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Sample records for mesa central mexico

  1. Geology, geochronology, and geochemistry of basaltic flows of the Cat Hills, Cat Mesa, Wind Mesa, Cerro Verde, and Mesita Negra, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, F.; Budahn, J.R.; Peters, L.; Unruh, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The geochronology, geochemistry, and isotopic compositions of basaltic flows erupted from the Cat Hills, Cat Mesa, Wind Mesa, Cerro Verde, and Mesita Negra volcanic centres in central New Mexico indicate that each of these lavas had unique origins and that the predominant mantle involved in their production was an ocean-island basalt type. The basalts from Cat Hills (0.11 Ma) and Cat Mesa (3.0 Ma) are similar in major and trace element composition, but differences in MgO contents and Pb isotopic values are attributed to a small involvement of a lower crustal component in the genesis of the Cat Mesa rocks. The Cerro Verde rock is comparable in age (0.32 Ma) to the Cat Hills lavas, but it is more radiogenic in Sr and Nd, has higher MgO contents, and has a lower La/Yb ratio. This composition is explained by the melting of an enriched mantle source, but the involvement of another crustal component cannot be disregarded. The Wind Mesa rock is characterized by similar age (4.01 Ma) and MgO contents, but it has enriched rare-earth element contents compared with the Cat Mesa samples. These are attributed to a difference in the degree of partial melting of the Cat Mesa source. The Mesita Negra rock (8.11 Ma) has distinctive geochemical and isotopic compositions that suggest a different enriched mantle and that large amounts of a crustal component were involved in generating this magma. These data imply a temporal shift in magma source regions and crustal involvement, and have been previously proposed for Rio Grande rift lavas. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  2. Helminth infracommunity structure of the sympatric garter snakes Thamnophis eques and Thamnophis melanogaster from the Mesa Central of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ruiz, F Agustin; García-Prieto, Luis; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2002-06-01

    Seventy-two Mexican garter snakes (Thamnophis eques) and 126 black-bellied garter snakes (T. melanogaster) were collected from 4 localities of the Mesa Central of Mexico between July 1996 and February 1998 and examined for helminths. Both species of garter snakes occurred sympatrically in every locality except in Lake Cuitzeo. Both species of snakes shared 9 helminth species, and in general, T. melanogaster hosted a larger number of species than T. eques. In each locality, a different helminth species showed the highest levels of prevalence and abundance (Spiroxys susanae in Ciénaga de Lerma, Telorchis corti in Lago de Pátzcuaro, Proteocephalus variabilis in Lago de Cuitzeo, and Contracaecum sp. in Lago de Chapala). Helminth communities in garter snakes of the Mesa Central are depauperate and dominated by a single parasite species. In those localities where the snakes occurred in sympatry, helminth communities were, in general, more diverse and species-rich in T. melanogaster. Differences in the ecology and physiology of these species of garter snakes may explain this pattern because black-bellied garter snakes (T. melanogaster) are more aquatic than Mexican garter snakes (T. eques) and primarily eat aquatic prey, potentially exposing themselves to a larger number of helminths transmitted by predator-prey infection. The helminth infracommunities of garter snakes in the Mesa Central of Mexico show a strong Nearctic influence because most of the species infecting these hosts have been recorded in other Nearctic colubrid snakes. However, the helminth infracommunities of these garter snakes are less species-rich and less diverse than those in colubrid snakes in more temperate latitudes. The widespread ecological perturbation of sampling sites in the Mesa Central because of human activity, and geographic differences in foraging ecology of the hosts and, thus, exposure to parasites transmitted by intermediate hosts may help to explain these patterns.

  3. Human impacts on drainages of the Mesa Central, Mexico, and its genetic effects on an endangered fish, Zoogoneticus quitzeoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Domínguez, Omar; Boto, Luis; Alda, Fernando; Pérez-Ponce De León, Gerardo; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    The Mesa Central of Mexico is of special conservation interest due to its high richness of freshwater fish species, of which the goodeines are one of the most representative groups. Through an integrated approach, we determined conservation priorities for goodeine populations. We based our recommendations on the genetic diversity (variation in five microsatellite DNA loci) in 10 populations of Zoogoneticus quitzeoensis and on an analysis of ecological (e.g., presence of exotic species), social (e.g., political situation), and environmental (e.g., pollution) information for 52 historical occurrence points for species in the genus Zoogoneticus. Patterns of genetic erosion and genetic diversity indices were closely associated with human impact. Recent bottleneck events were most evident in the populations from remnants of the lakes drained at the beginning of the twentieth century. We identified seven operational conservation units (OCUs), all of which should be conserved because they contain unique portions of the total variation of the species. Special attention needs to be given to increase genetic variability, recover population sizes, and reestablish contact among populations within OCUs. It is imperative to create an integrative and effective approach for the recovery and conservation of the freshwater fish diversity of Central Mexico that is based on social and natural sciences.

  4. Counterclockwise rotations in the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic fields of San Luis Potosí and Sierra de Guanajuato (eastern Mesa Central, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Louis; Gattacceca, Jerôme; Rangin, Claude; Martínez-Reyes, Juventino; Demory, François

    2014-12-01

    We used paleomagnetic and structural data to investigate the late Eocene-Oligocene tectonic evolution of the Mesa Central area in Mexico. The Mesa Central was affected by NW-trending faults (Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system) coeval with a Late Eocene-Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and by post-27 Ma NNE-trending grabens related to the Basin and Range. We obtained reliable paleomagnetic directions from 61 sites within the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic series (~ 30 to ~ 27 Ma) of the San Luis Potosí volcanic field and Sierra de Guanajuato. For each site we also measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Tilt corrections were made using AMS data for 33 sites where in situ bedding measurements were not available. Paleomagnetic directions indicate counterclockwise rotations of about 10° with respect to stable North America after 30-25 Ma. Structural data suggest that the volcanic succession was mainly affected by normal faults. However, we also found evidences for oblique or horizontal striae showing a left-lateral component along NW-trending faults and a right lateral component along NE-trending faults. Both motions are consistent with a N-S extension oblique to the Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system. Previous paleomagnetic studies in northern and southern Mexico show the prevalence of minor left-lateral shear components along regional-scale transpressional and transtensional lineaments. Our paleomagnetic data may reflect thus small vertical-axis rotations related to a minor shear component coeval with the Oligocene intra-arc extension in central Mexico.

  5. Geophysical Exploration of Fractured-Media Aquifers at the Mexican Mesa Central: Satellite City, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Loera, Héctor; Ramos Leal, José Alfredo; Dávila Harris, Pablo; Torres Gaytan, David Ernesto; Martinez Ruiz, Victor Julian; Gogichaishvili, Avto

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater is scarce in arid and semi-arid zones in the Mexican Mesa Central. It is found at depths over 200 m, and its movement is primarily through fractures. This work aims to present a geophysical methodology, which shows the potential of combining natural and induced methods to locate confined aquifers in fault zones. The studies begin by interpreting the aeromagnetic survey, mainly by seeking lineaments associated with low magnetic anomalies, which are correlated with fault zones, and/or fractures and/or geological contacts where ferromagnetic minerals have undergone oxidation due to their association with recharge zones. These aeromagnetic lineaments are confirmed on land by a ground magnetic survey. After locating these areas, interpreted as permeability zones, their possible association with moist zones is confirmed by applying the vertical electrical sounding (VES) technique. H-type curve is associated with the presence of saturated zones. This study used the proposed methodology to interpret four main aeromagnetic lineaments and 12 main ground magnetic lineaments in a 36 km2 (6 km × 6 km) area. Twenty-six SEV were performed over these magnetic lineaments, of which about 50 % were associated with H-type resistivity curves, interpreted as being associated with moisture. Of the 12 VES with inferred groundwater potential, two wells have been drilled to date, one having an extraction flow of 70 lps.

  6. Definition of groundwater recharge and discharge zones through surface indicators: Centre-South of the Mesa Central, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Andrea Peñuela Arévalo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the delimitation of groundwater recharge and discharge zones in the centresouth portion of the Mesa Central. This was achieved using groundwater flow systems theory, which has proved to be a valuable tool since it considers a systemic perspective of the environment, integrating several natural elements. There are various physical, chemical and biological processes generated in the subsoil within which groundwater is incorporated. This involvement is caused by the natural gravitational movement of groundwater which is manifested on the surface by contrasting evidences in the recharge and discharge zones. Therefore, the objective of this paper includes the demonstration of the usefulness of the analysis of those indicators to locate priority areas and also provides an approximation of groundwater functioning. The definition of recharge and discharge zones included the analysis of maps describing soil type, vegetation, topographic elevation, groundwater flowpath direction, springs, and presence of natural water bodies. Such analysis was carried out through the overlaying tool of ArcMap™ software. The results suggest that the highlands of Fría, San Miguelito and Santa Bárbara as recharge zones. Natural discharge zones were originally present in the plain of the Aguascalientes tectonic depression, and some flat and topographic low zones in the vicinity of Altos de Jalisco, Santa María del Río and Ojuelos.

  7. Is the Mesa Central of Mexico a biogeographical province? Descriptive analysis based on freshwater biotic components ¿La mesa central de México es una provincia biogeográfica? Análisis descriptivo basado en componentes bióticos dulceacuícolas

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    Omar Domínguez-Domínguez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents an analysis of the concept of Mesa Central of México as a potential biogeographical province. This region of México has been used as a reference for describing species richness and distribution patterns of the freshwater fish fauna. However, it has not been recognized as a biogeographical province in the available schemes which are mostly based on the composition of terrestrial biota. Here, we provide a historical sketch of the way the concept of Mesa Central arose in the literature as a physiographic province, and we provide a comparison with respect to the regionalization schemes of the Mexican territory, which are based on attributes such physiography, elevation, hydrology, geology and biogeography. We conclude that the Mesa Central, even though it represents a practical concept for establishing the distribution pattern of the fish fauna, in the way it was described originally cannot be circumscribed to any of the regions or provinces in which Mexico has been divided. We also argue that this geographical region cannot be considered as a synonym of the Transmexican Volcanic Axis biogeographical province, and also that it is possible that the fact that this area is not circumscribed to any regionalization scheme is due to the fact that freshwater elements have not been considered in the establishment of such biogeographical regions. We end by pointing out the need for a biogeographical analysis that integrates most of the freshwater elements in order to determine whether both the aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna are driven by the same geobiotic processes.En este ensayo se presenta un análisis del concepto de Mesa Central de México como una posible provincia biogeográfica. Esta región del país ha sido utilizada como referencia para describir la riqueza y distribución de una parte importante de la fauna ictiológica dulceacuícola, sin embargo, no es reconocida como provincia biogeográfica en ninguno de los

  8. Mexico and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, M

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and HIV/AIDS in Mexico and Central America, including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Most migrants travel to the US through Mexico. US-Mexico trade agreements created opportunities for increased risk of HIV transmission. The research literature focuses on Mexico. Most countries, with the exception of Belize and Costa Rica, are sending countries. Human rights of migrants are violated in transit and at destination. Migration policies determine migration processes. The Mexican-born population in the US is about 3% of US population and 8% of Mexico's population. About 22% arrived during 1992-97, and about 500,000 are naturalized US citizens. An additional 11 million have a Mexican ethnic background. Mexican migrants are usually economically active men who had jobs before leaving and were urban people who settled in California, Texas, Illinois, and Arizona. Most Mexican migrants enter illegally. Many return to Mexico. The main paths of HIV transmission are homosexual, heterosexual, and IV-drug-injecting persons. Latino migrants frequently use prostitutes, adopt new sexual practices including anal penetration among men, greater diversity of sexual partners, and use of injectable drugs.

  9. [The first experience wih ICSI and MESA in Panama, Central America and the Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, C; Sánchez, F

    1998-01-01

    The intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has represented an important advance in human reproduction technology, improving the results in those couples with a very low probability of achieving pregnancy. Our aim is present the results of our first experience with ICSI and MESA in Panama, Central America and the Caribe.

  10. New fusulinids from Lower Permian turbidites at Conglomerate Mesa, southeastern inyo Mountains, east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.

    2009-01-01

    Seven previously unrecognized fusulinid species from Lower Permian (Wolfcampian and Leonardian) turbidites near Conglomerate Mesa in east-central California, four of which are named as new species, are here described and figured. The four new species are Schwagerina merriami, S. wildei, Parafusulina mackevetti, and Skinnerella rossi. These fusulinid species have close affinities to similar taxa in Texas and northeastern Nevada, and they are distinct from some other faunas of slightly different age in the Conglomerate Mesa area that are dominated by endemic species and other species with Eastern Klamath Mountains affinities.

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30

    Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

  12. The algal growth-limiting nutrient of lakes located at Mexico’s Mesa Central

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    Fernando W. Bernal-Brooks

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the algal growth-limiting nutrients of five lakes located on Mexico’s Mesa Central - a topic poorly known in the regional limnology of Mexico. The five case studies involved three contiguous watersheds of Michoacán State and provided a trophic state variation from mesotrophic to hypereutrophic; the case studies included Lakes Zirahuén, Pátzcuaro, Teremendo, Cuitzeo and the Cointzio Reservoir. The fieldwork involved the collection of physical and chemical data (including nutrients from each case study during the dry and rainy seasons of 2010. Additionally, water samples (1 L were obtained and filtered (0.45 µm in the laboratory to keep the nutrient content available for bioassays. The chemical analyses suggested a phosphorus (P limitation in the Cointzio Reservoir, Lake Teremendo and Lake Zirahuén relative to an N:P>16:1. There was a nitrogen (N limitation at three sampling stations of Lake Pátzcuaro, with an N:P<16:1. As result of the bioassays conducted in July 2012, the Cointzio Reservoir and Lake Teremendo appeared to be P-limited and Lake Pátzcuaro appeared to be N-limited at three sampling stations. Lake Zirahuén showed seasonal variation, with an N limitation during the dry season and a P limitation during the wet season. Those cases with similar results from both methods confirmed the limiting nutrient identification. Lake Cuitzeo, Lake Zirahuén (dry season, and the shallowest sampling station in Lake Pátzcuaro produced unclear results because of divergent outcomes. In terms of the algal growth potential, the Cointzio Reservoir remained unaltered from one season to the next. However, for most of the lakes (with the exception of Lake Pátzcuaro sites 2 and 4, the rainy season provided a dilution effect. Effective lake management depends on a clear recognition of such elements that are in control of the aquatic productivity. In the area of Michoacán, both N and P may act as limiting nutrients.

  13. The Laramide Mesa formation and the Ojo de Agua caldera, southeast of the Cananea copper mining district, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dennis P.; Miller, Robert J.; Woodbourne, Keith L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mesa Formation extends from Cananea, Mexico, southeast to the Sonora River and is the main host rock of Laramide porphyry copper deposits in the Cananea District and at the Alacran porphyry prospect to the east. The Mesa consists of two members-a lower andesite and an upper dacite. The lowest part of the dacite member is a crystal tuff about 100 m thick. This tuff is the outfall of a caldera centered near the village of Ojo de Agua, dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 65.8 Ma ?0.4. The Ojo de Agua Caldera is about 9 km in diameter and is filled by a light gray biotite dacite tuff with abundant flattened pumice fragments. The volume of the caldera is estimated to be 24 km3.

  14. Ethnographic Evaluation of the MESA Program at a South-Central Phoenix High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, James A.

    MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Achievement) is a program designed to increase the number of underrepresented ethnic groups in professions related to mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences. This paper describes and evaluates the MESA program at Jarama High School, Phoenix (Arizona), using informal interviews and…

  15. Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drici, Warda [International Technologies Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2003-08-01

    This report documents the analysis of the available transport parameter data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  16. Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drici, Warda [Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2004-02-01

    This report documents the analysis of the available hydrologic data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  17. New permian fusulinids from conglomerate mesa, southeastern inyo Mountains, east-central california

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    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.

    2009-01-01

    In the Conglomerate Mesa area in the southeastern Inyo Mountains, east-central California, a series of distinctive fusulinid assemblages ranging in age from late Artinskian to Kungurian or Roadian was developed in units 7-10 of the sedimentary rocks of Santa Rosa Flat (part of the Owens Valley Group). The fauna of unit 7 shows some eastern Klamath Mountains affinity, but most of the species in unit 7 and the lower half of unit 8 are highly endemic and comprise three new genera with 12 new species, two unusual unassigned forms, and two other new species assigned to previously described genera. New taxa include: Crenulosepta new genus with five new species, C. inyoensis, C. delicata, C. fusiformis, C. rossi, and C. wahlmani; Nigribaccinus new genus with three new species, N. giganteus, N. elegans, and N. ? nestelli; and the new genus Inyoschwagerina with four new species, I. magnified, I. elayeri, I. elongata, and I.? linderae. Cuniculinella Skinner and Wilde, 1965, is represented by one new species, C. parva, and Skinnerella Coogan, 1960 by one new species, S.? mcallisteri. Faunas from the upper half of unit 8, unit 9, and unit 10 have a strong West Texas affinity. New species from these units are Skinnerella davydovi, S. hexagona, Parafusulina cerrogordoensis, P. complexa, P. halli, P. owensensis, and P. ubehebensis. Copyright ?? 2009, The Paleontological Society.

  18. Mesa redonda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lira Olmo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available En relación al tema central del presente número de la Revista Urbano, la "Identidad Urbana", el Comité Editorial de la misma estimó en su oportunidad de gran interés reunir en una Mesa Redonda a destacados intelectuales, académicos y profesionales que, de una u otra forma, están vinculados por su trabajo, investigación e inquietudes personales con este apasionante tema del cual existen tantas y tan variadas concepciones.

  19. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, John

    2004-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 101 and 102.

  20. 77 FR 3257 - Transfer of Land Tracts Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ...-central New Mexico, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) north- northeast of Albuquerque, and about 25 miles (40... State Road 502 on the Townsite Mesa top (about 55 acres) that had been retained to serve as a health and... Tract (about 245 acres) situated along DP Road on the DP Mesa top and east into the DP canyon area, as...

  1. Classic to postclassic in highland central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumond, D E; Muller, F

    1972-03-17

    The data and argument we have presented converge on three points. 1) With the decline and abandonment of Teotihuacan by the end of the Metepec phase (Teotihuacan IV), the valleys of Mexico and of Puebla-Tlax-cala witnessed the development of a ceramic culture that was represented, on the one hand, by obvious Teotihuacan derivations in presumably ritual ware and possible Teotihuacan derivations in simpler pottery of red-on-buff, and, on the other hand, by elements that seem to represent a resurgence of Preclassic characteristics. Whether the development is explained through a measure of outside influence or as a local phenomenon, the direct derivation of a substantial portion of the complex from Classic Teotihuacan is unmistakable. This transitional horizon predated the arrival of plumbate tradeware in highland central Mexico. 2) The transitional horizon coincided with (and no doubt was an integral part of) an alteration of Classic settlement patterns so drastic that it must bespeak political disruption. Nevertheless, there is no evidence that the Postclassic center of Tula represented a significant force in the highlands at that time. There is no evidence that the center of Cholula, which may even have been substantially abandoned during the previous period, was able to exert any force at this juncture; it appears more likely that Cholula was largely reoccupied after the abandonment of Teotihuacan. There is no direct evidence of domination by Xochicalco or any other known major foreign center, although some ceramic traits suggest that relatively minor influences may have emanated from Xochicalco; unfortunately, the state of research at that center does not permit a determination at this time. Thus the most reasonable view on the basis of present evidence is that the abandonment of Teotihuacan was not the direct result of the strength of another centralized power, although some outside populations may have been involved in a minor way. Whatever the proximate cause

  2. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31

    Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  3. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30

    Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  4. Completion Report for Well ER-20-12: Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtz, Jeff [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Well ER-20-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada National Security Administration Nevada Field Office in support of the Underground Test Area Activity. The well was drilled from October 2015 to January 2016 as an addition to the Central and Western Pahute Mesa corrective action units 101 and 102 the Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-12 was identified based on recommendations of the Pahute Mesa Guidance Team as a result of anomalous tritium detections in groundwater samples collected from Well PM-3 in 2011 and 2013. The primary purpose of the well was to provide information on the hydrogeology in the area downgradient of select underground tests on Western Pahute Mesa and define hydraulic properties in the saturated Tertiary volcanic rocks. The main 46.99-centimeter (cm) (18.5-inch [in.]) borehole was drilled to a depth of 765.14 meters (m) (2,510.3 ft) and the hole opened to 66.04 cm (26 in.); followed by the 50.80-cm (20-in.) surface casing, which was installed and sealed with cement; and a piezometer (p4) was set in the Timber Mountain welded-tuff aquifer (TMWTA) between the casing and the open borehole. The borehole was continued with a 46.99-cm (18.5-in.) drill bit to a depth of 1,326.53 m (4,352.16 ft), and an intermediate 24.44-cm (9.625-in.) casing was installed and sealed to 1,188.72 m (3,900.00 ft) A piezometer (p3) was installed across the Calico Hills zeolitic composite unit (CHZCM) (lava-flow aquifer [LFA]) in the annulus of the open borehole. Two additional piezometers were installed and completed between the intermediate casing and the borehole wall, one (p2) in the CHZCM and one (p1) in the Belted Range aquifer (BRA). The piezometers are set to monitor groundwater properties in the completed intervals. The borehole was continued with a 21.59-cm (8.5-in.) drill bit to a total depth of 1,384.80 m (4,543.33 ft), and the main completion 13.97-cm (5.5-in.) casing was installed in the open borehole across the Pre-Belted Range

  5. Microsystems technologist workforce development capacity and challenges in Central New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Thor D.

    2008-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has made major investments in microsystems-related infrastructure and research staff development over the past two decades, culminating most recently in the MESA project. These investment decisions have been made based in part upon the necessity for highly reliable, secure, and for some purposes, radiation-hardened devices and subsystems for safety and sustainability of the United States nuclear arsenal and other national security applications. SNL's microsystems development and fabrication capabilities are located almost entirely within its New Mexico site, rendering their effectiveness somewhat dependent on the depth and breadth of the local microsystems workforce. Consequently, the status and development capacity of this workforce has been seen as a key personnel readiness issue in relation to the maintenance of SNL's microsystems capabilities. For this reason SNL has supported the instantiation and development of the Southwest Center for Microsystems Education, an Advanced Technology Education center funded primarily by the National Science Foundation, in order to foster the development of local training capacity for microsystems technologists. Although the SCME and the associated Manufacturing Technology program at Central New Mexico Community College have developed an effective curriculum and graduated several highly capable microsystems technologists, the future of both the center and the degree program remain uncertain due to insufficient student enrollment. The central region of New Mexico has become home to many microsystems-oriented commercial firms. As the demands of those firms for technologists evolve, SNL may face staffing problems in the future, especially if local training capacity is lost.

  6. Mesa antivibraciones

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Vidorreta, Iván

    2010-01-01

    El objeto de este proyecto es el diseño y la construcción de una mesa antivibraciones. Las vibraciones (ruido) provienen de la tierra o de vibraciones sísmicas y existen en todos los ambientes del mundo. Este ruido tiene varias fuentes: las olas rompiendo en las costas costeras, la rutina constante de las placas tectónicas, el viento sopla los árboles y edificios, de las fuentes artificiales, como maquinaria, sistemas de climatización, el tráfico de la calle e incluso la ...

  7. Upper Mantle Discontinuities Underneath Central and Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Campos, X.; Clayton, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Central and southern Mexico are affected by the subduction of Cocos plate beneath North American plate. The MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE) and the Veracruz-Oaxaca (VEOX) project have mapped the geometry of the Cocos slab. It is characterized in central Mexico by a shallow horizontal geometry up to ~300 km from the trench, then it dives steeply (70°) into the mantle, to its apparent end at 500 km depth. In contrast, some 400 km to the south, the slab subducts smoothly, with a dip angle of ~26° to a depth of 150 km. We use receiver functions from teleseismic events, recorded at stations from MASE, VEOX, and the Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN, Mexican National Seismological Service) to map the upper mantle discontinuities and properties of the transition zone in central and southern Mexico. We also use data from the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) Experiment to get a complete picture of the subduction regime in central Mexico and compare the mantle transition zone in a slab tear regime. The 410 discontinuity shows significant variation in topography in central Mexico, particularly where the slab is expected to reach such depth. The 660 discontinuity shows a smoother topography, indicating that the slab does not penetrate this far down. The results will be compared with a ridge regime in the Gulf of California.

  8. CONDICIONES ATMOSFÉRICAS, COMPORTAMIENTO DE LA DISTRIBUCIÓN PLUVIOMÉTRICA Y SUS EFECTOS EN LA AGRICULTURA DE TEMPORAL DURANTE 1996 Y 1997 EN LA MESA CENTRAL DE GUANAJUATO, MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca GRANADOS RAMÍREZ

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available La agricultura de temporal sigue siendo la actividad primaria esencial en la economía de México, ocupa aproximadamente 17 000 000 de hectáreas en superficie; sin embargo, y como consecuencia de las condiciones irregulares de la precipitación se ha reducido considerablemente tanto en superficie como en productividad. Con objeto de relacionar los efectos de las condiciones atmosféricas y el comportamiento de la precipitación, en la presente investigación se abordó esta problemática mediante la interpretación de imágenes diarias del satélite Goes 8, se resumieron las condiciones prevalecientes en superficie y niveles medios de la atmósfera de enero a diciembre de 1996 y 1997. Además se recopiló y procesó información pluviométrica diaria y se realizó trabajo de campo específicamente en las áreas agrícolas de la Mesa Central de Guanajuato. Concluyéndose que los cambios en los patrones de lluvia han afectado severamente la actividad agrícola. En los dos ciclos analizados existió relación entre las fluctuaciones atmosféricas, factores climáticos, periodos vegetativos y producción de productos básicos de temporal (maíz y frijol; por tanto, se investigan nuevas alternativas que permitan a los agricultores cambiar el uso del suelo, o introducir nuevos cultivos que ayuden a amortiguar las pérdidas por las irregularidades en la precipitación. Athmospherical conditions, rainfall’s distribution dynamics and its effects in temporary agriculture during 1996 and 1997 in Guanajuato’s Central Mesa, Mexico Abstract Dryland agriculture is still the major economical activity in Mexico, to which a surface area of approximately 17 000 000 ha is devoted. However, as a consequence of irregular rainfall conditions, productivity and the amount of land devoted to dryland agriculture have considerably decreased. In order to relate the effects of atmospheric and rainfall behavior, in this study we examined these problems by interpretating

  9. Geology of the south-central part of the New River Mesa Quadrangle, Cave Creek area, Maricopa County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Ernest

    1979-01-01

    A small area north of Cave Creek, Arizona, contains key stratigraphic and structural information bearing on the Cenozoic development of the mountain and desert regions of Arizona. The area contains elements of the two physiographic regions. The northern and western parts are high mesas containing flat lying interbedded Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary strata. These deposits can be traced southward across the physiographic boundary where they are tilted and down faulted into the desert region. Seven bedrock units were revealed by geologic mapping at 1:12,000 scale. They are, in ascending stratigraphic order: (1) a basement of Precambrian schist, granitic rock, and diabase (300 meters exposed), (2) fanglomerate derived from the crystalline rocks, of probable early and middle Oligocene age (0-152 m thick), (3) andesite of possible middle Oligocene age (225 m thick), (4) interbedded sediments and volcanics of Oligocene and Miocene age (30-320 m thick), and (5) resistant cliff forming basalt flows of middle Miocene age (125-180 m thick) that cap the high mesas. Regional uplift of an exposed Precambrian terrane occurred ~38-30 m.y. ago, accompanied by erosion of the basement and deposition of fanglomerate. Regional volcanism began ~30 m.y. ago, apparently with the extrusion of andesite, followed by deposition of alkali basaltic flows, tuff, lake beds, and alluvium in one or more irregularly closed basins, formed as a result of faulting and volcanism. A transition from calcalkali and alkali volcanism to olivine basalt volcanism of the Hickey Formation occurred approximately IS m.y. ago. The interval 14.5-11 m.y. saw the deposition of olivine basalt flows of the New River Mesa formation, which cap the high mesas and correlate with basalt of the Hickey Formation. Topographic development of the mountain-desert region boundary occurred with collapse of the basalts of the New River Mesa formation into the desert region. This may have occurred at the time of initial subsidence

  10. Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2006-06-01

    The Pahute Mesa groundwater flow model supports the FFACO UGTA corrective action strategy objective of providing an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU in order to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing above background conditions exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. The FFACO (1996) requires that the contaminant transport model predict the contaminant boundary at 1,000 years and “at a 95% level of confidence.” The Pahute Mesa Phase I flow model described in this report provides, through the flow fields derived from alternative hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) and recharge models, one part of the data required to compute the contaminant boundary. Other components include the simplified source term model, which incorporates uncertainty and variability in the factors that control radionuclide release from an underground nuclear test (SNJV, 2004a), and the transport model with the concomitant parameter uncertainty as described in Shaw (2003). The uncertainty in all the above model components will be evaluated to produce the final contaminant boundary. This report documents the development of the groundwater flow model for the Central and Western Pahute Mesa CAUs.

  11. Estado de conservación de los peces de la familia Goodeidae (Cyprinodontiformes en la mesa central de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Y De la Vega-Salazar

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estableció el estado de conservación y se identificaron los riesgos que presentan los peces de la familia Goodeidae en la Mesa Central de México. Para ello se evaluó la disminución en el número de localidades y el área de distribución, y se incorporó una descripción limnológica en 53 localidades. Esta evaluación incluyó una comparación de las colecciones actuales con registros hist��ricos de la distribución de la familia. Un análisis de componentes principales de las variables limnológicas indicó que la mayoría de las especies de goodeidos habitan localidades caracterizadas por tener poca degradación ambiental, y sólo pocas especies parecen tener elevada tolerancia a dicho estado de contaminación. Los resultados de la disminución histórica de localidades y del área de distribución sugieren que el estado de conservación de las especies (de acuerdo con los criterios de la IUCN es el siguiente: una especie está extinta (Allotoca catarinae, una especie está extinta en la naturaleza (Skiffia francesae, ya que existen ejemplares en cautiverio, ocho están en peligro crítico (Allotoca goslinei, Allotoca regalis, Allotoca zacapuensis, Allodontichthys hubbsi, Ameca splendens, Characodon audax, Hubbsina turneri y Zoogoneticus tequila, once están en peligro, ocho se consideran como vulnerables, cuatro se pueden considerar en riesgo próximo y sólo dos parecen no enfrentar ningún riesgo. En conclusión, la pérdida de hábitat, la introducción de especies exóticas de peces, el ámbito geográfico restringido y la especialización ecológica de las especies son los principales factores de riesgo para las especies estudiadas de la familia Goodeidae. La supervivencia de este grupo requiere acciones para su conservación.Conservation status of Goodeidae familiy fishes (Cyprinodontiformes from the Mexican Central Plateau. To establish the conservation status and threats for Goodeidae fishes in the high plateau of Mexico

  12. Advances in integrated fire management in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante Arturo Rodríguez Trejo; Arturo Cruz Reyes

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research and operational results of efforts made by some rural communities, the National Forestry Commission (CONAFOR), the Universidad Autónoma Chapingo (UACH) and other organizations to achieve integrated fire management in central Mexico. The research includes the latest results obtained by UACH's Ajusco Project on the subject, in both...

  13. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31

    Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  14. Association of Drought with Typhus Epidemics in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna-Soto, R.; Stahle, D.; Villanueva Diaz, J.; Therrell, M.

    2007-05-01

    Typhus is an acute infectious disease caused by the bacteria Rickettsia prowazekii, which is transmitted among humans by the body lice (Pediculus humanus corporis). The disease is highly contagious and transmission is favored in populations living in crowded conditions. Under these circumstances, typhus transmission is facilitated by factors that favor the colonization and proliferation of body lice such as absence of personal hygiene and wearing the same clothes for long periods of time. Historically, periods of war and famine were associated with devastating epidemics with high mortality rates in many parts of the world. Central Mexico has a long record of typhus epidemics. In this region, at > 2000 meters above sea level, the disease was endemic and occurred with a seasonal pattern in winter, with occasional large epidemics. Recently, we completed a chronology of epidemics in Mexico. A total of 22 well-defined major typhus epidemics were identified between 1650 and 1920. All of them caused periods of increased mortality that lasted 2 - 4 years (more than one standard deviation from the previous ten year period). The record of typhus epidemics was evaluated against the tree-ring record of Cuauhtmoc La Fragua, Puebla. This chronology, based on Douglas fir, has demonstrated to be a faithful record of precipitation in central Mexico. The results indicate that a statistically significant drought (t test, p war. This indicates that drought alone was capable of inducing the social conditions for increased transmission of typhus in pre-industrial central Mexico.

  15. Completion Report for Well ER-20-7: Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-04-28

    Well ER-20-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to further investigate migration of radionuclides from the nearby, up-gradient TYBO and BENHAM underground nuclear tests, which originally was discovered at Well Cluster ER-20-5. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 44.45-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 681.8 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 671.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.12 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 894.9 meters. The completion string, set to the depth of 890.0 meters, consists of 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.37-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing has one continuous slotted interval open to the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, sidewall core samples from 20 depth intervals, various geophysical logs, water quality (primarily tritium) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 894.9 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including two saturated welded-tuff aquifers. A fluid level measurement was obtained during open-hole geophysical well logging for the upper, Tiva Canyon, aquifer at the depth of 615.7 meters on June 19, 2009. The fluid level measured in the open hole on June 27, 2009,after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off, was also at the depth of 615.7 meters. Preliminary field measurements indicated 1

  16. 1996 Central New Mexico Section [American Chemical Society] annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemistry Science and Technology Div.

    1997-02-07

    The main goal of the Central New Mexico Section this year was to increase attendance at the local meetings. Throughout the course of the year attendance at the meeting more than doubled. This was brought on by several factors: having the meeting spread throughout the section (Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Socorro, Los Alamos); supplementing the ACS National Tour speakers with interesting local sections speakers; and making full use of the newly formed Public Relations Committee. Activities during 1996 are summarized.

  17. Gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus parasite diversity in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Hernández-Camacho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has a long history of parasitological studies in communities of vertebrates. However, the mega diversity of the country makes fauna inventories an ongoing priority. Presently, there is little published on the parasite fauna of gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus Schereber, 1775 and this study provides new records of parasites for gray foxes in central Mexico. It is a continuation of a series of previous parasitological studies conducted with this carnivore in Mexico from 2003 to the present. A total of 24 foxes in the Parque Nacional El Cimatario (PANEC were trapped, anaesthetized, and parasites recovered. The species found were Dirofilaria immitis, Ctenocephalides canis, C. felis, Euhoplopsillus glacialis affinis (first report for gray foxes in Mexico Pulex simulants, and Ixodes sp. Three additional gray fox carcasses were necropsied and the parasites collected were adult nematodes Physaloptera praeputialis and Toxocara canis. The intensive study of the gray fox population selected for the 2013–2015 recent period allowed for a two-fold increase in the number of parasite species recorded for this carnivore since 2003 (nine to 18 parasite species, mainly recording parasitic arthropods, Dirofilaria immitis filariae and adult nematodes. The parasite species recorded are generalists that can survive in anthropic environments; which is characteristic of the present ecological scenario in central Mexico. The close proximity of the PANEC to the city of Santiago de Queretaro suggests possible parasite transmission between the foxes and domestic and feral dogs. Furthermore, packs of feral dogs in the PANEC might have altered habitat use by foxes, with possible impacts on transmission.

  18. Gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) parasite diversity in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Camacho, Norma; Pineda-López, Raúl Francisco; de Jesús Guerrero-Carrillo, María; Cantó-Alarcón, Germinal Jorge; Jones, Robert Wallace; Moreno-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Mosqueda-Gualito, Juan Joel; Zamora-Ledesma, Salvador; Camacho-Macías, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    Mexico has a long history of parasitological studies in communities of vertebrates. However, the mega diversity of the country makes fauna inventories an ongoing priority. Presently, there is little published on the parasite fauna of gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus Schereber, 1775) and this study provides new records of parasites for gray foxes in central Mexico. It is a continuation of a series of previous parasitological studies conducted with this carnivore in Mexico from 2003 to the present. A total of 24 foxes in the Parque Nacional El Cimatario (PANEC) were trapped, anaesthetized, and parasites recovered. The species found were Dirofilaria immitis, Ctenocephalides canis, C. felis, Euhoplopsillus glacialis affinis (first report for gray foxes in Mexico) Pulex simulants, and Ixodes sp. Three additional gray fox carcasses were necropsied and the parasites collected were adult nematodes Physaloptera praeputialis and Toxocara canis. The intensive study of the gray fox population selected for the 2013-2015 recent period allowed for a two-fold increase in the number of parasite species recorded for this carnivore since 2003 (nine to 18 parasite species), mainly recording parasitic arthropods, Dirofilaria immitis filariae and adult nematodes. The parasite species recorded are generalists that can survive in anthropic environments; which is characteristic of the present ecological scenario in central Mexico. The close proximity of the PANEC to the city of Santiago de Queretaro suggests possible parasite transmission between the foxes and domestic and feral dogs. Furthermore, packs of feral dogs in the PANEC might have altered habitat use by foxes, with possible impacts on transmission.

  19. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-12-01

    Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole

  20. Regional geothermal exploration in north central New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L. (ed.)

    1984-02-01

    A broad-based geothermal resource reconnaissance study covering Bernalillo, Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Taos, Torrance, and Valencia counties in north central New Mexico was conducted from June 15, 1981, through September 30, 1983. Specific activities included the compilation of actual temperature, bottom-hole temperature gradient, and geotemperature data; tabulation of water chemistry data; field collection of temperature-depth data from existing wells; and drilling of temperature gradient holes in the Ojo Caliente, San Ysidro, Rio Puerco, and Polvadera areas. The data collected were used to perform: (1) a regional analysis of the geothermal energy potential of north central New Mexico; (2) two site-specific studies of the potential relationship between groundwater constrictions and geothermal resources; (3) an evaluation of the geothermal energy potential at Santa Ana Pueblo; (4) a general analysis of the geothermal energy resources of the Rio Grande Rift, including specific data on the Valles Caldera; and (5) an evaluation of the use of geothermometers on New Mexico groundwaters. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual chapters.

  1. Subsidence Induced Faulting Hazard risk maps in Mexico City and Morelia, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Hernández-Espriu, J.; Cigna, F.; Wdowinski, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Falorni, G.; Bohane, A.; Colombo, D.

    2012-12-01

    Subsidence and surface faulting have affected urban areas in Central Mexico for decades and the process has intensified as a consequence of urban sprawl and economic growth. This process causes substantial damages to the urban infrastructure and housing structures and in several cities it is becoming a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies in the next decades. Subsidence is usually associated with aggressive groundwater extraction rates and a general decrease of aquifer static level that promotes soil consolidation, deformation and ultimately, surface faulting. However, local stratigraphic and structural conditions also play an important role in the development and extension of faults. Despite its potential for damaging housing, and other urban infrastructure, the economic impact of this phenomena is poorly known, in part because detailed, city-wide subsidence induced faulting risk maps have not been published before. Nevertheless, modern remote sensing techniques are most suitable for this task. We present the results of a risk analysis for subsidence induced surface faulting in two cities in central Mexico: Morelia and Mexico City. Our analysis in Mexico City and Morelia is based on a risk matrix using the horizontal subsidence gradient from a Persistent Scatterer InSAR (Morelia) and SqueeSAR (Mexico City) analysis and 2010 census population distribution data from Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography. Defining subsidence induced surface faulting vulnerability within these urbanized areas is best determined using both magnitude and horizontal subsidence gradient. Our Morelia analysis (597,000 inhabitants with localized subsidence rates up to 80 mm/yr) shows that 7% of the urbanized area is under a high to very high risk level, and 14% of its population (11.7% and 2.3% respectively) lives within these areas. In the case of the Mexico City (15'490,000 inhabitants for the

  2. Central Gulf of Mexico lease sale draws weak industry response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that interest in oil and gas leases in the Gulf of Mexico continued spiraling downward at the latest Minerals Management Service offshore sale. Companies participating in Outer Continental Shelf Sale 139 last week in New Orleans offered 196 bids for 151 blocks in the central Gulf of Mexico. MMS offered 5,213 blocks for lease. The number of tracts receiving bids was the fewest at a central gulf lease sale since 114 tracts garnered high bids totaling $146.4 million at Sale 104 in April 1986. Apparent high bids in Sale 139 totaled $56,195,552, and all bids offered totaled just $65,300,864. Both bidding totals were the lowest in a Gulf of Mexico lease sale since MMS began area-wide gulf leasing at Sale 72 in May 1983. Only 64 of 93 qualified companies participated in Sale 139. Fifty-five companies offered apparent winning bids. By comparison, 123 companies at central gulf lease Sale 131 in March 1991 offered 637 bids totaling $320.5 million for 464 tracts. Apparent high bids last spring totaled $259.9 million. At central gulf lease Sale 123 in March 1990, high bids totaled $427.4 million for 538 tracts. In that sale, BP Exploration Inc. led all bidders, exposing $78 million in 79 high bids, including 60 for deepwater tracts. Since then, interest in deepwater tracts has waned in part because of sagging oil and gas prices as U.S. operators sought bigger prospects outside the U.S. Ironically, Sale 139 was dominated by the U.S. subsidiary of an Italian holding company

  3. ECAIM : Air Quality Studies and its Impact in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Suárez, L. G.; Torres, R.; Garcia-Reynoso, J. A.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.; Grutter, M.; Delgado-Campos, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area has been the object of several well know intensive campaigns. Since MARI (1991) , IMADA (1997), MCMA 2003 and MILAGRO (2006). The spatial scope of these studies have gone from urban to regional to continental, with the focus on MCMA as an emissions source. During MILAGRO, the influence on MCMA of wildfires and agricultural biomass burning around the megacity was considered. However, around Mexico City a crown of metropolis and middle size cities make a region known as the Central Mexico Regional Crow (CRCM for its acronym in Spanish language) or Central Mexico City Belt. It contains 32 million inhabitants and produces 40% of national gross product. The region undergoes an uncontrolled urban sprawl. Evidence is building-up on complex air pollution transport processes between the air basins within CRCM. However, only MCMA counts with reliable long-term records of criteria pollutants monitoring. Only few intensive campaigns have been done in the air basins surrounding MCMA. ECAIM project has several goals: a) To use ground and satellite observations to assess emissions inventories; b) To use ground and satellite observations to assess the performance of air quality models for the whole region; c) to produce critical levels exceedence maps; d) To produce a preliminary diagnostic of air quality for the CRCM; e) to produce a preliminary estimate of the cost of air pollution within the CRCM. In this work we show the method approach to use the best available information from local AQM networks, field campaigns, satellite observations and modeling to achieve those goals. We show some preliminary results.

  4. Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A chain of volcanoes extends across central Mexico along the 19th parallel, a line just south of Mexico City. The westernmost of these peaks is Nevado de Colima at 4,636 feet above sea level. A subsidiary summit of Nevado de Colima is Volcan de Colima, locally called Fuego (fire) it still emits sulphurous fumes and an occasional plume of smoke since its disastrous eruption in 1941. Parictuin, now dormant, was born in the fall of 1943 when a cornfield suddenly erupted. Within 18 months, the cone grew more than 1,700 feet. Nevado de Toluca is a 15,433-foot volcanic peak south of the city of Toluca. Just southeast of Mexico City are two high volcanoes that are permanently covered by snow: Iztaccihuatl (17,342 fet) and Popocatepetl (17,887 feet) Further east is the third highest mountain in North America: 18,700-foot Citlateptl, or El Pico de Orizaba. North of these high peaks are two volcanoes, 14, 436-foot La Malinche and Cofre de Perote at 14,048 feet. This range of mountains is known variously as the Cordillera de Anahuac, the Sierra Volcanica Transversal, or the Cordillera Neovolcanica. 

  5. The relationship between adiposity-associated inflammation and coronary artery and abdominal aortic calcium differs by strata of central adiposity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Austin, Jan M; Wassel, Christina L; Jiménez, Jessica; Criqui, Michael H; Ix, Joachim H; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Budoff, Matthew J; Jenny, Nancy S; Allison, Matthew A

    2014-08-01

    Adipokines regulate metabolic processes linked to coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aorta calcification (AAC). Because adipokine and other adiposity-associated inflammatory marker (AAIM) secretions differ between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, we hypothesized that central adiposity modifies associations between AAIMs and CAC and AAC. We evaluated 1878 MESA participants with complete measures of AAIMs, anthropometry, CAC, and AAC. Associations of AAIMs with CAC and AAC prevalence and severity were analyzed per standard deviation of predictors (SD) using log binomial and linear regression models. The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was dichotomized at median WHR values based on sex/ethnicity. CAC and AAC prevalence were defined as any calcium (Agatston score >0). Severity was defined as ln (Agatston score). Analyses examined interactions with WHR and were adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Each SD higher interleukin-6 (IL-6), fibrinogen and CRP was associated with 5% higher CAC prevalence; and each SD higher IL-6 and fibrinogen was associated with 4% higher AAC prevalence. Associations of IL-6 and fibrinogen with CAC severity, but not CAC prevalence, were significantly different among WHR strata. Median-and-above WHR: each SD higher IL-6 was associated with 24.8% higher CAC severity. Below-median WHR: no association (p interaction =0.012). Median-and-above WHR: each SD higher fibrinogen was associated with 19.6% higher CAC severity. Below-median WHR: no association (p interaction =0.034). Adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were not associated with CAC or AAC prevalence or severity. These results support findings that adiposity-associated inflammation is associated with arterial calcification, and further add that central adiposity may modify this association. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Mesa Verde Archaeoastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Gregory E.

    Mesa Verde archaeoastronomy has been studied for over 100 years through academic research. Investigators have excavated, stabilized, and documented the major dwellings in Mesa Verde National Park. Evidence for astronomical orientation and alignment was found in Cliff Palace and Sun Temple. The level of documentation increased with each new research project. With good documentation practices, together, the research has shown that the cultures of the Mesa Verde were advanced in their social organization and use of astronomy. Consultation with Native American tribal leaders will add significant background to the depth of knowledge that their ancestors possessed.

  7. Patterns of illness in travelers visiting Mexico and Central America: the GeoSentinel experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Dupont, Herbert L.; Libman, Michael D.; Keystone, Jay S.; Hale, Devon C.; Burchard, Gerd; Han, Pauline V.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Freedman, David O.; Kain, Kevin C.; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Ward, Brian; Dick Maclean, J.; Jean Haulman, N.; Roesel, David; Jong, Elaine C.; Schwartz, Eli; Stauffer, William M.; Walker, Patricia F.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Pandey, Prativa; Murphy, Holly; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; McCarthy, Anne; Connor, Bradley A.; Chen, Lin H.; Wilson, Mary E.; Lynch, Michael W.; Licitra, Carmelo; Crespo, Antonio; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; de Vries, Peter J.; Gadroen, Kartini; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D.; Hynes, Noreen; Bradley Sack, R.; McKenzie, Robin; Field, Vanessa; Gurtman, Alejandra; Coyle, Christina M.; Wittner, Murray; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Leder, Karin; Torresi, Joseph; Brown, Graham; Jensenius, Mogens; Wang, Andy; MacDonald, Susan; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Antonio Perez Molina, Jose; Cahill, John D.; McKinley, George; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Shaw, Marc; Hern, Annemarie; Perret, Cecilia; Valdivieso, Francisca; Valdez, Luis; Siu, Hugo; Carosi, Giampiero; Castelli, Francesco; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Sagara, Hiroko; Kass, Robert; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; McLellan, Susan; Holtom, Paul; Goad, Jeff; Anglim, Anne; Hagmann, Stefan; Henry, Michael; Miller, Andy O.; Ansdell, Vernon; Kato, Yasuyuki; Borwein, Sarah; Anderson, Nicole; Batchelor, Trish; Meisch, Dominique; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Doyle, Patrick; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Piper Jenks, Nancy; Kerr, Christine; Lian Lim, Poh; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Mendelson, Marc; Vincent, Peter; Africa, South; Virk, Abinash; Sia, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Mexico and Central America are important travel destinations for North American and European travelers. There is limited information on regional differences in travel related morbidity. We describe the morbidity among 4779 ill travelers returned from Mexico and Central America who were evaluated at

  8. Analysis of gravity data in Central Valleys, Oaxaca, southern, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, T.; Ferrusquia, I.

    2015-12-01

    The region known as Central Valleys is located in the state of Oaxaca, southern, Mexico (16.3o- 17.7 o N Lat. and 96 o - 97 o W Long.) In its central portion is settled the capital of the state. There are very few published detailed geological studies.. Geomorphological and geological features, indicates that Central Valleys and surrounding mountains conform a graben structure. Its shape is an inverted Y, centred on Oaxaca City. The study area was covered by a detailed gravity survey with a homogenous distribution of stations. The Bouguer gravity map is dominated by a large gravity low, oriented NW-SE. In order to know the characteristics of anomalies observed gravity, data transformations were used. The use of spectral methods has increased in recent years, especially for the estimation of the depth of the source. Analysis of the gravity data sheds light on the regional depth of the Graben basement and the spatial distribution of the volcanic rocks

  9. The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was established in 1949 to perform the engineering development and ordnance responsibilities associated with nuclear weapons. By the early 1960's the facility had evolved into an engineering research and development laboratory and became a multiprogram laboratory during the 1970s. Sandia is operated for the US Department of Energy by the Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, Incorporated. For several years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analyses: the impact of SNL activities on central New Mexico and the economic impacts of SNL on the state of New Mexico. For purposes of this report, the central New Mexico region includes Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia, and Torrance counties. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts results from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the four-county region and the state of New Mexico. 6 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Climate change effects on central New Mexico's land use, transportation system, and key natural resources : task 1.2 memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate how planning decisions made today will affect central New Mexicos resilience to climate change impacts in 2040. This report first describes climate change impacts in central New Mexico. This report then ...

  11. Geochemical Characterization of Late Pleistocene and Holocene Tephra Layers from the Basin of Mexico, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Beatriz; Newton, Anthony J.

    1998-07-01

    In order to aid palaeoenvironmental research of Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits of central Mexico, tephra layers collected from the sediments of the Texcoco and Chalco sub-basins, in the southern part of the Basin of Mexico, are geochemically characterized and used as stratigraphic markers. The tephra layers range in composition from basaltic andesites to rhyolites and are calc-alkaline. The tephras range in age from >34,000 to ca. 2600 14C yr B.P. New names are used informally to designate correlated tephras. The Tlahuac tephra is present in Chalco, at a depth of 18 m; in the southeastern part of Texcoco, at a depth of around 10 m; and at the Tlapacoya archaeological site, where it had been mistakenly described as basaltic. This basalt-andesite tephra is dated to at least 34,000 14C yr B.P. The Tlapacoya 1 tephra is dated to between 15,020 ± 450 and 14,430 ± 190 yr B.P. and is present in all Chalco sections. The Tlapacoya 2 tephra corresponds to the previously described "pomez gruesa con fragmentos de andesita" (ca. 14,400 yr B.P.) and is present in all Chalco and Texcoco sections. The likely source of these three tephras is the volcano Popocatepetl. Tephra II at Chalco dates to 12,520 ± 135 yr B.P. and correlates with the Upper Toluca Pumice from Nevado de Toluca volcano. These represent the first geochemical glass-shard analysis of tephras from the Basin of Mexico, and so further research is necessary before a reliable tephrochronology can be established.

  12. Value of information analysis for Corrective Action Unit Nos. 101 and 102: Central and western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the basis for and present the results of a value of information analysis (VOIA) for the Pahute Mesa underground test area of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The value of information analysis was used to evaluate and compare potential characterization options at the Pahute Mesa underground test area for site remediation purposes. Thirty six characterization options were evaluated, ranging from a single, inexpensive study using existing data and intended to address a single question or uncertainty, to a forty-million-dollar suite of activities designed to collect and analyze new information to address multiple uncertainties. The characterization options were compared and ranked based on how effective the experts though the information collection would be in reducing uncertainties, how this effected the distance to contaminant boundary, and the cost of the option

  13. Value of information analysis for Corrective Action Unit Nos. 101 and 102: Central and western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the basis for and present the results of a value of information analysis (VOIA) for the Pahute Mesa underground test area of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The value of information analysis was used to evaluate and compare potential characterization options at the Pahute Mesa underground test area for site remediation purposes. Thirty six characterization options were evaluated, ranging from a single, inexpensive study using existing data and intended to address a single question or uncertainty, to a forty-million-dollar suite of activities designed to collect and analyze new information to address multiple uncertainties. The characterization options were compared and ranked based on how effective the experts though the information collection would be in reducing uncertainties, how this effected the distance to contaminant boundary, and the cost of the option.

  14. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Eddy; Stremme, Wolfgang; Bezanilla, Alejandro; Baylon, Jorge; Grutter, Michel; Blumenstock, Thomas; Hase, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Altzomoni is a high altitude station in central Mexico (19.12 N, 98.65 W, 4000 m a.s.l.) for continuous measurements of various atmospheric parameters. It is located within the Izta-Popo National Park and is operated remotely from the UNAM campus. Since May 2012, high resolution solar absorption spectra have been recorded from this site using a FTIR from Bruker (HR120/5) equipped with MCT, InSb and InGaAs detectors and various optical filters. In this contribution we present a detailed description of the measurement site and the instrumental set-up including a record of the instrumental line-shapes (modulation efficiency and phase error) obtained from cell measurements and analyzed with the LINEFIT code. A preliminary analysis of almost two years of spectra recorded at the Altzomoni site resulting in profile retrievals of four NDACC gases O3, CO, HF and HCl is presented. The retrieval code PROFFIT is used and the Averaging Kernels and an error analysis are used to describe the quality of the measurements. The annual cycles in the time series of O3 and CO are presented and discussed, as well as some examples of anomalies due to volcanic gas emissions of HF and HCl are shown. The presented work is part of an effort to certify this station as part of the NDACC international network.

  15. Evaporation from groundwater discharge playas, Estancia Basin, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menking, Kirsten M.; Anderson, Roger Y.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Allen, Bruce D.; Ellwein, Amy L.; Loveland, Thomas A.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2000-01-01

    Bowen ratio meteorological stations have been deployed to measure rates of evaporation from groundwater discharge playas and from an adjacent vegetated bench in the Estancia Basin, in central New Mexico. The playas are remnants of late Pleistocene pluvial Lake Estancia and are discharge areas for groundwater originating as precipitation in the adjacent Manzano Mts. They also accumulate water during local precipitation events. Evaporation is calculated from measured values of net radiation, soil heat flux, atmospheric temperature, and relative humidity. Evaporation rates are strongly dependent on the presence or absence of standing water in the playas, with rates increasing more than 600% after individual rainstorms. Evaporation at site E-12, in the southeastern part of the playa Complex, measured 74 cm over a yearlong period from mid-1997 through mid-1998. This value compares favorably to earlier estimates from northern Estancia playas, but is nearly three times greater than evaporation at a similar playa in western Utah. Differences in geographical position, salt crust composition, and physical properties may explain some of the difference in evaporation rates in these two geographic regions.

  16. Branched GDGT distributions in lakes from Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, A.; Werne, J. P.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Pérez, L.; Caballero, M.

    2017-12-01

    The potential to use bacterial derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) to reconstruct mean annual air temperatures from soils sparked significant interest in the terrestrial paleoclimate community, where a high-fidelity paleotemperature proxy is desperately needed. While the source of brGDGTs remains unknown (but are potentially attributed to the highly diverse phylum Acidobacteria), much evidence points to the potential for these bacteria to live not only in the terrestrial environment but also in lake water and sediments as well. Though the application of brGDGTs to lacustrine reconstructions is promising, the initial applications of soil-based MBT/CBT proxy to lacustrine sediments typically resulted in lower temperatures than were reasonable, likely due to additions from lacustrine bacterial brGDGTs. Here, we present data from a suite of >100 lakes in Mexico and Central America, producing a regional core-top calibration different from those developed in other regions. Results indicate a significant role for regional differences in controlling the brGDGTs distribution, likely due to different brGDGT-producing microbial communities thriving under varying environmental conditions. Rigorous development of brGDGT based proxies will improve our understanding of the source and applicability of these biomarkers, and increase confidence in the accuracy of paleotemperature reconstructions to numerous lacustrine records in the region.

  17. Seismicity Surveying in Central and North Mexico Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Samaniego, A.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. M.; Guzman-Speziale, M.; Zuniga, R.; Alaniz-Alvarez, S.; Barboza, R.; Davalos, O.

    2003-12-01

    The seismic nature of Central Mexico is poorly understood due to insufficient sampling. We carried out a seismic survey in part of the TransMexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the Central Altiplano. These regions are characterized by a very low deformation rates. Seismic activity is variable and ranges from microseismicity to large earthquakes, but no large historic earthquake has been instrumentally recorded. Only few direct observations such as intensity reconstructions and recent paleoseismic studies (e.g. the Acambay-Tixmadej earthquake of 1912) are available. Large earthquakes have occurred but their recurrence period is unknown; structural studies show this recurrence could range from hundreds to thousands of years. In order to understand the regional seismic behavior, we installed a temporal network. This network consists of 3-5 short period instruments, consisting of 16-bits triaxial digital velocity recorders (0.01-4.5 Hz). We registered several seismic sequences over a period of several months. One of them took place in Guanajuato within a graben structure in the TMVB and lasted for 2 weeks. Another sequence occurred at the northern limit of the TMVB in the Sierra Gorda. Over five weeks, several micro-earthquakes M Sierra Gorda, the event distribution is aligned along a small valley, but perpendicular to the main structural grain imposed by the Sierra Madre Oriental range. In no instances have surface ruptures been observed; those seismogenic structures could be blind ones. A challenge is to locate this structures which are may be too old to be still active. Increased seismotectonic knowledge of this region will yield further insight into the details of the interaction between surface structures driven by the regional stress field. Our results provide evidence that the region requires more intensive seismic surveying, and in some cases that some structures have been reactivated recently.

  18. Seismicity surveying in central and north mexico region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, J. M.; Guzmán, M.; Nieto, A.; Zúñiga, R.; Alaniz, S.; Barboza, R.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic nature of Central Mexico is poorly understood due to insufficient sampling. This region is characterized by a very low deformation rate. The seismic activity is variable and ranges from microseismicity to large earthquakes. Some large earthquakes have occurred with an unknown returning period; structural studies show this recurrence could range from hundreds to thousands of years. Some authors argue that there is not connection between ancient and recent activity. We carried out several seismic surveys in part of the TransMexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the Altiplano Central. We installed a temporal network, in order to record spatial seismic distribution. This network consists of 3-5 short period instruments, consisting of triaxial digital velocity recorders (0.01-4.5 Hz). We registered several swarms; one took place in Guanajuato and lasted for 2 weeks. Another crisis occurred at the northern limit of the TMVB at Sierra Gorda. Over five weeks several micro-earthquakes M < 2 were felt with anomaously high intensity. Relocated seismicity shows very shallow (< 10km) activity. The regional crust conditions appear to be roughly uniform even though the seismicity varies significantly. In some cases like seismic swarms, several microearthquakes are aligned, and seem to be quasi-parallel to the direction of the fault strike, some other times they are perpendicular. However, surface ruptures associated to earthquakes are not observed to confirm this. Then, a challenge is to locate the seismogenic structures, basically because of the surface structures are too old to be still active. Increased seismotectonic knowledge of this region may give further insight into the details of the interaction between surface structures driven by the regional stress field.

  19. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan TA-60 Roads and Grounds Facility and Associated Sigma Mesa Staging Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Leonard Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) is applicable to operations at the Technical Area -60 (TA-60) Roads and Grounds Facility and Associated Sigma Mesa Staging Area off Eniwetok Drive, in Los Alamos County, New Mexico.

  20. Post-Laramide and pre-Basin and Range deformation and implications for Paleogene (55-25 Ma) volcanism in central Mexico: A geological basis for a volcano-tectonic stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristán-González, Margarito; Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo J.; Labarthe-Hernández, Guillermo; Torres-Hernández, José Ramón; Bellon, Hervé

    2009-06-01

    At central-eastern Mexico, in the Mesa Central province, there are several ranges that were formed after the K/T Laramide compression but before the Basin and Range peak extensional episodes at middle-late Oligocene. Two important volcano-tectonic events happened during this time interval, 1) uplift of crustal blocks exhuming the Triassic-Jurassic metamorphic sequence and formation of basins that were filled with red beds and volcanic sequences, and 2) normal faulting and tilting to the NE of these blocks and fanglomerate filling of graben and half-graben structures. The first event, from late Paleocene to early Eocene, was related to NNE and NNW oriented dextral strike-slip faults. These faults were combined with NW-SE en echelon faulting in these blocks through which plutonism and volcanism occurred. The second event lasted from early Oligocene to early Miocene and coincided with Basin and Range extension. Intense volcanic activity occurred synchronously with the newly-formed or reactivated old fault systems, producing thick sequences of silicic pyroclastic rocks and large domes. Volcano-tectonic peaks occurred in three main episodes during the middle-late Oligocene in this part of Mexico, at about 32-30 Ma, 30-28 Ma, and 26-25 Ma. The objectives of this work is to summarize the volcano-tectonic events that occurred after the end of the Laramide orogeny and before the peak episodes of Basin and Range faulting and Sierra Madre Occidental Oligocene volcanism, and to discuss the influence of these events on the following Oligocene-Miocene volcano-tectonic peak episodes that formed the voluminous silicic volcanism in the Mesa Central, and hence, in the Sierra Madre Occidental. A model based upon geological observations summarizes the volcanic-tectonic evolution of this part of Mexico from the late Paleocene to the Early Miocene.

  1. BLM/OCS Ecological Investigations of Petroleum Production Platforms in the Central Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ecological Investigations of Petroleum Production Platforms in the Central Gulf of Mexico Project was conducted by Texas A and M University under contract to...

  2. Integrating climate change in transportation and land use scenario planning : an example from central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Central New Mexico Climate Change Scenario Planning Project, an Interagency Transportation, Land Use, and Climate Change Initiative, utilized a scenario planning process to develop a multiagency transportation- and land use-focused development st...

  3. Regional Specialization. The Middle Americas: Mexico, Panama, Central America and the Caribbean Basin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owen, Mark H; Inman, Kenneth A

    1997-01-01

    .... Generally viewed as lagging in efforts to develop stable governments and self-sustaining economies, Mexico, Central America to include Panama and the Caribbean, henceforth Middle America, have in the...

  4. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs

  5. Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-02-28

    Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

  6. The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

    1999-08-09

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy federally funded national security laboratory that uses engineering and science to ensure the security of the Nation. SNL provides scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs in nuclear weapons and related defense systems, energy security, and environmental integrity. SNL works in partnerships with universities and industry to enhance their mission and transfer technology that will address emerging national challenges for both government and industry. For several years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output (I/O) model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico. Caution should be exercised when comparing economic impacts between fiscal years prior to this report. The I/O model was rebased for FY 1998. The fringe benefits coefficients have been updated for the FY 1996 and FY 1997 economic impacts analysis. Prior to FY 1993 two different I/O base models were used to estimate the impacts. New technical information was released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Department of Commerce in 1991 and in 1994 and was incorporated in FY 1991, FY 1993, and FY 1994 I/O models. Also in 1993, the state and local tax coefficients and expenditure patterns were updated from a 1986 study for the FY 1992 report. Further details about the input-output model can be found in ''The Economic Impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico--FY 1998'' report by Lansford, et al. (1999). For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998) and includes two major

  7. Age of the Xalnene Ash, Central Mexico and Archeological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renne, P. R.; Feinberg, J. M.; Waters, M. R.; Cabrales, J. A.; Castillo, P. O.; Campa, M. P.; Knight, K. B.

    2005-12-01

    Human footprints ~40 ka old have been reported from the Toloquilla quarry near Valsequillo Reservoir, ca. 15 km south of the city of Puebla in central Mexico (http://www.mexicanfootprints.co.uk/default.htm). If correct, this would be important evidence for early peopling of the Americas. The indentations interpreted as footprints and other ichnofossils occur on the surface of an indurated basaltic lapilli tuff within a several meter thick sequence of thinly bedded (1-10 cm) tuffs of similar character, lacking paleosols, erosional features or interlayered sediments, informally known as the Xalnene ash. A sample was collected at 18°55.402` N latitude and 098°09.375` W longitude from the surface on which the purported footprints occur. Lapilli were separated and analyzed by incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar methods, yielding 9 indistinguishable plateau ages averaging 1.30 ±0.03 Ma (2σ) for single lapilli (N=6) and multiple lapilli (N=3) subsamples. Though some minor discordance (presumably due to 39Ar recoil) is manifest in 5 of the age spectra, all plateaux comprise >60% of the 39Ar released and 4 or more consecutive steps. Paleomagnetic data from azimuthally unoriented bulk samples of 11.25 cm3 reveal a reverse polarity (I = -32.1°) thermoremanent component carried by titanomagnetite and a normal polarity component carried by goethite. Measurements on individual matrix-free lapilli lack the goethite component, which is presumed to be associated with the clay-rich cement. Consistency of the reverse component implies deposition of the lapilli at supra-Curie temperatures, with no postdepositional reworking. Reverse polarity is consistent with deposition during chron C1r.2r (1.77 to 1.07 Ma) as indicated by the 40Ar/39Ar data. If the features observed on the tuff are indeed footprints, their 1.3 Ma antiquity would be truly remarkable, predating by far any other evidence for human presence in the Americas and in fact predating the evolutionary emergence of Homo sapiens

  8. Cerro Xalapaxco: An Unusual Tuff Cone with Multiple Explosion Craters, in Central Mexico (Puebla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, M. J.; Siebe, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Xalapaxco tuff cone is located on the northeast flank of La Malinche stratovolcano in central Mexico. An unusually large number (10) of explosion craters, concentrated on the central and on the uphill side of the cone, expose alternating beds of stratified surge deposits and massive fall deposits.

  9. Mexico’s Central American Policy: Apologies, Motivations, and Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-15

    Entre Mdxico y Nicaragua," El Mercado de Valores. May 18, 1981, p. 510. 14. See Errol D. Jones and David LaFrance, "Mexico’s Foreign Affairs Under...Medina Luna, "Proyecci6n de Mixico sobre Centroamerica," in Centro de Estudios Internacionales, Mexico y America Latina: La Neuva Poliica Exterior, Mdxico...p. 18. 21. The quotation is from Bryan, p. 36. For the text of the petroleum agreement, see "Programa de Cooperaci6n Energitica," El Mercado de

  10. Archaeomagnetism of some pre-Columbian mural paintings in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogichaishvili, A.; Soler, A.; Zanella, E.; Lanza, R.; Chiari, G.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2003-12-01

    This work investigates the magnetic remanence associated with the mural paintings at three archeological sites in Central Mexico dated between 200 AD and 1450 AD (Cholula, Cacaxtla and Templo Mayor). The remanence of the murals is shown, using X-ray analyses and rock-magnetic measurements, to be carried by both magnetite and hematite. In most specimens, a characteristic magnetization is successfully isolated by alternating field demagnetization. The mean site directions are consistent with the available master curve for Mesoamerica. This work shows that murals from Central Mexico can retain their remanent magnetization for centuries and demonstrates the viability in principle of pictorial remanence as an archeomagnetic tool.

  11. Suicidal ideation and migration aspirations among youth in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven

    2013-10-16

    Over the past 100 years the state of Guanajuato has consistently been one of the highest migrant sending states in Mexico. Youth living in high migratory states such as Guanajuato are heavily influenced by the expectation that they will travel to the US, and research has shown that those who do not migrate may be looked down upon by members of their community. This secondary analysis looks at the connection between suicidal ideation and migration aspirations among a group of adolescents living in Guanajuato, Mexico. Data were originally collected in 2007 as part of a comprehensive health survey of youth attending an alternative high schooling program. Regression analyses show that suicidal ideation predicts intentions to migrate among both males and females, while other factors differentially influence the adolescents by gender. The results indicate that suicidal ideation may be associated with migration aspirations among Mexican youth living in high migratory communities. Study limitations and implications are discussed.

  12. 78 FR 36571 - Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 227

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... evaluation period for Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 227. BOEM will complete the evaluation... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 227 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice to...

  13. 77 FR 59223 - Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ..., 2012, the post-sale evaluation period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 216/222 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior...

  14. Columnar aerosol optical properties at AERONET sites in northern, central and southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabali, Giovanni; Estévez, Hector; Florean-Cruz, Claudia; Navarro-Medina, Abigail; Valdés-Barrón, Mauro; Bonifaz-Alfonzo, Roberto; Riveros-Rosas, David; Velasco-Herrera, Víctor; Vázquez-Gálvez, Felipe

    2017-04-01

    The column-integrated optical properties of aerosol in the north, central and southern Mexico were investigated based on Sun/sky radiometer measurements made at Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. Characterization of aerosol properties in these Mexico regions is important due to natural and anthropogenic significant events that occurred: dust storms from Sonora desert, biomass burning from south forest areas and urban/industrial from Mexico City due to the increases in fossil fuel combustion. Some cities in northern Mexico located near desert areas are affected by the dust from Sonora and Chihuahua deserts. These particles are suspended in the atmosphere due to strong wind activity that creates dust storms. In the central part of the Mexican territory, urban air pollution is one of the biggest problems. Mexico City is the most important urban area that face seriously environmental problem generated by daily anthropogenic emissions from activities of some 21 million people and the vast amount of industry. On the other hand, biomass burning in the Yucatan Peninsula, Southern Mexico, and Guatemala is an important source of anthropogenic aerosol in the troposphere (Crutzen and Andrade, 1990). The pollution from these fires affects air quality locally and is transported over the Gulf of Mexico to the United States (Wang et al., 2006). The aim of this work is to study the optical properties of different types of aerosols by analyzing a 5-year (2005-2010) data set from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). Time series of Angstrom exponent (α) and aerosol optical depth (τ) in 7 wavelengths from 340 to 1020 nm are shown. Additionally, a graphical framework to classify aerosol properties using direct sun-photometer observations in the different regions of Mexico is presented. That aerosol classification was made by applying the method described by Gobbi et al (2007), which relies on the combined analysis of α and its spectral curvature δα.

  15. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  16. A rock- and paleomagnetic study of a Holocene lava flow in Central Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlag, P.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Boer, C.B. de; Gonzalez, S.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic measurements of the Tres Cruces lava flow (ca. 8500 years BP, Central Mexico) show the presence of two remanence carriers, a Ti-rich titanomagnetite with a Curie temperature between 350 and 400 °C and a Ti-poor magnetite with a Curie temperature close to 580°C. Magnetic changes after

  17. A preliminary analysis of emigration determinants in Mexico, Central America, northern South America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M A

    1994-01-01

    The author examines migratory movements and their causes in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Sections are included on migration trends, theoretical approaches, and methodological tools before the 1970s; the shift in migratory patterns after the 1980s; macrosocial variables as a general background of current international flows; and migration policies.

  18. Patterns of forest use and endemism in resident bird communities of north-central Michoacan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago Garcia; Deborah M. Finch; Gilberto Chavez. Leon

    1998-01-01

    We compared breeding avian communities among 11 habitat types in north-central Michoacan, Mexico, to determine patterns of forest use by endemic and nonendemic resident species. Point counts of birds and vegetation measurements were conducted at 124 sampling localities from May through July, in 1994 and 1995. Six native forest types sampled were pine, pine-oak, oak-...

  19. Earthworm activity and soil structural changes under conservation agriculture in central Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos Navarrete, A.; Rodriguez-Aragonés, C.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Kooistra, M.J.; Sayre, K.D.; Brussaard, L.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Crop residue mulching combined with zero tillage and crop rotation, known as conservation agriculture (CA), is being promoted as an alternative system to revert soil degradation in maize-based farming in the central highlands of Mexico. The goal of this paper was to determine the effects of CA vs.

  20. Captures of Crawford's gray shrews (Notiosorex crawfordi) along the Rio Grande in central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice Chung-MacCoubrey; Heather L. Bateman; Deborah M. Finch

    2009-01-01

    We captured >2000 Crawford's gray shrews (Notiosorex crawfordi) in a riparian forest mainly consisting of cottonwoods (Populus deltoides) along the Rio Grande in central New Mexico. Little has been published about abundance and habitat of Crawford's gray shrew throughout its distributional range. During 7 summers, we...

  1. Teacher Socialization of EFL Teachers at Public School Levels in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengeling, M. Martha; Mora Pablo, Irasema; Barrios Gasca, Blanca Lucía

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the processes of teacher socialization and identity formation of nine English as a foreign language teachers at public schools in central Mexico. These teachers began their careers in the National English Program in Basic Education. Qualitative research and narrative inquiry were used as a basis for this research. The…

  2. 76 FR 70748 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central and Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... Following Sale Numbers Lease sale, planning area Sale year Sale 229, Western GOM 2012 Sale 227, Central GOM 2013 Sale 233, Western GOM 2013 Sale 231, Central GOM 2014 Sale 238, Western GOM 2014 Sale 235, Central... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central and Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil...

  3. Contexts of offerings and ritual maize in the pictographic record in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Moragas Segura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is an initial enquiry into the evidence and classification of the offerings of maize in Central Mexico from the Classic period to early colonial times. In order to achieve this goal, we will analyse the presence of maize in Central Mexico according to the evidence found in mural paintings and some pictographic codices. Two Mesoamerican cultures will be considered to achieve our analysis: the Teotihuacan and Mexico-Tenochtitlan. Maize was instrumental in the performance of daily rituals and in the diet of these ancient Mesoamerican cultures and the cereal also had sacred connotations in pre-Hispanic, colonial and contemporary narratives. We suggest this by reading the iconographic and symbolic representations of corn in the form of seeds and pods, or as an ingredient in cooked foods which are represented in the mural paintings of Teotihuacan as well as some codices of the post-Classic Nahua tradition. These methodological enquiries reveal evidence of a cultural continuity in Central Mexico as a contrasting perspective on the archaeological and ethno-historical period.

  4. Agricultural Land Use Change after NAFTA in Central West Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quetzalcóatl Orozco-Ramírez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that agricultural land use change and modernization in agricultural production techniques are related to the loss of crop diversity. Two processes contribute to this loss; first is the replacement of landraces by modern varieties, and second is the abandonment of traditional crops in favor of cash crops. We studied the expression of these processes in a region that is both an agro-biodiversity and cultural center and one of the most significant fruit exporters of Mexico. We analyzed agricultural change based on the transformation of cropping areas and the primary crops’ locations in Michoacán state. We examined the crop-harvested area statistics from 1950 to 2015, and identified 23 crops as the most important in terms of harvested area and monetary value. After NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement, harvested area for nine crops changed significantly: seven crops increased, and two decreased. Positive trends were observed for commercial fruits oriented to export markets, and negative trends were observed for traditional crops. These crops, such as beans and maize, are important for food security. Additionally, we analyzed how these land-use and agricultural changes overlap in zones of maize planted-area change. Using a maize-race collection database, we identified three native maize races that could be at risk due to the abandonment of maize in favor of commercial crops.

  5. [Perception over smoke-free policies amongst bar and restaurant representatives in central Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Tonatiuh; Gimeno, David; Thrasher, James F; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Amick, Benjamin C; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the perceptions and appreciations over smoke-free environments of restaurant and bar managers from four cities in central Mexico. Managers from 219 restaurants and bars from Mexico City, Colima, Cuernavaca and Toluca were surveyed about smoke-free environments opinions and implementation. Simultaneously, environmental nicotine was monitored. The majority of surveyed managers considered public places should be smoke-free, although more than half were concerned with potential economic loses. Implementation of smoke-free environments was more frequent in Mexico City (85.4%) than in the other cities (15.3% overall), with consequently lower environmental nicotine concentrations. Managers acknowledge the need to create smoke-free environments. Concerns over economic negative effects derived from the prohibition could explain, at least partially, the rejection of this sector towards the implementation of this type of policy.

  6. Geothermal power plants of Mexico and Central America: a technical survey of existing and planned installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPippo. R.

    1978-07-01

    In this report, the fifth in a series describing the geothermal power plants of the world, the countries of Mexico and of Central America are studied. The geothermal plants are located in areas of recent and active volcanism; the resources are of the liquid-dominated type. Details are given about the plants located at Cerro Prieto in Mexico and at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. In both cases, attention is paid to the geologic nature of the fields, the well programs, geofluid characteristics, energy conversion systems, materials of construction, effluent handling systems, economic factors and plant operating experience. Exploration and development activities are described for other promising geothermal areas in Mexico and El Salvador, along with those in the countries of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama.

  7. A review of ozone-induced effects on the forests of central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bauer, María de Lourdes; Hernández-Tejeda, Tomás

    2007-06-01

    The first report on oxidant-induced plant damage in the Valley of Mexico was presented over 30 years ago. Ozone is known to occur in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and elsewhere as the cause of chlorotic mottling on pine needles that are 2 years old or older as observed in 1976 on Pinus hartwegii and Pinus leiophylla. Visible evidences for the negative effects of ozone on the vegetation of central Mexico include foliar injury expressed as chlorotic mottling and premature defoliation on pines, a general decline of sacred fir, visible symptoms on native forest broadleaved species (e.g. Mexican black cherry). Recent investigations have also indicated that indirect effects are occurring such as limited root colonization by symbiotic fungi on ozone-damaged P. hartwegii trees and a negative influence of the pollutant on the natural regeneration of this species. The negative ozone-induced effects on the vegetation will most likely continue to increase.

  8. Gulf of Mexico Sales 142 and 143: Central and western planning areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) addresses two proposed Federal actions, lease Sales 142 and 143, that will offer for lease Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas that may contain economically recoverable oil and gas resources. The lease sales are proposed for 1993 and include lease blocks in the Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (CPA) and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (WPA). Up to 10,099 blocks will be available for lease under the two proposed actions; only a small percentage is expected to be actually leased. On average, 401 blocks in the Central Gulf and 264 blocks in the Western Gulf have been leased in individual Gulf of Mexico OCS lease sales since 1984. Of the blocks that will be leased as a result of the two proposed actions, only a portion will be drilled and result in subsequent production. The scoping process was used to obtain information and comments on the proposed actions and the potential environmental effects from diverse interests, including the affected States, Federal agencies, the petroleum industry, environmental and public interest groups, and concerned individuals. This volume, Volume 2, reports on impacts from Sales 142 and 143

  9. Gulf of Mexico Sales 142 and 143: Central and western planning areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) addresses two proposed Federal actions, lease Sales 142 and 143, that will offer for lease Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas that may contain economically recoverable oil and gas resources. The lease sales are proposed for 1993 and include lease blocks in the Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (CPA) and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (WPA). Up to 10,099 blocks will be available for lease under the two proposed actions; only a small percentage is expected to be actually leased. On average, 401 blocks in the Central Gulf and 264 blocks in the Western Gulf have been leased in individual Gulf of Mexico OCS lease sales since 1984. Of the blocks that will be leased as a result of the two proposed actions, only a portion will be drilled and result in subsequent production. The scoping process was used to obtain information and comments on the proposed actions and the potential environmental effects from diverse interests, including the affected States, Federal agencies, the petroleum industry, environmental and public interest groups, and concerned individuals. The input from these sources aided in the identification of significant issues, possible alternatives to the proposed actions, and potential mitigating measures

  10. Early Holocene to present landscape dynamics of the tectonic lakes of west-central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Miguel; Muñoz-Salinas, Esperanza; Arce, José Luis; Roy, Priyadarsi

    2017-12-01

    Paleoclimatic reconstructions from lake sediments of central Mexico indicate that the environmental conditions in the Holocene have oscillated from cool-dry to warm-wet, thus, landscape erosion rates have been modified accordingly. The Cenozoic tectonics and volcanic activity of west-central Mexico have produced a set of lakes in warmer and drier conditions compared to lakes of central Mexico. Nevertheless, the Holocene landscape dynamics for this area remains understudied. Using age-depth models, OSL and multi-element chemistry analysis of sediments in the lakes of San Marcos and Sayula we explore the landscape dynamics from early Holocene present of west-central Mexico. Our results indicate that the sedimentation rates in San Marcos Lake notably increased from 240 yr BP to the present. Since AD 1950 the sedimentation rate in Sayula Lake rose fourfold the rates of the last 2000 years. Analysis of OSL and chemistry of major elements of sediments indicates that IRSL/BLSL strongly correlates with Ti/Al (R2 = 0.93) and with the mean monthly rainfall (R2 = 0.70). We propose that the IRSL/BLSL can be used as a proxy to infer past changes in landscape dynamics. Analysis of climatic data from the 1950s to present indicates that rainfall, and consequently water runoff, is enhanced in summers free of ENSO conditions. Extreme one-day rainfall can, however, exceed mean seasonal rainfall and occur in all phases of ENSO. Droughts are particularly severe in the phase of La Niña. Our results indicate that the erosion rate in San Marcos Lake was high from ∼8000 to ∼7000 yr BP in a period coinciding with the advance and recession of glaciers in Central Mexico, however, the erosion rates in the last 165 years have surpassed the rates of the early to mid-Holocene. By constraining the age of sediment and using environmental proxies such as the Ti/Al and IRSL/BLSL from lake sediments of Sayula and San Marcos we present the first model of landscape dynamics of this part of Mexico

  11. 77 FR 29682 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Central Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 216/222

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... 216/222. The Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2009-2012; Central Planning Area Lease Sales... billion barrels of oil (BBO) and over 133 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of natural gas which are undiscovered... Doc No: 2012-11999] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico, Outer...

  12. New species of Brachiacantha Dejean, 1837 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Mexico and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor-Arriola, Jorge Ismael; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo

    2017-12-15

    Five new species of the genus Brachiacantha Dejean (Coccinellidae) from Mexico and Central America are described and illustrated. The species B. angulata sp. nov., B. truncata sp. nov., B. brevicuspidata sp. nov. and B. robustihamata sp. nov. are consistent with the dentipes group. The species B. brevihamata sp. nov. is consistent with the fifth group of Leng (1911); the species shares some characteristics with South American species.

  13. Depositional Environment of Coral–Rudist Associations in the Upper Cretaceous Cardenas Formation (Central Mexico)

    OpenAIRE

    Schafhauser, A.; Götz, S.; Baron-Szabo, R.; Stinnesbeck, W.

    2003-01-01

    In the Cardenas Formation (central Mexico), a 175 m thick sedimentary sequence of Maastrichtian age was analyzed with respect to its palaeontology and sedimentology. A wide variety of lithological and palaeontological features characterize this sequence comprising unfossiliferous and fossil-bearing sand- and siltstones, and diverse rudist and coral–rudist associations in carbonate or mixed carbonate/clastic lithologies. A total of 24 rudist and coral–rudist associations are exposed in the inv...

  14. Early- Mid Pleistocene environments in the Valsequillo Basin, Central Mexico: a reassessment

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalfe, Sarah E.; Leng, Melanie J.; Kirby, Jason R.; Huddart, David; Vane, Christopher H.; Gonzalez, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The Valsequillo Basin in Central Mexico has been of interest due to the presence of megafaunal remains and evidence for early human occupation, but research has been controversial. It has been suggested that extensive and deep lakes characterized the Early Pleistocene environment but sediment exposure is highly fragmentary and reliable dating has been difficult. Here we report, for the first time, Early Pleistocene palaeoenvironmental reconstructions using stable isotopes, diatoms, tephra and...

  15. Germination patterns of a suite of semiarid grassland forbs from central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemary L. Pendleton; Burton K. Pendleton

    2014-01-01

    We examined the germination response of 21 forb species collected from semiarid grasslands of central New Mexico. After-ripened seeds were subjected to 1 of 3 treatments: 1) no treatment; 2) a 3-wk stratification at 5 °C (cold-moist treatment); or 3) a 3-wk warm-moist treatment at 30 °C. All seeds were incubated under an alternating 10/20 °C temperature regime for 6 wk...

  16. 75 FR 69122 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease Sales for the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program... impact statement (SEIS) for Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 218 and Central Planning Area (CPA... Central portion of GOM (excluding blocks that were previously included within the Eastern Planning Area...

  17. 75 FR 70023 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease Sales for the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program... supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) for the remaining Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central... Central portion of GOM (excluding blocks that were previously included within the Eastern Planning Area...

  18. 76 FR 7228 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau...- 2017 oil and gas leasing proposals in the Western and Central Planning Areas of the GOM, off the States... (Multisale EIS) for the several Western and Central Planning Areas lease sales to be held annually, scheduled...

  19. Integration Plan for the Mid-Region Council of Governments : Central New Mexico Climate Change Scenario Planning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This Integration Plan for the Central New Mexico Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSP) provides useful information on strategies that the Mid-Region Council of Governments (MRCOG) and its partners can pursue over the next five years to adap...

  20. Climate change effects on central New Mexico's land use, transportation system and key natural resources : task 1.1 memo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes potential climate change effects on the availability of water, land use, transportation infrastructure, and key natural resources in central New Mexico. This work is being done as part of the Interagency Transportation, Land Us...

  1. A review of ozone-induced effects on the forests of central Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Maria de Lourdes de; Hernandez-Tejeda, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    The first report on oxidant-induced plant damage in the Valley of Mexico was presented over 30 years ago. Ozone is known to occur in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and elsewhere as the cause of chlorotic mottling on pine needles that are 2 years old or older as observed in 1976 on Pinus hartwegii and Pinus leiophylla. Visible evidences for the negative effects of ozone on the vegetation of central Mexico include foliar injury expressed as chlorotic mottling and premature defoliation on pines, a general decline of sacred fir, visible symptoms on native forest broadleaved species (e.g. Mexican black cherry). Recent investigations have also indicated that indirect effects are occurring such as limited root colonization by symbiotic fungi on ozone-damaged P. hartwegii trees and a negative influence of the pollutant on the natural regeneration of this species. The negative ozone-induced effects on the vegetation will most likely continue to increase. - Ozone induced symptoms, poor tree regeneration and limited root colonization by mycorrhiza fungi observed in the valley of Mexico

  2. A review of ozone-induced effects on the forests of central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Maria de Lourdes de [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Colegio de Postgraduados, Carretera Los Reyes-Texcoco, 56230 Montecillo, Edo. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: libauer@colpos.mx; Hernandez-Tejeda, Tomas [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico, Col. Viveros de Coyoacan, 04110 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-06-15

    The first report on oxidant-induced plant damage in the Valley of Mexico was presented over 30 years ago. Ozone is known to occur in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and elsewhere as the cause of chlorotic mottling on pine needles that are 2 years old or older as observed in 1976 on Pinus hartwegii and Pinus leiophylla. Visible evidences for the negative effects of ozone on the vegetation of central Mexico include foliar injury expressed as chlorotic mottling and premature defoliation on pines, a general decline of sacred fir, visible symptoms on native forest broadleaved species (e.g. Mexican black cherry). Recent investigations have also indicated that indirect effects are occurring such as limited root colonization by symbiotic fungi on ozone-damaged P. hartwegii trees and a negative influence of the pollutant on the natural regeneration of this species. The negative ozone-induced effects on the vegetation will most likely continue to increase. - Ozone induced symptoms, poor tree regeneration and limited root colonization by mycorrhiza fungi observed in the valley of Mexico.

  3. Dark Mesas of Aram Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    6 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows several dark-toned mesas surrounded by light-toned sedimentary rock outcrops in Aram Chaos, a large impact basin -- over 200 km (more than 125 mi) across. These mesas are remnants of a once more extensive rock unit. The image is located near 2.0oN, 20.2oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  4. The Genetic Contribution of West-African Ancestry to Protection against Central Obesity in African-American Men but Not Women: Results from the ARIC and MESA Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimentidis, Yann C; Arora, Amit; Zhou, Jin; Kittles, Rick; Allison, David B

    2016-01-01

    Over 80% of African-American (AA) women are overweight or obese. A large racial disparity between AA and European-Americans (EA) in obesity rates exists among women, but curiously not among men. Although socio-economic and/or cultural factors may partly account for this race-by-sex interaction, the potential involvement of genetic factors has not yet been investigated. Among 2814 self-identified AA in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, we estimated each individual's degree of West-African genetic ancestry using 3437 ancestry informative markers. We then tested whether sex modifies the association between West-African genetic ancestry and body mass index (BMI), waist-circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), adjusting for income and education levels, and examined associations of ancestry with the phenotypes separately in males and females. We replicated our findings in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (n = 1611 AA). In both studies, we find that West-African ancestry is negatively associated with obesity, especially central obesity, among AA men, but not among AA women (pinteraction = 4.14 × 10(-5) in pooled analysis of WHR). In conclusion, our results suggest that the combination of male gender and West-African genetic ancestry is associated with protection against central adiposity, and suggest that the large racial disparity that exists among women, but not men, may be at least partly attributed to genetic factors.

  5. The genetic contribution of West-African ancestry to protection against central obesity in African-American men but not women: results from the ARIC and MESA studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann C Klimentidis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Over 80% of African-American (AA women are overweight or obese. A large racial disparity between AA and European-Americans (EA in obesity rates exists among women, but curiously not among men. Although socio-economic and/or cultural factors may partly account for this race-by-sex interaction, the potential involvement of genetic factors has not yet been investigated. Among 2,814 self-identified AA in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, we estimated each individual’s degree of West-African genetic ancestry using 3,437 ancestry informative markers. We then tested whether sex modifies the association between West-African genetic ancestry and body mass index (BMI, waist-circumference (WC, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, adjusting for income and education levels, and examined associations of ancestry with the phenotypes separately in males and females. We replicated our findings in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (n=1,611 AA. In both studies, we find that West-African ancestry is negatively associated with obesity, especially central obesity, among AA men, but not among AA women (pinteraction= 1.24 x 10-5 in pooled analysis of WHR. In conclusion, our results suggest that the combination of male sex and West-African genetic ancestry is associated with protection against central adiposity, and suggest that the large racial disparity that exists among women, but not men, may be at least partly attributed to genetic factors.

  6. The impact of religiosity on suicidal ideation among youth in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven; Marsiglia, Flavio F

    2014-02-01

    Although over 100 years of research has been dedicated to understanding the connection between religiosity and suicide, many questions still remain. This is especially true among adolescent populations in countries outside the US. In 2008, over 700 students attending eight alternative high school centers in central Mexico completed a health survey designed to provide a comprehensive overview of their physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional health. This article reports on the findings of a secondary analysis study of those data and focuses on the protective influence of religiosity on suicidal ideation. The findings of this study are discussed in light of the network theory's assertion that there is a belonging aspect to religion, and also to the idea that in religiously homogeneous communities of Mexico, religion can have a protective effect on the suicidal ideation of its members.

  7. Socio-economic vulnerability to climate change in the central mountainous region of eastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperón-Rodríguez, Manuel; Bonifacio-Bautista, Martín; Barradas, Víctor L

    2016-03-01

    Climate change effects are expected to be more severe for some segments of society than others. In Mexico, climate variability associated with climate change has important socio-economic and environmental impacts. From the central mountainous region of eastern Veracruz, Mexico, we analyzed data of total annual precipitation and mean annual temperature from 26 meteorological stations (1922-2008) and from General Circulation Models. We developed climate change scenarios based on the observed trends with projections to 2025, 2050, 2075, and 2100, finding considerable local climate changes with reductions in precipitation of over 700 mm and increases in temperature of ~9°C for the year 2100. Deforested areas located at windward were considered more vulnerable, representing potential risk for natural environments, local communities, and the main crops cultivated (sugarcane, coffee, and corn). Socio-economic vulnerability is exacerbated in areas where temperature increases and precipitation decreases.

  8. Regional scale tomography in central Mexico. Preliminary results from the correlation of seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-García, F.; Quintanar, L.

    2009-04-01

    In addition to local site effects, ground motion from coastal earthquakes on rock sites in central Mexico is amplified in a regional scale, relative to ground motion observed along a direction parallel to the coast. This regional amplification attains a factor of 10 at frequencies that are critical in seismic risk analyses (from 0.2 to at least 2 Hz). This amplification has been related to the irregular crustal structure associated with the presence of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (oblique to the trench along the subduction zone). However, this has not yet been verified. The available models are not well constrained and there is a significant lack of data regarding the crustal structure in this region. Recent publications have shown that the Green's function between two seismic stations may be estimated from the cross-correlation of seismic noise. Most papers have shown that surface wave modes emerge in those correlation functions. The larger the distance between stations, the longer the records of seismic noise that are needed to obtain a useful result. In this paper, we use seismic noise recorded by three different arrays to estimate Rayleigh wave dispersion between stations. two arrays were temporal and one, recently installed, is permanent. The first array consisted of only four stations. It operated continuously for three months in 1997. The second temporary array operated a line of 100 seismic recorders installed perpendicularly to the subduction zone in Mexico, the MASE (Middle American Seismic Experiment) array. From this large array we use data from 18 stations in central Mexico. Finally, we use data from the permanent Mexico basin seismic array, recently installed. We use week- and month-long noise records to compute cross-correlation between vertical components for all possible station pairs. The results show clearly the emergence of clear Rayleigh wave pulses. We use the multiple filter technique to determine group velocities in the period band 4 to 10 s

  9. Social networks, market transactions, and reputation as a central resource. The Mercado del Mar, a fish market in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Gutiérrez, Carmen; Hernández, Juan M

    2017-01-01

    Fish consumption in Mexico is considered low (around 12 kg per person per year) and non-homogeneously distributed across the country. One of the reasons for this situation is the scarcity of wholesale selling sites. In this context, the Mercado del Mar (MM), located in Guadalajara city, Jalisco, is the second biggest wholesale fish market in Mexico, with a distribution of about 500 tons per day and a variety of about 350 different species of fish. In this paper, we argue that MM has accumulated social capital, which is formed from two main resources: buyer and seller relationships, and reputation. Specifically, the MM manages a broad and intensive interaction among business actors and the already achieved reputation allows the MM to adapt to market changes. To validate our hypotheses, an empirical study was conducted in 2015 by means of interviews to fish wholesalers in the MM and a sample of their suppliers and buyers. For simplicity we have only considered fresh water fish. We have followed snow-ball sampling as the survey strategy. Results show that the MM has responded to fish market dynamics organizing a complex network of buyers and suppliers whose relationships can be explained in the form of strong and weak ties. At the same time, reputation has been the central resource to build this social capital and also gives place to market transactions. Additionally, the strategic position of Guadalajara city and the well-connected routes have facilitated fish bulking and distribution in the region.

  10. Social networks, market transactions, and reputation as a central resource. The Mercado del Mar, a fish market in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    Fish consumption in Mexico is considered low (around 12 kg per person per year) and non-homogeneously distributed across the country. One of the reasons for this situation is the scarcity of wholesale selling sites. In this context, the Mercado del Mar (MM), located in Guadalajara city, Jalisco, is the second biggest wholesale fish market in Mexico, with a distribution of about 500 tons per day and a variety of about 350 different species of fish. In this paper, we argue that MM has accumulated social capital, which is formed from two main resources: buyer and seller relationships, and reputation. Specifically, the MM manages a broad and intensive interaction among business actors and the already achieved reputation allows the MM to adapt to market changes. To validate our hypotheses, an empirical study was conducted in 2015 by means of interviews to fish wholesalers in the MM and a sample of their suppliers and buyers. For simplicity we have only considered fresh water fish. We have followed snow-ball sampling as the survey strategy. Results show that the MM has responded to fish market dynamics organizing a complex network of buyers and suppliers whose relationships can be explained in the form of strong and weak ties. At the same time, reputation has been the central resource to build this social capital and also gives place to market transactions. Additionally, the strategic position of Guadalajara city and the well-connected routes have facilitated fish bulking and distribution in the region. PMID:29016637

  11. 78 FR 9731 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA) Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area... OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2012-2017 Western Planning Area Lease Sales 229, 233, 238, 246, and 248; and Central Planning Area Lease Sales 227, 231, 235, 241, and 247; Final Environmental Impact...

  12. 77 FR 2991 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ...: 2007-2012; Western Planning Area (WPA) Sales 204, 207, 210, 215, and 218; Central Planning Area (CPA... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas Lease Sale for the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  13. Fluoride in ash leachates: environmental implications at Popocatépetl volcano, central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Armienta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ash emitted by volcanic eruptions, even of moderate magnitude, may affect the environment and the health of humans and animals through different mechanisms at distances significantly larger than those indicated in the volcanic hazard maps. One such mechanism is the high capacity of ash to transport toxic volatiles like fluoride, as soluble condensates on the particles' surface. The mobilization and hazards related to volcanic fluoride are discussed based on the data obtained during the recent activity of Popocatépetl volcano in Central Mexico.

  14. Potential impact of climate change on coffee rust over Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Ezquerro, Maria del Carmen; Martinez-Lopez, Benjamin; Cabos Narvaez, William David; Sein, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    In this work, some meteorological variables from a regional climate model are used to characterize the dispersion of coffee rust (a fungal disease) from Central America to Mexico, during the 20 Century. The climate model consists of the regional atmosphere model REMO coupled to the MPIOM global ocean model with increased resolution in the Atlantic Ocean. Lateral atmospheric and upper oceanic boundary conditions outside the coupled domain were prescribed using both ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalysis data. In addition to the historical simulation, a projection of the evolution of the coffee rust for the 21 Century was obtained from a REMO run using MPIESM data for the lateral forcing.

  15. Detection of soil moisture impact in convective initiation in the central region of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolores, Edgar; Caetano, Ernesto

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is important for understanding hydrological cycle variability in many regions. Local surface heat and moisture fluxes represent a major source of convective rainfall in Mexico during the summer, driven by positive evaporation-precipitation feedback. The effects of soil moisture are directly reflected in the limitation of evapotranspiration, affecting the development of the planetary boundary layer and, therefore, the initiation and intensity of convective precipitation. This study presents preliminary analysis of the role of soil moisture in convective initiations in central Mexico, for which a methodology for the detection of convective initiations similar to Taylor (2015) has been considered. The results show that the moisture fluxes from the surface influence the development of convection favored by mesoscale circulations at low levels. Initiations are more frequent in regions less humid than their surroundings with the very strong signal during the month of September. The knowledge of the soil predisposition to allow the development of deep convection suggests an alternative tool for the prediction of convective rains in Mexico.

  16. CO2 Total Column Variability From Ground-Based FTIR Measurements Over Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Plaza, E.; Bezanilla, A.; Grutter, M.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.

    2014-12-01

    There are now several space missions dedicated to measure greenhouse gases in order to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle. Ground based measurement sites are of great value in the validation process, however there are only a few stations in tropical latitudes. We present measurements of solar-absorption infrared spectra recorded on two locations over Central Mexico: the High-Altitude Station Altzomoni (19.12 N, 98.65 W), located in the Izta-Popo National Park outside of Mexico City; and the UNAM's Atmospheric Observatory (19.32 N, 99.17 W) in Mexico City. These measurements were performed using a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer FTIR (Bruker, HR 120/5) at Altzomoni and a moderate resolution FTIR (Bruker, Vertex 80) within the city. In this work, we present the first results for total vertical columns of CO2 derived from near-infrared spectra recorded at both locations using the retrieval code PROFFIT. We present the seasonal cycle and variability from the measurements, as well as the full diagnostics of the retrieval in order assess its quality and discuss the differences of both instruments and locations (altitudes, urban vs remote). This work aims to contribute to generate high quality datasets for satellite validation.

  17. Nature and extent of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Pahute Mesa, which has been identified in the FFACO as consisting of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units. Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a regional model that will be used to predict a contaminant boundary for these Corrective Action Units. Hydrogeologic maps have been prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa. Much of the groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa occurs within lava-flow aquifers. An understanding of the distribution and hydraulic character of these important hydrogeologic units is necessary to accurately model groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa. This report summarizes the results of a study by Bechtel Nevada geologists to better define the hydrogeology of lava-flow aquifers at Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) aid in the development of the hydrostratigraphic framework for Pahute Mesa, and (2) provide information on the distribution and hydraulic character of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa for more accurate computer modeling of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  18. Stratigraphy, geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic setting of the Mesozoic Nazas Formation, north-central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Claudio

    Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic volcanic-sedimentary sequences that were part of the Mesozoic continental-margin of western North America are exposed in northern and central Mexico. These sequences have been grouped into the Nazas Formation and crop out in the states of Durango, Coahuila, Zacatecas, and San Luis Potosi. The Nazas Formation consists of 2,500 m or more of volcanic and pyroclastic rocks and interbedded clastic sedimentary rocks that were deposited in alluvial fan and fluvial depositional systems that developed in intra-arc basins, mainly fault-bound grabens and topographic depressions within an extending Mesozoic volcanic arc. Major and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks suggests that the volcanic suite is calc-alkaline and includes rhyolite, dacite, rhyodacite, andesite, trachyandesite and rare basalt. Pyroclastic rocks are basically air-fall tuffs and volcanic breccias. The sedimentary strata include conglomerate, sandstone, shale, and siltstone, locally red in color. Geochronology (Ar-Ar, K-Ar and Rb-Sr) and field evidence indicate that the age of the Nazas Formation ranges from Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic, but the peak of arc volcanism appears to be Early and Middle Jurassic. The Mesozoic magmatic arc in Mexico has a northwest trend and extends from Sonora to Chiapas. The arc structure is more than 2,000 km long, and possibly up to 150 km wide. The width of the arc is uncertain due to the limited number of surface outcrops, however, it did not extend east into the Gulf of Mexico. Arc-related magmatism began in latest Triassic time, but the peak of arc evolution occurred during the Early and Middle Jurassic. By Oxfordian time, the arc was deeply dissected and eroded, and magmatic activity had ceased. A marine transgression from the Gulf of Mexico covered most of the Nazas arc, depositing the initial sediments of the Oxfordian Zuloaga Limestone in the Mexican Geosyncline. Jurassic crustal extension in the Gulf of Mexico was

  19. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    Focus in this discussion of Mexico is on the following: geography; the people; history; political conditions; the economy; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Mexico. As of July 1987, the population of Mexico numbered 81.9 million with an estimated annual growth rate of 2.09%. 60% of the population is Indian-Spanish (mestizo), 30% American Indian, 9% white, and 1% other. Mexico is the most populous Spanish-speaking country in the world and the 2nd most populous country in Latin America. Education is decentralized and expanded. Mexico's topography ranges from low desert plains and jungle-like coastal strips to high plateaus and rugged mountains. Hernan Cortes conquered Mexico in 1919-21 and founded a Spanish colony that lasted for almost 300 years. Independence from Spain was proclaimed by Father Miguel Hidalgo on September 16, 1810; the republic was established on December 6, 1822. Mexico's constitution of 1917 provides for a federal republic with a separation of powers into independent executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Significant political themes of the administration of President Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado, who began his 6-year term in 1982, have been restructuring the economy, liberalizing trade practices, decentralizing government services, and eliminating corruption among public servants. In 1987, estimates put the real growth of the Mexican economy at 1.5%; the gross domestic product (GDP) had shrunk by 3.5% in 1986. Yet, on the positive side, Mexico's international reserves increased to record levels in 1987 (to about $15 billion), and its current account surplus reached more than $3 billion. Mexico has made considerable progress in moving to restructure its economy. It has substantially reduced impediments to international trade and has moved to reduce the number of parastatal firms. 1987 was the 2nd consecutive year in which Mexico recorded triple-digit inflation; inflation reached 158.8%. Other problems include

  20. Teacher perceptions of the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempier, Tracie Tingle

    The 12 Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) are funded by the National Science Foundation and are designed to promote creative ways of disseminating marine science research and its importance to the public. The focus of this study is the COSEE Central Gulf of Mexico program which encourages active partnerships between research scientists and teachers. In these collaborative partnerships, teachers and scientists work together to create educational products and disseminate best practices in ocean sciences education. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the lesson plans and curricula created through the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program (COSEE:CGOM), which are the products of this collaboration, were being used effectively in the classroom. The study addressed issues such as teacher perceptions of collaboration with scientists, effectiveness of COSEE:CGOM curriculum implementation in producing more ocean literate students, and teachers' varying views concerning how to successfully implement new COSEE:CGOM knowledge and concepts into their classrooms in order to improve student scientific understanding. In addition, the study examined frequency of use of COSEE:CGOM lesson plans and identified predictor variables that can produce a model for understanding factors hindering or enhancing lesson plan use. Further, participant perceptions of using peer-teaching as a method for disseminating COSEE:CGOM information in their districts were addressed.

  1. Geoid modeling in Mexico and the collaboration with Central America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, D.; Gomez, R.

    2012-12-01

    The model of geoidal heights for Mexico, named GGM10, is presented as a geodetic tool to support vertical positioning in the context of regional height system unification. It is a purely gravimetric solution computed by the Stokes-Helmert technique in resolution of 2.5 arc minutes. This product from the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia (INEGI) is released together with a series of 10 gravimetric models which add to the improvements in description of the gravity field. In the recent years, the INEGI joined the initiative of the U.S. National Geodetic Survey and the Canada's Geodetic Survey Division to promote the regional height system unification. In an effort to further improve the compatibility among national geoid models in the region, the INEGI has begun to champion a network of specialists that includes national representatives from Central America and the Caribbean. Through the opening of opportunities for training and more direct access to international agreements and discussions, the tropical region is gaining participation. Now a significantly increased number of countries is pushing for a future North and Central American geoid-based vertical datum as support of height system unification.eoidal height in Mexico, mapped from the model GGM10.

  2. Fast airborne aerosol size and chemistry measurements above Mexico City and Central Mexico during the MILAGRO campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. DeCarlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The concentration, size, and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1 was measured over Mexico City and central Mexico with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. This was the first aircraft deployment of the HR-ToF-AMS. During the campaign the instrument performed very well, and provided 12 s data. The aerosol mass from the AMS correlates strongly with other aerosol measurements on board the aircraft. Organic aerosol (OA species dominate the NR-PM1 mass. OA correlates strongly with CO and HCN indicating that pollution (mostly secondary OA, SOA and biomass burning (BB are the main OA sources. The OA to CO ratio indicates a typical value for aged air of around 80 μg m−3 (STP ppm−1. This is within the range observed in outflow from the Northeastern US, which could be due to a compensating effect between higher BB but lower biogenic VOC emissions during this study. The O/C atomic ratio for OA is calculated from the HR mass spectra and shows a clear increase with photochemical age, as SOA forms rapidly and quickly overwhelms primary urban OA, consistent with Volkamer et al. (2006 and Kleinman et al. (2008. The stability of the OA/CO while O/C increases with photochemical age implies a net loss of carbon from the OA. BB OA is marked by signals at m/z 60 and 73, and also by a signal enhancement at large m/z indicative of larger molecules or more resistance to fragmentation. The main inorganic components show different spatial patterns and size distributions. Sulfate is regional in nature with clear volcanic and petrochemical/power plant sources, while the urban area is not a major regional source for this species. Nitrate is enhanced significantly in the urban area and immediate outflow, and is strongly correlated with CO indicating a strong urban source. The importance

  3. Seismic structure along transitions from flat to normal subduction: central Mexico, southern Peru, and southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Sara L.

    The fine-scale seismic structure of the central Mexico, southern Peru, and southwest Japan subduction zones is studied using intraslab earthquakes recorded by temporary and permanent regional seismic arrays. The morphology of the transition from flat to normal subduction is explored in central Mexico and southern Peru, while in southwest Japan the spatial coincidence of a thin ultra-slow velocity layer (USL) atop the flat slab with locations of slow slip events (SSEs) is explored. This USL is also observed in central Mexico and southern Peru, where its lateral extent is used as one constraint on the nature of the flat-to-normal transitions. In western central Mexico, I find an edge to this USL which is coincident with the western boundary of the projected Orozco Fracture Zone (OFZ) region. Forward modeling of the 2D structure of the subducted Cocos plate using a finite-difference algorithm provides constraints on the velocity and geometry of the slab's seismic structure in this region and confirms the location of the USL edge. I propose that the Cocos slab is currently fragmenting into a North Cocos plate and a South Cocos plate along the projection of the OFZ, by a process analogous to that which occurred when the Rivera plate separated from the proto-Cocos plate 10 Ma. In eastern central Mexico, observations of a sharp transition in slab dip near the abrupt end of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) suggest a possible slab tear located within the subducted South Cocos plate. The eastern lateral extent of the USL is found to be coincident with these features and with the western boundary of a zone of decreased seismicity, indicating a change in structure which I interpret as evidence of a possible tear. Analysis of intraslab seismicity patterns and focal mechanism orientations and faulting types provides further support for a possible tear in the South Cocos slab. This potential tear, together with the tear along the projection of the OFZ to the northwest

  4. 76 FR 51462 - Notice of Release of an Easement Restriction at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, Mesa, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Restriction at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, Mesa, AZ AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION... restriction covering 52.6 acres of property abutting Phoenix-Mesa Gateway, Mesa, Arizona, from all conditions... to Mr. Walter Fix, Phoenix-Gateway Airport Authority, 5835 S. Sossaman Road, Mesa, Arizona 85212...

  5. The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy federally funded national security laboratory that uses engineering and science to ensure the security of the Nation. SNL provides scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs in nuclear weapons and related defense systems, energy security, and environmental integrity. SNL works in partnerships with universities and industry to enhance their mission and transfer technology that will address emerging national challenges for both government and industry. For several years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained an inter-industry, input-output (I/O) model with capabilities to assess the impacts of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. This model will be used to assess economic, personal income and employment impacts of SNL on Central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico. Caution should be exercised when comparing economic impacts between fiscal years prior to this report. The I/O model was rebased for FY 1998. The fringe benefits coefficients have been updated for the FY 1996 and FY 1997 economic impacts analysis. Prior to FY 1993 two different I/O base models were used to estimate the impacts. New technical information was released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Department of Commerce in 1991 and in 1994 and was incorporated in FY 1991, FY 1993, and FY 1994 I/O models. Also in 1993, the state and local tax coefficients and expenditure patterns were updated from a 1986 study for the FY 1992 report. Further details about the input-output model can be found in ''The Economic Impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico-FY 1998'' report by Lansford, et al. (1999). For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998) and includes two major impact analyses: The

  6. Seismic hazard maps of Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J.G.; Shedlock, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard and/or economic constraints. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. We have produced a suite of seismic hazard estimates for Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. One of the preliminary maps in this suite served as the basis for the Caribbean and Central and South America portion of the Global Seismic Hazard Map (GSHM) published in 1999, which depicted peak ground acceleration (pga) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for rock sites. Herein we present maps depicting pga and 0.2 and 1.0 s spectral accelerations (SA) with 50%, 10%, and 2% chances of exceedance in 50 years for rock sites. The seismicity catalog used in the generation of these maps adds 3 more years of data to those used to calculate the GSH Map. Different attenuation functions (consistent with those used to calculate the U.S. and Canadian maps) were used as well. These nine maps are designed to assist in global risk mitigation by providing a general seismic hazard framework and serving as a resource for any national or regional agency to help focus further detailed studies required for regional/local needs. The largest seismic hazard values in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America generally occur in areas that have been, or are likely to be, the sites of the largest plate boundary earthquakes. High hazard values occur in areas where shallow-to-intermediate seismicity occurs frequently. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase I Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada with Errata Sheet 1, 2, 3, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2009-02-01

    As prescribed in the Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 1999) and Appendix VI of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008), the ultimate goal of transport analysis is to develop stochastic predictions of a contaminant boundary at a specified level of uncertainty. However, because of the significant uncertainty of the model results, the primary goal of this report was modified through mutual agreement between the DOE and the State of Nevada to assess the primary model components that contribute to this uncertainty and to postpone defining the contaminant boundary until additional model refinement is completed. Therefore, the role of this analysis has been to understand the behavior of radionuclide migration in the Pahute Mesa (PM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) model and to define, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the sensitivity of such behavior to (flow) model conceptualization and (flow and transport) parameterization.

  8. Emerging deforestation trends in tropical dry forests ecoregions of Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, C. A.; Cao, G.; Smith, V.

    2015-12-01

    Neotropical dry forests (TDF) have experienced an unprecedented deforestation that is leading to the loss of tropical biodiversity at a rapid pace, but information on deforestation dynamics in TDF is scarce. In this study, we present a sub-continental and national level assessment of TDF loss patterns in Mexico and Central America at high spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing and GIS technologies. We used the Global Forest Change (GFC) dataset published by Hansen et al. (2013) which shows results from time-series analysis of Landsat images in characterizing global forest extent and change from 2000 through 2013. We analyzed forest loss within and around mapped TDF cover mapped by Portillo-Quintero et al. 2010. In order to minimize errors in source data, we overlaid a 25 x 25 km grid on top of the regional dataset and conducted a cell by cell and country by country inspection at multiple scales using high resolution ancillary data. We identified trends in the clustering of space-time TDF deforestation data using ArcGIS, categorizing trends in: new, consecutive, intensifying, persistent, diminishing, sporadic, oscillating and historical hotspots (high frequency of deforestation events) and cold spots (low frequency of deforestation). In general, the region is experiencing less frequent deforestation events with a higher number of intensifying and new cold spots across TDF landscapes. However, an important number of intensifying and persistent hotspots exist so no general trend in forest loss was detected for the period 2001-2013, except for El Salvador which shows a significant decreasing trend in forest loss. Mexico, Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala are the major sources of intensifying, persistent and new deforestation hot spots. These were identified in the southern pacific coast and the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, northwestern Guatemala, both western and eastern Honduras and around Lake Nicaragua in Nicaragua.

  9. First report on the occurrence of microcystins in planktonic cyanobacteria from Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Vitor; Martins, António; Vale, Micaela; Antunes, Agostinho; Azevedo, Joana; Welker, Martin; Lopez, Oscar; Montejano, Gustavo

    2010-09-01

    Although toxic cyanobacteria are commonly described worldwide, only one recent paper on the toxicity of cyanobacteria in Mexico has been published reporting the occurrence of cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxins. Microcystins are the most commonly studied cyanotoxins in many countries and those that may cause the most dramatic problems in terms of human health. In this paper, we studied the occurrence of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in different ecosystems in Central Mexico. Samples were collected in natural lakes (Zumpango, Laguna Atotonilco and Cienega Chica), reservoirs (Los Angeles and Valle de Bravo), man-made channels (Cuemanco, Tlameleca) and urban lakes (Chapultepec). A multi-technique approach was applied by the use of molecular, immunological and chemical techniques. Cyanobacteria were found in all the sites, ranging from 1.6 x 10(3) cells/mL in Tlameleca to 7.5 x 10(6) cells/mL in Chapultepec Grande, representing between 67 and 100% of the total phytoplankton density. The concentration of total microcystins varied between 4.9 and 78.0 microg MC-LR eq/L. The results revealed the occurrence of MC-LR in all the sites analyzed by MALDI-TOF, and MC-FR, MC-RR and MC-H(4)YR in two sites. Most of the studied sites are used either as a source of drinking water, as a recreational area, or for agriculture irrigation purposes, so the risk for human health may be high if not properly monitored. This is the first report on the MC profiles and concentrations in blooms collected in Mexico. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cooperation and tensions in multiethnic corporate societies using Teotihuacan, Central Mexico, as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanilla, Linda R

    2015-07-28

    In this paper, I address the case of a corporate society in Central Mexico. After volcanic eruptions triggered population displacements in the southern Basin of Mexico during the first and fourth centuries A.D., Teotihuacan became a multiethnic settlement. Groups from different backgrounds settled primarily on the periphery of the metropolis; nevertheless, around the core, intermediate elites actively fostered the movement of sumptuary goods and the arrival of workers from diverse homelands for a range of specialized tasks. Some of these skilled craftsmen acquired status and perhaps economic power as a result of the dynamic competition among neighborhoods to display the most lavish sumptuary goods, as well as to manufacture specific symbols of identity that distinguished one neighborhood from another, such as elaborate garments and headdresses. Cotton attire worn by the Teotihuacan elite may have been one of the goods that granted economic importance to neighborhood centers such as Teopancazco, a compound that displayed strong ties to the Gulf Coast where cotton cloth was made. The ruling elite controlled raw materials that came from afar whereas the intermediate elite may have been more active in providing other sumptuary goods: pigments, cosmetics, slate, greenstone, travertine, and foreign pottery. The contrast between the corporate organization at the base and top of Teotihuacan society and the exclusionary organization of the neighborhoods headed by the highly competitive intermediate elite introduced tensions that set the stage for Teotihuacan's collapse.

  11. [Population mobility and HIV/AIDS in Central America and Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Flores, René; Aracena-Genao, Belkis; Serván-Mori, Edson

    2014-09-01

    Estimate the magnitude of the association between population mobility, measured by net migration rate (NMR), and HIV prevalence in Central America and Mexico. Using time series models, based on public information from UNAIDS, UNDP, ECLAC, and the World Bank for the period 1990-2009, this association was studied in individuals aged 15-49 years, and adjusted for socioeconomic factors (education, unemployment, life expectancy, and income). NMR was negative in all countries except Costa Rica and Panama. Unadjusted results of the model show a positive association and that NMR can explain 6% of recorded HIV prevalence. When socioeconomic cofactors are included by country (education, health, and income), the magnitude increases to 9% (PCentral America and Mexico, although large gaps persist among countries. The modest association observed between population mobility and HIV prevalence is conditioned by the socioeconomic status of the countries studied. Information availability limited the study's ability to establish the existence of this association with greater certainty. Accordingly, based on available information, it is not possible to affirm that migration plays a key role in the spread of HIV.

  12. Human footprints in Central Mexico older than 40,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia; Huddart, David; Bennett, Matthew R.; González-Huesca, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    The timing, route and origin of the first colonization to the Americas remains one of the most contentious topics in human evolution. A number of migration routes have been suggested and there are different views as to the antiquity of the earliest human occupation. Some believe that settlement happened as early as 30 ka BP, but most of the currently accepted early sites in North America date to the latest Pleistocene, related to the expansion of the Clovis culture, while the oldest directly radiocarbon dated human remains are 11.5 ka BP. In this context new evidence is presented in this paper, in the form of human footprints preserved in indurated volcanic ash, to suggest that Central Mexico was inhabited as early as over 40 ka BP. Human and animal footprints have been found within the upper bedding surfaces of the Xalnene volcanic ash layer that outcrops in the Valsequillo Basin, south of Puebla, Mexico. This ash layer was produced by a subaqueous monogenetic volcano erupting within a palaeo-lake, dammed by lava within the Valsequillo Basin during the Pleistocene. The footprints were formed during low stands in lake level along the former shorelines and indicate the presence of humans, deer, canids, big felids, and probably camels and bovids. The footprints were buried by ash and lake sediments as lake levels rose and transgressed across the site. The ash has been dated to at least 40 ka BP by OSL dating of incorporated, baked lake sediments.

  13. Rock Magnetic Properties of a Late Pleistocene Paleosol From Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J.; Ortega, B.; Solleiro, E.; Sedov, S.

    2005-05-01

    Rock-magnetic characteristics of a volcaniclastic-paleosol sequence from Tlaxcala, central Mexico, are analyzed in order to test the hypothesis of neo-formation of magnetic minerals as result of enhanced pedogenesis in A and B soil horizons, in comparison of the less affected or pedoganically unaltered parent material. Our study was carried out in a Chromic luvisol pedocomplex thought to have been formed during the last interglacial. The results show that, even if pedogenic fine grained magnetic minerals are present in the Bt horizons, these are destroyed in upper horizons, where pedogenesis has been more intense. Horizons A and E present the lowest magnetic susceptibility, however they also present the highest concentration of high coercivity hematite/goethite phases. In order to decode the paleoclimatic signal of this paleosol, rock-magnetism analysis in different pedogenetic materials as the soil itself, and cutans, cracks-filling material and humus found in soils, is in progress.

  14. House infestation dynamics and feeding sources of Triatoma dimidiata in central Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Montero, Jesús; López-Monteon, Aracely; Dumonteil, Eric; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel

    2012-04-01

    Chagas disease is endemic in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, and we investigated here the dynamics of house infestation by Chagas disease vectors to understand disease transmission and design effective control interventions. Bug collections in 42 rural villages confirmed the widespread distribution of Triatoma dimidiata in central Veracruz. Unexpectedly, collection data further indicated a clear pattern of seasonal infestation by mostly adult bugs. Analysis of feeding sources with a polymerase chain reaction-heteroduplex assay indicated a frequent feeding on humans, in agreement with the high seroprevalence previously observed. Feeding sources also confirmed a significant dispersal of bugs between habitats. High dispersal capabilities and seasonal infestation may thus be a shared characteristic of several of the T. dimidiata sibling species from this complex. It would thus be critical to adapt vector control interventions to this behavior to improve their efficacy and sustainability, as the control of T. dimidiata has been notoriously challenging.

  15. Water-quality and ground-water-level data, Bernalillo County, central New Mexico, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Water-quality and ground-water-level data were collected in two areas of eastern Bernalillo County in central New Mexico between March and July of 1995. Fifty-one wells, two springs, and the Ojo Grande Acequia in the east mountain area of Bernalillo County and nine wells in the northeast area of the city of Albuquerque were sampled. The water samples were analyzed for selected nutrient species; total organic carbon; major dissolved constituents; dissolved arsenic, boron, iron, and manganese; and methylene blue active substances. Analytical results were used to compute hardness, sodium adsorption ratio, and dissolved solids. Specific conductance, pH, temperature, and alkalinity were measured in the field at the time of sample collection. Ground- water-level and well-depth measurements were made at the time of sample collection when possible. Water-quality data, ground- water-level data, and well-depth data are presented in tabular form.

  16. The ectomycorrhizas of Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae associated with Alnus acuminata in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay-Serrano, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Two pure Alnus acuminata stands established in a montane forest in central Mexico (Puebla State) were monitored between 2010 and 2013 to confirm and recognize the ectomycorrhizal (EcM) systems of A. acuminata with Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae, two recently described species. Through comparison of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizas sampled in the forest stands, we confirmed their ectomycorrhizal association. The phytobiont was corroborated by comparing ITS sequences obtained from EcM root tips and leaves collected in the study site and from other sequences of A. acuminata available in Genbank. Detailed morphological and anatomical descriptions of the ectomycorrhizal systems are presented and complemented with photographs.

  17. Case history report on East Mesa and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, DG.; Sanyal, S.K.

    1979-06-01

    Well log analysis as applied to the geothermal industry is one of the areas of technology in great need of further development. One means of improving log analysis technology is to study case histories of the past uses of log analysis as applied to specific fields. The project described in this report involved case history studies on two well-known geothermal areas in North America: the East Mesa field in California and the Cerro Prieto field in Mexico. Since there was considerably more pertinent material available on East Mesa, a major part of the effort on this project was devoted to studying the East Mesa field. One particular problem that first came to attention when studying the Cerro Prieto data was the difficulty in determining actual formation temperature at the time of logging. Since the temperature can have a significant effect on well log readings, an accurate temperature determination was considered to be important.

  18. Mercury in Forage Fish from Mexico and Central America: Implications for Fish-Eating Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John E; Kirk, David A; Elliott, Kyle H; Dorzinsky, Jessica; Lee, Sandi; Inzunza, Ernesto Ruelas; Cheng, Kimberly M T; Scheuhammer, Tony; Shaw, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant of aquatic food chains. Aquatic birds, such as the osprey (Pandion haliaetus), with migratory populations breeding in Canada and the northern United States and wintering in the Central and South America, can be exposed to mercury on both the breeding and wintering ranges. We examined Hg levels in 14 fish taxa from 24 osprey wintering sites identified from satellite telemetry. Our main goal was to determine whether fish species that feature in the diet of overwintering and resident fish-eating birds reached toxicity thresholds for Hg. Mean Hg levels in fish whole carcasses ranged from a high of 0.18 µg g(-1) (wet weight) in Scomberomorus sierra to a low of 0.009 µg g(-1) in Catostomidae. Average Hg levels were within published toxicity threshold values in forage fish for only two sites in Mexico (Puerto Vallarta and San Blas Estuary), and all were marine species, such as mackerel (Scomberomorus sierra), sea catfish (Ariopus spp.), and sardinas species (Centropomus spp.). Except for one sample from Nicaragua, sea catfish from Puerto Morazan, none of the fish from sites in Central America had Hg levels which exceeded the thresholds. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed geographical differences in Hg levels with significant pairwise differences between sites along the Pacific Ocean (Mexico) versus the Bay of Campeche, partly due to differences in species composition of sampled fish (and species distributions). Hg increased with trophic level, as assessed by nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15)N but not δ(13)C), in freshwater and marine, but not estuarine, environments. Hg concentrations in forage fish do not account for the elevated Hg reported for many osprey populations on the breeding grounds, thus primary sources of contamination appear to be in the north.

  19. Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J.L.; Garcia, P.A.; Arce, J.L.; Siebe, C.; Espindola, J.M.; Komorowski, J.C.; Scott, K.

    1997-01-01

    This field guide describes a five day trip to examine deposits of Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in central Mexico. We will discuss the stratigraphy, petrology, and sedimentological characteristics of these deposits which provide insights into the eruptive history, type of volcanic activity, and transport and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic materials. These parameters will allow us to discuss the kinds of hazards and the risk that they pose to populations around these volcanoes. The area to be visited is tectonically complex thus we will also discuss the location of the volcanoes with respect to the tectonic environment. The first four days of the field trip will be dedicated to Nevado de Toluca Volcano (19 degrees 09'N; 99 degrees 45'W) located at 23 km. southwest of the City of Toluca, and is the fourth highest peak in the country, reaching an elevation of 4,680 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.). Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano, composed of a central vent excavated upon the remains of older craters destroyed by former events. Bloomfield and Valastro, (1974, 1977) concluded that the last cycle of activity occurred nearly equal 11,600 yr. ago. For this reason Nevado de Toluca has been considered an extinct volcano. Our studies, however, indicate that Nevado de Toluca has had at least two episodes of cone destruction by sector collapse as well as several explosive episodes including plinian eruptions and dome-destruction events. These eruptions occurred during the Pleistocene but a very young eruption characterized by surge and ash flows occurred ca. 3,300 yr. BP. This new knowledge of the volcano's eruptive history makes the evaluation of its present state of activity and the geological hazards necessary. This is important because the area is densely populated and large cities such as Toluca and Mexico are located in its proximity.

  20. Rainfall and cloud water interception in mature and secondary lower montane cloud forests of central Veracruz, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, F; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Muñoz-Villers, L.E.; Equihua, M.; Asbjornsen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall and cloud water interception (CWI) were determined for a mature and a 19-year old secondary lower montane cloud forest in central Veracruz, Mexico. Cloud water was measured using a passive fog gauge, and consisted most likely of a mixture of fog and wind-driven drizzle. CWI by the canopy

  1. Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. J. Christian; R. J. Yokelson; B. Cardenas; L. T. Molina; G. Engling; S.-C. Hsu

    2010-01-01

    In central Mexico during the spring of 2007 we measured the initial emissions of 12 gases and the aerosol speciation for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), anhydrosugars, Cl-, NO-3 , and 20 metals from 10 cooking fires, four garbage fires, three brick making kilns, three charcoal making kilns, and two crop residue fires. Global biofuel use has been...

  2. Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. J. Christian; R. J. Yokelson; B. Cardenas; L. T. Molina; G. Engling; S.-C. Hsu

    2009-01-01

    In central Mexico during the spring of 2007 we measured the initial emissions of 12 gases and the aerosol speciation for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), anhydrosugars, Cl-, NO-3 , and 20 metals from 10 cooking fires, four garbage fires, three brick making kilns, three charcoal making kilns, and two crop residue fires. Biofuel use has been estimated at over 2600...

  3. 77 FR 31037 - Outer Continental Shelf, Central and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Areas, Oil and Gas Lease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... Shelf, Central and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Areas, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for Years 2012-2017... previously included within the Eastern GOM Planning Area and are within 100 miles of the Florida coast; and 2... document describes a revision to the description of the areas not available for leasing in the OCS. BOEM...

  4. 76 FR 82319 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... conditions and potential environmental effects of oil and natural gas leasing, exploration, development, and... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas Lease Sales for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of...

  5. Strategic integration of public transport networks with airport infrastructure in the megalopolis of Central Mexico : Evolution and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas, C.R.; Garcia Cejudo, D.; Van Timmeren, A.

    2014-01-01

    Airports represent the contemporary global gateways of metropolitan areas worldwide. In the case of the megalopolis of Central Mexico, air transport was traditionally used only by upper social segments of the population, however, during the last years, the introduction of low-cost airlines in the

  6. Mexico Geoid Heights (MEXICO97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for Mexico, and North-Central America, is the MEXICO97 geoid model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine gravity...

  7. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on north-central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1998; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansford, R.R.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.; Ben-David, S.

    1999-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation's nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote US industrial competitiveness by working with US companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos is involved in partnerships and collaborations with other federal agencies, with industry (including New Mexico businesses), and with universities worldwide. For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998). It includes two major impact analysis: the impact of LANL activities on north-central New Mexico and the economic impacts of LANL on the state of New Mexico. Total impact represents both direct and indirect responding by business, including induced effects (responding by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the three-county region and the state of New Mexico

  8. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on north-central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation's nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote US industrial competitiveness by working with US companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos is involved in partnerships and collaborations with other federal agencies, with industry (including New Mexico businesses), and with universities worldwide. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analysis: the impact of LANL activities on north-central New Mexico and the economic impacts of LANL on the state of New Mexico. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the three-county region and the state of New Mexico. 5 figs., 12 tabs

  9. Vulnerability Assessment of the Central Gulf of Mexico Coast Using a Multi-Dimensional Index Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narra, S.; Dismukes, D. E.

    2016-02-01

    The coastal communities of the central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) form a highly productive and complex human, physical, and natural environment that interact in ways unique compared to other coastal areas of the globe. Past studies on understanding coastal resiliency and developing vulnerability indices for this region have mainly focused on climate change and sea-level rise, with more recent research directed towards recognizing socio-economic and demographic factors. The interactions of climate change and non-climatic drivers of the coastal ecosystem such as economy and infrastructure concentration are often overlooked. To support the development of policies relating to coastal management and climate change, it is vital to integrate all the relevant parameters. This paper presents a relative vulnerability assessment of the central GOM coast by incorporating climatic, geological, socio-economic, demographic and economic variables. A multi-dimensional Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) developed from these parameters is used to rate coastal segments into different classes based on their range of vulnerability. We study the relationship between energy infrastructure and the physical and human aspects of communities to identify and prioritize communities, and the proximate infrastructure most at risk from coastal climate change. Spatial analysis will be a component part of this index-based approach to characterize, organize, and analyze data for assessing coastal community vulnerability in areas supporting critical energy infrastructure. Special focus is directed towards the concentration of pipeline and transportation infrastructure in this region.

  10. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations.

  11. The combined influence of Pacific decadal oscillation and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation on central Mexico since the early 1600s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungjae; Byrne, Roger; Böhnel, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Periodic droughts have been one of the most serious environmental issues in central Mexico since the earliest times. The impacts of future droughts are likely to become even more severe as the current global warming trend increases potential evaporation and moisture deficits. A full understanding of the mechanism underlying climate variability is imperative to narrow the uncertainty about future droughts and predict water availability. The climatic complexity generated by the combined influence of both Atlantic and Pacific forcings, however, causes considerable difficulty in interpreting central Mexican climate records. Also, the lack of high-resolution information regarding the climate in the recent past makes it difficult to clearly understand current drought mechanisms. Our new high-resolution δ18 O record from Hoya Rincon de Parangueo in central Mexico provides useful information on climate variations since the early 1600s. According to our results, the central Mexican climate has been predominantly controlled by the combined influence of the 20-year Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the 70-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). However, the AMO probably lost much of its influence in central Mexico in the early 20th century and the PDO has mostly driven climate change since. Marked dryness was mostly associated with co-occurrence of highly positive PDO and negative AMO between ∼1600 and 1900.

  12. The violent Strombolian eruption of 10 ka Pelado shield volcano, Sierra Chichinautzin, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Merino, A.; Guilbaud, M.-N.; Roberge, J.

    2018-03-01

    Pelado volcano is a typical example of an andesitic Mexican shield with a summital scoria cone. It erupted ca. 10 ka in the central part of an elevated plateau in what is today the southern part of Mexico City. The volcano forms a roughly circular, 10-km wide lava shield with two summital cones, surrounded by up to 2.7-m thick tephra deposits preserved up to a distance of 3 km beyond the shield. New cartographic, stratigraphic, granulometric, and componentry data indicate that Pelado volcano was the product of a single, continuous eruption marked by three stages. In the early stage, a > 1.5-km long fissure opened and was active with mild explosive activity. Intermediate and late stages were mostly effusive and associated with the formation of a 250-m high lava shield. Nevertheless, during these stages, the emission of lava alternated and/or coexisted with highly explosive events that deposited a widespread tephra blanket. In the intermediate stage, multiple vents were active along the fissure, but activity was centered at the main cone during the late stage. The final activity was purely effusive. The volcano emitted > 0.9 km3 dense-rock equivalent (DRE) of tephra and up to 5.6 km3 DRE of lavas. Pelado shares various features with documented "violent Strombolian" eruptions, including a high fragmentation index, large dispersal area, occurrence of plate tephra, high eruptive column, and simultaneous explosive and effusive activity. Our results suggest that the associated hazards (mostly tephra fallout and emplacement of lava) would seriously affect areas located up to 25 km from the vent for fallout and 5 km from the vent for lava, an important issue for large cities built near or on potentially active zones, such as Mexico City.

  13. Ethnoecology of the palm Brahea dulcis (Kunth) Mart. in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, María T; Coronel-Ortega, Mayte

    2015-01-05

    There have been few studies on the sustainable use of non-timber forest products in arid and semi-arid zones. The palm Brahea dulcis has been one of the most important resources in semi-arid Mesoamerica, since pre-Hispanic times. Currently, some populations grow within protected natural areas, representing both a challenge and an opportunity for local development. This ethnoecological study of B. dulcis in central Mexico aimed to evaluate their uses, harvesting context, and potential for exploitation, in order to give practical advice on their best use and management. Ethnographic and ecological information was obtained in Barranca de Metztitlán Biosphere Reserve and Valle del Mezquital, Mexico. We studied the population structure and density; additionally, we evaluated the rate of leaf production, leaf renewal rate, percent survival of new leaves, the development of reproductive structures and performed a one-year defoliation experiment (involving a control and four treatments including a mix of semiannual and annual frequency of harvest and removal of two new leaves and/or two mature leaves). Twenty uses of the palm were recorded in the study area. Religious/symbolic and handicraft uses are highlighted. The population density of this species was the highest reported for the genus (1244 ± 231.7 ind/ha). The leaf production rate was the highest reported for arborescent palms of the Americas (11.83 ± 0.036 leaves/individual/year). The sexual reproductive cycle was 2.3 years long. A one-year defoliation experiment did not show statistically significant differences. Recommendations include: 1) implement management focused on increasing the abundance and quality of this useful resource in Metztitlán; 2) employ a strategy of focusing on ethnicity and gender in promoting their exploitation; 3) learn from theoretical frameworks of other non timber forest product studies. We propose that Brahea dulcis is the palm with the highest potential for sustainable use

  14. Floods of November 1978 to March 1979 in Arizona and west-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Byron Neil; Hales, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Severe flooding occurred in parts of the Little Colorado and Gila River basins as a result of a storm that occurred December 17-20, 1978. The central highlands received 3 to 10 inches of precipitation that was augmented by snowmelt to altitudes of 10,000 feet. The storm was preceded by extremely large amounts of rainfall and runoff in November and was followed by other periods of high runoff in January and March 1979. In some areas flood peaks in November, January, or March were higher than the peak of December 1978. At Winslow, the discharge of the Little Colorado River in December 1978 was the highest since at least 1952. The discharge of the Gila River above the San Francisco River was probably the highest since at least 1891, and in the Safford Valley, the peak was the highest since 1916. The Agua Fria River below Waddell Dam had the highest discharge since 1919. The flood of December 1978 caused 12 deaths and caused damage that was probably in excess of $150 million in Arizona and west-central New Mexico. Damage was estimated to be $51.8 million in Maricopa County, Arizona. Floods caused extensive agricultural damage along the Gila River in Virden Valley in New Mexico and in Duncan, York, and Safford Valleys in Arizona. Duncan, Arizona, was flooded with as much as 7 feet of water. The flood crest on the Gila River in December 1978 moved from Redrock, New Mexico, to Duncan, Arizona, in about 6 hours, which is more rapid than during other recent floods but is comparable to the travel-time recorded in 1941. Travel-time in the reach varies with discharge and is about 14 hours for discharges of 10,000 cubic feet per second and 5 hours for discharges of more than 40,000 cubic feet per second. Water-conservation reservoirs on the Gila, Salt, Verde, and Agua Fria Rivers and a flood-control reservoir on the Gila River had a major influence on the magnitude of floods downstream from the reservoirs. All runoff from the Gila River basin upstream from Coolidge Dam, Arizona

  15. Significance of detrital zircons in upper Devonian ocean-basin strata of the Sonora allochthon and Lower Permian synorogenic strata of the Mina Mexico foredeep, central Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, F.G.; Gehrels, G.E.; Stewart, John H.

    2008-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic dating of detrital zircons from a conglomeratic barite sandstone in the Sonora allochthon and a calciclastic sandstone in the Mina Mexico foredeep of the Minas de Barita area reveals two main age groups in the Upper Devonian part of the Los Pozos Formation, 1.73-1.65 Ga and 1.44-1.42 Ga; and three main age groups in the Lower Permian part of the Mina Mexico Formation, 1.93-1.91 Ga, 1.45-1.42 Ga, and 1.1-1.0 Ga. Small numbers of zircons with ages of 2.72-2.65 Ga, 1.30-1.24 Ga, ca. 2.46 Ga, ca. 1.83 Ga, and ca. 0.53 Ga are also present in the Los Pozos sandstone. Detrital zircons ranging in age from 1.73 to 1.65 Ga are considered to have been derived from the Yavapai, Mojave, and Mazatzal Provinces and their transition zones of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. The 1.45-1.30 Ga detrital zircons were probably derived from scattered granite bodies within the Mojave and Mazatzal basement rocks in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, and possibly from the Southern and Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Provinces of the southern United States. The 1.24-1.0 Ga detrital zircons are believed to have been derived from the Grenville (Llano) Province to the east and northeast or from Grenvilleage intrusions or anatectites to the north. Several detrital zircon ages ranging from 2.72 to 1.91 Ga were probably derived originally from the Archean Wyoming Province and Early Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Lake Superior region. These older detrital zircons most likely have been recycled one or more times into the Paleozoic sandstones of central Sonora. The 0.53 Ga zircon is believed to have been derived from a Lower Cambrian granitoid or meta-morphic rock northeast of central Sonora, possibly in New Mexico and Colorado, or Oklahoma. Detrital zircon geochronology suggests that most of the detritus in both samples was derived from Laurentia to the north, whereas some detritus in the Permian synorogenic foredeep sequence was derived from the

  16. Stratigraphy and Facies Analysis of a 122 M Long Lacustrine Sequence from Chalco Lake, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D. A.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.; Lozano, S.; Pi, T.; Brown, E. T.

    2010-12-01

    Chalco lake is located SE of the outskirts of Mexico City, at the central part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Previous studies show the importance of this lacustrine sequence as an archive of paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic changes. A set of five cores up to 122 m depth were drilled in the basin, in order to analyze the sedimentary record and to extent the previous knowledge of past environmental changes in central Mexico. As an initial step, in this work we present the identification and classification of sedimentary facies. Preliminary paleomagnetism analyses recognize the possible record of the Blake Event (ca. 120 kyr BP), and suggest that the sequence might span the last 240 kyr. In this case, variations in sedimentary facies could reflect the conditions of the MIS 1-7. The facies are mostly diatom ooze, carbonate mud, organic rich silt and volcaniclastic, both massive and laminated, and massive dark gray to reddish brown silt. From 1 to 8 m depth dominates the organic rich silt facies, which correlates with the MIS 1. Intercalations of reddish brown and grayish brown silt facies, between 8 to 60 m depth, indicate changes occurred during MIS 2 to 5d. Between 60-75 m depth the sequence is characterized by dark grayish silty clay facies, which possibly coincide with the MIS 5e. At 79 m depth (ca. 130 kyr BP) we found struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O), which may be related to dry conditions. The laminated diatom ooze facies dominates between 90 to 122 m depth and indicates rhythmic changes in the sediment deposition of the basin. The volcaniclastic facies is represented by lapilli and ash deposits in more than 100 individual tephra layers of both mafic and felsic composition. Some of them correspond to main volcanic eruptions, as the Upper Toluca Pumice (13,500 cal yr BP), from the Nevado de Toluca volcano and the Pómez con Andesita (17,700 cal yr BP) from the Popocatépetl volcano. The carbonate mud facies is composed of calcite and siderite, with frequent

  17. Water balances of old-growth and regenerating montane cloud forests in central Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Villers, L. E.; Holwerda, F.; Gómez-Cárdenas, M.; Equihua, M.; Asbjornsen, H.; Bruijnzeel, L. A.; Marín-Castro, B. E.; Tobón, C.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryThis paper compares the water budgets of two adjacent micro-catchments covered by mature (MAT) and 20-year-old secondary (SEC) lower montane cloud forests, respectively, in central Veracruz, Mexico over a 2-year period. Rainfall (P) and streamflow (Q) were measured continuously, whereas dry canopy evaporation (transpiration Et), wet canopy evaporation (rainfall interception I), and cloud water interception (CWI) were quantified using a combination of field measurements and modeling. Mean annual P was 3467 mm, of which typically 80% fell during the wet season (May-October). Fog interception occurred exclusively during the dry season (November-April), and was ⩽2% of annual P for both forests. Rainfall interception loss was dominated by post-event evaporation of intercepted water rather than by within-event evaporation. Therefore, the higher overall I (i.e. including CWI) by the MAT (16% of P vs. 8% for the SEC) reflects a higher canopy storage capacity, related in turn to higher leaf area index and greater epiphyte biomass. Annual Et totals derived from sapflow measurements were nearly equal for the MAT and SEC (˜790 mm each). Total annual water yield calculated as P minus (Et + I) was somewhat higher for the SEC (2441 mm) than for the MAT (2077 mm), and mainly reflects the difference in I. Mean annual Q was also higher for the SEC (1527 mm) than for the MAT (1338 mm), and consisted mostly of baseflow (˜90%). Baseflow recession rates were nearly equal between the two forests, as were stormflow coefficients (4% and 5% for MAT and SEC, respectively). The very low runoff response to rainfall is attributed to the high infiltration and water retention capacities of the volcanic soils throughout the ˜2 m deep profile. The water budget results indicate that ˜875 and 700 mm year-1 leave the SEC and MAT as deep groundwater leakage, which is considered plausible given the fractured geology in the study area. It is concluded that 20 years of natural regeneration

  18. [Nesting habitat characterization for Amazona oratrix (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae) in the Central Pacific, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrubio-Rico, Tiberio C; Álvarez-Jara, Margarito; Tellez-Garcia, Loreno; Tena-Morelos, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The nesting requirements of the Yellow-headed Parrot (Amazona oratrix) are poorly understood, despite their broad historical distribution, high demand for pet trade and current endangered status. Information concerning their nesting requirements is required in order to design specific restoration and conser- vation actions. To assess this, we studied their nesting ecology in the Central Pacific, Michoacan, Mexico during a ten year period. The analyzed variables ranged from local scale nest site characteristics such as nesting tree species, dimensions, geographic positions, diet and nesting forest patches structure, to large scale features such as vegetation use and climatic variables associated to the nesting tree distributions by an ecological niche model using Maxent. We also evaluated the parrot tolerance to land management regimes, and compared the Pacific nest trees with 18 nest trees recorded in an intensively managed private ranch in Tamaulipas, Gulf of Mexico. Parrots nested in tall trees with canopy level cavities in 92 nest-trees recorded from 11 tree species. The 72.8% of nesting occurred in trees of Astronium graveolens, and Enterolobium cyclocarpum which qualified as key- stone trees. The forests where the parrots nested, presented a maximum of 54 tree species, 50% of which were identified as food source; besides, these areas also had a high abundance of trees used as food supply. The lowest number of tree species and trees to forage occurred in an active cattle ranch, whereas the highest species rich- ness was observed in areas with natural recovery. The nesting cavity entrance height from above ground of the Pacific nesting trees resulted higher than those found in the Gulf of Mexico. We hypothesize that the differences may be attributed to Parrot behavioral differences adapting to differential poaching pressure and cavity avail- ability. Nesting trees were found in six vegetation types; however the parrots preferred conserved and riparian semi

  19. Geomorphology, deformation, and chronology of marine terraces along the pacific coast of central Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Alan J.

    1980-05-01

    Three emergent marine terraces are prominent between Playa El Marron and Arroyo El Salinito and comprise the most extensive Pleistocene planation surfaces in central Baja California, Mexico. The deposits of the lowest terrace, the Tomatal, are 120,000 ± 20,000 yr old (Sangamonian?) while the absolute ages of the two higher and older terraces, the Andrés and Aeropuerto, are unknown. The Tomatal terrace is particularly well developed and comprises degraded sea cliffs, paleodunes, and lagoonal sequences. Shingle paleobeach ridges also occur locally and reflect shore progradation and tombolo formation. The Tomatal shoreline is nearly horizontal at 7 ± 1 m above present mean sea level, whereas the older Aeropuerto terrace has been tilted so that it decreases in elevation toward the southeast. Nonetheless, coastal tilting is not nearly as great as at many other localities in California and Baja California. This is despite the fact that the entire Baja California peninsula has been assumed to be tectonically unstable during the Pleistocene, primarily because of the forces generated by plate motion.

  20. Water Quality of a Reservoir and Its Major Tributary Located in East-Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Hernández, Patricia; Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Herrera-San Luis, José Antonio; Cruz-López, Norma

    2014-01-01

    A reservoir with ecological and economic importance and its major tributary, localized in east-central Mexico, were studied. The aim of this work was to know the physicochemical water characteristics of both water bodies and to contrast these by their different uses, and also estimate overall water quality using a Water Quality Index (WQI). Water samples from the reservoir and the tributary were obtained in different climatic seasons. In the tributary, anoxic and hypoxic conditions and high levels of organic matter, orthophosphate, and ammonium showed that this is strongly impacted by wastewater discharges and that the water is not suitable for different uses; independently of the season, the WQI showed “poor” quality (34.4–47.2). In contrast, in the reservoir a better water quality was determined; the WQI in the sampling months ranged from 72.1–76.6 (“good” quality), and spatially, this was from 66.5–79.5 (“fair” and “good” quality). PMID:24919132

  1. Techniques for verifying human footprints: reappraisal of pre-Clovis footprints in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Sarita Amy; Bennett, Matthew R.; Gonzalez, Silvia; Huddart, David

    2010-09-01

    Verification of human footprints within the geological record provides critical evidence of presence as well as information on the biomechanics of the individuals who made those prints. Consequently, the correct identification of human footprints is important, but is something for which critical and objective criteria do not exist. The current paper attempts to address this issue by presenting a new statistically based approach to the verification of human footprints. The importance of this is illustrated by the recent controversy surrounding a series of marks identified as human prints in the Valsequillo Basin in Central Mexico dated originally to 40 000 years ago. The dating of these marks remains highly controversial with some teams placing their age at 1.3 million years old. Irrespective of this debate the crucial question that must be addressed is whether or not they represent evidence of human presence. Using an objective statistically based methodology developed here, these controversial marks are re-examined and found to be of questionable origin, as they are inconsistent with a suite of other, known human and hominin prints. Consequently, we argue that they should be removed as evidence in the ongoing controversy surrounding the colonization of the Americas.

  2. The influence of mistletoes on birds in an agricultural landscape of central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuria, Iriana; Castellanos, Ignacio; Gates, J. Edward

    2014-11-01

    Mistletoes are hemiparasitic flowering plants that function as keystone resources in forests and woodlands of temperate regions, where a positive relationship between mistletoe density and avian species richness has been observed. Mistletoes have been less studied in tropical regions and the relationship between birds and mistletoes has seldom been explored in tropical agricultural systems. Therefore, we studied the presence of infected trees and infection prevalence (i.e., number of parasitized trees/total number of trees) by Psittacanthus (Loranthaceae) mistletoes in 23 hedgerows located in an agricultural landscape of central Mexico during the dry and rainy seasons, and investigated the relationship between bird species richness and abundance and the abundance of mistletoes. We found a mean of 74 mistletoe plants per 100-m transect of only one species, Psittacanthus calyculatus. Thirty-one percent of the trees surveyed were infected and tree species differed in infection prevalence, mesquite (Prosopis laevigata) being the most infected species with 86% of the surveyed trees infected. For both seasons, we found a positive and significant association between bird species richness and number of mistletoe plants. The same pattern was observed for total bird abundance. Many resident and Neotropical migratory birds were observed foraging on mistletoes. Our results show that mistletoes are important in promoting a higher bird species richness and abundance in tropical agricultural landscapes.

  3. Geothermal potential of West-Central New Mexico from geochemical and thermal gradient data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitte, D.; Gambill, D.T.

    1980-11-01

    To study the low temperature and Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of west-central New Mexico, 46 water samples were collected and geothermal gradient measurements were made in 29 wells. Water chemistry data indicate that all the samples collected are meteoric waters. High temperatures of samples taken from wells between Gallup and Tohatchi indicate these wells may derive water from a warm aquifer below the depth of the wells. The chemistries of the samples farther south on the Zuni Indian reservation suggest these waters are not circulating below 600 m of the surface. Geothermometry calculations support the conclusion that the waters sampled are meteoric. The geothermometry also indicates that the deep reservoir between Gallup and Tohatchi may be greater than 60/sup 0/C. Thermal gradient data indicate an area of high gradient on the Zuni Indian Reservation with a measured maximum of 67/sup 0/C/km between 181 m and 284 m. This high probably is not hydrologically controlled. The maximum gradients in the study area are 76/sup 0/C/km and 138/sup 0/C/km, measured just east of Springerville, Arizona. These gradients are undoubtedly controlled by circulating water, possibly heated by a magmatic source at depth and circulating back to the surface.

  4. On the age of human footprints in Central Mexico: paleomagnetic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Fernandez, J.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Martin Del Pozo, A.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    Until recently, we thought we knew where ancestral Native Americans came from (central Siberia, then across Beringia), and when they arrived (about 13 000 cal BP, after a trek between the recently separated Canadian ice sheets after Fiedel, 2006). Recent theories of American origins postulate multiple pre-Clovis migrations including Transpacific or coastal voyages by Australians, Melanesians, or Ainu, and even a Transatlantic migrations by Caucasoid Solutreans from Iberia. Thus, timing, route and origin of the first colonization to the Americas remains one of the most important topics in human evolution. Human and animal footprints have been found within the upper bedding surfaces of the Xalnene volcanic ash layer that outcrops in the Valsequillo Basin, south of Puebla, Mexico (Gonzalez et al., 2005). The ash has been dated to at least 40 ka BP. Paleomagnetic investigation yielded an intermediate magnetic polarity for Xalnene ash deposits while nearby Toluquilla volcano is reversely magnetized. Moreover, the absolute geomagnetic paleointensity derived from the volcanic lava flow is significantly reduced with respect to the present day geomagnetic field strength. It is quite possible that the ash as well as volcanic lava flow formed during worldwide observed Laschamp geomagnetic event.

  5. Energy and Power Spectra of Thunder in the Magdalena Mountains, Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. L.; Johnson, J. B.; Arechiga, R. O.; Michnovicz, J. C.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.

    2011-12-01

    Thunder is generated primarily by heating and expansion of the atmosphere around a lightning channel and by charge relaxation within a cloud. Broadband acoustic studies are important for inferring dynamic charge behavior during and after lightning events. During the Summer monsoon seasons of 2009-2011, we deployed networks of 3-5 stations consisting of broadband (0.01 to 500 Hz) acoustic arrays and audio microphones in the Magdalena Mountains in central New Mexico. We utilize Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data for accurate timing of lightning events within a 10 km radius of our network. Unlike the LMA, which detects VHF signals from breakdown processes, thunder signals may be used to observe charge dynamics and thermal shocking of the atmosphere. Previous investigations show that thunder spectral content may distinguish between electrostatic and thermal heating processes. We collected extensive datasets in terms of number of independent broadband sensors (up to 20), number of observed flashes (hundreds from multiple storms), and available coincident LMA data. We use infrasound and audio data to quantify total acoustic energy produced at lightning sources in various frequency bands. We attribute the spectral content and intensity of thunder signals to source characteristics, sensor locations, propagation effects, and noise. We observe variations in acoustic energy for both entire storm systems and individual lightning flashes. We propose that some variations may be related to the type of lightning flash and that spectral content is important for distinguishing between thunder generation mechanisms.

  6. Urban-Rural Relations in the Central Region of Mexico: A Viewpoint from Tlaxcala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Rosales Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 90’s there was an important expansion of outsourcing industries all around the country and particularly on central region of Mexico, which enhanced an industrial diffusion that transformed the relation between rural an urban areas of the region. Labor and social practices around the textile industry on the region and particularly on the Tlaxcala state, enhanced the organization of a complex local-global network that was built on the context of the Nafta Agreement. Now a day, the local-global network around the textile industry has fall down due to the growing Chinese textile goods on the local and national market. The answer to this economic change has generated a wide range of changes among the different social actors that participated on the local-global network created by de textile industry during the golden years of the Nafta Agreement. Our research analyze the experience and strategies of a group of families from Tlaxcala, organized around the mixture of agricultural, manufacturing and service activities in order to reorganize the economic activities of their localities.

  7. Estimating the Rainwater Potential per Household in an Urban Area: Case Study in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Lizárraga-Mendiola

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In cities with problems of aridity and a shortage of drinking water supply, there is an urgent need to establish alternatives for an adequate water management program. This study proposes an estimation through which users can select a rainwater harvesting system for non-drinking water consumption. For the cities of Pachuca and Mineral de la Reforma, State of Hidalgo, Central Mexico, the historical record of rainfall analyzed covers a period of 33 years (1980–2013. We calculated the monthly volume of rainwater harvestable from roof areas (VR, m3 with household roof areas (Hra of 45 m2, 50 m2, 100 m2 and 200 m2. It is proposed to replace in each single house the flush toilets and washing machine with ecological devices with consumptions of 4.8 L/flush and 70 L/load, respectively. Furthermore, a maximum and a minimum consumption of eight and six flushes/day/person (flush toilets and five and four loads/week (washing machine, respectively, are proposed. From these considerations, our estimations of the harvestable rainwater showed that households with Hra of 45 m2 and 50 m2 would depend on the water supply system of the public network during part of the year. On the other hand, households with Hra of 100 m2 and 200 m2 might be able to store enough water to meet other needs besides toilet flushing and laundry.

  8. Two new species of the genus Xenotoca Hubbs and Turner, 1939 (Teleostei, Goodeidae) from central-western Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Domínguez, Omar; Bernal-Zuñiga, Dulce María; Piller, Kyle R

    2016-11-09

    The subfamily Goodeinae (Goodeidae) is one of the most representative and well-studied group of fishes from central Mexico, with around 18 genera and 40 species. Recent phylogenetic studies have documented a high degree of genetic diversity and divergences among populations, suggesting that the diversity of the group may be underestimated. The species Xenotoca eiseni has had several taxonomic changes since its description. Xenotoca eiseni is considered a widespread species along the Central Pacific Coastal drainages of Mexico, inhabiting six independent drainages. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that X. eiseni is a species complex, represented by at least three independent evolutionary lineages. We carried out a meristic and morphometric study in order to evaluate the morphological differences among these genetically divergent populations and describe two new species. The new species of goodeines, Xenotoca doadrioi and X. lyonsi, are described from the Etzatlan endorheic drainage and upper Coahuayana basin respectively.

  9. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes the key energy data for Mexico: 1 - energy organizations and policy: Ministry of energy (SENER), Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE), Ministry of Finances, Ministry of trade and industrial development (SECOFI), national commission for energy savings (CONAE); 2 - companies: federal commission of electricity (CFE), Minera Carbonifera Rio Escondido (MICARE - coal), Pemex (petroleum); 3 - energy production: resources, electric power, petroleum, natural gas; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - stakes and perspectives. Some economic and energy indicators are summarized in a series of tables: general indicators, supply indicators (reserves, refining and electric capacity, energy production, foreign trade), demand indicators (consumption trends, end use, energy independence, energy efficiency, CO 2 emissions), energy status per year and per energy source. (J.S.)

  10. Biostratigraphic data from Upper Cretaceous formations-eastern Wyoming, central Colorado, and northeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merewether, E.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Lithological and paleontological studies of outcrops of Upper Cretaceous formations were conducted at 12 localities in eastern Wyoming, central Colorado, and northeastern New Mexico. The sequence extends upward from the top of the Mowry Shale, or age-equivalent rocks, through the Graneros Shale, Greenhorn Limestone, Carlile Shale, Niobrara Formation, Pierre Shale, and Fox Hills Sandstone, or age-equivalent formations, to the top of the Laramie Formation, or laterally equivalent formations. The strata are mainly siliciclastic and calcareous, with thicknesses ranging from about 3,300 ft in northeastern New Mexico to as much as 13,500 ft in eastern Wyoming. Deposition was mainly in marine environments and molluscan fossils of Cenomanian through Maastrichtian ages are common. Radiometric ages were determined from beds of bentonite that are associated with fossil zones. The Upper Cretaceous formations at the 12 study localities are herein divided into three informal time-stratigraphic units based on fossil content and contact relations with adjacent strata. The basal unit in most places extends from the base of the Graneros to the top of the Niobrara, generally to the horizon of the fossil Scaphites hippocrepis, and spans a period of about 14 million years. The middle unit generally extends from the top of the Niobrara to the approximate middle of the Pierre, the horizon of the fossil Baculites gregoryensis, and represents a period of about 5 million years. The upper unit includes strata between the middle of the Pierre and the top of the Upper Cretaceous Series, which is the top of the Laramie Formation or of laterally equivalent formations; it represents a period of deposition of as much as 11 million years. Comparisons of the collections of fossils from each outcrop with the complete sequence of Upper Cretaceous index fossils can indicate disconformable contacts and lacunae. Widespread disconformities have been found within the Carlile Shale and between the Carlile

  11. New Permian durhaminid cerioid corals from east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.

    2009-01-01

    Permian colonial corals from Artinskian to Kungurian strata in the Conglomerate Mesa area, Inyo Mountains, east-central California, include five new species, one of which is assigned to a new genus. The new taxa are: Malpaisia maceyi n. gen. and n. sp., Pararachnastraea bellula n. sp., P. delicata n. sp., P. owensensis n. sp., and Cordillerastraea inyoensis n. sp. These species, several of which compare most closely with other Artinskian and Kungurian species from eastern Nevada and northern Mexico, represent three distinct stocks that differentiated on an isolated submarine uplift offshore from the main part of the Cordilleran carbonate shelf.

  12. Plants used in the traditional medicine of Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) and the Caribbean for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Domínguez, Fabiola; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Carranza-Álvarez, Candy

    2015-12-04

    Obesity is a worldwide medical concern. New ethnobotanical information regarding the antiobesity effect of medicinal plants has been obtained in the last 30 years in response to socio-demographic changes and high-fat diets became common. This review provides a summary of medicinal plants used in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for the empirical treatment of obesity in terms of ethnobotany, toxicity, pharmacology, conservation status, trade and chemistry. Bibliographic investigation was performed by analyzing recognized books, undergraduate and postgraduate theses and peer-reviewed scientific articles, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last four decades. Medicinal plants used for the treatment of obesity were classified in two categories: (1) plants with pharmacological evidence and (2) plants without pharmacological evidence. A total of 139 plant species, belonging to 61 families, native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean that are used for the empirical treatment of obesity were recorded. From these plants, 33 were investigated in scientific studies, and 106 plants lacked scientific investigation. Medicinal plants were experimentally studied in vitro (21 plants) and in vivo (16 plants). A total of 4 compounds isolated from medicinal plants used for the empirical treatment of obesity have been tested in vitro (2 compounds) and in vivo (4 compounds) studies. No clinical trials on obese subjects (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) have been performed using the medicinal plants cited in this review. There are no herbal-based products approved in Mexico for the treatment of obesity. There are a limited number of scientific studies published on medicinal plants from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean used for the treatment of obesity. This review highlights the need to perform pharmacological, phytochemical, toxicological and ethnobotanical studies with medicinal flora to obtain new antiobesity agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland

  13. Geology of the State of Morelos and contiguous areas in south-central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Carl F.

    1959-01-01

    The area described lies in south-central Mexico and embraces all but the southeastern corner and easternmost border of the State of Moreles, the second smallest State in the Mexican Republic. It includes small contiguous parts of the State of Mexico, in the northeastern corner, and of the State of Guerrero in the southwestern corner. Limiting geographic coordinates are 98 45 to 99 39 west longitude and 18 18 to 19 08 north latitude, the northern boundary being only 35 km south of Mexico City, capital of the Republic. The geological map does not cover the entire rectangle outlined, but is irregular in form and measures roughly 4150 sq. km, three-quarters of it representing two0thirds of the State of Moreles and the rest lying outside the State. The region ranges in altitude from 730 m above sea level at Iguala near the south edge of the map, to a general level of about 3000 m at the north edge, although individual peaks rise to 3900 m and Popocatepetl Volcano, a few kilometers east of the northeastern border of the map, rises to 5452 m above sea level. Annual rainfall ranges from a minimum of about 640 mm in the low country, to 1200 mm and more at altitudes above 2000 m. Most of it falls in summer between June and September. Winter frosts are rare below 1800 m. The climate is of savanna to steppe type; soils are thin and may be classified as belonging to the tachernoses group, with strong development of calcareous evaporates (caliche) at altitudes below 1800 m. The northern border of the area forms the southern half of the late Pliocene to Recent Neo-volcanic Belt of basic volcanism that crosses Mexico in the direction N. 80 W., and thus has constructional topography. The rest of the area belongs to the Balsas Basin physiographic province, which is characterized by maturely dissected terrain tributary to the large Balsas River. All but the southwestern corner of the area drains southward via the Amacuzac River into the Mexcala-Balsas River, and thence westward into

  14. Notes on the origin of extensive endorheic regions in central and northern Mexico, and some implications for paleozoogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Carranza-Castañeda, Oscar; Wang, Xiaoming; Tseng, Z. Jack; Pacheco-Castro, Adolfo

    2018-04-01

    The recent discovery of a fossil of Enhydritherium terraenovae in upper Miocene fluvial deposits in Juchipila (Mexico), nearly 200 km away from the nearest coast, together with other known occurrences of the same species in Florida and California, made possible to envision an alternative to the Panamanian and Polar routes of migration through fluvial systems in Mexico. In order to cross from one ocean to the other, individuals of E. terraenovae must have passed the continental divide, which is a physiographic feature that separates surface waters that flow into the Atlantic and Pacific versants. Two vast endorheic regions, which together span more than 400,000 km2 in area, currently dominate drainage systems in northern and central Mexico. The endorheic regions are broadly bounded by two mountain ranges and coincide with the arid and semi-arid regions of the Chihuahuan desert. These closed basins are an additional obstacle for migration. However, drainage systems are constantly varying and adjusting to changing conditions imposed by climate, tectonic activity, volcanism, and pronounced asymmetries in topography and rainfall distribution. The migration route across Mexico for Enhydritherium terraenovae in the late Miocene (≥6 Ma) could have been facilitated by one or more river captures that inverted the flow direction near the headwaters of a drainage system that debouched either into the Gulf of Mexico or the Pacific coast. Biologists studying fresh water fish faunas in the southern part of the United States and in northern and central Mexico have documented several living species that occur in both the Rio Grande and in the Mezquital rivers, two drainages that are not presently connected, drain in opposite directions (i.e. towards the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of California, respectively) and are separated by the endorheic regions. Furthermore, systematic studies of fresh water fish faunas in the region has numerous examples of endemicity and allopatric

  15. Regionalization and classification of bioclimatic zones in the central-northeastern region of Mexico using principal component analysis (PCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda-Martinez, L.F.; Carbajal, N.; Medina-Roldan, E. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, A. C., San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: lpineda@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2007-04-15

    Applying principal component analysis (PCA), we determined climate zones in a topographic gradient in the central-northeastern part of Mexico. We employed nearly 30 years of monthly temperature and precipitation data at 173 meteorological stations. The climate classification was carried out applying the Koeppen system modified for the conditions of Mexico. PCA indicates a regionalization in agreement with topographic characteristics and vegetation. We describe the different bioclimatic zones, associated with typical vegetation, for each climate using geographical information systems (GIS). [Spanish] Utilizando un analisis de componentes principales, determinamos zonas climaticas en un gradiente topografico en la zona centro-noreste de Mexico. Se emplearon datos de precipitacion y temperatura medias mensuales por un periodo de 30 anos de 173 estaciones meteorologicas. La clasificacion del clima fue llevada a cabo de acuerdo con el sistema de Koeppen modificado para las condiciones de Mexico. El analisis de componentes principales indico una regionalizacion que concuerda con caracteristicas de topografia y vegetacion. Se describen zonas bioclimaticas, asociadas a vegetacion tipica para cada clima, usando sistemas de informacion geografica (SIG).

  16. Agave salmiana Plant Communities in Central Mexico as Affected by Commercial Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Salvador, Martin; Mata-González, Ricardo; Morales Nieto, Carlos; Valdez-Cepeda, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Agave salmiana is a native plant species harvested for the commercial production of mezcal ( Agave spirits) in the highlands of central Mexico. The objective of this study was to identify vegetation changes in natural communities where A. salmiana has been differentially harvested for commercial purposes. Three plant community categories were identified in the state of Zacatecas based on their history of A. salmiana utilization: short (less than 10 years of use), moderate (about 25 years), and long (60 or more years). Species cover, composition, and density were evaluated in field surveys by use category. A gradient of vegetation structure of the communities parallels the duration of A. salmiana use. A. salmiana density was greatest (3,125 plants ha-1) in the short-use areas and less (892 plants ha-1) in the moderate-use areas, associated with markedly greater density of shrubs (200%) and Opuntia spp. (50%) in moderate-use areas. The main shrubs were Larrea tridentata, Mimosa biuncifera, Jatropha dioica and Buddleia scordioides while the main Opuntia species were Opuntia leucotricha and Opuntia robusta. A. salmiana density was least (652 plants ha-1) in the long-use areas where shrubs were less abundant but Opuntia spp. density was 25% higher than in moderate-use areas. We suggest that shrubs may increase with moderate use creating an intermediate successional stage that facilitates the establishment of Opuntia spp. Long-term Agave use is generating new plant communities dominated by Opuntia spp. (nopaleras) as a replacement of the original communities dominated by A. salmiana (magueyeras).

  17. Crustal P-wave velocity model for the central-western region of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, J.; Escudero, C. R.; Perez, O. G.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Several studies require a p-wave velocity model to obtain accurate results moreover such models could provide an insight of the tectonic structure of the study area. Accordingly, in this study we estimate the crustal 3D p-wave velocity model for the Jalisco Block located at the central-western region of Mexico. The Jalisco Block is limited on its eastern side by the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalcos Rifts, and the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt; while on its western side it is limited by the Mesoamerican Trench. Cocos and Rivera plates are subducting beneath the Jalisco Block conforming a tectonically complex region. We used earthquakes occurring within the limits of lithosphere volume from which we want to estimate the velocity model. Such events were registered by the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone experiment (MARS) and the Seismic and Acelerometric Network of Jalisco (RESAJ). During MARS experiment 51broadband stations active from January 2006 to June 2007 were deployed while RESAJ by July of 2012consists of nine active stations however more stations will be deployed until reach 30 stations. The velocity model is estimated using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) software. FMTOMO uses the Fast Marching Method (FMM) in order to solve the forward problem; the FMM is a numerical algorithm that tracks the interfaces evolution along a nodes narrow band, and travel times are updated solving the eikonal equation. Finally , the inverse problem is about adjusting the model parameters (interface depth, velocity, hypocenter location) in order to try to satisfy the observed data (travel times). We perform a resolution test using several events that show good resolution results up to a 60 km depth. We present a 3D p-wave velocity model, we compare our results within the MARS data with previous results for greater depths, approximately the upper mantle, finally we also present studies towards the northern portion of the Jalisco Block using the RESAJ data.

  18. Wave climate and trends in the Pacific region off Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nava, Héctor; Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Proper planning of maritime activities strongly depends on the prior knowledge of wave characteristics. In particular, knowledge of wave climate and its variability is essential for offshore and coastal operations and engineering projects. This work describes the wave climate and its variability in the Pacific region off Mexico and Central America (PMCA) based on a 19 years wave hindcast. It is found that the variability of the wave height is dominated by changes of the swell arriving from the North Pacific and of the waves generated in the Gulfs of Tehuantepec and Papagayo. The highest waves in PMCA region are associated with the occurrence of tropical storms however; tropical storms are so sparse in time and space that have little influence in the long-term mean. An analysis of the correlation of the monthly anomaly of wave height with several climate indices suggests that the major source of variability in PMCA region is El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is also suggested that, through the Pacific-North America teleconnection, ENSO modifies the storms characteristics over the North Pacific and causes changes in the waves arriving into PMCA region. In PMCA region wave height exhibits a negative trend almost everywhere. Notwithstanding, trends are only statistically significant in regions dominated by swell from the North Pacific, with decreasing rates between -1 to -3 cm.yr-1. This study suggests that the variability of the waves conditions over the North Pacific are related to changes of the strength and position of the Aleutian Low which are evidenced by the behaviour of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. If this is the case, the observed negative trends are expected to be part of a multi-decadal oscillation rather than a long-term behaviour.

  19. Inversion polymorphism in some natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura from central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Víctor M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of D. pseudoobscura were taken in seventeen localities in Central Mexico inside the parallels 18o - 20o N, with the purpose of determine the chromosomal polymorphism in the third of the different populations of this species. From each captured female a single larva of its offspring was taken, its salivary glands extracted and stained with a solution of aceto orcein to observe the polytene chromosomes. From these smears the corresponding karyotype of each larva was determined, keeping a record of them. With the information gathered the relative frequency of each one of the fourteen different inversions found was calculated. A grand total of 1894 third chromosomes were analyzed. The fourteen different inversions found are equivalent to a 34.1 % of the total chromosomal variation of the species. The most abundant inversions found were: TL 50.6 %, CU 27.2 5, SC 9.1 % and EP 5.5 %; the remaining ten inversions detected are in general grounds rare ones with variable relative frequencies depending on the locality. Analysis of the predominant inversions for each population was done. The presence of West-East gradients is reported, even if in cases not so well defined, since as one moves in a particular direction the ups and downs in relative frequency for the alternating pairs TL-CU; TL-SC in the western populations and TL-CU in the eastern ones were observed. The assignment of each population to a particular race was also done, and such a way we were able to recognize three different races coexisting in the area of study.

  20. Food habits of rodents inhabiting arid and semi-arid ecosystems of central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Andrew G.; Parmenter, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we describe seasonal dietary composition for 15 species of rodents collected in all major habitats on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (Socorro County) in central New Mexico. A comprehensive literature review of food habits for these species from throughout their distribution also is provided. We collected rodents in the field during winter, spring and late summer in 1998 from six communities: riparian cottonwood forest; piñon-juniper woodland; juniper-oak savanna; mesquite savanna; short-grass steppe; and Chihuahuan Desert scrubland. Rodents included Spermophilus spilosoma (Spotted Ground Squirrel), Perognathus flavescens (Plains Pocket Mouse), Perognathus flavus (Silky Pocket Mouse), Dipodomys merriami (Merriam’s Kangaroo Rat), Dipodomys ordii (Ord’s Kangaroo Rat), Dipodomys spectabilis (Banner-tailed Kangaroo Rat), Reithrodontomys megalotis (Western Harvest Mouse), Peromyscus boylii (Brush Mouse), Peromyscus eremicus (Cactus Mouse), Peromyscus leucopus (White-footed Mouse), Peromyscus truei (Piñon Mouse), Onychomys arenicola (Mearn’s Grasshopper Mouse), Onychomys leucogaster (Northern Grasshopper Mouse), Neotoma albigula/leucodon (White-throated Woodrats), and Neotoma micropus (Southern Plains Woodrat). We collected stomach contents of all species, and cheek-pouch contents of heteromyids, and quantified them in the laboratory. We determined seasonal diets in each habitat by calculating mean percentage volumes of seeds, arthropods and green vegetation (plant leaves and stems) for each species of rodent. Seeds consumed by each rodent were identified to genus, and often species, and quantified by frequency counts. Comparisons of diets between and among species of rodents, seasons, and ecosystems were also examined. We provide an appendix of all plant taxa documented.

  1. Chemical and physical defense traits in two sexual forms of Opuntia robusta in Central Eastern Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Krzysztof Janczur

    Full Text Available Sexually dimorphic plants provide an excellent opportunity for examining the differences in the extent of their defense against herbivores because they exhibit sex-related differences in reproductive investment. Such differences enable comparison of the sex with high reproduction expenses with the sex that expends less. The more costly sex is usually also better defended against herbivores. Generally, females are considered more valuable than hermaphrodites in terms of fitness; however, hermaphrodites are more valuable if they can produce seed by autonomous selfing, provided that the inbreeding depression is low and pollen is limited. We studied a gynodioecious population of Opuntia robusta from Central-Eastern Mexico, which has been reported to be trioecious, dioecious, or hermaphrodite, and addressed the following questions: 1 Is the hermaphrodite's reproductive output higher than the female's, and are hermaphrodites thus better defended? 2 Are plant tissues differentially defended? 3 Do trade-offs exist among different physical defense traits? and 4 among physical and chemical defense traits? We found that 1 hermaphrodites had a higher seed output and more spines per areola than females and that their spines contained less moisture. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained more total phenolic compounds (TPCs than female ones. In addition, 2 hermaphrodite reproductive cladodes bore more spines than female cladodes, and 3 and 4 we found a negative relationship between spine number per areola and areola number per cladode and a positive relationship between spine number per areola per plant and TPC concentration per plant. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained a higher concentration of TPCs than female cladodes, and parental cladodes contained fewer TPCs than both reproductive and empty cladodes.

  2. Semiarid watershed response in central New Mexico and its sensitivity to climate variability and change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Vivoni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrologic processes in the semiarid regions of the Southwest United States are considered to be highly susceptible to variations in temperature and precipitation characteristics due to the effects of climate change. Relatively little is known about the potential impacts of climate change on the basin hydrologic response, namely streamflow, evapotranspiration and recharge, in the region. In this study, we present the development and application of a continuous, semi-distributed watershed model for climate change studies in semiarid basins of the Southwest US. Our objective is to capture hydrologic processes in large watersheds, while accounting for the spatial and temporal variations of climate forcing and basin properties in a simple fashion. We apply the model to the Río Salado basin in central New Mexico since it exhibits both a winter and summer precipitation regime and has a historical streamflow record for model testing purposes. Subsequently, we use a sequence of climate change scenarios that capture observed trends for winter and summer precipitation, as well as their interaction with higher temperatures, to perform long-term ensemble simulations of the basin response. Results of the modeling exercise indicate that precipitation uncertainty is amplified in the hydrologic response, in particular for processes that depend on a soil saturation threshold. We obtained substantially different hydrologic sensitivities for winter and summer precipitation ensembles, indicating a greater sensitivity to more intense summer storms as compared to more frequent winter events. In addition, the impact of changes in precipitation characteristics overwhelmed the effects of increased temperature in the study basin. Nevertheless, combined trends in precipitation and temperature yield a more sensitive hydrologic response throughout the year.

  3. Late Pleistocene flank collapse of Zempoala volcano (Central Mexico) and the role of fault reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, José Luis; Macías, Rodolfo; García Palomo, Armando; Capra, Lucia; Macías, José Luis; Layer, Paul; Rueda, Hernando

    2008-11-01

    Zempoala is an extinct Pleistocene (˜ 0.7-0.8 Ma) stratovolcano that together with La Corona volcano (˜ 0.9 Ma) forms the southern end of the Sierra de las Cruces volcanic range, Central Mexico. The volcano consists of andesitic and dacitic lava flows and domes, as well as pyroclastic and epiclastic sequences, and has had a complex history with several flank collapses. One of these collapses occurred during the late Pleistocene on the S-SE flank of the volcano and produced the Zempoala debris avalanche deposit. This collapse could have been triggered by the reactivation of two normal fault systems (E-W and NE-SW), although magmatic activity cannot be absolutely excluded. The debris avalanche traveled 60 km to the south, covers an area of 600 km 2 and has a total volume of 6 km 3, with a calculated Heim coefficient (H/L) of 0.03. Based on the textural characteristics of the deposit we recognized three zones: proximal, axial, and lateral distal zone. The proximal zone consists of debris avalanche blocks that develop a hummocky topography; the axial zone corresponds with the main debris avalanche deposit made of large clasts set in a sandy matrix, which transformed to a debris flow in the lateral distal portion. The deposit is heterolithologic in composition, with dacitic and andesitic fragments from the old edifice that decrease in volume as bulking of exotic clasts from the substratum increase. Several cities (Cuernavaca, Jojutla de Juárez, Alpuyeca) with associated industrial, agricultural, and tourism activities have been built on the deposit, which pose in evidence the possible impact in case of a new event with such characteristics, since the area is still tectonically active.

  4. Chemical and physical defense traits in two sexual forms of Opuntia robusta in Central Eastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; León Solano, Héctor Javier; Solache Rámos, Lupita Tzenyatze; Mendoza Reyes, Citlalli Hypatia; Oro Cerro, María del Carmen; Mariezcurrena Berasain, María Dolores; Rivas Manzano, Irma Victoria; Manjarrez, Javier; Villareal Benitez, José Luis; Czarnoleski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic plants provide an excellent opportunity for examining the differences in the extent of their defense against herbivores because they exhibit sex-related differences in reproductive investment. Such differences enable comparison of the sex with high reproduction expenses with the sex that expends less. The more costly sex is usually also better defended against herbivores. Generally, females are considered more valuable than hermaphrodites in terms of fitness; however, hermaphrodites are more valuable if they can produce seed by autonomous selfing, provided that the inbreeding depression is low and pollen is limited. We studied a gynodioecious population of Opuntia robusta from Central-Eastern Mexico, which has been reported to be trioecious, dioecious, or hermaphrodite, and addressed the following questions: 1) Is the hermaphrodite's reproductive output higher than the female's, and are hermaphrodites thus better defended? 2) Are plant tissues differentially defended? 3) Do trade-offs exist among different physical defense traits? and 4) among physical and chemical defense traits? We found that 1) hermaphrodites had a higher seed output and more spines per areola than females and that their spines contained less moisture. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained more total phenolic compounds (TPCs) than female ones. In addition, 2) hermaphrodite reproductive cladodes bore more spines than female cladodes, and 3) and 4) we found a negative relationship between spine number per areola and areola number per cladode and a positive relationship between spine number per areola per plant and TPC concentration per plant. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained a higher concentration of TPCs than female cladodes, and parental cladodes contained fewer TPCs than both reproductive and empty cladodes.

  5. Ecosystem service trade-offs, perceived drivers, and sustainability in contrasting agroecosystems in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. González-Esquivel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of agroecosystems to provide food ultimately depends on the regulating and supporting ecosystem services that underpin their functioning, such as the regulation of soil quality, water quality, soil erosion, pests, and pollinators. However, there are trade-offs between provisioning and regulating or supporting services, whose nature at the farm and plot scales is poorly understood. We analyzed data at the farm level for two agroecosystems with contrasting objectives in central Mexico: one aimed at staple crop production for self-subsistence and local markets, the other directed to a cash crop for export markets. Bivariate and multivariate trade-offs were analyzed for different crop management strategies (conventional, organic, traditional, crop rotation and their underpinning socioeconomic drivers. There was a clear trade-off between crop yield and soil quality in self-subsistence systems. However, other expected trade-offs between yields and soil quality did not always occur, likely because of the overall good soils of the region and the low to medium input profile of most farms. Trade-offs were highly dependent on farm-specific agricultural practices; organic, traditional, and rotation management systems generally showed smaller trade-offs between yield and soil quality, pest control, and biodiversity than did conventional management systems. Perceived drivers reported by farmers included increasing prices for cash crops, rising costs of inputs, and extreme climatic events (e.g., drought, hail, frost. Farmers did not identify the regulation of soil quality, water quality, soil erosion, pests, or pollinators as important constraints. Although acceptable yields could be maintained irrespective of key regulating and supporting services according to these perceptions, current levels of soil erosion and nutrient runoff are likely to have important negative effects at the watershed scale. Sustainability in both agroecosystems could be

  6. Temporal variations of water and sediment fluxes in the Cointzio river basin, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert, C.; Gratiot, N.; Navratil, O.; Esteves, M.; Prat, C.; Nord, G.

    2009-04-01

    The STREAMS program (Sediment TRansport and Erosion Across MountainS) was launched in 2006 to study suspended sediment dynamics in mountainous areas. Two watersheds were selected as part of the program: the Bléone river basin in the French Alps, and the Cointzio river basin (636 km2), located in the mountainous region of Michoacán, in central Mexico. The volcanic soils of the Cointzio catchment undergo important erosion processes, especially during flashflood events. Thus, a high-frequency monitoring of sediment transport is highly required. The poster presents the high-frequency database obtained from the 2008 hydrological season at the Santiago Undameo gauged station, located at the basin's outlet. Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) was estimated every 10 minutes by calibrating turbidity measurements with bottle sampling acquired on a double-daily basis. Water discharge time-series was approximated with continuous water-level measurements (5 minutes time-step), and a stage-discharge rating curve. Our investigation highlights the influence of sampling frequency on annual water and sediment fluxes estimate. A daily or even a weekly water-level measurement provides an unexpectedly reliable assessment of the seasonal water fluxes, with an under-estimation of about 5 % of the total flux. Concerning sediment fluxes, a high-frequency SSC survey appears to be necessary. Acquiring SSC data even twice a day leads to a significant (over 30 %) under-estimation of the seasonal sediment load. These distinct behaviors can be attributed to the fact that sediment transport almost exclusively occurs during brief night flood events, whereas exfiltration on the watershed always provides a base flow during the daily water-level measurements.

  7. Cerro Xalapaxco: an unusual tuff cone with multiple explosion craters, in central Mexico (Puebla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Michael J.; Siebe, Claus

    1994-11-01

    The Xalapaxco tuff cone is located on the northeast flank of La Malinche stratovolcano in central Mexico. An unusually large number (10) of explosion craters, concentrated on the central and on the uphill side of the cone, expose alternating beds of stratified surge deposits and massive fall deposits. The morphology of the cone and the characteristics of its deposits point to the involvement of significant quantities of groundwater during its eruption. The phreatomagmatic eruptions which led to the cone's formation pierced an alluvial fan, whose source is a glacially carved canyon near the summit of La Malinche volcano. The large canyon was cut during repeated glacial episodes, the last of which ended ca. 8500 years ago. The present alluvial fan mostly consists of reworked glacio-fluviatile andesite/dacite material from La Malinche. Rising magma encountered substantial amounts of groundwater within the limestone basement and in overlying intercalated pyroclastic and glacio-fluviatile deposits of the alluvial fan. Short-lived phreatomagmatic eruptions produced surge and airfall deposits. Xenoliths found in the cone beds are composed of dacite and andesite clasts, limestone, chert, and rare ignimbrite fragments. No juvenile material could be unequivocally identified, but is represented most probably by porphyritic dacite similar in texture and composition to La Malinche lavas. The multiple craters were formed as a response to changes in water and magma supply during the short-lived eruption. Hence, the locations where ideal magma/water ratios existed to fuel phreatomagmatic explosions shifted in time and space. Analysis of diameter/depth ratios of the craters indicates that the activity shifted from the center of the cone to its periphery in the west. Due to the configuration of the hydrographic environment, more groundwater flowing from La Malinche was available from the fan on the uphill side than below the cone at later stages of the eruption. The apparently

  8. Regional amplification of ground motion in central Mexico. Results from coda-length magnitude data and preliminary modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Martín; Chávez-García, Francisco J.; Gusev, Alexander

    Seismic ground motion in central Mexico is amplified relative to ground motion observed at the same epicentral distance along the Pacific Coast in a frequency band that includes destructive ground motion at Mexico City. Although several hypothesis have been advanced, at present there is no generally accepted explanation of such amplification. We have analyzed coda-length magnitude data reported by Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN) for events recorded during 1993 to increase our understanding of the spatial distribution of this phenomenon. Our results indicate that regional amplification: (a) is detected by magnitude residual computed at each station, relative to the average of SSN network;and (b) is likely related to the crustal structure under the central portion of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Finally, preliminary wave propagation modelling (using SH wave, finite difference method) suggests that crustal heterogeneity is a possible cause of regional amplification. However, if this is so, it is required that both geometry and velocity distribution vary between the coast and Mexico City.

  9. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) database for Grant County, Central and Southern Parts, New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  10. Two Triatoma dimidiata clades (Chagas disease vector) associated with different habitats in southern Mexico and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamay-Segovia, Paulino; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Martínez, Fernando; Villalobos, Guiehdani; de la Serna, Francisco J Zavala-Díaz; de la Torre, Patricia; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Blum-Domínguez, Selene; Espinoza, Bertha

    2008-03-01

    Triatoma dimidiata is the only reported Chagas disease vector in Campeche, Mexico. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic variability of vectors from Campeche coastal and rain forest areas and establish a phylogenetic relationship with other T. dimidiata populations by analyzing the internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) region. The sequence length of samples from Campeche ranged from 469 to 478 basepairs. The ITS-2 variability among the populations enabled us to classify them into two clades with an 18-22 nucleotide difference. The genetic distance (0.042) between them confirms this divergence. Phylogenetic analysis of gene genealogies confirmed these two clades. Furthermore, the population genetic analyses showed two groups with little genetic similarity or migration between them. One group was associated with the tropical forest area and the other group was associated with a mainly coastal distribution. This correlation was also observed when T. dimidiata from other regions of Mexico and Central America were analyzed.

  11. The establishment of Central American migratory corridors and the biogeographic origins of seasonally dry tropical forests in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlie George Willis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogeography and community ecology can mutually illuminate the formation of a regional species pool or biome. We apply phylogenetic methods to a large and diverse plant clade, Malpighiaceae, to characterize the formation of its species pool in Mexico, and its occupancy of the seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF biome that occurs there. We find that the ~162 species of Mexican Malpighiaceae represent ~33 dispersals from South America beginning in the Eocene and continuing until the Pliocene (~46.4 – 3.8 Myr. Furthermore, dispersal rates between South America and Mexico show a significant six-fold increase during the mid-Miocene (~23.9 Myr. We hypothesize that this increase marked the availability of Central America as an important corridor for Neotropical plant migration. We additionally demonstrate that this high rate of dispersal contributed substantially more to the phylogenetic diversity of Malpighiaceae in Mexico than in situ diversification. Finally, we show that most lineages arrived in Mexico pre-adapted with regard to one key SDTF trait, total annual precipitation. In contrast, these lineages adapted to a second key trait, precipitation seasonality, in situ as mountain building in the region gave rise to the abiotic parameters of extant SDTF. The timing of this in situ adaptation to seasonal precipitation suggests that SDTF likely originated its modern characteristics by the late Oligocene, but was geographically more restricted until its expansion in the mid-Miocene. These results highlight the complex interplay of dispersal, adaptation, and in situ diversification in the formation of tropical biomes. Our results additionally demonstrate that these processes are not static, and their relevance can change markedly over evolutionary time. This has important implications for understanding the origin of SDTF in Mexico, but also for understanding the temporal and spatial origin of biomes and regional species pools more broadly.

  12. Eolic central Guerrero Negro, BCS, Mexico, performance first year operation; Central eolica Guerrero Negro, BCS, Mexico, resultados del primer ano de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadenas Tovar, Roberto; Sanchez Cornejo, Carlos; Lopez Rios, Serafin [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Ley Romero, Jose R [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Comision Federal de Electricidad installed a 600 kW wind turbine in the Guerrero Negro isolated electrical grid to evaluate, under actual operation conditions, the contribution of wind energy in the generation of electricity. This paper describes the performance of the wind turbine in terms of its availability, power curve and electricity produced. The results have been satisfactory, electricity was supplied with a lesser fuel consumption than before. [Spanish] La Comision Federal de Electricidad instalo en Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico un aerogenerador de 600 kW para evaluar en condiciones reales de operacion la integracion de la energia del viento a sistemas electricos aislados basados en diesel. En este trabajo se describen los resultados del primer ano de operacion del aerogenerador en terminos de su disponibilidad, curva de potencia y generacion obtenida. Los resultados han sido satisfactorios, registrandose una reduccion en el consumo de combustible fosil en el sistema.

  13. Residues of legacy organochlorine contaminants in the milk of Alpine and Saanen goats from the central region of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Beatriz; Gutiérrez, Rey; Ortiz, Rutilio; Vega, Salvador; Urban, Georgina; Ramírez, Acacia

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated a suite of legacy organochlorine contaminants in the milk of two breeds of goats raised in the central region of Mexico, where this agricultural production is of national (Mexican) economic importance. Forty milk samples from Alpine and Saanen goats were assessed. It was found that the concentrations of the majority of organochlorine pesticides in milk samples were lower than those stipulated in Mexican and international regulation. The values in both breeds of goat exceeded the upper permissible limits of Codex Alimentarius for delta hexachloro cyclohexane (HCH) (17.3 of samples of Saanen) and heptachlor plus heptachlor epoxide (50 % and 13 % of samples). It may be concluded that milk from these goat breeds from central Mexico showed some risks of contamination in certain times of the year (dry season). However, under further assessment and use of pesticides the goat's milk will likely be safe for human consumption and for use in products such as cheeses, regional candies and desserts (cajeta). In recent years, goat milk production has increased in the central regions and it is an economic alternative to milk from livestock. It is necessary to continue the monitoring of goat's milk to assess the presence and control of HCHs through best management practices.

  14. A new species of the genus Mahanarva Distant, 1909 (Hemiptera: Cercopoidea: Cercopidae, with a key to the species from Central America and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Castro–Valderrama

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Mahanarva Distant, 1909 (Hemiptera: Cercopoidea: Cercopidae currently includes two subgenera: Mahanarva Distant, 1909 with 38 species and six subspecies, and Ipiranga Fennah, 1968 with nine species. The Manaharva species are all from the Americas, and a few species are important pests in pasture grasses and sugarcane. There are no reports of any Manaharva species from North America, including Mexico and areas to the north. Here, a new species is described from Mexico and a key to the species of Mahanarva from Central America and Mexico is proposed.

  15. Gulf of Mexico Sales 157 and 161: Central and western planning areas final environmental impact statement, Volume I: Sections I through IV.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1996 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 157 (March 1996) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 161 (August 1996)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their potential effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities

  16. Gulf of Mexico sales 147 and 150: Central and western planning areas. Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1. Sections I through IV.C. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales (Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)). The document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the description of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities

  17. Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and Western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities.

  18. First records of the Brown Creeper breeding along the middle Rio Grande in central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; David L. Hawksworth; Deborah M. Finch

    2008-01-01

    In New Mexico, the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) typically breeds in montane coniferous forests ranging in elevation from 2100 to 3300 m (Ligon 1961, Hubbard 1978). Since 2003, however, we have also noted breeding in the riparian cottonwood forest (hereafter bosque) along the middle Rio Grande, in the south valley of Albuquerque, Bernalillo...

  19. UTJECAJ STRESA PRIJE KLANJA NA BOJU JUNEĆEGA MESA

    OpenAIRE

    Marenčić, Dejan; Ivanković, Ante

    2015-01-01

    Proizvođači govedskog mesa nerijetko se susreću s problemima pojave nepoželjne boje, prvenstveno pojave tamnog, suhog i tvrdog mesa. Potrošači nerado konzumiraju takvo meso, neopravdano misleći da potječe od starijih ili bolesnih životinja. Radi navedenog, veliki naglasak u proizvodnji govedskog mesa se stavlja na kontrolu i održivost boje mesa. Tamno meso jedan je od vodećih problema u prodaji junećega mesa, jer uzrokuje milijunske gubitke mesnoj industriji, zbog čega je predmet brojnih istr...

  20. Structural Vulnerability Among Migrating Women and Children Fleeing Central America and Mexico: The Public Health Impact of "Humanitarian Parole".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Elizabeth Salerno; Valdez, Luis A; Sabo, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Since October 2013, US Customs and Border Patrol has apprehended 15,979 families on the Southwest Border of the US. Daily, migrating women and children from Mexico and Central America that qualify for humanitarian parole are released from immigration detention to a humanitarian aid organization in Southern Arizona. After several days in detention facilities, these families arrive tired, hungry, dehydrated, and with minimal direction regarding their final destination, and adherence to the parameters of their parole. Project helping hands (PHHs) utilizes a network of volunteers to provide the women and children with food, water, clothing, hygiene products, hospitality, and legal orientation. The aim of this assessment was to document the experiences of families granted humanitarian parole through the lens of structural vulnerability. Here, we apply qualitative methods to elicit PHH lead volunteer perspectives regarding the migration experience of migrating families. Using inductive analysis, we found six major themes emerged from the qualitative data: reasons for leaving, experience on the journey, dehumanization in detention, family separation, vulnerability, and resiliency. These findings elucidate the different physical and psychological distresses that migrating families from Mexico and Central America experience before, during and after their arrival at the US-Mexico border. We posit that these distresses are a result of, or exacerbated by, structural vulnerability. Structural vulnerability has life-long health implications for a sub-population of young mothers and their children. The number of migrating families who have experienced traumatic events before and during their migration experience continues to expand and thus warrants consideration of mental health surveillance and intervention efforts for these families. More public health research is needed to better understand and combat the health challenges of this growing population.

  1. Structural Vulnerability among Migrating Women and Children Fleeing Central America and Mexico:The Public Health Impact of Humanitarian Parole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Salerno Valdez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since October 2013, US Customs and Border Patrol (USCBP has apprehended 15,979 families on the Southwest Border of the United States. Daily, migrating women and children from Mexico and Central America that qualify for humanitarian parole are released from immigration detention to a humanitarian aid organization in Southern Arizona. After several days in detention facilities, these families arrive tired, hungry, dehydrated, and with minimal direction regarding their final destination, and adherence to the parameters of their parole. Project Helping Hands (PHH utilizes a network of volunteers to provide the women and children with food, water, clothing, hygiene products, hospitality, and legal orientation. The aim of this assessment was to document the experiences of families granted humanitarian parole through the lens of structural vulnerability. Here we apply qualitative methods to elicit PHH lead volunteer perspectives regarding the migration experience of migrating families. Using inductive analysis, we found six major themes emerged from the qualitative data: reasons for leaving, experience on the journey, dehumanization in detention, family separation, vulnerability, and resiliency.These findings elucidate the different physical and psychological distresses that migrating families from Mexico and Central America experience before, during and after their arrival at the US-Mexico border. We posit that these distresses are a result of, or exacerbated by, structural vulnerability. Structural vulnerability has life-long health implications for a sub-population of young mothers and their children. The number of migrating families who have experienced traumatic events before, and during their migration experience continues to expand and thus warrants consideration of mental health surveillance and intervention efforts for these families. More public health research is needed to better understand and combat the health challenges of this growing

  2. Age of the Xalnene Ash, Central Mexico: A Rock Magnetic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Renne, P. R.; Waters, M. R.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.; Ochoa-Castillo, P.; Perez-Campo, M.

    2007-05-01

    Features interpreted as human footprints ~40 ka old have been reported from the Toluquilla quarry near Valsequillo Reservoir, 15 km south of the city of Puebla in central Mexico (Gonzalez et al., 2006). The indentations were found in an indurated basaltic lapilli tuff informally known as the Xalnene Ash. The ~40 ka age of the tuff was based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) analysis of baked quartz-rich materials incorporated into the ash during eruption. If true, this ~40 ka age suggests that humans migrated into the Americas at a far earlier time than is currently believed. In contrast to the conclusions of Gonzalez et al. (2006), the age of the Xalnene ash was determined as 1.30 ± 0.03 Ma (2σ) based on highly reproducible 40Ar/39Ar analyses of homogenous basaltic lapilli (Renne et al., 2005). This age is further supported by paleomagnetic data, which shows a reversed polarity for the Xalnene Ash, consistent with deposition during chron C1r.2r (1.77 to 1.07 Ma). The magnetic mineralogy within the Xalnene Ash is not straightforward, and is a reflection of its volcanic origin modified by its subsequent hydrous alteration via prolonged exposure to varying water levels in Lake Valsequillo. Submicron titanomagnetite grains occur within the cores of the lapilli and are characterized by Curie temperatures between 400-500 °C corresponding to unoxidized compositions ranging from Fe2.82Ti0.18O4 to Fe2.68Ti0.32O4. Two components of magnetization were revealed during progressive alternating field (AF) demagnetization of oriented, individual lapilli: a low coercivity, reversed component that is typically removed after 15-20 mT, and a randomly oriented, but well-defined, higher coercivity component. The directions associated with the low coercivity component are consistent with the direction of the bulk rock characteristic remanent magnetization. This low coercivity component may have been acquired immediately after deposition during the final stages of cooling, or

  3. BIOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF SCARABAEINAE AND GEOTRUPINAE ALONG A TRANSECT IN CENTRAL MEXICO (COLEOPTERA, SCARABAEOIDEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Halffter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Scarabaeinae and Geotrupinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea species composition is analyzed along a 150 km long altitudinal transect that runs S-NE in the Mexican Transition zone. The transect is located in the state of Hidalgo in central-eastern Mexico. The spatial unit of analysis is the landscape. The transect crosses five different landscapes. As terms of reference for studying the geographic distribution of the species, the entomofauna distribution patterns for the Mexican Transition zone were used. The transect includes all the patterns established by Halffter for this zone. Only genera with northern origins were found in landscape of the Pachuca Sierra (mountain range. The two landscapes of the High Plateau (temperate and arid have one genus with a northern origin (Onthophagus, along with species belonging to genera with Neotropical origins that evolved on the High Plateau. For the landscapes of the zacualtipán Sierra and the slope down to the Gulf–Las Huastecas region genera of Neotropical affinity dominate, and there are also some species with a tropical distribution and of northern-Old World origin. The relationship between the mountains and the phyletic lineages or genera of northern origin and of recent entry into the Mexican Transition zone is confirmed, as is that between the tropical lowlands and the Neotropical lines or genera, also recent arrivals. Taxa that arrived a long time ago, of either origin, do not exhibit this geographic-ecological dependence. The Hidalgo Transect is compared with two other, similar transects sampled in the Mexican Transition zone: the Cofre de Perote–Gulf Coast transect (Veracruz and that of Manantlán (Jalisco. In the mountain landscapes, High Plateau and Tropical Lowlands, there were no important differences in the species composition of the groups studied. In contrast, in the Transition landscape (zacualtipán in the Hidalgo Transect there were very notable differences. In the Cofre de Perote

  4. Taxonomic and floristic novelties for Echeveria ( Crassulaceae ) in Central Michoacan, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Garc?a-Ruiz, Ignacio; Valent?n-Mart?nez, Dagoberto; Carrillo-Reyes, Pablo; Costea, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Echeveria coruana , is described and illustrated from the malpa?s near San Andr?s Cor?, Michoacan, Mexico. The species belongs to series Gibbiflorae and the new taxon was compared with Echeveria purhepecha and Echeveria patriotica , with whom it shares the closest morphological affinities. Additionally, Echeveria yalmanantlaensis an endangered species from Sierra of Manantl?n Biosphere Reserve, State of Colima, was also discovered near San Andr?s Cor? and is reported f...

  5. Population Genetics of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies, Danaus plexippus (Linnaeus), from Central Mexico Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA and Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Edward; Nazario-Yepiz, Nestor O; Pérez-Gálvez, Fernan; Chávez-Mora, Cristina Alejandra; Laclette, Mariana Ramírez Loustalot; Rendón-Salinas, Eduardo; Markow, Therese Ann

    2017-03-01

    Population genetic variation and demographic history in Danaus plexippus (L.), from Mexico were assessed based on analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI; 658 bp) and subunit II (COII; 503 bp) gene segments and 7 microsatellite loci. The sample of 133 individuals included both migratory monarchs, mainly from 4 overwintering sites within the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve (MBBR) in central Mexico (states of Michoacán and México), and a nonmigratory population from Irapuato, Guanajuato. Haplotype (h) and nucleotide (π) diversities were relatively low, averaging 0.466 and 0.00073, respectively, for COI, and 0.629 and 0.00245 for COII. Analysis of molecular variance of the COI data set, which included additional GenBank sequences from a nonmigratory Costa Rican population, showed significant population structure between Mexican migratory monarchs and nonmigratory monarchs from both Mexico and Costa Rica, suggesting limited gene flow between the 2 behaviorally distinct groups. Interestingly, while the COI haplotype frequencies of the nonmigratory populations differed from the migratory, they were similar to each other, despite the great physical distance between them. Microsatellite analyses, however, suggested a lack of structure between the 2 groups, possibly owing to the number of significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium resulting from heterzoygote deficiencies found for most of the loci. Estimates of demographic history of the combined migratory MBBR monarch population, based on the mismatch distribution and Bayesian skyline analyses of the concatenated COI and COII data set (n = 89) suggested a population expansion dating to the late Pleistocene (~35000-40000 years before present) followed by a stable effective female population size (Nef) of about 6 million over the last 10000 years. © The American Genetic Association 2016.

  6. Calidad de las aceitunas de mesa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Fernández, Antonio

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper comments the different regulations related to table olives at national or international scales. The Unified Qualitative standard Applying to Table Olives in International Trade and COI/Codex (International Olive Oil Council, IOC, and IOC/Codex Alimentarius, «Reglamentación Técnico Sanitaria para la elaboración, circulación y venta de aceitunas de mesa» (Spanish, «Normas de calidad para la exportación de aceitunas de mesa» (Spanish, and the United States Standards for Grades of Green and Canned Ripe Olives (USA are especially considered. The effects of the new regulations on Nutritional Labelling (mainly in USA, applications of the Analysis and Control of Critical Points (ACCP, and the problems derived from the application of the ISO 9000, or EN 29000, to this Sector are also discussed.

    El trabajo comenta las diferentes normas, tanto nacionales como internacionales, que regulan los aspectos de la calidad de las aceitunas de mesa. Se comentan especialmente la Norma Cualitativa Unificada Aplicable a Aceitunas de Mesa en el Comercio Internacional y las correspondientes COI/CODEX (Consejo Oleícola Internacional, COI, y COI/Codex Alimentarius, respectivamente, la Reglamentación Técnico Sanitaria para la elaboración, circulación, y venta de aceitunas de mesa (española, las Normas de calidad para la exportación de Aceitunas de Mesa (española, y las «United States Standards for Grades of Green and Canned Ripe Olives» (USA. Asimismo se analizan las implicaciones de las nuevas reglamentaciones sobre etiquetado nutricional (principalmente en el comercio con USA, la aplicación del Análisis de Riesgos y Control de Puntos Críticos (ARCPC, y la necesidad de adaptar el Sector al cumplimiento de las diversas normas de la serie ISO 9000 o su equivalente EN 29000.

  7. Repellency of 29 Synthetic and Natural Commercial Topical Insect Repellents Against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuri-Morales, Pablo A; Correa-Morales, Fabián; González-Acosta, Cassandra; Sánchez-Tejeda, Gustavo; Moreno-Garcia, Miguel; Dávalos-Becerril, Eduardo; Juárez-Franco, Marissa F; Benitez-Alva, José Ismael; González-Roldán, Jesús F

    2017-09-01

    In Mexico, the use of repellents to prevent insects from landing and biting is a common practice. However, variation in the efficiency of natural and synthetic repellents has been observed. In this study, we evaluated the repellency and protection time of 16 synthetic and 13 natural-based commercial products against Aedes aegypti (L.) from an endemic dengue area (Jojutla, Morelos) in Central Mexico. The "arm exposure" cage test was used to assess the efficacy of the repellents. Tests were conducted by three adult volunteers. Results showed that DEET (N, N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) repellents provided the highest protection and duration times against Ae. aegypti. However, low repellency and short-time protection was observed (when compared with the manufacturers' protection times). Natural-based products did not repel (either landing or biting) mosquitoes for >30 min. These results show that most of the repellent products did not provide satisfactory levels of personal protection against mosquito bites. Frequent reapplication of repellents (synthetic and natural-based) may compensate for their short duration of action. Repellent efficacy data must be integrated into the decision-making process for an optimal response to the local (or specific region) situation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Paleomagnetic and AMS studies of the El Castillo ignimbrite, central-east Mexico: Source and rock magnetic nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Agarwal, A.; Caballero-Miranda, C.; García-Amador, B. I.; Morales-Barrera, W.; Rodríguez-Elizarraráz, S.; Rodríguez-Trejo, A.

    2017-04-01

    Lithological, petromagnetic, paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric studies are employed to determine the flow direction and the location of the source of the, 2.44 to 2.21 Ma, El Castillo ignimbrite in the central-east Mexico. Based on the increasing matrix to pumice ratio and decreasing pumice size, the ignimbrite field is divided into the northwestern, central and south-southeastern sectors. Lithological comparisons among the three sectors reveal that the ignimbrite had flowed from NW to SE, and the source is in the NW part of the study area. Thermomagnetic results concur with the increasing matrix proportions from the proximal to the distal sector. The coercivity and magnetization ratios of the hysteresis parameters are lower in the SE sector than in the NW and central sectors. The dominant flow direction inferred through magnetic fabrics, at most sites, is NW to SE, which coincides with the direction inferred from lithological comparisons. However, at some sites magnetic fabrics demonstrate flow towards ENE or other various directions. The paleomagnetic analysis and field observations reveal that these anomalous directions are a consequence of anticlockwise block rotation and tilting due to normal and lateral faulting in the region.

  9. [The inclusion of human rights in AIDS/HIV norms in Mexico and Central America: 1993-2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadra-Hernández, Silvia Magali; Leyva-Flores, René; Hernández-Rosete, Daniel; Bronfman-Pertzovsky, Mario N

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the inclusion of human rights in HIV/AIDS norms in Mexico and Central America for the 1993-2000 period. Norms and regulations for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in this region were analyzed. A constructivist perspective of judiciary subsystems and human rights was used as a reference framework, to establish categories of analysis with significance codes based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. During the study period, human rights were included within a vigorous legislative activity for HIV/AIDS transmission prevention. In some cases (as in the Panama Law and the Honduras Proposal) there were passages of law violating the right to non-discrimination and privacy. These laws lead to either of two conflicting paths: one ensuring human rights, and another increasing the vulnerability of some groups. The authors emphasize the importance of gaining a new understanding of social subjects and epidemiological surveillance, based on norms that incorporate human rights issues.

  10. Centrality of event across cultures. Emotionally positive and negative events in Mexico, China, Greenland, and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaragoza Scherman, Alejandra; Salgado, Sinué; Shao, Zhifang

    During their lifetime, people experience both emotionally positive and negative events. The Centrality of Event Scale (CES; Berntsen and Rubin, 2006; Berntsen, Rubin and Siegler, 2011) measures the extent to which an event is central to someone’s identity and life story. An event becomes central...... when it is an important part of our identity and life story, when it changes the way we view the world in everyday life, and when we use it as a turning point in our life story. CES research has produced important findings regarding how the emotionality of a life event influences the way we incorporate...... an emotional event into our life story and our identity. Key findings: 1) Positive events are rated as more central to identity than negative events; 2) The extent to which highly traumatic and negative events become central to a person’s life story and identity varies as a function of post-traumatic stress...

  11. A new species of Torrestrongylus (Trichostrongylidae, Anoplostrongylinae) from Macrotus waterhousii (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Peralta-Rodríguez, Jorge Luis; Galindo-García, María Guadalupe; Jiménez, Francisco Agustín

    2015-01-01

    A new species of nematode, Torrestrongylus tetradorsalis n. sp., is described herein, based on specimens recovered from the small intestine of the leaf-nosed bat, Macrotus waterhousii, from the Biosphere Reserve “Sierra de Huautla” in the state of Morelos, Mexico. The new species is included in Torrestrongylus because it features a bursa of the type 3 – 2, a divided cephalic vesicle with an anterior half in the shape of an umbrella, and a posterior widened half. The new species can be distinguished from the only other congener T. torrei Pérez-Vigueras, 1935 by four key features: first, by the absence of cervical alae in both males and females; second, by the relatively longer second half of the cephalic cap; third, by the configuration of the dorsal ray, that does not have a medial terminal ray, and finally, by the structure of the spicules. This is the second species in the genus, previously known from bats of the families Phyllostomidae and Molossidae in Cuba, and now in Mexico. PMID:26514594

  12. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and Human papillomavirus in female sex workers in Central Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ramírez, Azucena; López-Monteon, Aracely; Ramos-Ligonio, Angel; Méndez-Bolaina, Enrique; Guapillo-Vargas, Mario R B

    2018-03-13

    Female sex workers (FSWs) have been considered a key population for sexually transmitted infections (STIs); therefore, they are periodically screened as a requirement to obtain a work card. However, there is insufficient epidemiological data on STIs among FSWs in Mexico. The detection of Trichomonas vaginalis is limited to microscopic studies and the molecular screening of Human papillomavirus (HPV) is only done to women 35 years of age and older. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of T. vaginalis and HPV infections in FSWs in the city of Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico. Samples from 105 FSWs were obtained by cervical swab and analyzed. The identification of T. vaginalis and HPV was performed by molecular methods. HPV DNA was identified in 5.71% of the samples with the presence of HPV16, HPV18, and HPV58. A percentage of 25.7% samples were positive for T. vaginalis for optical microscopy and 23.8% for PCR. The results of the study indicate the need to incorporate more sensitive methods for the timely diagnosis of STIs as well as comprehensive health promotion programs directed to the most vulnerable groups among FSWs. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Fusarium species associated with basal rot of garlic in North Central Mexico and its pathogenicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ortiz, Juan C; Ochoa-Fuentes, Yisa M; Cerna-Chávez, Ernesto; Beltrán-Beache, Mariana; Rodríguez-Guerra, Raúl; Aguirre-Uribe, Luis A; Vázquez-Martínez, Otilio

    Garlic in Mexico is one of the most profitable vegetable crops, grown in almost 5,451ha; out of which more than 83% are located in Zacatecas, Guanajuato, Sonora, Puebla, Baja California and Aguascalientes. Blossom-end rot caused by Fusarium spp is widely distributed worldwide and has been a limiting factor in onion and garlic production regions, not only in Mexico but also in other countries. The presence of Fusarium oxysporum has been reported in Guanajuato and Aguascalientes. Fusarium culmorum has been reported in onion cultivars of Morelos; and Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium verticillioides, Fusarium solani and Fusarium acuminatum have been previously reported in Aguascalientes. The goal of this work was identifying the Fusarium species found in Zacatecas, Guanajuato and Aguascalientes, to assess their pathogenicity. Plants with disease symptoms were collected from hereinabove mentioned States. The samples resulted in the identification of: F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. solani and F. acuminatum species; out of which Aguascalientes AGS1A (F. oxysporum), AGS1B (F. oxysporum) and AGSY-10 (F. acuminatum) strains showed higher severity under greenhouse conditions. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The water and energy exchange of a shaded coffee plantation in the lower montane cloud forest zone of central Veracruz, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, F.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Barradas, V.L.; Cervantes, J.

    2013-01-01

    The water and energy fluxes of a shaded coffee plantation in the lower montane cloud forest (LMCF) zone of central Veracruz, Mexico, were measured over a two-year period (September 2006-August 2008) using the eddy covariance method. Complementary measurements of throughfall and stemflow were made to

  15. The population structure of Phytophthora infestans from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico suggests genetic differentiation between populations from cultivated potato and wild Solanum spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, W.G.; Grünwald, N.J.; Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Sturbaum, A.K.; Bosch, van den G.B.M.; Garay-Serrano, E.; Lozoya-Saldaña, H.; Fry, W.E.; Turkensteen, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico was assessed using 170 isolates collected front cultivated potatoes and the native wild Solanum spp., S. demissum and S. xedinense. All isolates were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and

  16. Effects of overcast and foggy conditions on transpiration rates of Pinus patula trees along a chronosequence within the cloud belt of the Sierra madre Oriental, central Veracrusz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinus patula is a native tree species of the montane cloud belt of central Veracruz, Mexico, and one of the most popular species for regional reforestation efforts, both within and outside its natural range of occurrence. Projected regional climate change is likely to cause a rise in the average clo...

  17. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source, robust, efficient, thread-safe libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESAstar, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESAstar solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. State-of-the-art modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, element diffusion data, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own explicitly defined public interface to facilitate independent development. Several detailed examples indicate the extensive verification and testing that is continuously performed and demonstrate the wide range of capabilities that MESA possesses. These examples include evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets to very old ages; the complete evolutionary track of a 1 M sun star from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to a cooling white dwarf; the solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate-mass stars through the He-core burning phase and thermal pulses on the He-shell burning asymptotic giant branch phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; the complete evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the PMS to the onset of core collapse; mass transfer from stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and the evolution of helium accretion onto a neutron star. MESA can be downloaded from the project Web site (http://mesa.sourceforge.net/).

  18. MESA: Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A newly designed 1-D stellar evolution module, MESA star, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very-low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESA star solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. Independently usable modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own public interface. Examples include comparisons to other codes and show evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets; the complete evolution of a 1 Msun star from the pre-main sequence to a cooling white dwarf; the Solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate mass stars through the thermal pulses on the He-shell burning AGB phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the pre-main sequence to the onset of core collapse; stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and accretion onto a neutron star.

  19. Reflections on Critical Incidents of EFL Teachers During Career Entry in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martha Lengeling

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the reflections of critical incidents of eight beginning English as a foreign language teachers and one of their trainers in Mexico. Based upon narrative inquiry and through the use of journals, critical incidents and how they have impacted beginning teachers in their thinking were specifically looked at. From the data we found seven emerging themes which basically revolve around the relationships that are established between the teacher and the students, the emerging professional identities of the beginning teachers, and the tutor’s reflection on knowledge transfer. Results showed how these teachers reflected upon their teaching practice and how the critical incidents helped them to analyze and evaluate their teaching process.

  20. Used battery collection in central Mexico: metal content, legislative/management situation and statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-García, José Antonio; Montiel-Corona, Virginia

    2012-03-01

    A statistical analysis of a used battery collection campaign in the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico, is presented. This included a study of the metal composition of spent batteries from formal and informal markets, and a critical discussion about the management of spent batteries in Mexico with respect to legislation. A six-month collection campaign was statistically analyzed: 77% of the battery types were "AA" and 30% of the batteries were from the informal market. A substantial percentage (36%) of batteries had residual voltage in the range 1.2-1.4 V, and 70% had more than 1.0 V; this may reflect underutilization. Metal content analysis and recovery experiments were performed with the five formal and four more frequent informal trademarks. The analysis of Hg, Cd and Pb showed there is no significant difference in content between formal and informal commercialized batteries. All of the analyzed trademarks were under the permissible limit levels of the proposed Mexican Official Norm (NOM) NMX-AA-104-SCFI-2006 and would be classified as not dangerous residues (can be thrown to the domestic rubbish); however, compared with the EU directive 2006/66/EC, 8 out of 9 of the selected battery trademarks would be rejected, since the Mexican Norm content limit is 20, 7.5 and 5 fold higher in Hg, Cd and Pb, respectively, than the EU directive. These results outline the necessity for better regulatory criteria in the proposed Mexican NOM in order to minimize the impact on human health and the environment of this type of residues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating the Impacts of Climate Change on Soil Erosion Rates in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Martínez-Santiago

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although water-eroded soil (WES resulting from human activities has been recognized as the leading global cause of land degradation, the soil erosion risks from climate change are not clear. Studies have reported that WES is the second most significant cause of soil loss in Mexico, and its future trajectory has not been sufficiently evaluated. The aims of this study are to 1 determine the impacts of climate change on WES and its distribution for the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico, and to 2 compare the present and future soil loss rates for the study unit (SU. The State of Aguascalientes is located in the “Region del Bajio.” The impact of climate change on WES was evaluated using the near-future divided world scenario (A2 presented in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. Daily temperature and precipitation data from 18 weather stations were downscaled to model historic laminar water erosion (HLWE and changes therein in the A2 near-future scenario for 2010–2039 (LWEScA2. Due to future changes in mean annual rainfall (MAR levels, a change in the LWEScA2 of between 1.6 and 8.9% could result in average soil losses up to 475.4 t ha-1 yr-1, representing a loss of slightly more than a 30-mm layer of mountain soil per year. The risk zones, classified as class 4 for LWE, are located to western of the State in part of municipalities of Calvillo, Jesus María, San José de Gracia y Cosio, where there are typical hills and falls with soil very sensitive to rain erosion.

  2. 'Bread Loaf' Mesa East of Phlegra Montes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] An isolated mesa east of the Phlegra Montes in northeastern Elysium Planitia has a cracked surface that, combined with its overall shape, gives the appearance of a giant loaf of bread. Other mesas with similar surfaces are found in the area, suggesting that at one time these mesas were part of a continuous layer of material. It is likely that at that time, some process caused the graben-like cracks to form. Later erosion of the cracked layer left only the isolated mesas seen in the THEMIS image. One clue that supports this scenario is the presence of many filled and eroded craters throughout the scene but no fresh ones. One way to produce this landscape begins with an ancient and heavily cratered surface that subsequently is buried by some other material. If this overburden was stripped off relatively recently, not enough time would have passed to allow for a new population of fresh craters to be produced. The result would be a landscape with isolated mesas of younger material on top of an ancient, cratered surface.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey

  3. Chemical and nutritional composition of tejate, a traditional maize and cacao beverage from the Central Valleys of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Angela; Soleri, Daniela; Wacher, Carmen; Sánchez-Chinchillas, Argelia; Argote, Rosa Maria

    2012-06-01

    Foam-topped cacao and maize beverages have a long history in Mesoamerica. Tejate is such a beverage found primarily in the Zapotec region of the Central Valleys of Oaxaca, Mexico. Historically tejate has been ceremonially important but also as an essential staple, especially during periods of hard fieldwork. However, the nutritional contribution of traditional foods such as tejate has not been investigated. We analyzed tejate samples from three Central Valley communities, vendors in urban Oaxaca markets and one migrant vendor in California, USA for their proximate composition, amino acid content and scores, and mineral and methylxanthine content. Nutritional and chemical variation exists among tejate recipes, however, the beverage is a source of energy, fat, methylxanthines, K, Fe and other minerals although their availability due to presence of phytates remains to be determined. Tejate is a source of protein comparable to an equal serving size of tortillas, with protein quality similarly limited in both. Tejate provides the nutritional benefits of maize, and some additional ones, in a form appealing during hot periods of intense work, and year round because of its cultural significance. Its substitution by sodas and other high glycemic beverages may have negative nutritional, health and cultural consequences.

  4. Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, T. J.; Yokelson, R. J.; Cárdenas, B.; Molina, L. T.; Engling, G.; Hsu, S.-C.

    2010-01-01

    In central Mexico during the spring of 2007 we measured the initial emissions of 12 gases and the aerosol speciation for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), anhydrosugars, Cl-, NO3-, and 20 metals from 10 cooking fires, four garbage fires, three brick making kilns, three charcoal making kilns, and two crop residue fires. Global biofuel use has been estimated at over 2600 Tg/y. With several simple case studies we show that cooking fires can be a major, or the major, source of several gases and fine particles in developing countries. Insulated cook stoves with chimneys were earlier shown to reduce indoor air pollution and the fuel use per cooking task. We confirm that they also reduce the emissions of VOC pollutants per mass of fuel burned by about half. We did not detect HCN emissions from cooking fires in Mexico or Africa. Thus, if regional source attribution is based on HCN emissions typical for other types of biomass burning (BB), then biofuel use and total BB will be underestimated in much of the developing world. This is also significant because cooking fires are not detected from space. We estimate that ~2000 Tg/y of garbage are generated globally and about half may be burned, making this a commonly overlooked major global source of emissions. We estimate a fine particle emission factor (EFPM2.5) for garbage burning of ~10.5±8.8 g/kg, which is in reasonable agreement with very limited previous work. We observe large HCl emission factors in the range 2-10 g/kg. Consideration of the Cl content of the global waste stream suggests that garbage burning may generate as much as 6-9 Tg/yr of HCl, which would make it a major source of this compound. HCl generated by garbage burning in dry environments may have a relatively greater atmospheric impact than HCl generated in humid areas. Garbage burning PM2.5 was found to contain levoglucosan and K in concentrations similar to those for biomass burning, so it could be a source of interference in some areas when using

  5. Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Christian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In central Mexico during the spring of 2007 we measured the initial emissions of 12 gases and the aerosol speciation for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC, anhydrosugars, Cl, NO3, and 20 metals from 10 cooking fires, four garbage fires, three brick making kilns, three charcoal making kilns, and two crop residue fires. Global biofuel use has been estimated at over 2600 Tg/y. With several simple case studies we show that cooking fires can be a major, or the major, source of several gases and fine particles in developing countries. Insulated cook stoves with chimneys were earlier shown to reduce indoor air pollution and the fuel use per cooking task. We confirm that they also reduce the emissions of VOC pollutants per mass of fuel burned by about half. We did not detect HCN emissions from cooking fires in Mexico or Africa. Thus, if regional source attribution is based on HCN emissions typical for other types of biomass burning (BB, then biofuel use and total BB will be underestimated in much of the developing world. This is also significant because cooking fires are not detected from space. We estimate that ~2000 Tg/y of garbage are generated globally and about half may be burned, making this a commonly overlooked major global source of emissions. We estimate a fine particle emission factor (EFPM2.5 for garbage burning of ~10.5±8.8 g/kg, which is in reasonable agreement with very limited previous work. We observe large HCl emission factors in the range 2–10 g/kg. Consideration of the Cl content of the global waste stream suggests that garbage burning may generate as much as 6–9 Tg/yr of HCl, which would make it a major source of this compound. HCl generated by garbage burning in dry environments may have a relatively greater atmospheric impact than HCl generated in humid areas. Garbage burning PM2.5 was found to contain levoglucosan and K in concentrations similar to those for

  6. Site characterization and construction of a controlled shallow test site in central Mexico for archaeological and engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Fuentes, A.; Arango-Galvan, C.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Hernández-Quintero, J. E.; Mendo-Perez, G.

    2017-12-01

    A controlled shallow test site (CSTS) has been constructed at the UNAM Geomagnetic Observatory in Teoloyucan, central Mexico. The objective of the CSTS is to have a controlled place to test new developments and arrays that can be used for archaeological and engineering exploration, as well as to calibrate instruments, train students and for future research. The CSTS was built far enough not to influence the geomagnetic sensors and not be affected by noise sources. Special attention was given to the distribution and geometry of buried materials as well as the instruments used. Before the CSTS was built, a combination of near-surface, non-invasive geophysical techniques was performed to characterize the area of 20 by 32 meters. The methods include magnetometry, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and seismic refraction tomography (SRT). The GPR, SRT and ERT results show relatively flat interfaces. In general, the vertical gradient of the total magnetic field and the electric conductivity have very small variations, showing only one strong magnetic dipole associated to a shallow anomaly. These results indicate that the area is ideal for the construction of the test site. The CSTS consists on buried structures made with different materials and geometries (cubes, cylinders and tubes) commonly used as construction materials in Mexico since Pre-Hispanic times. These materials include concrete, reinforced concrete, wood, brick, adobe, basalt, tezontle and also empty space for controlling responses. The CSTS is versatile enough to be reshaped considering new geometries or materials and to conduct further investigations.

  7. Lacustrine sedimentation and facies model for the last 45,000 yr in Chalco basin. Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, B.; Lozano, S.; Caballero, M.; Herrera, D.

    2013-05-01

    Chalco basin in central Mexico (19° 15' N, 98° 58' W, 2200 m asl) is one of the most detailed lake sediment sequence analyzed in Mexico for paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies. In this former lake, five drill cores up to 27 m depth were recovered in 1987-1989 by the UNAM team, and three cores covering most of the former sequence were obtained in 2008 and 2011. The upper 27 m of the Chalco lacustrine sequence contains the record of the last 45 kyr climate history in the northern American tropics. The active tectonic and volcanic setting of Chalco Lake in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, provides an opportunity to evaluate environmental (volcanic + tectonic vs. climatic) controls on lacustrine sedimentation. The establishment of a detailed time scale by 14C in pollen extracts provides an accurate chronological control. The stratigraphical and sedimentological analyses presented here provided the recognition of depositional environments and the architecture of the upper lacustrine succession. Sedimentary facies were defined on the basis of sedimentological descriptions, microscopic observation and compositional analyses. According to compositional criteria, facies were identified and groped into two main categories according to compositional criteria: 1) detrital and volcaniclastic, and 2) biogenic facies. The clastic facies includes massive to laminated, silty and clayey sediments composed of clay minerals, feldspars, amphiboles with minor amounts of quartz, opaque minerals and calcite. Diatoms are the most common biological remains in all the clastic facies. Most of the volcaniclastic deposits correspond to fall-out deposits, some of them of well documented eruptions of the nearby large stratovolcanoes Popocatepetl and Nevado de Toluca, which in turn serve as stratigraphical markers. The biogenic facies are massive to finely laminated diatom ooze and ostracod ooze layers. The sedimentary architecture of the lacustrine succession has been controlled by

  8. Diversity of Carabidae (Insecta, Coleoptera) in epiphytic Bromeliaceae in central Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, E; Ball, G E; Spence, J R

    2007-06-01

    This paper documents the existence of carabid assemblages associated with bromeliads on the Cofre de Perote, Veracruz, Mexico. Based on bromeliads sampled over three altitudinal ranges, the assemblages included at least 26 species with an arboreal lifestyle and another 11 species that are not strictly arboreal. Seven species are new to science, urging us to pay attention to the arboreal fauna in forest conservation studies. Composition of carabid assemblages associated with bromeliads changes with altitude. In lowlands, it is comprised almost entirely of species of Lebiini, with the Platynini dominating assemblages found in bromeliads >1,000 m above sea level. Our data suggest that carabids use bromeliads to reduce stresses associated with drought periods, the exact timing of which depends on altitude. The unexpected low diversity of the carabid fauna associated with bromeliads at middle altitude is explained in terms of anthropogenic conversion of the original forest to pastureland. Given the importance of arboreal elements, further fragmentation of subtropical and tropical mountain forest significantly threatens overall carabid diversity.

  9. Elevation Control on Vegetation Organization in a Semiarid Ecosystem in Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S. S.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Adams, J. M.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Hutton, E. W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Many semiarid and desert ecosystems are characterized by patchy and dynamic vegetation. Topography plays a commanding role on vegetation patterns. It is observed that plant biomes and biodiversity vary systematically with slope and aspect, from shrublands in low desert elevations, to mixed grass/shrublands in mid elevations, and forests at high elevations. In this study, we investigate the role of elevation dependent climatology on vegetation organization in a semiarid New Mexico catchment where elevation and hillslope aspect play a defining role on plant types. An ecohydrologic cellular automaton model developed within Landlab (component based modeling framework) is used. The model couples local vegetation dynamics (that simulate biomass production based on local soil moisture and potential evapotranspiration) and plant establishment and mortality based on competition for resources and space. This model is driven by elevation dependent rainfall pulses and solar radiation. The domain is initialized with randomly assigned plant types and the model parameters that couple plant response with soil moisture are systematically changed. Climate perturbation experiments are conducted to examine spatial vegetation organization and associated timescales. Model results reproduce elevation and aspect controls on observed vegetation patterns indicating that this model captures necessary and sufficient conditions that explain these observed ecohydrological patterns.

  10. Direct impacts of outer continental shelf activities on wetland loss in the central Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, R.H.; Turner, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The direct impacts of outer continental shelf (OCS) development on recent wetland loss in the northern Gulf of Mexico were quantified using aerial imagery, field surveys, and literature review. The total direct impacts accounted for an estimated 25.6 percent of total net wetland loss within the Louisiana portion of the study area from 1955/56 to 1978. Of the total direct impacts of 73,905 ha, OCS-related activities accounted for 11,589-13,631 ha of the wetland loss during the same time interval. Although this is a substantial areal loss, it represents only 4.0-4.7 percent of the total Louisiana wetland loss from 1955/56 to 1978, and 15.7-18.4 percent of direct impacts. Direct impacts from OCS pipelines averages 2.49 ha/km, lower than published guidelines, and totaled 12,012 ha. Lowest impacts are for backfilled pipelines in the Chenier Plain of western Louisiana and for small young pipeline canals does not appear to be an important factor for total new wetland loss in the coastal zone because few pipelines are open to navigation and, for the examples found, the impact width was not significantly different than for open pipelines closed to navigation. Navigation channels account for a minimum of 16,902 ha of habitat change. Direct impacts per unit length of navigation channel average 20 times greater than pipelines

  11. Air pollutant characterization in Tula industrial corridor, Central Mexico, during the MILAGRO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, G; Vega, E; González-Avalos, E; Mora, V; López-Veneroni, D

    2013-01-01

    Pollutant emissions and their contribution to local and regional air quality at the industrial area of Tula were studied during a four-week period as part of the MILAGRO initiative. A recurrent shallow stable layer was observed in the morning favoring air pollutants accumulation in the lower 100 m atmospheric layer. In the afternoon the mixing layer height reached 3000 m, along with a featuring low level jet which was responsible of transporting air pollutants at regional scales. Average PM10 at Jasso (JAS) and Tepeji (TEP) was 75.1 and 36.8 μ g/m(3), respectively while average PM2.5 was 31.0 and 25.7 μ g/m(3). JAS was highly impacted by local limestone dust, while TEP was a receptor of major sources of combustion emissions with 70% of the PM10 constituted by PM2.5. Average hourly aerosol light absorption was 22 Mm(-1), while aerosol scattering (76 Mm(-1)) was higher compared to a rural site but much lower than at Mexico City. δ(13)C values in the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata show that the emission plume directly affects the SW sector of Mezquital Valley and is then constrained by a mountain range preventing its dispersion. Air pollutants may exacerbate acute and chronic adverse health effects in this region.

  12. Air Pollutant Characterization in Tula Industrial Corridor, Central Mexico, during the MILAGRO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant emissions and their contribution to local and regional air quality at the industrial area of Tula were studied during a four-week period as part of the MILAGRO initiative. A recurrent shallow stable layer was observed in the morning favoring air pollutants accumulation in the lower 100 m atmospheric layer. In the afternoon the mixing layer height reached 3000 m, along with a featuring low level jet which was responsible of transporting air pollutants at regional scales. Average PM10 at Jasso (JAS and Tepeji (TEP was 75.1 and 36.8 μg/m3, respectively while average PM2.5 was 31.0 and 25.7 μg/m3. JAS was highly impacted by local limestone dust, while TEP was a receptor of major sources of combustion emissions with 70% of the PM10 constituted by PM2.5. Average hourly aerosol light absorption was 22 Mm−1, while aerosol scattering (76 Mm−1 was higher compared to a rural site but much lower than at Mexico City. δ13C values in the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata show that the emission plume directly affects the SW sector of Mezquital Valley and is then constrained by a mountain range preventing its dispersion. Air pollutants may exacerbate acute and chronic adverse health effects in this region.

  13. Active mountain building and the distribution of core Maxillariinae species in tropical Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    The observation that southeastern Central America is a hotspot for orchid diversity has long been known and confirmed by recent systematic studies and checklists. An analysis of the geographic and elevation distribution demonstrates that the most widespread species of “core” Maxillariinae are all adapted to life near sea level, whereas the most narrowly endemic species are largely distributed in wet highland environments. Drier, hotter lowland gaps exist between these cordilleras and evidently restrict the dispersal of the species adapted to wetter, cooler conditions. Among the recent generic realignments of “core” Maxillariinae based on molecular phylogenetics, the Camaridium clade is easily the most prominent genus in Central America and is largely restricted to the highlands of Costa Rica and Panama, indicating that this region is the ancestral home of this genus and that its dispersal limits are drier, lowland cordilleran gaps. The mountains of Costa Rica and Panama are among the geologically youngest topographic features in the Neotropics, reflecting the complex and dynamic interactions of numerous tectonic plates. From consideration of the available geological evidence, I conclude that the rapid growth of the mountain ranges in Costa Rica and Panama during the late Cenozoic times created, in turn, very rapid ranges in ecological life zones and geographic isolation in that part of the isthmus. Thus, I suggest that these recent geologic events were the primary drivers for accelerated orchid evolution in southeastern Central America.

  14. 36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mesa Verde National Park. 7.39 Section 7.39 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.39 Mesa Verde National Park. (a) Visiting of...

  15. Pleistocene cohesive debris flows at Nevado de Toluca Volcano, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.; Macías, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    During the Pleistocene, intense hydrothermal alteration promoted a flank failure of the southern portion of Nevado de Toluca volcano. This event produced a debris avalanche that transformed into a cohesive debris flow (Pilcaya deposit) owing to water saturation and weakness of the altered pre-avalanche rocks. The Pilcaya debris flow traveled along a narrow tectonic depression up to a distance of 40 km and then spread over a flat plain reaching up to 55 km from the volcano summit. This transition zone corresponds with a sudden break in slope from 5 to 0.5° that caused a rapid reduction in velocity and thickening of the flow that consequently reduced its competence to transport large particles. The resulting deposit thickens from 15 to 40 m, and contains boulders up to 15 m in diameter that form hummocky morphology close to the transitional zone. Sometime after the emplacement of the Pilcaya debris flow, heavy rains and superficial drainage contributed to remobilize the upper portions of the deposit causing two secondary lahars. These debris flows called El Mogote, traveled up to 75 km from the volcano. The edifice collapse generated lahars with a total volume of 2.8 km3 that devastated an approximate area of 250 km2. The area versus volume plot for both deposits shows that the magnitude of the event is comparable to other cohesive debris flows such as the Teteltzingo lahar (Pico de Orizaba, Mexico) and the Osceola mudflow (Mount Rainier, Wa). The Pilcaya debris flow represents additional evidence of debris flow transformed from a flank failure, a potentially devastating phenomenon that could threaten distant areas from the volcano previously considered without risk.

  16. Miocene to Recent structural evolution of the Nevado de Toluca volcano region, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palomo, A.; Macías, J. L.; Garduño, V. H.

    2000-03-01

    Based on aerial photography, satellite imagery, and detailed field work, a geological and structural model of Nevado de Toluca and its surroundings is presented. The Nevado de Toluca volcano is built upon the intersection of three complex fault systems of different age, orientation, and kinematics. These systems from the older to the younger are: (a) The Taxco-Querétaro Fault System (NNW-SSE) with clear expression south of the volcano; (b) The San Antonio Fault System (NE-SW) that runs between the San Antonio and Nevado de Toluca volcanoes; and (c) The Tenango Fault System (E-W) located to the east of Nevado de Toluca volcano. Our field data, supported by previous studies, suggest that these systems have coexisted since the late Miocene. In addition, the stratigraphy, chronology, and kinematics of fault planes point to the existence of at least three main deformation events that have affected the region since the late Miocene. During the early Miocene, an extensional phase with the same deformation style as the Basin and Range tectonics of northern Mexico caused the formation of horsts and grabens south of Nevado de Toluca and allowed the intrusion of sub-vertical dikes oriented NW-SE and NNW-SSE. During the middle Miocene, a transcurrent episode generated NE-SW faults that presented two main motions: the first movement was left-lateral with a σ3 oriented NW-SE and later turned into normal through a counter-clockwise rotation of σ3 up to a N-S position. The latest deformation phase started during the late Pliocene and produced oblique extension ( σ3 oriented NE-SW) along E-W-trending faults that later changed to pure extension by shifting of σ3 to a N-S orientation. These faults appear to control the late Pleistocene to Holocene monogenetic volcanism, the flank collapses of Nevado de Toluca volcano and the seismic activity of the region.

  17. LOPEZ DE MESA Y LA MEDICINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Roselli

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Hace apenas dos meses la Academia Nacional de Medicina y la Sociedad Colombiana de Historia de la Medicina iniciaban en este mismo recinto el homenaje del cuerpo médico colombiano a la memoria del Profesor Luis López de Mesa con motivo del primer centenario de su nacimiento, homenaje que ahora culmina con esta nueva sesión solenme conjunta.

    Fue la del Profesor López de Mesa una vida eminente en grado sumo, habiéndose destacado en todas las actividades que emprendiera, como se ha recordado profudamente en estos días. Autor de más de 20 obras que incluyeron novelas, tratados de sociología, de historia colombiana, ensayos filosóficos y reflexiones personales; hombre público que se destacó como Ministro de Educación, como parlamentario y diplomático, y luego como Ministro de Relaciones Exteriores, Rector de la Universidad Nacional; Académico y Presidente de la Academia Nacional de Medicina,Miembro de las de la Lengua, de Historia y de Ciencia Exactas, Físicas y Naturales; Presidente del Colegio Máximo de Academias; prácticamente no hubo campo de la inteligencia y de la cultura colombianas que el Profesor López de Mesa no hubiera tocado con éxito y en los cuales no hubiera dejado huellas de su pensamiento y de su trajín humanista. Se le considera como uno de los fundadores de la sociología en Colombia y un estilista difícil pero correcto y profundo. La trayectoria de su vida pública es aún ampliamente recordada en nuestro medio.

    En aquella ocasión hicimos un repaso de la carrera del Profesor López de Mesa como médico y psiquiatra y escudriñamos algunas de las circunstancias de su formación científica que habrían posteriormente de reflejarse en su obra como sociólogo y estadista.! En esta oportunidad resumimos aquellos y algunos otros detalles.

  18. Symbolism and ritual practices related to hunting in Maya communities from central Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Fita, Dídac; Naranjo, Eduardo J; Estrada, Erin I J; Mariaca, Ramón; Bello, Eduardo

    2015-09-29

    Some Mayan peasant-hunters across the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico still carry out a hunting ritual -Loojil Ts'oon, Loj Ts'oon or Carbine Ceremony- in which they renew the divine permission for hunting in order to continue deserving the gift of prey after a period of hunt. Thus they are granted access to game by the gods and the Lords of the Animals, particularly the spirit/evil-wind call. This paper focuses on the acts within the Loojil Ts'oon -which is performed in the X-Pichil community and surrounding area- that make it unique among the hunting rituals performed in other parts of the Peninsula. The Loojil Ts'oon hunting ritual was observed and registered in audiovisual format in two different occasions in X-Pichil (Friday 04/29/2011 and Friday 07/29/2011). Afterwards, we delivered digital videodisks (DVD) to hunters and their families and to the j-men (the magic-medic-ritual specialist) who participated in these ceremonies. This delivery produced confidence among participants to talk more openly and in-depth about the Loojil Ts'oon, revealing symbolic, psychological, and material details previously unknown to outsiders. Qualitative information was obtained through the ethnographic method using techniques such as participant observation and guided tours. Semi-structured interviews were carried out to obtain complementary information. On one hand, we describe the preparation and cleansing of the "Sip soup", as well as its parading and distribution -delivery to the spirit/evil-wind Sip- on the streets of the community (highlingting the role of the rooster as a counter-gift). On the other hand, the cleansing of the jaws (of deer: Odocoileus virginianus, Mazama spp.; and peccaries: Tayassuidae) and their return to the Lords of Animals in the hills so that they may give these animals new life. By performing the Loojil Ts'oon, the act of killing an animal is legitimized. The kill transforms into an exchange to perpetuate life, in which gods and Lords of animals grant

  19. Herbivory of sympatric elk and cattle on Lincoln National Forest, south-central New Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather H. Halbritter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Wildlife and livestock grazing are important products of forest ecosystems, but can be controversial. Herbivory by North American elk and domestic cattle is a contentious management issue throughout western North America, often driving management proposals to decrease cattle and elk numbers based on perceived overutilization of forages. Such observations are often site level rather than landscape, and may confuse ecological sustainability with desired conditions. Methods We used line transects to document vegetation composition, structure, and grazing and browsing utilization for 4 key habitat types: mountain meadows, aspen, thinned conifer, and burned conifer on Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, USA. We documented relative habitat use of these types by elk, mule deer, and cattle and modeled relative use on residual grass biomass of mountain meadows and browse utilization of forested types. We determined diets and diet quality of elk and cattle to assess degree of competition. Results Use of grasses in meadows was below management thresholds, and combined elk, cattle, and deer relative habitat use accounted for < 14 % of the variance in residual stubble height of Poa pratensis, the most abundant grass. Palatable browse was limited in habitat types (< 107 stems·ha -1 , use was generally high, and elk presence was correlated with the majority of browsing. Elk and cattle diets did not significantly overlap (Schoener’s index 0.54–0.57; elk fed primarily on deciduous shrubs (34 %–55 % of annual diets and cattle on grass (72 %–77 %. Digestibility and crude protein levels of cattle diets and body condition of elk indicated high quality diets for cattle and marginal–good quality diets for elk. Conclusions At observed stocking levels and densities, cattle and elk were not competing for forage based on diet similarity, nor were key habitat types being used beyond sustainable levels. Low browse availability indicates that

  20. Terminal Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic eruptions at Zuni Salt Lake, west-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Jill; Forman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Zuni Salt Lake (ZSL) is a large maar in the Red Hill-Quemado volcanic field located in west-central New Mexico in the southwestern USA. Stratigraphic analysis of sections in and around the maar, coupled with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, indicate that ZSL volcanic activity occurred between ˜13.4 and 9.9 ka and was most likely confined to a ≤500-year interval sometime between ˜12.3 and 11.0 ka. The basal volcanic unit consists of locally widespread basaltic ash fallout interpreted to represent a violent or wind-aided strombolian eruption tentatively attributed to Cerro Pomo, a scoria cone ˜10 km south of ZSL. Subsequent eruptions emanated from vents near or within the present-day ZSL maar crater. Strombolian eruptions of multiple spatter and scoria cones produced basaltic lava and scoria lapilli fallout. Next, a phreatomagmatic eruption created the maar crater and surrounding tephra rim and apron. ZSL eruptions ended with strombolian eruptions that formed three scoria cones on the crater floor. The revised age range of ZSL is younger and more precise than the 190-24 ka 2-sigma age range derived from previous argon dating. This implies that other morphologically youthful, argon-dated volcanoes on the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau might be substantially younger than previously reported.

  1. Artificial nest predation in hedgerows and scrub forest in a human-dominated landscape of central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuria, Iriana; Gates, J. Edward; Castellanos, Ignacio

    2007-03-01

    Hedgerows as well as other narrow corridors could be valuable habitats for birds in regions of intensive agriculture, however, it is still not clear how successful breeding birds are in different types of hedgerows as compared to birds nesting in their natural habitats. We used artificial nests to examine whether hedgerows were sinks (ecological traps) for birds by comparing rates of predation in two types of hedgerows with different vegetation structure (simple and complex), and in a tract of scrub forest in an agricultural landscape of central Mexico. We determined also the types of predators responsible for egg predation. Ground and elevated nests were baited with one Japanese quail Coturnix japonica egg and one plasticine egg and placed alternately along transects. Significantly, greater predation rates were found in scrub forest and complex hedgerows than in simple hedgerows. Higher predation rates in complex habitats seemed to reflect the higher number of predator types found there. The most important predator types were carnivores followed by rodents, birds, and humans. Carnivores and rodents mainly predated ground nests, whereas birds and humans predated elevated nests. Simple hedgerows in this landscape appeared to offer relatively safe nest sites in terms of predation pressure when compared to more complex habitats (complex hedgerows and scrub forest).

  2. PREVALENCE OF Cryptosporidium spp. AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS IN FEMALE CALVES IN THE CENTRAL REGION OF VERACRUZ, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Romero Salas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and its associated risk factors in female calves in central Veracruz, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with a convenience sampling was conducted. One fecal sample was obtained from each of 120 female calves. The lateral flow immunochromatographic (LFIC and the Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN tests were performed. A questionnaire was applied in each farm to obtain individual and herd information. Overall prevalence was 3.33% (CI95% 1-8 through LFIC and 12.50% (CI95% 8-20 through ZN. Prevalence by municipality was 0 to 9.1% (CI95% 0.03-0.24 through LFIC and 0 to 30.43% (CI95% 16-51 through ZN. Prevalence by age was 0% at 31-45 days and 9.10% at 1-15 days through LFIC, and 0% at 31-45 days and 18.8% at 1-15 days through ZN. The calves with diarrhea had the highest prevalence, which was 14.3% (CI95% 3-51 through LFIC and 57.1% (CI95% 25-84 through ZN. The protective factors were calves housed in individual stalls, compared with those in common stalls but separated one from the other (OR=0.27; 0.09-0.85, P

  3. Pre-eruptive conditions of the ~31 ka rhyolitic magma of Tlaloc volcano, Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J.; Arce, J.; Rueda, H.; Gardner, J.

    2008-12-01

    Tlaloc volcano is located at the northern tip of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range in Central Mexico. This Pleistocene to Recent volcanic range consists from north to south of Tlaloc-Telapón-Teyotl-Iztaccíhuatl-and- Popocatépetl volcanoes. While andesitic to barely dacitic volcanism dominates the southern part of the range (i.e. Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl); dacitic and rare rhyolithic volcanism (i.e. Telapón, Tlaloc) dominates the northern end. The known locus of rhyolitic magmatism took place at Tlaloc volcano with a Plinian-Subplinian eruption that occurred 31 ka ago. The eruption emplaced the so-called multilayered fallout and pumiceous pyroclastic flows (~2 km3 DRE). The deposit consists of 95% vol. of juvenile particles (pumice + crystals) and minor altered lithics 5% vol. The mineral association of the pumice fragments (74-76 % wt. SiO2) consists of quartz + plagioclase + sanidine + biotite and rare oxides set in a glassy groundmass with voids. Melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts suggest that prior to the eruption the rhyolitic contain ~7% of H2O and Nevado de Toluca volcano (~6 km) some 50 km to the southwest.

  4. Buried palaeosols of the Nevado de Toluca: an alternative record of Late Quaternary environmental change in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedov, Sergey; Solleiro-Rebolledo, Elizabeth; Gama-Castro, Jorge E.; Vallejo-Gómez, Ernestina; González-Velázquez, Arelia

    2001-05-01

    Buried palaeosols of central Mexico, not previously analysed from a palaeopedological standpoint, have helped to develop a reliable regional model of Late Quaternary climatic change. This paper focuses upon morphological and micromorphological properties, particle-size distribution, and extractable Fe, Al and Si of seven palaeosols (named PT1-PT7) in the vicinity of the Nevado de Toluca volcano. The characteristics of Andic Cambisol PT1, similar to those of modern soils in semi-arid environments, indicate a drier climate in the first half of the Holocene. Humic Andosols PT2-PT4 are analogous to modern volcanic soils of humid forest environments. They show evidence that a moist palaeoclimate prevailed during marine oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 2 and 3. Luvisols PT5 and PT6, which are assumed to have formed at the end of marine OIS 5 to marine OIS 4, also indicate humid conditions. We attribute the differences between Andosols PT2-PT4 and Luvisols PT5-PT7 to variations in the duration in the pedogenesis rather than to changes in palaeoclimate. Micromorphological features of Andosol to Luvisol transition confirm that these soils form an evolutionary sequence. Being for the most part consistent with lacustrine records, the palaeosol properties do not reflect the episodes of drier climate during the Last Glacial Maximum, however, as shown by diatom and palynological data from lake sediments. Mesoclimate variations and/or incompleteness of soil memory, reflecting mostly periods of humid pedogenesis, probably provide the reason for this disagreement.

  5. Effect of fungi and light on seed germination of three Opuntia species from semiarid lands of central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sánchez, Pablo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Guerrero-González, María de la Luz; Flores, Joel

    2013-09-01

    Fungal attack under light reduces mechanical resistance of the testa of Opuntia seeds, making it easier for the embryo to emerge. However, the effect of fungi on Opuntia seed germination in darkness is unknown. We evaluated the combined effects of light and inoculation with Phoma medicaginis, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma koningii, and Penicillium chrysogenum on germination of O. streptacantha, O. leucotricha, and O. robusta seeds, from central Mexico. We also evaluated the combined effects of seed age (2-, 3-, and 12-year-old seeds) and presence of fungi on the testa on O. streptacantha germination. All fungal species eroded the funicular envelope and promoted seed germination for O. leucotricha and O. streptacantha, but did more so in light than in darkness. For the latter species, younger seeds inoculated with fungi had lower germination than older ones. For O. robusta, we found that seeds inoculated with P. medicaginis and T. harzianum had similar germination in light and in darkness. Our results strongly indicate that deterioration of the testa by fungi is higher in light than in darkness.

  6. Farm and socio-economic characteristics of smallholder milk producers and their influence on technology adoption in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Carlos Galdino Martínez; Dorward, Peter; Rehman, Tahir

    2012-08-01

    In order to identify the factors influencing adoption of technologies promoted by government to small-scale dairy farmers in the highlands of central Mexico, a field survey was conducted. A total of 115 farmers were grouped through cluster analysis (CA) and divided into three wealth status categories (high, medium and low) using wealth ranking. Chi-square analysis was used to examine the association of wealth status with technology adoption. Four groups of farms were differentiated in terms of farms' dimensions, farmers' education, sources of incomes, wealth status, management of herd, monetary support by government and technological availability. Statistical differences (p technologies identified, six of which focused on crop or forage production and 11 of which were related to animal husbandry. Relatives and other farmers played an important role in knowledge diffusion and technology adoption. Although wealth status had a significant association (p technology to farmers, usefulness and productive benefits of innovations together with farmers' knowledge of them, were important. It is concluded that the analysis of the information per group and wealth status was useful to identify suitable crop or forage related and animal husbandry technologies per group and wealth status of farmers. Therefore the characterizations of farmers could provide a useful starting point for the design and delivery of more appropriate and effective extension.

  7. Crust and upper-mantle seismic anisotropy variations from the coast to inland in central and Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Jorge; Pérez-Campos, Xyoli; Valenzuela, Raúl; Husker, Allen; Ferrari, Luca

    2017-07-01

    Subduction zones are among the most dynamic tectonic environments on Earth. Deformation mechanisms of various scales produce networks of oriented structures and faulting systems that result in a highly anisotropic medium for seismic wave propagation. In this study, we combine shear wave splitting inferred from receiver functions and the results from a previous SKS-wave study to quantify and constrain the vertically averaged shear wave splitting at different depths along the 100-station MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment array. This produces a transect that runs perpendicular to the trench across the flat slab portion of the subduction zone below central and southern Mexico. Strong anisotropy in the continental crust is found below the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and above the source region of slow-slip events. We interpret this as the result of fluid/melt ascent. The upper oceanic crust and the overlying low-velocity zone exhibit highly complex anisotropy, while the oceanic lower crust is relatively homogeneous. Regions of strong oceanic crust anisotropy correlate with previously found low Vp/Vs regions, indicating that the relatively high Vs is an anisotropic effect. Upper-mantle anisotropy in the southern part of the array is in trench-perpendicular direction, consistent with the alignment of type-A olivine and with entrained subslab flow. The fast polarization direction of mantle anisotropy changes to N-S in the north, likely reflecting mantle wedge corner flow perpendicular to the TMVB.

  8. Economic analysis of alternative nutritional management of dual-purpose cow herds in central coastal Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absalón-Medina, Victor Antonio; Nicholson, Charles F; Blake, Robert W; Fox, Danny Gene; Juárez-Lagunes, Francisco I; Canudas-Lara, Eduardo G; Rueda-Maldonado, Bertha L

    2012-08-01

    Market information was combined with predicted input-output relationships in an economic analysis of alternative nutritional management for dual-purpose member herds of the Genesis farmer organization of central coastal Veracruz, Mexico. Cow productivity outcomes for typical management and alternative feeding scenarios were obtained from structured sets of simulations in a companion study of productivity limitations and potentials using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System model (Version 6.0). Partial budgeting methods and sensitivity analysis were used to identify economically viable alternatives based on expected change in milk income over feed cost (change in revenues from milk sales less change in feed costs). Herd owners in coastal Veracruz have large economic incentives, from $584 to $1,131 in predicted net margin, to increase milk sales by up to 74% across a three-lactation cow lifetime by improving diets based on good quality grass and legume forages. This increment is equal to, or exceeds, in value the total yield from at least one additional lactation per cow lifetime. Furthermore, marginal rates of return (change in milk income over feed costs divided by change in variable costs when alternative practices are used) of 3.3 ± 0.8 indicate clear economic incentives to remove fundamental productivity vulnerabilities due to chronic energy deficits and impeded growth of immature cows under typical management. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the economic outcomes are robust for a variety of market conditions.

  9. Computer-assisted cartography using topographic properties: precision and accuracy of local soil maps in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cruz-Cárdenas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Map units directly related to properties of soil-landscape are generated by local soil classes. Therefore to take into consideration the knowledge of farmers is essential to automate the procedure. The aim of this study was to map local soil classes by computer-assisted cartography (CAC, using several combinations of topographic properties produced by GIS (digital elevation model, aspect, slope, and profile curvature. A decision tree was used to find the number of topographic properties required for digital cartography of the local soil classes. The maps produced were evaluated based on the attributes of map quality defined as precision and accuracy of the CAC-based maps. The evaluation was carried out in Central Mexico using three maps of local soil classes with contrasting landscape and climatic conditions (desert, temperate, and tropical. In the three areas the precision (56 % of the CAC maps based on elevation as topographical feature was higher than when based on slope, aspect and profile curvature. The accuracy of the maps (boundary locations was however low (33 %, in other words, further research is required to improve this indicator.

  10. Physical responses of volcanic soils to land-use intensity in tropical headwater catchments of central Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, N. T.; Kolka, R.; Asbjornsen, H.; Munoz-Villers, L.; Colin, P. O.; Gómez Aguilar, L. R.; Ward, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    Soil physical properties, such as bulk density (ρb) and penetrability (P), may vary in response to anthropogenic disturbance and are relatively easy to measure. These variables are thus often used as proxies for soil characteristics that more directly govern process rates but are logistically challenging to sample in situ (e.g., hydraulic conductivity). We evaluated within- and among-site variability in the physical condition of the upper soil throughout eight first-order catchments in the volcanic landscape of central Veracruz, Mexico, through nested sampling of ρb, P, and ground cover characteristics. The study catchments spanned a land-use intensity gradient, ranging in dominant cover type from sugarcane to mature cloud forest, with pasture and coffee agroforest as intermediate cover types. Catchments were compared using data collected in forest inventory plots and at points distributed along the topographic position index. Analysis of this hierarchical dataset led to a ranking of catchments in terms of soil physical condition and, importantly, revealed the bias introduced by ignoring the within-catchment variability in response metrics. These results will help optimize soil sampling effort in landscapes with complex topography and land-use/cover distributions.

  11. Tillandsia usneoides L, a biomonitor in the determination of Ce, La and Sm by neutron activation analysis in an industrial corridor in Central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac-Olive, K. [Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n, esq. Jesus Carranza, Toluca, 50120 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Solis, C., E-mail: corina@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Martinez-Carrillo, M.A; Andrade, E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Lopez, C.; Longoria, L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Salazar, 50045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Lucho-Constantino, C.A. [Universidad Politecnica de Pachuca, Carretera Pachuca-Cd. Sahagun, Km. 20., Hidalgo, Mexico (Mexico); Beltran-Hernandez, R.I. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo. Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo km. 4.5, 42184, Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico)

    2012-04-15

    The atmosphere of the Tula Industrial Corridor in Central Mexico is contaminated due to several industries including oil refining while station monitoring in this area are limited. Lanthanides are considered fingerprint of oil refinery activities, and La, Ce and Sm have been previously detected in this area using filters. The suitability of T. usneoides as a biomonitor assessing the La, Ce and Sm concentrations in Particulate Matter is evaluated by NAA. Results of both biomonitor and filters are highly correlated.

  12. Migrations. From the American dream to the Mexican disenchantment. Experiences and expectations of Central Americans migrants during their pass in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Astorga-Morales, Abel

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze the multiple situationsthat Central American immigrants endure on theirway through Mexico. This analysis is made based onthe experiences of immigrants interviewed in 2011 atFM4 Paso Libre, Casa del Migrante in Guadalajara, Jalisco.We approached this analysis through the methodology oforal history, in which someone’s testimony constitutes thefundamental structure of transition between memory andhistory. Moreover, we found another methodological support in two histori...

  13. The Teotihuacan Anomaly: The Historical Trajectory of Urban Design in Ancient Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Michael E.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan had the most aberrant design of any city in ancient Mesoamerica. I examine similarities and differences between the design of Teotihuacan and other Mesoamerican cities. During the Preclassic period, a set of common Mesoamerican planning principles emerged. The designers of Teotihuacan rejected most of these principles in favor of a new and radical set of planning concepts. After the fall of Teotihuacan, subsequent urban planners ignored the Teotihuacan principles and returned to ancient Mesoamerican planning ideas. Elements of the Teotihuacan plan did not resurface until the Mexica of Tenochtitlan revived them for a specific goal. The historical sequence of central Mexican city layouts highlights the anomalous character of Teotihuacan’s principles of urban design within the canons of ancient Mesoamerican urbanism.

  14. Risk factors for diabetes, but not for cardiovascular disease, are associated with family history of Type 2 diabetes in subjects from central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Brambila, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Independent of obesity, family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FHT2DM) is another important risk factor for developing diabetes. To establish the association among FHT2DM, risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in subjects from central Mexico. Clinical and biochemical studies were performed in 383 first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and 270 subjects unrelated to patients with type 2 diabetes-all subjects were from the city of Puebla in central Mexico. Logistic regressions were used to assess the association between FHT2DM and metabolic parameters. Cardiovascular risk was classified by dyslipidemia and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). FHT2DM was associated with risk factors for diabetes, such as increased fasting insulin levels (OR = 1.731, 95% CI = 1.041-2.877), decreased insulin sensitivity (OR = 1.951, 95% CI = 1.236-3.080) and pre-diabetes (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.14-2.33). FHT2DH was not associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as dyslipidemia (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.70-1.79) and FRS (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.40-1.36) when adjusted for gender, age, smoking and obesity. Diabetic risk factors, but not cardiovascular disease risk factors, are associated with a positive family history of diabetes in subjects from central Mexico, independent of the presence of obesity.

  15. Pre-Cenozoic History of the Jalisco Block (Guerrero Terrane of West-Central Mexico) From U- Pb Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, V. A.; Righter, K. O.; Gehrels, G.; Ruiz, J.; Ducea, M.; Rosas-Helguera, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Jalisco Block is a fault-bounded crustal fragment, located along the western edge of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt of west-central Mexico, and it forms part of the Triassic-Jurassic Guerrero terrane. Because of its extensive Miocene-Quaternary volcanic cover and Early Cretaceous-Tertiary intrusions, little is known about its Pre-Tertiary history. U-Pb (LA-MC-ICPMS) zircon geochronology of metasedimentary (Quartz Feldespathic Schist), marine sedimentary and plutonic rocks from several localities of the Jalisco Block (southern Mexico) were determined to constrain the geological evolution of this region. Results for the metasedimentary rocks, which are present as roof pendants, indicate a depositional age between the Late Triassic and Middle Jurassic. The older depositional sequence (Late Triassic) shows an important continental influence with subordinate clusters from the Carboniferous (297 Ma), Ordovician (446 Ma), Late and Middle Proterozoic (760, 1041, 1200, 1500 Ma) and Archean (~~2700 Ma), whereas the youngest depositional sequence (Middle Jurassic) have mainly Jurassic zircons, indicating sedimentation in a restricted basin. Ages of turbiditic marine sediments reveal a maximum depositional age of ~~130 Ma (Early Cretaceous), comparable to zircon populations from other areas of the Guerrero Terrane, and with minor age peaks at 320, 480-560, 743, 997-1260, and ~~2750 Ma. Magmatic granitic rocks from Atenguillo, Puerto Vallarta, Mascota and Tomatlan have ages of ~~60 Ma, ~~74 Ma and 80-90 Ma. These ages overlap with previously determined ages of granites and rhyolitic ash flow tuffs from the Jalisco Block, Baja California, Sonora and Sinaloa states. On the other hand, a granitic sample of Cuale region yielded a middle Jurassic age. Metasedimentary and sedimentary rocks of the Jalisco Block have a depositional evolution similar to coeval formations in the Guerrero and Alisitos terranes. We conclude that this

  16. Rock magnetic and geochemical proxies for iron mineral diagenesis in a tropical lake: Lago Verde, Los Tuxtlas, East Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Beatriz; Caballero, Margarita; Lozano, Socorro; Vilaclara, Gloria; Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2006-10-01

    inferred are in concordance with the glacial advances recorded in central Mexico. Higher erosion rates reflect destruction of the rainforest over the last 40 years.

  17. 78 FR 52562 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Central Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease... socioeconomic analyses in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2012-2017; Western Planning Area Lease... will focus on the potential environmental effects of oil and natural gas leasing, exploration...

  18. 76 FR 38676 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Sale 216/222, originally evaluated in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2007-2012; WPA... baseline conditions and potential environmental effects of oil and natural gas leasing, exploration... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental...

  19. A taxonomic study of Albizia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae: Ingeae in Mexico and Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Arce, María de Lourdes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Albizia is economically and environmentally important because many elements are multipurpose trees. A taxonomic study of 12 Central American and Mexican Albizia species is presented. Identification keys, illustrations and ecological information are provided together with some taxonomic comments. Distribution maps and conservation status are given for each native species in the area. Three epithets are lectotypyfied and three new name combinations are made. An interactive identification electronic key is available from the authors if requested. Full specimen records are available at www.kew.org/herbcat .El género Albizia tiene importancia económica y ecológica porque en su mayoría está integrado por árboles con usos múltiples. Se presenta un estudio taxonómico para 12 especies con distribución en México y Centro América, se incluyen claves para la identificación de las especies, ilustraciones, mapas de distribución, estados de conservación de las especies nativas del área y comentarios ecológicos y taxonómicos. Se formaliza la lectipificacion de tres epítetos y se proponen tres nuevas combinaciones. Una clave electrónica interactiva para la identificación de las especies se puede solicitar a los autores. Finalmente el conjunto completo de los ejemplares de herbario puede ser consultado en el sitio Web de los Jardines Reales de Kew: www.kew.org/herbcat.

  20. The Quaternary history of effusive volcanism of the Nevado de Toluca area, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Orozco, R.; Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Benowitz, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    Andesite and dacite lava flows and domes, and intermediate-mafic cones from the Nevado de Toluca area were classified into five groups using field data and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology constraints. Thirty-four lava units of diverse mineralogy and whole-rock major-element geochemistry, distributed between the groups, were identified. These effusive products were produced between ∼1.5 and ∼0.05 Ma, indicating a mid-Pleistocene older-age for Nevado de Toluca volcano, coexisting with explosive products that suggest a complex history for this volcano. A ∼0.96 Ma pyroclastic deposit attests for the co-existence of effusive and explosive episodes in the mid-Pleistocene history. Nevado de Toluca initiated as a composite volcano with multiple vents until ∼1.0 Ma, when the activity began to centralize in an area close to the present-day crater. The modern main edifice reached its maximum height at ca. 50 ka after bulky, spiny domes erupted in the current summit of the crater. Distribution and geochemical behavior in major elements of lavas indicate a co-magmatic relationship between different andesite and dacite domes and flows, although unrelated to the magmatism of the monogenetic volcanism. Mafic-intermediate magma likely replenished the system at Nevado de Toluca since ca. ∼1.0 Ma and contributed to the eruption of new domes, cones, as well as effusive-explosive activity. Altogether, field and laboratory data suggest that a large volume of magma was ejected around 1 Ma in and around the Nevado de Toluca.

  1. GPR and Magnetic Modeling on an Archaeological Site in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, R. E.; Argote, D. L.; Camara, M. E.; Cifuentes, G.; Lopez, P.

    2007-05-01

    A geophysical study was carried out in an archaeological site called Los Teteles de Ocotitla, which means `bunch of rocks'. The area is located within the central portion of the Sierra de Ocotitla, towards the northeast of La Malinche volcano, in the municipality of Altzayanca, State of Tlaxcala. This site is conformed of several artificial terraces with evidence of human occupation, probably from the Teotihuacan or Tenanyecac phase. At first the presence of several hills, which are the remains of small pyramids can be seen. Also, some exposed walls and floors can be appreciated. The geophysical work included magnetic (vertical field) and GPR observations in five terraces. The magnetic data depicted a series of dipolar anomalies probably related to walls, and stairways. A report from a previous archaeological excavation carried out almost 30 years ago on an upper terrace, mentioned the discovery of an ancient burial. The tomb was a room (3x2x2 m3) to a depth of 1 m, where corpse remains were found, along other archaeological artifacts. Magnetic and GPR profiles were observed in this area to define geophysical signatures of the mentioned ancient structure, to later compare with anomalies obtained in other terraces. Two interesting anomalies were observed in two lower terraces that compared well with the signatures obtained. The magnetic anomalies were modeled employing a 3D inverse approach, assuming that the Earth is conformed of a series of magnetic dipoles. The final result produced a magnetic block of 5x3x3 m3 to a depth of 1.5 m, approximately. The GPR anomalies helped to constrain the initial geometry of the archaeological structure.

  2. Evolving R Coronae Borealis Stars with MESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Lauer, Amber; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Frank, Juhan

    2018-01-01

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars form a small class of cool, carbon-rich supergiants that have almost no hydrogen. They undergo extreme, irregular declines in brightness of up to 8 magnitudes due to the formation of thick clouds of carbon dust. Two scenarios have been proposed for the origin of an RCB star: the merger of a CO/He white dwarf (WD) binary and a final helium-shell flash. We are using a combination of 3D hydrodynamics codes and the 1D MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) stellar evolution code including nucleosynthesis to construct post-merger spherical models based on realistic merger progenitor models and on our hydrodynamical simulations, and then following the evolution into the region of the HR diagram where RCB stars are located. We are investigating nucleosynthesis in the dynamically accreting material of CO/He WD mergers which may provide a suitable environment for significant production of 18O and the very low 16O/18O values observed.Our MESA modeling consists of two steps: first mimicking the WD merger event using two different techniques, (a) by choosing a very high mass accretion rate with appropriate abundances and (b) by applying "stellar engineering" to an initial CO WD model to account for the newly merged material by applying an entropy adjusting procedure. Second, we follow the post-merger evolution using a large nuclear reaction network including the effects of convective and rotational instabilities to the mixing of material in order to match the observed RCB abundances. MESA follows the evolution of the merger product as it expands and cools to become an RCB star. We then examine the surface abundances and compare them to the observed RCB abundances. We also investigate how long fusion continues in the He shell near the core and how this processed material is mixed up to the surface of the star. We then model the later evolution of RCB stars to determine their likely lifetimes and endpoints when they have returned to

  3. Morphological and molecular data for a new species of Pomphorhynchus Monticelli, 1905 (Acanthocephala: Pomphorhynchidae) in the Mexican redhorse Moxostoma austrinum Bean (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae) in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Varela, Martín; Mendoza-Garfias, Berenit; Choudhury, Anindo; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2017-11-01

    Pomphorhynchus purhepechus n. sp. is described from the intestine of the Mexican redhorse Moxostoma austrinum Bean (Catostomidae) in central Mexico. The new species can be distinguished from the other seven described species of Pomphorhynchus Monticelli, 1905 in the Americas by a subspherical proboscis and 14 longitudinal rows with 16-18 hooks each; the third and the fourth row of hooks are alternately longest. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene and the large subunit (LSU) rDNA (including the domains D2-D3) were used to corroborate the morphological distinction between the new species and Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli Linkins in Van Cleave, 1919, a species widely distributed in several freshwater fish species across Canada, USA, and Mexico. The genetic divergence estimated between the new species and the isolates of P. bulbocolli ranged between 13 and 14% for cox1, and between 0.6 and 0.8% for LSU. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses of each dataset showed that the isolates of P. bulbocolli parasitising freshwater fishes from three families, the Catostomidae, Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae, represent a separate lineage, and that the acanthocephalans collected from two localities in central Mexico comprise an independent lineage. In addition, our analysis of the genetic variation of P. bulbocolli demonstrates that individuals of this acanthocephalan from different host species are conspecific. Finally, the distribution, host-association, and phylogenetic relationship of the new species, when placed in the context of the region's geological history, suggest that both host and parasite underwent speciation after their ancestors became isolated in Central Mexico.

  4. Order Granting the Petition to Object to Williams Four Corners, LLC - Sims Mesa Central Delivery Point natural gas processing plant and compressor station, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, Title V Operating Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  5. Petition to Object to the Williams Four Corners, LLC - Sims Mesa Central Delivery Point natural gas processing plant and compressor station, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, Title V Operating Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. Revisions to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the Abiquiu Formation, Abiquiu and contiguous areas, north-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Florian; Kelley, Shari A.

    2009-01-01

    Stratigraphic studies and geologic mapping on the Abiquiu 7.5-min quadrangle have led to revision of the stratigraphic nomenclature for the Oligocene to Miocene Abiquiu Formation in north-central New Mexico. The Abiquiu Formation had previously been defined to include informal upper, middle (Pedernal chert member), and lower members. The basement-derived conglomeratic lower member in the northern Jemez Mountains and Abiquiu embayment is here redefined. We propose removing the "lower member" from the Abiquiu Formation because provenance of these coarse sediments is dramatically different than the volcaniclastic strata of the "upper member." Furthermore, we propose that the term "lower member of the Abiquiu Formation" be replaced with an existing unit name, the Ritito Conglomerate of Barker (1958), and that the name Abiquiu Formation be restricted to the volcaniclastic succession. The lower part of the Ritito Conglomerate in Arroyo del Cobre on the Abiquiu quadrangle is 47 m (155 ft) thick and is composed of arkosic conglomeratic beds interbedded with arkosic sands and siltstones. Clasts include, in descending order of abundance, Proterozoic quartzite, granite, metavolcanic rocks, quartz, schist, and gneiss and a trace of Mesozoic sandstone and Paleozoic chert. Clasts are predominantly of pebble and cobble size but range from granule to boulder size. Paleocurrent data collected in the Arroyo del Cobre area indicate that the Ritito Conglomerate was deposited by a south-flowing river system during the Oligocene, eroding Laramide highlands such as the Tusas Mountains to the northeast, which contain predominantly Proterozoic rocks. This depositional setting has also been suggested by previous workers. The middle member or Pedernal chert member is present both at the top of the Ritito Conglomerate and as lenses within the lower part of the Abiquiu Formation. This post-depositional diagenetic chert remains an informal unit called the Pedernal chert.

  7. Initial Time Of Two High Altitude Crater Lakes (Nevado De Toluca, Central Mexico Recorded In Subfossil Cladocera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeroczyńska Krystyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the recognition and reconstruction of the origin of two high altitude lakes and the ecological conditions of their early existence based on subfossil Cladocera and chemical analyses. The study focused on the oldest lacustrine sediments from Lake Sol and Lake Luna, located in the crater of Volcano Nevado de Toluca (Central Mexico. The Nevado de Toluca crater developed approximately 12 ka yr BP. According to the literature, the volcano was last active approximately 3.3 ka yr BP, and the lakes developed after that eruption. The remains of nine Cladocera species were found in the bottom sediments of both lakes. The most dominant taxa were two endemic littoral species: Alona manueli and Iliocryptus nevadensis. The total frequency of Cladocera specimens in both of the sediment cores was very low. No Cladocera remains were recorded in the sediment layer at depths between 123–103 m from Lake Luna. The results of the lithological and geochemical analyses showed that this sediment layer was composed of allochthonous material, probably originating from slid down from the volcanic cone. This was suggested by the content of silica (up to 13%, iron (up to 12%, and titanium (up to 4%. The Cladocera remains recorded in the bottom sediments suggested that both reservoirs developed as freshwater lakes at the beginning of the sedimentation. The calibrated radiocarbon dates obtained for the bottom samples were 4040 to 3990 yr BP for Lake Luna (129 cm and 4485 to 4485 yr BP for Lake Sol (89 cm. The obtained ages were older than the dates of the last eruption, which occurred approximately 3300 yr BP. This result was likely related to the type of radiocarbon dated materials (charcoals.

  8. Contribution of family labour to the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production systems in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas-Domínguez, Rodolfo Rogelio; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Martínez-Castañeda, Francisco Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of family labour on the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy farms in the highlands of Central Mexico. Economic data from 37 farms were analysed from a stratified statistical sampling with a Neyman assignment. Three strata were defined taking herd size as criterion. Stratum 1: herds from 3 to 9 cows plus replacements, Stratum 2: herds from 10 to 19 cows and Stratum 3: herds from 20 to 30 cows. The policy analysis matrix was used as the method to determine profitability and competitiveness. The coefficient of private profitability (CPP) when the economic cost of family labour is included in the cost structure was 8.0 %, 31.0 % and 46.0 %. When the economic cost of family labour is not included, CPP increase to 47.0 %, 57.0 % and 66.0 % for each strata, respectively. The private cost ratio (PCR) when family labour is included was 0.79, 0.51 and 0.42 for strata 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When family labour is not included, the PCR was 0.07, 0.25 and 0.26. Net profit per litre of milk including family labour was US$0.03 l(-1) for Stratum 1, US$0.09 for Stratum 2 and US$0.12 l(-1) for Stratum 3; but increased to $0.12, 0.14 and 0.15, respectively, when the economic cost of family labour is not included. It is concluded that family labour is a crucial factor in the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production.

  9. Megacities air pollution problems: Mexico City Metropolitan Area critical issues on the central nervous system pediatric impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kulesza, Randy J; Doty, Richard L; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo

    2015-02-01

    The chronic health effects associated with sustained exposures to high concentrations of air pollutants are an important issue for millions of megacity residents and millions more living in smaller urban and rural areas. Particulate matter (PM) and ozone (O3) concentrations close or above their respective air quality standards during the last 20 years affect 24 million people living in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Herein we discuss PM and O3 trends in MCMA and their possible association with the observed central nervous system (CNS) effects in clinically healthy children. We argue that prenatal and postnatal sustained exposures to a natural environmental exposure chamber contribute to detrimental neural responses. The emerging picture for MCMA children shows systemic inflammation, immunodysregulation at both systemic and brain levels, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, small blood vessel pathology, and an intrathecal inflammatory process, along with the early neuropathological hallmarks for Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. Exposed brains are briskly responding to their harmful environment and setting the bases for structural and volumetric changes, cognitive, olfactory, auditory and vestibular deficits and long term neurodegenerative consequences. We need to improve our understanding of the PM pediatric short and long term CNS impact through multidisciplinary research. Public health benefit can be achieved by integrating interventions that reduce fine PM levels and pediatric exposures and establishing preventative screening programs targeting pediatric populations that are most at risk. We fully expect that the health of 24 million residents is important and blocking pediatric air pollution research and hiding critical information that ought to be available to our population, health, education and social workers is not in the best interest of our children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cancer incidence study in Mesa County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouimette, D.R.; Ferguson, S.W.; Zoglo, D.; Murphy, S.; Alley, S.; Bahler, S.

    1983-01-01

    In November of 1982 the Colorado Department of Health completed an epidemiologic investigation of leukemia, multiple myeloma, and cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas and colon in Mesa County, Colorado for the years 1970 to 1979. This investigation was performed in response to a concern that the presence of uranium mill tailings in some Mesa County homes presents a potential cancer hazard. The results of the investigation show that the incidence of multiple myeloma, colon, stomach and pancreatic cancer are not above expected rates. The incidence of leukemia is not above expected rates for the entire study period, 1970 to 1979. The incidence of lung cancer appears elevated when compared to the The Third National Cancer Survey data for Colorado but lower than expected when compared to Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data. To further examine the leukemia and lung cancer incidence findings, a case/control study was conducted. The controls consisted of colon, stomach and pancreatic cancer cases. The results of the leukemia case/control analysis show no association with the radiation exposure variables: occupational radiation exposure; uranium mining exposure; having ever lived in a type A home (uranium tailings home); and radiation therapy. The lung cancer case/control analysis shows a significant association with only the radiation exposure variable, uranium mining history, indicating cases were more likely to have been uranium miners than were controls. As with leukemia, the study found no association between lung cancer and living in a uranium mill tailings home. The relatively low radiation exposures typical of type A homes and the small number of persons exposed make it very difficult to establish, by epidemiologic methods, that a risk exists

  11. The diversity of the Chagas parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, infecting the main Central American vector, Triatoma dimidiata, from Mexico to Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Patricia L; McClure, Annie G; Gallaspy, Meghan D; Waleckx, Etienne; Woods, Adrienne S; Monroy, Maria Carlota; Stevens, Lori

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the strains of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating in Central America and specifically in the most important vector in this region, Triatoma dimidiata. Approximately six million people are infected with T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, which has the greatest negative economic impact and is responsible for ~12,000 deaths annually in Latin America. By international consensus, strains of T. cruzi are divided into six monophyletic clades called discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-VI) and a seventh DTU first identified in bats called TcBat. TcI shows the greatest geographic range and diversity. Identifying strains present and diversity within these strains is important as different strains and their genotypes may cause different pathologies and may circulate in different localities and transmission cycles, thus impacting control efforts, treatment and vaccine development. To determine parasite strains present in T. dimidiata across its geographic range from Mexico to Colombia, we isolated abdominal DNA from T. dimidiata and determined which specimens were infected with T. cruzi by PCR. Strains from infected insects were determined by comparing the sequence of the 18S rDNA and the spliced-leader intergenic region to typed strains in GenBank. Two DTUs were found: 94% of infected T. dimidiata contained TcI and 6% contained TcIV. TcI exhibited high genetic diversity. Geographic structure of TcI haplotypes was evident by Principal Component and Median-Joining Network analyses as well as a significant result in the Mantel test, indicating isolation by distance. There was little evidence of association with TcI haplotypes and host/vector or ecotope. This study provides new information about the strains circulating in the most important Chagas vector in Central America and reveals considerable variability within TcI as well as geographic structuring at this large geographic scale. The lack of association with particular vectors/hosts or ecotopes

  12. Gonopodial system review and a new fish record of Poeciliopsis infans (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliidae for Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacan, central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Galindo-Villegas

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997, Poeciliopsis infans Woolman 1894 has been recognized as a new inhabitant of Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacan in Central Mexico. Between February 1997 and October 1998, nine fish samples were collected at Lake Patzcuaro. Morphometric and meristic counts were conducted on a random selection of 40 organisms of both sexes of Poeciliopsis infans. Males of these viviparous fish posses a modified anal fin called gonopodium. The characteristic hemal spine on the 18,h caudal vertebra for this species is describes herein and the bony components of the gonopodial structure and suspensorio that together comprise the gonopodial system, which is important for taxonomic studies at various levels of classification were reviewed. Poeciliopsis infans displays a high degree of sexual dimorphism in body shape and anal fin anatomy with the most conspicuous difference observed in anal fin height, which averages 40% of SI in males and 17% in females. Comparisons between male and female anal fins are describes herein as well as the possible impacts of this species on Lake Patzcuaro fish fauna.A partir de Febrero de 1997 la especie Poeciliopsis infans Woolman 1894 es reconocida como un habitante más en las aguas del Lago de Pátzcuaro, el cual se sitúa en la meseta central mexicana. Nueve colectas ictiológicas se efectuaron en este lago dentro del periodo comprendido entre febrero de 1997 y octubre de 1998. Conteos meristicos y mediciones morfométricas se efectuaron en 40 organismos de ambos sexos seleccionados al azar. Los machos de esta especie presentan una aleta anal modificada que recibe el nombre de gonopodio. En este artículo se llevo a cabo una revisión y se describe la dieciochoava espina hemal que es una característica única de esta especie así mismo se describe el sistema gonopódico el cual está comprendido por la estructura gonopodial y el suspensorio. P. infans muestra un alto grado de dimorfismo sexual tanto en la forma del cuerpo como en

  13. The diversity of the Chagas parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, infecting the main Central American vector, Triatoma dimidiata, from Mexico to Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Dorn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the strains of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating in Central America and specifically in the most important vector in this region, Triatoma dimidiata. Approximately six million people are infected with T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, which has the greatest negative economic impact and is responsible for ~12,000 deaths annually in Latin America. By international consensus, strains of T. cruzi are divided into six monophyletic clades called discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-VI and a seventh DTU first identified in bats called TcBat. TcI shows the greatest geographic range and diversity. Identifying strains present and diversity within these strains is important as different strains and their genotypes may cause different pathologies and may circulate in different localities and transmission cycles, thus impacting control efforts, treatment and vaccine development. To determine parasite strains present in T. dimidiata across its geographic range from Mexico to Colombia, we isolated abdominal DNA from T. dimidiata and determined which specimens were infected with T. cruzi by PCR. Strains from infected insects were determined by comparing the sequence of the 18S rDNA and the spliced-leader intergenic region to typed strains in GenBank. Two DTUs were found: 94% of infected T. dimidiata contained TcI and 6% contained TcIV. TcI exhibited high genetic diversity. Geographic structure of TcI haplotypes was evident by Principal Component and Median-Joining Network analyses as well as a significant result in the Mantel test, indicating isolation by distance. There was little evidence of association with TcI haplotypes and host/vector or ecotope. This study provides new information about the strains circulating in the most important Chagas vector in Central America and reveals considerable variability within TcI as well as geographic structuring at this large geographic scale. The lack of association with particular vectors

  14. Water-quality assessment of the Central Arizona Basins, Arizona and northern Mexico; environmental setting and overview of water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, Gail E.; Rees, Julie A.; Edmonds, Robert J.; Gebler, Joseph B.; Wirt, Laurie; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Anning, David W.

    1998-01-01

    The Central Arizona Basins study area in central and southern Arizona and northern Mexico is one of 60 study units that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. The purpose of this report is to describe the physical, chemical, and environmental characteristics that may affect water quality in the Central Arizona Basins study area and present an overview of water quality. Covering 34,700 square miles, the study area is characterized by generally north to northwestward-trending mountain ranges separated by broad, gently sloping alluvial valleys. Most of the perennial rivers and streams are in the northern part of the study area. Rivers and streams in the south are predominantly intermittent or ephemeral and flow in response to precipitation such as summer thunderstorms. Effluent-dependent streams do provide perennial flow in some reaches. The major aquifers in the study area are in the basin-fill deposits that may be as much as 12,000 feet thick. The 1990 population in the study area was about 3.45 million, and about 61 percent of the total was in Maricopa County (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Extensive population growth over the past decade has resulted in a twofold increase in urban land areas and increased municipal water use; however, agriculture remains the major water use. Seventy-three percent of all water with drawn in the study area during 1990 was used for agricultural purposes. The largest rivers in the study area-the Gila, Salt, and Verde-are perennial near their headwaters but become intermittent downstream because of impoundments and artificial diversions. As a result, the Central Arizona Basins study area is unique compared to less arid basins because the mean surface-water outflow is only 528 cubic feet per second from a total drainage area of 49,650 square miles. Peak flows in the northern part of the study area are the result of snowmelt runoff; whereas, summer thunderstorms account for the peak flows in

  15. Identification of phenolic compounds by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in seventeen species of wild mushrooms in Central Mexico and determination of their antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Elhadi M; Gutiérrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Moreno-Pérez, Marco A

    2017-07-01

    Wild mushrooms are important for the diet of some communities in Mexico. However, limited information exists on their chemical composition, contribution to the diet, and health effects. We characterized seventeen wild mushroom species growing in the state of Queretaro in Central Mexico. Most species analyzed were edible, but also included nonedible, medicinal, poisonous and toxic specimens. Whole mushrooms (caps and stipes) were characterized for water content, color, and total content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and anthocyanins. In vitro antioxidant capacity was measured by FRAP and DPPH assays. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-mass spectrometry. All species analyzed were found to possess antioxidant activity in vitro and a wide range of phenolic and organic compounds were identified. Our results add to the limited information available on the composition and potential nutritional and health value of wild mushrooms. Further analyses of their bioactivities are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pecos National Monument, New Mexico: Its Geologic Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ross Byron

    1969-01-01

    The ruins of the pueblos and missions of Pecos lie on the east bank of Glorieta Creek near its junction with the Pecos River at the south end of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in north-central New Mexico. Here the Pecos River and Glorieta Creek have formed a broad rolling valley in which the red adobe walls of the mission church stand as a striking monument to a historic past. This is beautiful country; the bright hues of red rocks are complemented by the varied greens of the junipers, pi?ons, and ponderosa pines. Northward the Sangre de Cristo Mountains stretch for miles in a blue mist toward the Truchas Peaks and forests of the Pecos Wilderness. A few miles south of the ruins the steep high escarpment of Glorieta Mesa marks, in a general way, the southern termination of the Rocky Mountain System, which here is represented by the Sangre de Cristos. The escarpment of Glorieta Mesa has been formed largely by the Pecos River and its tributaries eroding the soft sedimentary layers. The Pecos flows southward from the high mountains in the north, parallels the mesa escarpment for 15 miles, and breaches the mesa near San Jose. About 1-1/2 miles southwest of the Pecos ruins at Cerro de Escobas is the highest point on Glorieta Mesa. It is the most conspicuous feature of the local landscape and rises to an elevation of 8,212 feet - 1,270 feet above the ruins. The slope of the escarpment here is very steep, rising 6 feet in every 10 horizontal feet. Along the north side of the Glorieta Mesa escarpment is a 30-mile-long natural pass around the south end of the Sangre de Cristos that extends from Canoncito on the west to Starvation Peak on the east (fig. 1). The elevation of the pass is greater than 6,000 feet at all places, and it reaches its summit of 7,432 feet near the village of Glorieta near the west end of the pass. This pass has been used as a major travel route for more than 800 years by the Indians, Spanish, and Americans. The famous Santa Fe Trail passed through

  17. Persistence of Carbonate Platform Environments in Central Mexico during the Oceanic Anoxic Event 2: impact of the Carribean Plateau?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomou, Brahimsamba; Adatte, Thierry; Föllmi, Karl; Arnaud-Vanneau, Annie; Fleitmann, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    The Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 is described as an interruption of normal pelagic sediment deposition by several distinct intervals of widespread oceanic anoxia (Schlanger & Jenkyns, 1976; Jenkyns, 1980; Arthur et al., 1990) characterized by black shales deposition coinciding with a positive shift in carbon isotope excursion. Some authors show a relationship between OAEs and massive volcanic events associated with the emplacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) and sea floor spreading at mid-ocean ridges (Kuroda et al., 2007; Snow et al., 2005). High metal abundance anomalies recorded in pelagic sections (e.g. Pueblo, Colorado) coincide with the massive volcanism that built the Carribean plateau (around 93-94 Ma), associated with the onset of OAE 2 (Snow et al., 2005). Mort et al., (2007) demonstrate that the onset of the OAE 2 was triggered by a short-lived but significant increase in phosphorus burial. The bottom waters became anoxic and switched from being a P sink to a P source, sustaining the productivity in a positive feedback loop. However, the behaviour of phosphorus and trace metals at larger scale, in different paleogeography and paleodepht is still poorly known. The Axaxacualco and Baranca el Cañon sections, located at the Guerrero-Morelos carbonate platform in southern Mexico exhibit a fully correlateable d13C curves. In the distal part of the carbonate platform at Axaxacualco, the maximum d13C positive excursion coincides with oligotrophic carbonate platform environments supported by low concentrations in P and characterized by abundant and diversified benthic microfauna and rudists. The impact of OAE appears may be more significant in the proximal part of the carbonate platform at Barranca, characterized by the deposition of thick laminated microbialites indicative of mesotrophic conditions. The Morelos Carbonate platform with oligotrophic to mesotrophic conditions was persistent throughout the entire OAE2 in Central Mexico despite

  18. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on North-Central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansford, R.R.; Ben-David, S.

    1996-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation's nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote U.S. industrial competitiveness by working with U.S. companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos has provided technical assistance to over 70 small New Mexico businesses enabling economic development activities in the region and state

  19. Fine and coarse particulate matter chemical characterization in a heavily industrialized city in central Mexico during Winter 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Hugo; Martínez-Villa, Gerardo; Sosa, Gustavo; González-Avalos, Eugenio; Reyes, Elizabeth; García, José

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the first reported study on fine particulate matter (PM) chemical composition at Salamanca, a highly industrialized urban area of Central Mexico. Samples were collected at six sites within the urban area during February and March 2003. Several trace elements, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and six ions were analyzed to characterize aerosols. Average concentrations of PM with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM10) and fine PM with aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) ranged from 32.2 to 76.6 [g m(-3) and 11.1 to 23.7 microg m(-3), respectively. OC (34%), SO4= (25.1%), EC (12.9%), and geological material (12.5%) were the major components of PM2.5. For PM10 geological material (57.9%), OC (17.3%), and SO4= (9.7%) were the major components. Coarse fraction (PM,, -PM2.5), geological material (81.7%), and OC (8.6%) were the dominant species, which amounted to 90.4%. Correlation analysis showed that sulfate in PM2.5 was present as ammonium sulfate. Sulfate showed a significant spatial variation with higher concentrations to the north resulting from predominantly southwesterly winds above the surface layer and by major SO2 sources that include a power plant and refinery. At the urban site of Cruz Roja it was observed that PM2.5 mass concentrations were similar to the submicron fraction concentrations. Furthermore, the correlation between EC in PM2.5 and EC measured from an aethalometer was r(2) = 0.710. Temporal variations of SO2 and nitrogen oxide were observed during a day when the maximum concentration of PM2.5 was measured, which was associated with emissions from the nearby refinery and power plant. From cascade impactor measurements, the three measured modes of airborne particles corresponded with diameters of 0.32, 1.8, and 5.6 microm.

  20. Estimation of sediment residence times in subtropical highland catchments of central Mexico combining river gauging and fallout radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Duvert, Clément; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Esteves, Michel; Bonté, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Subtropical regions of the world are affected by intense soil erosion associated with deforestation, overgrazing and cropping intensification. This land degradation leads to important on-site (e.g. decrease in soil fertility) and off-site impacts (e.g. reservoir sedimentation, water pollution). This study determined the mean sediment residence times in soils and rivers of three catchments (3 - 12 km²) with contrasted land uses (i.e. cropland, forests, rangelands, extended gully networks) located in highlands of the transvolcanic belt of central Mexico. Calculations were based on rainfall and river gauging as well as on fallout radionuclide measurements (Be-7, Cs-137, Pb-210). Atmospheric deposition of Be-7 and Pb-210 was estimated based on the analysis of rainfall precipitated samples. Rainfall samples were collected all throughout the rainy season in order to take account of the temporal variations of the radionuclide fluxes. Furthermore, sampling of suspended sediment was conducted at the outlet of each catchment during most of the storms that occurred throughout the 2009 rainy season. Be-7, Cs-137 and Pb-210 concentrations of this sediment were determined by gamma-spectrometry. A two-box balance model was then used to estimate the sediment residence time and the inventory of radionuclides in the three selected catchments. This model subdivided each catchment into two boxes: (i) a "soil-box" characterised by low transport velocities and hence long radionuclide residence times and (ii) a "river-box" covering the river surface and its surroundings characterised by quicker exchanges and shorter radionuclide residence times. Input and output fluxes of sediment and radionuclides were taken into account in each box. Radioactive decay during the residence time of sediment was also considered. The mean residence time of sediment in soils ranged between 13,300 - 28,500 years. In contrast, sediment residence time in rivers was much shorter, fluctuating between 28 and 393

  1. Comments on cladocerans of crater lakes of the Nevado de Toluca Volcano (Central Mexico), with the description of a new species, Alona manueli sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinev, Artem Y; Zawisza, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Cladoceran communities of two lakes of Nevado de Toluca Volcano, Central Mexico, were studied. A new species of Aloninae, Alona manueli sp. nov., is described. It was previously confused with Palearctic Alona intermedia Sars, 1862, but clearly differs from it in the morphology of postabdomen, head shield and head pores, and thoracic limbs. Position of Alona manueli sp. nov. within the genus is unclear, it did not belong to any species-group within Alona s. lato. Other species recorded in the studied lakes are Alona ossiani Sinev, 1998, Alonella pulchella Herrick, 1884, Chydorus belonging to sphaericus-group, Eurycercus longirostris Hann, 1982 and Pleuroxus cf. denticulatus Birge, 1879.

  2. Tillandsia usneoides L, a biomonitor in the determination of Ce, La and Sm by neutron activation analysis in an industrial corridor in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac-Olivé, K; Solís, C; Martínez-Carrillo, M A; Andrade, E; López, C; Longoria, L C; Lucho-Constantino, C A; Beltrán-Hernández, R I

    2012-04-01

    The atmosphere of the Tula Industrial Corridor in Central Mexico is contaminated due to several industries including oil refining while station monitoring in this area are limited. Lanthanides are considered fingerprint of oil refinery activities, and La, Ce and Sm have been previously detected in this area using filters. The suitability of T. usneoides as a biomonitor assessing the La, Ce and Sm concentrations in Particulate Matter is evaluated by NAA. Results of both biomonitor and filters are highly correlated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of central nervous system tumors at the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Pérez, L; Jiménez-Marcial, M E; Martínez-Martínez, J E

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of different Central Nervous System Tumors (CNST) diagnosed at the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery) from Mexico City over a 10-year period (1990 to 1999) by means of a hospital survey. This institute is a reference hospital that provides medical attention to a very high number of adult neurological patients every year (approximately 6,000 new patients per year besides emergency cases). From a total number of 2,041 CNST cases, we found that the most frequent tumors were those affecting the neuroepithelial tissue (32.8 %), followed by tumors of the anterior pituitary gland (26.2 %) and tumors of the meninges and similar tissues (24.1 %). In both, male and female patients the higher frequency of CNST was found in patients whose age ranged from 25 to 44 years, and CNST were slightly more frequent in women than in men. Most of the CNST patients lived in the southern districts of Mexico City, it could be because of the great number of people living in the southern districts of the city, or perhaps due to the presence of certain yet unidentified environmental carcinogenic substance in this area. Since CNST are among the more frequent malignant neoplasms, it is necessary to improve the registration system to include frequency, prevalence, incidence and mortality of these diseases in Mexico, in order to plan health policies like in developed countries.

  4. La verdad servida en la mesa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Rincón Oñate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucho se habla sobre la verdad, la justicia, la reparación y la no repetición como imperativos progresivos que rigen las conversaciones en el actual proceso de paz colombiano, que tiene como lugar protagónico la mesa de negociación que se está llevando a cabo en la Habana, alrededor de la cual confluyen el Gobierno Colombiano y el grupo insurgente FARC-EP. Esta dinámica de la palabra en constante tensión sugiere una necesaria reflexión sobre la verdad de quien negocia y, particularmente, sobre el futuro excombatiente y su apuesta subjetiva, un lugar que llama a la pregunta por un lazo social que evidencia y contrapone al amo, al esclavo y al subversivo, este último, sinónimo de la búsqueda de la libertad, la igualdad y la fraternidad, tres imperativos revolucionarios que han guiado los movimientos emancipatorios.

  5. Structural Vulnerability Among Migrating Women and Children Fleeing Central America and Mexico: The Public Health Impact of “Humanitarian Parole”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Elizabeth Salerno; Valdez, Luis A.; Sabo, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Since October 2013, US Customs and Border Patrol has apprehended 15,979 families on the Southwest Border of the US. Daily, migrating women and children from Mexico and Central America that qualify for humanitarian parole are released from immigration detention to a humanitarian aid organization in Southern Arizona. After several days in detention facilities, these families arrive tired, hungry, dehydrated, and with minimal direction regarding their final destination, and adherence to the parameters of their parole. Project helping hands (PHHs) utilizes a network of volunteers to provide the women and children with food, water, clothing, hygiene products, hospitality, and legal orientation. The aim of this assessment was to document the experiences of families granted humanitarian parole through the lens of structural vulnerability. Here, we apply qualitative methods to elicit PHH lead volunteer perspectives regarding the migration experience of migrating families. Using inductive analysis, we found six major themes emerged from the qualitative data: reasons for leaving, experience on the journey, dehumanization in detention, family separation, vulnerability, and resiliency. These findings elucidate the different physical and psychological distresses that migrating families from Mexico and Central America experience before, during and after their arrival at the US–Mexico border. We posit that these distresses are a result of, or exacerbated by, structural vulnerability. Structural vulnerability has life-long health implications for a sub-population of young mothers and their children. The number of migrating families who have experienced traumatic events before and during their migration experience continues to expand and thus warrants consideration of mental health surveillance and intervention efforts for these families. More public health research is needed to better understand and combat the health challenges of this growing population. PMID:26157791

  6. Live birth rates after MESA or TESE in men with obstructive azoospermia: is there a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wely, Madelon; Barbey, Natalie; Meissner, Andreas; Repping, Sjoerd; Silber, Sherman J.

    2015-01-01

    How do live birth rates compare after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) for men with obstructive azoospermia when using sperm derived from testicular sperm extraction (TESE) versus microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration (MESA)? Our study suggests that proximal epididymal sperm (from MESA)

  7. Potential postwildfire debris-flow hazards—A prewildfire evaluation for the Jemez Mountains, north-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Anne C.; Haas, Jessica R.

    2016-08-11

    and Rio Grande-Santa Fe watershed areas. No subbasins in this group have basin areas less than 1.0 km2. Many of these areas already had significant mass‑wasting episodes following the Las Conchas Fire in 2011. Other subbasins with integrated hazard index values in the top 2 percent are scattered throughout the Jemez River watershed area, including some subbasins in the interior of the Valles Caldera. Only a few subbasins in the top integrated hazard index group are in the Rio Chama watershed area.This prewildfire assessment approach is valuable to resource managers because the analysis of the debris-flow threat is made before a wildfire occurs, which facilitates prewildfire management, planning, and mitigation. In north‑central New Mexico, widespread watershed restoration efforts are being done to safeguard vital watersheds against the threat of catastrophic wildfire. This study was designed to help select ideal locations for the restoration efforts that could have the best return on investment.

  8. Completion Report for Well ER-12-4, Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain (includes Errata Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in May 2005, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit in the north-central portion of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located on Rainier/Aqueduct Mesa, northwest of Yucca Flat, within Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The well provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in U12t Tunnel, information on the pre-Tertiary rocks in the area, and depth to the regional water table.

  9. 76 FR 14040 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central and Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... sales are specifically covered by this Call: five in the Central GOM Planning Area and five in the... Statement (EIS) covering the same ten sales in the Central and Western GOM Planning Areas. For each of the... EIS (76 FR 376). The planning areas are the Western and Central GOM, as well as the area of the...

  10. Simbolismo ritual entre los aymaras : mesas y yatiris

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Juárez, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    Las ofrendas aymaras denominadas mesas se inscriben dentro de un amplio marco genérico en el cual la reciprocidad constituye una condición indispensable en el éxito del entramado social pertinente que se establece entre las personas y los seres tutelares del altiplano. Los seres tutelares apetecen las mesas como requisito previo a cualquier tipo de acuerdo o solicitud que se les plantee. Cada uno de los platos rituales presenta una serie de ingredientes específicos cuya articulación depende d...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of breast cancer control strategies in Central America: the cases of Costa Rica and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niëns, Laurens M; Zelle, Sten G; Gutiérrez-Delgado, Cristina; Rivera Peña, Gustavo; Hidalgo Balarezo, Blanca Rosa; Rodriguez Steller, Erick; Rutten, Frans F H

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the most cost-effective policy options to support and improve breast cancer control in Costa Rica and Mexico. Total costs and effects of breast cancer interventions were estimated using the health care perspective and WHO-CHOICE methodology. Effects were measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted. Costs were assessed in 2009 United States Dollars (US$). To the extent available, analyses were based on locally obtained data. In Costa Rica, the current strategy of treating breast cancer in stages I to IV at a 80% coverage level seems to be the most cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$4,739 per DALY averted. At a coverage level of 95%, biennial clinical breast examination (CBE) screening could improve Costa Rica's population health twofold, and can still be considered very cost-effective (ICER US$5,964/DALY). For Mexico, our results indicate that at 95% coverage a mass-media awareness raising program (MAR) could be the most cost-effective (ICER US$5,021/DALY). If more resources are available in Mexico, biennial mammography screening for women 50-70 yrs (ICER US$12,718/DALY), adding trastuzumab (ICER US$13,994/DALY) or screening women 40-70 yrs biennially plus trastuzumab (ICER US$17,115/DALY) are less cost-effective options. We recommend both Costa Rica and Mexico to engage in MAR, CBE or mammography screening programs, depending on their budget. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution however, as the evidence on the intervention effectiveness is uncertain. Also, these programs require several organizational, budgetary and human resources, and the accessibility of breast cancer diagnostic, referral, treatment and palliative care facilities should be improved simultaneously. A gradual implementation of early detection programs should give the respective Ministries of Health the time to negotiate the required budget, train the required human resources and understand possible

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Breast Cancer Control Strategies in Central America: The Cases of Costa Rica and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niëns, Laurens M.; Zelle, Sten G.; Gutiérrez-Delgado, Cristina; Rivera Peña, Gustavo; Hidalgo Balarezo, Blanca Rosa; Rodriguez Steller, Erick; Rutten, Frans F. H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the most cost-effective policy options to support and improve breast cancer control in Costa Rica and Mexico. Total costs and effects of breast cancer interventions were estimated using the health care perspective and WHO-CHOICE methodology. Effects were measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted. Costs were assessed in 2009 United States Dollars (US$). To the extent available, analyses were based on locally obtained data. In Costa Rica, the current strategy of treating breast cancer in stages I to IV at a 80% coverage level seems to be the most cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$4,739 per DALY averted. At a coverage level of 95%, biennial clinical breast examination (CBE) screening could improve Costa Rica's population health twofold, and can still be considered very cost-effective (ICER US$5,964/DALY). For Mexico, our results indicate that at 95% coverage a mass-media awareness raising program (MAR) could be the most cost-effective (ICER US$5,021/DALY). If more resources are available in Mexico, biennial mammography screening for women 50–70 yrs (ICER US$12,718/DALY), adding trastuzumab (ICER US$13,994/DALY) or screening women 40–70 yrs biennially plus trastuzumab (ICER US$17,115/DALY) are less cost-effective options. We recommend both Costa Rica and Mexico to engage in MAR, CBE or mammography screening programs, depending on their budget. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution however, as the evidence on the intervention effectiveness is uncertain. Also, these programs require several organizational, budgetary and human resources, and the accessibility of breast cancer diagnostic, referral, treatment and palliative care facilities should be improved simultaneously. A gradual implementation of early detection programs should give the respective Ministries of Health the time to negotiate the required budget, train the required human resources and understand possible

  13. Cost-effectiveness of breast cancer control strategies in Central America: the cases of Costa Rica and Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens M Niëns

    Full Text Available This paper reports the most cost-effective policy options to support and improve breast cancer control in Costa Rica and Mexico. Total costs and effects of breast cancer interventions were estimated using the health care perspective and WHO-CHOICE methodology. Effects were measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted. Costs were assessed in 2009 United States Dollars (US$. To the extent available, analyses were based on locally obtained data. In Costa Rica, the current strategy of treating breast cancer in stages I to IV at a 80% coverage level seems to be the most cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of US$4,739 per DALY averted. At a coverage level of 95%, biennial clinical breast examination (CBE screening could improve Costa Rica's population health twofold, and can still be considered very cost-effective (ICER US$5,964/DALY. For Mexico, our results indicate that at 95% coverage a mass-media awareness raising program (MAR could be the most cost-effective (ICER US$5,021/DALY. If more resources are available in Mexico, biennial mammography screening for women 50-70 yrs (ICER US$12,718/DALY, adding trastuzumab (ICER US$13,994/DALY or screening women 40-70 yrs biennially plus trastuzumab (ICER US$17,115/DALY are less cost-effective options. We recommend both Costa Rica and Mexico to engage in MAR, CBE or mammography screening programs, depending on their budget. The results of this study should be interpreted with caution however, as the evidence on the intervention effectiveness is uncertain. Also, these programs require several organizational, budgetary and human resources, and the accessibility of breast cancer diagnostic, referral, treatment and palliative care facilities should be improved simultaneously. A gradual implementation of early detection programs should give the respective Ministries of Health the time to negotiate the required budget, train the required human resources and understand

  14. High heterogeneity, mixed infections and new genotypes in human congenital toxoplasmosis cases in the mega-metropolis of Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Torres, Claudia Patricia; Valenzuela-Moreno, Luis Fernando; Luna-Pastén, Héctor; Figueroa-Damián, Ricardo; Gómez-Toscano, Valeria; Hernández-Delgado, Lorena; Escobedo-Torres, Mónica Patricia; Correa, Dolores

    2018-02-01

    Mexico presents high prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection, including the congenital form, but there are few data about the genetic diversity of the parasite, so we attempted parasite isolation and genotyping in nine mother/children pairs with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT), living in the Valley of Mexico, who were part of a 30 cases cohort that started 12 years ago. They were recruited through research projects which included pre- and postnatal screening of congenital infections or directly CT, and cases referred to INP for management because they had clinical abnormalities. Genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP of SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico markers, followed by sequencing. Sixty seven percent of samples were typed for the SAG3 locus, 39% for Apico and 33% for BTUB, while Alt. SAG2, GRA6 and c29-2 types could be labelled in less cases. Type I alleles predominated, followed by II and III. We isolated the first strain obtained from humans in Mexico and found three genotypes not previously found in the world. The presence of ToxoDB#10 clonal type was documented in one pair, as well as mixed infections in five mothers. No relation of genotype or parasite load with clinical signs was found. In conclusion, we encountered great genetic diversity and mixed T. gondii infections among mother/children pairs with congenital toxoplasmosis in the mega-metropolis of the Valley of Mexico. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence, concordance and determinants of human papillomavirus infection among heterosexual partners in a rural region in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parada Rocio

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although human papillomavirus (HPV infection in heterosexual couples has been sparsely studied, it is relevant to understand disease burden and transmission mechanisms. The present study determined the prevalence and concordance of type-specific HPV infection as well as the determinants of infection in heterosexual couples in a rural area of Mexico. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 504 clinically healthy heterosexual couples from four municipalities in the State of Mexico, Mexico. HPV testing was performed using biotinylated L1 consensus primers and reverse line blot in cervical samples from women and in genital samples from men. Thirty-seven HPV types were detected, including high-risk oncogenic types and low-risk types. Multivariate logistic regression models were utilized to evaluate factors associated with HPV. Results The prevalence of HPV infection was 20.5% in external male genitals and 13.7% in cervical samples. In 504 sexual couples participating in the study, concordance of HPV status was 79%; 34 partners (6.7% were concurrently infected, and 21 out of 34 partners where both were HPV positive (61.8% showed concordance for one or more HPV types. The principal risk factor associated with HPV DNA detection in men as well as women was the presence of HPV DNA in the respective regular sexual partner (OR = 5.15, 95%CI 3.01-8.82. In men, having a history of 10 or more sexual partners over their lifetime (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.3 - 4.8 and having had sexual relations with prostitutes (OR 1.7, 95%CI 1.01 - 2.8 increased the likelihood of detecting HPV DNA. Conclusions In heterosexual couples in rural regions in Mexico, the prevalence of HPV infection and type-specific concordance is high. High-risk sexual behaviors are strong determinants of HPV infection in men.

  16. Accumulation, mobility and plant availability of heavy metals in soils irrigated with untreated sewage effluent in Central Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebe-Grabach, C.

    1994-01-01

    In Irrigation District 03, Tula, Mexico, wastewater from Mexico City has been used for irrigating agricultural land since the beginning of this century. Today, approximately 85 000 ha are irrigated, alfalfa and maize being the main crops. The sewage effluent does not receive any treatment previous to its evacuation to this irrigation district, and only a part of the water is stored in the Endho Dam before being used, receiving in this way a kind or primary treatment through the sedimentation processes taking place. The reuse of wastewater for agricultural purposes represents an economic source of water and nutrients and has become an important disposal alternative for Mexico City. Nevertheless the contaminants and pathogens contained in the water represent a potential public health hazard and the production capacity of the soils. The aim of the present investigation is to determine the actual contamination levels of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn) in soils, analysing the accumulation tendencies in time and space, and also to characterize their mobility and plant availability and thus their ecotoxicity. (orig.) [de

  17. Curecanti-Blue Mesa-Salida 115-kV transmission lines access roads rehabilitation, maintenance, and construction project. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is a power marketing agency of the US Department of Energy, with jurisdiction in 15 western states. The Salt Lake City Area (SLCA) of Western performs the agency`s mission in parts of Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, Arizona, Wyoming, and Nevada. As part of its mission, Western owns, operates, and maintains a system of transmission lines for transmitting bulk electrical energy from points of generation to and between delivery points. Part of that system in southwestern Colorado includes the Blue Mesa-Curecanti and Blue Mesa-Salida 115-kV transmission lines. Western proposes to conduct maintenance and improve its access roads for these two transmission lines. This paper discusses the impacts to the existing environment as well as the environmental consequences resulting from the maintenance and construction that is proposed.

  18. Children’s Migration to the United States from Mexico and Central America: Evidence from the Mexican and Latin American Migration Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine M. Donato

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of rising numbers of unaccompanied minors at the Mexico-US border in 2014, this article examines child migration from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. Using data from the Mexican and Latin American Migration Projects that permit us to go beyond simple descriptive analysis about children apprehended at the border, we investigate the extent to which children from these countries: (1 enter without legal authorization to do so; (2 are more likely to cross the border now than in the past; and (3 are tied to their parents’ migration. In theory, if immigration and refugee protections worked well for children and offered them legal pathways to reunify with their families, then we would expect low levels of unauthorized entry and no dramatic shifts over time. However, our examination of child migration shows that it is strongly linked to unauthorized entry, period of entry, and parents’ US experience.The findings show that the migration of children is closely linked to their parents’ migration history. Although the overall likelihood of a Mexican child making a first US trip is quite low, it is practically non-existent for children whose parents have no US experience. Thus, the increase in child migration from Central America, and the continued high levels of child migration from Mexico result from widespread migration networks and the United States’ long-standing reliance on the children’s parents as immigrant workers. The findings suggest that these children need protection in the form of family reunification and permanent legal status.

  19. Morphological, morphometrical and molecular (CO1 and ITS) analysis of the rotifer Asplanchna brightwellii from selected freshwater bodies in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Contreras, Jorge; Sarma, S S S; Calderón-Torres, Marissa; Nandini, S

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated different strains of the rotifer Asplanchna brightwellii collected from central Mexico using morphology, morphometry and molecular tools (CO1 and ITS). Three distinct clonal populations from each of the 3 regions (Mexico City, State of Mexico and State of Guerrero) were established under laboratory conditions. For a given waterbody, morphometric comparisons within the populations of A. brightwellii showed almost stable measurements of trophi and with no statistically significant differences among them (p > 0.05). However, asplanchnid body length and width as well as the cyst diameter varied significantly depending on the waterbody from which A. brightwellii was collected. The smallest adults (about 700 microm) were from Valerio Trujano lake (Guerrero State) samples while the largest were from Xochimilco lake. Similar tendencies were reflected in the diameter of resting eggs. In addition, morphologically the cysts of A. brightwellii from the three waterbodies showed slightly different pattern. The number of globular structures on the surface of cysts was smaller for Valerio Trujano strain, while these were larger and less numerous for both Xochimilco and Zumpango strains. The ITS region tree displayed two groups Xochimilco and Valerio Trujano -Zumpango, this analysis did not reflect the morphological grouping; on the contrary the CO1 gene tree separated the populations according to morphological clusters and location (Xochimilco, Valerio Trujano and Zumpango lakes). When the tree was built using the combination of both ITS and CO1 sequences, the phylogenetic relationships observed on CO1 gene were consistent; but showed differences with the relationships observed on ITS region tree (only two groups).

  20. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Convective Boundaries, Element Diffusion, and Massive Star Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Blinnikov, Sergei; Duffell, Paul; Farmer, R.; Goldberg, Jared A.; Marchant, Pablo; Sorokina, Elena; Thoul, Anne; Townsend, Richard H. D.; Timmes, F. X.

    2018-02-01

    We update the capabilities of the software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and enhance its ease of use and availability. Our new approach to locating convective boundaries is consistent with the physics of convection, and yields reliable values of the convective-core mass during both hydrogen- and helium-burning phases. Stars with Msoftware modules for handling floating point exceptions and stellar model optimization, as well as four new software tools - MESA-Web, MESA-Docker, pyMESA, and mesastar.org - to enhance MESA's education and research impact.

  1. Subsoil TPH and other petroleum fractions-contamination levels in an oil storage and distribution station in north-central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturbe, Rosario; Flores, Carlos; Flores, Rosa Ma; Torres, Luis G

    2005-12-01

    Many oil industry related sites have become contaminated due to the activities characteristic of this industry, such as oil exploration and production, refining, and petro-chemistry. In Mexico, reported hydrocarbon spills for the year 2000 amounted to 185203, equivalent to 6252 tons (PEMEX, 2000). The first step for the remediation of these polluted sites is to assess the size and intensity of the oil contamination affecting the subsoil and groundwater, followed by a health risk assessment to establish clean up levels. The aim of this work was to characterize the soil and water in a north-central Mexico Oil Storage and Distribution Station (ODSS), in terms of TPHs, gasoline and diesel fractions, BTEX, PAHs, MTBE, and some metals. Besides, measurements of the explosivity index along the ODSS were made and we describe and discuss the risk health assessment analysis performed at the ODSS, as well as the recommendations arising from it. Considering soils with TPH concentrations higher than 2000 mg kg(-1), the contaminated areas corresponding to the railway zone is about 12776.5 m2, to the south of the storage tanks is about 6558 m2, and to the south of the filling tanks is about 783 m2. Total area to be treated is about 20107 m2 (volume of 20107 m3), considering 1m depth.

  2. Latest Paleozoic early Mesozoic structures in the central Oaxaca Terrane of southern Mexico: deformation near a triple junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno-Garcia, E.; Keppie, J. Duncan

    1999-01-01

    Paleozoic rocks in the Oaxaca Terrane of southern Mexico occur as two outliers (Rio Salinas and Santiago Ixtaltepec) unconformably overlying the 1-Ga Oaxaca Complex. They consist of the Upper Cambrian-Lower Ordovician Tiñu Formation, Mississippian Santiago Formation, lower-middle Pennsylvanian Ixtaltepec Formation and the unfossiliferous Yododeñe Formation of presumed Permian or younger age. These Paleozoic rocks have been deformed by several sets of structures. Three moderately westerly-dipping, bedding-parallel shear zones displaying dextral kinematic indicators (C-S fabrics, curvilinear isoclinal folds, en-echelon boudinage, en-echelon veins, and strained amygdales) occur along the boundaries between the Tiñu and Santiago formations, between the Santiago and Ixtaltepec formations, and within the Ixtaltepec Formation in the Santiago Ixtaltepec outlier. The bedding and these bedding-parallel shear zones are deformed by N-S, upright-asymmetric, subhorizontal folds accompanied by a slaty or spaced cleavage, that are in turn deformed by several sets of kink bands: subhorizontal and steeply dipping E-W, NW-SE and NE-SW. In the northern part of the Santiago Ixtaltepec outlier, the stratigraphy, bedding-parallel shear zones and slaty cleavage are displaced by NW-SE normal faults, all of which are truncated by the angular unconformity at the base of the Cretaceous, which brackets their age as post-Early Permian and pre-Cretaceous. Geometric correlation of the major N-S folds with E-vergent thrusting of the Oaxacan Complex over the Juarez Terrane suggests that they are older than Middle Jurassic. No age constraints are available for the kink and chevron folds; however, most may be related to Laramide structures in the overlying Cretaceous rocks. Unfolding the major structures in the Paleozoic rocks reorients the bedding-parallel shear zones to subhorizontal detachment shear zones or faults with a top-to-the-north sense of displacement. They may be related to either

  3. A regression model for the temporal development of soil pipes and associated gullies in the alluvial-fill valley of the Rio Puerco, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, C. D.; Elston, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    On Mars, the association of gullied escarpments and chaotic terrain is evidence for failure and scarp retreat of poorly consolidated materials. Some martian gullies have no surface outlets and may have drained through subterranean channels. Similar features, though on a much smaller scale, can be seen in alluvium along terrestrial river banks in semiarid regions, such as the Rio Puerco Valley of central New Mexico. Many of the escarpments along the Rio Puerco are developing through formation of collapse gullies, which drain through soil pipes. Gully development can be monitored on aerial photographs taken in 1935, 1962, and 1980. A regression model was developed to quantify gully evolution over a known time span. Soil pipes and their associated collapse gullies make recognizable signatures on the air photos. The areal extent of this signature can be normalized to the scarp length of each pipe-gully system, which makes comparisons between systems possible.

  4. Geochemistry of soils along a transect from Central Mexico to the Pacific Coast: a pilot study for continental-scale geochemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiprés, J.A.; de la Calleja,; Tellez, J.I.; Jiménez, F.; Cruz, Carlos; Guerrero, E.G.; Castro, J.; Monroy, M.G.; Salinas, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mexican Geological Survey (SGM), the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Informatics (INEGI) and the Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi (UASLP) have established a multidisciplinary team with the objective of creating a national program of geochemical mapping of soils in Mexico. This is being done as part of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project in partnership with the US Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada. As the first step, a pilot study was conducted over a transect that extends from the Mexico–US border near Ciudad Juarez in the north to the Pacific Ocean in the south. This pilot transect was conducted in two phases, and this paper presents results from the first phase, which sampled soils at about a 40-km spacing along a 730-km transect beginning in Central Mexico and ending at the Pacific Coast. Samples were collected from the A and C horizons at each site and 60 elements were analyzed. This pilot study demonstrates that geochemical mapping based on a 40-km spacing is adequate to identify broad-scale geochemical patterns. Geologic influence (i.e., soil parent material) was the most important factor influencing the distribution of elements along the transect, followed by the influence of regional mineralization. The study also showed that influence by human activities over the transect is minimal except possibly in large mining districts. A comparison of element abundance in the A horizon with the environmental soil guidelines in Mexico showed that the natural concentrations of the studied soils were lower than the established threshold for soil restoration with the exception of V and As. The former had a median value (75 mg/kg) approximately equal to the value established in Mexico for soil restoration in agricultural and residential lands (78 mg/kg), and the latter had three values higher than the 22 mg/kg threshold for soil restoration in agricultural and residential lands. These cases demonstrate

  5. Landscape evolution of the graben of Puerto Vallarta (west-central Mexico) using the analysis of landforms and stream long profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of landforms and stream long profiles are useful tools that can provide information about the tectonic activity in the landscape. The west-central portion of Mexico is a region that is mostly dominated by an extensional tectonics initiated in the Miocene and continuing in the Quaternary, where there has also been a vast emission of volcanic products. Of particular importance is the graben of Puerto Vallarta which was formed during the extensional activity that opened the Gulf of California in the Miocene. Nevertheless, the geomorphology and landscape evolution of this structure has not been studied in detail. Here I present a study of the rivers, landforms and topography of Puerto Vallarta graben in order to assess its evolution, focusing on the evidences of its initial phase of formation. The geomorphological map elaborated in this study reveals the presence of lava flows and volcanic structures in the eastern sector of the graben. Here it is proposed that this volcanism occurred during the formation of the graben in the Miocene, nevertheless, radiometric dating of lavas is still required to determine the precise timing of this event. Analysis of stream long profiles confirms that knickpoints are propagating in the fluvial network at a rate of ∼0.07 to ∼0.7 mm yr-1 and these were probably triggered by a drop in the base-level of rivers during the graben formation. The rates of knickpoint retreat in the graben of Puerto Vallarta are slightly lower than those observed in other recent (Quaternary) tectonic areas, however, the migration rates of the graben of Puerto Vallarta were probably higher at the onset of the faulting. Here the analysis of landforms and stream long profiles were useful to elucidate one part of the evolution of the graben of Puerto Vallarta. This study emphasizes the importance of incorporating the tectonic geomorphology in future studies of the extensional zones of west-central Mexico.

  6. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Bloodstream Infections in Patients With Solid Tumors in a Central American Population at Mexico Hospital, San Jose, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Calvo-Lon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Bloodstream infections (BSIs are an important cause of mortality in patients with solid tumors. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the epidemiologic profile and mortality of patients with solid tumors who have BSIs and were admitted to Mexico Hospital. This is the first study in Costa Rica and Central America describing the current epidemiologic situation. Methods: We analyzed the infectious disease database for BSIs in patients with solid tumors admitted to Mexico Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014. Epidemiology and mortality were obtained according to microorganism, antibiotic sensitivity, tumor type, and presence of central venous catheter (CVC. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: A total of 164 BSIs were recorded, the median age was 58 years, 103 patients (63% were males, and 128 cases of infection (78% were the result of gram-negative bacilli (GNB. Klebsiella pneumoniae (21%, Escherichia coli (21%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15% were the most common microorganisms isolated. Gram-positive cocci (GPC were found in 36 patients, with the most frequent microorganisms being Staphylococcus aureus (10% and Staphyloccocus epidermidis (6%. With respect to tumor type, BSIs were more frequent in the GI tract (57% followed by head and neck (9% and genitourinary tract (8%. Regarding antibiotic susceptibility, only 17% (GNB expressed extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and 12% (GPC had methicillin resistance. Patients with CVCs (n = 59 were colonized mainly by GNB (78%. Overall the mortality rate at 30 days was about 30%. Conclusion: GNB are the most frequent cause of BSIs in solid tumors and in patients with CVCs. GI cancers had more BSIs than other sites. Mortality and antibiotic sensitivity remained stable and acceptable during this observational period in this Latin American population.

  7. Ten Years of Rainfall and Community-Based Streamflow Monitoring in the Tropical Montane Cloud Forest Region of Central Veracruz, Mexico: What Do These Data Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, F.; Aranda-Delgado, E.; Castilleja-Delgado, E.; Munoz-Villers, L.

    2016-12-01

    Montane ecosystems and the water resources provided by them play a crucial role in the development and growth of cities and the productive sector in Mexico. For the planning and sustainable management of these resources, it is necessary to quantify the key hydrological components and have (at least some) basic understanding of the water cycle at the operational watershed-scale. However, the difficulty of implementing and maintaining rainfall-discharge observation networks due to the lack of financial resources and well-trained personnel, coupled with poor accessibility and safety, as well as the complexity of the biophysical and climatic conditions in montane regions have hampered progress in hydrological research and the generation of basic knowledge for the benefit of society. In 2005, research-motivated measurements of rainfall (P) and community-based observations of streamflow (Q) were initiated independently in the tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) region of central Veracruz, Mexico. In this presentation, we will explore these data to study the seasonal and annual P inputs and Q outputs of the ca. 11,000 ha Pixquiac river watershed as observed during the past ten years (2005-2015). The P data used in this analysis include continuous measurements from the major recharge zone within the study area (2000-2300 m asl), supplemented with observations from lower and higher altitudes to determine the P-elevation relationship. The Q data of the Pixquiac river consist of monthly measurements made near the outlet of the watershed (1300-1400 m asl) by citizen volunteers using the Global Water Watch methodology. We expect that these observations will contribute to an improved understanding of the hydrometeorology of mesoscale TMCF watersheds in central Veracruz, which is a prerequisite for sustainable planning and management of the water resources in this region.

  8. Cut and carry vs. grazing of cultivated pastures in small-scale dairy systems in the central highlands of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Estefania Pincay-Figueroa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale dairy systems are an option to alleviate poverty and contribute up to 37% of milk production in Mexico; however high costs affect their economic sustainability. Since grazing may reduce feeding costs, a participatory on farm experiment was undertaken to compare animal performance and feeding costs of the traditional cut-and-carry strategy or grazing cultivated pastures, during the dry season in the highlands of Mexico. Pastures of perennial and annual ryegrasses with white clover were utilised, complemented with maize silage and commercial concentrate. Five dairy cows were assigned to each strategy. The experiment ran for 12 weeks, recording weekly milk yields and fat and milk protein content; live-weight and body condition score every 14 days. Analysis was as a split-plot design. The adjusted (covariance mean milk yield was 18.78 kg/cow/day with no significant differences (P>0.05 between treatments, and no significant differences for live-weight or body condition score. There were no significant differences for milk fat (P>0.05, but there were for protein in milk (P

  9. Paleoecological studies at Lake Patzcuaro on the west-central Mexican Plateau and at Chalco in the basin of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, W.A.; Bradbury, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    A 1520-cm sediment core from Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacan, Mexico, is 44,000 yr old at the base. All parts of the core have abundant pollen of Pinus (pine), Alnus (alder), and Quercus (oak) with frequent Abies (fir). The interval dated from 44,000 to 11,000 yr ago has a homogeneous flora characterized by abundant Juniperus (juniper) pollen and frequent Artemisia (sagebrush). It is believed to represent an appreciably drier and colder climate than at present. The Holocene at Lake Patzcuaro is characterized by a moderate increase in Pinus pollen and the loss of Juniperus pollen, as the modern type of climate succeeded. Alnus was abundant until about 5000 yr ago; its abrupt decrease with the first appearance of herbaceous weed pollen may reflect the cutting of lake-shore and stream-course alder communities for agricultural purposes, or it may simply reflect a drying tendency in the climate. Pollen of Zea (corn) appears at Lake Patzcuaro along with low peaks of chenopod and grass pollen at 3500 yr B.P. apparently recording a human population large enough to modify the natural environment, as well as the beginning of agriculture. A rich aquatic flora in this phase suggests eutrophication of the lake by slope erosion. In the most recent period corn is absent from the sediments, perhaps reflecting a change in agricultural practices. The environment changes at Lake Patzcuaro are similar to and correlate with those in the Cuenca de Mexico, where diatom stratigraphy from the Chalco basin indicates fluctuations in lake levels and lake chemistry in response to variations in available moisture. Before 10,000 yr ago climates there were cool and dry, and the Chalco basin was occupied by a shallow freshwater marsh that drained north to Lake Texcoco, where saline water accumulated by evaporation. Increases in effective moisture and possible melting of glaciers during the Holocene caused lake levels to rise throughout the Cuenca de Mexico, and Lake Texcoco flooded the Chalco basin with

  10. Household risk factors associated to infestation of Triatoma dimidiata, the Chagas disease vector in Central Region of Veracruz, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    César A Sandoval-Ruiz; Roger Guevara; Sergio Ibáñez-Bernal

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate risk factors facilitating the colonization of dwellings by Triatoma dimidiata in the central region of the state of Veracruz. Materials and methods. We applied socioeconomic questionnaires and entomologic surveys in three localities (Chavarrillo, Soyacuautla and Arroyo Agrio) in central Veracruz involving 115 households. Results. We found that the main risk factors were the predominance of unplastered walls and particularly those made of light weight aggregate concrete ...

  11. No Evidence of Dengue Virus Infections in Several Species of Bats Captured in Central and Southern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Romo, S; Max Ramirez, C; Recio-Tótoro, B; Tolentino-Chi, J; Lanz, H; Del Ángel, R M; Sánchez-Cordero, V; Rodríguez-Moreno, Á; Ludert, J E

    2016-12-01

    Bats are reservoirs for viruses with zoonotic potential in the Americas, and scattered evidence exists suggesting that bats may act as reservoirs for dengue virus (DENV). To explore further the role of bats as part of DENV sylvatic cycles, 240 bats of 18 species were captured in 2 states of Mexico with contrasting ecological characteristics but concurrent DENV activity in humans. RT-PCR analysis of RNA extracted from liver or spleen tissue from de bats failed to show evidence for the presence of DENV nucleic acids in these organs. In addition, plasma assayed by plaque reduction neutralization test showed no evidence of neutralizing anti-DENV antibodies. These results suggest that American bats may not be reservoirs or amplification host for DENV infection. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Out of operation in simultaneous way of the two reactors of nucleoelectric central of Laguna Verde(Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar, Bernardo Salas

    2013-01-01

    The two nuclear reactors that Mexico has in the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant, were out of operation simultaneously in September 2012. First it was reported that one of the reactors had problems with the diesel generator, while the other had problems with the nuclear fuel reloading. The day after it was reported a problem related to sediment in the Obra de Toma, place the plant feeds seawater to cool the condenser the depth to which it must operate is 6 meters, with the current level of 1.5 meters, causing a lack of cooling water. Finally it was reported the cause of the suspension of operations, the cracks in jet pumps in both reactors. It is described a brief analysis of these opinions. The reactors are of cooling water of General Electric (BWR-5) and generate 1640 MWe each one

  13. Seasonal Changes in a Maize-Based Polyculture of Central Mexico Reshape the Co-occurrence Networks of Soil Bacterial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Eria A; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson; Roessler, Kyria; Gaut, Brandon S; Alcaraz, Luis D; Benítez, Mariana; Escalante, Ana E

    2017-01-01

    The milpa is a traditional maize-based polyculture in Mexico that is typically practiced as rainfed agriculture. Because milpa cultivation has been practiced over a vast range of environmental and cultural conditions, this agroecosystem is recognized as an important repository of biological and cultural diversity. As for any agroecosystem, the relationship between plant development and the biogeochemical processes of the soil is critical. Although the milpa has been studied from different perspectives, the diversity and structure of microbial communities within milpa soils remain largely unexplored. In this study, we surveyed a milpa system in Central Mexico across cropping season: before planting (dry season; t1 ), during the early growth of plants (onset of the rainy season; t2 ), and before harvest (end of the rainy season; t3 ). In order to examine changes in community structure through time, we characterized bacterial diversity through high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and recorded the nutrient status of multiple (5-10) soil samples from our milpa plots. We estimated microbial diversity from a total of 90 samples and constructed co-occurrence networks. Although we did not find significant changes in diversity or composition of bacterial communities across time, we identified significant rearrangements in their co-occurrence network structure. We found particularly drastic changes between the first and second time points. Co-occurrence analyses showed that the bacterial community changed from a less structured network at ( t1 ) into modules with a non-random composition of taxonomic groups at ( t2 ). We conclude that changes in bacterial communities undetected by standard diversity analyses can become evident when performing co-occurrence network analyses. We also postulate possible functional associations among keystone groups suggested by biogeochemical processes. This study represents the first contribution on soil microbial diversity of

  14. Shallow velocity structure above the Socorro Magma Body from ambient noise tomography using the large-N Sevilleta array, central Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, L. L.; Ranasinghe, N. R.; Schmandt, B.; Jiang, C.; Finlay, T. S.; Bilek, S. L.; Aster, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest recognized active mid-crustal magma intrusions globally. Inflation of the SMB drives sporadically seismogenic uplift at rates of up to of few millimeters per year. We examine the upper crustal structure of the northern section of the SMB region using ambient noise seismic data collected from the Sevilleta Array and New Mexico Tech (NMT) seismic network to constrain basin structure and identify possible upper crustal heterogeneities caused by heat flow and/or fluid or magma migration to shallower depths. The Sevilleta Array comprised 801 vertical-component Nodal seismic stations with 10-Hz seismometers deployed within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in the central Rio Grande rift north of Socorro, New Mexico, for a period of 12 days during February 2015. Five short period seismic stations from the NMT network located south of the Sevilleta array are also used to improve the raypath coverage outside the Sevilleta array. Inter-station ambient noise cross-correlations were computed from all available 20-minute time windows and stacked to obtain estimates of the vertical component Green's function. Clear fundamental mode Rayleigh wave energy is observed from 3 to 6 s period. Beamforming indicates prominent noise sources from the southwest, near Baja California, and the southeast, in the Gulf of Mexico. The frequency-time analysis method was implemented to measure fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities and the resulting inter-station travel times were inverted to obtain 2-D phase velocity maps. One-dimensional sensitivity kernels indicate that the Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to a depth interval of 1 to 8 km, depending on wave period. The maps show (up to 40%) variations in phase velocity within the Sevilleta Array, with the largest variations found for periods of 5-6 seconds. Holocene to upper Pleistocene, alluvial sediments found in the Socorro Basin consistently show lower phase

  15. 77 FR 40081 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas Lease Sales for... environmental impacts resulting from the Deepwater Horizon event, BOEM conducted an extensive search for... events, including a low- probability catastrophic event associated with a proposed lease sale and a...

  16. Occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi and parasitic nematodes on Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae collected in Central Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm larvae (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) were collected from whorl-stage cornfields, between the V2 and V4 stages, in 22 localities of Central, Chiapas, México, called "La Frailesca" during late June 2009 to determine the occurrence of native entomopathogens and parasitic nema...

  17. Microvasculature and incident atrioventricular conduction abnormalities in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Billy G; Edwards, Matthew S; Sharrett, A Richey; Qureshi, Waqas T; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Herrington, David M; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2015-10-01

    Abnormalities of the microvasculature are linked to major cardiac events, but their role in the development of atrioventricular conduction abnormalities (AVCA) is unknown. We examined the association between central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE), a measure of the microvasculature, and incident AVCA. This analysis included 3975 participants free of AVCA at baseline from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Incident AVCA was defined as a composite of new heart rate-adjusted PR interval ⩾ 200 ms (first-degree AV block) and advanced block (second-degree or complete AV block) detected from the MESA exam 5 electrocardiogram (ECG). CRAE was measured from retinal photographs at exam 2. Both ECGs and retinal photographs were collected using standardized methods and read and graded at central core labs. Incident AVCA were present in 7.4% (n=290) of the participants, of which 94% were first-degree AV block. Incident AVCA were increasingly more common in participants with narrower CRAE (4.6% in Q4, 6.4% in Q3, 7.0% in Q2 and 10.8% in Q1, p-value for trend < 0.0001). The socio-demographic and cardiovascular disease risk-adjusted odds of incident AVCA in the Q1 group (the group with the narrowest retinal arteriolar diameter) was nearly twice the odds in the Q4 group (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.15-2.51). This association remained significant after adjustment for major ECG abnormalities and incident cardiovascular disease (Q1 vs Q4, OR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.01-2.71). In conclusion, narrower retinal arteriolar caliber is associated with development of new AV conduction abnormalities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Mesas de dinero: generalidades y experiencia en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Alvarez Jaramillo

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN   Las necesidades de financiamiento de corto plazo, ha determinado el aguzamiento  de la imaginación para garantizar los recursos. Generalmente, las prácticas financieras en Colombia se extienden sin ningún control institucional; hasta que desafortunadamente, las prácticas desleales  o fraudulentas, llevan al estado a intervenir y reglamentar. Las llamadas MESAS DE DINERO, se han generalizado en nuestro medio en la medida en que proveen recursos financieros de corto plazo, difíciles de conseguir por los canales tradicionales. Los recientes escándalos del sector bursátil y anteriormente, la crisis bancaria, desaceleraron el crecimiento del mercado financiero extrainstitucional, pero no lo han acabado  del todo.El presente artículo, pretende informar brevemente sobre las experiencias de las llamadas  MESAS DE DINERO, su práctica y desarrollo.

  19. The origin of groundwater arsenic and fluorine in a volcanic sedimentary basin in central Mexico: a hydrochemistry hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Arredondo, Iván; Rodríguez, Ramiro; Armienta, Maria Aurora; Villanueva-Estrada, Ruth Esther

    2016-06-01

    A groundwater sampling campaign was carried out in the summer of 2013 in a low-temperature geothermal system located in Juventino Rosas (JR) municipality, Guanajuato State, Mexico. This groundwater presents high concentrations of As and F- and high Rn counts, mainly in wells with relatively higher temperature. The chemistry of major elements was interpreted with different methods, like Piper and D'Amore diagrams. These diagrams allowed for classification of four groundwater types located in three hydrogeological environments. The aquifers are hosted mainly in alluvial-lacustrine sediments and volcanic rocks in interaction with fault and fracture systems. The subsidence, faults and fractures observed in the study area can act as preferential channels for recharge and also for the transport of deep fluids to the surface, especially in the basin plain. The formation of a piezometric dome and the observed hydrochemical behavior of groundwater suggest a possible origin of the As and F-. Geochemical processes occurring during water-rock interaction are related to high concentrations of As and F-. High temperatures and alteration processes (like rock weathering) induce dissolution of As and F--bearing minerals, increasing the content of these elements in groundwater.

  20. Repeated volcanic disasters in Prehispanic time at Popocatépetl, central Mexico: Past key to the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebe, Claus; Abrams, Michael; Macías, José Luis; Obenholzner, Johannes

    1996-05-01

    The Holocene eruptive history of Popocatépetl volcano is characterized by recurrent voluminous Plinian eruptions every 1000 to 3000 yr, the most recent of which destroyed human settlements. Major eruptions occurred between 3195 and 2830 B.C., 800 and 215 B.C., and A.D. 675 and 1095. The three eruptions followed a similar pattern and started with minor ash fall and ash flows. The eruptions reached their peak with a main Plinian pulse that produced deposition of a pumice fall, the emplacement of hot ash flows, and finally extensive mudflows. Each time the area of devastation had become repopulated, before being devastated once again. During the last eruption several settlements, including Cholula (a major urban center), were inundated by lahars. A scenario of the possible recurrence of an eruption of similar magnitude, which would have disastrous consequences for the now highly populated areas around Popocatépetl, should be considered seriously in any volcano emergency contingency plan. This is especially important because more than one million people are living within a radius of 35 km around the volcano (the outskirts of Mexico City are at a distance of 40 km), and Popocatépetl resumed emitting ash on December 21, 1994, after decades of dormancy.

  1. Alcohol and drug consumption, depressive features, and family violence as associated with complaints to the Prosecutor's Office in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermina Natera; García, Francisco Juárez; Icaza, María Elena Medina-Mora; Sainz, Marcela Tiburcio

    2007-01-01

    The article is aimed at reporting the characteristics of the population detected at State Prosecutors' Offices including the two such offices that existed in the city selected for the study, one located in a general hospital for the inspection of violence-related cases (n = 156); and the second in the facility where all detainees are taken when arrested (n = 129), and where victims can file a complaint (n = 186). A household survey undertaken among the population 18 to 65 years of age (n = 887) was used as a group of reference. Both studies were undertaken in Pachuca City, the capital of Hidalgo, located 100 km from Mexico City during the second half of 1996. Face-to-face questionnaires were used to obtain sociodemographic data, drug use and drinking patterns, depressive symptomatology, and family violence. Discriminant and logistic regression analysis were undertaken. The age group from 18 to 24 displayed the highest number of legal complaints and arrests (OR = 1.773). The likelihood for appearing at a State Prosecutor's Office was higher for those living in an atmosphere of threats and injuries within the family (OR = 19) and for those that reported alcohol consumption on the day of the event (OR = 14). Extremely high rates of family violence were obtained in this sample, increasing the likelihood of arriving at the Prosecutor's Office either because arrested or for being a victim. Results confirm the relationship between alcohol use, depression, and violence, reinforcing the need to prevent alcohol abuse, especially among youth.

  2. Congreso www.derechotics.com 2010 Ana Aba, Mesa 3

    OpenAIRE

    Cotino Hueso, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Garantías de la privacidad en las redes sociales, por Ana Aba Catoira, Profesora titular de Derecho constitucional, U. de A Coruña.Mesa 3: Privacidad y la propiedad intelectual frente a la libertad de expresión e información en la redCongreso www.derechotics.com Valencia, 14-15 octubre 2010 Libertades informativas en internet: ejercicio, amenazas y garantías, Lorenzo Cotino (org.)

  3. Mexico Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity anomaly grid for Mexico, North-Central America and the Western Caribbean Sea is NOT the input data set used in the development of the MEXICO97 model....

  4. Hydraulic Property and Soil Textural Classification Measurements for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Nimmo, John R.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents particle size analysis, field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and qualitative descriptions of surficial materials at selected locations at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Measurements and sample collection were conducted in the Rainier Mesa area, including unconsolidated sediments on top of the mesa, an ephemeral wash channel near the mesa edge, and dry U12n tunnel pond sediments below the mesa. Particle size analysis used a combination of sieving and optical diffraction techniques. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements employed a single-ring infiltrometer with analytical formulas that correct for falling head and spreading outside the ring domain. These measurements may prove useful to current and future efforts at Rainier Mesa aimed at understanding infiltration and its effect on water fluxes and radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone.

  5. Household risk factors associated to infestation of Triatoma dimidiata, the Chagas disease vector in Central Region of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Ruiz, César A; Guevara, Roger; Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate risk factors facilitating the colonization of dwellings by Triatoma dimidiata in the central region of the state of Veracruz. We applied socioeconomic questionnaires and entomologic surveys in three localities (Chavarrillo, Soyacuautla and Arroyo Agrio) in central Veracruz involving 115 households. We found that the main risk factors were the predominance of unplastered walls and particularly those made of light weight aggregate concrete blocks and wood. At Chavarrillo, houses usually have unplastered walls, whereas in Soyocuautla walls are commonly manufactured with wood. In Arroyo Agrio, the phenomenon was seasonal, and bugs were commonly found in the dry season, particularly in relatively new houses, less than 20 years old. These results help to improve the surveillance capacity for this vector and the control strategies to reduce the transmission of Chagas disease in the state of Veracruz and other sites where this species is present.

  6. Household risk factors associated to infestation of Triatoma dimidiata, the Chagas disease vector in Central Region of Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A Sandoval-Ruiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate risk factors facilitating the colonization of dwellings by Triatoma dimidiata in the central region of the state of Veracruz. Materials and methods. We applied socioeconomic questionnaires and entomologic surveys in three localities (Chavarrillo, Soyacuautla and Arroyo Agrio in central Veracruz involving 115 households. Results. We found that the main risk factors were the predominance of unplastered walls and particularly those made of light weight aggregate concrete blocks and wood. At Chavarrillo, houses usually have unplastered walls, whereas in Soyocuautla walls are commonly manufactured with wood. In Arroyo Agrio, the phenomenon was seasonal, and bugs were commonly found in the dry season, particularly in relatively new houses, less than 20 years old. Conclusions. These results help to improve the surveillance capacity for this vector and the control strategies to reduce the transmission of Chagas disease in the state of Veracruz and other sites where this species is present.

  7. Active mountain building and the distribution of “core” Maxillariinae species in tropical Mexico and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    The observation that southeastern Central America is a hotspot for orchid diversity has long been known and confirmed by recent systematic studies and checklists. An analysis of the geographic and elevation distribution demonstrates that the most widespread species of “core” Maxillariinae are all adapted to life near sea level, whereas the most narrowly endemic species are largely distributed in wet highland environments. Drier, hotter lowland gaps exist between these cordilleras and evidently restrict the dispersal of the species adapted to wetter, cooler conditions. Among the recent generic realignments of “core” Maxillariinae based on molecular phylogenetics, the Camaridium clade is easily the most prominent genus in Central America and is largely restricted to the highlands of Costa Rica and Panama, indicating that this region is the ancestral home of this genus and that its dispersal limits are drier, lowland cordilleran gaps. The mountains of Costa Rica and Panama are among the geologically youngest topographic features in the Neotropics, reflecting the complex and dynamic interactions of numerous tectonic plates. From consideration of the available geological evidence, I conclude that the rapid growth of the mountain ranges in Costa Rica and Panama during the late Cenozoic times created, in turn, very rapid ranges in ecological life zones and geographic isolation in that part of the isthmus. Thus, I suggest that these recent geologic events were the primary drivers for accelerated orchid evolution in southeastern Central America.

  8. Investigation of Laramide Deformation in North-Central New Mexico and Its Role in Guiding Miocene Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, C. M.; Hamilton, J.; Murphy, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    North-trending Laramide age dextral faults in New Mexico help to explain shortening features along the northern margin of the Colorado Plateau. However, a palinspastic reconstruction of aeromagnetic anomalies that are cut by these dextral faults, do not explain shortening in the Tusas-Brazos uplift suggesting that the geometry of the Laramide structural system needs to be reassessed. We conducted geologic mapping and structural analysis of a series of Laramide asymmetric anticlines as well as Miocene normal faults between the Tusas-Brazos and Nacimento uplift to assess alternative models describing Laramide deformation. The kinematics of Laramide features in Northern New Mexico has been interpreted in multiple conflicting models. One model suggests that Laramide deformation in this region was characterized by several (4-6) large N-S striking faults with net dextral slip estimates ranging from ~55-170km. A second model suggests a hybrid of the two models above, suggesting a counter-clockwise rotation in the maximum shortening direction from E-W to NNE-SSW. The anticlines investigated lie between the north-trending east-vergent Tusas-Brazos uplift and the west-vergent Nacimento uplift. They form an en echelon set of km-scale folds that trend ~N40E and verge to the east and west. The estimated shortening direction from conjugate fractures and lineations are close to agreeing on an orientation of N30E, with conjugates at N10W and N50E. Fracture data throughout the specific areas are not easily explained by east-west extension during Rio Grande rifting but instead correlate to Laramide deformation. The regional fracture pattern suggests a vertically oriented σ2 advocating for a strike-slip deformation regime. Also apparent from the fracture pattern is a possible change in σ1 direction, with both E-W and NNE-SSW possible, though timing is uncertain. Mineral stretching lineations in Proterozoic rocks of the Laramide-uplifted Tusas Mountains display an average NE

  9. Nitrous oxide flux in maize and wheat cropped soils in the central region of Mexico during El nino year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longoria Ramirez, R. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Carbajal Benitez, G.; Mar Morales, B.E.; Ruiz Suarez, G. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (UNAM), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-10-01

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were measured in agricultural lands used for farming wheat and maize during 1998 in the states of Hidalgo and Tlaxcala in Mexico. In an irrigated wheat field (El Tenhe, Hidalgo), an average flux of -10.85 {mu}g N{sub 2}O - N m{sup -}2 h{sup -}1 was obtained for the total cycle (155 days between December and May). There, high negative values were observed with Water Fill Porous Space (WFPS) close to 70%. The average flux of the complete cycle (269 days between March and December) in an irrigated maize field (El Progreso, Hidalgo) was 37.43 {mu}g N{sub 2}O - N m{sup -}2 h{sup -}1. In this case, more insignificant negative fluxes were found with WFPS close to 45% or less. These last results may have been influenced by the strong El Nino, which occurred in the middle of 1998. Twenty once percent of the measurements in the state of Hidalgo showed soil acting as a nitrous oxide sink. The samples from Tlaxcala showed that these fields acted as emitters. In the rain fed fields in the state of Tlaxcala, an average flux of 121 {mu}g N{sub 2}O - N m{sup -}2 h{sup -}1 was obtained for the wheat field. The farming season lasted 142 days, from July to December. In addition, for the maize field the averaged flux was 285.61 {mu}g N{sub 2}O - Nm{sup -}2h-1. The farming season lasted 246 days, from April to December. [Spanish] En 1998 se midieron las emisiones de oxido nitroso (N{sub 2}O) de suelos agricolas para cultivar trigo y maiz en los estados de Hidalgo y Tlaxcala, en Mexico. Para un campo irrigado de trigo (El Tenhe, Hidalgo), se obtuvo un flujo promedio de -10.85 {mu}g N{sub 2}O - N m{sup -}2 h{sup -}1 para el ciclo total (155 dias entre diciembre y mayo). En este caso se observaron valores negativos elevados en el espacio poroso relleno de agua (VFPS, pos sus siglas en ingles), cercanos a 70%. El flujo promedio para el ciclo completo (269 dias entre marzo y diciembre) en un campo irrigado de maiz fue de 37.43 {mu}g N{sub 2}O - N m

  10. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems.

  11. Mountain cloud forest and grown-shade coffee plantations: A comparison of tree biodiversity in central Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo González-Zamora

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The objective of this work is to compare tree diversity and richness among one grown-shade coffee plantation (CAE and two sites of montane cloud forests, one preserved (MCF1 and other perturbed (MCF2. We also develop an analysis of the importance of coffee plantations as a refuge of tree species, holding a potential role for conservation.Area of study: Our study area is the coffee region of Coatepec-Xico, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico.Material and methods: We compiled a list of all tree species in each site to determine tree diversity and floristic similarity (dissimilarity. We used different similarity indices and a cluster analysis to show relations among sites.Main results: 2721 individuals from 154 species were registered in the montane cloud forests as a whole. In the grown-shade coffee plantation we registered 2947 individuals from 64 species. The most similar sites were the perturbed montane cloud forest and the grown-shade coffee plantation and the least similar were the preserved montane cloud forest and the grown-shade coffee plantation. The high biodiversity found in all sites and the differences in tree composition between the two montane cloud forests supports evidence of the ecosystems richness in the region.Research highlight: Diversity differences among sites determine that the grown-shade coffee plantation is not substitute for montane cloud forest. CAE’s are developed under similar environmental conditions than the MCF; therefore, coexistence and recombination (replacement of species make them particularly complementary. CAE’s in Veracruz have a potential role as refuge for biodiversity.

  12. Mountain cloud forest and grown-shade coffee plantations: A comparison of tree biodiversity in central Veracruz, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Zamora, A.; Esperón-Rodríguez, M.; Barradas, V.L.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: The objective of this work is to compare tree diversity and richness among one grown-shade coffee plantation (CAE) and two sites of montane cloud forests, one preserved (MCF1) and other perturbed (MCF2). We also develop an analysis of the importance of coffee plantations as a refuge of tree species, holding a potential role for conservation. Area of study: Our study area is the coffee region of Coatepec-Xico, in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Material and methods: We compiled a list of all tree species in each site to determine tree diversity and floristic similarity (dissimilarity). We used different similarity indices and a cluster analysis to show relations among sites. Main results: 2721 individuals from 154 species were registered in the montane cloud forests as a whole. In the grown-shade coffee plantation we registered 2947 individuals from 64 species. The most similar sites were the perturbed montane cloud forest and the grown-shade coffee plantation and the least similar were the preserved montane cloud forest and the grown-shade coffee plantation. The high biodiversity found in all sites and the differences in tree composition between the two montane cloud forests supports evidence of the ecosystems richness in the region. Research highlight: Diversity differences among sites determine that the grown-shade coffee plantation is not substitute for montane cloud forest. CAE’s are developed under similar environmental conditions than the MCF; therefore, coexistence and recombination (replacement) of species make them particularly complementary. CAE’s in Veracruz have a potential role as refuge for biodiversity. (Author)

  13. Summary of the mineral- and energy-resource endowment, BLM roswell resource area, east-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Sutphin, D.M.; Ball, M.M.; Korzeb, S.L.; Kness, R.F.; Dutchover, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    In this summary of two comprehensive resource reports produced by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, we discuss the mineral- and energyresource endowment of the 14-millon-acre Roswell Resource Area, New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The Bureau and Survey reports result from separate studies that are compilations of published and unpublished data and integrate new findings on the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, mineral, industrial, and energy commodities, and resources for the seven-county area. The reports have been used by the Bureau of Land Management in preparation of the Roswell Resource Area Resource Management Plan, and will have future use in nationwide mineral- and energy-resource inventories and assessments, as reference and training documents, and as public-information tools. In the Roswell Resource Area, many metals, industrial mineral commodities, and energy resources are being, or have been, produced or prospected. These include metals and high-technology materials, such as copper, gold, silver, thorium, uranium and/or vanadium, rare-earth element minerals, iron, manganese, tungsten, lead, zinc, and molybdenum; industrial mineral resources, including barite, limestone/dolomite, caliche, clay, fluorspar, gypsum, scoria, aggregate, and sand and gravel; and fuels and associated resources, such as oil, gas, tar sand and heavy oil, coal, and gases associated with hydrocarbons. Other commodities that have yet to be identified in economic concentrations include potash, halite, polyhalite, anhydrite, sulfur, feldspar, building stone and decorative rock, brines, various gases associated with oil and gas exploration, and carbon dioxide. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  14. Adsorbate-induced Restructuring of Pb mesas Grown on Vicinal Si(111) in the Quantum Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Khajetoorians, Alexander Ako; Zhu, Wenguang; Kim, Jisun; Qin, Shengyong; Eisele, Holger; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the adsorption of a minute amount of Cs on a Pb mesa grown in the quantum regime can induce dramatic morphological changes of the mesa, characterized by the appearance of populous monatomic-layer-high Pb nano-islands on top of the mesa. The edges of the Pb nano-islands are decorated with Cs adatoms, and the nano-islands preferentially nucleate and grow on the quantum mechanically unstable regions of the mesa. Furthermor...

  15. Accumulation of pharmaceuticals, Enterococcus, and resistance genes in soils irrigated with wastewater for zero to 100 years in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkmann, Philipp; Broszat, Melanie; Siebe, Christina; Willaschek, Elisha; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Huebner, Johannes; Amelung, Wulf; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Siemens, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Irrigation with wastewater releases pharmaceuticals, pathogenic bacteria, and resistance genes, but little is known about the accumulation of these contaminants in the environment when wastewater is applied for decades. We sampled a chronosequence of soils that were variously irrigated with wastewater from zero up to 100 years in the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, and investigated the accumulation of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, clarithromycin, carbamazepine, bezafibrate, naproxen, diclofenac, as well as the occurrence of Enterococcus spp., and sul and qnr resistance genes. Total concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and carbamazepine increased with irrigation duration reaching 95% of their upper limit of 1.4 µg/kg (ciprofloxacin), 4.3 µg/kg (sulfamethoxazole), and 5.4 µg/kg (carbamazepine) in soils irrigated for 19-28 years. Accumulation was soil-type-specific, with largest accumulation rates in Leptosols and no time-trend in Vertisols. Acidic pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, naproxen, bezafibrate) were not retained and thus did not accumulate in soils. We did not detect qnrA genes, but qnrS and qnrB genes were found in two of the irrigated soils. Relative concentrations of sul1 genes in irrigated soils were two orders of magnitude larger (3.15 × 10(-3) ± 0.22 × 10(-3) copies/16S rDNA) than in non-irrigated soils (4.35 × 10(-5)± 1.00 × 10(-5) copies/16S rDNA), while those of sul2 exceeded the ones in non-irrigated soils still by a factor of 22 (6.61 × 10(-4) ± 0.59 × 10(-4) versus 2.99 × 10(-5) ± 0.26 × 10(-5) copies/16S rDNA). Absolute numbers of sul genes continued to increase with prolonging irrigation together with Enterococcus spp. 23S rDNA and total 16S rDNA contents. Increasing total concentrations of antibiotics in soil are not accompanied by increasing relative abundances of resistance genes. Nevertheless, wastewater irrigation enlarges the absolute concentration of resistance genes in soils due to a long

  16. Accumulation of pharmaceuticals, Enterococcus, and resistance genes in soils irrigated with wastewater for zero to 100 years in central Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Dalkmann

    Full Text Available Irrigation with wastewater releases pharmaceuticals, pathogenic bacteria, and resistance genes, but little is known about the accumulation of these contaminants in the environment when wastewater is applied for decades. We sampled a chronosequence of soils that were variously irrigated with wastewater from zero up to 100 years in the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, and investigated the accumulation of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, clarithromycin, carbamazepine, bezafibrate, naproxen, diclofenac, as well as the occurrence of Enterococcus spp., and sul and qnr resistance genes. Total concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and carbamazepine increased with irrigation duration reaching 95% of their upper limit of 1.4 µg/kg (ciprofloxacin, 4.3 µg/kg (sulfamethoxazole, and 5.4 µg/kg (carbamazepine in soils irrigated for 19-28 years. Accumulation was soil-type-specific, with largest accumulation rates in Leptosols and no time-trend in Vertisols. Acidic pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, naproxen, bezafibrate were not retained and thus did not accumulate in soils. We did not detect qnrA genes, but qnrS and qnrB genes were found in two of the irrigated soils. Relative concentrations of sul1 genes in irrigated soils were two orders of magnitude larger (3.15 × 10(-3 ± 0.22 × 10(-3 copies/16S rDNA than in non-irrigated soils (4.35 × 10(-5± 1.00 × 10(-5 copies/16S rDNA, while those of sul2 exceeded the ones in non-irrigated soils still by a factor of 22 (6.61 × 10(-4 ± 0.59 × 10(-4 versus 2.99 × 10(-5 ± 0.26 × 10(-5 copies/16S rDNA. Absolute numbers of sul genes continued to increase with prolonging irrigation together with Enterococcus spp. 23S rDNA and total 16S rDNA contents. Increasing total concentrations of antibiotics in soil are not accompanied by increasing relative abundances of resistance genes. Nevertheless, wastewater irrigation enlarges the absolute concentration of resistance genes in soils due to a

  17. Medical therapeutic itineraries of women with breast cancer diagnosis affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Tejada-Tayabas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe the medical itineraries followed by breast cancer women affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico. We used an ethnographic approach based on oral histories of 12 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the year prior to the first meeting. Two face-to-face sessions per participant lasting 60 minutes each were conducted followed by a telephone interview. Content and diachronic analyses were used. Three main itineraries were identified: (1 diagnostic process, (2 final diagnosis to treatment, and (3 cancer control and relapse. Findings suggested that infrastructure and human resources to adequately screen and timely diagnose breast cancer were scant and insufficiently trained, respectively. Deferral of medical assessment was related with lack of information about breast cancer consequences, with women being afraid of a positive result, and with economic constraints. The current screening program needs to be redesigned to prevent diagnostic delays, as these seem to explain the high frequency of advanced stages reported at the time of diagnosis.

  18. Analysis of diatomite sediments from a paleolake in central Mexico using PIXE, X-ray tomography and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J.; Oliver, A.; Vilaclara, G.; Rico-Montiel, R.; Macías, V. M.; Ruvalcaba, J. L.; Zenteno, M. A.

    1994-03-01

    Diatomite samples from paleolake Tlaxcala, in Central Mexico, have been analyzed using proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE), X-ray tomography and X-ray diffraction. Chiseled blocks were scanned with a 0.7 MeV proton beam, 0.1 mm in diameter, in 0.25 mm steps across the sediments. X-ray tomography with the same step sizes was then applied, in order to compare the concentrations obtained with PIXE and the material density in the sediment layers. Three different kinds of layers were found, related to their colors: dark, white and gray. The composition of the layers is fairly uniform. The dark zone is enriched in Al, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe. This dark layer may be associated with eruptions of the Malitzin volcano. The white zone is found to contain diatomite of a high purity, with traces of K, Ca, and Fe, while the gray zones are also Al enriched, suggesting a clay contamination of the diatomite. X-ray diffraction of materials obtained from each main layer showed that the white and gray phases are highly amorphous, with a small component of cristobalite, as expected from the diatom sediment diagenesis, while the dark layer contains also important amounts of anorthite and orthoclase, supporting the volcanic origin of this layer.

  19. Interactions between payments for hydrologic services, landowner decisions, and ecohydrological consequences: synergies and disconnection in the cloud forest zone of central Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Asbjornsen

    2017-06-01

    hydrologic services and people's decisions, behavior, and knowledge regarding forest conservation and water. Using central Veracruz as our case study, we identify areas of both synchrony and disconnection between PHS goals and outcomes. Mature and regenerating cloud forests (targeted by PHS were found to produce enhanced hydrologic services relative to areas converted to pasture, including reduced peak flows during large rain events and maintenance of dry-season base flows. However, unexpectedly, these hydrologic benefits from cloud forests were not necessarily greater than those from other vegetation types. Consequently, the location of forests in strategic watershed positions (e.g., where deforestation risk or hydrologic recharge are high may be more critical than forest type in promoting hydrologic functions within watersheds and should be considered when targeting PHS payments. While our results suggest that participation in PHS improved the level of knowledge among watershed inhabitants about forest-water relationships, a mismatch existed between payment amounts and landowner opportunity costs, which may contribute to the modest success in targeting priority areas within watersheds. Combined, these findings underscore the complexity of factors that influence motivations for PHS participation and land use decisions and behavior, and the importance of integrating understanding of both ecohydrological and socioeconomic dynamics into PHS design and implementation. We conclude by identifying opportunities for improving the design of PHS programs and recommending priority areas for future research and monitoring, both in Mexico and globally.

  20. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  1. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  2. Heavy metal concentrations in diploid and triploid oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from three farms on the north-central coast of Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Sevilla, Norma Patricia; Villanueva-Fonseca, Brenda Paulina; Góngora-Gómez, Andrés Martin; García-Ulloa, Manuel; Domínguez-Orozco, Ana Laura; Ortega-Izaguirre, Rogelio; Campos Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth

    2017-10-03

    The concentrations of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Hg in diploid and triploid oysters from three farms (Guasave, Ahome, and Navolato) on the north-central coast of Sinaloa, Mexico, were assessed based on samples recovered during a single culture cycle 2013-2014. Metal burdens were more strongly correlated (p  Cu > Cd > Pb > Hg. For all three farms, the mean concentrations of Cd and Pb in Crassostrea gigas were high, ranging from 2.52 to 7.98 μg/g wet weight for Cd and from 0.91 to 2.83 μg/g wet weight for Pb. Diploid and triploid oysters from the Guasave farm contained high levels of Cu (76.41 and 68.97 μg/g wet weight, respectively). Cu, Cd, and Zn were highly correlated (p < 0.05), and their concentrations may be influenced by agrochemical inputs. The mean levels of Cu for the Guasave farm and of Cd and Pb for all three farms exceeded permissible limits and represented a threat to human health during the sampling period (July 2014 to July 2014).

  3. Correlating Remote Sensing Data with the Abundance of Pupae of the Dengue Virus Mosquito Vector, Aedes aegypti, in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max J. Moreno-Madriñán

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a geographic transect in Central Mexico, with an elevation/climate gradient, but uniformity in socio-economic conditions among study sites, this study evaluates the applicability of three widely-used remote sensing (RS products to link weather conditions with the local abundance of the dengue virus mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti. Field-derived entomological measures included estimates for the percentage of premises with the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae and the abundance of Ae. aegypti pupae per premises. Data on mosquito abundance from field surveys were matched with RS data and analyzed for correlation. Daily daytime and nighttime land surface temperature (LST values were obtained from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS/Aqua cloud-free images within the four weeks preceding the field survey. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM-estimated rainfall accumulation was calculated for the four weeks preceding the field survey. Elevation was estimated through a digital elevation model (DEM. Strong correlations were found between mosquito abundance and RS-derived night LST, elevation and rainfall along the elevation/climate gradient. These findings show that RS data can be used to predict Ae. aegypti abundance, but further studies are needed to define the climatic and socio-economic conditions under which the correlations observed herein can be assumed to apply.

  4. Characterizing a deep freeze event in a creasote shrubland in central New Mexico using a combination of remote sensing and in-situ carbon flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Ladwig, L.; Litvak, M. E.; Pockman, W.

    2013-12-01

    In February 2011 temperatures on the Sevilleta LTER in central New Mexico dropped to -29 deg C (roughly a 25-50 year minimum temperature), resulting in the widespread, differential mortality of creasote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the region. The sudden loss of leaf area was followed by patchy regrowth of the vegetation about three months following the freeze, at the onset of warmer temperatures. The summer of 2011 then marked the onset of a significant drought which further suppressed the recovery of the shrubland. We took advantage of a combination of phenocam and eddy-covariance data sets to characterize the patterns in carbon and energy flux prior to and following the mortality and recovery of this ecosystem during severe drought conditions across the Sevilleta LTER. We also leveraged a time series of high resolution satellite images (5 x 5 meters, 5 spectral bands) from RapidEye to upscale our local measurements of ecosystem structural and functional change to the region. This case study provides valuable insight into how woody shrublands may respond to combinations of intense climatic disturbance that are projected to become more frequent and severe.

  5. Completion Report for Well ER-12-3. Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

  6. Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters

  7. Water resources of the Santa Ysabel and Mesa Grande Indian Reservations, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freckleton, John R.

    1981-01-01

    The Santa Ysabel (consisting of three tracts) and Mesa Grande Indian Reservations are in north-central San Diego County, Calif. On both reservations fractured and weathered igneous and metamorphic rocks and alluvium are water bearing; however, no wells are known to derive their water entirely from alluvium. Well yields range from 2.5 to 250 gallons per minute. Springs occur where saturated fractured or weathered material intersects the land surface. Spring discharge ranged from 0 gallon per minute (November 1979) to 9.4 gallons per minute (November 1979). Few data are available for the surface water characteristics of the study area. One-time measurements of discharge at selected stream sites were made in late November 1979 and late May 1980; discharges ranged from less than 0.01 cubic foot per second to an estimated 3 cubic feet per second. Further study of the surface-water systems would provide a basis for estimating their development potential. The existing water-supply development on the Santa Ysabel Indian Reservation is adequate for the present residents. The Mesa Grande reservation was unoccupied in 1952, was reportedly unoccupied in November 1979, and has no developed water supply. Additional water can be developed for both reservations from the igneous and metamorphic rock, from presently undeveloped springs, and from perennial reaches of the larger streams. Except for excessive iron and sodium at some ground-water sites and excessive sodium at a few surface-water sites, the water is of suitable quality for domestic and agricultural use. (USGS)

  8. [Bird biodiversity in natural and modified habitats in a landscape of the Central Depression of Chiapas, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Albores, Jorge E

    2010-03-01

    In many parts of the neotropics, the original habitats are rapidly changing because of excessive logging, agriculture and livestock activity, with an often negative impact on bird communities. I present an analysis of the diversity and richness of birds in a fragmented landscape of the Central Chiapas Depression. Fieldwork was conducted from February 2003 to January 2004. Using point counts, a total of 35 families and 225 bird species were registered (164 residents and 61 migratory); 3% are abundant and 30% rare. Diversity, species richness and number of individuals were significantly higher in tropical deciduous forest (H'=3.41, 178 species ANOVA p<0.0001), which also had the greatest number of species restricted to a single vegetation type (39 species). The incorporation and maintenance of natural and modified habitats are necessary for the survival and reproduction of many birds species in the study area.

  9. Insulin resistance, subclinical left ventricular remodeling, and the obesity paradox: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi V; Abbasi, Siddique A; Heydari, Bobak; Rickers, Carsten; Jacobs, David R; Wang, Lu; Kwong, Raymond Y; Bluemke, David A; Lima, Joao A C; Jerosch-Herold, Michael

    2013-04-23

    This study assessed whether impaired fasting glucose (IFG), insulin resistance, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) had effects on cardiac remodeling, independent of obesity, in the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) trial. Recent studies have suggested that central obesity and insulin resistance may be primary mediators of obesity-related cardiac remodeling independent of body mass index (BMI). We investigated 4,364 subjects without diabetes in the MESA trial. IFG (100 to 125 mg/dl) or insulin resistance (by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) and WHR were used for cardiometabolic phenotyping. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine the effects of the cardiometabolic markers on left ventricular (LV) remodeling, assessed primarily through the LV mass-to-volume ratio obtained by cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Individuals with IFG were more likely to be older and hypertensive, with increased prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors regardless of BMI. In each quartile of BMI, subjects with above-median HOMA-IR, above-median WHR, or IFG had a higher LV mass-to-volume ratio (p central obesity, may play a critical role in LV remodeling independently of BMI. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Localized double-array stacking analysis of PcP: D″ and ULVZ structure beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, central Pacific, and north Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin

    2009-01-01

    A large, high quality P-wave data set comprising short-period and broadband signals sampling four separate regions in the lowermost mantle beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, the central Pacific, and the north Pacific is analyzed using regional one-dimensional double-array stacking and modelling with reflectivity synthetics. A data-screening criterion retains only events with stable PcP energy in the final data stacks used for modelling and interpretation. This significantly improves the signal stacks relative to including unscreened observations, allows confident alignment on the PcP arrival and allows tight bounds to be placed on P-wave velocity structure above the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The PcP reflections under the Cocos plate are well modelled without any ultra-low velocity zone from 5 to 20°N. At latitudes from 15 to 20°N, we find evidence for two P-wave velocity discontinuities in the D″ region. The first is ∼182 km above the CMB with a δln Vp of +1.5%, near the same depth as a weaker discontinuity (<+0.5%) observed from 5 to 15°N in prior work. The other reflector is ∼454 km above the CMB, with a δln Vp of +0.4%; this appears to be a shallower continuation of the joint P- and S-wave discontinuity previously detected south of 15° N, which is presumed to be the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. The data stacks for paths bottoming below Mexico have PcP images that are well matched with the simple IASP91 structure, contradicting previous inferences of ULVZ presence in this region. These particular data are not very sensitive to any D″ discontinuities, and simply bound them to be <∼2%, if present. Data sampling the lowermost mantle beneath the central Pacific confirm the presence of a ∼15-km thick ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) just above the CMB, with δln Vp and δln Vs of around −3 to −4% and −4 to −8%, respectively. The ULVZ models predict previous S-wave data stacks well. The data for this region

  11. Can government be self-organized? A mathematical model of the collective social organization of ancient Teotihuacan, central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Gershenson, Carlos; Manzanilla, Linda R

    2014-01-01

    Teotihuacan was the first urban civilization of Mesoamerica and one of the largest of the ancient world. Following a tradition in archaeology to equate social complexity with centralized hierarchy, it is widely believed that the city's origin and growth was controlled by a lineage of powerful individuals. However, much data is indicative of a government of co-rulers, and artistic traditions expressed an egalitarian ideology. Yet this alternative keeps being marginalized because the problems of collective action make it difficult to conceive how such a coalition could have functioned in principle. We therefore devised a mathematical model of the city's hypothetical network of representatives as a formal proof of concept that widespread cooperation was realizable in a fully distributed manner. In the model, decisions become self-organized into globally optimal configurations even though local representatives behave and modify their relations in a rational and selfish manner. This self-optimization crucially depends on occasional communal interruptions of normal activity, and it is impeded when sections of the network are too independent. We relate these insights to theories about community-wide rituals at Teotihuacan and the city's eventual disintegration.

  12. Can government be self-organized? A mathematical model of the collective social organization of ancient Teotihuacan, central Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Froese

    Full Text Available Teotihuacan was the first urban civilization of Mesoamerica and one of the largest of the ancient world. Following a tradition in archaeology to equate social complexity with centralized hierarchy, it is widely believed that the city's origin and growth was controlled by a lineage of powerful individuals. However, much data is indicative of a government of co-rulers, and artistic traditions expressed an egalitarian ideology. Yet this alternative keeps being marginalized because the problems of collective action make it difficult to conceive how such a coalition could have functioned in principle. We therefore devised a mathematical model of the city's hypothetical network of representatives as a formal proof of concept that widespread cooperation was realizable in a fully distributed manner. In the model, decisions become self-organized into globally optimal configurations even though local representatives behave and modify their relations in a rational and selfish manner. This self-optimization crucially depends on occasional communal interruptions of normal activity, and it is impeded when sections of the network are too independent. We relate these insights to theories about community-wide rituals at Teotihuacan and the city's eventual disintegration.

  13. Preliminary study of the uranium potential of Tertiary rocks in the central San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, H.P.; O'Neill, A.J.

    1977-12-01

    Three formations in the Tertiary of the San Juan Basin were investigated for their uranium favorability. They are the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, the Nacimiento Formation, and the San Jose Formation. The study comprised a literature survey and a basin analysis, which consisted of subsurface lithofacies, stratigraphic, and radiometric mapping. Field work in preparation for the subsurface analysis consisted of examination of outcrop and measured sections, surface radiometric traverses, and checking of reported surface radioactive anomalies. Interpretation of subsurface mapping provided the primary basis for favorability assessment. The sandstone trends depicted in lithofacies maps, and stratigraphic cross sections reflect large channel complexes and major fluvial systems originating in favorable source areas. Although surface radioactivity anomalies were found to be few, weak, and widespread, the San Juan Basin has abundant favorable host rocks. The subsurface anomalies, although weak, are widespread and sometimes persist throughout thickness intervals greater than 50 ft. Subsurface anomalies were mapped on a wide-spaced grid and are generalized. On the basis of apparent source, lithology, differential permeability, contents of carbonaceous detritus, and geometry, the Nacimiento Formation and the basal facies of the San Jose Formation in the north-central basin have the greatest potential. The Ojo Alamo Sandstone is less favorable, and the Nacimiento Formation in the southern part of the basin and the upper San Jose Formation are the least favorable of the units studied

  14. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance. Type of Information... disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other forms of CVD that have not produced signs and symptoms...

  15. MESA: Supporting Teaching and Learning about the Marine Environment--Primary Science Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The Marine Education Society of Australasia (MESA) Inc. is a national organisation of marine educators that aims to bring together people interested in the study and enjoyment of coastal and marine environments. MESA representatives and members organise education and interpretation activities in support of schools and communities during a number…

  16. 76 FR 22075 - Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; CO; Black Mesa Vegetation Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; CO; Black Mesa Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest... Web site http://www.fs.usda.gov/riogrande under ``Land & Resource Management'', then ``Projects'' on... need for the Black Mesa Vegetation Management Project is move toward achieving long-term desired...

  17. Opportunities for parity violating electron scattering experiments at the planned MESA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    We suggest to start an accelerator physics project called the Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) as an extension to our experimental facilities. MESA may allow to introduce an innovative internal target regime based on the ERL principle. A second mode of operation will be to use an external polarized electron beam for parity violating experiments.

  18. Elevation gradients of flower visitation on a mesa in the Nama Karoo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francis

    We investigated the composition of the insect fauna visiting flowers on the mesa of Tafelberg. (Eastern Cape ... Plant species diversity is higher on the top of koppies/mesas (K.Esler, pers.comm.), but this ..... Moldenke AR (1979) Pollination ecology as an assay for ecosystemic organization: convergent evolution in Chile.

  19. Profesor Luis López de Mesa. Reminiscencias

    OpenAIRE

    J. Hernando Ordoñez

    1998-01-01

    Personalidad


    El 18 de Octubre pasado se cumplieron 30 años de la muerte del Profesor Luis López de Mesa, fecha luctuosa para la cultura americana. Con tal motivo quiero revivir su memoria y rendirle un cálido homenaje de gratitud y admiración, haciendo reminiscencias de hechos y anécdotas vividas gracias a la cordial amistad que me permitió apreciar la grandeza de su personalidad, que brilló con luz propia en todos los campos...

  20. Documentos: Comunicación y desarrollo (Mesa Redonda IPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revista Chasqui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El Instituto para América Latina (IPAL a través de su Centro de Estudios sobre Cultura Transnacional (Lima organizó una Mesa Redonda sobre Comunicación y Desarrollo que se llevó a cabo en Lima, en la sede de la Junta del Acuerdo de Cartagena entre el 21 y 23 de mayo de 1986, bajo los auspicios de la UNESCO, el Sistema Económico Latinoamericano (SELA, la Junta del Acuerdo de Cartagena y la Fundación Friederich Ebert.

  1. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Sediments from Prevalent Dust Sources in the Central Chihuahuan Desert, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez Acosta, M.; Gill, T. E.; Peinado, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Chihuahuan Desert has been recognized as an important contributor of mineral aerosols emplaced into the atmosphere in the Western Hemisphere. Along with the production of these aerosols, growing concern has been stated relating the downwind transport of atmospheric dust particles to increases in human health related impacts such as asthma and bronchitis in the Binational Paso Del Norte, the largest urban area in the region. Efforts have been made to describe the source types (land use/cover) and frequency of emission from the "dust hotspots" or prevalent sources within the region. These studies have outlined specific areas and their related sedimentological environments responsible for the regular dust production. Ephemeral lakes, fluvial and alluvial related environments form the main natural dust producing landforms in the region, modulated by short-term climatic variability and anthropogenic disturbance. Analysis of remote sensing imagery shows that the margins between natural areas and agricultural lands form the main anthropogenic related source areas. Most of the previously published studies focus on these remotely sensed descriptions of the dust sources, while only a few deal with in situ or field characteristics of these sources. A formal and detailed description of the physicochemical properties of many of these areas is presented, providing key data on this component of the overall dust production cycle. Elemental and mineralogical compositions of dust source sediments, soil textural compositions (grain size distributions) and field sedimentological descriptions are presented as an effort to attain a detailed in situ description of the prevalent dust sources in the central part of the Chihuahuan Desert.

  2. [Relative abundance of the gray fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus (Carnívora: Canidae) in Veracruz central area, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Sonia; López Colunga, Paloma; Valdespino, Carolina; Farías, Verónica

    2016-03-01

    The gray fox, Urocyon cinereoargenteus, is a medium-size canid widely distributed in México. Most studies on this species focus on habitat use, home range, diet, intraguild competence, and lanscape distribution between urban and rural sites. In central Veracruz, gray foxes are present in fragments of cloud forest and in shaded coffee plantations; nevertheless, its abundance has not yet been compared among other vegetation types found in the area, such as sugarcane plantations. In this study we described gray foxes abundance variations using 500 m transects, among sugarcane plantations, shaded coffee plantations, and cloud forest fragments throughout eight months, by scat counting in three sites of each cover type. We reported the relative abundance index for each cover type and each month, and evaluated its relationship with four landscape features: (a) shade percent, (b) trail density, (c) human population density, and (d) habitat juxtaposition, in influence areas of 450 ha around sampling sites. Abundance comparison among cover types showed lower abundances in cloud forest fragments and higher abundances in coffee and sugarcane plantations. No significant differences were found throughout months (p = 0.476). We proposed that higher abundances in plantations may be related to the presence of rodent plagues and fruit trees which offer food resources to gray foxes. The evaluation of landscape features showed that only medium-impact trail density and human population density were positively correlated with gray fox abundance; fact that demonstrates that this canid can coexist with humans in rural sites. We highlight the gray fox capacity to take advantage of heterogeneous landscapes.

  3. MODULES FOR EXPERIMENTS IN STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (MESA): PLANETS, OSCILLATIONS, ROTATION, AND MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Bill; Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Arras, Phil [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Dotter, Aaron [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Mankovich, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Montgomery, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Stello, Dennis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Townsend, Richard, E-mail: matteo@kitp.ucsb.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA star. Improvements in MESA star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 M{sub Sun} stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved the scaling of MESA's calculational speed on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit that packages all the required components needed to form a unified, maintained, and well-validated build environment for MESA. We also highlight a few tools developed by the community for rapid visualization of MESA star

  4. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Planets, Oscillations, Rotation, and Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Cantiello, Matteo; Arras, Phil; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F.; Dotter, Aaron; Mankovich, Christopher; Montgomery, M. H.; Stello, Dennis; Timmes, F. X.; Townsend, Richard

    2013-09-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA star. Improvements in MESA star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 M ⊙ stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved the scaling of MESA's calculational speed on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit that packages all the required components needed to form a unified, maintained, and well-validated build environment for MESA. We also highlight a few tools developed by the community for rapid visualization of MESA star results.

  5. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Binaries, Pulsations, and Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Marchant, Pablo; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Cantiello, Matteo; Dessart, Luc; Farmer, R.; Hu, H.; Langer, N.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Townsley, Dean M.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-09-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open-source software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). MESA can now simultaneously evolve an interacting pair of differentially rotating stars undergoing transfer and loss of mass and angular momentum, greatly enhancing the prior ability to model binary evolution. New MESA capabilities in fully coupled calculation of nuclear networks with hundreds of isotopes now allow MESA to accurately simulate the advanced burning stages needed to construct supernova progenitor models. Implicit hydrodynamics with shocks can now be treated with MESA, enabling modeling of the entire massive star lifecycle, from pre-main-sequence evolution to the onset of core collapse and nucleosynthesis from the resulting explosion. Coupling of the GYRE non-adiabatic pulsation instrument with MESA allows for new explorations of the instability strips for massive stars while also accelerating the astrophysical use of asteroseismology data. We improve the treatment of mass accretion, giving more accurate and robust near-surface profiles. A new MESA capability to calculate weak reaction rates “on-the-fly” from input nuclear data allows better simulation of accretion induced collapse of massive white dwarfs and the fate of some massive stars. We discuss the ongoing challenge of chemical diffusion in the strongly coupled plasma regime, and exhibit improvements in MESA that now allow for the simulation of radiative levitation of heavy elements in hot stars. We close by noting that the MESA software infrastructure provides bit-for-bit consistency for all results across all the supported platforms, a profound enabling capability for accelerating MESA's development.

  6. Nutritional status and dental fluorosis among schoolchildren in communities with different drinking water fluoride concentrations in a central region in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen-Camacho, M E; García Pérez, A; Mejía González, A; Huizar Alvarez, R

    2016-01-15

    Poor water quality and under nutrition are important factors affecting the health of many communities in developing countries. The aims of this study were: i) to describe the fluoride water concentration and the hydrogeological conditions in a region of a state located in the central in Mexico ii) to measure the association between undernutrition and dental fluorosis in children living in communities with different drinking water fluoride concentrations in a state located in the central region of Mexico. Field work was performed in the region to identify the prevailing groundwater flow characteristics and water wells were sampled to analyze water fluoride concentration. Children were selected from three communities that had different drinking water fluoride concentrations (i.e., 0.56, 0.70 and 1.60 mg/l). Fluoridated salt was available in these communities. The Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI) was used to assess dental fluorosis. Categories four or higher of this index involve changes in the entire tooth surface (ITF ≥ 4). The weight and height of the children were measured. The assessment of undernutrition was based on the World Health Organization criteria: children were classified as being at risk of low-height (Height-for-Age Z score children". In the region the mineralization of the water captured by the wells is the result of a reaction with volcanic materials. The water fluoride concentration in the region ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 mg/l. A total of 734 schoolchildren participated in the study. The percentage of children in fluorosis categories (ITF ≥ 4) was 15.9%, 21.1% of the children were at risk of low height-for-age, and 8.0% had low height-for-age. The percentage of children with fluorosis (ITF ≥ 4) was 6.3%, 9.1% and 31.9% (p ˂ 0.001) and low high-for-age was 2.9%, 2.5% and 8.4% (p ˂ 0.001), for the communities with F concentrations of 0.56 mg/l, 0.70 mg/l and 1.6 mg/l, respectively. The logistic regression model showed an association between

  7. Postwildfire preliminary debris flow hazard assessment for the area burned by the 2011 Las Conchas Fire in north-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Anne C.; Darr, Michael J.; Cannon, Susan H.; Michael, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The Las Conchas Fire during the summer of 2011 was the largest in recorded history for the state of New Mexico, burning 634 square kilometers in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico. The burned landscape is now at risk of damage from postwildfire erosion, such as that caused by debris flows and flash floods. This report presents a preliminary hazard assessment of the debris-flow potential from 321 basins burned by the Las Conchas Fire. A pair of empirical hazard-assessment models developed using data from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States was used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volume of debris flows at the outlets of selected drainage basins within the burned area. The models incorporate measures of burn severity, topography, soils, and storm rainfall to estimate the probability and volume of debris flows following the fire. In response to a design storm of 28.0 millimeters of rain in 30 minutes (10-year recurrence interval), the probabilities of debris flows estimated for basins burned by the Las Conchas Fire were greater than 80 percent for two-thirds (67 percent) of the modeled basins. Basins with a high (greater than 80 percent) probability of debris-flow occurrence were concentrated in tributaries to Santa Clara and Rio del Oso Canyons in the northeastern part of the burned area; some steep areas in the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Los Alamos, and Guaje Canyons in the east-central part of the burned area; tributaries to Peralta, Colle, Bland, and Cochiti canyons in the southwestern part of the burned area; and tributaries to Frijoles, Alamo, and Capulin Canyons in the southeastern part of the burned area (within Bandelier National Monument). Estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from 400 cubic meters to greater than 72,000 cubic meters. The largest volumes (greater than 40,000 cubic meters) were estimated for basins in Santa Clara, Los Alamos, and Water Canyons, and for two

  8. Detecting Zones of High Rock Uplift Rates Using Topographic Analysis and OSL Signals: A Case of Study in The Jalisco Block (Central Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M.; Ferrari, L.; Munoz-Salinas, E.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.

    2013-12-01

    The topography of mountainous settings records information of the interaction among tectonics, climate and erosion. Rivers respond to rapid tectonic uplift rates by increasing their incision rate and propagating knickpoints. River incision also enhances the local relief that can be quantified at broad spatial scales studying river basins. We evaluate the response of rivers to different tectonic uplift rates by analyzing the river basins and stream profiles of the Jalisco block (Central Mexico). The Jalisco Block is a complex tectonic unit bounded to the northwest and the northeast by the Puerto Vallarta graben and the Amatlán de Cañas half graben, respectively, and controlled to the southwest by the subduction of the Rivera Plate beneath the North America Plate. We analyze the means of local relief, normalized channel steepness index (ksn), ridgeline convexity and bottom-valley concavity of river basins, ranging from ~13 to ~2300 km 2 of drainage area as well as slope-area plots, to detect zones of high rock uplift and river incision. We complement our topographic analysis using OSL signals from sandy sediment samples extracted from riverbed to estimate the erosion rates operating on the landscape. Our results indicate that river incision is higher in the north and northwestern sector of the Jalisco Block, regardless that there valleys are filled with Plio-Quaternary lava flows. Rivers draining in the western sector of the Jalisco Block appear to have reached a quasi-steady state where OSL signals and ksn values exhibit a scaling with basins elevation.

  9. A detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation of the Matuyama-Bruhnes geomagnetic reversal recorded in tephra-paleosol sequence of Tlaxcala(Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Soler-Arechalde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic reversals are global phenomena, for about 50 years the paleomagnetists attempted to acquire as many detailed records as possible using the magnetic memory of sediments and lava flows. Yet, transitional field behavior remains poorly characterized largely because of sporadic aspect of volcanic eruptions. In some specific cases, paleosols such as those developed from alluvial or aeolian sediments, may also record the variations of the Geomagnetic Field across the polarity changes. Here, we report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation on some radiometrically dated chromic luvisols located in Central Mexico carrying detrital or chemical remanent magnetization. The research was developed in order i to demonstrate the primary origin of the magnetic remanence and ii to show that paleosoils are good candidates to provide a high resolution record of the behavior of geomagnetic field during reversals. The lower part of the paleosoil sequence shows a clearly defined reverse polarity magnetization followed by geomagnetically unstable transitional field and ended by normal polarity remanence. Our AMS and rock magnetic data suggest that magnetization is acquired during the initial stage of soil formation in context of active volcanic activity since magnetic fabric is essentially sedimentary and reverse and normal polarity paleodirections are almost antipodal. Titanomagnetites are identified as main magnetic carriers of rock-magnetic measurements including thermomagnetics and hysteresis cycles. We propose that the transition recorded in this study correspond to the B-M boundary, considering the K-Ar datings available at the sequence bottom and that the chromic luvisols are potentially good recorders of the paleosecular variation. The identification of the B-M boundary within the studied sequence has fundamental significance for improving the chronological scale of Tlaxcala paleosol-sedimentary sequence and its correlation with the

  10. A detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation of the Matuyama-Bruhnes geomagnetic reversal recorded in tephra-paleosol sequence of Tlaxcala(Central Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Arechalde, Ana; Goguitchaichvili, Avtandyl; Carrancho, Ángel; Sedov, Sergey; Caballero-Miranda, Cecilia; Ortega, Beatriz; Solís, Berenice; Morales Contreras, Juan; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Bautista, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic reversals are global phenomena, for about 50 years the paleomagnetists attempted to acquire as many detailed records as possible using the magnetic memory of sediments and lava flows. Yet, transitional field behavior remains poorly characterized largely because of sporadic aspect of volcanic eruptions. In some specific cases, paleosols such as those developed from alluvial or aeolian sediments, may also record the variations of the Geomagnetic Field across the polarity changes. Here, we report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation on some radiometrically dated chromic luvisols located in Central Mexico carrying detrital or chemical remanent magnetization. The research was developed in order i) to demonstrate the primary origin of the magnetic remanence and ii) to show that paleosoils are good candidates to provide a high resolution record of the behavior of geomagnetic field during reversals. The lower part of the paleosoil sequence shows a clearly defined reverse polarity magnetization followed by geomagnetically unstable transitional field and ended by normal polarity remanence. Our AMS and rock magnetic data suggest that magnetization is acquired during the initial stage of soil formation in context of active volcanic activity since magnetic fabric is essentially sedimentary and reverse and normal polarity paleodirections are almost antipodal. Titanomagnetites are identified as main magnetic carriers of rock-magnetic measurements including thermomagnetics and hysteresis cycles. We propose that the transition recorded in this study correspond to the B-M boundary, considering the K-Ar datings available at the sequence bottom and that the chromic luvisols are potentially good recorders of the paleosecular variation. The identification of the B-M boundary within the studied sequence has fundamental significance for improving the chronological scale of Tlaxcala paleosol-sedimentary sequence and its correlation with the global proxies.

  11. Pre-eruptive conditions of dacitic magma erupted during the 21.7 ka Plinian event at Nevado de Toluca volcano, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Gardner, J. E.; Macías, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Nevado de Toluca volcano in Central Mexico has been active over the last ca. 42 ka, during which tens of km3 of pyroclastic material were erupted and two important Plinian-type eruptions occurred at ca. 21.7 ka (Lower Toluca Pumice: LTP) and ca. 10.5 ka (Upper Toluca Pumice: UTP). Samples from both the LTP and UTP contain plagioclase, amphibole, iron-titanium oxides, and minor anhedral biotite, set in a vesicular, rhyolitic, glassy matrix. In addition, UTP dacites contain orthopyroxene. Analysis of melt inclusions in plagioclase phenocrysts yields H2O contents of 2-3.5 wt.% for LTP and 1.3-3.6 wt.% for UTP samples. Ilmenite-ulvospinel geothermometry yields an average temperature of ~ 868 °C for the LTP magma (hotter than the UTP magma, ~ 842 °C; Arce et al., 2006), whereas amphibole-plagioclase geothermometry yields a temperature of 825-859 °C for the LTP magma. Water-saturated experiments using LTP dacite suggest that: (i) amphibole is stable above 100 MPa and below 900 °C; (ii) plagioclase crystallizes below 250-100 MPa at temperatures of 850-900 °C; and (iii) pyroxene is stable only below pressures of 200-100 MPa and temperatures of 825-900 °C. Comparison of natural and experimental data suggests that the LTP dacitic magma was stored at 150-200 MPa (5.8-7.7 km below the volcano summit). No differences in pressure found between 21.7 ka and 10.5 ka suggest that these two magmas were stored at similar depths. Orthopyroxene produced in lower temperature LTP experiments is compositionally different to those found in UTP natural samples, suggesting that they originated in two different magma batches. Whole-rock chemistry, petrographic features, and mineral compositions suggest that magma mixing was responsible for the generation of the dacitic Plinian LTP eruption.

  12. Plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system near Albuquerque, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAda, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground water from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system of the Albuquerque Basin is the principal source of water for municipal, domestic, commercial, and industrial uses in the Albuquerque area, an area of about 410 square miles. Ground- water withdrawal in the basin has increased from about 97,000 acre-feet in 1970 to about 171,000 acre-feet in 1994. About 92 percent of the 1994 total was withdrawn in the Albuquerque area. Management of ground water in the Albuquerque Basin is related to the surface water in the Rio Grande. Because the aquifer system is hydraulically connected to the Rio Grande and water in the river is fully appropriated, the ability to reliably estimate the effects of ground-water withdrawals on flow in the river is important. This report describes the components of the Rio Grande/Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area and the data availability and data and interpretation needs relating to those components, and presents a plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. The information needs related to the components of the river/aquifer system are prioritized. Information that is necessary to improve the understanding or quantification of a component in the river/aquifer system is prioritized as essential. Information that could add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, is prioritized as useful. The study elements are prioritized in the same manner as the information needs; study elements designed to provide information considered necessary to improve the quantification of the system are prioritized as essential, and those designed to provide information that would add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, are prioritized as useful.

  13. Modeling unsaturated-zone flow at Rainier Mesa as a possible analog for a future Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    Rainier Mesa is structurally similar to Yucca Mountain, and receives precipitation similar to the estimated long-term average for Yucca Mountain. Tunnels through the unsaturated zone at Rainier Mesa have encountered perched water and, after the perched water was drained, flow in fractures and faults. Although flow observations have been primarily qualitative, Rainier Mesa hydrology is a potential analog for Yucca Mountain hydrology in a wetter climate. In this paper, a groundwater flow model that has been used in the performance assessment of Yucca Mountain--the weeps model--is applied to Rainier Mesa. The intent is to gain insight in both Rainier Mesa and the weeps flow model

  14. Approach to estimating participant pollutant exposures in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Martin A; Adar, Sara D; Allen, Ryan W; Avol, Edward; Curl, Cynthia L; Gould, Timothy; Hardie, David; Ho, Anne; Kinney, Patrick; Larson, Timothy V; Sampson, Paul; Sheppard, Lianne; Stukovsky, Karen D; Swan, Susan S; Liu, L J Sally; Kaufman, Joel D

    2009-07-01

    Most published epidemiology studies of long-term air pollution health effects have relied on central site monitoring to investigate regional-scale differences in exposure. Few cohort studies have had sufficient data to characterize localized variations in pollution, despite the fact that large gradients can exist over small spatial scales. Similarly, previous data have generally been limited to measurements of particle mass or several of the criteria gases. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) is an innovative investigation undertaken to link subclinical and clinical cardiovascular health effects with individual-level estimates of personal exposure to ambient-origin pollution. This project improves on prior work by implementing an extensive exposure assessment program to characterize long-term average concentrations of ambient-generated PM2.5, specific PM2.5 chemical components, and copollutants, with particular emphasis on capturing concentration gradients within cities. This paper describes exposure assessment in MESA Air, including questionnaires, community sampling, home monitoring, and personal sampling. Summary statistics describing the performance of the sampling methods are presented along with descriptive statistics of the air pollution concentrations by city.

  15. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and western Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf, Lease Sales 139 and 141. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.R.; Lear, E.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 139 and 141

  16. Tunable terahertz emission from the intrinsic Josephson junctions in acute isosceles triangular Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O₈+δ mesas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfanazari, K; Asai, H; Tsujimoto, M; Kashiwagi, T; Kitamura, T; Yamamoto, T; Sawamura, M; Ishida, K; Watanabe, C; Sekimoto, S; Minami, H; Tachiki, M; Klemm, R A; Hattori, T; Kadowaki, K

    2013-01-28

    In order to determine if the mesa geometry might affect the properties of the coherent terahertz (THz) radiation emitted from the intrinsic Josephson junctions in mesas constructed from single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor, Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O₈+δ, we studied triangular mesas. For equilateral triangular mesas, the observed emission was found to be limited to the single mesa TM(1,0) mode. However, tunable radiation over the range from 0.495 to 0.934 THz was found to arise from an acute isosceles triangular mesa. This 47% tunability is the widest yet observed from the outer current-voltage characteristic branch of such mesas of any geometry. Although the radiation at a few of the frequencies in the tunable range appear to have been enhanced by cavity resonances, most frequencies are far from such resonance frequencies, and can only be attributed to the ac-Josephson effect.

  17. Advances in Understanding Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Diseases: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Joel D.; Spalt, Elizabeth W.; Curl, Cynthia L.; Hajat, Anjum; Jones, Miranda R.; Kim, Sun-Young; Vedal, Sverre; Szpiro, Adam A.; Gassett, Amanda; Sheppard, Lianne; Daviglus, Martha L.; Adar, Sara D.

    2016-01-01

    The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) leveraged the platform of the MESA cohort into a prospective longitudinal study of relationships between air pollution and cardiovascular health. MESA Air researchers developed fine-scale, state-of-the-art air pollution exposure models for the MESA Air communities, creating individual exposure estimates for each participant. These models combine cohort-specific exposure monitoring, existing monitoring systems, and an extensive database of geographic and meteorological information. Together with extensive phenotyping in MESA—and adding participants and health measurements to the cohort—MESA Air investigated environmental exposures on a wide range of outcomes. Advances by the MESA Air team included not only a new approach to exposure modeling but also biostatistical advances in addressing exposure measurement error and temporal confounding. The MESA Air study advanced our understanding of the impact of air pollutants on cardiovascular disease and provided a research platform for advances in environmental epidemiology. PMID:27741981

  18. COM AÇÚCAR, COM AFETO: UM OLHAR ANTROPOLÓGICO SOBRE RITUAIS MATRIMONIAIS A PARTIR DE SUAS MESAS DE DOCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teixeira Marins

    Full Text Available Resumo Neste artigo, argumento que as mesas de doces presentes nos rituais matrimoniais ocupam lugar central nos festejos que se seguem à cerimônia de casamento e são atravessadas por dimensões econômicas, morais, materiais, estéticas e afetivas, funcionando como um condensador do ritual. Defendo ainda que, quando observadas atentamente, as mesas de doces são reveladoras da existência de uma hierarquia presente em todo o ritual, bem como de uma temporalidade que é própria dele. Nos últimos anos, venho me dedicando a estudar este ritual de passagem com o intuito de compreender alguns dos significados, códigos e valores nele investidos. O exame do percurso da mesa de doces, desde sua montagem até sua desmontagem, focalizando em especial suas funções sociais e simbólicas, é realizado a partir de material etnográfico construído entre os anos 2011 e 2014.

  19. Numerical simulation of vertical ground-water flux of the Rio Grande from ground-water temperature profiles, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolino, James R.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    1999-01-01

    An important gap in the understanding of the hydrology of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico, is the rate at which water from the Rio Grande recharges the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Several methodologies-including use of the Glover-Balmer equation, flood pulses, and channel permeameters- have been applied to this problem in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In the work presented here, ground-water temperature profiles and ground-water levels beneath the Rio Grande were measured and numerically simulated at four sites. The direction and rate of vertical ground-water flux between the river and underlying aquifer was simulated and the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying the river was estimated through model calibration. Seven sets of nested piezometers were installed during July and August 1996 at four sites along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area, though only four of the piezometer nests were simulated. In downstream order, these four sites are (1) the Bernalillo site, upstream from the New Mexico State Highway 44 bridge in Bernalillo (piezometer nest BRN02); (2) the Corrales site, upstream from the Rio Rancho sewage treatment plant in Rio Rancho (COR01); (3) the Paseo del Norte site, upstream from the Paseo del Norte bridge in Albuquerque (PDN01); and (4) the Rio Bravo site, upstream from the Rio Bravo bridge in Albuquerque (RBR01). All piezometers were completed in the inner-valley alluvium of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Ground-water levels and temperatures were measured in the four piezometer nests a total of seven times in the 24-month period from September 1996 through August 1998. The flux between the surface- and ground-water systems at each of the field sites was quantified by one-dimensional numerical simulation of the water and heat exchange in the subsurface using the heat and water transport model VS2DH. Model calibration was aided by the use of PEST, a model-independent computer program that uses

  20. The Population Structure of Phytophthora infestans from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico Suggests Genetic Differentiation Between Populations from Cultivated Potato and Wild Solanum spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flier, Wilbert G; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Kroon, Laurens P N M; Sturbaum, Anne K; van den Bosch, Trudy B M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Lozoya-Saldaña, Hector; Fry, William E; Turkensteen, Lod J

    2003-04-01

    ABSTRACT The population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico was assessed using 170 isolates collected from cultivated potatoes and the native wild Solanum spp., S. demissum and S. xendinense. All isolates were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) multi-locus fingerprint genotype. Isolate samples were monomorphic for mtDNA haplotype because all isolates tested were of the Ia haplotype. A total of 158 multilocus AFLP genotypes were identified among the 170 P. infestans isolates included in this study. P. infestans populations sampled in the Toluca Valley in 1997 were highly variable and almost every single isolate represented a unique genotype based on the analysis of 165 AFLP marker loci. Populations of P. infestans collected from the commercial potato-growing region in the valley, the subsistence potato production area along the slopes of the Nevado de Toluca, and the native Solanum spp. on the forested slopes of the volcano showed a high degree of genetic diversity. The number of polymorphic loci varied from 20.0 to 62.4% for isolates collected from the field station and wild Solanum spp. On average, 81.8% (135) of the AFLP loci were polymorphic. Hetero-zygosity varied between 7.7 and 19.4%. Significant differentiation was found at the population level between strains originating from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum spp. (P = 0.001 to 0.022). Private alleles were observed in individual isolates collected from all three populations, with numbers of unique dominant alleles varying from 9 to 16 for isolates collected from commercial potato crops and native Solanum spp., respectively. Four AFLP markers were exclusively found present in isolates collected from S. demissum. Indirect estimation of gene flow between populations indicated restricted gene flow between both P. infestans populations from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum hosts. There was no evidence

  1. Do the historical biogeography and evolutionary history of the digenean Margotrema spp. across central Mexico mirror those of their freshwater fish hosts (Goodeinae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Martínez-Aquino

    Full Text Available Host-parasite systems provide an ideal platform to study evolution at different levels, including codivergence in a historical biogeography context. In this study we aim to describe biogeographic and codivergent patterns and associated processes of the Goodeinae freshwater fish and their digenean parasite (Margotrema spp. over the last 6.5 Ma (million years, identifying the main factors (host and/or hydrogeomorphology that influenced the evolution of Margotrema. We obtained a species tree for Margotrema spp. using DNA sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers (COI and ITS1, respectively and performed molecular dating to discern divergence events within the genus. The dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis (DEC model was used to describe the historical biogeography of digeneans and applied to cophylogenetic analyses of Margotrema and their goodeine hosts. Our results showed that the evolutionary history of Margotrema has been shaped in close association with its geographic context, especially with the geological history of central Mexico during the Pleistocene. Host-specificity has been established at three levels of historical association: a Species-Species, represented by Xenotaenia resolanae-M. resolanae exclusively found in the Cuzalapa River Basin; b Species-Lineage, represented by Characodon audax-M. bravoae Lineage II, exclusive to the Upper and Middle Mezquital River Basin, and c Tribe-Lineage, including two instances of historical associations among parasites and hosts at the taxonomical level of tribe, one represented by Ilyodontini-M. bravoae Lineage I (distributed across the Ayuquila and Balsas River Basins, and another comprised of Girardinichthyini/Chapalichthyini-M. bravoae Lineage III, found only in the Lerma River Basin. We show that the evolutionary history of the parasites is, on several occasions, in agreement with the phylogenetic and biogeographic history of their hosts. A series of biogeographic and host

  2. Potential postwildfire debris-flow hazards: a prewildfire evaluation for the Sandia and Manzano Mountains and surrounding areas, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Anne C.; Haas, Jessica R.; Miller, Lara W.; Scott, Joe H.; Thompson, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire can drastically increase the probability of debris flows, a potentially hazardous and destructive form of mass wasting, in landscapes that have otherwise been stable throughout recent history. Although there is no way to know the exact location, extent, and severity of wildfire, or the subsequent rainfall intensity and duration before it happens, probabilities of fire and debris-flow occurrence for different locations can be estimated with geospatial analysis and modeling efforts. The purpose of this report is to provide information on which watersheds might constitute the most serious, potential, debris-flow hazards in the event of a large-scale wildfire and subsequent rainfall in the Sandia and Manzano Mountains. Potential probabilities and estimated volumes of postwildfire debris flows in the unburned Sandia and Manzano Mountains and surrounding areas were estimated using empirical debris-flow models developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in combination with fire behavior and burn probability models developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. The locations of the greatest debris-flow hazards correlate with the areas of steepest slopes and simulated crown-fire behavior. The four subbasins with the highest computed debris-flow probabilities (greater than 98 percent) were all in the Manzano Mountains, two flowing east and two flowing west. Volumes in sixteen subbasins were greater than 50,000 square meters and most of these were in the central Manzanos and the western facing slopes of the Sandias. Five subbasins on the west-facing slopes of the Sandia Mountains, four of which have downstream reaches that lead into the outskirts of the City of Albuquerque, are among subbasins in the 98th percentile of integrated relative debris-flow hazard rankings. The bulk of the remaining subbasins in the 98th percentile of integrated relative debris-flow hazard rankings are located along the highest and steepest slopes of the Manzano Mountains. One

  3. CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

    2003-06-01

    Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned

  4. MESAFace, a graphical interface to analyze the MESA output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, M.; Wise, M.; Mohammed, A.

    2013-04-01

    MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) has become very popular among astrophysicists as a powerful and reliable code to simulate stellar evolution. Analyzing the output data thoroughly may, however, present some challenges and be rather time-consuming. Here we describe MESAFace, a graphical and dynamical interface which provides an intuitive, efficient and quick way to analyze the MESA output. Catalogue identifier: AEOQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6300592 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: Any computer capable of running Mathematica. Operating system: Any capable of running Mathematica. Tested on Linux, Mac, Windows XP, Windows 7. RAM: Recommended 2 Gigabytes or more. Supplementary material: Additional test data files are available. Classification: 1.7, 14. Nature of problem: Find a way to quickly and thoroughly analyze the output of a MESA run, including all the profiles, and have an efficient method to produce graphical representations of the data. Solution method: We created two scripts (to be run consecutively). The first one downloads all the data from a MESA run and organizes the profiles in order of age. All the files are saved as tables or arrays of tables which can then be accessed very quickly by Mathematica. The second script uses the Manipulate function to create a graphical interface which allows the user to choose what to plot from a set of menus and buttons. The information shown is updated in real time. The user can access very quickly all the data from the run under examination and visualize it with plots and tables. Unusual features: Moving the

  5. Protection gaps in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Villasenor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With Mexico a major destination – and transit – country for people displaced by violence in the Northern Triangle of Central America, the Mexican government needs urgently to improve its asylum systems and procedures if they are to be fit for purpose.

  6. Archaeological investigations on the Buckboard Mesa Road Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amick, D.S.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

    1991-10-01

    In 1986, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of a new alignment for the Buckboard Mesa Road on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy (DOE). During this reconnaissance, several archaeological sites of National Register quality were discovered and recorded including a large quarry, site 26Ny4892, and a smaller lithic scatter, site 26Ny4894. Analysis of the debitage at 26Ny4892 indicates that this area was used primarily as a quarry for relatively small cobbles of obsidian found in the alluvium. Lithic reduction techniques used here are designed for efficiently reducing small pieces of toolstone and are oriented towards producing flake blanks from small cores and bifacially reducing exhausted cores. Projectile point cross references indicate that the area has seen at least casual use for about 10,000 years and more sustained use for the last 3,000 years. Initial obsidian hydration measurements indicate sustained use of the quarry for about the last 3,000 years although the loci of activities appear to change over time. Based on this study, the DRI recommends that quarrying activities in the area of 26Ny4892 are sufficiently sampled and that additional investigations into that aspect of prehistoric activity in the area are not necessary. This does not apply to other aspects of prehistoric use. DRI recommends that preconstruction surveys continue to identify nonquarrying, prehistoric utilization of the area. With the increased traffic on the Buckboard Mesa Road, there is a greater potential for vandalism to sites of National Register-quality located near the road. The DRI recommends that during the orientation briefing the workers at the Test Site be educated about the importance of cultural resources and the need for their protection. 202 refs., 41 figs., 52 tabs.

  7. NPDES Permit for Mesa Verde National Park Water Treatment Plant in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit number CO-0034462, the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service is authorized to discharge from the Mesa Verde National Park water treatment plant, in Montezuma County, Colo.

  8. Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Surficial Sediment Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Study was funded by NOAA and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The Atlas was a historical...

  9. Physical activity, measures of obesity, and cardiometabolic risk: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Paul A; Chen, Haiying; Lee, Duck-Chul; Artero, Enrique Garcia; Bluemke, David A; Burke, Gregory L

    2014-05-01

    The influence of higher physical activity on the relationship between adiposity and cardiometabolic risk is not completely understood. Between 2000-2002, data were collected on 6795 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. Self-reported intentional physical activity in the lowest quartile (0-105 MET-minutes/week) was categorized as inactive and the upper three quartiles (123-37,260 MET-minutes/week) as active. Associations of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference categories, stratified by physical activity status (inactive or active) with cardiometabolic risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, upper quartile of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR] for population, and impaired fasting glucose or diabetes) were assessed using logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and current smoking. Among obese participants, those who were physically active had reduced odds of insulin resistance (47% lower; P insulin resistance (OR [95% CI] 1.63 [1.24-2.15]) compared with the active reference group. Physical activity was inversely related to the cardiometabolic risk associated with obesity and central obesity.

  10. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-07-01

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the first six months of 2004 (January 1, 2004-June 30, 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Azotea Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Azote Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico.

  11. An Exploratory Study of Low Income Spanish-American Families in Dona Ana County, New Mexico: Their Marketing and Credit Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Glen Hugh

    Utilizing a 77-item questionnaire, the marketing and credit practices of the Spanish American poor in New Mexico were examined. Randomly selected from the Community Action Program files, approximately 100 households in Las Cruces, the main urban center, and 60 households in the small rural communities of Dona Ana and La Mesa (30 in each) were…

  12. Landscape Evolution Comparison between Sacra Mensa, Mars and the Grand Mesa, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, J. M.; Wegmann, K. W.; Cole, R. D.; Byrne, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Grand Mesa in Colorado is one of the largest and highest flat-topped mountains on Earth, and as such provides a compelling analog for Mars' Sacra Mensa. Both basalt-capped landforms are morphologically similar, enabling a landscape evolution comparison between the two that considers key differences in locale, composition, and environmental conditions. Sacra Mensa is nearly 50 times the area of Grand Mesa and towers 3 km above the surrounding area. The 1,300 km2 Grand Mesa rises 2 km above Grand Valley, and is bracketed by the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers in much the same way as Sacra Mensa is bounded by braided channels of Kasei Valles. The sustained incision by the Gunnison and Colorado was a key erosive force in the creation of the Grand Mesa, whereas punctuated but voluminous Hesperian glacio-fluvial floods are thought to have carved the Sacra Mensa. The Grand Mesa is undergoing extensive mass wasting, ranging from deadly landslides like the 2014 West Salt Creek rock avalanche to hundreds of slower-moving retrogressive slump blocks calving off the Miocene basalt cap. The genesis and modification of both landforms includes volcanic and fluvial activity, albeit in an inverted sequence. The Grand Mesa basalt cap has preserved the landform during the incision around its sides, whereas Sacra Mensa was likely carved by floods, with those flood channels later modified by lava flows. Recent (2015-2017) LiDAR surveys revealed massive and possible ancient landslides in many stream valleys and extensive earthflows on all sides of the Grand Mesa. In the case of the Grand Mesa, the large landslides are mainly occurring in one stratigraphic unit. In comparison, the western half of Sacra Mensa contains substantial slumping accompanied by landslides and debris flows, whereas the eastern half has relatively few such phenomena. Here, we report on the first Mesa-Mensa landscape evolution analog study. The surficial and bedrock mapping and 14C dating of key features of the

  13. Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-02-01

    In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

  14. El género Hydrophilus (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae: Hydrophilina en México y Centroamérica The genus Hydrophilus (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae: Hydrophilina in Mexico and Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Arce-Pérez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la revisión morfológica de 499 ejemplares adultos y datos bibliográficos se actualizó la identidad y la distribución precisa de las especies del género Hydrophilus Geoffroy, 1762 que habitan en México y Centroamérica. Se presenta a H. (Dibolocelus purpuracens Régimbart, 1901 como nuevo registro para México. Las especies más ampliamente distribuidas son H. (H. ensifer Brullé, 1837 en 5 países y las Antillas e H. (H. insularis Castelnau, 1840 en 4 países y las Antillas. Los países con mayor riqueza fueron México con 5 especies, y Nicaragua y Costa Rica con 3 especies. En México el estado con mayor riqueza es Veracruz, y en Nicaragua los departamentos de León y Río San Juan. Se presenta una clave ilustrada para el reconocimiento de las especies.The taxonomy and precise distribution of the species of the genus Hydrophilus Geoffroy, 1762 from Mexico and Central America are reviewed, based on the morphological study of499 adult specimens, descriptions and literature records. Hydrophilus (Dibolocelus purpuracens Régimbart, 1901 is recorded for the first time for Mexico. Species with widest distribution are H. (H. ensifer Brullé, 1837 cited from 5 countries and in the Antilles, and H. (H. insularis Castelnau, 1840 cited from 4 countries and the Antilles. The richest countries are Mexico with 5 species, and Costa Rica and Nicaragua with 3 species. The highest species richness is recorded for the state of Veracruz, Mexico, and from the departments of León and Río San Juan, Nicaragua. An illustrated key to the species is included.

  15. Analysis of the financial task generated by the construction of a nuclear power plant in Mexico; Analisis de la carga financiera generada por la construccion de una central nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Palacios, J.; Delfin, A., E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The construction of new nuclear reactors requires of a high investment making them intensive projects in capital and that require as minimum of 5 years for its construction. The financial task that represents for the electric company is of vital importance, since in the case of privates in other countries prevents them of entering in this type of projects if they do not have its Government support. In the case of Mexico, being an electric company integrated vertically can have financing to carry out this investment type. In this study is analyzed the construction viability of new nuclear reactors in Mexico based on the financial task that represents for the Electric Company its construction. (Author)

  16. On the behavior of site effects in central Mexico (the Mexican volcanic belt - MVB), based on records of shallow earthquakes that occurred in the zone between 1998 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Chavez, A.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Lermo, J.; Figueroa-Soto, A.; Valdés, C.; Montiel, M.; Chavez, O.; Arroyo, M.

    2014-06-01

    The Mexican volcanic belt (MVB) is a seismogenic zone that transects the central part of Mexico with an east-west orientation. The seismic risk and hazard of this seismogenic zone has not been studied in detail due to the scarcity of instrumental data as well as because seismicity in the continental regime of central Mexico is not too frequent. However, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw > 6.0) that have taken place in this zone. The valley of Mexico City (VM) is the sole zone, within the MVB, that has been studied in detail. Studies have mainly focused on the ground amplification during large events such as the 1985 subduction earthquake that occurred off coast of Michoacán. The purpose of this article is to analyze the behavior of site effects in the MVB zone based on records of shallow earthquakes (data not reported before) that occurred in the zone between 1998 and 2011. We present a general overview of site effects in the MVB, a classification of the stations in order to reduce the uncertainty in the data when obtaining attenuation parameters in future works, as well as some comparisons between the information presented here and that presented in previous studies. A regional evaluation of site effects and Fourier acceleration spectrum (FAS) shape was estimated based on 80 records of 22 shallow earthquakes within the MVB zone. Data of 25 stations were analyzed. Site effects were estimated by using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) methodology. The results show that seismic waves are less amplified in the northeast sites of the MVB with respect to the rest of the zone and that it is possible to classify two groups of stations: (1) stations with negligible site amplification (NSA) and (2) stations with significant site amplification (SSA). Most of the sites in the first group showed small (seismicity regions. These variations were attributed to the location of the source. These aspects help to advance the understanding

  17. Two new species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) parasitizing Girardinichthys multiradiatus (Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae), an endemic freshwater fish from central Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendoza-Palmero, Carlos Alonso; Sereno-Uribe, A. L.; Salgado-Maldonado, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 2 (2009), s. 315-318 ISSN 0022-3395 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Monogenea * Cyprinodontiformes * fishes * Mexico * Gyrodactylus * taxonomy Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.195, year: 2009

  18. Gulf of Mexico sales 142 and 143: Central and western planning areas. Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 2. Sections IV.D through IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The EIS is a description of the environmental aspects and impacts of oil and gas activities resulting from these lease sales or the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. The report provides a description of the areas, the affected environment, and the environmental consequences; it discusses the proposed actions, issues and areas of concern, and the major differences of holding these lease sales

  19. Gulf of Mexico Sales 139 and 141: Central and western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement. Volume 2: Sections 4.D. through 9. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The report is Volume II of two volumes. The EIS is a description of the environmental aspects and impacts of oil and gas activities resulting from these lease sales or the States bordering the Gulf of Mexico. The volume continues with Environmental Consequences; Consultation and Coordination; Bibliography and Special References; Preparers; Glossary; and the Appendices

  20. Gulf of Mexico Sales 142 and 143: Central and western planning areas. Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1. Sections I through IV.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The EIS is a description of the environmental aspects and impacts of oil and gas activities resulting from these lease sales or the states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. The report provides a description of the areas, the affected environment, and the environmental consequences; it discusses the proposed actions, issues and areas of concern, and the major differences of holding these lease sales

  1. Postwildfire debris-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2012 Little Bear Fire, south-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Anne C.; Matherne, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary hazard assessment was developed of the debris-flow potential from 56 drainage basins burned by the Little Bear Fire in south-central New Mexico in June 2012. The Little Bear Fire burned approximately 179 square kilometers (km2) (44,330 acres), including about 143 km2 (35,300 acres) of National Forest System lands of the Lincoln National Forest. Within the Lincoln National Forest, about 72 km2 (17,664 acres) of the White Mountain Wilderness were burned. The burn area also included about 34 km2 (8,500 acres) of private lands. Burn severity was high or moderate on 53 percent of the burn area. The area burned is at risk of substantial postwildfire erosion, such as that caused by debris flows and flash floods. A postwildfire debris-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the Little Bear Fire was performed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Lincoln National Forest. A set of two empirical hazard-assessment models developed by using data from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain Western United States was used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volume of debris flows along the burn area drainage network and for selected drainage basins within the burn area. The models incorporate measures of areal burn extent and severity, topography, soils, and storm rainfall intensity to estimate the probability and volume of debris flows following the fire. Relative hazard rankings of postwildfire debris flows were produced by summing the estimated probability and volume ranking to illustrate those areas with the highest potential occurrence of debris flows with the largest volumes. The probability that a drainage basin could produce debris flows and the volume of a possible debris flow at the basin outlet were estimated for three design storms: (1) a 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall of 27 millimeters (mm) (a 50 percent chance of occurrence in

  2. Hydrologic Source Term Processes and Models for the Clearwater and Wineskin Tests, Rainier Mesa, Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, Steven F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-04

    This report describes the development, processes, and results of a hydrologic source term (HST) model for the CLEARWATER (U12q) and WINESKIN (U12r) tests located on Rainier Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada (Figure 1.1). Of the 61 underground tests (involving 62 unique detonations) conducted on Rainier Mesa (Area 12) between 1957 and 1992 (USDOE, 2015), the CLEARWATER and WINESKIN tests present many unique features that warrant a separate HST modeling effort from other Rainier Mesa tests.

  3. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico; Conformacion de un proceso de evaluacion para una solicitud de renovacion de licencia de una central nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano R, M. L., E-mail: mlserrano@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    So that the construction stages, of operation, closing, dismantlement and the radioactive waste disposal of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are carried out in Mexico, is necessary that the operator has a license, permission or authorization for each stage. In Mexico, these licenses, permissions or authorizations are granted by the Energy Secretariat with base in the verdict of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The operation licenses ar the moment effective for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) they will expire respectively in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit 1 and Unit 2, for what the CNSNS has begun its preparation before a potential solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. Defining the process to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this phase as normalization, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc., is the task that intends to be carried out the regulator body so that the evaluation process is effective and efficient, so much for the same regulator body as for the licensee. This work exposes the advance that the CNSNS has in this aspect and is centered specifically in the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude, taking as base what the regulator body of the United States of North America (US NRC) established and following to the IAEA. Also, this work includes statistical of electric power production in Mexico, licensing antecedents for the NPP-L V, a world perspective of the license renovations and the regulation of the US NRC related to the license renovation of a NPP. (Author)

  4. Regulator process for the authorization of an amendment to the operation license of a nuclear power plant in Mexico; Proceso regulador para la autorizacion de una enmienda a la licencia de operacion de una central nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Espinosa V, J.M.; Salgado, J.R.; Mamani, Y.R. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The regulator process by which an authorization is granted from an amendment to the License of Operation of a nuclear power station in Mexico is described. It makes an appointment the effective legal mark, the technical characteristics of the modification, the evaluation process and deposition upon oath of tests and finally the elaboration of the Safety report and the Technical Verdict that is a correspondent for the regulator organism to the Secretary of Energy, the one that in turn is the responsible of granting the amendment the License just as it establishes it the Law. (Author)

  5. Geology of the Horse Range Mesa quadrangle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Fred W.; Bush, A.L.; Bell, Henry; Withington, C.F.

    1953-01-01

    The Horse Range Mesa quadrangle is one of eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of the quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore to large, tabular masses containing many thousands of tons. The ore consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary strictures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  6. Resonant Frequency Monitoring at Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, A.; Moore, J. R.; Thorne, M. S.; Culp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The national parks of southern Utah are home to a number of spectacular landmarks that draw visitors from across the world. However, there is currently no methodology in place to evaluate the structural health of these structures as they change through time or in the wake of a damaging event. Our study combines in-situ ambient vibration measurements with 3D numerical modeling to monitor the resonance characteristics of Mesa Arch, a prominent arch in Canyonlands National Park. We measure spectral and polarization attributes of ambient vibrations using two broadband seismometers: one placed on the arch and the other located at a distance of ~100 m for reference. Repeat measurements, ranging in duration from 1 hour to 3 days, are aimed at assessing short- and long-term changes in resonance characteristics, which in turn provide evidence of internal mechanical change. Numerical modal analysis, executed by inputting geometric and representative material properties of the arch into 3D modeling software, allows us to match the measured fundamental frequency as well as higher-order modes. Preliminary results suggest minor variations in resonant frequencies are predominantly controlled by thermal effects, i.e. changes in bulk material stiffness as the rock expands and contracts.

  7. MESA: Message-Based System Analysis Using Runtime Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Nastaran; Tkachuk, Oksana; Mehlitz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach and framework for run-time verication of large, safety critical messaging systems. This work was motivated by verifying the System Wide Information Management (SWIM) project of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). SWIM provides live air traffic, site and weather data streams for the whole National Airspace System (NAS), which can easily amount to several hundred messages per second. Such safety critical systems cannot be instrumented, therefore, verification and monitoring has to happen using a nonintrusive approach, by connecting to a variety of network interfaces. Due to a large number of potential properties to check, the verification framework needs to support efficient formulation of properties with a suitable Domain Specific Language (DSL). Our approach is to utilize a distributed system that is geared towards connectivity and scalability and interface it at the message queue level to a powerful verification engine. We implemented our approach in the tool called MESA: Message-Based System Analysis, which leverages the open source projects RACE (Runtime for Airspace Concept Evaluation) and TraceContract. RACE is a platform for instantiating and running highly concurrent and distributed systems and enables connectivity to SWIM and scalability. TraceContract is a runtime verication tool that allows for checking traces against properties specified in a powerful DSL. We applied our approach to verify a SWIM service against several requirements.We found errors such as duplicate and out-of-order messages.

  8. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge at Pahute Mesa using the Chloride Mass-Balance Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Lyles, Brad F [DRI

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater recharge on Pahute Mesa was estimated using the chloride mass-balance (CMB) method. This method relies on the conservative properties of chloride to trace its movement from the atmosphere as dry- and wet-deposition through the soil zone and ultimately to the saturated zone. Typically, the CMB method assumes no mixing of groundwater with different chloride concentrations; however, because groundwater is thought to flow into Pahute Mesa from valleys north of Pahute Mesa, groundwater flow rates (i.e., underflow) and chloride concentrations from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat were carefully considered. Precipitation was measured with bulk and tipping-bucket precipitation gauges installed for this study at six sites on Pahute Mesa. These data, along with historical precipitation amounts from gauges on Pahute Mesa and estimates from the PRISM model, were evaluated to estimate mean annual precipitation. Chloride deposition from the atmosphere was estimated by analyzing quarterly samples of wet- and dry-deposition for chloride in the bulk gauges and evaluating chloride wet-deposition amounts measured at other locations by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Mean chloride concentrations in groundwater were estimated using data from the UGTA Geochemistry Database, data from other reports, and data from samples collected from emplacement boreholes for this study. Calculations were conducted assuming both no underflow and underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. Model results estimate recharge to be 30 mm/yr with a standard deviation of 18 mm/yr on Pahute Mesa, for elevations >1800 m amsl. These estimates assume Pahute Mesa recharge mixes completely with underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. The model assumes that precipitation, chloride concentration in bulk deposition, underflow and its chloride concentration, have been constant over the length of time of recharge.

  9. Paleosols of the upper Paleozoic Sangre de Cristo Formation, north-central New Mexico: Record of early Permian palaeoclimate in tropical Pangaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence H. Tanner

    2017-04-01

    During the early Permian, northern New Mexico was situated in a near equatorial position (ca. 4° N. The overall character of the paleosols suggests a persistent warm, semi-humid, seasonal climate throughout most of the interval of deposition during the Wolfcampian, but with episodically increased aridity during formation of the more mature calcretes. No long-term trend of climate change is evident in the stratigraphic section examined for this study.

  10. Used battery collection camping in central Mexico: statics and metal content report, advances in recycling technology and legislative/regulatory situation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara-Garcia, J. A.; Montiel-Corona, V.; Juarez Galindo, A.; Mendoza Sarmiento, G.; Munoz Lopez, F.; Papalotzi Juarez, S.; Cruz Diaz, R. de la

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, environmental pollution produced by the disposal of used cells and batteries is a major concern in Mexico. The regulatory law proposal (NMX-AA-104-SCFI-2006) establish a content limit 20, 7.5 and 5 fold higher in Hg, Cd and Pb, respectively, than the European directive 2006/66/CE. Furthermore, transnational companies refused to have participation on the collection/recycling process, putting forward that pollution comes only from illegal market batteries. (Author)

  11. Gulf of Mexico Sales 139 and 141: Central and western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement. Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The report is Volume I of two volumes. The EIS is a description of the environmental aspects and impacts of oil and gas activities resulting from these lease sales or the States bordering the Gulf of Mexico. It provides a description of the areas, the affected environment, and the environmental consequences; it describes the proposed actions, issues and areas of concern, and the major differences of holding these lease sales

  12. Mountainous Ecosystem Sensor Array (MESA): a mesh sensor network for climate change research in remote mountainous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. W.; Neal, D.; Frome, D.; Kavanagh, K.; Davis, A.; Gessler, P. E.; Hess, H.; Holden, Z. A.; Link, T. E.; Newingham, B. A.; Smith, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Developing sensor networks robust enough to perform unattended in the world's remote regions is critical since these regions serve as important benchmarks that lack anthropogenic influence. Paradoxically, the factors that make these remote, natural sites challenging for sensor networking are often what make them indispensable for climate change research. The MESA (Mountainous Ecosystem Sensor Array) project has faced these challenges and developed a wireless mesh sensor network across a 660 m topoclimatic gradient in a wilderness area in central Idaho. This sensor array uses advances in sensing, networking, and power supply technologies to provide near real-time synchronized data covering a suite of biophysical parameters used in ecosystem process models. The 76 sensors in the network monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, humidity, air and soil temperature, soil water content, precipitation, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, snow depth, wind speed and direction, and leaf wetness at synchronized time intervals ranging from two minutes to two hours and spatial scales from a few meters to two kilometers. We present our novel methods of placing sensors and network nodes above, below, and throughout the forest canopy without using meteorological towers. In addition, we explain our decision to use different forms of power (wind and solar) and the equipment we use to control and integrate power harvesting. Further, we describe our use of the network to sense and quantify its own power use. Using examples of environmental data from the project, we discuss how these data may be used to increase our understanding of the effects of climate change on ecosystem processes in mountainous environments. MESA sensor locations across a 700 m topoclimatic gradient at the University of Idaho Taylor Wilderness Research Station.

  13. Helminth parasites of atherinopsid freshwater fishes (Osteichthyes: Atheriniformes from central Mexico Helmintos parásitos de aterinópsidos de agua dulce (Osteichthyes: Atheriniformes del centro de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Lira-Guerrero

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Between May 1997 and September 1998, 270 atherinopsids belonging to 7 fish species were analyzed for helminths in 6 lakes located in central Mexico. In addition, a database with all the available previous records of helminth parasites of atherinopsids was built. Based on both information sources, we analyze the composition of the helminth fauna parasitizing atherinopsid freshwater fishes from central Mexico, in order to determine some general species compositional patterns. The helminth fauna parasitizing this fish family in central Mexico is composed by 10 digeneans, 13 cestodes, 1 acanthocephalan, and 8 nematodes (24 of them as larval stage. Individual species richness ranged from 1 to 22 helminth species. Feeding habits of the hosts are identified as the main factor in determining helminth species composition (22 of them are acquired through ingestion. Helminth species composition of almost all host species was dominated by generalist helminth species. Only 2 specialist species were found: Allocreadium mexicanum and Spinitectus osorioi, representing the core helminth fauna of this group of fishes. These results corroborate the hypothesis that the parasite fauna in freshwater fishes is largely circumscribed by higher levels of monophyletic host taxa.Entre mayo de 1997 y septiembre de 1998, se recolectaron 270 aterinópsidos pertenecientes a 7 especies de peces en busca de helmintos, en 6 lagos del centro de México. Basados en esta información y en los registros previos sobre helmintos en este grupo de hospederos, se construyó una base de datos. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar dicha información, para establecer algunos patrones generales acerca de la composición de los helmintos que los parasitan. Treinta y dos especies de helmintos infectan a los peces de esta familia (10 digéneos, 13 cestodos, 1 acantocefalo y 8 nematodos, 24 de ellas en estado larvario. Los hábitos alimenticios de los aterinópsidos determinan la composici

  14. Annotated bibliography of the physical data of Rainier Mesa and Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.E.

    1988-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been designated as the only site to undergo characterization to determine if it meets the criteria to become the Nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. During this process, care must be taken to not compromise the site's integrity through excessive testing. In order to supplement the limited data to be gathered at Yucca Mountain, analog areas are to be considered. This annotated bibliography was compiled by the Desert Research Institute to help investigate ways in which Rainier Mesa could either be used as a supplemental repository test site or where existing Rainier Mesa data can be used either to support or refute test results from Yucca Mountain. Rainier Mesa, the location of numerous underground nuclear tests on the NTS, possesses some geologic characteristics similar to those of Yucca Mountain, which makes it a likely candidate for comparison. Almost 500 references regarding geology, hydrology, meteorology, biology, and archaeology were annotated and entered alpha-numerically into the bibliography. These references were categorized into 50 topics which are defined in Section 2 and presented in Section 3. Each reference is categorized as to whether it contains Yucca Mountain data, Rainier Mesa data, or both, and a final category consists of those reports that contain Rainier Mesa data that have already been applied to Yucca Mountain research. The annotated bibliography is presented in Section 4

  15. Another Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Carlin

    2009-01-01

    A Mexican saying holds that "Como Mexico no hay dos"--There is only one Mexico. American media these days interpret that notion with a vengeance. Story after story depicts a country overrun by out-of-control drug wars and murder, where corrupt police officers trip over beheaded victims more often than they nab perpetrators. South of the…

  16. La geopolítica de México en Centro América: ¿una hegemonía regional? Mexico's geopolitics in Central America: regional hegemony?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Rocha

    2006-12-01

    analizar el Mecanismo de Diálogo y Concertación de Tuxtla-Gutiérrez y sus tres ámbitos de operación: 1. El ámbito político. 2. El ámbito del desarrollo. 3. El ámbito de la cooperación técnica regional. 4. El ámbito económico, comercial y financiero.Mexico as well as Brazil (first decade of 2000 started to release geo-economic and geo-political projections about their unmediated surroundings (their region of belonging and their mediated surroundings (their neighboring region, besides playing major political roles in their far surroundings (the Latin American and Caribbean region and their remote surroundings (the American continent. As a result, we have proposed and developed the idea that such situations and realities are those of processes of constitution of States with "sub-hegemonic" roles, with their respective functions of "sub-hegemony". We therefore ask the following question: Why are both Mexico and Brazil defining "sub-hegemonic" roles? Are such roles and functions possible within a continental space where a "superpower" exerts unquestionable "supremacy" besides seeking to redefine its "hegemony" (the one now undergoing a crisis? In order to work on the theme of Mexico's geopolitical relations with Central America, we have carried out four approximations: Mexico's current stance; historical background of the relations; process of institutionalization of cooperation; and field of action of the relations. Besides, the work is concluded with some ideas about Mexico's geopolitical view. The approximation to Mexico's structural stance in the world and in the American Continent seeks to highlight realities in its condition of semiperipheral and "sub-hegemonic" country. The historical approximation leads to the 1980s and the 1990s, when the background for Mexico's cooperation with Central America is established and that cooperation is started and strengthened. The institutional approximation, focused on the 1990s and the early 2000s, approaches the field of

  17. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy

  18. 75 FR 63488 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ...; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: Under the... valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event... of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other forms of CVD that...

  19. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychaner, James H.

    1983-01-01

    The N aquifer is the main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations in northeastern Arizona. The N aquifer consists of the Navajo Sandstone and parts of the underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone of Jurassic and Triassic age. Maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 1,050 feet in the northwestern part of the area, and the aquifer thins to extinction to the southeast. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles of the area. To the east, north, and west of Black Mesa, the aquifer is exposed at the surface, and water is unconfined. The aquifer was in equilibrium before about 1965. Recharge of about 13,000 acre-feet per year was balanced primarily by discharge near Moenkopi Wash and Laguna Creek and by evapotranspiration. At least 180 million acre-feet of water was in storage. The estimated average hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 0.65 foot per day. The confined storage coefficient is estimated to be about 0.0004 where the aquifer is thickest, and the estimated unconfined storage coefficient ranges from 0.10 to 0.15. Ground-water withdrawals that averaged 5,300 acre-feet per year from 1976 to 1979 have caused water levels to decline in wells in the confined part of the aquifer. Withdrawals include an average of 3,700 acre-feet per year to supply a coal-slurry pipeline from a coal mine on Black Mesa. Six observation wells equipped with water-level recorders have been used to monitor aquifer response. The water level in one well 32 miles south of the mine declined 17 feet from 1972 through 1979 and 3.5 feet during 1979. A mathematical model of the N aquifer was developed and calibrated for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The model was used in part to improve estimates of aquifer characteristics and the water budget, and it successfully reproduced the observed response of the aquifer through 1979. The model results indicate that about 95 percent of

  20. TPH and PAH concentrations in the subsoil of polyduct segments, oil pipeline pumping stations, and right-of-way pipelines from Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturbe, Rosario; Castro, Alejandrina; Perez, Guillermina; Flores, Carlos; Torres, Luis G.

    2008-10-01

    For the year 1996, 366 incidents related with clandestine poaching of oil-products were reported in Mexico, 159 in 1997, and 240 in 1998. For the year 2003 (the most recently reported figure), there were 136 events. Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), very concerned with the environmental agenda, has developed programs oriented to diminish contamination levels in all of its oil facilities. This work was aimed at characterizing zones around polyduct segments, pipelines, pumping stations, and right-of-way pipelines located in the center of Mexico. The TPH contaminated sites were, in decreasing order, polyduct km 39 + 150 > polyduct km 25 + 020 > Zoquital > Tepetitlan > Catalina > Venta Prieta > Ceiba. Most of the sampled points showed the presence of more than one of the 16 PAHs considered by USEPA as priority pollutants. Except point TEPE 2A, where no PAHs were detected, all the sampled points showed values from low to medium concentrations; however, values found at the sites did not exceed the limits according to the Mexican or the American legislation. The place with the largest contaminated area corresponded to the polyduct km 39 + 150, with 130 m2 and 260 m3 to be treated. The least contaminated area was that around the JUAN 4 point at Juandho station, with 20 m2 and 22 m3 of contaminated soil. The total area to be treated is about 230 m2 and 497 m3.

  1. Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico (Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora Pablo, Irasema; Lengeling, M. Martha; Rubio Zenil, Buenaventura; Crawford, Troy; Goodwin, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews.…

  2. Caracterización de Tagetes filifolia del centro-sur de México por morfometría de los aquenios Characterization of Tagetes filifolia from central-south Mexico by morphometric achene traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Núñez-Colín

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tagetes filifolia Lag. es una especie ruderal ampliamente distribuida en México de la cual se empieza a conocer su variabilidad morfológica, como parte de una serie de estudios relacionados con su posible domesticación para obtener biopesticidas. Para ampliar el conocimiento sobre este recurso vegetal se definieron mediante 11 características del aquenio 104 recolecciones del centro-sur de México empleando una técnica digital de imágenes. Se identificaron 5 diferentes grupos morfológicos. El Grupo I presentó recolecciones con aquenios pequeños y anchos; el Grupo II, aquenios grandes y anchos; el Grupo III, aquenios pequeños y alargados; el Grupo IV, aquenios grandes y alargados, y el Grupo V, aquenios grandes pero más alargados que los del Grupo IV. Las variables más discriminantes fueron el índice de alargamiento, índice de compactación, índice de redondez, relación eje menor/ eje mayor para la raíz canónica 1, y perímetro longitudinal y longitud del eje mayor para la raíz canónica 2. La gran variabilidad de las características de la forma y tamaño de los aquenios de T. filifolia se pudo agrupar en 5 morfotipos, los cuales no estuvieron presentes en toda la región centro-sur de México.Tagetes filifolia Lag. is a ruderal species widely distributed in Mexico from which is starting to make knowledge about its morphological variability as a part of a study sequence related with its possible domestication to obtain biopesticides. For acquiring more knowledge on this plant resource, 104 accessions from central-south Mexico were morphologically characterized by 11 achene traits employing a digital images technique. Five different morphologic groups were identified. Group I had accessions with small and wide achenes, group II had big and wide achenes, group III had small and long achenes, group IV had big and long achenes, and group V had big achenes but longer than group IV. The most discriminant variables were elongation

  3. 76 FR 52946 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Sims Mesa Central Delivery Point (CDP) compressor station in northwestern Rio Arriba County, New Mexico... Williams Four Corners, LLC, Sims Mesa CDP Compressor Station AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... the Williams Four Corners, LLC, Sims Mesa CDP Compressor Station is available electronically at: http...

  4. Padrão de identidade e qualidade do tomate (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) de mesa

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira,Sila Mary Rodrigues; Freitas,Renato João Sossela de; Lazzari,Elisa Noemberg

    2004-01-01

    O valor comercial do tomate, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., é definido pelas características de identidade e qualidade presentes no fruto que podem ser avaliadas pela classificação do produto. A presente revisão de literatura teve como objetivo descrever o padrão de identidade e qualidade do tomate de mesa, através da classificação. O tomate de mesa é classificado em grupos, subgrupos, classes e tipos. De acordo com o formato do fruto, o tomate é classificado em dois grupos: oblongo, quando o...

  5. Paleoecological studies at Lake Patzcuaro on the west-central Mexican Plateau and at Chalco in the basin of Mexico*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, W. A.; Bradbury, J. Platt

    1982-01-01

    A 1520-cm sediment core from Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacan, Mexico, is 44,000 yr old at the base. All parts of the core have abundant pollen of Pinus (pine), Alnus (alder), and Quercus (oak) with frequent Abies (fir). The interval dated from 44,000 to 11,000 yr ago has a homogeneous flora characterized by abundant Juniperus (juniper) pollen and frequent Artemisia (sagebrush). It is believed to represent an appreciably drier and colder climate than at present. The Holocene at Lake Patzcuaro is characterized by a moderate increase in Pinus pollen and the loss of Juniperus pollen, as the modern type of climate succeeded. Alnus was abundant until about 5000 yr ago; its abrupt decrease with the first appearance of herbaceous weed pollen may reflect the cutting of lake-shore and stream-course alder communities for agricultural purposes, or it may simply reflect a drying tendency in the climate. Pollen of Zea (corn) appears at Lake Patzcuaro along with low peaks of chenopod and grass pollen at 3500 yr B.P. apparently recording a human population large enough to modify the natural environment, as well as the beginning of agriculture. A rich aquatic flora in this phase suggests eutrophication of the lake by slope erosion. In the most recent period corn is absent from the sediments, perhaps reflecting a change in agricultural practices. The environment changes at Lake Patzcuaro are similar to and correlate with those in the Cuenca de Mexico, where diatom stratigraphy from the Chalco basin indicates fluctuations in lake levels and lake chemistry in response to variations in available moisture. Before 10,000 yr ago climates there were cool and dry, and the Chalco basin was occupied by a shallow freshwater marsh that drained north to Lake Texcoco, where saline water accumulated by evaporation. Increases in effective moisture and possible melting of glaciers during the Holocene caused lake levels to rise throughout the Cuenca de Mexico, and Lake Texcoco flooded the Chalco basin with

  6. Gulf of Mexico sales 147 and 150: Central and western planning areas. Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 2. Sections IV.D through IX. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Contents: environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives; proposed central gulf sale 147; proposed western gulf sale 150; analysis of a large oil spill; consultation and coordination; bibliography and special references; glossary; appendices

  7. Paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic study on volcanic units of the Valsequillo Basin: implications for early human occupation in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Pozzo, Ana Lillian Martin-Del; Rocha-Fernandez, Jose Luis; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Soler-Arechalde, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    Alleged human and animal footprints were found within the upper bedding surfaces of the Xalnene volcanic ash layer that outcrops in the Valsequillo Basin, south of Puebla, Mexico (Gonzalez et al, 2005). The ash has been dated at 40 ka by optically stimulated luminescence analysis, thereby providing new evidence that America was colonized earlier than the Clovis culture (about 13.5 Ma). We carried out paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analysis on 18 Xalnene ash block and core samples collected at two distinct localities and 19 standard paleomagnetic cores belonging to nearby monogenetic volcanoes. Our data provide evidence that both the volcanic lava flow and Xalnene ash were emplaced during the Laschamp geomagnetic event spanning from about 45 to 39 ka.

  8. Paleomagnetic Evidence From Volcanic Units of Valsequillo Basin for the Laschamp Geomagnetic Excursion, and Implications for Early Human Occupation in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, J.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Martin Del Pozzo, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Soler, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Alleged human and animal footprints were found within the upper bedding surfaces of the Xalnene volcanic ash layer that outcrops in Valsequillo basin, south of Puebla, Mexico (Gonzalez et al., Quaternary Science Reviews doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev, 2005). The ash has been dated to 40 ka by means of optically stimulated luminescence analysis. This was held as new evidence that America was colonized earlier. We carried out paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analysis of 18 Xalnene ash block and core samples collected at two distinct localities, and nineteen standard paleomagnetic cores belonging to nearby monogenetic volcanoes. Our data yield evidence that both volcanic lava flow and Xalnene ash were emplaced at during the Laschamp geomagnetic event spanning from about 45 to 39 ka. This interpretation indicates that Valsequillo probably remains one of the sites of early human occupation in the Americas, producing evidence of early arrival.

  9. Egade, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubany, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Presents a business school design in Mexico, whose spiral building sits atop a parking structure creating a compact, symbolic form for an arid urban landscape. Includes seven photographs, a floor plan, and sectional drawing. (GR)

  10. Mexico North-South Deflections (DMEX97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Mexico, and North-Central is the DMEX97 model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine...

  11. Mexico East-West Deflections (DMEX97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Mexico, and North-Central is the DMEX97 model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine...

  12. Aptitud agroclimática en la Mesa Central de Guanajuato, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Granados Ramírez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente en la agricultura de temporal están implícitos el riesgo y la incertidumbre; constantemente los agricultores temporaleros obtienen los menores rendimientos por unidad de superficie y los mayores índices de siniestralidad. Las principales causas de siniestro son impugnables al ambiente, principalmente por los cambios climáticos paulatinos que se han presentado. Conocer el comportamiento y la distribución actual de los elementos del clima en tiempo y espacio, es de vital importancia para adecuar técnicas agrícolas que se ajusten a estos cambios. Este trabajo consistió en integrar un conjunto de indicadores térmicos y pluviales que influyen directamente en la actividad agrícola. Los indicadores fueron aplicados en la región norte de Guanajuato, para obtener una regionalización potencial climática y sugerir la introducción de cultivos alternativos como: amaranto, sorgo y girasol forrajero.

  13. 77 FR 20376 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...:15 p.m. ADDRESSES: Bradbury Science Museum, 15th and Central Avenue, Los Alamos, New Mexico. FOR... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens...

  14. Sociodemographic correlates of cognition in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to describe the methodology utilized to evaluate cognitive function in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and to present preliminary results by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Cross-sectional measurements of a prospective observational cohort. Residents of 6 U.S. commun...

  15. Mesa-height Dependent Quantum Efficiency Characteristics of InGaN Micro-LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of mesa-height dependent efficiency and efficiency droop of blue InGaN/GaN micro-LED is presented. Device with a large etch-depth (> 1.3 µm) shows significant strain relief with aggravated current crowding.

  16. ERDA test facilities, East Mesa Test Site. Geothermal resource investigations, Imperial Valley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Detailed specifications which must be complied with in the construction of the ERDA Test Facilities at the East Mesa Site for geothermal resource investigations in Imperial Valley, California are presented for use by prospective bidders for the construction contract. The principle construction work includes a 700 gpm cooling tower with its associated supports and equipment, pipelines from wells, electrical equipment, and all earthwork. (LCL)

  17. Canine neoplasia and exposure to uranium mill tailings in Mesa County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, J.S.; Schweitzer, D.J.; Ferguson, S.W.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    A canine cancer registry was established for Mesa County, Colorado in order to collect material for a case control analysis of exposure to uranium tailings. Between 1979 and 1981, 212 cases of canine cancer were confirmed histologically. Based on the address provided at the time of diagnosis, 33 dogs (15.6%) lived in a house with some exposure to uranium tailings. A control group, comprised of dogs with a histologic diagnosis other than cancer, was stratified according to hospital and matched with cases on a 1:1 basis. No significant differences were noted with respect to exposure to uranium tailings for total cancers or cancers of specific sites including lymph node, breast, liver, testicle and bone. The overall estimated relative risk was 0.70 (95% CI 0.04 to 1.16). Canine population estimates were derived for Mesa County in order to develop crude incidence rates for the major types and sites of cancer. Crude rates were compared with those published previously for Alameda County, California and Tulsa County, Oklahoma. Mesa County rates for total cancer incidence, connective tissue tumors and non melanoma skin cancer were higher than those reported for Alameda County. When compared with Tulsa County, Mesa County rates for total cancer, breast cancer, melanoma and mastocytoma were lower than expected while rates for osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma and fibrosarcoma significantly exceeded expected values

  18. 78 FR 16816 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Munds Park, Wickenburg, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Munds Park... filed by Univision Radio License Corporation for an increase in existing service by Station KHOV-FM, Wickenburg, Arizona. The Bureau also dismisses a Petition for Rule Making filed by Rocket Radio, Inc. for a...

  19. 77 FR 2242 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [MB Docket No. 08-85; RM-11427, RM-11517, RM-11518, RM-11519; DA 11- 2059] Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ, and Needles, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed...

  20. 77 FR 2241 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ...-2058] Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...., proposes the allotment of FM Channel 287C2 at Williams, Arizona, as the community's second local service... Williams allotment, we issue an Order to Show Cause to Univision Radio License Corporation as to why its...

  1. Mesa Verde: A Study of Man in an Agricultural Setting. Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This student manual contains information and guides to assist the secondary student in functioning as an archeologist. Included are fables, pictures for analysis, a time line and description of the pre-history of Mesa Verde, Colorado. The manual concludes with artifact identification word sheets. A related document is ED 001 722. (AWW)

  2. New species of the damselfly genus Argia from Mexico, Central America and Ecuador with an emphasis on Costa Rica (Insecta: Odonata: Coenagrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Rosser W; Ellenrieder, Natalia VON

    2017-02-20

    Seven new species of Argia are described, five of which occur in Costa Rica: Argia calverti n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Costa Rica, Cartago Prov., Tapantí Reserve, 1,310 m, 6 vii 1963, F. G. Thompson leg., in FSCA); Argia carolus n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Costa Rica, San José Prov., El Rodeo Biological Reserve, 7 km W of Villa Colón, 9°54' N, 84°16' W, 561 m, 10-13 vii 1990, T. W. Donnelly leg., in FSCA); Argia elongata n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Costa Rica, Cartago Prov., Reventazón river, SE of Turrialba by highway 10, 9°52'56'' N, 83°38'49'' W, 561 m, 10 viii 1979, R. W. & J. A. Garrison leg., in CSCA); Argia haberi n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Costa Rica, San José Prov., Bosque del Tolomuco, km 118 on Pan American highway, in seeps and trickles through brushy pasture on forested hillside, 9°28'18'' N, 83°41'48'' W, 1,710 m, 27 iii 2006, F. Sibley leg., in FSCA); Argia schorri n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Costa Rica, Puntarenas Prov., 2.8 mi E of Golfito, 8°39' N, 83°7' W, 35 m, 4 vii 1967, O. S. Flint, Jr. & M. A. Ortiz B. leg., in USNM), and two which are so far only known from Mexico and Ecuador respectively: Argia rudolphi n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Mexico, Puebla State, Zihuateutla, Sierra de Huauchinango, La Unión, in drainage area, 20°14'25'' N, 97°53'38'' W, 596 m, 21 v 1987, R. Novelo & A. Gómez leg., in CSCA) and Argia schneideri n. sp. (Holotype ♂, Ecuador, Napo Prov., Las Palmas, on Anzu river in Napo river watershed, 11 xii 1936, W. Clark-MacIntyre leg., in UMMZ). All the new species, as well as closely related species needed for diagnosis including A. anceps Garrison, A. cupraurea Calvert, A. cuprea (Hagen), A. extranea (Hagen), A. fissa Selys, A. fulgida Navás, A. oenea Hagen in Selys, A. popoluca Calvert, A. rhoadsi Calvert, and A. westfalli Garrison, are illustrated and diagnosed from their congeners and their known distribution areas are mapped.

  3. Molecular detection and sensitivity to antibiotics and bacteriocins of pathogens isolated from bovine mastitis in family dairy herds of central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Galván, Ma Fabiola; Barboza-Corona, José E; Lechuga-Arana, A Arianna; Valencia-Posadas, Mauricio; Aguayo, Daniel D; Cedillo-Pelaez, Carlos; Martínez-Ortega, Erika A; Gutierrez-Chavez, Abner J

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two farms (n = 535 cows) located in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico, were sampled. Pathogens from bovine subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CLM) were identified by 16S rDNA and the sensitivity to both antibiotics and bacteriocins of Bacillus thuringiensis was tested. Forty-six milk samples were selected for their positive California Mastitis Test (CMT) (≥3) and any abnormality in the udder or milk. The frequency of SCM and CLM was 39.1% and 9.3%, respectively. Averages for test day milk yield (MY), lactation number (LN), herd size (HS), and number of days in milk (DM) were 20.6 kg, 2.8 lactations, 16.7 animals, and 164.1 days, respectively. MY was dependent on dairy herd (DH), LN, HS, and DM (P resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, ampicillin, and cefotaxime. Bacteriocins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis inhibited the growth of multiantibiotic resistance bacteria such as S. agnetis, S. equorum, Streptococcus uberis, Brevibacterium stationis, and Brachybacterium conglomeratum, but they were not active against S. sciuri, a microorganism that showed an 84% resistance to antibiotics tested in this study.

  4. Molecular Detection and Sensitivity to Antibiotics and Bacteriocins of Pathogens Isolated from Bovine Mastitis in Family Dairy Herds of Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Galván, Ma. Fabiola; Barboza-Corona, José E.; Lechuga-Arana, A. Arianna; Valencia-Posadas, Mauricio; Aguayo, Daniel D.; Cedillo-Pelaez, Carlos; Martínez-Ortega, Erika A.; Gutierrez-Chavez, Abner J.

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two farms (n = 535 cows) located in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico, were sampled. Pathogens from bovine subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CLM) were identified by 16S rDNA and the sensitivity to both antibiotics and bacteriocins of Bacillus thuringiensis was tested. Forty-six milk samples were selected for their positive California Mastitis Test (CMT) (≥3) and any abnormality in the udder or milk. The frequency of SCM and CLM was 39.1% and 9.3%, respectively. Averages for test day milk yield (MY), lactation number (LN), herd size (HS), and number of days in milk (DM) were 20.6 kg, 2.8 lactations, 16.7 animals, and 164.1 days, respectively. MY was dependent on dairy herd (DH), LN, HS, and DM (P < 0.01), and correlations between udder quarters from the CMT were around 0.49 (P < 0.01). Coagulase-negative staphylococci were mainly identified, as well as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Brevibacterium stationis, B. conglomeratum, and Staphylococcus agnetis. Bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, ampicillin, and cefotaxime. Bacteriocins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis inhibited the growth of multiantibiotic resistance bacteria such as S. agnetis, S. equorum, Streptococcus uberis, Brevibacterium stationis, and Brachybacterium conglomeratum, but they were not active against S. sciuri, a microorganism that showed an 84% resistance to antibiotics tested in this study. PMID:25815326

  5. Genetic Diversity and Distribution of Blastocystis Subtype 3 in Human Populations, with Special Reference to a Rural Population in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Rojas-Velázquez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blastocystis subtype 3 (ST3 is a parasitic protist found in the digestive tract of symptomatic and asymptomatic humans around the world. While this parasite exhibits a high prevalence in the human population, its true geographic distribution and global genetic diversity are still unknown. This gap in knowledge limits the understanding of the spread mechanisms, epidemiology, and impact that this parasite has on human populations. Herein, we provided new data on the geographical distribution and genetic diversity of Blastocystis ST3 from a rural human population in Mexico. To do so, we collected and targeted the SSU-rDNA region in fecal samples from this population and further compared its genetic diversity and structure with that previously observed in populations of Blastocystis ST3 from other regions of the planet. Our analyses reveled that diversity of Blastocystis ST3 showed a high haplotype diversity and genetic structure to the world level; however, they were low in the Morelos population. The haplotype network revealed a common widespread haplotype from which the others were generated recently. Finally, our results suggested a recent expansion of the diversity of Blastocystis ST3 worldwide.

  6. High numbers of Vibrio vulnificus in tar balls collected from oiled areas of the north-central Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhen; Bullard, Stephen; Arias, Covadonga

    2011-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill was the largest oil spill in USA history releasing approximately 4.9 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Soon after the spill started, tar balls and other forms of weathered oil appeared in large numbers on beaches in Mississippi and Alabama. In this study, we analyzed tar balls for total aerobic bacterial (TAB) counts and also for the presence of Vibrio vulnificus, a human pathogen known to be abundant in the Gulf Coast environment and capable of causing severe wound infections by contact with contaminated surfaces. Our results showed that TAB counts were significantly higher in tar balls than in sand and seawater collected at the same location. In addition, V. vulnificus numbers were 10× higher in tar balls than in sand and up to 100× higher than in seawater. Densities of V. vulnificus were higher than 10(5) colony forming units/g of tar ball in all samples analyzed. Our data suggest that tar balls can act as reservoirs for bacteria including human pathogens.

  7. Vegetation classification and distribution mapping report Mesa Verde National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; McTeague, Monica L.; Ogden, Lindsay; Floyd, M. Lisa; Schulz, Keith; Friesen, Beverly A.; Fancher, Tammy; Waltermire, Robert G.; Cully, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The classification and distribution mapping of the vegetation of Mesa Verde National Park (MEVE) and surrounding environment was achieved through a multi-agency effort between 2004 and 2007. The National Park Service’s Southern Colorado Plateau Network facilitated the team that conducted the work, which comprised the U.S. Geological Survey’s Southwest Biological Science Center, Fort Collins Research Center, and Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center; Northern Arizona University; Prescott College; and NatureServe. The project team described 47 plant communities for MEVE, 34 of which were described from quantitative classification based on f eld-relevé data collected in 1993 and 2004. The team derived 13 additional plant communities from field observations during the photointerpretation phase of the project. The National Vegetation Classification Standard served as a framework for classifying these plant communities to the alliance and association level. Eleven of the 47 plant communities were classified as “park specials;” that is, plant communities with insufficient data to describe them as new alliances or associations. The project team also developed a spatial vegetation map database representing MEVE, with three different map-class schemas: base, group, and management map classes. The base map classes represent the fi nest level of spatial detail. Initial polygons were developed using Definiens Professional (at the time of our use, this software was called eCognition), assisted by interpretation of 1:12,000 true-color digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles (DOQQs). These polygons (base map classes) were labeled using manual photo interpretation of the DOQQs and 1:12,000 true-color aerial photography. Field visits verified interpretation concepts. The vegetation map database includes 46 base map classes, which consist of associations, alliances, and park specials classified with quantitative analysis, additional associations and park specials noted

  8. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF STATE DATA RELATED TO ABANDONED CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Seay Nance

    2003-03-01

    This 2003 Spring Semi-Annual Report contains a summary of the Final Technical Report being prepared for the Soil Remediation Requirements at Commercial and Centralized Drilling-Fluid Disposal (CCDD) Sites project funded by the United States Department of Energy under DOE Award No. DE-AC26-99BC15225. The summary describes (1) the objectives of the investigation, (2) a rationale and methodology of the investigation, (3) sources of data, assessment of data quality, and data availability, (4) examples of well documented centralized and commercial drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites and other sites where drilling fluid was disposed of, and (5) examples of abandoned sites and measures undertaken for their assessment and remediation. The report also includes most of the figures, tables, and appendices that will be included in the final report.

  9. Performance of small-scale dairy farms in the highlands of central Mexico during the dry season under traditional feeding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Carlos Galdino; Rayas-Amor, Adolfo Armando; Anaya-Ortega, Juan Pablo; Martínez-Castañeda, Francisco Ernesto; Espinoza-Ortega, Angélica; Prospero-Bernal, Fernando; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel

    2015-02-01

    In Mexico, small-scale dairy systems (SSDS) represent over 78 % of dairy farms and contribute with 37 % of national milk production; however, they face high feeding costs. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of SSDS during the dry season in terms of milk yields, milk composition and feeding costs under traditional feeding strategies, to identify areas of opportunity for improving their profitability. The information was collected from 22 SSDS every month during dry season. Feeds were classified in quality forages (QF), supplements (SU) and straws (ST). Two factors were identified: factor 1-a positive relationship among QF, SU, milk yield and ration cost and factor 2-represented straw usage. Four feeding strategies were identified: (1) low-cost feeding strategy; (2) home-grown feeding strategy; (3) high-cost feeding strategy; and (4) straw-based feeding strategy. There were differences (P feeding strategies for QF, SU, ST, total dry matter offered (TDMO), ration cost (RC), external inputs, home-grown inputs and milk yield. There were no significant (P > 0.05) differences among feeding strategies for fat and protein contents in milk. It is concluded that to improve performance and profitability and enhance sustainability in SSDS, farmers should base feeding strategies on home-grown quality forages, as it was the case in group 2 which showed lower feeding cost and better milk yield. It is also recommended to increase the inclusion of quality forages like grazing pastures and maize silages during the dry season and to avoid the inclusion of straws.

  10. Occurrence of AH1N1 viral infection and clinical features in symptomatic patients who received medical care during the 2009 influenza pandemic in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Palencia, Juan Pablo; Laflamme, Lucie; Monárrez-Espino, Joel

    2012-12-20

    In 2009 a new influenza serotype (AH1N1) was identified in Mexico that spread rapidly generating worldwide alarm. San Luis Potosi (SLP) was the third state with more cases reported in that year. The clinical identification of this flu posed a challenge to medical staff. This study aimed at estimating the AH1N1 infection, hospitalization and mortality rates, and at identifying related clinical features in persons who received medical care during the influenza pandemic. Retrospective study with persons with flu-like illness who received public or private medical care in SLP from 15.03.09 to 30.10.09. Physicians purposely recorded many clinical variables. Samples from pharyngeal exudate or bronchoalveolar lavage were taken to diagnose AH1N1 using real-time PCR. Clinical predictors were identified using multivariate logistic regression with infection as a dependent variable. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed. Analyses were stratified by age group based on the distribution of positive cases. From the 6922 persons with flu symptoms 6158 had available laboratory results from which 44.9% turned out to be positive for AH1N1. From those, 5.8% were hospitalized and 0.7% died. Most positive cases were aged 5-14 years and, in this subgroup, older age was positively associated with A H1N1 infection (95% CI 1.05-1.1); conversely, in patients aged 15 years or more, older age was negatively associated with the infection (95% CI 0.97-0.98). Fever was related in those aged 15 years or more (95% CI 1.4-3.5), and headache (95% CI 1.2-2.2) only in the 0-14 years group. Clear rhinorrhea and cough were positively related in both groups (p influenza and revealed that some of them can be age-specific.

  11. Value of Riparian Vegetation Remnants for Leaf-Litter Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in a Human-Dominated Landscape in Central Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Miguel Á; Escobar-Sarria, Federico; López-Barrera, Fabiola; Castaño-Meneses, Gabriela; Valenzuela-González, Jorge E

    2015-12-01

    Riparian remnants are linear strips of vegetation immediately adjacent to rivers that may act as refuges for biodiversity, depending on their habitat quality. In this study, we evaluated the role of riparian remnants in contributing to the diversity of leaf-litter ants by determining the relationship between ant diversity and several riparian habitat characteristics within a human-dominated landscape in Veracruz, Mexico. Sampling was carried out in 2012 during both dry and rainy seasons at 12 transects 100 m in length, where 10 leaf-litter samples were collected along each transect and processed with Berlese-Tullgren funnels and Winkler sacks. A total of 8,684 individuals belonging to 53 species, 22 genera, and seven subfamilies were collected. The observed mean alpha diversity accounted for 34.4% of the total species recorded and beta diversity for 65.6%. Species richness and composition were significantly related to litter-layer depth and soil compaction, which could limit the distribution of ant species depending on their nesting, feeding, and foraging habits. Riparian remnants can contribute toward the conservation of ant assemblages and likely other invertebrate communities that are threatened by anthropogenic pressures. In human-dominated landscapes where remnants of riparian vegetation give refuge to a diverse array of myrmecofauna, the protection of the few remaining and well-preserved riparian sites is essential for the long-term maintenance of biodiversity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Dynamic source inversion of the M6.5 intermediate-depth Zumpango earthquake in central Mexico: A parallel genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Mojica, John; Cruz-Atienza, Víctor M.; Madariaga, Raúl; Singh, Shri K.; Tago, Josué; Iglesias, Arturo

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a method for imaging the earthquake source dynamics from the inversion of ground motion records based on a parallel genetic algorithm. The source model follows an elliptical patch approach and uses the staggered-grid split-node method to simulate the earthquake dynamics. A statistical analysis is used to estimate errors in both inverted and derived source parameters. Synthetic inversion tests reveal that the average rupture speed (Vr), the rupture area, and the stress drop (Δτ) may be determined with formal errors of ~30%, ~12%, and ~10%, respectively. In contrast, derived parameters such as the radiated energy (Er), the radiation efficiency (ηr), and the fracture energy (G) have larger errors, around ~70%, ~40%, and ~25%, respectively. We applied the method to the Mw 6.5 intermediate-depth (62 km) normal-faulting earthquake of 11 December 2011 in Guerrero, Mexico. Inferred values of Δτ = 29.2 ± 6.2 MPa and ηr = 0.26 ± 0.1 are significantly higher and lower, respectively, than those of typical subduction thrust events. Fracture energy is large so that more than 73% of the available potential energy for the dynamic process of faulting was deposited in the focal region (i.e., G = (14.4 ± 3.5) × 1014J), producing a slow rupture process (Vr/VS = 0.47 ± 0.09) despite the relatively high energy radiation (Er = (0.54 ± 0.31) × 1015 J) and energy-moment ratio (Er/M0 = 5.7 × 10- 5). It is interesting to point out that such a slow and inefficient rupture along with the large stress drop in a small focal region are features also observed in both the 1994 deep Bolivian earthquake and the seismicity of the intermediate-depth Bucaramanga nest.

  13. The Upper Toluca Pumice (10.5 kyr): Product of the last major Plinian eruption of Nevado de Toluca volcano, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    The last Plinian eruption at Nevado de Toluca volcano occurred 10.5 kyr ago producing the Upper Toluca Pumice (UTP). The UTP consists of four widespread fallout layers, interbedded with pyroclastic flow and surge deposits. The UTP event occurred under open vent conditions starting with hydromagmatic explosions that emplaced a hot pyroclastic flow (F0) on the east and northern flanks of the volcano. This explosion decompressed the magmatic system allowing almost immediately the formation of a 21 km high Plinian column that was dispersed by predominant winds 5o to the NE (PC0), which waned after some time. The eruption recommenced with the establishment of three Plinian columns that were dispersed in a NE-E direction, reaching heights of 39, 42, and 28 km, and deposited fall layers (PC1, PC2, and PC3) respectively. These Plinian columns were interrupted several times by phreatomagmatic and collapse events that emplaced pyroclastic flows (F1, F2, and F3) and surges (S1, and S2), mainly on the eastern and northern flanks of the volcano. The juvenile components of the UTP sequence are white, gray and banded pumice and gray juvenile lithic clasts both of dacitic composition (63-66wt% SiO2), and minor accidental lithics. The fallout deposits (PC1 and PC2) covered a minimum area of 2000 km2 with a total volume of 14 km3 (ca. 6 km3 D.R.E.); a mass eruption rate ranging from 3\\times107 to 5\\times108 kg/s and a total mass of 1.2\\times1013 kg. The UTP emplaced 1.5 m of gravel-sized pumice in the modern City of Toluca region and ca. 20 cm of fine sand in the Mexico City region. A future event of this magnitude might represent a major catastrophe to the 30 million people living in these cities and their surroundings.

  14. Physical Activity and Adiposity-related Inflammation: The MESA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Chantal A; Allison, Matthew A; Cushman, Mary; Jenny, Nancy S; Miles, Mary P; Larsen, Britta; Lakoski, Susan G; Michos, Erin D; Blaha, Michael J

    2017-05-01

    Physical activity is associated with decreased adiposity-related inflammation in adults. Whether this association is independent of central obesity is unknown but important for understanding the mechanisms associated with reducing cardiometabolic disease risk through physical activity. This study examined whether associations of physical activity and obesity-related inflammatory markers were independent of central adiposity. Between 2002 and 2005, 1970 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis completed detailed health history and physical activity questionnaires, underwent physical measurements including computed tomography to quantify abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat, and measurements of adiponectin, leptin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and resistin. Statistical analyses included analysis of covariance and multivariable-adjusted regression. The mean (range) age of participants was 64.7 (55-84) yr and 50% were women. After adjustment for age and sex, and compared with the lowest quartile, inflammatory markers in the highest quartile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were 16% higher for adiponectin and 30%, 26%, and 9% lower for leptin, interleukin-6, and resistin, respectively (P central adiposity (P central adiposity (P > 0.05). There were no significant interactions by race/ethnicity or sex. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associated with a more favorable profile of inflammatory markers, independent of relevant cardiometabolic disease risk factors including central obesity.

  15. Geologic map of the Rio Puerco quadrangle, Bernalillo and Valencia Counties, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Florian

    2003-01-01

    The Rio Puerco quadrangle is located southwest of Albuquerque in central New Mexico and covers part of the western part of the Isleta Reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, and the University of New Mexico have conducted geologic mapping on the Isleta Reservation and vicinity as part of the Middle Rio Grande Basin Project. The map area contains surficial deposits, calcic soils, fluvial deposits of the Rio Puerco, deposits of the Santa Fe Group, and three volcanic fields. The area is characterized by predominantly north-trending normal faults with generally down-to-the-east movement. Post-Santa Fe Group deposits are composed of surficial deposits (Pleistocene-Holocene) and fluvial deposits of the Rio Puerco (Pleistocene-Holocene). The surficial deposits are divided into eolian, alluvial, colluvial, and landslide deposits. The fluvial deposits of the Rio Puerco consist of four terrace and present channel deposits. The Santa Fe Group is divided into lower and upper parts. The lower part of the Santa Fe Group is exposed near the southwestern corner of the study area where deposits consist of reddish-brown mudstone and sandstone correlated to the Popotosa Formation (Unit 1) of Lozinsky and Tedford (1991). They interpreted deposition of the unit in a basin-floor playa setting. The Popotosa Formation is in fault contact to the east with deposits of the upper Santa Fe Group. The upper Santa Fe Group is derived from major tributary fluvial systems (ancestral Rio Puerco Puerco and possibly the Rio San Jose drainages) draining the adjacent Colorado Plateau and Sierra Nacimiento and correlated to parts of Kelley's (1977) Ceja Formation of the Santa Fe Group and equivalent to Machette's (1978) Sierra Ladrones Formation, Connell's Arroyo Ojito Formation (Connell and others, 1999, and Maldonado's lithofacies of the Isleta Reservation (Maldonado and Atencio,1998a, b). The group also locally includes a fine- grained unit

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, John

    2004-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the

  17. Environmental Footprint Analysis of Steam Enhanced Extraction Remedy: Former Williams Air Force Base, Site ST012 Mesa, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    This green remediation (GR) study quantifies environmental footprint for an In-Situ Thermal Treatment (ISTT) remedy using Steam Enhanced Extraction (SEE) for Site ST012 located on the Former Williams Air Force Base (AFB) in Mesa, Arizona.

  18. Psychosocial Predictors of Metabolic Syndrome among Latino Groups in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel S Ortiz

    Full Text Available We sought to determine the contribution of psychological variables to risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS among Latinos enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA, and to investigate whether social support moderates these associations, and whether inflammatory markers mediate the association between psychological variables and MetS.Cross-sectional analyses at study baseline were conducted with a national Latino cohort (n = 1,388 that included Mexican Americans, Dominican Americans, Puerto Rican Americans and Central/South Americans. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the effects of psychosocial variables (chronic stress, depressive symptoms, and social support on MetS. In addition, separate subgroup-specific models, controlling for nationality, age, gender, socioeconomic position, language spoken at home, exercise, smoking and drinking status, and testing for the effects of chronic stress, depressive symptoms and inflammation (IL-6, CRP, fibrinogen in predicting risk for MetS were conducted.In the overall sample, high chronic stress independently predicted risk for MetS, however this association was found to be significant only in Mexican Americans and Puerto Rican Americans. Social support did not moderate the associations between chronic stress and MetS for any group. Chronic stress was not associated with inflammatory markers in either the overall sample or in each group.Our results suggest a differential contribution of chronic stress to the prevalence of MetS by national groups.

  19. Psychosocial Predictors of Metabolic Syndrome among Latino Groups in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Manuel S; Myers, Hector F; Dunkel Schetter, Christine; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Seeman, Teresa E

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of psychological variables to risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Latinos enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), and to investigate whether social support moderates these associations, and whether inflammatory markers mediate the association between psychological variables and MetS. Cross-sectional analyses at study baseline were conducted with a national Latino cohort (n = 1,388) that included Mexican Americans, Dominican Americans, Puerto Rican Americans and Central/South Americans. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the effects of psychosocial variables (chronic stress, depressive symptoms, and social support) on MetS. In addition, separate subgroup-specific models, controlling for nationality, age, gender, socioeconomic position, language spoken at home, exercise, smoking and drinking status, and testing for the effects of chronic stress, depressive symptoms and inflammation (IL-6, CRP, fibrinogen) in predicting risk for MetS were conducted. In the overall sample, high chronic stress independently predicted risk for MetS, however this association was found to be significant only in Mexican Americans and Puerto Rican Americans. Social support did not moderate the associations between chronic stress and MetS for any group. Chronic stress was not associated with inflammatory markers in either the overall sample or in each group. Our results suggest a differential contribution of chronic stress to the prevalence of MetS by national groups.

  20. Surficial Geologic Map of Mesa Verde National Park, Montezuma County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado was established in 1906 to preserve and protect the artifacts and dwelling sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, of the Ancestral Puebloan people who lived in the area from about A.D. 550 to A.D. 1300. In 1978, the United Nations designated the park as a World Heritage Site. The geology of the park played a key role in the lives of these ancient people. For example, the numerous (approximately 600) cliff dwellings are closely associated with the Cliff House Sandstone of Late Cretaceous age, which weathers to form deep alcoves. In addition, the ancient people farmed the thick, red loess (wind-blown dust) deposits on the mesa tops, which because of its particle size distribution has good moisture retention properties. The soil in this loess cover and the seasonal rains allowed these people to grow their crops (corn, beans, and squash) on the broad mesa tops. Today, geology is still an important concern in the Mesa Verde area because the landscape is susceptible to various forms of mass movement (landslides, debris flows, rockfalls), swelling soils, and flash floods that affect the park's archeological sites and its infrastructure (roads, septic systems, utilities, and building sites). The map, which encompasses an area of about 100 mi2 (260 km2), includes all of Mesa Verde National Park, a small part of the Ute Mountain Indian Reservation that borders the park on its southern and western sides, and some Bureau of Land Management and privately owned land to the north and east. Surficial deposits depicted on the map include: artificial fills, alluvium of small ephemeral streams, alluvium deposited by the Mancos River, residual gravel on high mesas, a combination of alluvial and colluvial deposits, fan deposits, colluvial deposits derived from the Menefee Formation, colluvial deposits derived from the Mancos Shale, rockfall deposits, debris flow deposits, earthflow deposits, translational and rotational landslide

  1. Postwildfire measurement of soil physical and hydraulic properties at selected sampling sites in the 2011 Las Conchas wildfire burn scar, Jemez Mountains, north-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Orlando C.; Ebel, Brian A.; Martin, Deborah A.; Buchan, Katie W.; Jornigan, Alanna D.

    2018-04-10

    The generation of runoff and the resultant flash flooding can be substantially larger following wildfire than for similar rainstorms that precede wildfire disturbance. Flash flooding after the 2011 Las Conchas Fire in New Mexico provided the motivation for this investigation to assess postwildfire effects on soil-hydraulic properties (SHPs) and soil-physical properties (SPPs) as a function of remotely sensed burn severity 4 years following the wildfire. A secondary purpose of this report is to illustrate a methodology to determine SHPs that analyzes infiltrometer data by using three different analysis methods. The SPPs and SHPs are measured as a function of remotely sensed burn severity by using the difference in the Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) metric for seven sites. The dNBR metric was used to guide field sample collection across a full spectrum of burn severities that covered the range of Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) and Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) thematic classes from low to high severity. The SPPs (initial and saturated soil-water content, bulk density, soil-organic matter, and soil-particle size) and SHPs (field-saturated hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity) were measured under controlled laboratory conditions for soil cores collected in the field. The SHPs were estimated by using tension infiltrometer measurements and three different data analysis methods. These measurements showed large effects of burn severity, focused in the top1 centimeter (cm) of soil, on some SPPs (bulk density, soil organic matter, and particle sizes). The threshold of these bulk density and soil organic matter effects was between 300 and 400 dNBR, which corresponds to a MTBS thematic class between moderate and high burn severity and a BARC4 thematic class of high severity. Gravel content and the content of fines in the top 1 cm of soil had a higher threshold value between 450 and 500 dNBR. Lesser effects on SPPs were observed at depths of 1–3 cm

  2. Differences in plant cover and species composition of semiarid grassland communities of central Mexico and its effects on net ecosystem exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delgado-Balbuena

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in land use across the semiarid grasslands of northern Mexico have driven a decline of plant cover and alteration of plant species composition. A number of different plant communities have resulted from these changes. Their implications, however, on the carbon (C cycle and regional carbon balance are still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of plant cover loss and changes in species composition on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE and their biotic and abiotic controls. NEE was measured in five representative plant community types within a semiarid grassland by temporarily enclosing the entire aboveground ecosystem using a chamber method (i.e., geodesic dome. Sites included an oat crop (crop, a moderately grazed grassland (moderate grazing, a 28 yr-old grazing exclosure (exclosure, an overgrazed site with low perennial grass cover (overgrazed, and an overgrazed site presenting shrub encroachment (shrub encroachment. For natural vegetation, rates of standardized daytime NEE for sites with a high plant cover (exclosure and moderate grazing were similar (P > 0.05 as compared to sites with low plant cover (overgrazed and shrub encroachment. However, yearly total nighttime NEE (carbon loss was more than double (P < 0.05 for sites with high plant cover compared to sites with low cover, resulting to slight C sinks for the low plant cover sites, and neutral or sources for the high plant cover sites as accounted by daytime and nighttime NEE annual balance. Differences in plant cover and its associated biomass defined the sensitivity to environmental controls. Thus, daytime NEE in low plant cover sites reached light compensation points at lower photosynthetic photon flux density than those from high plant cover sites. Differences in species composition did not influence NEE rates even though there were transient or permanent changes in C3 vs. C4 functional groups. Our results allowed the detection of the large variability and

  3. Analysis of Well ER-EC-1 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-1 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-1 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  4. Analysis of well ER-18-2 testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-18-2 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-18-2 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  5. Analysis of Well ER-EC-7 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-7 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program was documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-7 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  6. Analysis of Well ER-EC-8 testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-8 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-8 Data Report for development and Hydraulic Testing.

  7. Analysis of Well ER-EC-4 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-4 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-4 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  8. Analysis of Well ER-EC-5 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-5 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-5 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  9. Analysis of Well ER-EC-6 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-6 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-6 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  10. Analysis of Well ER-EC-2a Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-2a during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-2a Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  11. The environmental policy in Mexico: Crisis and perspectives; La politica ambiental en Mexico: Crisis y perspectivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, Victor [Colegio de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper some aspects of the environmental situation in Mexico are condensed. The main roll performed by the modality of the energy resources consumption and the evolution of the environmental policy in Mexico from 1971 to 1996 is analyzed. It is concluded that in Mexico it has not been able to define the environmental policy in all its extension requiring, therefore, a greater participation of all the sectors to protect Nature and fight against the industrial and municipal pollution [Espanol] En esta ponencia se resumen algunos aspectos de la situacion ambiental actual de Mexico. Se analiza el papel central desempenado por la modalidad del consumo de energeticos y la evolucion de la politica ambiental en Mexico desde 1971 hasta 1996. Se concluye en que la politica ambiental en Mexico no se ha podido definir todavia en todos sus alcances por lo que se requiere una mayor participacion de todos los sectores para proteger la naturaleza y combatir la contaminacion industrial y municipal

  12. Effects of housing conditions and season on the activity rhythm of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) kept under natural conditions within their distributional range in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Delgado, Jairo; Sánchez-Ferrer, José Carlos; Pérez-Galicia, Sergio; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo; Erkert, Hans G

    2014-11-01

    The timing and pattern of mammalian behavioral activities are regulated by an evolutionary optimized interplay of the genetically based biological (circadian) clock located in the brain's suprachiasmatic nuclei and direct responses to environmental factors that superimpose and thus mask the clock-mediated effects, the most important of which is the photically induced phase-setting (synchronization) of the circadian rhythmicity to the 24-hour solar day. In wild and captive animals living under the natural conditions prevailing in their habitat, to date, only a few attempts have been made to analyze the role of these two regulatory mechanisms in the species' adaptation to the time structure prevailing in their habitat. We studied the impact of housing conditions and season on the daily timing and pattern of activity in Mexican spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi). To this end, we carried out long-term activity recordings with Actiwatch® AW4 accelerometer/data-logger devices in 11 adult Ateles living under identical natural lighting and climatic conditions in either a large wire netting cage or a 0.25 ha forest enclosure in the primatological field station of Veracruz State University near Catemaco, Mexico. In a gravid female in the forest enclosure, we obtained first-hand information on the effect of late pregnancy and parturition on the monkey's activity rhythm. The Ateles behaved strictly diurnal and undertook about 90% of daily total activity during this activity time. Due to a higher second activity peak in late afternoon, the bimodal activity pattern was more pronounced in monkeys living in the forest enclosure. Although the spider monkeys kept there had an earlier activity onset and morning activity peak than their conspecifics in the cage, no consistent differences were found in the parameters characterizing the phase-setting of the circadian system to the environmental 24-h periodicity, either by comparison or correlation with the external time markers of

  13. Two-dimensional velocity models for paths from Pahute Mesa and Yucca Flat to Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walck, M.C.; Phillips, J.S.

    1990-11-01

    Vertical acceleration recordings of 21 underground nuclear explosions recorded at stations at Yucca Mountain provide the data for development of three two-dimensional crystal velocity profiles for portions of the Nevada Test Site. Paths from Area 19, Area 20 (both Pahute Mesa), and Yucca Flat to Yucca Mountain have been modeled using asymptotic ray theory travel time and synthetic seismogram techniques. Significant travel time differences exist between the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa source areas; relative amplitude patterns at Yucca Mountain also shift with changing source azimuth. The three models, UNEPM1, UNEPM2, and UNEYF1, successfully predict the travel time and amplitude data for all three paths. 24 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Geohydrologic data and models of Rainier Mesa and their implications to Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Cook, N.G.W.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Carnahan, C.L.; Javandel, I.; Tsang, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    The geohydrologic data collected at Rainier Mesa provide the only extensive observations in tunnels presently available on flow and transport in tuff units similar to those of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This information can, therefore, be of great value in planning the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) testing in underground drifts at Yucca Mountain. In this paper, we compare the geohydrologic characteristics of tuff units of these two sites and summarize the hydrochemical data indicating the presence of nearly meteoric water in Rainier Mesa tunnels. A simple analytic model is used to evaluate the possibility of propagating transient pulses of water along fractures or faults through the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff unit to reach the tunnel beds below. The results suggest that fast flow could occur without significant mixing between meteoric fracture water and matrix pore water. The implications of these findings on planning for the ESF Calico Hills study at Yucca Mountain are discussed

  15. Primer registro de Harriota raleighiana (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Rhinochimaeridae en la costa del Pacífico central de México First record of Harriota raleighiana (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Rhinochimaeridae in the central Pacific coast of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Castro-Aguirre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este es el primer registro de la quimera narizona, Harriota raleighiana Goode y Bean 1895, en el litoral del Pacífico central de México, con base en una hembra moribunda, recolectada en la superficie del océano sobre agua muy profunda cerca de Manzanillo, Colima. También constituye el segundo registro de su existencia en el océano Pacífico oriental, lo que podría comprobar su patrón distribucional que la calificaría como cosmopolita. Se proporcionan sus medidas y algunos datos biológicos.This is the first record in Mexican central Pacific of the "longnosed chimaera" Harriota raleighiana Goode and Bean 1895, based on a nearly dead female specimen collected at sea surface over very deep water of Manzanillo, Colima. Also, it is the second published report on the occurrence of this species in the eastern Pacific ocean, and seems to support its geographical distribution pattern, which has been classified as cosmopolitan-like type. Morphometric and some biological data are also offered.

  16. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} mesa diodes for the study of edge recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paire, Myriam, E-mail: myriam.paire@edf.fr [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Jean, Cyril; Lombez, Laurent [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Collin, Stéphane; Pelouard, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Gérard, Isabelle [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR, 8180 Versailles (France); Guillemoles, Jean-François; Lincot, Daniel [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2015-05-01

    The concentrating approach was applied on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} to develop photovoltaic devices with increased efficiency using less rare materials. To withstand the operating conditions, Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} devices are miniaturized. Compared to previous generations of microcells, with only window layer structuration, microcells with a mesa design are fabricated. These microcells are created by etching ZnO, CdS and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layers. The crucial issue addressed in this study is the electrical behavior of the device edges, to determine if microcells suffer from perimeter recombination. We analyze the influence of different etching techniques on the edge recombination signal. It is found that bromine etch result in well passivated surfaces, and devices as small as 50 × 50 μm do not experience edge recombination efficiency limitations. This behavior is remarkable compared to that of the microcells made of crystalline materials. For devices where the edges are deteriorated by a chemical post-treatment, a quasi-shunting signal coming from the edges is seen. We tested these microcells under concentrated illumination and important open-circuit voltage and efficiency gains are seen. - Highlights: • Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} mesa diodes are fabricated by chemical etching. • Opto-electronic measurements show that mesa edges are passivated. • Open-circuit voltage over 950 mV is obtained at high concentration on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} micromesa diodes.

  18. Seeking a Rational Approach to a Regional Refugee Crisis: Lessons from the Summer 2014 “Surge” of Central American Women and Children at the US-Mexico Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Musalo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early summer months of 2014, an increasing number of Central American children alone and with their parents began arriving at the US-Mexico border in search of safety and protection. The children and families by and large came from the Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala — three of the most dangerous countries in the world — to seek asylum and other humanitarian relief. Rampant violence and persecution within homes and communities, uncontrolled and unchecked by state authorities, compelled them to flee north for their lives. On the scale of refugee crises worldwide, the numbers were not huge. For example, 24,481 and 38,833 unaccompanied children, respectively, were apprehended by US Border Patrol (USBP in FY 2012 and FY 2013, while 68,631 children were apprehended in FY 2014 alone (USBP 2016a. In addition, apprehensions of “family units,” or parents (primarily mothers with children, also increased, from 15,056 families in FY 2013 to 68,684 in FY 2014 (USBP 2016b.[1] While these numbers may seem large and did represent a significant increase over prior years, they are nonetheless dwarfed by refugee inflows elsewhere; for example, Turkey was host to 1.15 million Syrian refugees by year end 2014 (UNHCR 2015a, and to 2.5 million by year end 2015 (UNHCR 2016 — reflecting an influx of almost 1.5 million refugees in the course of a single year. Nevertheless, small though they are in comparison, the numbers of Central American women and children seeking asylum at our southern border, concentrated in the summer months of 2014, did reflect a jump from prior years. These increases drew heightened media attention, and both news outlets and official US government statements termed the flow a “surge” and a “crisis” (e.g., Basu 2014; Foley 2014; Negroponte 2014. The sense of crisis was heightened by the lack of preparedness by the federal government, in particular, to process and provide proper custody

  19. P12.01 Epidemiology in spinal tumors treated surgically at the South Central Hospital of High Specialty from PEMEX in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Resendiz, R.; Cordoba Mosqueda, M.; Guerra Mora, J.; Loya Aguilar, I.; Garcia Gonzalez, U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The spinal tumors are rare neoplasms, they can be primary or metastatic; in the literature they are divided in extradural and intradural, extramedullary and intramedullary, from which extradural tumors are the most frequent and are usually metastatic, the intramedullary are generally gliomas. From the primary tumors up to 78% are benign and 22% malign, the histological stripe and the involvement to the spinal compartments are of great importance for the results and the treatment which is mainly surgical, individualized and meticulously planned with the support of technological resources such as the electrophysiological monitoring during the surgery. Methods and Materials: Observational study with a range of patients from March 1999- March 2016 to whom surgical resection of the spinal tumor was performed and reported on the Electronic Files of the South Central Hospital of High Specialty PEMEX. A Statistical analysis is made with the SPSS Statistic of disease of the Institution program. Results: 23 patients with spinal tumor surgical resection were found. The median age was 53 ± 10 years. The most common clinical manifestation was radiculopathy (65%). The Karnofsky scale was used for initial evaluation where a 43% of patients had a 90 score at the moment of the diagnosis, while 65% had an ECOG 1. The most frequent tumor was the Spinal Shwannoma (39%), followed in prevalence by the Condroid Cordoma (17%), where the intradural extramedullary location was the most prevalent (78%). The medium rate of survival after the surgical procedure was from 11 months. Conclusions: Our cases and the international statistics coincide. Radiculopathy as high prevalence initial manifestation conceals us to dismiss in the sixth decade of life any possibility for spinal tumor presentation. Most of spinal tumor patients do not have any clinical deterioration in their basal state, which indicates that performing a successful surgical procedure and the right

  20. Contenido de carbono en un ecosistema semiárido del centro de México / Carbon content in a semi-arid ecosystem in central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Becerril-Piña

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En las últimas décadas se han propuesto diversas ecuaciones alométricas (EA para especies tropicales y subtropicales a fin de estimar el contenido de carbono (CC en la biomasa aérea, sin embargo, los ecosistemas semiáridos han sido poco estudiados a pesar de constituir cerca del 40 % de la superficie de México. El objetivo de este estudio fue desarrollar EA para determinar el CC en la biomasa aérea en mezquite (Prosopis laevigata, huizache (Acacia farnesiana y herbáceas representativas de una región semiárida del centro del país. Se seleccionaron y muestrearon por método destructivo cinco individuos de cada especie para estimar biomasa seca total y por componente (hojas, ramas y fuste, los cuales se correlacionaron con parámetros de fácil medición en campo: cobertura de la copa, radio de la copa, altura total y volumen, encontrándose valores de R2 entre 0.96 y 0.80 dependiendo de la especie. Mediante información satelital se estimó la distribución espacial del CC en la Cuenca Dolores Hidalgo (Guanajuato, localizada en la región semiárida del centro de México. La cobertura vegetal del área de estudio se reclasificó en tres tipos: abierta, semiabierta y cerrada. El contenido de carbono en la cobertura abierta fue de 2.4 Mg C ha-1, semiabierta 10.26 Mg C ha-1 y cerrada de 21.20 Mg C ha-1. Los resultados sugieren que los ecosistemas semiáridos de la zona central de México representan un potencial considerable como sumideros de carbono con un promedio de 11 Mg C ha-1.

  1. Tectonic evolution of the central-eastern sector of Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt and its influence on the eruptive history of the Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, F.; Capra, L.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.

    2006-11-01

    The Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano of Late Pliocene-Holocene age located within the central and eastern sectors of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Morphostructural analysis, aerial photograph and satellite image interpretation, structural analysis and geological fieldwork were methods used to investigate the relationship between the evolution of the volcano and the tectonic framework of its basement. The study revealed that the area of Nevado de Toluca is affected by three main fault systems that intersect close to the volcanic edifice. These are from oldest to youngest, the Taxco-Querétaro, San Antonio and Tenango fault systems. The NNW-SSE Taxco-Querétaro fault system was active in the area since Early Miocene, and is characterized by right-lateral transtensive movement. Its reactivation during Early to Middle Pleistocene was responsible for the emplacement of andesitic to dacitic lava flows and domes of La Cieneguilla Supersynthem. The NE-SW San Antonio fault system was active during Late Pliocene, before the reactivation of the Taxco-Querétaro fault system, and is characterized by extensional left-lateral oblique-slip kinematics. The youngest is the E-W Tenango fault system that has been active since Late Pleistocene. This fault system is characterized by transtensive left-lateral strike-slip movement, and partly coeval with the youngest eruptive phase, the Nevado Supersynthem, which formed the present summit cone of the Nevado de Toluca volcano. The stress re-orientation from the Taxco-Querétaro to the Tenango fault system during Late Pleistocene is responsible for the ˜ 1 Ma hiatus in the magmatic activity between 1.15 Ma and 42 ka. After this period of repose, the eruptive style drastically changed from effusive to explosive with the emission of dacitic products. The methodology presented here furnish new data that can be used to better assess the complex structural evolution of this sector of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

  2. P02.05 Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Epidemiology in the South Central Hospital of High Specialty from PEMEX in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Mora, J.; Cordoba Mosqueda, M.; Hernandez Resendiz, R.; Loya Aguilar, I.; Vicuña Gonzalez, R.; Garcia Gonzalez, U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The peripheral sheath tumors are part of a large group of neoplasms that range from biologically benign with minimal disorders in life quality to highly malign with life quality deterioration and high mortality. There are subtypes with high prevalence like Schwannomas and some much rarer like the intracranial peripheral nerve sheath tumor which happen to have very bad prognosis. The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of patients with peripheral nerve sheat tumors in a hospital of high specialty. Method and materials: Observational study with patients from March 1999 to March 2016 with confirmed diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumor in the electronic files of the South Central Hospital of High Specialty PEMEX. A statistical analysis is made through the SPSS Statistics of the disease in this Institution program. Results: There were 84 patients with the diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumor with a median age of 48.04 years, 65.5% were males, the most common histological type found was the Schwannoma with a 72.6%, followed by senescent Schwannoma 13.1%, neurofibroma 8.3%, and malign peripheral nerve sheath tumor 2.4%. The most frequent location was at the site of cranial nerves, followed by cervical level 27.4%, lumbar 16.7% and thoracic 9.5%. The most common initial symptom was pain in 23.8% of the patients, and the time of the onset of symptoms to the diagnosis was 31.6 months. From the total of patients 8.3% had neurofibromatosis type 1, 6.0% neurofibromatosis type 2. Conclusions: We realized in our series of reported cases that the frequency is similar to those reported in worldwide population; nevertheless the time between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis is much higher in our cases as well as the population of patients with neurofibromatosis. This study justifies the need of attention quality improvement and the knowledge of this information the medical doctor of first

  3. September 1985 Mexico City, Mexico Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The magnitude 8.1 earthquake occurred off the Pacific coast of Mexico. The damage was concentrated in a 25 square km area of Mexico City, 350 km from the epicenter....

  4. An economic evaluation of southern New Mexico's low-temperature geothermal resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, C.L.; Whittier, J.; Witcher, J.C.; Shoenmackers, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on an economic model that has been developed to evaluate the costs associated with developing low-temperature geothermal resources for commercial greenhouses. Three southern New Mexico sites, the lower Animas Valley, the Las Cruces East Mesa, and Truth or Consequences, have been analyzed to compare development costs and delivered energy costs on an equivalent basis. The economic analysis utilizes a levelized life-cycle costs of geothermal energy development. Levelized geothermal costs have been developed for four different thermal loads at three locations. For comparative purposes, levelized natural gas costs were also calculated. Geothermal energy has a competitive advantage relative to natural gas for supplying larger thermal loads

  5. Characterization of Near-Surface Geology and Possible Voids Using Resistivity and Electromagnetic Methods at the Gran Quivira Unit of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, Central New Mexico, June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Land, Lewis A.; Teeple, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    At the Gran Quivira Unit of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument in central New Mexico, a partially excavated pueblo known as Mound 7 has recently become architecturally unstable. Historical National Park Service records indicate both natural caves and artificial tunnels may be present in the area. Knowledge of the local near-surface geology and possible locations of voids would aid in preservation of the ruins. Time-domain and frequency-domain electromagnetic as well as direct-current resistivity methods were used to characterize the electrical structure of the near-surface geology and to identify discrete electrical features that may be associated with voids. Time-domain electromagnetic soundings indicate three major electrical layers; however, correlation of these layers to geologic units was difficult because of the variability of lithologic data from existing test holes. Although resistivity forward modeling was unable to conclusively determine the presence or absence of voids in most cases, the high-resistivity values (greater than 5,000 ohm-meters) in the direct-current resistivity data indicate that voids may exist in the upper 50 meters. Underneath Mound 7, there is a possibility of large voids below a depth of 20 meters, but there is no indication of substantial voids in the upper 20 meters. Gridded lines and profiled inversions of frequency-domain electromagnetic data showed excellent correlation to resistivity features in the upper 5 meters of the direct-current resistivity data. This technique showed potential as a reconnaissance tool for detecting voids in the very near surface.

  6. Modeling the residential infiltration of outdoor PM(2.5) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ryan W; Adar, Sara D; Avol, Ed; Cohen, Martin; Curl, Cynthia L; Larson, Timothy; Liu, L-J Sally; Sheppard, Lianne; Kaufman, Joel D

    2012-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies of fine particulate matter [aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM(2.5))] typically use outdoor concentrations as exposure surrogates. Failure to account for variation in residential infiltration efficiencies (F(inf)) will affect epidemiologic study results. We aimed to develop models to predict F(inf) for > 6,000 homes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air), a prospective cohort study of PM(2.5) exposure, subclinical cardiovascular disease, and clinical outcomes. We collected 526 two-week, paired indoor-outdoor PM(2.5) filter samples from a subset of study homes. PM(2.5) elemental composition was measured by X-ray fluorescence, and F(inf) was estimated as the indoor/outdoor sulfur ratio. We regressed F(inf) on meteorologic variables and questionnaire-based predictors in season-specific models. Models were evaluated using the R² and root mean square error (RMSE) from a 10-fold cross-validation. The mean ± SD F(inf) across all communities and seasons was 0.62 ± 0.21, and community-specific means ranged from 0.47 ± 0.15 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, to 0.82 ± 0.14 in New York, New York. F(inf) was generally greater during the warm (> 18°C) season. Central air conditioning (AC) use, frequency of AC use, and window opening frequency were the most important predictors during the warm season; outdoor temperature and forced-air heat were the best cold-season predictors. The models predicted 60% of the variance in 2-week F(inf), with an RMSE of 0.13. We developed intuitive models that can predict F(inf) using easily obtained variables. Using these models, MESA Air will be the first large epidemiologic study to incorporate variation in residential F(inf) into an exposure assessment.

  7. U.S. Geological Survey investigations in connection with the dining car event, U12e.18 tunnel, rainier mesa, Nevada test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    The Dining Car event was a Defense Nuclear Agency nuclear weapons test located in the U12e.18 drift of the E-tunnel complex, central Rainier Mesa, Area 12, Nevada Test Site. The main drift and bypass drift were mined in zeolitized tuff to a total length of 544 m (1,785 ft). The overburden thickness above the experiment is approximately 396 m (1,300 ft) in the U12e.18 area. The pre-Tertiary surface, which is most probably quartzite in this area, is located approximately 243.8 to 274.3 m (800 to 900 ft) below tunnel level. Site geology and geophysical investigations were made in one vertical and two horizontal drill holes prior to mining of the U12e.18 drift. Electric logs in the two horizontal holes indicate no extensive zones of argillization which might create problems in tunnelling. Geophysical logs in the vertical exploratory hole suggest that the tuff is saturated at a depth of about 244 m (800 ft). Electric logs in all three holes show a pronounced signature in tunnel bed 4J. Seismic velocities obtained in the tunnel after mining compare favorably with sonic velocities obtained in one hole by means of a sonic probe, indicating that the bulk geologic structure is not significant in affecting seismic-wave propagation. This condition is not always observed in such comparisons. A repeat seismic survey in the tunnel showed no change in seismic velocity 4 months after mining. In situ stresses determined by the overcore technique are within experience for the Rainier Mesa tunnel complex

  8. Influence of mesa edge capacitance on frequency behavior of millimeter-wave AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yong; Bai, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yang; Feng, Zhihong; Dun, Shaobo; Yu, Qi

    2017-03-01

    The influence of mesa edge capacitance on the frequency characteristics of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs with 90 nm gate length was studied in this paper. To extract mesa edge capacitances, a small-signal equivalent circuit model considering mesa edge capacitances was provided. Based on the model, the intrinsic gate capacitances of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs with 2 × 20 μm, 2 × 30 μm, 2 × 40 μm, and 2 × 50 μm gate widths were extracted, respectively. Through linear fitting along gate width for the extracted results and simulations, 8.06 fF/μm2 of mesa edge capacitances at Vgs = -4.5 V and Vds = 8 V in the devices with 2 × 20 μm gate width was obtained, which can be about 33.2% of the total gate capacitance. Mesa edge capacitances results in a significant drop of current-gain cut-off frequency (fT), and the effect is more serious in the shorter gate length devices.

  9. Comparison of spatially matched airways reveals thinner airway walls in COPD. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) COPD Study and the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes in COPD Study (SPIROMICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin M; Hoffman, Eric A; Rabinowitz, Dan; Bleecker, Eugene; Christenson, Stephanie; Couper, David; Donohue, Kathleen M; Han, Meilan K; Hansel, Nadia N; Kanner, Richard E; Kleerup, Eric; Rennard, Stephen; Barr, R Graham

    2014-11-01

    COPD is characterised by reduced airway lumen dimensions and fewer peripheral airways. Most studies of airway properties sample airways based upon lumen dimension or at random, which may bias comparisons given reduced airway lumen dimensions and number in COPD. We sought to compare central airway wall dimensions on CT in COPD and controls using spatially matched airways, thereby avoiding selection bias of airways in the lung. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) COPD Study and Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes in COPD Study (SPIROMICS) recruited smokers with COPD and controls aged 50-79 years and 40-80 years, respectively. COPD was defined by current guidelines. Using CT image data, airway dimensions were measured for all central airway segments (generations 0-6) following 5 standardised paths into the lungs. Case-control airway comparisons were spatially matched by generation and adjusted for demographics, body size, smoking, CT dose, per cent emphysema, airway length and lung volume. Among 311 MESA COPD participants, airway wall areas at generations 3-6 were smaller in COPD compared with controls (all pcentral airways. Other approaches to airway sampling result in comparisons of more proximal to more distal airways and potentially biased assessment of airway properties in COPD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Integrated geographic information systems (IGIS) analysis and definition of the tectonic framework of northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Pina, Carlos Manuel

    Allende fault. The second result refers to the hypothesis that the Mesa Central was brought to its present location by a subduction zone located to the north. This subduction zone coincides with several researchers who postulated the idea. The compressional zones refer to segments of the Sinforosa and a postulated Aquinquari fault located in the stratotectonic Guerrero Terrane regarded as a highly mineralized zone. Negative anomalies near -200 milligals are strongly suggestive of a cratonic block identified in western Chihuahua, it being named the Western Chihuahua Cratonic Block (WCCB). In the southwestern portion of the North American craton the age provinces are well documented, but the block versus mobile belt idea has not been put forth or emphasized. The present study combines data of several types, sedimentological, structural, igneous geochemistry, and geochronologic data to evaluate this behavior in SW NA, and the proposed block is tested against these data. The presence of the WCCB is supported by a wide variety of data. Basins, troughs, aulacogens, bimodal volcanism, and other rift and rift shoulder features, characterize the spatially constrained mobile belts. Mobile belts surrounding the WCCB contain geologic records of the events going back to 1.4 Ga, with different aspects being dominant over geologic time. Mobile belts will participate in compression,(subduction), extension (rifting), and transform (lateral) faulting. The WCCB may have been derived from closely, adjacent, North American craton by mobile belt action. This study has shown that integration of data is essential, because allows detection of differences in hypotheses for the same event in the same area. This integration capability is what makes integrated geographic information systems a powerful tool, not only for their synergy, but because they can be combined with specific techniques that provide data before going to conduct fieldwork. Whether the issue of defining the tectonic framework of

  11. Mexico: Imports or exports?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, J.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of Mexico's energy sector. Proven oil reserves place Mexico in ninth position in the world and fourth largest in natural gas reserves. Energy is one of the most important economic activities of the country, representing 3 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Oil exports represent 8.4 per cent of total exports. Approximately 40 per cent of total public investment is earmarked for energy projects. The author discusses energy resources and energy sector limitations. The energy sector plan for the period 2001-2006 is discussed. Its goals are to ensure energy supply, to develop the energy sector, to stimulate participation of Mexican enterprises, to promote renewable energy sources, and to strengthen international energy cooperation. The regulatory framework is being adapted to increase private investment. Some graphs are presented, displaying the primary energy production and primary energy consumption. Energy sector reforms are reviewed, as are electricity and natural gas reforms. The energy sector demand for 2000-2010 and investment requirements are reviewed, as well as fuel consumption for power generation. The author discusses the National Pipeline System (SNG) and the bottlenecks caused by pressure efficiency in the northeast, flow restriction on several pipeline segments, variability of the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) own use, and pressure drop on central regions. The entire prospect for natural gas in the country is reviewed, along with the Strategic Gas Program (PEG) consisting of 20 projects, including 4 non-associated natural gas, 9 exploration and 7 optimization. A section dealing with multiple service contracts is included in the presentation. The authors conclude by stating that the priority is a national energy policy to address Mexico's energy security requirements, to increase natural gas production while promoting the diversification of imports, and a regulatory framework to be updated in light of current

  12. All projects related to mexico | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Region: Brazil, South America, Chile, Guatemala, North and Central America, Mexico, Uruguay. Program: Employment and Growth. Total Funding: CA$ ... Total Funding: CA$ 851,826.00. International Migration, Management of Natural Resources and Division of Labour along Gender Lines in Veracruz, Mexico. Project.

  13. Emerging Threat to America: Non-State Entities Fighting Fourth Generation Warfare in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    2009). A more secure and less corrupt Mexico would conceivably increase tourism , trade, and travel between the two countries. In Juarez, Mexico...goals & countries Internal security & anti- trafficking; social justice; development. Primary= Colombia; secondary=Peru & Ecuador Internal security...Colombia; secondary=Peru & Ecuador Internal security; law enforceme