovered mechanisms that might regulate the expression of CNS genes involved in the definition of the identity of specific cell types in the ventral midbrain. We integrate bioinformatics and functional genomics, together with developmental neurobiology. Moreover, we propose guidelines for the computational analysis of microarray gene expression data. Our findings help to clarify some molecular aspects of the development and differentiation of DA neurons within the midbrain.

  13. Effect of radiation and serotonin treatment on serotoninergic system of mouse fetal mesencephalon and diencophalon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapronova, A.Ya.; Proshlyakova, E.V.; Konstantinova, M.M.; Panaeva, S.V.; Podmareva, O.N.; Voronova, S.N.; Ugryumov, M.V.; Turpaev, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Effect of radiation and introduction of serotonin before and after irradiation in the critical period of nervous system development on functional state of serotoninergic system of the mice marrow by the moment of their birth was determined. The revealed radioprotective effect of serotonin and its therapeutic effect after irradiation show that these effects are not conditioned by changes in the functional state of the serotoninergic system of the average and intermediate marrow of the mice fetus

  14. Dopamine release in organotypic cultures of foetal mouse mesencephalon: effects of depolarizing agents, pargyline, nomifensine, tetrodotoxin and calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Rossen, Sine; Gramsbergen, Jan B

    2008-01-01

    Organotypic mesencephalic cultures provide an attractive in vitro alternative to study development of the nigrostriatal system and pathophysiological mechanisms related to Parkinson's disease. However, dopamine (DA) release mechanisms have been poorly characterized in such cultures. We report here...

  15. Ontogenesis of embryonic porcine ventral mesencephalon in the perspective of its potential use as a xenograft in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, GJ; Hogenesch, RI; Sprengers, MES; Staal, MJ

    1997-01-01

    Human fetal neural dopaminergic tissue can be transplanted and can ameliorate neurological deficiencies in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Donor tissue from other species has been used experimentally for several years in animal experiments and is now being considered an attractive

  16. Dissociation between the panicolytic effect of cannabidiol microinjected into the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, and fear-induced antinociception elicited by bicuculline administration in deep layers of the superior colliculus: The role of CB1-cannabinoid receptor in the ventral mesencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Juliana Almeida; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; de Souza Crippa, José Alexandre; Cecílio Hallak, Jaime Eduardo; Zuardi, Antônio Waldo; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-07-05

    Many studies suggest that the substantia nigra, pars reticulata (SNpr), a tegmental mesencephalic structure rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and cannabinoid receptor-containing neurons, is involved in the complex control of defensive responses through the neostriatum-nigral disinhibitory and nigro-tectal inhibitory GABAergic pathways during imminently dangerous situations. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role played by CB1-cannabinoid receptor of GABAergic pathways terminal boutons in the SNpr or of SNpr-endocannabinoid receptor-containing interneurons on the effect of intra-nigral microinjections of cannabidiol in the activity of nigro-tectal inhibitory pathways. GABAA receptor blockade in the deep layers of the superior colliculus (dlSC) elicited vigorous defensive behaviour. This explosive escape behaviour was followed by significant antinociception. Cannabidiol microinjection into the SNpr had a clear anti-aversive effect, decreasing the duration of defensive alertness, the frequency and duration of defensive immobility, and the frequency and duration of explosive escape behaviour, expressed by running and jumps, elicited by transitory GABAergic dysfunction in dlSC. However, the innate fear induced-antinociception was not significantly changed. The blockade of CB1 endocannabinoid receptor in the SNpr decreased the anti-aversive effect of canabidiol based on the frequency and duration of defensive immobility, the frequency of escape expressed by running, and both the frequency and duration of escape expressed by jumps. These findings suggest a CB1 mediated endocannabinoid signalling in cannabidiol modulation of panic-like defensive behaviour, but not of innate fear-induced antinociception evoked by GABAA receptor blockade with bicuculline microinjection into the superior colliculus, with a putative activity in nigro-collicular GABAergic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bilateral Ageusia and Tongue Anesthesia Following Unilateral Brainstem Infarct: A Case Report with a Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Saleh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient who suffered bilateral ageusia following a unilateral left-sided mesencephalon infarct. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a mesencephalon lesion leading to ageusia. We discuss the literature on this rare but important symptom following a stroke.

  18. 0713-0726_ESM.docx

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unknown

    F: the F value from ANOVA; partial η2: effect size for ANOVA; ε: the values of epsilon of Greenhouse-Geisser correction; *: p<0.05, #: p<0.1; LT: left telencephalon; RT: right telencephalon; LM: left mesencephalon; RM: right mesencephalon. Supplementary table 2. The SNR due to line noise with and without the hardware ...

  19. DORSAL MESENCEPHALIC PROJECTIONS TO PONS, MEDULLA, AND SPINAL-CORD IN THE CAT - LIMBIC AND NONLIMBIC COMPONENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COWIE, RJ; HOLSTEGE, G

    1992-01-01

    The vertebrate dorsal mesencephalon consists of the superior colliculus, the dorsal portion of the periaqueductal gray, and the mesencephalic trigeminal neurons in between. These structures, via their descending pathways, take part in various behavioral responses to environmental stimuli. This study

  20. Effects of combined BDNF and GDNF treatment on cultured dopaminergic midbrain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sautter, J; Meyer, Morten; Spenger, C

    1998-01-01

    Neural transplantation is an experimental therapy for Parkinson's disease. Pretreatment of fetal donor tissue with neurotrophic factors may improve survival of grafted dopaminergic neurons. Free-floating roller tube cultures of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon were treated with brain...

  1. Protein Kinase Pathways That Regulate Neuronal Survival and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    radiography . The incorporation of phosphate into GSK-313 and L-pyruvate kinase addition of the stimulus. Cells that did not receive drugs received a...mesencephalon strands were x400 magnification into SlideBook digital deconvolu- made by bisecting fragments of human fetal ventral mesencephalon, tion...death technique utilized to prevent selective counting bias was that random fields were selected by two independent researchers. Ten fields contain

  2. Parkinson's disease : The syndrome, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Anna L.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by a slowly expanding degeneration of neurons particularly in the mesencephalon. The causes are unknown although risk factors in the genetic and toxic domain are being discovered. An important pathophysiological feature in PD is the loss of part of the

  3. Autoradiographic visualization on the role of central 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine in acupuncture analgesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Shi Fuxi; Liu Zhonghao; Jiang Ji

    1990-10-01

    The role played by central 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in electroacupuncture analgesia has been studied in rats by means of autoradiography with isotopic tracers 3 H-5-HT. The purpose of the study is to determine the localization of 3 H-5-HT in the midbrain raphe nuclei and in the mesencephalon aquaeduct as well as periaquaeductal gray matter. Parallel experiments were studied by freezing microautoradiographic method and histo-fixative microautoradiographic method. The analgesic effect of acupuncture can be enhanced or lowered by the increment or the decrement of the 5-HT level in the midbrain raphe nuclei and in the mesencephalon aquaeduct as well as periaquaeductal gray matter. The results show that when the rats were subjected to electro-acupuncture analgesia, the microautoradiographic intensities of 3 H-5-HT both in the midbrain raphe nuclei and in the areas of mesencephalon aqueduct were significantly increased. It may be observed that the release of 5-HT in these regions of the brain is accelerated during acupuncture analgesia. From this it can be concluded that the midbrain raphe nuclei and the mesencephalon aquaeduct as well as the periaquaeductal gray matter are closely related to acupuncture analgesia. The results imply that 5-HT in these areas may be one of the most important neurochemical agents mediating acupuncture analgesia

  4. Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences Morphogenesis of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Abstract. This study was carried out to investigate the development of the midbrain in the grey breasted helmeted guinea fowl. Domestication of grey helmeted guinea fowl is increase but scanty documentation on the development of midbrain (mesencephalon) and how it relates to the neurobiology of this bird is lacking.

  5. Initial and follow-up MRI in a case of early diagnosed Reye's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdoba, C.; Pfenninger, J.; Schroth, G.

    1997-01-01

    Early MRI in a case of clinically established Reye's syndrome confirmed CT findings of compressed ventricles and additionally demonstrated signal alterations in the thalamus, mesencephalon and pons. On follow-up MRI the pontine lesion had vanished by 1 week later, while the thalamic lesion persisted for more than 2 months. The patient, however, recovered without neurological sequelae. (orig.). With 3 figs

  6. Nitration of soluble proteins in organotypic culture models of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    chromatography/negative chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry technique and DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) by HPLC in tissues or medium of organotypic, mouse mesencephalon cultures after acute or chronic treatments with the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1), the dopaminergic...

  7. Changes in the distribution of the neuron-specific B-50, neurofilament protein and glial fibrillary acidic proteins following an unilateral mesencephalic lesion in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Oestreicher, A.B.; Devay, P.; Isaacson, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Following a unilateral electrolytic lesion in the ventral rat mesencephalon, changes in the immunocytochemical distribution of the neuron-specific B-50, neurofilament (NF) protein and glial fibrillary acidic (GFAP) proteins were studied around the lesion after 0, 3, 10 and 28 days. At all recovery

  8. Total protein and cholesterol concentrations in brain regions of male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed similarities (P>0.05) between the treatments in total protein concentrations in the cerebral cortex, medulla, hypothalamus, amygdala, mesencephalon and hippocampus. Total protein concentrations however differed significantly between diets (P<0.05) in the cerebellum and pons varoli with the lowest ...

  9. Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the telencephalon, immunoreactivity was identified in cerebral cortex and subcortical structures, hippocampus, amygdala and basal ganglia. Within the diencephalon high density of positive signals was observed in mediodorsal and lateral posterior thalamic nuclei and medial habenular nucleus. In the mesencephalon ...

  10. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon,

  11. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon,

  12. Organization of ascending auditory pathways in the pigeon (Columba livia) as determined by autoradiographic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, M.J.; Eden, A.R.; Westlund, K.N.; Coulter, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    A mixture of tritiated proline and fucose was injected into the labyrinthine endolymphatic space of 5 white king pigeons (Columba livia). Using standard autoradiographic techniques, the authors observed transsynaptic labeling in ascending auditory pathways to the level of the mesencephalon. Auditory system structures, ipsilateral to the injection site, which labeled heavily were the cochlear nerve, the magnocellular and angular nuclei, and the superior olive. Those ipsilateral structures which were slightly labeled were the lateral lemniscus and the dorsal part of the lateral mesencephalic nucleus. Contralateral structures which labeled were the superior olive, lateral lemniscus, and dorsal part of the lateral mesencephalic nucleus. The results of this study suggest that ascending auditory pathways (to the level of mesencephalon) in the pigeon are more similar to those described for mammals in general than previously thought. (Auth.)

  13. Hydrocephalus due to extreme dilation of Virchow-Robin spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Frederic; Cotton, Francois; Haine, Max; Gilbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS) are extensions of the subarachnoid space surrounding perforating blood vessels entering the brain parenchyma. VRS are fluid filled, but almost virtual and only visible on MRI of the brain when dilated. Such dilations are commonly asymptomatic. In rare cases, extreme dilations can be observed; the clinical repercussions of which remain unclear. We report the case of a patient presenting symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus due to extreme VRS mesencephalon dilations. PMID:25564639

  14. Folic acid in the monkey brain: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, A; Coveñas, R; Geffard, K; Geffard, M; Marcos, P; Insausti, R; Dabadie, M P

    2004-05-27

    The present report describes the first visualization of folic acid-immunoreactive fibers in the mammalian central nervous system using a highly specific antiserum directed against this vitamin. The distribution of folic acid-immunoreactive structures was studied in the brainstem and thalamus of the monkey using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. We observed fibers containing folic acid, but no folic acid-immunoreactive cell bodies were found. In the brainstem, no immunoreactive structures were visualized in the medulla oblongata, pons, or in the medial-caudal mesencephalon, since at this location immunoreactive fibers containing folic acid were only found at the rostral level in the dorsolateral mesencephalon (in the mesencephalic-diencephalic junction). In the thalamus, the distribution of folic acid-immunoreactive structures was more widespread. Thus, we found immunoreactive fibers in the midline, in nuclei close to the midline (dorsomedial nucleus, centrum medianum/parafascicular complex), in the ventral region of the thalamus (ventral posteroinferior nucleus, ventral posteromedial nucleus), in the ventrolateral thalamus (medial geniculate nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus, inferior pulvinar nucleus) and in the dorsolateral thalamus (lateral posterior nucleus, pulvinar nucleus). The highest density of fibers containing folic acid was observed in the dorsolateral mesencephalon and in the pulvinar nucleus. The distribution of folic acid-immunoreactive structures in the monkey brain suggests that this vitamin could be involved in several mechanisms, such as visual, auditory, motor and somatosensorial functions. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Expression of the homeobox genes OTX2 and OTX1 in the early developing human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen B; Lutterodt, Melissa C; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the Otx2 gene is expressed in the diencephalon, mesencephalon, and cerebellum and is crucial for the development of these brain regions. Together with Otx1, Otx2 is known to cooperate with other genes to develop the caudal forebrain and, further, Otx1 is also involved in differentiati...... in the neocortex, and OTX2 in the archicortex, diencephalon, rostral brain stem, and cerebellum.......In rodents, the Otx2 gene is expressed in the diencephalon, mesencephalon, and cerebellum and is crucial for the development of these brain regions. Together with Otx1, Otx2 is known to cooperate with other genes to develop the caudal forebrain and, further, Otx1 is also involved in differentiation...... of young neurons of the deeper cortical layers. We have studied the spatial and temporal expression of the two homeobox genes OTX2 and OTX1 in human fetal brains from 7 to 14 weeks postconception by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. OTX2 was expressed in the diencephalon, mesencephalon...

  16. Evaluation of Parkinson's disease using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedolin, Leonardo; Marchiori, Edson; Rieder, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Parkinson's disease. In the period from October 1999 to October 2002, 42 patients with parkinsonism were investigated using a 1.5 T MR equipment. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 26) and patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome (n = 16). The results were compared with a control group (n = 18). The following variables were evaluated: thickness of the mesencephalon compact pars, hypointense signal in the putamen, degree of brain atrophy, lesions in the mesencephalon, lesions in the white matter, and the presence of lesions in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen. Statistical data analysis was carried out using the SPSS program. Results: The mean age was 58.2 years for the Parkinson's disease and control groups, and 60.5 years for the atypical Parkinsonian syndrome group. Patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes presented decreased thickness of the compact pars and a higher degree of signal hypointensity in the putamen. Cerebral atrophy was more prominent in the patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome. Lesions in mesencephalon and white matter were similar in both groups. The frequency of hyperintense signal in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen was low within the studied population, although that could suggest multiple-system atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the detection of brain morphological changes that may help in the diagnosis of Parkinsonian syndromes. (author)

  17. Texture analysis of MR images of patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holli, Kirsi K; Harrison, Lara; Dastidar, Prasun; Wäljas, Minna; Liimatainen, Suvi; Luukkaala, Tiina; Öhman, Juha; Soimakallio, Seppo; Eskola, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to study the effect of trauma on texture features in cerebral tissue in mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Our hypothesis was that a mild trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection but could be detected with texture analysis (TA). We imaged 42 MTBI patients by using 1.5 T MRI within three weeks of onset of trauma. TA was performed on the area of mesencephalon, cerebral white matter at the levels of mesencephalon, corona radiata and centrum semiovale and in different segments of corpus callosum (CC) which have been found to be sensitive to damage. The same procedure was carried out on a control group of ten healthy volunteers. Patients' TA data was compared with the TA results of the control group comparing the amount of statistically significantly differing TA parameters between the left and right sides of the cerebral tissue and comparing the most discriminative parameters. There were statistically significant differences especially in several co-occurrence and run-length matrix based parameters between left and right side in the area of mesencephalon, in cerebral white matter at the level of corona radiata and in the segments of CC in patients. Considerably less difference was observed in the healthy controls. TA revealed significant changes in texture parameters of cerebral tissue between hemispheres and CC segments in TBI patients. TA may serve as a novel additional tool for detecting the conventionally invisible changes in cerebral tissue in MTBI and help the clinicians to make an early diagnosis

  18. Texture analysis of MR images of patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Our objective was to study the effect of trauma on texture features in cerebral tissue in mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Our hypothesis was that a mild trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection but could be detected with texture analysis (TA). Methods We imaged 42 MTBI patients by using 1.5 T MRI within three weeks of onset of trauma. TA was performed on the area of mesencephalon, cerebral white matter at the levels of mesencephalon, corona radiata and centrum semiovale and in different segments of corpus callosum (CC) which have been found to be sensitive to damage. The same procedure was carried out on a control group of ten healthy volunteers. Patients' TA data was compared with the TA results of the control group comparing the amount of statistically significantly differing TA parameters between the left and right sides of the cerebral tissue and comparing the most discriminative parameters. Results There were statistically significant differences especially in several co-occurrence and run-length matrix based parameters between left and right side in the area of mesencephalon, in cerebral white matter at the level of corona radiata and in the segments of CC in patients. Considerably less difference was observed in the healthy controls. Conclusions TA revealed significant changes in texture parameters of cerebral tissue between hemispheres and CC segments in TBI patients. TA may serve as a novel additional tool for detecting the conventionally invisible changes in cerebral tissue in MTBI and help the clinicians to make an early diagnosis. PMID:20462439

  19. Effect of certain psychopharmacological preparations on adaptation under stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanishevskaya, A. V.; Mezentseva, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments staged on rats demonstrated that the formation of pathological states caused by stress and accompanied by the development of ulcerative lesion of the gastric mucosa are associated with the degree of the catecholamines level drop in the mesencephalon and hypothalamus. The application of seduxen and also of combinations consisting of L-DOPA with seduxen, or with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan tends to reduce the frequency of developing alcerative lesions of the stomach. The protective effect produced by the combination of L-DOPA with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan is barred by an additional administration of an B-adrenoblocking agent, inderal.

  20. Expansion and characterization of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells: effect of mitogens and investigation of FA1 as a potential dopaminergic marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia; Bauer, Matthias; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2007-01-01

    Methods for identification and in vitro expansion of ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic precursor cells are of interest in the search for transplantable neurons for cell therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the potential use of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and fibroblast growth...... factor 8 (FGF8) for expansion of such dopaminergic precursor cells, and fetal antigen-1 (FA1), a secreted neuronal protein of unknown function, as a non-invasive dopaminergic marker. Tissue from embryonic day (ED) 12 rat ventral mesencephalon was dissociated mechanically and cultured for 4 days...

  1. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  2. Association between etiology and lesion site in ischemic brainstem infarcts: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran G

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gozde Baran,1 Tugce Ozdemir Gultekin,2 Oguz Baran,3 Cigdem Deniz,3 Salim Katar,3 Gulsen Babacan Yildiz,2 Talip Asil2 1Department of Neurology, Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Research and Training Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, Bezmialem Vakif University, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Background and purpose: To assess the anatomical distribution of the ischemic strokes of the brainstem, the effect of anatomical distribution on clinical features and prognosis, and the association between etiology and anatomical involvement.Methods: A retrospective search of the patient database of our institution was performed for a total of 227 patients who were admitted to the Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Bezmialem Vakif University between January 2012 and September 2014. Patients with adequate diagnostic data and 3-month follow-up visit were included in the study.Results: Twenty-one (9%, 136 (60%, and 65 (29% patients had an infarction only at the mesencephalon, pons, and medulla, respectively. However, a single patient (0.5% had an infarction both at the mesencephalon and pons, 3 (1.5% at the pons and medulla, and 1 (0.5% at the mesencephalon, pons, and medulla. While anterior involvement was more common in the mesencephalon and pons, posterior and lateral involvement occurred more frequently in the medulla. Large arterial atherothrombosis was the predominant cause of the strokes in all anatomical sites, particularly in infarcts involving the pons. Cardioembolic events were more common in patients with mesencephalic infarcts. Also, ischemia due to dissection was more common in infarctions involving the medulla, especially the lateral medulla. In subjects with simultaneous infarcts at other sites in addition to the brainstem, there was a significantly higher co-occurrence of medullary infarcts with cerebellar infarcts, mesencephalic infarcts with posterior cerebral artery infarcts, and pons

  3. Endodermal cyst of the oculomotor nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.A. [School of Medicine, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Enterline, D.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fukushima, T. [Carolina Neuroscience Research Inst., Carolina Skull Base Surgery Center, Raleigh, NC (United States); McLendon, R.E.; Cummings, T.J. [Dept. of Pathology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Endodermal cysts are rare congenital intracranial lesions. Although histologically benign, they can become symptomatic as a result of mass effect and cause neurological deficits. We report a 30-year-old woman who presented with paresis of her right oculomotor nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 13 x 8-mm cystic lesion originating from the right oculomotor nerve at its exit from the mesencephalon. She underwent craniotomy, biopsy, slit resection, and drainage of the cyst. To our knowledge, endodermal cysts have not been previously described in relation to the oculomotor nerve. (orig.)

  4. Changes caused by haloperidol are blocked by music in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasset, Inmaculada; Quero, Ismael; García-Mayórgaz, Ángel D; del Río, Manuel Causse; Túnez, Isaac; Montilla, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effect of classical music, using Mozart's sonata for two pianos (K. 448), on changes in dopamine (DA) levels in the striatal nucleus (SN), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and mesencephalon, and on prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone secretion in adult male Wistar rats. Rats were divided into four groups: (1) control, (2) haloperidol treatment (single dose of 2 mg/kg s.c.), (3) music (two 2-h sessions per day) and (4) haloperidol plus music. Rats were sacrificed 2 h after haloperidol injection. Music prompted a fall in plasma PRL and corticosterone levels in healthy rats (P music was associated with a significant increase in DA levels in all groups, with the increase being particularly marked in PFC and SN (P music, by contrast, enhances DA activity and turnover in the brain. The results obtained here bear out reports that music triggers a reduction in systolic pressure and an increase in mesencephalon dopamine levels in human and rats treated with ecstasy, through a calmodulin-dependent system.

  5. Unilateral absence of cerebellar hemisphere: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdogan, N.; Ozturk, O. [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine, Kayseri (Turkey); Kocakoc, E. [Department of Radiology, Women' s Hospital, Sivas (Turkey); Bekar, D. [Department of Neurology, City Hospital, Sivas (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a 38-year-old woman with absence of right cerebellar hemisphere incidentally discovered by MR imaging. No cerebellar abnormality was detected on neurological examination. Tissue probably representing dysgenetic cerebellar tissue with no corticomedullary differentiation was present, connected to the right superior cerebellar peduncle. Ipsilateral enlargement of the pons and cerebral peduncle were additional findings. Although the terms ''aplasia'' or ''agenesis'' have been used to describe this entity, intrauterine destruction is the presumed pathogenetic mechanism in our case, and therefore these terms have been avoided. Asymmetry of pons and mesencephalon may be related to compensatory reorganisation or to the impairment of sequential development of nuclei and neural tracts. (orig.)

  6. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro....... Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal...... derivatives may constitute good candidates for the study of development and physiology of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro, and to develop tools for Parkinson's disease cell replacement preclinical research and drug testing....

  7. Giant posterior fossa mature teratoma with adjacent subacute haematoma, compressive on the brainstem, with acute hydrocephalus. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mature teratoma of the vermis is a rare entity in neurosurgical adulthood pathology. We present the case of a 65 years old patient, admited as an emergency for intense headache (VAS 8/10, nausea, vomiting, gait ataxia, orizontal nistagmus, dismetria, disdiadocokinezia, predominant on the left side, long tracts signs, predominant on the left side. Native and contrast CT and MRI scan of the head revealed a tumoral lesion, in the vermian, paravermian and in the fourth ventricle, with the aspect of a teratoma with intratumoral subacute haemorrhage including a giant lesion 5,5/5/4,5 cm, compressive on mesencephalon, and with suprajacent acute internal hidrocephalus. Emergency neurosurgery was performed (occipital infratentorial craniectomy, microneurosurgical total tumoral resection and haematoma evacuation. Postoperative, the patient recovered progressivelly , subtotal neo and arhicerebellar symptoms. The motor long tract signs recovered slower and persisted incomplete.

  8. Quantitative [18F]fluorodopa/PET and histology of fetal mesencephalic dopaminergic grafts to the striatum of MPTP-poisoned minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Annette Møller; Danielsen, Erik Hvid; Sørensen, Jens Christian

    2002-01-01

    , and again at 3 and 6 months postsurgery, all animals were subjected to quantitative [18F]fluorodopa PET scans and testing for motor impairment. At the end of 6 months, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons were counted in the grafts by stereological methods. The MPTP poisoning persistently reduced...... treatment, or which received bilateral grafts to the striatum of tissue blocks harvested from E28 fetal pig mesencephalon with and without immunosuppressive treatment after grafting, or with additional co-grafting with immortalized rat neural cells transfected to produce GDNF. In the baseline condition......-expressing HiB5 cells, a rat-derived neural cell line, tended to impair the survival of the grafts with the lowest values for graft volumes, TH-positive cell numbers, behavioral scores, and relative DOPA decarboxylase activity. From the results we conclude that pig ventral mesencephalic allografts can restore...

  9. Vitamin D regulates tyrosine hydroxylase expression: N-cadherin a possible mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X; Pertile, R; Liu, P; Eyles, D W

    2015-09-24

    Vitamin D is a neuroactive steroid. Its genomic actions are mediated via the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The VDR emerges in the rat mesencephalon at embryonic day 12, representing the peak period of dopaminergic cell birth. Our prior studies reveal that developmental vitamin D (DVD)-deficiency alters the ontogeny of dopaminergic neurons in the developing mesencephalon. There is also consistent evidence from others that 1,25(OH)2D3 promotes the survival of dopaminergic neurons in models of dopaminergic toxicity. In both developmental and toxicological studies it has been proposed that 1,25(OH)2D3 may modulate the differentiation and maturation of dopaminergic neurons; however, to date there is lack of direct evidence. The aim of the current study is to investigate this both in vitro using a human SH-SY5Y cell line transfected with rodent VDR and in vivo using a DVD-deficient model. Here we show that in VDR-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly increased production of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. This effect was dose- and time-dependent, but was not due to an increase in TH-positive cell number, nor was it due to the production of trophic survival factors for dopamine neurons such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In accordance with 1,25(OH)2D3's anti-proliferative actions in the brain, 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced the percentage of dividing cells from approximately 15-10%. Given the recently reported role of N-cadherin in the direct differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, we examined here whether it may be elevated by 1,25(OH)2D3. We confirmed this in vitro and more importantly, we showed DVD-deficiency decreases N-cadherin expression in the embryonic mesencephalon. In summary, in our in vitro model we have shown 1,25(OH)2D3 increases TH expression, decreases proliferation and elevates N-cadherin, a potential factor that mediates these processes

  10. Midbrain expression of Delta-like 1 homologue is regulated by GDNF and is associated with dopaminergic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Nicolai S.; Gronborg, Mette; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl

    2007-01-01

    upregulation with increased positive staining of cell bodies in the SNc and fibers in the striatum. Analysis of the developmental regulation of Dlk1 in the murine ventral midbrain showed that the upregulation of Dlk1 mRNA correlated with the generation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons. Furthermore......Affymetrix GeneChip technology and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) were used to examine changes in gene expression in the adult murine substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) following lentiviral glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) delivery in adult striatum. We identified several......, Dlk1 expression was analyzed in MesC2.10 cells, which are derived from embryonic human mesencephalon and capable of undergoing differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. We detected upregulation of Dlk1 mRNA and protein under conditions where MesC2.10 cells differentiate into a dopaminergic phenotype...

  11. Hydrocephalus caused by conditional ablation of the Pten or beta-catenin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtoshi Akihira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the roles of Pten and β-Catenin in the midbrain, either the Pten gene or the β-catenin gene was conditionally ablated, using Dmbx1 (diencephalon/mesencephalon-expressed brain homeobox gene 1-Cre mice. Homozygous disruption of the Pten or β-catenin gene in Dmbx1-expressing cells caused severe hydrocephalus and mortality during the postnatal period. Conditional deletion of Pten resulted in enlargement of midbrain structures. β-catenin conditional mutant mice showed malformation of the superior and inferior colliculi and stenosis of the midbrain aqueduct. These results demonstrate that both Pten and β-Catenin are essential for proper midbrain development, and provide the direct evidence that mutations of both Pten and β-catenin lead to hydrocephalus.

  12. The Pathology of Wobbly Hedgehog Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Delgado, Josué; Whitley, Derick B; Storts, Ralph W; Heatley, Jill J; Hoppes, Sharman; Porter, Brian F

    2018-01-01

    Wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS) is a leading cause of neurologic disease in African pygmy hedgehogs (APHs; Atelerix albiventris). This study describes the signalment, clinical signs, gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural lesions of WHS in a cohort of 12 pet APHs. Microscopically, lesions consisted of status spongiosus of the white matter, typically bilateral and symmetrical, with myelin degeneration and loss that was accompanied by neuronal/axonal degeneration plus reactive microgliosis and mild, focal astrocytosis and astrogliosis. Lesions were most severe in the cerebellum and medulla oblongata, as well as cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Less affected areas were the corona radiata, corpus callosum, corpus striatum, internal capsule, and the mesencephalon. Ultrastructurally, the lesions consisted of splitting of the myelin sheath at the intraperiod line with subsequent focal expansion, resulting in status spongiosus, disruption, dilatation, rhexis, and phagocytosis. Based on these results, WHS is best described as a "spongy myelinopathy" with widespread central nervous system involvement.

  13. Fahr Syndrome Unknown Complication: Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devrim Tuglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient’s medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome.

  14. Combined Ipsilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Contralateral Downbeat Nystagmus in a Case of Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Matsuzono

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy.

  15. Synapsin I (protein I) in different brain regions in senile dementia of Alzheimer type and in multiinfarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolfsson, R.; Alafuzoff, I.; Winblad, B.; Perdahl, E.; Albert, K.A.; Nestler, E.J.; Greengard, P.

    1984-01-01

    Synapsin I (Protein I), a neuron-specfic phosphoprotein enriched in presynaptic nerve terminals, has been used as a quantitative marker for the density of nerve terminals in five brain regions (caudate nucleus, cingulate gyrus, hippocampus, mesencephalon and putamen) from patients who had suffered from Alzheimer disease/senile dementia of Alzheimer type (AD/SDAT), from patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and from agematched controls. Samples were obtained at autopsy. Lower levels of Synapsin I were observed in the hippocampus of patients with AD/SDAT but not with MID. There were no significant differences in Synapsin I levels between patients and controls in any of the other four brain regions examined. (Author)

  16. [Effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide on brain monoamine levels during feeding and drinking motivational excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, L V; Timofeev, N A; Kadar, T; Varsegi, M; Zhuravlev, B V; Telegdi, G

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents studies of the influence of octapeptide cholecystokinin (ChCK-8) on the level of dofamine, noradrenaline and serotonine in the hypothalamus, septum, amygdala, striatum and mesencephalon of the rats brain during 24-, 48- and 96-hour alimentary and water deprivation. A change of catecholamines content under the influence of ChCK-8 was observed for the most part in conditions of thirst and only in the hypothalamus. ChCK-8 action in conditions of water deprivation was selective and directed mainly to the restoration of the changes in transmitter's level. ChCK-8 did not have a significant influence on the level of the brain monoamines during hunger. It may be assumed, that "satiation" hormone ChCK-8 is to a great extent connected with the mechanisms of reinforcement, and its "satiating" effect would appear at catecholamines' level in the process of satisfying of corresponding need.

  17. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  18. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte; Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina

    2006-01-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [ 11 C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  19. Diffuse and focal presentations of brainstem tumors in children: the images and the prognostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menor, F.; Canete, A.; Romero, M. J.; Trilles, L.; Carvajal, E.; Marti-Bonmati, L.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the presentation of brainstem tumors as diffuse or focal lesions showed any prognostic value in children. A retrospective review was carried out of the neuroradiological findings in 43 children with brainstem tumors, all of whom underwent computed tomography (CT) and 31 of whom underwent magnetic resonance (MR). The diffuse tumors (n=20) were all located in the pons, spreading to mesencephalon in 6 cases and to medulla oblongata in 1, and exhibiting exophytic growth, preferentially to the prepontine cistern. They presented homogeneous low attenuation in CT (90%) and decrease/increased signal intensity in T1/T2-weighted MR images (91.6%). Contrast uptake was observed in 20% of cases, with agreement between CT and MR. The patients showed a good initial response to treatment (70%), a high rate of relapse (80%) and a 5-year survival of 12%. The focal tumors were located in the pons (11 cases, spreading to the medulla oblongata in 2), mesencephalon (11 cases, 9 tectal and 2 peduncular) and medulla oblongata (1 case), and exhibited exophytic growth predominantly to the pontocerebellar junction and to the cerebellar peduncles. They showed a certain tendency toward heterogeneity (21.7%), toward isoattenuation in CT (47.8%) and isointensity in T1-weighted MR images (26.3%). CT showed a rate of tumor uptake of 26%, while the rate of contrast iptake was 58% MR. Fifty percent of these lesions responded well to therapy, with a recurrence rate of 28% and 4-year survival of 63%. Neuroimaging helps to define two basic patterns in brainstem tumors that play a role in prognosis. The diffuse tumor, which characteristically shows a good initial response to therapy, has a worse prognosis, probably reflecting its histological aggressiveness. (Author) 21 refs

  20. Seasonal Differences in Relative Gene Expression of Putative Central Appetite Regulators in Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus Do Not Reflect Its Annual Feeding Cycle.

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    Anja Striberny

    Full Text Available The highly seasonal anadromous Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus was used to investigate the possible involvement of altered gene expression of brain neuropeptides in seasonal appetite regulation. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMCA1, POMCA2, Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART, Agouti related Peptide (AgRP, Neuropeptide Y (NPY and Melanocortin Receptor 4 (MC4-R genes were examined. The function of centrally expressed Leptin (Lep in fish remains unclear, so Lep (LepA1, LepA2 and Leptin Receptor (LepR genes were included in the investigation. In a ten months study gene expression was analysed in hypothalamus, mesencephalon and telencephalon of immature charr held under natural photoperiod (69°38'N and ambient temperature and given excess feed. From April to the beginning of June the charr did not feed and lost weight, during July and August they were feeding and had a marked increase in weight and condition factor, and from November until the end of the study the charr lost appetite and decreased in weight and condition factor. Brain compartments were sampled from non-feeding charr (May, feeding charr (July, and non-feeding charr (January. Reverse transcription real-time quantitative PCR revealed temporal patterns of gene expression that differed across brain compartments. The non-feeding charr (May, January had a lower expression of the anorexigenic LepA1, MC4-R and LepR in hypothalamus and a higher expression of the orexigenic NPY and AgRP in mesencephalon, than the feeding charr (July. In the telencephalon, LepR was more highly expressed in January and May than in July. These results do not indicate that changes in central gene expression of the neuropeptides investigated here directly induce seasonal changes in feeding in Arctic charr.

  1. Walking pattern analysis after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion and transplantation of foetal dopaminergic progenitor cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alexander; Wessolleck, Johanna; Papazoglou, Anna; Metz, Gerlinde A; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-05-16

    Functional sensorimotor recovery after transplantation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons has been well documented in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of Parkinson's disease. However, the functional restoration of more specific gait-related patterns such as skilled walking, balance, and individual limb movements have been insufficiently studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioural effects of intrastriatal DA grafts on different aspects of normal and skilled walking in rats following unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the medial forebrain bundle. Rats were subjected to drug-induced rotation, detailed footprint analysis, and assessment of skilled walking in the ladder rung walking test prior and after the transplantation of E14 ventral mesencephalon-derived progenitor cells. Good DAergic graft survival, as revealed by immunohistochemistry, was accompanied by a compensation of drug-induced rotational asymmetries. Interestingly, the analysis of walking patterns displayed a heterogeneous graft-induced response in skilled and non-skilled limb use. Grafted animals made fewer errors with their contralateral limbs in skilled walking than the sham-transplanted rats, and they improved their ipsi- and contralateral limb rotation. However, the parameter distance between feet showed a delayed recovery, and the stride length was not affected by the DA grafts at all. These findings indicate that ectopic intrastriatal transplantation of E14 ventral mesencephalon-derived cells promotes recovery of gait balance and stability, but does not ameliorate the shuffling gait pattern associated with 6-OHDA lesions. A full restoration of locomotor gait pattern might require a more complete and organotypic reconstruction of the mesotelencephalic DAergic pathway.

  2. Diffuse and focal presentations of brainstem tumors in children: the images and the prognostic value; Presentacion difusa o focal de los tumores troncoencefalicos en los ninos: imagen y valor pronostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menor, F.; Canete, A.; Romero, M. J.; Trilles, L.; Carvajal, E. [Hospital Universitario La Fe. Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, L. [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset. Valencia (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To determine whether the presentation of brainstem tumors as diffuse or focal lesions showed any prognostic value in children. A retrospective review was carried out of the neuroradiological findings in 43 children with brainstem tumors, all of whom underwent computed tomography (CT) and 31 of whom underwent magnetic resonance (MR). The diffuse tumors (n=20) were all located in the pons, spreading to mesencephalon in 6 cases and to medulla oblongata in 1, and exhibiting exophytic growth, preferentially to the prepontine cistern. They presented homogeneous low attenuation in CT (90%) and decrease/increased signal intensity in T1/T2-weighted MR images (91.6%). Contrast uptake was observed in 20% of cases, with agreement between CT and MR. The patients showed a good initial response to treatment (70%), a high rate of relapse (80%) and a 5-year survival of 12%. The focal tumors were located in the pons (11 cases, spreading to the medulla oblongata in 2), mesencephalon (11 cases, 9 tectal and 2 peduncular) and medulla oblongata (1 case), and exhibited exophytic growth predominantly to the pontocerebellar junction and to the cerebellar peduncles. They showed a certain tendency toward heterogeneity (21.7%), toward isoattenuation in CT (47.8%) and isointensity in T1-weighted MR images (26.3%). CT showed a rate of tumor uptake of 26%, while the rate of contrast iptake was 58% MR. Fifty percent of these lesions responded well to therapy, with a recurrence rate of 28% and 4-year survival of 63%. Neuroimaging helps to define two basic patterns in brainstem tumors that play a role in prognosis. The diffuse tumor, which characteristically shows a good initial response to therapy, has a worse prognosis, probably reflecting its histological aggressiveness. (Author) 21 refs.

  3. Avaliação da doença de Parkinson pela ressonância magnética Evaluation of Parkinson´s disease using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Vedolin

    2004-04-01

    with Parkinson's disease (n = 26 and patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome (n = 16. The results were compared with a control group (n = 18. The following variables were evaluated: thickness of the mesencephalon compact pars, hypointense signal in the putamen, degree of brain atrophy, lesions in the mesencephalon, lesions in the white matter, and the presence of lesions in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen. Statistical data analysis was carried out using the SPSS program. RESULTS: The mean age was 58.2 years for the Parkinson's disease and control groups, and 60.5 years for the atypical Parkinsonian syndrome group. Patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes presented decreased thickness of the compact pars and a higher degree of signal hypointensity in the putamen. Cerebral atrophy was more prominent in the patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome. Lesions in mesencephalon and white matter were similar in both groups. The frequency of hyperintense signal in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen was low within the studied population, although that could suggest multiple-system atrophy. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging allows the detection of brain morphological changes that may help in the diagnosis of Parkinsonian syndromes.

  4. Divergence of brain and retinal anatomy and histology in pelagic antarctic notothenioid fishes of the sister taxa Dissostichus and Pleuragramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Joseph T; Lannoo, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    The neutrally buoyant Antarctic fishes of the sister taxa Dissostichus (D. eleginoides and D. mawsoni) and Pleuragramma antarcticum diverged early in the notothenioid radiation and filled different niches in the pelagic realm of the developing Southern Ocean. To assess the influence of phylogenetic and ecological factors in shaping neural morphology in these taxa, we studied the anatomy and histology of the brains and retinae, and determined the proportional weights of brain regions. With the brain of the non-Antarctic sister taxon Eleginops maclovinus as plesiomorphic, statistically significant departures in the brains of the two Antarctic taxa include reduction of the corpus cerebelli and expansion of the mesencephalon and medulla. Compared to Eleginops, both species also have a relatively smaller telencephalon, although this is significant only in Dissostichus. There are a number of apomorphic features in the brain of Pleuragramma including reduced olfactory nerves and bulbs, an extremely small corpus cerebelli and an expanded mesencephalon. Although there is not a significant difference in the relative weights of the medulla in the two taxa, the prominence of the eminentia granularis and bulging cap-like appearance of the crista cerebellaris are distinctive in Pleuragramma. Brain histology of Dissostichus and Pleuragramma reflects typical perciform patterns and the two species of Dissostichus are histologically identical. Lateral compression in Pleuragramma and notable lobation in Dissostichus also contribute to differences between the taxa. Compression in Pleuragramma is attributable to convergence on an anchovy/herring body shape and to the relatively large brain in this small fish. The less prominent pattern of lobation of the telencephalon, inferior lobes and corpus cerebelli in Pleuragramma probably reflects underlying histology, specifically a reduction in cellularity of the neuropil in the nuclei and lobes. The retinal histology of Dissostichus and

  5. Effects of chronic stress on the auditory system and fear learning: an evolutionary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a complex biological reaction common to all living organisms that allows them to adapt to their environments. Chronic stress alters the dendritic architecture and function of the limbic brain areas that affect memory, learning, and emotional processing. This review summarizes our research about chronic stress effects on the auditory system, providing the details of how we developed the main hypotheses that currently guide our research. The aims of our studies are to (1) determine how chronic stress impairs the dendritic morphology of the main nuclei of the rat auditory system, the inferior colliculus (auditory mesencephalon), the medial geniculate nucleus (auditory thalamus), and the primary auditory cortex; (2) correlate the anatomic alterations with the impairments of auditory fear learning; and (3) investigate how the stress-induced alterations in the rat limbic system may spread to nonlimbic areas, affecting specific sensory system, such as the auditory and olfactory systems, and complex cognitive functions, such as auditory attention. Finally, this article gives a new evolutionary approach to understanding the neurobiology of stress and the stress-related disorders.

  6. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Z.; Obenberger, J.; Vitak, T.

    1996-01-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was confirmed on 52 patients. In 25 patients, MS was diagnosed as highly probable, in additional 8 patients this diagnosis was suspected. MR imaging supported the diagnosis in 21 (95%) patients where this disease had been diagnosed as highly probable, and in 3 (38%) suspect patients. Lesions were found most frequently paraventricularly in the white matter of the brain, but also in the deep structures of the white matter of the temporal lobe and below the tentorium (in the cerebellum, pons and mesencephalon). No lesions were found in the optic nerve despite the frequent diagnosis of retrobulbar neuritis. Computerized tomography (CT) was performed in 14 patients; this technique only supported the diagnosis of MS in 3 patients, in all of whom this diagnosis had also been suggested by MR imaging. It is concluded that MR imaging can fully supersede CT as a tool for diagnosing multiple sclerosis. 3 figs., 10 refs

  7. The chronic infusion of nicotine into the developing chick embryo does not alter the density of (-)-[3H]nicotine-binding sites or vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, R. L.; Jones, T. A.; Benowitz, N. L.; Morley, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    (-)-Nicotine (1.2 mg/day) or saline was infused into chick embryos (Gallus domesticus) for 10 days beginning 12 h beyond the eight day of incubation (E8 + 12 h). Twelve h beyond the eighteenth day of incubation (E18 + 12 h), the eggs were opened to access the embryos and subcutaneous skull electrodes placed. Short latency vestibular response thresholds and input/output functions were determined to assess neurophysiological consequences of chronic nicotine administration. Samples of serum and extraembryonic (amniotic and albumen) fluid were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the levels of nicotine and its major metabolite, cotinine. The brains were removed and divided into diencephalon and mesencephalon and the density of (-)-[3H]nicotine binding sites in each brain area was measured. Nicotine and cotinine were found in the serum and extraembryonic fluid, but nicotinic receptors were not up-regulated in the brains of animals infused with nicotine in comparison to controls. Vestibular response thresholds also did not differ between nicotine-treated and control animals.

  8. MRI findings of radiation encephalopathy of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Changhong; Li Guoye; Huang Biao; Huang Meiping; Zheng Junhui; Tan Shaoheng; Zeng Qiongxin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study MRI findings and clinical manifestation of radiation encephalopathy (RE) of brain stem. Methods: MRI findings and clinical symptoms in 51 patients with RE of brain stem after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer were reviewed. Results: Clinical symptoms included number weakness or paralysis in the limbs and symptoms of damaged cranial nerves. All lesions appeared hypo- or iso-intense on spin echo(SE) T 1 -weighted images and inhomogeneous and mixed hyper- and iso-intense on Turbo spin echo (TSE) T 2 -weighted images. The lesions were located in mesencephalon, pons, medulla, basilar part of pons, basilar part of pons and medulla oblongata in 2,7,3,9 and 30 patients respectively. The enhancement patterns included irregular rings in 39 patients, spotty in 3 and no enhancement in 9 patients. Mass effect was minimal in all patients. On follow-up MRI, the lesions disappeared in 4 patients, did not change in size and shape in 8 patients and enlarged in 2 patients. Conclusion: MRI could demonstrate the characteristic findings of RE of brain stem. MRI findings sometimes are not consistent with the clinical symptoms

  9. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Tønnesen

    Full Text Available Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD, but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 and halorhodopsin (NpHR, respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  10. Glucose metabolism in different regions of the rat brain under hypokinetic stress influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitzer, K.; Voigt, S.

    1980-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in rats kept under long term hypokinetic stress was studied in 7 brain regions. Determination was made of the regional levels of glucose, lactate, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma-aminobutyrate and the incorporation of C-14 from plasma glucose into these metabolites, in glycogen and protein. From the content and activity data the regional glucose flux was approximated quantitatively. Under normal conditions the activity gradient cortex and frontal pole cerebellum, thalamus and mesencephalon, hypothalamus and pons and medulla is identical with that of the regional blood supply (measured with I131 serum albumin as the blood marker). Within the first days of immobilization a functional hypoxia occurred in all brain regions and the utilization of cycle amino acids for protein synthesis was strongly diminished. After the first week of stress the capillary volumes of all regions increased, aerobic glucose metabolism was enhanced (factors 1.3 - 2.0) and the incorporation of glucose C-14 via cycle amino acids into protein was considerably potentiated. The metabolic parameters normalized between the 7th and 11th week of stress. Blood supply and metabolic rate increased most in the hypothalamus.

  11. Bioaccumulation of manganese and its toxicity in feral pigeons (Columba livia) exposed to manganese oxide dust (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, P.; Chakrabarti, S.; Tounkara, R.; Loranger, S.; Kennedy, G.; Zayed, J. [Univ. of Montreal (Canada)

    1998-11-01

    Manganese tetroxide (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) is a product from the combustion of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl. Exposure to high levels of manganese can lead to serious health effects especially to the central nervous and respiratory systems. Very few studies on the effects of long-term low level exposure to Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been reported. The present study was therefore conducted to examine the bioaccumulation and toxicity of manganese in various organs of feral pigeons (Columba kivia) when exposed to low levels of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} via inhalation and hence to find any possible relationship between these two parameters. A total of 22 pigeons was exposed to 239 {micro}g/m{sup 3} of manganese for 7 h/day, 5 days/week for 5, 9, and 13 consecutive weeks. Manganese concentrations in various tissues, e.g., brain (mesencephalon), lung, liver, intestine, pancreas, kidney, muscle, bone, and whole blood, were measured by neutron activation analysis. Various biochemical parameters in blood, e.g., hematocrit, total proteins, glucose, uric acid, alinine aminotransferase, total iron, blood urea nitrogen and triglycerides, were also measured.

  12. Outbreaks of Eastern equine encephalitis in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria L C R; Galiza, Glauco J N; Dantas, Antônio F M; Oliveira, Rafael N; Iamamoto, Keila; Achkar, Samira M; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2011-05-01

    Outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis observed from May 2008 to August 2009 in the Brazilian states of Pernambuco, Ceará, and Paraíba are reported. The disease occurred in 93 farms affecting 229 equids with a case fatality rate of 72.92%. Main clinical signs were circling, depression or hyperexcitability, ataxia, and progressive paralysis with a clinical manifestation period of 3-15 days. Main histologic lesions were a diffuse lymphocytic encephalomyelitis with neuronal death, satellitosis, neuronophagia, and hemorrhages being more severe in the cerebral gray matter of the telencephalon, diencephalon, and mesencephalon. Some animals also had areas of malacia in the telencephalon, thalamus, and basal nuclei. From 1 case, the virus was isolated by mice inoculation, and in other 13 cases was identified as Eastern equine encephalitis virus by semi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After DNA sequencing, all samples were identified as eastern equine encephalitis through the BLASTn analysis, but samples from the Ceará and Paraíba states corresponded to the same cluster, while the sample from the state of Pernambuco corresponded to a different cluster. © 2011 The Author(s)

  13. Enhancement of Dopaminergic Differentiation in Proliferating Midbrain Neuroblasts by Sonic Hedgehog and Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicelli, Floriana; Consales, Claudia; Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Perrone-Capano, Carla; di Porzio, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the molecular mechanisms involved in the acquisition and maturation of dopaminergic (DA) neurons generated in vitro from rat ventral mesencephalon (MES) cells in the presence of mitogens or specific signaling molecules. The addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to MES cells in serum-free medium stimulates the proliferation of neuroblasts but delays DA differentiation. Recombinant Sonic hedgehog (SHH) protein increases up to three fold the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells and their differentiation, an effect abolished by anti-SHH antibodies. The expanded cultures are rich in nestin-positive neurons, glial cells are rare, all TH+ neurons are DA, and all DA and GABAergic markers analyzed are expressed. Adding ascorbic acid to bFGF/SHH-treated cultures resulted in a further five- to seven-fold enhancement of viable DA neurons. This experimental system also provides a powerful tool to generate DA neurons from single embryos. Our strategy provides an enriched source of MES DA neurons that are useful for analyzing molecular mechanisms controlling their function and for experimental regenerative approaches in DA dysfunction. PMID:15303305

  14. Frequent occurrence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in GABAergic neurons of the chick visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Torrão

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Double-labeling immunohistochemical methods were used to investigate the occurrence of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits in presumptive GABAergic neurons of the chick nervous system. Nicotinic receptor immunoreactivity was often found in cells exhibiting GABA-like immunoreactivity, especially in the visual system. The alpha8 subunit appeared to be present in presumptive GABAergic cells of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus, nucleus of the basal optic root of the accessory optic system, and the optic tectum, among several other structures. The alpha5 subunit was also found in GABA-positive neurons, as observed in the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon and other pretectal nuclei. The numbers of alpha8- and alpha5-positive neurons that were also GABA-positive represented high percentages of the total number of neurons containing nicotinic receptor labeling in several brain areas, which indicates that most of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits are present in GABAergic cells. Taken together with data from other studies, our results indicate an important role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the functional organization of GABAergic circuits in the visual system.

  15. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T.; Seiz, Emma G.; Ramos, Milagros; Meyer, Morten; Juliusson, Bengt; Kusk, Philip; Martinez-Serrano, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal of growth factors, proliferation and expression of v-myc were dramatically reduced and the cells differentiated into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. hVM1 cells yield a large number of dopaminergic neurons (about 12% of total cells are TH + ) after differentiation, which also produce dopamine. In addition to proneural genes (NGN2, MASH1), differentiated cells show expression of several genuine mesencephalic dopaminergic markers such as: LMX1A, LMX1B, GIRK2, ADH2, NURR1, PITX3, VMAT2 and DAT, indicating that they retain their regional identity. Our data indicate that this cell line and its clonal derivatives may constitute good candidates for the study of development and physiology of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro, and to develop tools for Parkinson's disease cell replacement preclinical research and drug testing.

  16. Pattern of calbindin-D28k and calretinin immunoreactivity in the brain of Xenopus laevis during embryonic and larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morona, Ruth; González, Agustín

    2013-01-01

    The present study represents a detailed spatiotemporal analysis of the localization of calbindin-D28k (CB) and calretinin (CR) immunoreactive structures in the brain of Xenopus laevis throughout development, conducted with the aim to correlate the onset of the immunoreactivity with the development of compartmentalization of distinct subdivisions recently identified in the brain of adult amphibians and primarily highlighted when analyzed within a segmental paradigm. CR and CB are expressed early in the brain and showed a progressively increasing expression throughout development, although transient expression in some neuronal subpopulations was also noted. Common and distinct characteristics in Xenopus, as compared with reported features during development in the brain of mammals, were observed. The development of specific regions in the forebrain such as the olfactory bulbs, the components of the basal ganglia and the amygdaloid complex, the alar and basal hypothalamic regions, and the distinct diencephalic neuromeres could be analyzed on the basis of the distinct expression of CB and CR in subregions. Similarly, the compartments of the mesencephalon and the main rhombencephalic regions, including the cerebellum, were differently highlighted by their specific content in CB and CR throughout development. Our results show the usefulness of the analysis of the distribution of these proteins as a tool in neuroanatomy to interpret developmental aspects of many brain regions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Brain responses associated with consciousness of breathlessness (air hunger).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotti, M; Brannan, S; Egan, G; Shade, R; Madden, L; Abplanalp, B; Robillard, R; Lancaster, J; Zamarripa, F E; Fox, P T; Denton, D

    2001-02-13

    Little is known about the physiological mechanisms subserving the experience of air hunger and the affective control of breathing in humans. Acute hunger for air after inhalation of CO(2) was studied in nine healthy volunteers with positron emission tomography. Subjective breathlessness was manipulated while end-tidal CO(2-) was held constant. Subjects experienced a significantly greater sense of air hunger breathing through a face mask than through a mouthpiece. The statistical contrast between the two conditions delineated a distributed network of primarily limbic/paralimbic brain regions, including multiple foci in dorsal anterior and middle cingulate gyrus, insula/claustrum, amygdala/periamygdala, lingual and middle temporal gyrus, hypothalamus, pulvinar, and midbrain. This pattern of activations was confirmed by a correlational analysis with breathlessness ratings. The commonality of regions of mesencephalon, diencephalon and limbic/paralimbic areas involved in primal emotions engendered by the basic vegetative systems including hunger for air, thirst, hunger, pain, micturition, and sleep, is discussed with particular reference to the cingulate gyrus. A theory that the phylogenetic origin of consciousness came from primal emotions engendered by immediate threat to the existence of the organism is discussed along with an alternative hypothesis by Edelman that primary awareness emerged with processes of ongoing perceptual categorization giving rise to a scene [Edelman, G. M. (1992) Bright Air, Brilliant Fire (Penguin, London)].

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery of angiographically occult vascular malformations: Indications and preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondziolka, D.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Bissonette, D.J.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has been shown to treat successfully angiographically demonstrated arteriovenous malformations of the brain. Angiographic obliteration has represented cure and eliminated the risk of future hemorrhage. The role of radiosurgery in the treatment of angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) has been less well defined. In the initial 32 months of operation of the 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife at the University of Pittsburgh, 24 patients meeting strict criteria for high-risk AOVMs were treated. Radiosurgery was used conservatively; each patient had sustained two or more hemorrhages and had a magnetic resonance imaging-defined AOVM located in a region of the brain where microsurgical removal was judged to pose an excessive risk. Venous angiomas were excluded by performance of high-resolution subtraction angiography in each patient. Fifteen malformations were in the medulla, pons, and/or mesencephalon, and 5 were located in the thalamus or basal ganglia. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 24 months. Nineteen patients either improved or remained clinically stable and did not hemorrhage again during the follow-up interval. One patient suffered another hemorrhage 7 months after radiosurgery. Five patients experienced temporary worsening of pre-existing neurological deficits that suggested delayed radiation injury. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated signal changes and edema surrounding the radiosurgical target. Dose-volume guidelines for avoiding complications were constructed. Our initial experience indicates that stereotactic radiosurgery can be performed safely in patients with small, well-circumscribed AOVMs located in deep, critical, or relatively inaccessible cerebral locations

  19. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  20. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Localization of NADPH-diaphorase in the brain of the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, G

    1993-08-08

    NADPH-diaphorase, an enzyme catalyzed reaction thought to reflect the activity of nitric oxide synthase in the mammalian nervous system, was mapped in the brain of the chicken. Intensely stained neurons and fibers were found in most parts of the telencephalon, in particular in the neostriatum, paleostriatum augmentatum, olfactory tubercle, lobus parolfactorius, hyperstriatum accessorium, and hyperstriatum ventrale. Medial to the nucleus taeniae, an accumulation of stained cells was observed that appeared to merge with a band of stained neurons located dorsal to the occipitomesencephalic tract. These are considered to belong to the nucleus interstitialis of the dorsal olfactory projection. Further caudally, neurons with different staining intensities were found in the lateral hypothalamic area, lateral mammillary nucleus, periventricular organ, ventral tegmental area, medial spiriform nucleus, optic tectum, isthmooptic nucleus, mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and central gray of the mesencephalon. A particularly dense cluster of NADPH-diaphorase positive neurons was located in the locus coeruleus. It is proposed that these might represent cholinergic cells intermingled with catecholaminergic neurons, thus forming the avian counterpart of the tegmental cholinergic nuclei of mammals. Several NADPH-diaphorase reactive neurons were seen in the parabrachial nucleus and medial and dorsal vestibular nucleus, as well as scattered in the reticular formation. In the caudal medulla, intensely stained cells were grouped around the central canal. Therefore the pattern of expression of NADPH-diaphorase, and thus possibly of nitric oxide synthase, within the avian and mammalian brain might be largely conserved.

  2. Timing of neurodegeneration and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide deposition in the brain of aging kokanee salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Tammy A; Jones, Richard E; Norris, David O

    2002-10-01

    Brains of kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) in one of four reproductive stages (sexually immature, maturing, sexually mature, and spawning) were stained with cresyl violet and silver stain to visualize neurodegeneration. These reproductive stages correlate with increasing somatic aging of kokanee salmon, which die after spawning. Twenty-four regions of each brain were examined. Brains of sexually immature fish exhibited low levels of neurodegeneration, whereas neurodegeneration was more marked in maturing fish and greatest in spawning fish. Neurodegeneration was present in specific regions of the telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, and rhombencephalon. Pyknotic neurons were observed in all regions previously reported to be immunopositive for A beta. Regions that did not exhibit neurodegeneration during aging included the magnocellular vestibular nucleus, the nucleus lateralis tuberis of the hypothalamus, and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, all of which also lack A beta; perhaps these regions are neuroprotected. In 14 of 16 brain areas for which data were available on both the increase in A beta deposition and pyknosis, neurodegeneration preceded or appeared more or less simultaneously with A beta production, whereas in only two regions did A beta deposition precede neurodegeneration. This information supports the hypothesis that A beta deposition is a downstream product of neurodegeneration in most brain regions. Other conclusions are that the degree of neurodegeneration varies among brain regions, neurodegeneration begins in maturing fish and peaks in spawning fish, the timing of neurodegeneration varies among brain regions, and some regions do not exhibit accelerated neurodegeneration during aging. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

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    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  4. The Proteome of the Differentiating Mesencephalic Progenitor Cell Line CSM14.1 In Vitro

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    B. Weiss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of Parkinson's disease by transplantation of dopaminergic (DA neurons from human embryonic mesencephalic tissue is a promising approach. However, the origin of these cells causes major problems: availability and standardization of the graft. Therefore, the generation of unlimited numbers of DA neurons from various types of stem or progenitor cells has been brought into focus. A source for DA neurons might be conditionally immortalized progenitor cells. The temperature-sensitive immortalized cell line CSM14.1 derived from the mesencephalon of an embryonic rat has been used successfully for transplantation experiments. This cell line was analyzed by unbiased stereology of cell type specific marker proteins and 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry to characterize the differentially expressed proteome. Undifferentiated CSM14.1 cells only expressed the stem cell marker nestin, whereas differentiated cells expressed GFAP or NeuN and tyrosine hydroxylase. An increase of the latter cells during differentiation could be shown. By using proteomics an explanation on the protein level was found for the observed changes in cell morphology during differentiation, when CSM14.1 cells possessed the morphology of multipolar neurons. The results obtained in this study confirm the suitability of CSM14.1 cells as an in vitro model for the study of neuronal and dopaminergic differentiation in rats.

  5. SOX2 and OCT4 mRNA-expressing cells, detected by molecular beacons, localize to the center of neurospheres during differentiation.

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    Mirolyuba Ilieva

    Full Text Available Neurospheres are used as in vitro assay to measure the properties of neural stem cells. To investigate the molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of neurospheres, molecular beacons (MBs targeted against the stem cell markers OCT4 and SOX2 were designed, and synthesized with a 2'-O-methyl RNA backbone. OCT4 and SOX2 MBs were transfected into human embryonic mesencephalon derived cells, which spontaneously form neurospheres when grown on poly-L-ornitine/fibronectin matrix and medium complemented with bFGF. OCT4 and SOX2 gene expression were tracked in individual cell using the MBs. Quantitative image analysis every day for seven days showed that the OCT4 and SOX2 mRNA-expressing cells clustered in the centre of the neurospheres cultured in differentiation medium. By contrast, cells at the periphery of the differentiating spheres developed neurite outgrowths and expressed the tyrosine hydroxylase protein, indicating terminal differentiation. Neurospheres cultured in growth medium contained OCT4 and SOX2-positive cells distributed throughout the entire sphere, and no differentiating neurones. Gene expression of SOX2 and OCT4 mRNA detected by MBs correlated well with gene and protein expression measured by qRT-PCR and immunostaining, respectively. These experimental data support the theoretical model that stem cells cluster in the centre of neurospheres, and demonstrate the use of MBs for the spatial localization of specific gene-expressing cells within heterogeneous cell populations.

  6. Musical hallucination associated with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Tanit Ganz; Rocha, Savya Cybelle Milhomem; Knobel, Keila Alessandra Baraldi; Kii, Márcia Akemi; Santos, Rosa Maria Rodrigues dos; Pereira, Cristiana Borges

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the fact that musical hallucination have a significant impact on patients' lives, they have received very little attention of experts. Some researchers agree on a combination of peripheral and central dysfunctions as the mechanism that causes hallucination. The most accepted physiopathology of musical hallucination associated to hearing loss (caused by cochlear lesion, cochlear nerve lesion or by interruption of mesencephalon or pontine auditory information) is the disinhibition of auditory memory circuits due to sensory deprivation. Concerning the cortical area involved in musical hallucination, there is evidence that the excitatory mechanism of the superior temporal gyrus, as in epilepsies, is responsible for musical hallucination. In musical release hallucination there is also activation of the auditory association cortex. Finally, considering the laterality, functional studies with musical perception and imagery in normal individuals showed that songs with words cause bilateral temporal activation and melodies activate only the right lobe. The effect of hearing aids on the improvement of musical hallucination as a result of the hearing loss improvement is well documented. It happens because auditory hallucination may be influenced by the external acoustical environment. Neuroleptics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used in the treatment of musical hallucination. Cases of improvement with the administration of carbamazepine, meclobemide and donepezil were reported, but the results obtained were not consistent.

  7. Rhombencephalosynapsis as a cause of aqueductal stenosis: an under-recognized association in hydrocephalic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Grimm, John; Nelson, Marvin D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is a rare genetic aberration characterized by variable vermian hypoplasia/aplasia in conjunction with united cerebellar hemispheres. Genetic defects in the isthmic organizer at the mesencephalic-metencephalic junction are presumably responsible for the associated aqueductal stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of 20 children with rhombencephalosynapsis to evaluate for and emphasize the association of aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 20 children (0-11 years old) with rhombencephalosynapsis encountered at two academic children's hospitals. Rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum severity was graded based on pre-existing literature. We analyzed examinations for ventriculomegaly and degree of aqueductal stenosis. The collicular distances were measured from the collicular apices. Imaging studies were also analyzed for malformations of cortical and cerebellar development. Thirteen of the 20 children (65%) with rhombencephalosynapsis presented with clinical or imaging evidence of hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis, principally involving the caudal cerebral aqueduct. All children with aqueductal stenosis had collicular fusion. All six children with complete rhombencephalosynapsis had aqueductal stenosis. The cerebral aqueduct varied from normal to stenotic in children with incomplete rhombencephalosynapsis. Corpus callosum dysgenesis was present in four children. Aqueductal stenosis in the setting of rhombencephalosynapsis is an under-recognized cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Our findings support the hypothesis that a defect involving the common gene(s) responsible for the differentiation and development of both the roof plate and midline cerebellar primordium at the mesencephalon/first rhombomere junction may be responsible for the association of aqueductal stenosis and rhombencephalosynapsis. (orig.)

  8. Behcet's disease with cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardamaglia, L.; Desmond, P.M.; Gonzales, M.F.; Bendrups, A.; Brodtmann, A.

    2001-01-01

    The case presented illustrates the diagnostic dilemma off neurological involvement in Behcet's disease and other inflammatory diseases. 'Psychiatric' symptoms were present for 2 years without abnormalities on SPECT or MRI and without CSF pleocytosis. Even at the time of fitting, no CSF abnormalities were observed. The preceding psychiatric presentations may have been due to cerebral vasculitis that was exacerbated by withdrawal of steroids. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most sensitive imaging modality. Lesions are usually in the brainstem, cerebellum, basal ganglia region or periventricular white matter, and the pons and the mesencephalon are commonly affected. In our patient there was no diencephalic or brainstem involvement. The inflammatory process can appear as a very large lesion, with gadolinium enhancement and significant mass effect, as in our patient. Brain magnetic resonance imaging. Postgadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, axial image shows two large lesions in the right frontal lobe, with the larger, posterior lesion demonstrating vivid ring enhancement. A central nodule is isodense, with the cerebral white matter within the larger lesion. Surrounding low T 1 signal involves the hemispheric white matter without cortical extension and is consistent with vasogenic oedema. Minor mass effect is demonstrated with bowing of the anterior falx cerebri to the left. Biopsy shows prominent fibrinoid necrosis in small calibre postcapillary venules and cerebral white matter. There are surrounding acute and chronic inflammatory cells and nuclear debris, consistent with vasculitis

  9. Neural correlates of admiration and compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; McColl, Andrea; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2009-05-12

    In an fMRI experiment, participants were exposed to narratives based on true stories designed to evoke admiration and compassion in 4 distinct categories: admiration for virtue (AV), admiration for skill (AS), compassion for social/psychological pain (CSP), and compassion for physical pain (CPP). The goal was to test hypotheses about recruitment of homeostatic, somatosensory, and consciousness-related neural systems during the processing of pain-related (compassion) and non-pain-related (admiration) social emotions along 2 dimensions: emotions about other peoples' social/psychological conditions (AV, CSP) and emotions about others' physical conditions (AS, CPP). Consistent with theoretical accounts, the experience of all 4 emotions engaged brain regions involved in interoceptive representation and homeostatic regulation, including anterior insula, anterior cingulate, hypothalamus, and mesencephalon. However, the study also revealed a previously undescribed pattern within the posteromedial cortices (the ensemble of precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, and retrosplenial region), an intriguing territory currently known for its involvement in the default mode of brain operation and in self-related/consciousness processes: emotions pertaining to social/psychological and physical situations engaged different networks aligned, respectively, with interoceptive and exteroceptive neural systems. Finally, within the anterior insula, activity correlated with AV and CSP peaked later and was more sustained than that associated with CPP. Our findings contribute insights on the functions of the posteromedial cortices and on the recruitment of the anterior insula in social emotions concerned with physical versus psychological pain.

  10. Mapping of neurokinin-like immunoreactivity in the human brainstem

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    Narvaez Jose

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we have studied the distribution of immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies containing neurokinin in the adult human brainstem with no prior history of neurological or psychiatric disease. Results Clusters of immunoreactive cell bodies and high densities of neurokinin-immunoreactive fibers were located in the periaqueductal gray, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and in the reticular formation of the medulla, pons and mesencephalon. Moreover, immunoreactive cell bodies were found in the inferior colliculus, the raphe obscurus, the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, and in the midline of the anterior medulla oblongata. In general, immunoreactive fibers containing neurokinin were observed throughout the whole brainstem. In addition to the nuclei mentioned above, the highest densities of such immunoreactive fibers were located in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, the lateral reticular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the superior colliculus, the substantia nigra, the nucleus ambiguus, the gracile nucleus, the cuneate nucleus, the motor hypoglossal nucleus, the medial and superior vestibular nuclei, the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi and the interpeduncular nucleus. Conclusion The widespread distribution of immunoreactive structures containing neurokinin in the human brainstem indicates that neurokinin might be involved in several physiological mechanisms, acting as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator.

  11. Intermediate filament immunohistochemistry of astroglial cells in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Franceschini, Valeria

    2005-11-01

    The distribution of intermediate filament molecular markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, has been studied in the central nervous system (CNS) of the adult leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius. This immunohistochemical study points out the presence of different astroglial cell types. The main pattern is constituted by ependymal radial glia, which have their cell bodies located in the ependymal layer throughout the brain ventricular system. Radial glia proper or radial astrocytes show their cell bodies displaced from the ependymal layer into a periependymal zone and are observed only in the spinal cord. Star-shaped astrocytes are scarce. They are detected in the ventral and lateral regions of the diencephalon and mesencephalon, in the superficial layer of the optic tectum, in the ventral medulla oblongata, and in the ventral and lateral spinal cord. In the different regions of the CNS, the staining intensity appears not to be identical even in the same cellular type. The results reported in the present study show an heterogeneous feature of the astroglial pattern in E. macularius.

  12. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis.

  13. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis

  14. Musical hallucination associated with hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T G Sanchez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that musical hallucination have a significant impact on patients' lives, they have received very little attention of experts. Some researchers agree on a combination of peripheral and central dysfunctions as the mechanism that causes hallucination. The most accepted physiopathology of musical hallucination associated to hearing loss (caused by cochlear lesion, cochlear nerve lesion or by interruption of mesencephalon or pontine auditory information is the disinhibition of auditory memory circuits due to sensory deprivation. Concerning the cortical area involved in musical hallucination, there is evidence that the excitatory mechanism of the superior temporal gyrus, as in epilepsies, is responsible for musical hallucination. In musical release hallucination there is also activation of the auditory association cortex. Finally, considering the laterality, functional studies with musical perception and imagery in normal individuals showed that songs with words cause bilateral temporal activation and melodies activate only the right lobe. The effect of hearing aids on the improvement of musical hallucination as a result of the hearing loss improvement is well documented. It happens because auditory hallucination may be influenced by the external acoustical environment. Neuroleptics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used in the treatment of musical hallucination. Cases of improvement with the administration of carbamazepine, meclobemide and donepezil were reported, but the results obtained were not consistent.

  15. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale; Black, Ira B.

    2006-01-01

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFRα1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  16. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Ramos-Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural stem cells (hNSCs derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson′s disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time after in vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cells in vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, proliferation, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulfing dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time.

  17. Nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in intramural hematoma of the basilar artery - a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.; Nakov, V.; Hristov, H.

    2012-01-01

    Pretruncal (perimesencephalic) nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a benign variant of SAH. Although angiography fails to show a source of the hemorrhage, mild basilar artery narrowing may be observed. The cause of pretruncal nonaneurysmal SAH has not been established. Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that the center of this type of SAH is not around the mesencephalon but is in the prepontine or interpeduncular cistern with the hemorrhage closely associated with the basilar artery. We review the possible sources of hemorrhage in these cisterns and hypothesize that pretruncal nonaneurysmal SAH is caused by a primary intramural hematoma of the basilar artery. Such an intramural hematoma would explain bleeding under low pressure, the location of the hemorrhage anterior to the brainstem, and the typical findings of hemorrhage adjacent to the basilar artery lumen on magnetic resonance imaging and mild basilar artery narrowing on angiography. Hemorrhage in such location is easily found in native computed tomography (CT) images. Crescent, hyperdense thickening of the basilar artery wall is also observed. We have presented this unusual case to highlight the possible mechanism of hematoma formation and underline the importance of MDCT examination in the diagnosis confirmation and also excluding other potentially serious underlying condition that could also lead to non traumatic SAH. (authors)

  18. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  19. EFFECTS OF REVERSIBLE INACTIVATION OF BILATERAL ACCUMBENS NUCLEI ON MEMORY STORAGE: ANIMAL STUDY IN RAT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A ALAEI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Memory and learning play an important role in human"s life that will become problematic in case disability is weak for any reason. There are many factors that facilitate process of mamory and learning of which accumbens nucleus plays an important role. Accumbens nucleus, which is a part of the limbic system, is one of many nuclei found of the septum in the mesencephalon. This study was performed to determine the effects of reversible Inactivation of a accumbens nuclei by lidocaein on memory storage in rat. Method s. Male wistar rats were surgically implancted with cannulae at the accumbens nuclei (Acb bilaterally one weak later they recived one trial PAL (1 mA 1.S sec and exactly at times zero, 60 and 120 minutes after posttraining, lidocaine was infused into the Acb. Retention was tested two days after training. Latency period before entering into the dark part of the shuttle box and duration of time in darkness were index for evaluation of retention. Results. A significant impaired retention performance was at zero and 60 minutes after posttrianing infusion of lidocaine into the Acb. Infusion administered 120 minutes after training had no effect. Discussion. This study has shown that Accumbens nucleus plays major role in praimary learning and memory and it is probable that by blocking this nucleus dopamine release is diminished which causes the learning process to be delayed consequently.

  20. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  1. Susceptibility-weighted imaging of the venous networks around the brain stem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Ming; Lin, Zhong-Xiao; Zhang, Nu [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Zhang, Xiao-Fen; Qiao, Hui-Huang; Chen, Cheng-Chun [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Human Anatomy, Wenzhou (China); Ren, Chuan-Gen; Li, Jian-Ce [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, The 1nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China)

    2014-10-18

    The venous network of the brainstem is complex and significant. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a practical technique which is sensitive to veins, especially tiny veins. Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the visualization of the venous network of brainstem by using SWI at 3.0 T. The occurrence rate of each superficial veins of brainstem was evaluated by using SWI on a 3 T MR imaging system in 60 volunteers. The diameter of the lateral mesencephalic vein and peduncular vein were measured by SWI using the reconstructed mIP images in the sagittal view. And the outflow of the veins of brainstem were studied and described according to the reconstructed images. The median anterior pontomesencephalic vein, median anterior medullary vein, peduncular vein, right vein of the pontomesencephalic sulcus, and right lateral anterior pontomesencephalic vein were detected in all the subjects (100 %). The outer diameter of peduncular vein was 1.38 ± 0.26 mm (range 0.8-1.8 mm). The lateral mesencephalic vein was found in 75 % of the subjects and the mean outer diameter was 0.81 ± 0.2 mm (range 0.5-1.2 mm). The inner veins of mesencephalon were found by using SWI. The venous networks around the brain stem can be visualized by SWI clearly. This result can not only provide data for anatomical study, but also may be available for the surgical planning in the infratentorial region. (orig.)

  2. Traumatic brain injury and disturbed sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a frequent condition worldwide, and sleep-wake disturbances often complicate the course after the injuring event. Current evidence suggests that the most common sleep-wake disturbances following traumatic brain injury include excessive daytime sleepiness and posttraumatic hypersomnia, that is, increased sleep need per 24 h. The neuromolecular basis of posttraumatic sleep pressure enhancement is not entirely clear. First neuropathological and clinical studies suggest that impaired hypocretin (orexin) signalling might contribute to sleepiness, but direct or indirect traumatic injury also to other sleep-wake modulating systems in the brainstem and the mesencephalon is likely. Posttraumatic insomnia may be less common than posttraumatic sleepiness, but studies on its frequency revealed conflicting results. Furthermore, insomnia is often associated with psychiatric comorbidities, and some patients with posttraumatic disruption of their circadian rhythm may be misdiagnosed as insomnia patients. The pathophysiology of posttraumatic circadian sleep disorders remains elusive; however, there is some evidence that reduced evening melatonin production due to traumatic brain damage may cause disruption of circadian regulation of sleep and wakefulness.

  3. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain

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    Niurka Trujillo-Paredes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs, but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+. These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons.

  4. Region-specific expression of mitochondrial complex I genes during murine brain development.

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    Stefanie Wirtz

    Full Text Available Mutations in the nuclear encoded subunits of mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase may cause circumscribed cerebral lesions ranging from degeneration of the striatal and brainstem gray matter (Leigh syndrome to leukodystrophy. We hypothesized that such pattern of regional pathology might be due to local differences in the dependence on complex I function. Using in situ hybridization we investigated the relative expression of 33 nuclear encoded complex I subunits in different brain regions of the mouse at E11.5, E17.5, P1, P11, P28 and adult (12 weeks. With respect to timing and relative intensity of complex I gene expression we found a highly variant pattern in different regions during development. High average expression levels were detected in periods of intense neurogenesis. In cerebellar Purkinje and in hippocampal CA1/CA3 pyramidal neurons we found a second even higher peak during the period of synaptogenesis and maturation. The extraordinary dependence of these structures on complex I gene expression during synaptogenesis is in accord with our recent findings that gamma oscillations--known to be associated with higher cognitive functions of the mammalian brain--strongly depend on the complex I activity. However, with the exception of the mesencephalon, we detected only average complex I expression levels in the striatum and basal ganglia, which does not explain the exquisite vulnerability of these structures in mitochondrial disorders.

  5. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 1. Anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins.

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    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Parthasarathi, Venkatraman; Aydin, Emre; Al Schameri, Rahman A; Roth, Peter; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    We reviewed the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins aiming to elucidate aspects related to the cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae. Data from relevant articles on the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins were identified using one electronic database, supplemented by data from selected reference texts. Persisting fetal pial-arachnoidal veins correspond to the adult bridging veins. Relevant embryologic descriptions are based on the classic scheme of five divisions of the brain (telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, metencephalon, myelencephalon). Variation in their exact position and the number of bridging veins is the rule and certain locations, particularly that of the anterior cranial fossa and lower posterior cranial fossa are often neglected in prior descriptions. The distal segment of a bridging vein is part of the dural system and can be primarily involved in cranial dural arteriovenous lesions by constituting the actual site of the shunt. The veins in the lamina cribriformis exhibit a bridging-emissary vein pattern similar to the spinal configuration. The emissary veins connect the dural venous system with the extracranial venous system and are often involved in dural arteriovenous lesions. Cranial dural shunts may develop in three distinct areas of the cranial venous system: the dural sinuses and their interfaces with bridging veins and emissary veins. The exact site of the lesion may dictate the arterial feeders and original venous drainage pattern.

  6. Clinical and pathological aspects of chronic Senecio spp. poisoning in sheep

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    Paula R. Giaretta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an outbreak of chronic Senecio spp. poisoning in grazing sheep in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, causing the death of 10 out of 860 adult sheep. Eight sick ewes were euthanized and necropsied. Cattle from this farm were also affected. Clinical signs included progressive weight loss, apathy and photosensitization. Four out of seven tested sheep had increased gamma-glutamyl transferase serum activity and two of them presented serum elevation of alkaline phosphatase. At necropsy, three out of eight ewes presented slightly irregular toughened livers with multifocal nodules, two out of eight ewes had a whitish liver with thickened fibrotic Glisson's capsule partially adhered to the diaphragm, and three out of eight ewes had smooth and grossly normal livers. Necropsy findings attributed to liver failure included hydropericardium (7/8, ascites (5/8, icterus (2/8, hydrothorax (1/8, and edema of mesentery (1/8. The main hepatic histological findings that allowed the establishment of the diagnosis were megalocytosis, proliferation of bile ducts and fibrosis. Spongy degeneration was observed in the brains of all eight necropsied sheep and was more severe at the cerebellar peduncles, mesencephalon, thalamus, and pons. These are suggested as the portions of election to investigate microscopic lesions of hepatic encephalopathy in sheep with chronic seneciosis. The diagnosis of Senecio spp. poisoning was based on epidemiology, clinical signs, laboratory data, necropsy and histological findings.

  7. Clathrin-Dependent Uptake of Paraquat into SH-SY5Y Cells and Its Internalization into Different Subcellular Compartments.

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    Li, Fengrui; Tian, Xiaofei; Zhan, Xiaoni; Wang, Baojie; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao

    2017-08-01

    The herbicide paraquat (PQ) is an exogenous toxin that allows the selective activation of dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalon to induce injury and also causes its apoptosis in vitro. However, uptake mechanisms between PQ and neurons remain elusive. To address this issue, we undertook a study of PQ endocytosis in a dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line as well as explored the subsequent subcellular location and potential functional analysis of PQ. The PQ was found to bind the SH-SY5Y cell membrane and then became internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway. PQ was internalized by many subcellular organelles in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the taken up PQ and secretogranin III (SCG3), which became dysregulated with PQ treatment that induced SH-SY5Y apoptosis in our previous study, colocalized in cytoplasmic vesicles. Taken together, our findings indicate that PQ is endocytosed by SH-SY5Y cells and that its multiple, subcellular localizations indicate PQ may potentially be involved in subcellular-level functions. More importantly, PQ distributing preferentially into SCG3-positive vesicles demonstrates its selective targeting which may affect SCG3 and cargoes carried by SCG3-positive vesicles. Therefore, it is reasonable to infer that PQ toxic insults may potentially interfere with neurotransmitter storage and transport associated with secretory granules.

  8. Potential sources of stem cells as a regenerative therapy for Parkinson's disease

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    Abir Oueida El-Sadik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abir Oueida El-SadikDepartment of Anatomy and Embryology, Scientific Research Unit, Female Health Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Stem cells are believed to hold enormous promise as potential replacement therapy in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. Stem cells were investigated to be the alternative therapeutic source capable of differentiating into dopamine (DA neurons. Multiple important signaling factors were recorded for the induction of DA neuronal traits from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs such as fibroblast growth factor 8, sonic hedgehog, and Wnt 1. Recent protocols were described for the differentiation of human ESCs into DA neurons, achieving high efficiency of DA neuronal derivation. Despite that, the use of human ESCs is still ethically controversial. The transcription factors necessary for DA neuron development from adult neural stem cells (NSCs, such as Pitx3, Nurr1, En-1, En-2, Lmx1a, Lmx1b, Msx1, and Ngn2, were investigated. In addition to replacement of lost DA neurons, adult NSCs were recorded to provide neuroprotective and neurogenic factors for the mesencephalon. In addition, induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells represent reliable stem cell sources of DA neurons. Future studies are recommended to provide further insight into the regenerative capacity of stem cells needed for the treatment of PD.Keywords: dopamine, embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, Parkinson's disease, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells

  9. Neuromorphic PEDOT/Au assemblies as thin-film neural interface materials.

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    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Chudy, Magdalena; Vallejo-Giraldo, Catalina; Skorupa, Malgorzata; Wieclawska, Daria; Turczyn, Roman; Biggs, Manus

    2018-04-10

    Electrically conducting polymer formulations have emerged as promising approaches for the development of interfaces and scaffolds in neural engineering, facilitating the development of physicochemically modified constructs capable of cell stimulation through electrical and ionic charge transfer. In particular, topographically functionalized or neuromorphic materials are able to guide the growth of axons and promote enhanced interfacing with neuroelectrodes in vitro. In this study, we present a novel method for the formation of conducting polymer/gold assemblies via a combinational sputter and spin coating technique. The resulting multilayered PEDOT/Au substrates possessed enhanced electrochemical properties as a function of the number of deposited organic/inorganic layers. It was observed that through subsequent electrochemical conditioning it was possible to form neuromorphic fractal-like assemblies of gold particles, which significantly impacted on the electrochemical characteristics of the PEDOT/Au films. PEDOT/Au assemblies were observed to possess unique topographical features, advantageous charge storage capacity (34.9 ± 2.6 mC/cm2) and low electrical impedance (30 ± 2 Ω at 1 kHz). Furthermore, PEDOT/Au assemblies were observed to facilitate the outgrowth of neurites in a mixed ventral mesencephalon cell population and promotean increase in the neurons/astrocytes ratio relative to all experimental groups, indicating PEDOT/Au biomimetic neuromorphic assemblies as promising materials in engineering electrically conductive neural interface systems. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Estrogen-2-hydroxylase in the brain of the male African catfish, Clarias gariepinus

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    Timmers, R.J.; Granneman, J.C.; Lambert, J.G.; van Oordt, P.G.

    1988-11-01

    Estrogen-2-hydroxylase activity, involved in the biosynthesis of catecholestrogens, was localized in the brain of the male African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, by means of a radiometric assay using (2-TH)estradiol as substrate. Fore- and midbrain were divided in 18, 500-microns thick, transverse sections from which small defined areas were punched out and assayed. The estrogen-2-hydroxylase activity was calculated from the release of tritium during hydroxylation, and expressed in femtomole catecholestradiol.milligram-1 tissue.hour-1. The enzyme could be demonstrated throughout the brain. A high activity (greater than 350 fmol) was observed in the telencephalon, in particularly the rostral part and the area ventralis pars dorsalis; in the diencephalon in the preoptic region, including the magnocellular part of the preoptic nucleus and the rostral part of the anterior periventricular nucleus; and in the area tuberalis, including the nucleus lateralis tuberis, the rostral part of the nucleus anterior tuberis, the caudal part of the nucleus posterior periventricularis, and in the nucleus recessus posterioris. Also a high activity was detected in the mesencephalic tectum opticum and the dorsolateral part of the torus semicircularis. The ventral mesencephalon showed a moderate (200-350 fmol) to low (less than 200 fmol) activity, whereas the lowest activity was found in the hindbrain (118 fmol). The significance of the biosynthesis of catecholestrogens in the brain is discussed in light of the negative feedback mechanism of gonadal steroids on gonadotropin release.

  11. Polioencefalomalacia experimental induzida por amprólio em ovinos Experimentally amprolium-induced polioencephalomalacia in sheep

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    Fabiano J.F. de Sant'Ana

    2009-09-01

    . All sheep died or were euthanized in extremis after illness of 3-7 days. Clinical signs included depression, incoordination, midriasis, grinding of the teeth, blindness, and laying down with opisthotonus and paddling movements. Drooling and a sawhorse stance were observed in one sheep and myoclonus in another one. Main gross lesions were restricted to the central nervous system and included swelling of the brain with flattening of telencephalic gyri, and hemorrhages in the parietal and occipital lobes of the telencephalon, in the submeningeal areas of the spinal cord and in the mesencephalon. Histologically, there was segmental laminar neuronal necrosis (red neurons associated with edema, swelling of endothelial cells, hemorrhages and infiltration by foamy macrophages (gitter cells. These changes were more marked in the frontal, parietal and occipital telecephalic lobes and there was sharp demarcation between the lesions and the adjacent normal neuropile. Additionally, similar, but less marked lesions were seen in the mesencephalon, thalamus and hippocampus. Considering the consistent reproducible aspects of polioencephalomalacia in sheep using amprolium, this may be an useful model for the study of the disease.

  12. Distribution of histaminergic neuronal cluster in the rat and mouse hypothalamus.

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    Moriwaki, Chinatsu; Chiba, Seiichi; Wei, Huixing; Aosa, Taishi; Kitamura, Hirokazu; Ina, Keisuke; Shibata, Hirotaka; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) catalyzes the biosynthesis of histamine from L-histidine and is expressed throughout the mammalian nervous system by histaminergic neurons. Histaminergic neurons arise in the posterior mesencephalon during the early embryonic period and gradually develop into two histaminergic substreams around the lateral area of the posterior hypothalamus and the more anterior peri-cerebral aqueduct area before finally forming an adult-like pattern comprising five neuronal clusters, E1, E2, E3, E4, and E5, at the postnatal stage. This distribution of histaminergic neuronal clusters in the rat hypothalamus appears to be a consequence of neuronal development and reflects the functional differentiation within each neuronal cluster. However, the close linkage between the locations of histaminergic neuronal clusters and their physiological functions has yet to be fully elucidated because of the sparse information regarding the location and orientation of each histaminergic neuronal clusters in the hypothalamus of rats and mice. To clarify the distribution of the five-histaminergic neuronal clusters more clearly, we performed an immunohistochemical study using the anti-HDC antibody on serial sections of the rat hypothalamus according to the brain maps of rat and mouse. Our results confirmed that the HDC-immunoreactive (HDCi) neuronal clusters in the hypothalamus of rats and mice are observed in the ventrolateral part of the most posterior hypothalamus (E1), ventrolateral part of the posterior hypothalamus (E2), ventromedial part from the medial to the posterior hypothalamus (E3), periventricular part from the anterior to the medial hypothalamus (E4), and diffusely extended part of the more dorsal and almost entire hypothalamus (E5). The stereological estimation of the total number of HDCi neurons of each clusters revealed the larger amount of the rat than the mouse. The characterization of histaminergic neuronal clusters in the hypothalamus of rats and

  13. Motor cortex stimulation in neuropathic pain. Correlations between analgesic effect and hemodynamic changes in the brain. A PET study.

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    Peyron, Roland; Faillenot, Isabelle; Mertens, Patrick; Laurent, Bernard; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2007-01-01

    To investigate brain mechanisms whereby electrical stimulation of the motor cortex (MCS) may induce pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes were studied using H2O PET in 19 consecutive patients treated with MCS for refractory neuropathic pain. Patients were studied in three conditions, (a) before MCS (Baseline, stimulator stopped 4 weeks before), (b) during a 35-min period of MCS and (c) during a 75-min period after MCS had been discontinued (OFF). Compared to Baseline, turning on the stimulator was associated with CBF increase in the contralateral (anterior) midcingulate cortex (aMCC, BA24 and 32) and in the dorso-lateral prefrontal (BA10) cortices. The most important changes of CBF were observed in the 75 min after discontinuation of MCS (OFF). This post-stimulation period was associated with CBF increases in a large set of cortical and subcortical regions (from posterior MCC (pMCC) to pregenual (pg) ACC, orbitofrontal cortex, putamen, thalami, posterior cingulate and prefrontal areas) and in the brainstem (mesencephalon/periaqueductal grey (PAG) and pons). CBF changes in the post-stimulation period correlated with pain relief. Functional connectivity analysis showed significant correlation between pgACC and PAG, basal ganglia, and lower pons activities, supporting the activation of descending ACC-to-PAG connections. MCS may act in part through descending (top-down) inhibitory controls that involve prefrontal, orbitofrontal and ACC as well as basal ganglia, thalamus and brainstem. These hemodynamic changes are lengthened and might therefore underlie the long-lasting clinical effects that largely outlast the actual stimulation periods.

  14. Retinal projections to the subcortical visual system in congenic albino and pigmented rats

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    Fleming, Mark D.; Benca, Ruth M.; Behan, Mary

    2007-01-01

    The primary visual pathway in albino mammals is characterized by an increased decussation of retinal ganglion cell axons at the optic chiasm and an enhanced contralateral projection to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. In contrast to the primary visual pathway, little is known about the organization of retinal input to most nuclei of the subcortical visual system in albino mammals. The subcortical visual system is a large group of retinorecipient nuclei in the diencephalon and mesencephalon. These areas mediate a range of behaviors that include both circadian and acute responses to light. We used a congenic strain of albino and pigmented rats with a mutation at the c locus for albinism (Fischer 344-c/+; La Vail and Lawson, 1986) to quantitatively assess the effects of albinism on retinal projections to a number of subcortical visual nuclei including the ventral lateral hypothalamus (VLH), ventral lateral preoptic area (VLPO), olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), posterior limitans (PLi), commissural pretectal area (CPA), intergeniculate leaflet (IGL), ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (vLGN) and superior colliculus (SC). Following eye injections of the neuroanatomical tracer cholera toxin-β, the distribution of anterogradely transported label was measured. The retinal projection to the contralateral VLH, PLi, CPA and IGL was enhanced in albino rats. No significant differences were found between albino and pigmented rats in retinal input to the VLPO, OPN and vLGN. These findings raise the possibility that enhanced retinofugal projections to subcortical visual nuclei in albinos may underlie some light-mediated behaviors that differ between albino and pigmented mammals. PMID:16996223

  15. Putative Adult Neurogenesis in Old World Parrots: The Congo African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus and Timneh Grey Parrot (Psittacus timneh

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    Pedzisai Mazengenya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we examined for the first time, the potential for adult neurogenesis throughout the brain of the Congo African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus and Timneh grey parrot (Psittacus timneh using immunohistochemistry for the endogenous markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, which labels proliferating cells, and doublecortin (DCX, which stains immature and migrating neurons. A similar distribution of PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was found throughout the brain of the Congo African grey and Timneh grey parrots, but minor differences were also observed. In both species of parrots, PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was observed in the olfactory bulbs, subventricular zone of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, telencephalic subdivisions of the pallium and subpallium, diencephalon, mesencephalon and the rhombencephalon. The olfactory bulb and telencephalic subdivisions exhibited a higher density of both PCNA and DCX immunoreactive cells than any other brain region. DCX immunoreactive staining was stronger in the telencephalon than in the subtelencephalic structures. There was evidence of proliferative hot spots in the dorsal and ventral poles of the lateral ventricle in the Congo African grey parrots at rostral levels, whereas only the dorsal accumulation of proliferating cells was observed in the Timneh grey parrot. In most pallial regions the density of PCNA and DCX stained cells increased from rostral to caudal levels with the densest staining in the nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL. The widespread distribution of PCNA and DCX in the brains of both parrot species suggest the importance of adult neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity during learning and adaptation to external environmental variations.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of a Case of Central Neurocytoma.

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    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Ramadani, Naser; Mucaj, Sefedin; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the MRI features of central neurocytoma. A 45 year old man with 3 months of worsening daily headaches. These headaches were diffuse, lasted for several hours, and mostly occurred in the morning. She was initially diagnosed and treated for migraines but later he had epileptic attack and diplopia and neurolog recomaded MRI. precontrast MRI; TSE/T2Wsequence in axial/coronal planes; 3D-Hi-resolution T1W sagittal; FLAIR/T2W axial; FLAIR/T2W and Flash/T2W oblique coronal plane (perpendicular to temporal lobes) GRE/T2W axial plane for detection of heme products. Post-contrast TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Diffusion weighted and ADC mapping MRI images for EPI sequence in axial plane. A 23x12mm heterogeneous mass within aqueductus cerebri, with calcified and hemorrhagic foci and extending downwards till fourth ventricle. It's originating from the right paramedian posterior aqueductal wall (tectum), and also extending to and involving the tegmentum of mesencephalon at its right paramedian aspect. CSF flow obstruction secondary to described aqueductal mass, with resultant triventricular hydrocephalus). Marked transependymal CSF leak can be noted at periventricular white matter, secondary to severe hydrocephalus. After IV injection of contrast media, this mass shows mild-to-moderate heterogenous speckled enhancement. MRI is helpful in defining tumor extension, which is important in preoperative planning. Although IN is a relatively rare lesion, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular lesions in the presence of such typical MR findings. However, a definitive diagnosis requires immunochemical study and electron microscopy.

  17. Role of MRI in Diagnosis of Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muçaj, Sefedin; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Ramadani, Naser; Jerliu, Naim

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial dermoid cystic tumors account for <1% of all intracranial masses. A 52-year-old male, having headaches, nausea and is presented with a history of 2 episodes of new onset seizures. On presentation, the patient had a normal physical exam, including a complete neurological and cranial nerve exam. Precontrast MRI; TSE/T2Wsequence in axial/coronal planes; 3D - HI-resolution T1W sagittal; FLAIR/T2W axial; FLAIR/T2W, Flash/T2W oblique coronal plane, GRE/T2W axial. Post-contrast TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Diffusion weighted and ADC mapping, postcontrast: TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Subsequent MRI of the brain revealed an oval and lobulated 47x34x30mm (TRxAPxCC) non-enhancing T1-hyperintense mass in right cavernous sinus, with compression of surrounding mesial temporal lobe and right anterolateral aspect of mesencephalon. Findings are consistent with ruptured dermoid cyst, given the evacuated sebum content at its lower half. Sebum particles in millimetric sizes are seen within right Sylvian fissure, anterior horns of lateral ventricles and to a lesser extent within left Sylvian fissure, right parietal sulci, cerebral aqueduct, and basal cisterns. No restricted diffusion is seen, eliminating the possibility of epidermoid. A shunt catheter is evident traversing between right lateral ventricle and right parietal bone; besides, slit-like right lateral ventricle is noted (likely secondary to over-draining shunt catheter). Intracranial dermoid cysts are benign rare slow-growing tumors that upon rupture, however, widespread presence of T1 hyperintense droplets and leptomeningeal enhancement can be noted-making MRI the best imaging modality for diagnosis of this rare entity.

  18. Dentatorubrothalamic tract localization with postmortem MR diffusion tractography compared to histological 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollink, J; van Baarsen, K M; Dederen, P J W C; Foxley, S; Miller, K L; Jbabdi, S; Slump, C H; Grotenhuis, J A; Kleinnijenhuis, M; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography is a technique with great potential to characterize the in vivo anatomical position and integrity of white matter tracts. Tractography, however, remains an estimation of white matter tracts, and false-positive and false-negative rates are not available. The goal of the present study was to compare postmortem tractography of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) by its 3D histological reconstruction, to estimate the reliability of the tractography algorithm in this specific tract. Recent studies have shown that the cerebellum is involved in cognitive, language and emotional functions besides its role in motor control. However, the exact working mechanism of the cerebellum is still to be elucidated. As the DRTT is the main output tract it is of special interest for the neuroscience and clinical community. A postmortem human brain specimen was scanned on a 7T MRI scanner using a diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession sequence. Tractography was performed with PROBTRACKX. The specimen was subsequently serially sectioned and stained for myelin using a modified Heidenhain-Woelke staining. Image registration permitted the 3D reconstruction of the histological sections and comparison with MRI. The spatial concordance between the two modalities was evaluated using ROC analysis and a similarity index (SI). ROC curves showed a high sensitivity and specificity in general. Highest measures were observed in the superior cerebellar peduncle with an SI of 0.72. Less overlap was found in the decussation of the DRTT at the level of the mesencephalon. The study demonstrates high spatial accuracy of postmortem probabilistic tractography of the DRTT when compared to a 3D histological reconstruction. This gives hopeful prospect for studying structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders using tractography of the DRTT.

  19. Epigenetic activation of the Foxa2 gene is required for maintaining the potential of neural precursor cells to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons after expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, So-Young; Kwon, So Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Yi, Sang Ah; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Jang, Choon-Gon; You, Jueng Soo; Lee, Sang-Hun; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2015-02-15

    Dysregulation of forkhead box protein A2 (Foxa2) expression in fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM)-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) appears to be associated with the loss of their potential to differentiate into dopaminergic (DA) neurons after mitogenic expansion in vitro, hindering their efficient use as a transplantable cell source. Here, we report that epigenetic activation of Foxa2 in VM-derived NPCs by inducing histone hyperacetylation rescues the mitogenic-expansion-dependent decrease of differentiation potential to DA neurons. The silencing of Foxa2 gene expression after expansion is accompanied by repressive histone modifications, including hypoacetylation of histone H3 and H4 and trimethylation of H3K27 on the Foxa2 promoter, as well as on the global level. In addition, histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) is highly expressed during differentiation and recruited to the Foxa2 promoter. Induction of histone acetylation in VM-derived NPCs by either knockdown of HDAC7 or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor apicidin upregulates Foxa2 expression via hyperacetylation of H3 and a decrease in H3K27 trimethylation on the promoter regions, leading to the expression of DA neuron developmental genes and enhanced differentiation of DA neurons. These effects are antagonized by the expression of shRNAs specific for Foxa2 but enhanced by shRNA for HDAC7. Collectively, these findings indicate that loss of differentiation potential of expanded VM-derived NPCs is attributed to a decrease in Foxa2 expression and suggest that activation of the endogenous Foxa2 gene by epigenetic regulation might be an approach to enhance the generation of DA neurons.

  20. Variation in brain organization of coral reef fish larvae according to life history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecchini, David; Lecellier, Gael; Lanyon, Rynae Greta; Holles, Sophie; Poucet, Bruno; Duran, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    In coral reefs, one of the great mysteries of teleost fish ecology is how larvae locate the relatively rare patches of habitat to which they recruit. The recruitment of fish larvae to a reef, after a pelagic phase lasting between 10 and 120 days, depends strongly on larval ability to swim and detect predators, prey and suitable habitat via sensory cues. However, no information is available about the relationship between brain organization in fish larvae and their sensory and swimming abilities at recruitment. For the first time, we explore the structural diversity of brain organization (comparative sizes of brain subdivisions: telencephalon, mesencephalon, cerebellum, vagal lobe and inferior lobe) among larvae of 25 coral reef fish species. We then investigate links between variation in brain organization and life history traits (swimming ability, pelagic larval duration, social behavior, diel activity and cue use relying on sensory perception). After accounting for phylogeny with independent contrasts, we found that brain organization covaried with some life history traits: (1) fish larvae with good swimming ability (>20 cm/s), a long pelagic duration (>30 days), diurnal activity and strong use of cues relying on sensory perception for detection of recruitment habitat had a larger cerebellum than other species. (2) Fish larvae with a short pelagic duration (fish larvae exhibiting solitary behavior during their oceanic phase had larger inferior and vagal lobes. Overall, we hypothesize that a well-developed cerebellum may allow fish larvae to improve their chances of successful recruitment after a long pelagic phase in the ocean. Our study is the first one to bring together quantitative information on brain organization and the relative development of major brain subdivisions across coral reef fish larvae, and more specifically to address the way in which this variation correlates with the recruitment process.

  1. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular RN (pRN) located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular RN (mRN) in the mesencephalon. The RN integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract (RST). Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the RN. Surprisingly, RN neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the RN, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the RN. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined RST development and found that the RN neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of RN neurons but not for their specification and maintenance. PMID:25698939

  2. PINK1 is necessary for long term survival and mitochondrial function in human dopaminergic neurons.

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    Alison Wood-Kaczmar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a common age-related neurodegenerative disease and it is critical to develop models which recapitulate the pathogenic process including the effect of the ageing process. Although the pathogenesis of sporadic PD is unknown, the identification of the mendelian genetic factor PINK1 has provided new mechanistic insights. In order to investigate the role of PINK1 in Parkinson's disease, we studied PINK1 loss of function in human and primary mouse neurons. Using RNAi, we created stable PINK1 knockdown in human dopaminergic neurons differentiated from foetal ventral mesencephalon stem cells, as well as in an immortalised human neuroblastoma cell line. We sought to validate our findings in primary neurons derived from a transgenic PINK1 knockout mouse. For the first time we demonstrate an age dependent neurodegenerative phenotype in human and mouse neurons. PINK1 deficiency leads to reduced long-term viability in human neurons, which die via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Human neurons lacking PINK1 demonstrate features of marked oxidative stress with widespread mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial morphology. We report that PINK1 plays a neuroprotective role in the mitochondria of mammalian neurons, especially against stress such as staurosporine. In addition we provide evidence that cellular compensatory mechanisms such as mitochondrial biogenesis and upregulation of lysosomal degradation pathways occur in PINK1 deficiency. The phenotypic effects of PINK1 loss-of-function described here in mammalian neurons provides mechanistic insight into the age-related degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons seen in PD.

  3. Putative adult neurogenesis in two domestic pigeon breeds (Columba livia domestica: racing homer versus utility carneau pigeons

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    Pedzisai Mazengenya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of neurons in the brains of adult birds has been studied extensively in the telencephalon of song birds and few studies are reported on the distribution of PCNA and DCX in the telencephalon of adult non-song learning birds. We report here on adult neurogenesis throughout the brains of two breeds of adult domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica, the racing homer and utility carneau using endogenous immunohistochemical markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA for proliferating cells and doublecortin (DCX for immature and migrating neurons. The distribution of PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was very similar in both pigeon breeds with only a few minor differences. In both pigeons, PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was observed in the olfactory bulbs, walls of the lateral ventricle, telencephalic subdivisions of the pallium and subpallium, diencephalon, mesencephalon and cerebellum. Generally, the olfactory bulbs and telencephalon had more PCNA and DCX cells than other regions. Two proliferative hotspots were evident in the dorsal and ventral poles of the lateral ventricles. PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells migrated radially from the walls of the lateral ventricle into the parenchyma. In most telencephalic regions, the density of PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells increased from rostral to caudal, except in the mesopallium where the density decreased from rostral to middle levels and then increased caudally. DCX immunoreactivity was more intense in fibres than in cell bodies and DCX-immunoreactive cells included small granular cells, fusiform bipolar cells, large round and or polygonal multipolar cells. The similarity in the distribution of proliferating cells and new neurons in the telencephalon of the two breeds of pigeons may suggest that adult neurogenesis is a conserved trait as an ecological adaptation irrespective of body size.

  4. Putative adult neurogenesis in two domestic pigeon breeds (Columba livia domestica): racing homer versus utility carneau pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazengenya, Pedzisai; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Nkomozepi, Pilani; Manger, Paul R; Ihunwo, Amadi O

    2017-07-01

    Generation of neurons in the brains of adult birds has been studied extensively in the telencephalon of song birds and few studies are reported on the distribution of PCNA and DCX in the telencephalon of adult non-song learning birds. We report here on adult neurogenesis throughout the brains of two breeds of adult domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica), the racing homer and utility carneau using endogenous immunohistochemical markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) for proliferating cells and doublecortin (DCX) for immature and migrating neurons. The distribution of PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was very similar in both pigeon breeds with only a few minor differences. In both pigeons, PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was observed in the olfactory bulbs, walls of the lateral ventricle, telencephalic subdivisions of the pallium and subpallium, diencephalon, mesencephalon and cerebellum. Generally, the olfactory bulbs and telencephalon had more PCNA and DCX cells than other regions. Two proliferative hotspots were evident in the dorsal and ventral poles of the lateral ventricles. PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells migrated radially from the walls of the lateral ventricle into the parenchyma. In most telencephalic regions, the density of PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells increased from rostral to caudal, except in the mesopallium where the density decreased from rostral to middle levels and then increased caudally. DCX immunoreactivity was more intense in fibres than in cell bodies and DCX-immunoreactive cells included small granular cells, fusiform bipolar cells, large round and or polygonal multipolar cells. The similarity in the distribution of proliferating cells and new neurons in the telencephalon of the two breeds of pigeons may suggest that adult neurogenesis is a conserved trait as an ecological adaptation irrespective of body size.

  5. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in five Chihuahua dogs.

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    Higgins, R J; Dickinson, P J; Kube, S A; Moore, P F; Couto, S S; Vernau, K M; Sturges, B K; Lecouteur, R A

    2008-05-01

    An acute to chronic idiopathic necrotizing meningoencephalitis was diagnosed in 5 Chihuahua dogs aged between 1.5 and 10 years. Presenting neurologic signs included seizures, blindness, mentation changes, and postural deficits occurring from 5 days to 5.5 months prior to presentation. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses from 2 of 3 dogs sampled were consistent with an inflammatory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 2 dogs demonstrated multifocal loss or collapse of cortical gray/white matter demarcation hypointense on T1-weighted images, with T2-weighted hyperintensity and slight postcontrast enhancement. Multifocal asymmetrical areas of necrosis or collapse in both gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres was seen grossly in 4 brains. Microscopically in all dogs, there was a severe, asymmetrical, intensely cellular, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis usually with cystic necrosis in subcortical white matter. There were no lesions in the mesencephalon or metencephalon except in 1 dog. Immunophenotyping defined populations of CD3, CD11d, CD18, CD20, CD45, CD45 RA, and CD79a immunoreactive inflammatory cells varying in density and location but common to acute and chronic lesions. In fresh frozen lesions, both CD1b,c and CD11c immunoreactive dendritic antigen-presenting cells were also identified. Immunoreactivity for canine distemper viral (CDV) antigen was negative in all dogs. The clinical signs, distribution pattern, and histologic type of lesions bear close similarities to necrotizing meningoencephalitis as described in series of both Pug and Maltese breed dogs and less commonly in other breeds.

  6. Mesencephalic dopamine neurons become less sensitive to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity during development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danias, P; Nicklas, W J; Ofori, S; Shen, J; Mytilineou, C

    1989-10-01

    The in vitro development of monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity and [3H]dopamine (DA) uptake capacity of dissociated cell cultures from rat embryo mesencephalon were correlated with the potency of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+) neurotoxicity. Specific activities of both MAO-A and MAO-B increased during in vitro development of the cultures, with MAO-B activity increasing 20-fold between the first and fourth week. Similarly, [3H]DA accumulation increased 2.6-fold between the first and third week in vitro, when it reached a plateau. Unexpectedly, the toxicities of MPTP and MPP+ were substantially decreased in the older cultures. Exposure to MPTP reduced [3H]DA accumulation per culture by 77% in 1-week-old cultures and by 36% in 4-week-old cultures. Similarly, damage caused by MPPT was reduced from 84% of control in the first week to 34% of control in the fourth week. The attenuation of neurotoxicity was not due to an increase in storage of MPP+ in the synaptic vesicles of DA neurons, nor to a change in the distribution of MPP+ between dopaminergic and other cellular components of the cultures. The damage to DA neurons caused by the mitochondrial toxin, rotenone, also showed a similar reduction in the older cultures. These observations coupled with an increase in lactate formation and glucose consumption during the in vitro development of the cultures suggest a shift toward increased glycolysis and decreased dependence on aerobic metabolism. This would render the cells more resistant to the inhibition of mitochondrial function by MPP+.

  7. Ghrelin receptor in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica

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    Hiroyuki eKaiya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We identified cDNA encoding a functional growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, ghrelin receptor in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica. Deduced receptor protein for bullfrog and Japanese tree frog (tree frog was comprised of 374- and 371-amino acids, respectively. The two receptors showed 86% identity with each other, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two receptors belong to the same category with tetrapods. In functional analyses, ghrelin and GHS-R1a agonists increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HEK293 cell that transfected each receptor cDNA, but ligand selectivity of ghrelin with Ser3 and Thr3 was not observed between the two receptors. Bullfrog GHS-R1a mRNA was mainly expressed in the brain, stomach and testis. In the brain, the gene expression was detected in the diencephalon and mesencephalon, but not in the pituitary. Tree frog GHS-R1a mRNA was predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and ovary, but not detected in the pituitary. In bullfrog stomach, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased at 10 days after fasting, but not in the brain. In tree frog, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased in the brain, stomach and ventral skin by 10-days fasting, and in the stomach and ventral skin by a dehydration treatment. Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin in dehydrated tree frog did not affect water absorption from the ventral skin. These results suggest that ghrelin is involved in energy homeostasis and possibly in osmoregulation in frogs.

  8. Toxic effects of prolonged administration of leaves of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) to goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Blanco, Benito; Górniak, Silvana Lima

    2010-07-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major source of dietary energy for humans and domestic animals in many tropical countries. However, consumption of cassava is limited by its characteristic content of cyanogenic glycosides. The present work aimed to evaluate the toxic effects of ingestion of cassava leaves by goats for 30 consecutive days, and to compare the results with the toxic effects of cyanide in goats, which have been described previously. Eight Alpine cross-bred female goats were divided into two equal groups, and were treated with ground frozen cassava leaves at a target dose of 6.0mg hydrogen cyanide (HCN)/kg/day (treated animals), or with ground hay and water only (control group) by gavage for 30 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 7, 15, 21, and 30 for biochemical panel and cyanide determination. At the end of the experiment, fragments of pancreas, thyroid gland, liver, kidney, lungs, heart, spleen, and the whole central nervous system were collected for histopathological examination. Clinical signs were observed in all goats treated with cassava on the first day of the experiment. From the second day the dose of cassava leaves was reduced to 4.5mgHCN/kg/day. No changes were found in the blood chemical panel. A mild increase in the number of resorption vacuoles in the thyroid follicular colloid, slight vacuolation of periportal hepatocytes, and spongiosis of the mesencephalon were found in goats treated with cassava. The pattern of lesions seen in the present goats was similar to what has been described previously in cyanide-dosed goats. Thus, the toxic effects of the ingestion of cassava leaves by goats can be attributed to the action of cyanide released from cyanogenic glycosides, and none of the effects was promoted by these glycosides directly.

  9. Premitotic DNA synthesis in the brain of the adult frog (Rana esculenta L.): An autoradiographic 3H-thymidine study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernocchi, G.; Scherini, E.; Giacometti, S.; Mares, V.

    1990-01-01

    Replicative synthesis of DNA in the brain of the adult frog was studied by light microscope autoradiography. Animals collected during the active period (May-June) and in hibernation (January) were used. In active frogs, 3H-thymidine labelling occurred mainly in the ependymal cells which line the ventricles. The mean labelling index (LI%) was higher in the ependyma of the lateral and fourth ventricles than in the ependyma of the lateral diencephalon and tectal parts of the mesencephalon. In the recessus infundibularis and preopticus the number of labelled cells (LCs) was several times greater than in the lateral parts of the third ventricle. LCs were seen subependymally only occasionally. The incidence of LCs in the parenchyma of the brain was much lower in most regions than in the ventricular ependyma; LCs were mainly small and, from their nuclear morphology, they were glial cells. The LI% reached the highest value in the septum hippocampi and in the nucleus entopeduncularis. In these locations, LCs were larger and closer in size to the nerve cells of these regions. From comparison with data obtained earlier in the brain of mammals, it is evident that the distribution of proliferating cells in the olfactory and limbic system is phylogenetically conservative. The occurrence of pyknotic cells in the same areas which contain LCs, suggests that cell division reflects in part the process of cell renewal observed in mammals. However, proliferating cells could also be linked to the continuous growth observed in non-mammalian vertebrates. In hibernating frogs, LCs and pyknoses were not seen or were found occasionally, which further indicates the functional significance of both processes

  10. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism.

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    Kiyoshi Matsuo

    Full Text Available Eyelid opening stretches mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle to activate the proprioceptive fiber supplied by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. This proprioception induces reflex contractions of the slow-twitch fibers in the levator palpebrae superioris and frontalis muscles to sustain eyelid and eyebrow positions against gravity. The cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalon potentially make gap-junctional connections with the locus coeruleus neurons. The locus coeruleus is implicated in arousal and autonomic function. Due to the relationship between arousal, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and skin conductance, we assessed whether upgaze with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation activates sympathetically innervated sweat glands and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Specifically, we examined whether 60° upgaze induces palmar sweating and hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex in 16 subjects. Sweating was monitored using a thumb-mounted perspiration meter, and prefrontal cortex activity was measured with 45-channel, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and 2-channel NIRS at Fp1 and Fp2. In 16 subjects, palmar sweating was induced by upgaze and decreased in response to downgaze. Upgaze activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex with an accumulation of integrated concentration changes in deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin levels in 12 subjects. Upgaze phasically and degree-dependently increased deoxyhemoglobin level at Fp1 and Fp2, whereas downgaze phasically decreased it in 16 subjects. Unilateral anesthetization of mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle used to significantly reduce trigeminal proprioceptive evocation ipsilaterally impaired the increased deoxyhemoglobin level by 60° upgaze at Fp1 or Fp2 in 6 subjects. We concluded that upgaze with strong trigeminal proprioceptive evocation was sufficient to phasically activate sympathetically

  11. Cloning and expression of tachykinins and their association with kisspeptins in the brains of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Ramadasan, Priveena Nair; Goschorska, Maja; Anantharajah, Aveena; Ng, Kai We; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2012-09-01

    The tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides, including substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), and neurokinin B (NKB), that are encoded by the tac1 (SP and NKA) or tac2/3 (NKB) genes. Tachykinins are widely distributed in the central nervous system and have roles as neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators. Recent studies in mammals have demonstrated the coexpression of NKB and kisspeptin and their comodulatory roles over the control of reproduction. We have recently identified two kisspeptin-encoding genes, kiss1 and kiss2, in teleosts. However, such relationship between tachykinins and kisspeptins has not been demonstrated in non-mammalian species. To determine the involvement of tachykinins in the reproduction in teleosts, we identified tac1 and two tac2 (tac2a and tac2b) sequences in the zebrafish genome using in silico data mining. Zebrafish tac1 encodes SP and NKA, whereas the tac2 sequences encode NKB and an additional peptide homologous to NKB (NKB-related peptide). Digoxigenin in situ hybridization in the brain of zebrafish showed tac1 mRNA-containing cells in the olfactory bulb, telencephalon, preoptic region, hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and rhombencephalon. The zebrafish tac2a mRNA-containing cells were observed in the preoptic region, habenula, and hypothalamus, whereas the tac2b mRNA-containing cells were predominantly observed in the dorsal telencephalic area. Furthermore, we examined the coexpression of tachykinins and two kisspeptin genes in the brain of zebrafish. Dual fluorescent in situ hybridization showed no coexpression of tachykinins mRNA with kisspeptins mRNA in hypothalamic nuclei or the habenula. These results suggest the presence of independent pathways for kisspeptins and NKB neurons in the brain of zebrafish. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. New type of tachykinin binding site in the rat brain characterized by specific binding of a labeled eledoisin derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Viger, A.; Glowinski, J.

    1984-09-01

    A new ligand for investigating tachykinin-binding site subtypes was synthesized by coupling the /sup 125/I-Bolton and Hunter reagent to eledoisin (/sup 125/I-BHE). Using a synaptosomal preparation (P2 fraction) of rat cerebral cortex, /sup 125/I-BHE was shown to bind with apparent high affinity (apparent Kd . 15.3 nM). When concentrations of up to 30 nM /sup 125/I-BHE were used, /sup 125/I-BHE binding was specific, saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent. In contrast to (/sup 3/H)dopamine, /sup 125/I-BHE was not taken up within synaptosomes by an ouabain-sensitive process. Eledoisin, kassinin, and substance P were examined for their ability to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding to cortical synaptosomes. Eledoisin and kassinin were considerably more potent than substance P, in contrast to the order of potency observed for specific /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter substance P (/sup 125/I-BHSP) binding. Specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding was highest in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; intermediate in the hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus; low in the mesencephalon, septum, and substantia nigra; and absent in the cerebellum. Comparison of these data with those previously obtained for /sup 125/I-BHSP binding to synaptosomes indicated that /sup 125/I-BHE-labeled binding sites differ markedly from those of /sup 125/I-BHSP-labeled binding sites. Therefore, tachykinin receptors other than substance P receptors seem to be present in the central nervous system.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of delta opioid receptors within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system using radioiodinated (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin ( sup 125 I-DPDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilts, R.P.; Kalivas, P.W. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The enkephalin analog (2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine)enkephalin was radioiodinated (125I-DPDPE) and shown to retain a pharmacological selectivity characteristic of the delta opioid receptor in in vitro binding studies. The distributions of 125I-DPDPE binding, using in vitro autoradiographic techniques, were similar to those previously reported for the delta opioid receptor. The nucleus accumbens, striatum, and medial prefrontal cortex contain dense gradients of 125I-DPDPE binding in regions known to receive dopaminergic afferents emanating from the mesencephalic tegmentum. Selective chemical lesions of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra were employed to deduce the location of the 125I-DPDPE binding within particular regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Unilateral lesions of dopamine perikarya (A9 and A10) within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra produced by mesencephalic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine resulted in significant (20-30%) increases in 125I-DPDPE binding contralateral to the lesion within the striatum and nucleus accumbens. Lesions of the perikarya (dopaminergic and nondopaminergic) of the ventral tegmental area, induced by quinolinic acid injections, caused increases of less magnitude within these same nuclei. No significant alterations in 125I-DPDPE binding were observed within the mesencephalon as a result of either treatment. The specificity of the lesions was confirmed by immunocytochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase. These results suggest that the enkephalins and opioid agonists acting through delta opioid receptors do not directly modulate dopaminergic afferents but do regulate postsynaptic targets of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

  14. Mapping of tyrosine hydroxylase in the alpaca (Lama pacos) brainstem and colocalization with CGRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, P; Arroyo-Jimenez, M M; Lozano, G; Aguilar, L A; Coveñas, R

    2011-03-01

    The distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the brainstem of alpaca (Lama pacos) has been analysed using immunohistochemical methods. The following catecholaminergic cell nuclei have been detected: A1, C1, A2, C2 and area postrema in the medulla oblongata; A5, A6d, A7sc and A7d in the pons; as have several mesencephalic groups: A8, A9l, A9m, A9v, A9pc, A10, A10c, A10d and A10dc. This nuclear parcellation differs from that found in rodents, but agrees with the results reported in other members of the Artiodactyla order, such as giraffe or pig, and with the catecholaminergic distribution detected in species of other mammalian orders. Thus, these findings support the hypothesis that the animals included in the same order show the same nuclear complement in the neuromodulatory systems. In addition, it seems that other species share the same catecholaminergic groups as the alpaca, suggesting that a specific nuclear disposition was important and worth maintaining throughout evolution. Moreover, the distribution of TH has been compared with that of CGRP by double immunohistochemistry. Double-labelled neurons were very isolated and observed only in a few catecholaminergic groups: A1 and C2 in the medulla oblongata, A6d, A7sc and A7d in the pons, and A9l in the mesencephalon. However, interaction between TH and CGRP may be possible in more brainstem regions, particularly the area postrema. This interaction may prove important in the regulation of the specific cardiovascular control of alpacas given their morphological characteristics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence for brainstem network disruption in temporal lobe epilepsy and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy

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    Susanne G. Mueller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The symptoms witnessed in unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP suggest a breakdown of central autonomic control. Since the brainstem plays a crucial role in autonomic control, the objectives of this study were 1. To investigate if temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is associated with brainstem atrophy and to characterize it using graph Analysis 2. To compare the findings with those in two probable TLESUDEP. T1 images were obtained from 17 controls, 30 TLE (16 with mesial-temporal-sclerosis (TLE-MTS and 14 without (TLE-no and from 2 patients who died of SUDEP. The brainstem was extracted, warped onto a brainstem atlas and Jacobian determinants maps (JDM calculated. SPM8 was used to compare the JDMs at the group level, z-score maps were calculated for single subject analysis. Brainstem regions encompassing autonomic structures were identified based on macroscopic landmarks and mean z-scores from 5 × 5 × 5 voxel cubes extracted to calculate a new measure called atrophy-similarity index (ASI for graph analysis. TLE-MTS had volume loss in the dorsal mesencephalon. The SUDEP cases had severe and more extensive volume loss in the same region. Nodal degrees and participation coefficients were decreased and local efficiency increased in SUDEP compared to controls. TLE is associated with volume loss in brainstem regions involved in autonomic control. Structural damage in these regions might increase the risk for a fatal dysregulation during situations with increased demand such as following severe seizures.

  16. Postotic and preotic cranial neural crest cells differently contribute to thyroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kazuhiro; Asai, Rieko; Maruyama, Kazuaki; Kurihara, Yukiko; Nakanishi, Toshio; Kurihara, Hiroki; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid development and formation vary among species, but in most species the thyroid morphogenesis consists of five stages: specification, budding, descent, bilobation and folliculogenesis. The detailed mechanisms of these stages have not been fully clarified. During early development, the cranial neural crest (CNC) contributes to the thyroid gland. The removal of the postotic CNC (corresponding to rhombomeres 6, 7 and 8, also known as the cardiac neural crest) results in abnormalities of the cardiovascular system, thymus, parathyroid glands, and thyroid gland. To investigate the influence of the CNC on thyroid bilobation process, we divided the CNC into two regions, the postotic CNC and the preotic CNC (from the mesencephalon to rhombomere 5) regions and examined. We found that preotic CNC-ablated embryos had a unilateral thyroid lobe, and confirmed the presence of a single lobe or the absence of lobes in postotic CNC-ablated chick embryos. The thyroid anlage in each region-ablated embryos was of a normal size at the descent stage, but at a later stage, the thyroid in preotic CNC-ablated embryos was of a normal size, conflicting with a previous report in which the thyroid was reduced in size in the postotic CNC-ablated embryos. The postotic CNC cells differentiated into connective tissues of the thyroid in quail-to-chick chimeras. In contrast, the preotic CNC cells did not differentiate into connective tissues of the thyroid. We found that preotic CNC cells encompassed the thyroid anlage from the specification stage to the descent stage. Finally, we found that endothelin-1 and endothelin type A receptor-knockout mice and bosentan (endothelin receptor antagonist)-treated chick embryos showed bilobation anomalies that included single-lobe formation. Therefore, not only the postotic CNC, but also the preotic CNC plays an important role in thyroid morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Siblings from Families with Two or More Children with Learning or Intellectual Disabilities and Need for Full-Time Special Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannerkoski, M.; Heiskala, H.; Aaberg, L. (Child Neurology, HUCH Dept. of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Helsinki (Finland)); Raininko, R. (Dept. of Radiology, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)); Sarna, S. (Dept. of Public Health, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)); Wirtavuori, K. (HUCH Dept. of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Helsinki (Finland)); Autti, T. (HUCH Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-05-15

    Background: Several factors are involved in determining a child's need for special education (Sweden). Thus, the value of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for subjects with learning and intellectual disabilities is uncertain. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of MRI in the diagnostic process of siblings with learning and intellectual disabilities and need for full-time SE. Material and Methods: Altogether, 119 siblings (mean age 11.9 years) from families in which two or more children attended/had previously attended full-time SE underwent prospective brain MRI. SE grouping included three levels, from specific learning disabilities (level 1) to global intellectual disabilities (level 3). Forty-three controls (level 0, mean age 12.0 years) attended mainstream education groups. Signal intensity and structural abnormalities were analyzed, and areas of the cerebrum, posterior fossa, corpus callosum, vermis and brain stem, and diameters of the corpus callosum were measured. In analyses, all area measurements were calculated in proportion to the total inner skull area. Results: Abnormal finding in MRI was more common for siblings (n=62; 52%) in SE (58% for level 3; 49% for level 2; 35% for level 1) than for controls (n=13; 16%). The siblings showed enlarged supra- (P<0.001) and infratentorial (P=0.015) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and mild corpus callosum abnormalities (P=0.003) compared to controls. Siblings in SE had smaller inner skull area than controls (P<0.001). Further, the relative area of the mesencephalon (P=0.027) and the diameter of the body of the corpus callosum (P=0.015) were significantly smaller than in controls. In binary logistic regression analysis, enlarged supratentorial CSF spaces increased the probability of SE (odds ratio 4.2; P=0.023). Conclusion: Subjects with learning and intellectual disabilities commonly have more MRI findings than controls. Enlarged supratentorial CSF spaces were a frequent finding in siblings in full

  18. Response of diencephalon but not the gonad to female-promoting temperature with elevated estradiol levels in the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame-Mendez, A; Herrera-Munoz, J; Moreno-Mendoza, N; Merchant-Larios, H

    1998-03-01

    Although temperature sex determination is well known in several reptile species, the physiological mechanism underlying this process remains to be elucidated. In the current work, we analyzed the levels of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) in the gonads; two brain regions--telencephalon (Te) and diencephalon/mesencephalon (Di)--and the serum of developing embryos of the olive ridley Lepidochelys olivacea incubated at male- or female-promoting temperatures. Conversion of pregnenolone (P5) to T and T to E2 were studied in the gonads and brain. The analyses were performed during three periods: the thermosensitive period (TSP), histologically undifferentiated gonads (UDG), and differentiated gonads (DG). In the gonads, serum, and brain, T concentrations were higher at the female-promoting temperature during the three periods, whereas in the gonads and serum, E2 levels were similar at the female and male-promoting temperature. In Di, the concentration of E2 was significantly higher at the female-promoting temperature. Biotransformation of P5 to T in gonadal tissues were slightly higher at the female-promoting temperature in TSP and increased during UDG and DG. Conversion of T to E2, however, was similar at the two temperatures during the three periods. In the brain, the Di showed a higher efficiency for transforming T to E2 at the female-promoting temperature. Our present results do not allow us to decide whether the diencephalon is the cause or the effect, but they conclusively demonstrate that, in L. olivacea, this region of the brain senses temperature during sex determination.

  19. Ghrelin Receptor in Two Species of Anuran Amphibian, Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), and Japanese Tree Frog (Hyla japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Yasushi; Konno, Norifumi; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Uchiyama, Minoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2011-01-01

    We have identified cDNA encoding a functional growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, ghrelin receptor) in two species of anuran amphibian, the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), and the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). Deduced receptor protein for bullfrog and Japanese tree frog (tree frog) was comprised of 374- and 371-amino acids, respectively. The two receptors shared 86% identity, and are grouped to the clade of the tetrapod homologs by phylogenetic analysis. In functional analyses, ghrelin and GHS-R1a agonists increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in GHS-R1a-transfected-HEK293 cell, but ligand selectivity of ghrelin with Ser(3) and Thr(3) was not observed between the two receptors. Bullfrog GHS-R1a mRNA was mainly expressed in the brain, stomach, and testis. In the brain, the gene expression was detected in the diencephalon and mesencephalon, but not in the pituitary. Tree frog GHS-R1a mRNA was predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and ovary, but not detected in the pituitary. In bullfrog stomach but not the brain, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased after 10 days of fasting. For tree frog, GHS-R1a mRNA expression was increased in the brain, stomach and ventral skin by 10 days of fasting, and in the stomach and ventral skin by a dehydration treatment. Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin in dehydrated tree frog did not affect water absorption from the ventral skin. These results suggest that ghrelin is involved in energy homeostasis and possibly in osmoregulation in frogs.

  20. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Siblings from Families with Two or More Children with Learning or Intellectual Disabilities and Need for Full-Time Special Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannerkoski, M.; Heiskala, H.; Aaberg, L.; Raininko, R.; Sarna, S.; Wirtavuori, K.; Autti, T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Several factors are involved in determining a child's need for special education (SE). Thus, the value of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for subjects with learning and intellectual disabilities is uncertain. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of MRI in the diagnostic process of siblings with learning and intellectual disabilities and need for full-time SE. Material and Methods: Altogether, 119 siblings (mean age 11.9 years) from families in which two or more children attended/had previously attended full-time SE underwent prospective brain MRI. SE grouping included three levels, from specific learning disabilities (level 1) to global intellectual disabilities (level 3). Forty-three controls (level 0, mean age 12.0 years) attended mainstream education groups. Signal intensity and structural abnormalities were analyzed, and areas of the cerebrum, posterior fossa, corpus callosum, vermis and brain stem, and diameters of the corpus callosum were measured. In analyses, all area measurements were calculated in proportion to the total inner skull area. Results: Abnormal finding in MRI was more common for siblings (n=62; 52%) in SE (58% for level 3; 49% for level 2; 35% for level 1) than for controls (n=13; 16%). The siblings showed enlarged supra- (P<0.001) and infratentorial (P=0.015) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and mild corpus callosum abnormalities (P=0.003) compared to controls. Siblings in SE had smaller inner skull area than controls (P<0.001). Further, the relative area of the mesencephalon (P=0.027) and the diameter of the body of the corpus callosum (P=0.015) were significantly smaller than in controls. In binary logistic regression analysis, enlarged supratentorial CSF spaces increased the probability of SE (odds ratio 4.2; P=0.023). Conclusion: Subjects with learning and intellectual disabilities commonly have more MRI findings than controls. Enlarged supratentorial CSF spaces were a frequent finding in siblings in full-time SE

  1. Metastatic brain tumour in pregnancy: A case report

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    Pantović Sveto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant tumours of the central nervous system in pregnancy are rare and are most frequently diagnosed in the second part of pregnancy Of all malignant tumours which may occur in pregnancy, intracranial tumours bear the highest risk of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Case Outline. A 29-year-old primipara was admitted to our hospital as an emergency in the twenty-ninth week of pregnancy due to headache, right eye sight disorders (double vision, nausea and vomiting. The patient had a total thyroidectomy and a dissection of lymph glands of the neck at the age of seven years due to papillary carcinoma of the thyroid glands. The clinical and sonographic test revealed regular foetal growth and morphology. The MRI showed expansive changes in the brain parenchyma corresponding to metastatic lesion with the subtentorial herniation of the uncus of the hippocampus by compressive effect onto the right cerebral peduncle of the mesencephalon. Emergent neurosurgical intervention was indicated. Having in mind the age at pregnancy, it was decided to perform a caesarean operation. Alive female child was born weighing 1,370 grams. The post-operative procedure was normal. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery department on the first post-operative day, where she underwent emergent surgery. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the metastatic tumour originating from the primary papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland. Conclusion. Neurosurgical diseases in pregnancy simultaneously jeopardize two lives and represent both medical and ethical problem. Upon confirming the presence of intracranial malignancy in pregnancy, further procedure is very individual and it implies cooperation of gynaecologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, oncologists, anaesthesiologists and neonatologists.

  2. Autologous Adrenal Medullary, Fetal Mesencephalic, and Fetal Adrenal Brain Transplantation in Parkinson's Disease: A Long-Term Postoperative Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrazo, Ignacio; Franco-Bourland, Rebecca; Aguilera, Maricarmen; Ostrosky-Solis, Feggy; Madrazo, Mario; Cuevas, Carlos; Catrejon, Hugo; Guizar-Zahagun, Gabriel; Magallon, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    We report on the clinical status of 5 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) 3 years after autologous adrenal medullary (AM)-to-caudate nucleus (CN) implanfion, and of 2 PD patients, 2 years after fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM)- and fetal adrenal (A)-to-CN homotransplantation. Current clinical evaluation of 4 of the AM grafted patients revealed sustained bilateral amelioration of their PD signs, most notably of rgidity, postural imbalance and gait disturbances, resulting in a substantial improvement in their quality of life. the disease-related dystonia of one of them disappeared only 2 years after surgery. The levodopa requirements of 2 of these patients and the anticholinergic therapy of another have been reduced. In agreement with the satisfactory clinical evaluation of these 4 patients, their neuropsychological and electrophysiological improvements, initially registered 3 months after surgery, have been maintained for 3 years. After 1 year of significant recovery, the 5th patient of this group has almost returned to her preoperative state. The 2 homotransplanted patients also showed sustained bilateral improvement of their PD signs. Two years after surgery, the most improved signs of the fetal VM case were rigidity, bradykinesia, postural imbalance, gait disturbances and facial expression. The fetal A case has only shown amelioration of rigidity and bradykinesia. Neither of them has shown significant neuropsychological changes. Their current levodopa requirements are less than before surgery. The improvements shown here by PD patients after brain tissue grafts go beyond those obtained using any other therapeutic approach, when levodopa fails. Although more studies and the development of these procedures are obviously required, these initial human trials appear to be resisting the test of time. PMID:1782251

  3. Distribution of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha-1 in the brain of adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Carla; Carla, Lucini; Facello, Bruna; Bruna, Facello; Maruccio, Lucianna; Lucianna, Maruccio; Langellotto, Fernanda; Fernanda, Langellotto; Sordino, Paolo; Paolo, Sordino; Castaldo, Luciana; Luciana, Castaldo

    2010-08-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent trophic factor for several types of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The biological activity of GDNF is mediated by a multicomponent receptor complex that includes a common transmembrane signaling component (the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene product, a tyrosine kinase receptor) as well as a GDNF family receptor alpha (GFRalpha) subunit, a high-affinity glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked binding element. Among the four known GFRalpha subunits, GFRalpha1 preferentially binds to GDNF. In zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, the expression of the GFRalpha1a and GFRalpha1b genes has been shown in primary motor neurons, the kidney, and the enteric nervous system. To examine the activity of GFRalpha in the adult brain of a lower vertebrate, we have investigated the localization of GFRalpha1a and GFRalpha1b mRNA and the GFRalpha1 protein in zebrafish. GFRalpha1a and GFRalpha1b transcripts were observed in brain extracts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Whole-mount in-situ hybridization experiments revealed a wide distribution of GFRalpha1a and GFRalpha1b mRNAs in various regions of the adult zebrafish brain. These included the olfactory bulbs, dorsal and ventral telencephalic area (telencephalon), preoptic area, dorsal and ventral thalamus, posterior tuberculum and hypothalamus (diencephalon), optic tectum (mesencephalon), cerebellum, and medulla oblongata (rhombencephalon). Finally, expression patterns of the GFRalpha1 protein, detected immunohistochemically, correlated well with the mRNA expression and provided further insights into translational activity at the neuroanatomical level. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that the presence of GFRalpha1 persists beyond the embryonic development of the zebrafish brain and, together with the GDNF ligand, is probably implicated in the brain physiology of an adult teleost fish.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Intracranial Hypotension: Diagnostic Value of Combined Qualitative Signs and Quantitative Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Kerim; Gunbey, Hediye Pinar; Tomak, Leman; Ozmen, Zafer; Incesu, Lutfi

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of combination quantitative metrics (mamillopontine distance [MPD], pontomesencephalic angle, and mesencephalon anterior-posterior/medial-lateral diameter ratios) with qualitative signs (dural enhancement, subdural collections/hematoma, venous engorgement, pituitary gland enlargements, and tonsillar herniations) provides a more accurate diagnosis of intracranial hypotension (IH). The quantitative metrics and qualitative signs of 34 patients and 34 control subjects were assessed by 2 independent observers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of quantitative metrics and qualitative signs, and for the diagnosis of IH, optimum cutoff values of quantitative metrics were found with ROC analysis. Combined ROC curve was measured for the quantitative metrics, and qualitative signs combinations in determining diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were found, and the best model combination was formed. Whereas MPD and pontomesencephalic angle were significantly lower in patients with IH when compared with the control group (P qualitative signs, the highest individual distinctive power was dural enhancement with area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.838. For quantitative metrics, the highest individual distinctive power was MPD with AUC of 0.947. The best accuracy in the diagnosis of IH was obtained by combination of dural enhancement, venous engorgement, and MPD with an AUC of 1.00. This study showed that the combined use of dural enhancement, venous engorgement, and MPD had diagnostic accuracy of 100 % for the diagnosis of IH. Therefore, a more accurate IH diagnosis can be provided with combination of quantitative metrics with qualitative signs.

  5. Rhombencephalosynapsis as a cause of aqueductal stenosis: an under-recognized association in hydrocephalic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Grimm, John; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is a rare genetic aberration characterized by variable vermian hypoplasia/aplasia in conjunction with united cerebellar hemispheres. Genetic defects in the isthmic organizer at the mesencephalic-metencephalic junction are presumably responsible for the associated aqueductal stenosis. We performed a retrospective review of 20 children with rhombencephalosynapsis to evaluate for and emphasize the association of aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus. We retrospectively reviewed the MR and CT images of 20 children (0-11 years old) with rhombencephalosynapsis encountered at two academic children's hospitals. Rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum severity was graded based on pre-existing literature. We analyzed examinations for ventriculomegaly and degree of aqueductal stenosis. The collicular distances were measured from the collicular apices. Imaging studies were also analyzed for malformations of cortical and cerebellar development. Thirteen of the 20 children (65%) with rhombencephalosynapsis presented with clinical or imaging evidence of hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis, principally involving the caudal cerebral aqueduct. All children with aqueductal stenosis had collicular fusion. All six children with complete rhombencephalosynapsis had aqueductal stenosis. The cerebral aqueduct varied from normal to stenotic in children with incomplete rhombencephalosynapsis. Corpus callosum dysgenesis was present in four children. Aqueductal stenosis in the setting of rhombencephalosynapsis is an under-recognized cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Our findings support the hypothesis that a defect involving the common gene(s) responsible for the differentiation and development of both the roof plate and midline cerebellar primordium at the mesencephalon/first rhombomere junction may be responsible for the association of aqueductal stenosis and rhombencephalosynapsis. (orig.)

  6. Abuse potential and adverse cognitive effects of mitragynine (kratom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nurul H M; Suhaimi, Farah W; Vadivelu, Raja K; Hassan, Zurina; Rümler, Anne; Rotter, Andrea; Amato, Davide; Dringenberg, Hans C; Mansor, Sharif M; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Müller, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Mitragynine is the major psychoactive alkaloid of the plant kratom/ketum. Kratom is widely used in Southeast Asia as a recreational drug, and increasingly appears as a pure compound or a component of 'herbal high' preparations in the Western world. While mitragynine/kratom may have analgesic, muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects, its addictive properties and effects on cognitive performance are unknown. We isolated mitragynine from the plant and performed a thorough investigation of its behavioural effects in rats and mice. Here we describe an addictive profile and cognitive impairments of acute and chronic mitragynine administration, which closely resembles that of morphine. Acute mitragynine has complex effects on locomotor activity. Repeated administration induces locomotor sensitization, anxiolysis and conditioned place preference, enhances expression of dopamine transporter- and dopamine receptor-regulating factor mRNA in the mesencephalon. While there was no increase in spontaneous locomotor activity during withdrawal, animals showed hypersensitivity towards small challenging doses for up to 14 days. Severe somatic withdrawal signs developed after 12 hours, and increased level of anxiety became evident after 24 hours of withdrawal. Acute mitragynine independently impaired passive avoidance learning, memory consolidation and retrieval, possibly mediated by a disruption of cortical oscillatory activity, including the suppression of low-frequency rhythms (delta and theta) in the electrocorticogram. Chronic mitragynine administration led to impaired passive avoidance and object recognition learning. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for an addiction potential with cognitive impairments for mitragynine, which suggest its classification as a harmful drug. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Anatomical and MRI relations of the cerebral aqueduct to the adjacent parts of the brain and calvaria

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    Stanković Gordana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducton/Objective. Insufficiency of relevant anatomic data and great neurological and neurosurgical significance were the reasons for this study with scientific and practical implications. The purpose was to determine, at the transverse in situ section of the head, the position and relations of the sylvian aqueduct of the mesencephalon by measuring its distances from particular brain and calvaria structures. Also, the aim was to determine the same distances according to axial sections by using MRI. Methods. The material consisted of twenty autopsy human heads. The section of the head was made at the level of the tentorial hiatus and the midbrain. After that, we measured the distances between the cerebral aqueduct and a posterior border of the optic chiasm, b upper border of the dorsum sellae, c terminal bifurcation of the basilar artery, d beginning of the straight sinus, e internal occipital protuberance, f tentorial edge (lateral from the aqueduct, and g internal surface of the calvaria (lateral to the aqueduct. We determined the same distances by the MRI system. The measurements were made in 37 subjects. Results. The numerical data obtained by this study will be of benefit to neurosurgeons in choosing a surgical approach to the contents of the incisural space, and to neurologists for the exact localization of the lesion and interpretation of certain signs and symptoms. Conclusion. The results of a detailed examination of the sylvian aqueduct position and relations have shown that the use of MRI is the morphometric method of choice, because it is more precise for all the parameters monitored than in situ measurements. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175030

  8. Cerebral acetylcholine and choline contents and turnover following low-dose acetylcholinesterase inhibitors treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsung-Ming; Scremin, Oscar U; Roch, Margareth; Huynh, Ly; Sun, Wei; Jenden, Donald J

    2006-11-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 3 weeks with (1) regular tap drinking water plus subcutaneous (s.c.) saline (0.5 ml/kg) injections three times/week, (2) pyridostigmine bromide (PB) in drinking water (80 mg/L) plus s.c. saline injections three times/week, (3) regular tap drinking water plus s.c. sarin (0.5 x LD(50)) injections three times/week, or (4) PB in drinking water plus s.c. sarin injections three times/week. Repeated doses of sarin, in the presence or absence of PB, were devoid of acute toxicity during the three-week treatment period. Two, 4, and 16 weeks post-treatment, animals were given an intravenous pulse injection of choline labeled with 4 deuterium atoms (D4Ch) followed, after 1 min, by microwave fixation of the brain in vivo. Tissue levels of endogenous acetylcholine (D0ACh), endogenous choline (D0Ch), D4Ch, and ACh synthesized from D4Ch (D4ACh) were measured by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry in hippocampus, infundibulum, mesencephalon, neocortex, piriform cortex, and striatum. Ch uptake from blood and ACh turnover were estimated from D4Ch and D4ACh concentrations in brain tissue, respectively. Statistically significant differences among brain regions were found for D0Ch, D4Ch, D0ACh and D4ACh at 2, 4 and 16 weeks post-treatment. However, differences in the values of these parameters between control and drug treatments were found only for D0ACh and D0Ch at 2 and 4 weeks, but not at 16 weeks post-treatment. In conclusion, the results from these experiments do not support a delayed or persistent alteration in cholinergic function after exposure to low doses of PB and/or sarin.

  9. Glioblastoma pediátrico: estudo clínico patológico de 12 casos com imunoistoquímica para proteína p53 Pediatric glioblastoma: a clinicopathological study of 12 cases with p53 protein immunohistochemistry

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    Leonora Zozula Blind Pope

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma é um dos tumores primários mais letais do sistema nervoso central (SNC. Apesar dos significativos progressos, há poucas análises em crianças. Com o objetivo de avaliar localização, idade, sexo, sobrevida e imunoistoquímica para proteína p53, foram coletados casos de glioblastomas pediátricos do "Banco de Tumores do SNC de Curitiba", durante 1987-2003 e do Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, de 1970 a 1988. Doze preencheram os critérios de inclusão. A idade variou até 12 anos (média 7, sendo sete do sexo feminino e cinco do masculino. A sobrevida média foi 7,9 meses. Localizavam-se em hemisférios cerebrais (58,4%, mesencéfalo e tronco (33,3% e um no cerebelo. A imunoistoquímica demonstrou p53 positivo em 9 (75%. Em conclusão, glioblastoma tem comportamento semelhante entre crianças e adultos, sendo nestas menos freqüentes. Acomete hemisférios cerebrais com maior freqüência que estruturas infratentoriais, mostrando alta sensitividade com a imunomarcação para proteína p53, sendo nestes casos mais agressivos, com menor sobrevida.Glioblastoma is one of the most lethal central nervous system (CNS primary tumor. Although significant progress, only few analysis have been made in pediatric glioblastoma, which are less common and have worse prognosis than in adults. To evaluate gender, site, age, survival, and immunohistochemistry to p53, we selected cases of pediatric glioblastoma of "CNS Tumors Database in Curitiba", 1987-2003 and of the Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, 1970-1988. Twelve tumors were included. The age ranged from up to 12 years (median 7. There were 7 females and 5 males. The median survival was 7.9 months. Location was: cerebral hemispheres (58.4%, mesencephalon and brainstem (33.3% and one case in the cerebellum. Immunostained to p53 in 9 (75% cases. In conclusion, glioblastoma behaves similarly in children and adults. It is rare in children, affects both cerebral hemispheres more

  10. Morfologia da artéria cerebelar superior do macaco prego (Cebus apella L., 1766: divisões e anastomoses Morphology of the superior cerebellar artery of the “macaco prego” (Cebus paella L., 1766: divisions and anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Alves da Silva

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Dando continuidade a estudos já existentes na área de mapeamento da vascularização cerebral do Cebus apella e considerando a semelhança desse animal com outros primatas descritos, inclusive os humanos, estudou-se a morfologia das artérias cerebelares superiores, que destinam a irrigar a superfície superior do cerebelo. 57 hemisférios cerebelares foram injetados com látex corado e fixados em solução de formol a 10%, dissecados sob mesoscopia de luz com microdissecações. As artérias cerebelares superiores são simétricas em 84,21% e assimétricas em 7,01%, ramificam-se em 4 ramos: sendo 1 para o mesencéfalo e 3 troncos principais para a superfície superior do cerebelo e regiões anterior dessa superfície. Estas artérias terminam na fissura póstero-superior ou pós-semilunar após emitir vários ramos colaterais de hierarquia decrescente de calibreIn order to continue studies already done in the area of mapping the cerebral vascularization of Cebus paella and taking into consideration the resemblance of this animal with other primates described, humans included, we studied the morphology of the superior cerebellar arteries determined to perfuse the superior surface of the cerebellum. Fifty-seven cerebellar hemispheres were injected with stained latex, fixed in 10% formol solution and dissected under light mesoscopy. The superior cerebellar arteries are symmetrical in 84,21% and asymmetrical in 7,01%, and give off four branches, one to the mesencephalon and three mains branches to the upper surface of the cerebellum and its anterior portion. These arteries end in the posterior superior or post-semilunar fissure, after giving off many collaterals of decreasing diameter

  11. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob: considerações clínicas, eletrencefalográficas e anatomopatológicas a propósito de uma caso Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case report with clinical, electroencephalographic and neuropathological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Luiz Sanvito

    1971-03-01

    nuclei, the mesencephalon, the pons and the anterior horns. In the cerebelum the granular cells were reduced. Pathogenetic and etiological considerations remained inconclusive, but the slow-virus concept applicable to other neurological diseases (Kuru, subacute sclerosing leuco-encephalitis should not be dismissed from etiopathogenetic considerations of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  12. MR-Guided Unfocused Ultrasound Disruption of the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Kelly A.; King, Randy L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound with microbubbles can temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for drug delivery. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) can visualize gadolinium passage into the brain, indicating BBB opening. Previous studies used focused ultrasound, which is appropriate for the targeted delivery of drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate unfocused ultrasound for BBB opening across the whole brain. In 10 rats, gadolinium-based MR contrast agent (Gd; 0.25 ml) was administered concurrent with ultrasound microbubbles (Optison, 0.25 ml) and circulated for 20 sec before sonication. A 753 kHz planar PZT transducer, diameter 1.8 cm, sonicated each rat brain with supplied voltage of 300, 400, or 500 mVpp for 10 sec in continuous wave mode, or at 500 mVpp at 20% duty cycle at 10 Hz for 30-300 sec. After sonication, coronal T1-weighted FSE CE-MRI images were acquired with a 3in surface coil. The imaging protocol was repeated 3-5 times after treatment. One control animal was given Gd and microbubbles, but not sonicated, and the other was given Gd and sonicated without microbubbles. Signal change in ROIs over the muscle, mesencephalon/ventricles, and the cortex/striatum were measured at 3-5 time points up to 36 min after sonication. Signal intensity was converted to % signal change compared to the initial image. In the controls, CE-MRI showed brightening of surrounding structures, but not the brain. In the continuous wave subjects, cortex/striatum signal did not increase, but ventricle/mesenchephalon signal did. Those that received pulsed sonications showed signal increases in both the cortex/striatum and ventricles/mesenchephalon. In conclusion, after pulsed unfocused ultrasound sonication, the BBB is disrupted across the whole brain, including cortex and deep grey matter, while continuous wave sonication affects only the ventricles and possibly deeper structures, without opening the cortex BBB. As time passes, the timeline of Gd passage into the brain

  13. Re-Cloning the N27 Dopamine Cell Line to Improve a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Lu Gao

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is characterized by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. To understand the molecular mechanisms of the disease, an in vitro model is important. In the 1990s, we used the SV40 large T antigen to immortalize dopaminergic neurons derived from Embryonic Day 14 rat mesencephalon. We selected a clone for its high expression of dopaminergic neuron markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, and we named it 1RB3AN27 (N27. Because the original N27 cell line has been passaged many times, the line has become a mixture of cell types with highly variable expression of TH. In the current study, we have performed multiple rounds of clonal cultures and have identified a dopaminergic cell clone expressing high levels of TH and the dopamine transporter (DAT. We have named this new clone N27-A. Nearly 100% of N27-A cells express TH, DAT and Tuj1. Western blots have confirmed that N27-A cells have three to four times the levels of TH and DAT compared to the previous mixed population in N27. Further analysis has shown that the new clone expresses the dopamine neuron transcription factors Nurr1, En1, FoxA2 and Pitx3. The N27-A cells express the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2, but do not express dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DβH, the enzyme responsible for converting dopamine to norepinephrine. Functional analysis has shown that N27-A cells are more sensitive than N27 cells to neurotoxins taken up by the dopamine transporter such as 6-hydroxydopamine and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+. The DAT inhibitor nomifensine can block MPP+ induced toxicity. The non-selective toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide were similar in both cell lines. The N27-A cells show dopamine release under basal and depolarization conditions. We conclude that the new N27-A clone of the immortalized rat dopaminergic cell line N27 should provide an improved in vitro model for Parkinson's disease research.

  14. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na+/K+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase, [Formula: see text], and nkaα1 Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Mc Subhash; Simi, Satheesan

    2017-01-01

    Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA) in the brain segments, namely, prosencephalon (PC), mesencephalon (MC), and metencephalon (MeC) in an obligate air-breathing fish exposed either to hypoxia stress (30 minutes forced immersion in water) or challenged with zymosan treatment (25-200 ng g -1 for 24 hours) or both. Zymosan that produced nonspecific immune responses evoked differential regulation of NKA, H + /K + -ATPase (HKA), and [Formula: see text] (NNA) in the varied brain segments. On the contrary, hypoxia stress that demanded activation of NKA in PC and MeC showed a reversed NKA activity pattern in MeC of immune-challenged fish. A compromised HKA and NNA regulation during hypoxia stress was found in immune-challenged fish, indicating the role of these brain ion transporters to hypoxia stress and immune challenges. The differential mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of NKA, nkaα1a , nkaα1b , and nkaα1c , in hypoxia-stressed brain showed a shift in its expression pattern during hypoxia stress-immune interaction in PC and MC. Evidence is thus presented for the first time that ion transporters such as HKA and NNA along with NKA act as functional brain markers which respond differentially to both hypoxia stress and immune challenges. Taken together, the data further provide evidence for a differential Na + , K + , H + , and [Formula: see text] ion signaling that exists in brain neuronal clusters during hypoxia stress-immune interaction as a result of modified regulations of NKA, HKA, and NNA transporter functions and nkaα1 isoform

  15. Microtransplantation of dopaminergic cell suspensions: further characterization and optimization of grafting parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhah, Guido; Rosenthal, Christoph; Falkenstein, Gero; Roedter, Alexandra; Papazoglou, Anna; Brandis, Almuth

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral transplantation of dopaminergic (DA) cells is currently further explored as a potential restorative therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, before they can be considered for a more widespread clinical use a number of critical issues have to be resolved, including an optimized transplantation protocol. This study has been performed in a rat 6-hydroxydopamine model of PD and is based on the microtransplantation approach. The results demonstrate a reduced survival (threefold) for a single cell suspension of E14 rat ventral mesencephalon compared to a fragment suspension when a metal cannula is used for implantation. However, fragment suspensions result in a more variable graft survival and ectopically placed cells along the implantation tract. When a glass capillary is used for implantation, the survival of the single cell suspension (so-called "micrograft") improved by fourfold (vs. single cells/metal cannula) and is superior to the combination of the metal cannula and fragment suspension (+40%). The micrografts show a reduced variability in DA neuron survival as well as fewer ectopically placed cells. Moreover, the implantation time can significantly be reduced from 19 to 7 min in micrografted animals without a compromise in DA graft survival and functional behavioral outcome. Using the microtransplantation approach graft size can be tailored effectively by varying the density of the final cell suspension at least between 11,000 and 320,000 cells/microl, resulting in comparable survival of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the range of 2-4%. With this approach no more than 100 surviving TH-positive neurons are necessary to produce functional effects in the amphetamine-induced rotation test. Interestingly, we found that DA micrografts into lesion striatum present 20% higher survival rates of TH neurons in comparison to the intact striatum. In summary, these results provide further evidence for the usefulness of the

  16. Prenatal pharmacotherapy rescues brain development in a Down's syndrome mouse model.

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    Guidi, Sandra; Stagni, Fiorenza; Bianchi, Patrizia; Ciani, Elisabetta; Giacomini, Andrea; De Franceschi, Marianna; Moldrich, Randal; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Mardon, Karine; Giuliani, Alessandro; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Intellectual impairment is a strongly disabling feature of Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder of high prevalence (1 in 700-1000 live births) caused by trisomy of chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence shows that widespread neurogenesis impairment is a major determinant of abnormal brain development and, hence, of intellectual disability in Down's syndrome. This defect is worsened by dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations. Most of the pharmacotherapies designed to improve cognitive performance in Down's syndrome have been attempted in Down's syndrome mouse models during adult life stages. Yet, as neurogenesis is mainly a prenatal event, treatments aimed at correcting neurogenesis failure in Down's syndrome should be administered during pregnancy. Correction of neurogenesis during the very first stages of brain formation may, in turn, rescue improper brain wiring. The aim of our study was to establish whether it is possible to rescue the neurodevelopmental alterations that characterize the trisomic brain with a prenatal pharmacotherapy with fluoxetine, a drug that is able to restore post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down's syndrome. Pregnant Ts65Dn females were treated with fluoxetine from embryonic Day 10 until delivery. On post-natal Day 2 the pups received an injection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and were sacrificed after either 2 h or after 43 days (at the age of 45 days). Untreated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice exhibited a severe neurogenesis reduction and hypocellularity throughout the forebrain (subventricular zone, subgranular zone, neocortex, striatum, thalamus and hypothalamus), midbrain (mesencephalon) and hindbrain (cerebellum and pons). In embryonically treated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice, precursor proliferation and cellularity were fully restored throughout all brain regions. The recovery of proliferation potency and cellularity was still present in treated Ts65Dn 45-day-old mice. Moreover, embryonic treatment restored

  17. Meningoencefalite granulomatosa em bovinos em pastoreio de ervilhaca (Vicia spp Granulomatous meningoencephalitis in cattle grazing vetch (Vicia spp

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    Raquel R. Rech

    2004-09-01

    massa intermedia, mesencephalon at the level of rostral colliculi, pons and cerebellar peduncles, medulla at the level of obex, frontal lobe at the level of the genu of the corpus callosum, and cerebellum. The character and the distribution of the inflammatory changes are emphasized regarding the differential diagnosis with other diseases and lesions of the bovine central nervous system in the context of the Brazilian surveillance program for bovine spongiform encephalopath.

  18. The Ontogeny and Brain Distribution Dynamics of the Appetite Regulators NPY, CART and pOX in Larval Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L..

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    Hoang T M D Le

    Full Text Available Similar to many marine teleost species, Atlantic cod undergo remarkable physiological changes during the early life stages with concurrent and profound changes in feeding biology and ecology. In contrast to the digestive system, very little is known about the ontogeny and the localization of the centers that control appetite and feed ingestion in the developing brain of fish. We examined the expression patterns of three appetite regulating factors (orexigenic: neuropeptide Y, NPY; prepro-orexin, pOX and anorexigenic: cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, CART in discrete brain regions of developing Atlantic cod using chromogenic and double fluorescent in situ hybridization. Differential temporal and spatial expression patterns for each appetite regulator were found from first feeding (4 days post hatch; dph to juvenile stage (76 dph. Neurons expressing NPY mRNA were detected in the telencephalon (highest expression, diencephalon, and optic tectum from 4 dph onward. CART mRNA expression had a wider distribution along the anterior-posterior brain axis, including both telencephalon and diencephalon from 4 dph. From 46 dph, CART transcripts were also detected in the olfactory bulb, region of the nucleus of medial longitudinal fascicle, optic tectum and midbrain tegmentum. At 4 and 20 dph, pOX mRNA expression was exclusively found in the preoptic region, but extended to the hypothalamus at 46 and 76 dph. Co-expression of both CART and pOX genes were also observed in several hypothalamic neurons throughout larval development. Our results show that both orexigenic and anorexigenic factors are present in the telencephalon, diencephalon and mesencephalon in cod larvae. The telencephalon mostly contains key factors of hunger control (NPY, while the diencephalon, and particularly the hypothalamus may have a more complex role in modulating the multifunctional control of appetite in this species. As the larvae develop, the overall progression in

  19. Polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM in the human trigeminal ganglion and brainstem at prenatal and adult ages

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    Melis Tiziana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM is considered a marker of developing and migrating neurons and of synaptogenesis in the immature vertebrate nervous system. However, it persists in the mature normal brain in some regions which retain a capability for morphofunctional reorganization throughout life. With the aim of providing information relevant to the potential for dynamic changes of specific neuronal populations in man, this study analyses the immunohistochemical occurrence of PSA-NCAM in the human trigeminal ganglion (TG and brainstem neuronal populations at prenatal and adult age. Results Western blot analysis in human and rat hippocampus supports the specificity of the anti-PSA-NCAM antibody and the immunodetectability of the molecule in postmortem tissue. Immunohistochemical staining for PSA-NCAM occurs in TG and several brainstem regions during prenatal life and in adulthood. As a general rule, it appears as a surface staining suggestive of membrane labelling on neuronal perikarya and proximal processes, and as filamentous and dot-like elements in the neuropil. In the TG, PSA-NCAM is localized to neuronal perikarya, nerve fibres, pericellular networks, and satellite and Schwann cells; further, cytoplasmic perikaryal staining and positive pericellular fibre networks are detectable with higher frequency in adult than in newborn tissue. In the adult tissue, positive neurons are mostly small- and medium-sized, and amount to about 6% of the total ganglionic population. In the brainstem, PSA-NCAM is mainly distributed at the level of the medulla oblongata and pons and appears scarce in the mesencephalon. Immunoreactivity also occurs in discretely localized glial structures. At all ages examined, PSA-NCAM occurs in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, solitary nuclear complex, vestibular and cochlear nuclei, reticular formation nuclei, and most of the precerebellar nuclei. In specimens of different age

  20. Atomoxetine affects transcription/translation of the NMDA receptor and the norepinephrine transporter in the rat brain – an in vivo study

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    Udvardi PT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patrick T Udvardi,1,2 Karl J Föhr,3 Carolin Henes,1,2 Stefan Liebau,2 Jens Dreyhaupt,4 Tobias M Boeckers,2 Andrea G Ludolph11Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, 2Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, 3Department of Anaesthesiology, 4Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, GermanyAbstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most frequently diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder. The norepinephrine transporter (NET inhibitor atomoxetine, the first nonstimulant drug licensed for ADHD treatment, also acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antagonist. The compound's effects on gene expression and protein levels of NET and NMDAR subunits (1, 2A, and 2B are unknown. Therefore, adolescent Sprague Dawley rats were treated with atomoxetine (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [ip] or saline (0.9%, ip for 21 consecutive days on postnatal days (PND 21–41. In humans, atomoxetine's earliest clinical therapeutic effects emerge after 2–3 weeks. Material from prefrontal cortex, striatum (STR, mesencephalon (MES, and hippocampus (HC was analyzed either directly after treatment (PND 42 or 2 months after termination of treatment (PND 101 to assess the compound's long-term effects. In rat brains analyzed immediately after treatment, protein analysis exhibited decreased levels of the NET in HC, and NMDAR subunit 2B in both STR and HC; the transcript levels were unaltered. In rat brains probed 2 months after final atomoxetine exposure, messenger RNA analysis also revealed significantly reduced levels of genes coding for NMDAR subunits in MES and STR. NMDAR protein levels were reduced in STR and HC. Furthermore, the levels of two SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor proteins, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein 25, were also significantly altered in both treatment groups. This in vivo study detected atomoxetine's effects

  1. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  2. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination

  3. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na/K-ATPase, H/K-ATPase, , and Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish

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    MC Subhash Peter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA in the brain segments, namely, prosencephalon (PC, mesencephalon (MC, and metencephalon (MeC in an obligate air-breathing fish exposed either to hypoxia stress (30 minutes forced immersion in water or challenged with zymosan treatment (25-200 ng g −1 for 24 hours or both. Zymosan that produced nonspecific immune responses evoked differential regulation of NKA, H + /K + -ATPase (HKA, and Na + / NH 4 + - ATPase (NNA in the varied brain segments. On the contrary, hypoxia stress that demanded activation of NKA in PC and MeC showed a reversed NKA activity pattern in MeC of immune-challenged fish. A compromised HKA and NNA regulation during hypoxia stress was found in immune-challenged fish, indicating the role of these brain ion transporters to hypoxia stress and immune challenges. The differential mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of NKA, nkaα1a , nkaα1b , and nkaα1c , in hypoxia-stressed brain showed a shift in its expression pattern during hypoxia stress-immune interaction in PC and MC. Evidence is thus presented for the first time that ion transporters such as HKA and NNA along with NKA act as functional brain markers which respond differentially to both hypoxia stress and immune challenges. Taken together, the data further provide evidence for a differential Na + , K + , H + , and NH 4 + ion signaling that exists in brain neuronal clusters during hypoxia stress-immune interaction as a result of modified regulations of NKA, HKA, and NNA transporter functions and nkaα1 isoform

  4. The Histamine H1 Receptor Participates in the Increased Dorsal Telencephalic Neurogenesis in Embryos from Diabetic Rats

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    Karina H. Solís

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased neuron telencephalic differentiation during deep cortical layer formation has been reported in embryos from diabetic mice. Transitory histaminergic neurons within the mesencephalon/rhombencephalon are responsible for fetal histamine synthesis during development, fibers from this system arrives to the frontal and parietal cortex at embryo day (E 15. Histamine is a neurogenic factor for cortical neural stem cells in vitro through H1 receptor (H1R which is highly expressed during corticogenesis in rats and mice. Furthermore, in utero administration of an H1R antagonist, chlorpheniramine, decreases the neuron markers microtubuline associated protein 2 (MAP2 and forkhead box protein 2. Interestingly, in the diabetic mouse model of diabetes induced with streptozotocin, an increase in fetal neurogenesis in terms of MAP2 expression in the telencephalon is reported at E11.5. Because of the reported effects on cortical neuron differentiation of maternal diabetes in one hand and of histamine in the other, here the participation of histamine and H1R on the increased dorsal telencephalic neurogenesis was explored. First, the increased neurogenesis in the dorsal telencephalon at E14 in diabetic rats was corroborated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Then, changes during corticogenesis in the level of histamine was analyzed by ELISA and in H1R expression by qRT-PCR and Western blot and, finally, we tested H1R participation in the increased dorsal telencephalic neurogenesis by the systemic administration of chlorpheniramine. Our results showed a significant increase of histamine at E14 and in the expression of the receptor at E12. The administration of chlorpheniramine to diabetic rats at E12 prevented the increased expression of βIII-tubulin and MAP2 mRNAs (neuron markers and partially reverted the increased level of MAP2 protein at E14, concluding that H1R have an important role in the increased neurogenesis within the dorsal telencephalon

  5. Refluxo gastroesofágico participando da cascata cognitiva do pânico Gastroesophageal reflux participating on panic cognitive cascade

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    Kalil Duailibi

    2008-01-01

    with elimination of the panic crises. The acute thoracic pain of the GR is interpreted as a near threat, causing uncertainty regarding an unwell feeling with hyperventilation, acting as a trigger of the panic cognitive cascade, in the dorsal mesencephalon. The esophagic mucosa inflammation is interpreted as a distal threat, stimulating the amygdale and generating anticipated anxiety, increasing stress hormones. According to Deakin-Graeff model, even though 5HT inhibits the panic attack and stimulates the anticipated anxiety, the panic disorder stimulates the latter through dorsal raphe nucleus. In conclusion, the association between PD and GR should be better identified in order that the correct diagnosis and adequate treatment is achieved.

  6. Connectivity derived thalamic segmentation in deep brain stimulation for tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Harith; Dayal, Viswas; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Georgiev, Dejan; Hyam, Jonathan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; De Vita, Enrico; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Ashburner, John; Behrens, Tim; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2018-01-01

    ) and ventroposterior (VP) thalamus. The dentate-thalamic area, lay within the M1-thalamic area in a ventral and lateral location. Streamlines corresponding to the DRT connected M1 to the contralateral dentate nucleus via the dentate-thalamic area, clearly crossing the midline in the mesencephalon. Good response was seen when the active contact VTA was in the thalamic area with highest connectivity to the contralateral dentate nucleus. Non-responders had active contact VTAs outside the dentate-thalamic area. We conclude that probabilistic tractography techniques can be used to segment the VL and VP thalamus based on cortical and cerebellar connectivity. The thalamic area, best representing the VIM, is connected to the contralateral dentate cerebellar nucleus. Connectivity based segmentation of the VIM can be achieved in individual patients in a clinically feasible timescale, using HARDI and high performance computing with parallel GPU processing. This same technique can map out the DRT tract with clear mesencephalic crossing.

  7. The treatment of Parkinson's disease with dopamine agonists

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    Frank, Wilhelm

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease is a chronic degenerative organic disease with unknown causes. A disappearance of cells with melanin in the substantia nigra is considered as biological artefact of the disease, which causes a degenerative loss of neurons in the corpus striatum of mesencephalon. This structure produces also the transmitter substance dopamine. Due to this disappearance of cells dopamine is not produced in a sufficient quantity which is needed for movement of the body. The questions of this report are concerned the efficiency and safety of a treatment with dopamine agonists. Furthermore the cost-effectiveness is investigated as well as ethic questions. The goal is to give recommendation for the use of dopamine agonists to the German health system. A systematic literature search was done. The identified studies have different methodological quality and investigate different hypothesis and different outcome criteria. Therefore a qualitative method of information synthesis was chosen. Since the introduction of L-Dopa in the 1960´s it is considered as the most effective substance to reduce all the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson disease. This substance was improved in the course of time. Firstly some additional substances were given (decarbonxylase inhibitors, catechol-o-transferase inhibitors (COMT-inhibitors, monoaminoxydase-inhibitors (MAO-inhibitors and NMDA-antagonists (N-Methyl-d-aspartat-antagonists. In the practical therapy of Parkinson dopamine agonists play an important role, because they directly use the dopamine receptors. The monotherapy of Parkinson disease is basically possible and is used in early stages of the disease. Clinical practise has shown, that an add on therapy with dopamine agonists can led to a reduction of the dose of L-dopa and a reduction of following dyskinesia. The studies for effectiveness include studies for the initial therapy, monotherapy and add-on-therapy. Basically there is a good effectiveness of dopamine

  8. Expression and function of nr4a2, lmx1b, and pitx3 in zebrafish dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuronal development

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    Willaredt Marc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Dopaminergic neurons form in diverse areas of the vertebrate di- and mesencephalon to constitute several major neuromodulatory systems. While much is known about mammalian mesencephalic dopaminergic neuron development, little is known about the specification of the diencephalic dopaminergic groups. The transcription factors Pitx3 and Lmx1b play an important role in mammalian mesencephalic dopaminergic specification, and Nurr1/Nr4a2 has been shown to contribute to specification of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter phenotype. We use zebrafish to analyze potentially evolutionarily conserved roles of these transcription factors in a vertebrate brain that lacks a mesencephalic dopaminergic system, but has an ascending dopaminergic system in the ventral diencephalon. Results: We use a combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to determine whether nr4a2, lmx1b, and pitx3 genes are expressed in mature dopaminergic neurons or in potential precursor populations. We identify a second nr4a2 paralogue, nr4a2a, and find it co-expressed with Tyrosine hydroxylase in preoptic, pretectal and retinal amacrine dopaminergic neurons, while nr4a2b is only expressed in preoptic and retinal dopaminergic neurons. Both zebrafish nr4a2 paralogues are not expressed in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic neurons with ascending projections. Combined morpholino antisense oligo mediated knock-down of both nr4a2a and nr4a2b transcripts reveals that all zebrafish dopaminergic neurons expressing nr4a2a depend on Nr4a2 activity for tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression. Zebrafish lmx1b.1 is expressed in noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus and medulla oblongata, but knock-down reveals that it is specifically required for tyrosine hydroxylase expression only in the medulla oblongata area postrema noradrenergic neurons. Both lmx1b genes and pitx3 are not expressed in dopaminergic neurons, but in a

  9. The neurologist facing pain in dementia.

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    Álvaro González, Luis Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Ageing, a common background in dementia, is usually associated with painful disorders. Nevertheless, the use of analgesics is limited due to poor communication. On the other hand, dementia lesions are placed in the nociceptive pathways. For this reason, the painful experience becomes different and distinctive for every lesional type. The lateral nociceptive pathway (lateral thalamic nuclei and primary parietal cortex), which is in charge of the primary pain perception, is preserved in dementia. Thereafter, the shear painful perception, including pain intensity and threshold, remains unmodified. Distinctly, the medial pain pathways are affected by dementia lesions. In this pathway are included: the intralaminar thalamic nuclei, the pons (locus ceruleus:LC), the mesencephalon (periaacueductal grey substance: PGS), the hypothalamus (paraventricular nuclei, mamilary tuberculum) and different areas of the parietal (primary, secondary, operculum), temporal (amigdala, hypoccampus) and frontal (anterior cingular: ACC). As a consequence, the features of pain executed by these areas will be compromised: the cognitive assessment, the mood and emotion inherent to pain, the pain memory or the autonomic responses are modified in dementia. Specifically, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) there is a reduction in the anticipatory and avoidance responses and also a flattening of the autonomic responses. These are essentially secondary to the degenerative changes in the medial temporal (pain memory) and ACC (cognitive and mood aspects) areas. In vascular dementias, there is a cortico-subcortical deafferentation secondary to the white matter lesions. The consequence is the presence of hyperpathy and hyperalgesia. In the frontotemporal dementias, there is a reduction in pain expressivity. It is linked to the lesions in the orbitofrontal and anterior temporal areas, which are responsible of the emotional aspects of pain. In Parkinson's disease, painful conditions are a common characteristic

  10. Estudo da imunorreatividade astrocitária para GFAP e vimentina no tronco encefálico de ratos Wistar submetidos ao modelo gliotóxico do brometo de etídio Investigation into the astrocytic immunoreactivity to GFAP and vimentin in the brainstem of Wistar rats submitted to the ethidium bromide gliotoxic model

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    Eduardo Fernandes Bondan

    2003-09-01

    group E, extensive lesions were seen in the pons and mesencephalon, with astrocyte disappearance from the central area 24 hours post-injection. Macrophagic infiltration and peripheral astrocytic reaction were noted after 3 days. Marginal astrocytes presented increased immunoreactivity to GFAP and reexpression of VIM, the last one confined to the edges of the injury site. In group C, discrete pontine lesions were observed, showing central astrocyte preservation and a peripheral GFAP staining less intense comparing to group E. No immunoreactivity to VIM was noted in such astrocytes. CONCLUSION: Astrocytes from the edges of the EB-induced lesions presented increased immunoreactivity to GFAP and reexpression of VIM.

  11. Meningoencefalite por Listeria monocytogenes em ovinos Meningoencephalitis in sheep caused by Listeria monocytogenes

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    Daniel R. Rissi

    2010-01-01

    fed with silage. In three farms there were close contact among affected sheep and other species. Clinical signs were characterized by recumbency (7/7, head tilt (4/7, incoordination (3/7, depression (3/7, circling (2/7, unilateral blindness, wasting, fever, midriasis, paddling, opisthotonus, hind or hind and fore limb paralysis, drooling, and muscle tremors (1/7 each. Clinical evolution varied from 12 hours to three days. Histological findings consisted of predominantly unilateral, microabscedative encephalitis with variable degrees of gliosis and degenerative lesions characterized by axonal spheroids and infiltration by Gitter cells. These lesions were observed extending from medulla oblongata to mesencephalon. Listeria monocytogenes antigen was showed by imunohistochemistry in routinely processed sections of brainstem from all seven affected sheep. The diagnostic was based on epidemiological, clinical, and pathological findings and confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHQ using polyclonal anti-L. monocytogenes antibody.

  12. Aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos e distribuição das lesões histológicas no encéfalo de bovinos com raiva Epidemiology, clinical signs and distribution of lesions in the brain of rabid cattle

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    Ingeborg Maria Langohr

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram determinados o tipo, a distribuição e a intensidade das alterações histopatológicas no encéfalo de 25 bovinos com sinais clínicos neurológicos confirmados como casos de raiva pela imunofluorescência direta ou inoculação em camundongos. Foram examinadas secções do encéfalo que incluíram bulbo na altura do óbex, ponte e pedúnculos cerebelares, cerebelo, mesencéfalo na altura dos colículos rostrais, diencéfalo e telencéfalo na altura dos corpos mamilares, e telencéfalo na altura do córtex frontal. A medula cervical foi também examinada em sete desses casos. A duração do curso clínico foi, em média, cinco dias e se caracterizou por paresia ascendente. Não foram observados achados de necropsia específicos. Microscopicamente, o tronco encefálico, o cerebelo e a medula cervical foram mais afetados que o tálamo e o telencéfalo (inluindo o hipocampo. O tipo de lesões era característico de encefalites por infecção viral e incluía encefalomielite não-supurativa com degeneração neuronal, gliose nodular e infiltrado mononuclear perivascular. Corpúsculos de Negri foram encontrados em 17 (68% dos encéfalos examinados. A intensidade e a distribuição das lesões observadas foram correlacionadas com os sinais e a duração da doença clínica.The type, distribution and intensity of the histopathological changes were determined in the brain of 25 cattle which had neurological signs and were confirmed as rabies cases by direct immunofluorescent antibody or biological assay in mice. Sections of the brain examined included medulla at the obex; pons and cerebellar peduncles/ cerebellum; mesencephalon at the level of rostral colliculi; diencephalon and telencephalon through the mamillary bodies; and telencephalon at the level of frontal cortex. The cervical spinal cord was also examined in seven of those cases. The duration of clinical course averaged five days and was characterized by ascendent paresia. Specific

  13. A phase I trial of etanidazole and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in children with diffuse brain stem glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, S.C.; Pomeroy, S.L.; Billett, A.L.; Barnes, P.; Kuhlman, C.; Riese, N.E.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Coleman, C.N.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Prospective phase I study to evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole administered concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HRT) for children with brain stem glioma. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients with brain stem glioma were treated with etanidazole and HRT from 1990-1996. Eligibility required MRI confirmation of diffuse glioma of medulla, pons or mesencephalon, and signs/symptoms of cranial nerve deficit, ataxia or long tract signs of ≤ 6 months duration. Cervico-medullary tumors were excluded. Patients (median age 8.5 years; 11 males, 7 females) received HRT to the tumor volume plus a 2 cm margin with parallel opposed 6-15 MV photons. The total dose was 66 Gy for the first 3 patients, followed by 63 Gy over 4.2 weeks (1.5 Gy BID with 6 hours between fractions) for the subsequent 15 patients. Etanidazole was administered as a rapid IV infusion 30 minutes prior to the morning fraction of HRT at doses of 1.8 gm/m2 x 17 doses (30.6 gm/m2) at step 1 to a maximum of 2.4 gm/m2 x 21 doses (50.4 gm/m2) at step 8. Dose escalation was planned with 3 patients at each of the 8 levels. Results: Three patients were treated at each dose level except level 2, on which only one patient was treated. The highest dose level achieved was step 7 which delivered a total etanidazole dose of 46.2 gm/m2. Two patients were treated at this level, and both patients experienced grade 3 toxicity in the form of a diffuse cutaneous rash. Three patients received a lower dose of 42 gm/m2 without significant toxicity, and this represents the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). There were 24 cases of grade 1 toxicity (10 vomiting, 5 peripheral neuropathy, 2 rash, 2 constipation, 1 skin erythema, 1 weight loss, 3 other), eleven cases of grade 2 toxicity (4 vomiting, 2 skin erythema, 2 constipation, 1 arthalgia, 1 urinary retention, 1 hematologic), and four grade b 3 toxicities (2 rash, 1 vomiting, 1 skin desquamation). Grade 2 or 3 peripheral

  14. The central adrenergic system. An immunofluorescence study of the location of cell bodies and their efferent connections in the rat utilizing dopamine-beta-hydroxylase as a marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, L W; Hartman, B K

    1975-10-15

    mesencephalon and in the zona incerta and substantia innominata in the diencephalon. At the level of the septal area separate bundles reach the cortex dorsally over the genu of the corpus calosum via the medial septal-diagonal band nuclei and the lateral septum and ventrally between the olfactory tubercle and caudate-putamen. In the medulla and pons adrenergic fibers undoubtedly course in both directions. Anterior to the most rostral pontine cell bodies, however, all fibers presumably ascend. Along the course of the bundle distinct branches emerge to innervate circumscribed terminal fields. In addition, certain regions of the brain such as the reticular formation and pontine gray receive diffuse DBH innervation derived from less clearly defined pathways. A small number of areas in the brain contain little or no detectable DBH. These include the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, globus pallidus, olfactory tubercle, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, pretectal area, third, fourth and sixth cranial verve nuclei, and the trapezoid body nucleus.

  15. Neuropatologia da cinomose canina: 70 casos (2005-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C. Silva

    2009-08-01

    distemper. Cases were grouped according to the age of the dogs and classified according to the evolution of the lesions. It was possibly to conclude that: (1 the encephalomyelitis induced by canine distemper virus is more prevalent in puppies and adults; (2 gross lesions in the CNS occur infrequently; (3 the brain is more frequently affected than the spinal cord; (4 the five anatomical sites of the rain more frequently affected are, in decreasing order of frequency, cerebellum, diencephalon, frontal lobe of telencephalon, pons and mesencephalon; (5 the anatomical site more frequently affected in the spinal cord is the cervical (C1-C5 segment; (6 subacute and chronic lesions are more common than acute ones; (7 demyelization is the more prevalent lesion and occur mainly in the cerebellum, pons and diencephalons, usually associated with astrogliosis and non-suppurative inflammation; (8 in most cases with astrogliosis, gemistocytic astrocytes are observed, frequently with syncitia formation; (9 non-suppurative leptomeningitis, malacia and cortical neuronal necrosis are moderately frequent in the brain and less so in the spinal cord; (10 inclusion bodies are frequent in the brain; occur mainly in astrocytes and less frequently in neurons, however independently of the affected cell they occur mainly in the nucleus; (11 a classification of canine distemper encephalitis based in age-related clinical syndromes it is not accurate.

  16. [Cerebral hydatic cyst and psychiatric disorders. Two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, F; Tazi, I; Maaroufi, K; El Moudden, A; Ghannane, H; Ait Benali, S

    2007-01-01

    unconscious of his disorders. The patient has first been put under classical neuroleptic 9 mg/day of Haloperidol and 200 mg/day of chlorpromazine. The diagnosis of schizophrenia has been kept according to criteria of DSM IV. The PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) was to 137 (score on a positive scale was to 34, score on a negative scale was to 35 and the general psychopathologie scale was to 58). One week after his hospitalization, he developed headache with subconfusion, a cerebral scanning has been made in emergency and showed a voluminous cyst in oval foramen compressing the mesencephalon strongly. The cyst was well limited, hypodense, not taking the contrast, and without intracerebral oedema, the diagnosis of cerebral hydatic cyst has been made. The complementary exploration didn't show any other localizations, and biologic exam results didn't show any particular anomalies. The patient has been operated in neurosurgery. The immediate evolution was favorable with disappearance of confusion and absence of complications. The patient was lost of view. Six months after, the patient has been readmitted to the psychiatric emergency. He dropped his neuroleptic treatment. He was aggressive, raving, hallucinated and depersonalized. The global score to the PANSS was 63. He has been put back under neuroleptics. Three weeks after improvement and passage of the PANSS to 30, the patient went out. We couldn't have a cerebral scanner of control because the patient had no medical assurance and no money for cerebral scanner. Case 2 - Patient aged of 53 years, father of four children, uneducated, native and resident of Marrakech, confectioner as profession. He is in contact with dogs since 12 years. He has been brought to the psychiatric emergencies by his family after an agitation. The history of his illness seemed to go back at eight months ago, by the progressive apparition of an instability, sleep disorders, hostility, associated with an emotional lability. To the interview he