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Sample records for meridian bioscience cincinnati

  1. [Identification of meridian-acupoint diagrams and meridian diagrams].

    Shen, Wei-hong

    2008-08-01

    In acu-moxibustion literature, there are two kinds of diagrams, meridian-acupoint diagrams and meridian diagrams. Because they are very similar in outline, and people now have seldom seen the typical ancient meridian diagrams, meridian-acupoint diagrams have been being incorrectly considered to be the meridian diagrams for a long time. It results in confusion in acu-moxibustion academia. The present paper stresses its importance in academic research and introduces some methods for identifying them correctly. The key points for identification of meridian-acupoint diagrams and meridian diagrams are: the legend of diagrams and the drawing style of the ancient charts. In addition, the author makes a detailed explanation about some acu-moxibustion charts which are easily confused. In order to distinguish meridian-acupoint diagrams and meridian diagrams correctly, he or she shoulnd understand the diagrams' intrinsic information as much as possible and make a comprehensive analysis about them.

  2. Study on stability of DMS meridian detector.

    Yang, Ning; Huang, Li; Yuan, Jiamin; Zhang, Zhifang; Yang, Zhimin

    2016-05-01

    The stability of meridian detector was the basis to study meridian through conductance method. Ancient documents mentioned that the human body's blood could change with the time and meridians. When qi and blood came, the qi and blood would be full of that place; when qi and blood gone, the local skin shining could fade and recess. It liked the tidal fluctuation, then caused the corresponding acupuncture points conductance value changes. Modern studies had reported that meridian detector instrument the skin area of twelve meridians acupuncture points could change along with time within 24 hours. In this circumstance, whether the conductance values changes in human acupuncture points had statistical significance was vital important. DMS meridian detector instruction was adopt to measure the twelve meridian jingyuan acupuncture point in order to analyze the acupuncture point conductance value changes within one day.

  3. Why the Greenwich Meridian Moved

    2015-08-01

    ellipsoid from a point on its minor axis above the north pole. O = spheroid axis passing through the geocenter, Eq = ground level equipotential surface , Sph...which the geodetic coor- dinates, ϕ and λ, refer. The DoV components (ξ , η) also represent the slopes of the geoid surface with respect to the surface of...illustrated, the shift eastward at Greenwich represents only a lateral transfer of the trace of the geodetic longitude λ = 0 meridian across the surface

  4. Defining meridians: a modern basis of understanding.

    Longhurst, John C

    2010-06-01

    Acupuncture, one of the primary methods of treatment in traditional Oriental medicine, is based on a system of meridians. Along the meridians lie acupuncture points or acupoints, which are stimulated by needling, pressure or heat to resolve a clinical problem. A number of methods have been used to identify meridians and to explain them anatomically. Thus, tendinomuscular structures, primo-vessels (Bonghan ducts), regions of increased temperature and low skin resistance have been suggested to represent meridians or as methods to identify them. However, none of these methods have met the criteria for a meridian, an entity that, when stimulated by acupuncture can result in clinical improvement. More recently, modern physiologists have put forward the "neural hypothesis" stating that the clinical influence of acupuncture is transmitted primarily through stimulation of sensory nerves that provide signals to the brain, which processes this information and then causes clinical changes associated with treatment. Although additional research is warranted to investigate the role of some of the structures identified, it seems clear that the peripheral and central nervous system can now be considered to be the most rational basis for defining meridians. The meridian maps and associated acupoints located along them are best viewed as road maps that can guide practitioners towards applying acupuncture to achieve optimal clinical results. Copyright 2010 Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  5. A new definition of an acupuncture meridian.

    Kovich, Fletcher

    2018-05-11

    This article provides a new definition of an acupuncture meridian. It suggests that a meridian consists of a distal tract of tissue that is affected by organ function. In the 1960's, Kim discovered the primo vascular system, and regarded the superficial primo vessels as equating to the meridians. Instead, this article suggests that the superficial primo vessels merely underlie the meridians, in that they enable their creation, which is why some meridians are said to occur along the paths of superficial primo vessels. But the meridians themselves do not have a dedicated anatomical structure; instead they are merely tracts of tissue whose normal function is impeded when the related abdominal organ is stressed. It is hypothesised that the organ information is communicated in electrical waves that may travel through the connective tissue sheaths of the superficial primo vessels. Hence the primo vessels serve as an inadvertent transport for this information, but the organ information is independent of the physiological purpose of the primo vascular system, as are the resultant meridians. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Bioscience

    biological agents. We integrate our renowned engineering, nanotechnology, and computational capabilities to Foundations Bioscience Computing & Information Science Electromagnetics Engineering Science Geoscience Opportunities Microsensors Bioscience Leadership Computing and Information Science Engineering Science

  7. Alice Walker’s Womanism in Meridian

    GAN Lin

    2015-01-01

    Meridian is one of Alice Walker’s early work. It tells a story that happened in the American south during the 1960s and early 70s’. It describes the life of the main character, Meridian Hill, a black woman from a southern town, who got out of the oppression of white society, and ends up in participate in Civil Rights Movement. The paper firstly illustrates the soul of womanism—anti-sexism, anti-racism, sisiterhood as well as the maternity love, then analyzes how these theories permeated into the novel—Meridian. The paper paid attention to the function of this novel on the improvement of Alice Walker ’s womanism. In proving that womanism not only permeates into Meridian, but also improved womanism from many perspectives, it comes to the conclusion that Meridian is a novel to improve Alice Walker’s womanism, it serves as the good novel to highlight the African Culture, and made a great contribution for the encouragement of black women to seek for freedom in the society.

  8. Journal of Biosciences

    Madhu

    The Journal of Biosciences welcomes contributions containing the results of original research in any area of biology. Both brief communications (within 4 typed pages or 1500 words of text) and full-length articles are accepted. There are no page charges for printing colour photographs. Fifty reprints will be supplied free of ...

  9. Journal of Applied Biosciences

    The Journal of Applied Biosciences provides a forum for scholars and practitioners in all spheres of biological sciences to publish their research findings or theoretical concepts and ideas of a scientific nature. Other websites related to this journal: http://m.elewa.org/Journals/about-jab/ ...

  10. Investigation of the Lower Resistance Meridian: Speculation on the Pathophysiological Functions of Acupuncture Meridians

    Weisheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was pointed out in the two earlier papers of the present author that the meridians are in fact zones in the loose connective tissue containing richer interstitial fluid and thus are lower-resistance passages for diffusion of meridian-signal carriers or mediators. Moreover, a hypothesis, which incorporates the wide variety of functions of the loose connective tissue, the circulatory system, and the nervous system into the meridian function, has been proposed and in the hypothesis the mast cell plays some key roles. In the present paper, considering also the latest knowledge on cell migration along with some existing experimental results, it is further pointed out that meridians ought to be lower-resistance passages for chemotactic migration of cells and mast cells can indeed migrate longitudinally along meridians. Finally, the present paper points out that if we add the last two points to the hypothesis and keep in mind that mast cells have been known very recently to be versatile regulators of inflammation, tissue remodeling, host defense, and homeostasis, the rich pathophysiological functions of the meridian pointed out by the traditional Chinese medicine can be understood quite naturally.

  11. Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma: University of Cincinnati experience

    Karim, Nagla Abdel; Schuster, James; Eldessouki, Ihab; Gaber, Ola; Namad, Tariq; Wang, Jiang; Xie, Changchun; Morris, John C.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To review the outcomes of treatment in patients with pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma (PSC) treated at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center (UCMC). Results There was no significant difference in survival of patients treated with chemotherapy alone (median, 256 days) compared to patients not undergoing treatment (median, 205.5 days). Patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy showed a trend in improvement of survival (median, 457.6 days). Patients requiring only surgery had the longest OS of 713.5 days. Conclusions Systemic chemotherapy alone did not improve survival in patients with PSC. Surgery provides the greatest overall survival benefit and adjuvant chemotherapy may also improve survival. Methods From 2000 to 2014, twenty-five patients with pathologically confirmed PSC were treated at UCMC. The outcomes were retrospectively analyzed by treatment with overall survival (OS) as the endpoint. PMID:29423107

  12. [Science of Meridians, Collaterals and Acupoints--Exploration on teaching method of meridian syndromes].

    Wang, Yinping; Zhang, Zongquan; Wang, Wenlin; Yuan, Limin

    2015-04-01

    Meridian syndromes are the required basic knowledge for mastering Science of Meridians, Collaterals and Acupoints but have not brought the adequate attention on the teaching program. The writers discovered' that the content of this section occupied a decisive role for developing the students' clinical thinking ability and, stimulating their interests to learn classical TCM theories. It's necessary to enhance the importance on meridian syndromes during teaching program. The teaching program was discussed in three aspects, named workshop pattern, competitive pattern and multimedia pattern. This teaching method may improve students' interests in the study on classical TCM theories, deepen the understanding on knowledge and motivate students' learning autonomy so that the teaching quality can be improved.

  13. Bioscience, bioinnovations, and bioethics.

    Leisola, Matti

    2007-01-01

    Biosciences and their applications, which we call biotechnology, have affected human society in many ways. Great hopes have been set on future biotechnology. The future depends on three key issues. First, we need good science. Recent developments in biosciences have surprised us in many ways. I shall explain in this article how. Secondly, we need structured innovation systems in order to commercialize our discoveries. Europe is slow in this respect compared to our Japanese and American competitors and may lose in the competition. I shall describe the Finnish innovation chain using the rewarded Otaniemi model as an example of how commercialization can be done in a systematic way. Thirdly, we need norms to guide what to do and where to go. Bioethics is probably the most neglected of the three key issues. With modern biotechnology we are able to do things that should worry every citizen, but the ethical discussion has been largely neglected or the discussion in our pluralistic society is leading nowhere. I shall finally discuss these problems from a historical perspective.

  14. [Professor ZHAO Jiping's meridian diagnosis and treatment for primary dysmenorrhea].

    Tan, Cheng; Zhang, Chang; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Jun

    2016-03-01

    For the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea, professor ZHAO Jiping focuses on meridian diagnosis and inspection, and uses pressing methods to locate the response points along the meridian, including acupoints and aishi points. During the stage of attack, it is essential to press along the spleen meridian, mainly Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Diji (SP 8) and Yinlingquan (SP 9); during the stage of remission, it is essential to press along the bladder meridian and stomach meridian, mainly Ganshu (BL 18), Pishu (BL 20), Weishu (BL 21), Shenshu (BL 23) and Zusanli (ST 36). The differences between deficiency syndrome and excess syndrome lead to the different feelings of doctors and patients. Combined with the results of meridian diagnosis and inspection, the aim of treatment can be achieved by different acupuncture methods. Professor ZHAO pays attention to the treatment of accompanied symptoms and timing of treatment, since the relief of accompanied syndromes and selection of timing are keys to relieving patient's pain.

  15. Electrical impedance along connective tissue planes associated with acupuncture meridians

    Hammerschlag Richard

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture points and meridians are commonly believed to possess unique electrical properties. The experimental support for this claim is limited given the technical and methodological shortcomings of prior studies. Recent studies indicate a correspondence between acupuncture meridians and connective tissue planes. We hypothesized that segments of acupuncture meridians that are associated with loose connective tissue planes (between muscles or between muscle and bone visible by ultrasound have greater electrical conductance (less electrical impedance than non-meridian, parallel control segments. Methods We used a four-electrode method to measure the electrical impedance along segments of the Pericardium and Spleen meridians and corresponding parallel control segments in 23 human subjects. Meridian segments were determined by palpation and proportional measurements. Connective tissue planes underlying those segments were imaged with an ultrasound scanner. Along each meridian segment, four gold-plated needles were inserted along a straight line and used as electrodes. A parallel series of four control needles were placed 0.8 cm medial to the meridian needles. For each set of four needles, a 3.3 kHz alternating (AC constant amplitude current was introduced at three different amplitudes (20, 40, and 80 μAmps to the outer two needles, while the voltage was measured between the inner two needles. Tissue impedance between the two inner needles was calculated based on Ohm's law (ratio of voltage to current intensity. Results At the Pericardium location, mean tissue impedance was significantly lower at meridian segments (70.4 ± 5.7 Ω compared with control segments (75.0 ± 5.9 Ω (p = 0.0003. At the Spleen location, mean impedance for meridian (67.8 ± 6.8 Ω and control segments (68.5 ± 7.5 Ω were not significantly different (p = 0.70. Conclusion Tissue impedance was on average lower along the Pericardium meridian, but not

  16. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture—A comparative review. Part 1: The meridian system

    Shyang Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, acupuncture has been used to heal various diseases and physiologic malfunctions in clinical practice for more than 2500 years. Due to its efficacy, acupuncture has been recommended by the World Health Organization in 1980 as an effective alternative therapy for 43 different disorders. Over the past few decades, various theories of the meridian system and mechanisms have been proposed to explain how acupuncture might work. Most of these mechanisms, however, cannot yet explain conclusively why acupuncture is efficacious in treating so many different diseases. A plausible mechanism has been unavailable until recently. This is the first of a three-part series that aims to provide a comparative review of the aforementioned topics. Part 1 reviews the current indications for acupuncture, basic concepts of TCM, and the essence of the meridian system. To establish a mathematically rigorous framework of TCM, the chaotic wave theory of fractal continuum is proposed. This theory is then applied to characterize the essence of the meridian system. Parts 2 and 3 will review the possible mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and acupuncture therapies, respectively, based on biochemical, bioelectromagnetic, chaotic wave, and neurophysiologic approaches. It is sincerely hoped that this series of review articles can promote an understanding of the meridian system and acupuncture mechanisms to help patients in a logical and passionate way.

  17. The Meridians of Reference of Indian Astronomical Canons

    Mercier, R.

    The canons of Sanskrit astronomy depend on mean motions which are normally postulated to refer to the central meridian of Ujjain. The present work is a statistical analysis of these mean motions designed to discover the optimum position of the meridian, by comparison with modern mean motions. This follows earlier work done by Billard in determining the optimum year.

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. DALE JAMIESON. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 3-8 Commentary. Liberating primatology · SINDHU RADHAKRISHNA DALE JAMIESON · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vidita A Vaidya. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 25 Issue 2 June 2000 pp 123-124. Clipboard: Stress, depression and hippocampal damage · Vidita A Vaidya · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  20. [Analysis on property of meridian supramolecules by biological evolution path].

    Deng, Kaiwen; Tao, Yeqin; Tang, Wenhan; He, Fuyuan; Liu, Wenlong; Shi, Jilian; Yang, Yantao; Zhou, Yiqun; Chang, Xiaorong

    2017-03-12

    With human placed in the whole nature, by following the biologic evolution path, the property of channel structure for "imprinting template" in meridian and zang-fu was explored with supramolecular chemistry. In the history of biologic evolution, each molecule in "molecule society" gradually developed into various highly-ordered supramolecular bodies based on self-identification, self-assembly, self-organization, self-replicating of"imprinting template", and thereby the original biochemical system was established, and finally evolved into human. In the forming process of supramolecular bodies, the channel structure of"imprinting template" in guest supramolecular bodies would be kept by host supramolecular bodies, and communicate with the outside to exchange materials, energy, information, otherwise life phenomenon could not continue, for which it was the chemical nature of biolo-gical supramolecular bodies for body to develop meridian. Therefore, the human was a gigantic and complicated supramolecules body in biological nature, and possessed the supramolecules "imprinting template" at each stage of evolution, for which the meridians were formed. When meridians converged, acupoints appeared; when acupointsconverged, zang-fu appeared. With the promotion of the blood from heart, according to"imprinting template", the guest supramolecular bodies and host meridian produced qi -analysis, which was the qi -phenomenon of guest in meridian. It presented as zang-fu image of physiology and pathology as well as action regularities of medication and acupuncture tolerance, by which current various meridian viewpoints could be explained and propose the hypothesis of meridian supramolecular bodies. The meridian and its phenomenon was decide by its "imprinting template" of supramolecular bodies and self-reaction regularities, which abided through the living nature. This was the substance for meridian biology.

  1. Comparison of Acupuncture Effect on Blood Perfusion between Needling Nonacupoint on Meridian and Needling Nonacupoint off Meridian

    Wei-Bo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the ancient theory of rather missing the acupoint than missing the meridian, acupuncture at nonacupoint on meridian and acupuncture at nonacupoint off meridian were performed, respectively. The blood perfusion (BP on the calf around bladder meridian area was measured with a laser Doppler perfusion imager before, during, and after acupuncture. The whole scanning field was divided into seven subareas, and mean BP on each area was calculated. The ratio of mean BP between a subarea and a reference subarea was gotten, and then the change rate was calculated as ratio change rate (RCR. The results showed that RCR on bladder meridian area and around Chengshan (BL57 during or after acupuncture at nonacupoint on meridian was significantly higher than that at nonacupoint off meridian, which supports the ancient theory. Such differences may be attributable to some factors that can facilitate the signals transmission and produce a better acupuncture effect, such as richer nerve terminals, blood vessels, and mast cells which can produce stronger signals on the acupoints and the low hydraulic resistance channel along meridians which plays a role of signal transmitting channel to get a better effect of acupuncture.

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Cover page gallery. Cover page gallery. Journal of Biosciences. Cover page. Journal of Biosciences. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 1. Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 1. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Gallery of Cover Art · Search ...

  3. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  4. Gender Gaps in Cincinnati Public Schools, Then and Now.

    Bertaux, Nancy E.; Gerring, Lori F.

    1994-01-01

    Explores the gender gap in salaries and promotions among Cincinnati (Ohio) public school teachers from the beginning of the school system in 1830 to 1991. Current data show that, although increasing numbers of women are being promoted to principal, the proportion still lags behind that of men. (SLD)

  5. Information Models of Acupuncture Analgesia and Meridian Channels

    Chang Hua Zou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture and meridian channels have been major components of Chinese and Eastern Asian medicine—especially for analgesia—for over 2000 years. In recent decades, electroacupuncture (EA analgesia has been applied clinically and experimentally. However, there were controversial results between different treatment frequencies, or between the active and the placebo treatments; and the mechanisms of the treatments and the related meridian channels are still unknown. In this study, we propose a new term of infophysics therapy and develop information models of acupuncture (or EA analgesia and meridian channels, to understand the mechanisms and to explain the controversial results, based on Western theories of information, trigonometry and Fourier series, and physics, as well as published biomedical data. We are trying to build a bridge between Chinese medicine and Western medicine by investigating the Eastern acupuncture analgesia and meridian channels with Western sciences; we model the meridians as a physiological system that is mostly constructed with interstices in or between other physiological systems; we consider frequencies, amplitudes and wave numbers of electric field intensity (EFI as information data. Our modeling results demonstrate that information regulated with acupuncture (or EA is different from pain information, we provide answers to explain the controversial published results, and suggest that mechanisms of acupuncture (or EA analgesia could be mostly involved in information regulation of frequencies and amplitudes of EFI as well as neuronal transmitters such as endorphins.

  6. [Characteristics of infrared radiation of meridians and acupoints].

    Zheng, Juan-Juan; Shen, Xue-Yong; Zhao, Yi

    2010-10-01

    Infrared radiation temperature and characteristics of infrared spectrum of meridians and acupoints are summarized in this article. The infrared radiant track along the running course of meridians might be a ubiquitous phenomenon of the vital activity. The high temperature bands below the meridian lines at the cuticular layer are often taken as the manifestation of the tract. It could be induced by various stimulations on acupoints with warm-needling as the best causative method. High temperature and low resistance are considered as 2 features of the acupoint zone. The adenosine-triphosphate energy metabolism of the acupoint zone is higher than the non-point zone, which indicates that essential physiological and pathological information are carried by infrared radiation temperature of acupoint and infrared spectrum of acupoint. However, it is realized that study on characteristics of infrared radiation only is far from enough to reveal the essence of meridians and acupoints. And much still remains to be done in strengthening basic studies of characteristics of infrared radiation, structure pattern of meridians and acupoints as well as volt-ampere characteristics.

  7. Severe Obesity Decreasing in Children in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    Kharofa, Roohi Y; Klein, Jillian A; Khoury, Philip; Siegel, Robert M

    2017-07-01

    Childhood obesity rates appear to be leveling off. Studies not looking at severe obesity may be masking a rightward shift in the distribution of body mass indexes. Our objective was to provide current prevalence rates and examine trends in overweight, obesity, class 2 obesity, and class 3 obesity for youth in Cincinnati, Ohio. We performed a retrospective chart review of children 2 to 18 years old seen at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2014. Data from 217 037 BMIs were obtained; 35.2% of children were found to have an elevated BMI. Prevalence rates were highest in older, Hispanic, and Medicaid-insured children. The only significant trend over the 3-year period was a downward shift in class 3 obesity ( P = .02), contrary to national findings. Further studies assessing which clinical/community efforts have led to this downward trend will be essential to target future resources and facilitate continued progress.

  8. Global communication using a constellation of low earth meridian orbits

    Oli, P. V. S.; Nagarajan, N.; Rayan, H. R.

    1993-07-01

    The concept of 'meridian orbits' is briefly reviewed. It is shown that, if a satellite in the meridian orbit makes an odd number of revolutions per day, then the satellite passes over the same set of meridians twice a day. Satellites in such orbits pass over the same portion of the sky twice a day and every day. This enables a user to adopt a programmed mode of tracking, thereby avoiding a computational facility for orbit prediction, look angle generation, and auto tracking. A constellation of 38 or more satellites placed in a 1200 km altitude circular orbit is favorable for global communications due to various factors. It is shown that appropriate phasing in right ascension of the ascending node and mean anomaly results in a constellation, wherein each satellite appears over the user's horizon one satellite after another. Visibility and coverage plots are provided to verify the continuous coverage.

  9. On dermatomes, meridians and points: results of a quasiexperimental study.

    Sánchez-Araujo, Max; Luckert-Barela, Ana J; Sánchez, Nathalia; Torres, Juan; Conde, Jesus Eloy

    2014-02-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) meridians and points run vertically, reflecting their function in the Zhang-Fu system (meridian pattern). However, the trunk's spinal nerves show a traverse orientation, or a 'horizontal pattern'. The aim of the present work was to evaluate, via a cognitive quasiexperiment, whether the clinical indications of the points on the trunk are associated with their meridian function or with their innervation and visceral-somatic connection. The points in each dermatome of the trunk were considered crosswise, regardless of their meridians. The clinical indications for each point were differentiated into two mutually exclusive categories: (a) vertical distribution effect (VDE) or 'meridian pattern', when indications were quite different regarding the indications for the other points on the dermatome; and (b) transverse distribution effects (TDE) or 'horizontal pattern', represented by mainly local or segmental indications except for Shu-Mu points. After observing that the proportions between both categories often exceeded 60% in pilot samples, 60% was adopted as the reference value. A total of 22 dermatomes accommodated 148 points with 809 indications, of which 189 indications (23.4%) exhibited VDE features, whereas 620 (76.6%) exhibited TDE features. A TDE/VDE ratio of 3 : 1 implies that the clinical indications for the points of any dermatome on the torso are similar, regardless of their meridians, and suggests that most of the indications for trunk points involve a 'horizontal pattern' due to their neurobiological nature. These findings may help in understanding acupuncture's neurobiology and clarify some confusing results of clinical research, for example, excluding sham acupuncture as an inert intervention for future clinical trials.

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JONAS P RAMOS. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 657-664 Article. In vitro leishmanicidal, antibacterial and antitumour potential of anhydrocochlioquinone A obtained from the fungus Cochliobolus sp. FERNANDA F CAMPOS JONAS ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Chen Fang. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 351-357 Articles. Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha curcas is induced by stress · Wei Qin Huang Ming-Xing Xu Ying Zhang Xin-Shen Chen Fang · More Details ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vibha Dwivedi. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 281-297 Articles. Suppression of induced but not developmental apoptosis in Drosophila by Ayurvedic Amalaki Rasayana and Rasa-Sindoor · Vibha Dwivedi Shweta Tiwary Subhash C ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Priyakshi Mahanta. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 351-364 Articles. FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data · Priyakshi Mahanta Hasin Afzal Ahmed Dhruba Kumar Bhattacharyya Ashish Ghosh.

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Kamalvishnu P Gottimukkala. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 3 August 2011 pp 461-469 Articles. N-terminal PDZ-like domain of chromatin organizer SATB1 contributes towards its function as transcription regulator · Dimple Notani Praveena L Ramanujam ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. XIAOQIAN DING. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 637-645 Article. MicroRNA-146 protects A549 and H1975 cells from LPS-induced apoptosis and inflammation injury · QIANG WANG DAGANG LI YUQUAN HAN XIAOQIAN DING TAO ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MASOUD SOLEIMANI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 1 March 2017 pp 23-30 Article. Overexpression of hsa-miR-939 follows by NGFR down-regulation and apoptosis reduction · FAHIMEH HOSSEINI AGHDAEI BAHRAM M SOLTANI SADAT ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Anil K Gupta. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 7 December 2002 pp 703-714 Review Article. Applications of inulin and oligofructose in health and nutrition · Narinder Kaur Anil K Gupta · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Inulin and oligofructose belong to a ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LAXMAN S MEENA. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 149-154 Mini-Review. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis · PRATAP C MALI LAXMAN S MEENA · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. HIMANI DEY. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 333-344 Review. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational modifications · USHA P KAR HIMANI DEY ABDUR RAHAMAN · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Dynamin ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Urvashi Bahadur. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 1 March 2001 pp 39-46 Articles. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure and promoter regulation by estrogen · Nandini Vasudevan Urvashi Bahadur Paturu Kondaiah.

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Journal of Biosciences. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 1 · Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 1. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Gallery of Cover Art · Search · Online submission at eBiosciences · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sebastian Fettig. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 3 April 2007 pp 501-510 Articles. specific and unspecific responses of plants to cold and drought stress · Erwin H Beck Sebastian Fettig Claudia Knake Katja Hartig Tribikram Bhattarai · More Details Abstract ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Carissa Reason. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 389-398 Articles. Declines of seagrasses in a tropical harbour, North Queensland, Australia, are not the result of a single event · Skye McKenna Jessie Jarvis Tonia Sankey Carissa Reason ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PRASAD A DESHPANDE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 647-656 Article. IGF1 stimulates differentiation of primary follicles and their growth in ovarian explants of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) cultured in vitro · PANCHARATNA A KATTI ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Samira Mansour. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 815-823 Review. Casuarina glauca: A model tree for basic research in actinorhizal symbiosis · Chonglu Zhong Samira Mansour Mathish Nambiar-Veetil Didier Bogusz Claudine ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Journal of Biosciences. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 1. Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 1. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Gallery of Cover Art · Search · Online submission at eBiosciences · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rashmi Chhabra. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 1 February 2003 pp 7-11. Effects of exogenous vitamin E supplementation on the levels of oxidants and antioxidants in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease · M K Daga Rashmi Chhabra Bhavneesh ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Lidia Andreu Guillo. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 1 March 2012 pp 33-39 Articles. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes · Kárita Antunes Costa Lidia Andreu Guillo · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The p53 protein exerts different ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Lorena Carro. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 685-693 Articles. Micromonospora is a normal occupant of actinorhizal nodules · Lorena Carro Petar Pujic Martha E Trujillo Phillipe Normand · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Odir A Dellagostin. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 3 September 2008 pp 355-363 Articles. Purification and molecular cloning of a new galactose-specific lectin from Bauhinia variegata seeds · Luciano S Pinto Celso S Nagano Taianá M Oliveira Tales R ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shweta Dubey. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 497-501. Clipboard: Putting T cells to sleep: a new paradigm for immune evasion by persistent viruses · Shweta Dubey Shahid Jameel · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Bhagyashri A Shanbhag. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 105-110 Articles. Factors influencing offspring traits in the oviparous multi-clutched lizard, Calotes versicolor (Agamidae) · Rajkumar S Radder Bhagyashri A Shanbhag.

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Pankaj Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 3-15 Articles. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes · Vattipally B Sreenu Pankaj Kumar Javaregowda Nagaraju Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rajiv Sarin. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 93-102. Genotype, phenotype and cancer: Role of low penetrance genes and environment in tumour susceptibility · Ashwin Kotnis Rajiv Sarin Rita Mulherkar · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. S A Ranade. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 25 Issue 3 September 2000 pp 291-299 Review articles. Role of polyamines and ethylene as modulators of plant senescence · S Pandey S A Ranade P K Nagar Nikhil Kumar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Devarshi U Gajjar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 6 December 2012 pp 979-987 Articles. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens epithelial cells · Anshul I Arora Kaid Johar Devarshi U Gajjar Darshini A Ganatra Forum B Kayastha ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Subrata Basu Ray. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 5 December 2001 pp 555-559. Commentary: The enigma of morphine tolerance: recent insights · Subrata Basu Ray Shashi Wadhwa · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 51-56 ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Naveen Kumar Nair. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 2 June 2012 pp 301-312 Review. Nucleic acids in circulation: Are they harmful to the host? Indraneel Mittra Naveen Kumar Nair Pradyumna Kumar Mishra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. It has been ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Veeraputhiran Subbiah. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 2 June 2008 pp 185-193 Articles. Identification of a root-specific glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis and characterization of its promoter · Virupapuram Vijaybhaskar Veeraputhiran Subbiah Jagreet ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. GEOFFREY BODENHAUSEN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 189-199. Commentary: On toxic effects of scientific journals · Antoinette Molinié Geoffrey Bodenhausen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The advent of online publishing ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. ABDUR RAHAMAN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 333-344 Review. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational modifications · USHA P KAR HIMANI DEY ABDUR RAHAMAN · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Dynamin ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. A Sahni. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 673-686 Articles. The origin and early evolution of whales: macroevolution documented on the Indian Subcontinent · S Bajpai J G M Thewissen A Sahni · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Victor Smetacek. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 589-607 Perspectives. Making sense of ocean biota: How evolution and biodiversity of land organisms differ from that of the plankton · Victor Smetacek · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Surendra Ghaskadbi. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 2 June 2001 pp 153-155 Articles. Hydra constitutively expresses transcripts involved in vertebrate neural differentiation · Sandipan Chatterjee Shweta Lahudkar N N Godbole Surendra Ghaskadbi.

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Tonina Fernandes. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 427-434 Articles. Unusual radioresistance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena strains · Harinder Singh Tonina Fernandes Shree Kumar Apte · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PRATAP C MALI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 149-154 Mini-Review. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis · PRATAP C MALI LAXMAN S MEENA · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Srinivasan. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 1 February 2002 pp 15-25. Comparative genomics using data mining tools · Tannistha Nandi Chandrika B-Rao Srinivasan Ramachandran · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. We have analysed the genomes of ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. C SUDHEER KUMAR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 469-479 Article. Modulation of chaperone-like and membranolytic activities of major horse seminal plasma protein HSP-1/2 by L-carnitine · C SUDHEER KUMAR MUSTI J ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Ardashir K Masouleh. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 5 November 2012 pp 829-841 Articles. Application of large-scale sequencing to marker discovery in plants · Robert J Henry Mark Edwards Daniel L E Waters S Gopala Krishnan Peter Bundock Timothy ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. G P Talwar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 4 September 2005 pp 435-447 Perspectives. A destiny to fulfill · G P Talwar · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 34 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 909-916 Articles. A partner monoclonal antibody to Moab 730 kills ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Manjula Kalia. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 451-464. Molecular biology and pathogenesis of hepatitis E virus · Vivek Chandra Shikha Taneja Manjula Kalia Shahid Jameel · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The hepatitis E virus ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. L Singh. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 739-748 Review. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) – A promising spice for phytochemicals and biological activities · R S Policegoudra S M Aradhya L Singh · More Details Abstract ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. D Raghunath. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 593-603. Emerging antibiotic resistance in bacteria with special reference to India · D Raghunath · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The antibiotic era started in the 1940s and changed ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Pankaj Verma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 2 June 2012 pp 221-226 Brief communication. Molecular typing of fecal eukaryotic microbiota of human infants and their respective mothers · Prashant K Pandey Jay Siddharth Pankaj Verma Ashish Bavdekar ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vidya Ramachandran. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 437-464. Epidemiological profile of India: Historical and contemporary perspectives · M D Gupte Vidya Ramachandran R K Mutatkar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. VINCENZO IERARDI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 623-636 Article. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic force microscopy · VINCENZO IERARDI PAOLO DOMENICHINI SILVIA REALI GIAN MARCO ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Satish K Amarnath. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 539-547. Brucellosis in India – a review · Basappa G Mantur Satish K Amarnath · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Brucellosis is an important re-emerging zoonosis with a ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Xiuhong Yang. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 1 March 2008 pp 103-112 Articles. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum · Xiuhong Yang Chao Sun Yuanlei ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Finny Monickaraj. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 1 March 2013 pp 113-122 Articles. Accelerated fat cell aging links oxidative stress and insulin resistance in adipocytes · Finny Monickaraj Sankaramoorthy Aravind Pichamoorthy Nandhini Paramasivam ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MOHAMMAD HOSSEIN GHAHREMANI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 555-563 Article. Induction of morphological and functional differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells by miR-124 · SAMANEH SHARIF MOHAMMAD ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Harinder Singh. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 427-434 Articles. Unusual radioresistance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena strains · Harinder Singh Tonina Fernandes Shree Kumar Apte · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Jacinta S D'souza. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 2 March 2003 pp 223-233 Articles. Purification and characterization of a Ca -dependent/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase from moss chloronema cells · Jacinta S D'souza Man Mohan Johri.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Ashwin Kotnis. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 93-102. Genotype, phenotype and cancer: Role of low penetrance genes and environment in tumour susceptibility · Ashwin Kotnis Rajiv Sarin Rita Mulherkar · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. ZAKI ABU RABI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 265-274 Article. Interleukin 8 in progression of hormone-dependent early breast cancer · JELENA MILOVANOVIĆ NATAŠA TODOROVIĆ-RAKOVIĆ TIJANA VUJASINOVIĆ ZAKI ABU RABI.

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PAIKE JAYADEVA BHAT. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 4 October 2009 pp 513-522 Articles. Epigenetics of the yeast galactose genetic switch · Paike Jayadeva Bhat Revathi S Iyer · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The transcriptional activation of ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Subhash C Lakhotia. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 3 September 2004 pp 219-224. Commentary: Epigenetics of heterochromatin · Subhash C Lakhotia · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 32 Issue 3 April 2007 pp 429-431. Foreword · Subhash C ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Michel Morange. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 4 December 2004 pp 378-380. Commentary: The death of Francis Crick: the end of a golden age in biology · Michel Morange · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 30 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 313-316 Series.

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MONIDIPA GHOSH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 427-438 Article. Cholesterol-lowering drug, in combination with chromium chloride, induces early apoptotic signals in intracellular L. donovani amastigotes, leading to death.

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. John Bernet. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 249-264 Articles. Viral mimicry of the complement system · John Bernet Jayati Mullick Akhilesh K Singh Arvind Sahu · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The complement system is a potent ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SADHANA SINGH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 355-364 Articles. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study · Sadhana Singh Shilpi Modi Satnam Goyal ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MOSAMI GALVANKAR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 2 June 2017 pp 251-263 Article. Estrogen is essential but not sufficient to induce endometriosis · MOSAMI GALVANKAR NEHA SINGH MODI DEEPAK · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Baby P S Chakrapani. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 2 June 2008 pp 269-277 Articles. Development and evaluation of an in vivo assay in Caenorhabditis elegans for screening of compounds for their effect on cytochrome P450 expression · Baby P S ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. M Balasubramanyam. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 3 September 2001 pp 383-390 Review Article. Orally active insulin mimics: where do we stand now? M Balasubramanyam V Mohan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The war against diabetes ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Leelavinothan Pari. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 581-587 Articles. Effect of a novel insulinotropic agent, succinic acid monoethyl ester, on lipids and lipoproteins levels in rats with streptozotocin-nicotinamideinduced type 2 diabetes.

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Naveen Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 5 August 2007 pp 937-945 Articles. ARC: Automated Resource Classifier for agglomerative functional classification of prokaryotic proteins using annotation texts · Muthiah Gnanamani Naveen Kumar ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JIANPING SI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 4 December 2016 pp 727-742 ARTICLE. Functional analyses of Populus euphratica brassinosteroid biosynthesis enzyme genes DWF4 (PeDWF4) and CPD (PeCPD) in the regulation of growth and ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. AA SULTAN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 531-535 Brief communication. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype distribution in dhps and dhfr from Northeast India · NP SARMAH K SARMA DR BHATTACHARYYA ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Satya Keerthi Kota. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 329-337 Articles. Cloning and characterization of mouse cullin4B/E3 ubiquitin ligase · Rachana Tripathi K Seetharama Satya Keerthi Kota Usha K Srinivas · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. BETANIA B COTA. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 657-664 Article. In vitro leishmanicidal, antibacterial and antitumour potential of anhydrocochlioquinone A obtained from the fungus Cochliobolus sp. FERNANDA F CAMPOS JONAS ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Anshu Aggarwal. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 4 July 2002 pp 339-346 Articles. Place prioritization for biodiversity content · Sahotra Sarkar Anshu Aggarwal Justin Garson Chris R Margules Juliane Zeidler · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LI-MIN FENG. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 547-554 Article. Thymoquinone induces cytotoxicity and reprogramming of EMT in gastric cancer cells by targeting PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway · LI-MIN FENG XUE-FENG WANG QING-XIAN ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. P Chauhan. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 729-747 Articles. India at the cross-roads of human evolution · R Patnaik P Chauhan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The Indian palaeoanthropological record, although patchy at the ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Franck Molina. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 145-155 Articles. Formal TCA cycle description based on elementary actions · Pierre Mazière Nicolas Parisey Marie Beurton-Aimar Franck Molina · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. P Dayanandan. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 455-469 Articles. Structural and histochemical studies on grain-filling in the caryopsis of rice (Oryza sativa L.) S Krishnan P Dayanandan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The endosperm ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Faezeh Mohammad-Hashem. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 1 March 2012 pp 85-90 Articles. Differential expression of ZFX gene in gastric cancer · Parvaneh Nikpour Modjtaba Emadi-Baygi Faezeh Mohammad-Hashem Mohamad Reza Maracy ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. QING-XIAN HUANG. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 547-554 Article. Thymoquinone induces cytotoxicity and reprogramming of EMT in gastric cancer cells by targeting PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway · LI-MIN FENG XUE-FENG WANG ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shobha Rao. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 481-489. Nutritional status of the Indian population · Shobha Rao · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. High prevalence of low birth weight, high morbidity and mortality in children and poor ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Isaac Salazar-Ciudad. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 4 October 2009 pp 573-587 Articles. Looking at the origin of phenotypic variation from pattern formation gene networks · Isaac Salazar-Ciudad · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. This article critically ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Gregor Durstewitz. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 5 November 2012 pp 821-828 Articles. Large SNP arrays for genotyping in crop plants · Martin W Ganal Andreas Polley Eva-Maria Graner Joerg Plieske Ralf Wieseke Hartmut Luerssen Gregor Durstewitz.

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Piyali Ganguli. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 4 October 2015 pp 769-789 Articles. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: A computational study · Piyali Ganguli Saikat Chowdhury Rupa Bhowmick ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Anuradha Aritakula. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 5 December 2008 pp 731-742 Articles. Drosophila-based in vivo assay for the validation of inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor/Ras pathway · Anuradha Aritakula Annadurai Ramasamy.

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. LOCHNER. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 59-74 Article. Thalassiosira mala italic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, frustule morphology ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. P T V Praveen Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 5 December 2013 pp 887-892 Articles. Maternal hormonal interventions as a risk factor for Autism Spectrum Disorder: An epidemiological assessment from India · Madhu Poornima Mamidala Anupama ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Niranjan Mishra. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 1 March 2010 pp 79-86. Evidence of a humoral immune response against the prokaryotic expressed N-terminal autoprotease (N) protein of bovine viral diarrhoea virus · Niranjan Mishra Katherukamem ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sindhu Radhakrishna. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 5 December 2011 pp 749-753. Commentary: Less than wild? Commensal primates and wildlife conservation · Sindhu Radhakrishna Anindya Sinha · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 43 Issue 1 ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Murlidhar J Mendki. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 301-309 Articles. Transcriptome analysis of Anopheles stephensi embryo using expressed sequence tags · Kaustubh Gokhale Deepak P Patil Dhiraj P Dhotre Rajnikant Dixit Murlidhar J ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Antoinette Molinié. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 189-199. Commentary: On toxic effects of scientific journals · Antoinette Molinié Geoffrey Bodenhausen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The advent of online publishing greatly ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Hsinyu Lee. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 1 March 2012 pp 157-165 Review. Autophagy: A double-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease · Ying-Tsen Tung Bo-Jeng Wang Ming-Kuan Hu Wen-Ming Hsu Hsinyu Lee Wei-Pang Huang Yung-Feng Liao.

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    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SUDHANSHU GAUTAM. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 613-621 Article. Small phosphatidate phosphatase ( TtPAH2 ) of Tetrahymena complements respiratory function and not membrane biogenesis function of yeast PAH1.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Anasuya Majumdar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 4 September 2005 pp 469-474 Articles. Structural organization of the transfer RNA operon I of Vibrio cholerae: Differences between classical and El Tor strains · Atreyi Ghatak Anasuya Majumdar Ranajit ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Lei He. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 1 March 2014 pp 63-74 Articles. Screening of cellular proteins that interact with the classical swine fever virus non-structural protein 5A by yeast two-hybrid analysis · Chengcheng Zhang Lei He Kai Kang Heng Chen ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Suman Jain. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 3 September 2013 pp 605-614 Reviews. Role of sound stimulation in reprogramming brain connectivity · Sraboni Chaudhury Tapas C Nag Suman Jain Shashi Wadhwa · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Alok Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 6 September 2007 pp 1089-1110 Articles. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in -prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications · Alok Sharma Divya Chandran Desh D Singh M ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. David L Beveridge. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 379-397 Articles. The ABCs of molecular dynamics simulations on B-DNA, circa 2012 · David L Beveridge Thomas E Cheatham III Mihaly Mezei · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

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  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. S A Kulasooriya. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 645-650 Reviews. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials · W M M S Bandara Gamini Seneviratne S A Kulasooriya · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. A Adaikala Koteswari. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 6 December 2003 pp 715-721 Articles. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species generation: Novel therapeutic implications · M Balasubramanyam A Adaikala Koteswari R ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. M T Tanuja. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 1 March 2001 pp 71-76 Articles. Incipient sexual isolation in the nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila: No-choice experiments · M T Tanuja N B Ramachandra H A Ranganath · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Triptish Bhatia. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 1 February 2002 pp 35-52. Molecular genetics of schizophrenia: past, present and future · Suman Prasad Prachi Semwal Smita Deshpande Triptish Bhatia V L Nimgaonkar B K Thelma · More Details Abstract ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Amar J S Klar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 1 March 2010 pp 11-15 Perspectives. A proposal for re-defining the way the aetiology of schizophrenia and bipolar human psychiatric diseases is investigated · Amar J S Klar · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SUMITRA NAIN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 481-490 Article. Promoter polymorphism MMP-1 (-1607 2G/1G) and MMP-3 (-1612 5A/6A) in development of HAND and modulation of pathogenesis of HAND · HARI OM SINGH ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shree Kumar Apte. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 2 June 2004 pp 153-161 Articles. A novel potassium deficiency-induced stimulon in Anabaena torulosa · Anuradha Alahari Shree Kumar Apte · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Potassium deficiency ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SONG XUE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 2 June 2016 pp 229-236 Article. Silencing of HMGA2 promotes apoptosis and inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells · Zhan Shi Ding Wu Run Tang Xiang Li Renfu Chen Song Xue Chengjing ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JAMUNA R SUBRAMANIAM. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 4 December 2016 pp 689-695 ARTICLE. Reserpine requires the D2-type receptor, dop-3 , and the exoribonuclease, eri-1 , to extend the lifespan in C. elegans · KOPAL SAHARIA RANJEET ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Mihaly Mezei. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 379-397 Articles. The ABCs of molecular dynamics simulations on B-DNA, circa 2012 · David L Beveridge Thomas E Cheatham III Mihaly Mezei · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. This article ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Jaeok Lee. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 341-354 Articles. Inhibitory activity of the peptides derived from buffalo prolactin on angiogenesis · Jaeok Lee Syamantak Majumder Suvro Chatterjee Kambadur Muralidhar · More Details Abstract ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Durai Sundar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 483-491 Articles. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins · Sumedha Roy Shayoni Dutta Kanika Khanna Shruti Singla Durai Sundar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Milena Radakovic. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 1 March 2013 pp 53-62 Articles. Evaluation of the DNA damaging effects of amitraz on human lymphocytes in the Comet assay · Milena Radakovic Jevrosima Stevanovic Ninoslav Djelic Nada Lakic Jelena ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Ana M soto. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 103-118. Emergentism as a default: Cancer as a problem of tissue organization · Ana M soto Carlos Sonnenschein · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. During the last fifty years the dominant ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. NARAHARI P GRAMAPUROHIT. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 459-468 Article. Can embryonic skipper frogs ( Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis ) learn to recognise kairomones in the absence of a nervous system? SWAPNIL C SUPEKAR ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. VIDYANAND NANJUNDIAH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 25 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 9-10. Commentary: The smallest form of life yet? Vidyanand Nanjundiah · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 28 Issue 6 December 2003 pp 697-707 Articles. Calcium regulates ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. AMOTZ ZAHAVI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 49-58 Article. An individual-level selection model for the apparent altruism exhibited by cellular slime moulds · AMOTZ ZAHAVI KEITH D HARRIS VIDYANAND NANJUNDIAH · More Details ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Carlos Sonnenschein. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 103-118. Emergentism as a default: Cancer as a problem of tissue organization · Ana M soto Carlos Sonnenschein · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. During the last fifty years the ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Angelo Martino. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 6 September 2007 pp 1207-1212 Review. Sphingosine 1-phosphate as a novel immune regulator of dendritic cells · Angelo Martino · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Although originally described as an ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. AGASTHYA SURESH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 75-83 Article. PAX6 can substitute for LHX2 and override NFIA-induced astrogliogenesis in developing hippocampus in vivo · VEENA KINARE ASHWIN S SHETTY AGASTHYA ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Marta Linde-Medina. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 575-585 Brief communication. Adaptation or exaptation? The case of the human hand · Marta Linde-Medina · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. A controversy of relevance to the ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sangappa. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 30 Issue 2 March 2005 pp 259-268 Articles. Crystal structure of raw pure Mysore silk fibre based on (Ala-Gly)2-Ser-Gly peptide sequence using Linked-Atom-Least-Squares method · Sangappa S S Mahesh R Somashekar.

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JASWANDI UJWAL DANDEKAR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 585-601 Article. Fermentative metabolism impedes p53-dependent apoptosis in a Crabtree-positive but not in Crabtree-negative yeast · ABHAY KUMAR JASWANDI ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Anurag Kumar Mishra. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 3 June 2002 pp 251-259 Articles. Cloning and sequencing of complete -crystallin cDNA from embryonic lens of Crocodylus palustris · Raman Agrawal Reena Chandrashekhar Anurag Kumar Mishra ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. ASHIS KUMAR NANDI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 3 September 2013 pp 583-592 Articles. Down-regulation of OsSAG12-1 results in enhanced senescence and pathogen-induced cell death in transgenic rice plants · Subaran Singh Mrunmay Kumar ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Indranil Dasgupta. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 791-806 Review. Begomovirus research in India: A critical appraisal and the way ahead · Basanta K Borah Indranil Dasgupta · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Begomoviruses are ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rajiv D Kalraiya. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 5 December 2013 pp 867-876 Articles. 2,6 Sialylation associated with increased 1,6-branched -oligosaccharides influences cellular adhesion and invasion · Amit Ranjan Rajiv D Kalraiya · More Details ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Julio Reyes Leyva. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 6 December 2012 pp 999-1004 Articles. Sialyl Lewis x expression in cervical scrapes of premalignant lesions · Noé Velázquez-Márquez Gerardo Santos López Lucio Jiménez Aranda Julio Reyes Leyva ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. R S Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 391-405. Current status of fertility control methods in India · R S Sharma M Rajalakshmi D Antony Jeyaraj · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Approximately 48.2% of couples of 15 to 49 ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHUGUANG HAN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 671-681 Article. MiR-876-5p suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lung cancer by directly down-regulating bone morphogenetic protein 4 · LIANG BAO LEI LV JINPING ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Jesper G Sørensen. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 4 December 2004 pp 503-511. Ecologically relevant stress resistance: from microarrays and quantitative trait loci to candidate genes – A research plan and preliminary results using Drosophila as a ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Scott F Gilbert. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 3 September 2001 pp 293-298. Commentary: New vistas for developmental biology · Scott F Gilbert Rocky S Tuan · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 27 Issue 5 September 2002 pp 445-446. Commentary: ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Partha P Majumder. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 390a-390a. Preface · Partha P Majumder A Jagannadha Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 533-545. Ethnic populations of India as seen from ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. XINHUA WANG. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 671-681 Article. MiR-876-5p suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lung cancer by directly down-regulating bone morphogenetic protein 4 · LIANG BAO LEI LV JINPING ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Amrita Banerjee. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 475-481 Articles. A revisit of the mode of interaction of small transcription inhibitors with genomic DNA · Dipak Dasgupta Parijat Majumder Amrita Banerjee · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Neeti Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2010 pp 187-202 Articles. Spectrum of CREBBP mutations in Indian patients with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome · Neeti Sharma Avinash M Mali Sharmila A Bapat · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Adrian Surmacki. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 691-699 Articles. Differences in predatory pressure on terrestrial snails by birds and mammals · Zuzanna M Rosin Paulina Olborska Adrian Surmacki Piotr Tryjanowski · More Details ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. G V R Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 5 November 2009 pp 649-659 Articles. Divergence time estimates of mammals from molecular clocks and fossils: Relevance of new fossil finds from India · G V R Prasad · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. MUNIASAMY NEERATHILINGAM. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 41 Issue 3 September 2016 pp 535-561 Review. Application of aptamers in diagnostics, drug-delivery and imaging · CHETAN CHANDOLA SHEETAL KALME MARCO G CASTELEIJN ARTO URTTI ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Q M I Haq. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 329-340 Articles. Mutagenesis in ORF AV2 affects viral replication in Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus · A Rouhibakhsh Q M I Haq V G Malathi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Mungbean ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JEDY JOSE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 363-371 Brief communication. Amalaki Rasayana improved memory and neuronal metabolic activity in AβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease · VIVEK TIWARI KAMAL SABA ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Girish J Kotwal. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 265-271 Articles. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug · Purushottam Jha Girish J Kotwal · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Vaccinia ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Saqib Mahmood. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 521-530 Articles. Role of leptin G-2548A polymorphism in age- and gender-specific development of obesity · Adeela Shahid Sobia Rana Saqib Mahmood Shahid Saeed · More Details ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHUKLA SUSHMITA. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 613-621 Article. Small phosphatidate phosphatase ( TtPAH2 ) of Tetrahymena complements respiratory function and not membrane biogenesis function of yeast PAH1.

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Sinha Sinha. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2014 pp 525-536 Reviews. Conservation of PHO pathway in ascomycetes and the role of Pho84 · Parul Tomar Sinha Sinha · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. ANANT B PATEL. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 363-371 Brief communication. Amalaki Rasayana improved memory and neuronal metabolic activity in AβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease · VIVEK TIWARI KAMAL SABA ...

  16. East Midlands healthcare and bioscience sector strategy

    East Midlands Development Agency

    2007-01-01

    The healthcare and bioscience sector is one of four priority sectors identified in the regional economic strategy, A Flourishing Region. This document sets out a strategy for maximising the contribution of the healthcare and biosciences sector to the economic development of the East Midlands.

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. T Naga Sowjanya. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 35 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 539-546 Articles. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications in Neurospora can disrupt genes and create novel open reading frames · Parmit K Singh ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. NILOFER NAQVI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 127-138 Article. Blocking dephosphorylation at Serine 120 residue in t-SNARE SNAP-23 leads to massive inhibition in exocytosis from mast cells · NASKAR PIEU NILOFER NAQVI NITI ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHRUTI D MARATHE. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 3 September 2017 pp 481-490 Article. Promoter polymorphism MMP-1 (-1607 2G/1G) and MMP-3 (-1612 5A/6A) in development of HAND and modulation of pathogenesis of HAND · HARI OM SINGH ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JASMINE M SHAH. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 173-187 Review. Plant reference genes for development and stress response studies · JOYOUS T JOSEPH NAJYA JABEEN POOLAKKALODY JASMINE M SHAH · More Details Abstract ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Pushpa Mittra Bhargava. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 167-168. Commentary: Insufficient regulatory supervision prior to release of genetically modified crops for commercial cultivation in India · Pushpa Mittra Bhargava · More Details ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. PRABHJOT KAUR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 355-364 Articles. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study · Sadhana Singh Shilpi Modi Satnam Goyal ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Madhuri Thakar. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 515-525. HIV infection in India: Epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis. Samir Lakhashe Madhuri Thakar Sheela Godbole Srikanth Tripathy Ramesh Paranjape.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. JAMES A NIENOW. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 59-74 Article. Thalassiosira mala italic> (Bacillariophyta), a potentially harmful, marine diatom from Chilka Lake and other coastal localities of Odisha, India: Nomenclature, frustule ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. D BANSAL. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 531-535 Brief communication. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype distribution in dhps and dhfr from Northeast India · NP SARMAH K SARMA DR BHATTACHARYYA ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. SHEETAL S NARVEKAR. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 42 Issue 4 December 2017 pp 647-656 Article. IGF1 stimulates differentiation of primary follicles and their growth in ovarian explants of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) cultured in vitro · PANCHARATNA A KATTI ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Antonio G Valdecasas. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 835-843 Perspectives. Understanding complex systems: lessons from Auzoux's and von Hagens's anatomical models · Antonio G Valdecasas Ana M Correas Carmen R Guerrero ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. B N Singh. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 263-274 Articles. Variations in morphological and life-history traits under extreme temperatures in Drosophila ananassae · Seema Sisodia B N Singh · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rahul Gaur. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 4 June 2007 pp 747-754 Articles. Diet-dependent depletion of queuosine in tRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans does not lead to a developmental block · Rahul Gaur Glenn R Björk Simon Tuck Umesh Varshney.

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Smita Deshpande. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 27 Issue 1 February 2002 pp 35-52. Molecular genetics of schizophrenia: past, present and future · Suman Prasad Prachi Semwal Smita Deshpande Triptish Bhatia V L Nimgaonkar B K Thelma · More Details ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. S Ignacimuthu. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 31 Issue 3 September 2006 pp 339-345 Articles. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea with -amylase inhibitor gene for insect resistance · S Ignacimuthu S Prakash · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vindhya Mohindra. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 373-383 Articles. Physiological responses to acute experimental hypoxia in the air-breathing Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758) · Ratnesh Kumar Tripathi Vindhya Mohindra ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Will D Penny. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 129-144 Articles. Dynamic causal models of neural system dynamics: current state and future extensions · Klaas E Stephan Lee M Harrison Stefan J Kiebel Olivier David Will D Penny Karl J ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. STHITAPRANJYA PATI. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 43 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 85-95 Article. Acute pharmacogenetic activation of medial prefrontal cortex excitatory neurons regulates anxiety-like behaviour · STHITAPRANJYA PATI ANKIT SOOD SOURISH ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Shikha Srivastava. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 1 March 2012 pp 63-72 Articles. High prevalence of oncogenic HPV-16 in cervical smears of asymptomatic women of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India: A population-based study · Shikha Srivastava Sadhana ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rajkumar S. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 105-110 Articles. Factors influencing offspring traits in the oviparous multi-clutched lizard, Calotes versicolor (Agamidae) · Rajkumar S Radder Bhagyashri A Shanbhag · More Details Abstract ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Gavan Holloway. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 28 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 323-335 Articles. HIV-1 Nef control of cell signalling molecules: multiple strategies to promote virus replication · Alison L Greenway Gavan Holloway Dale A McPhee Phoebe Ellis Alyssa ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. K B Saxena. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 5 November 2012 pp 811-820 Articles. Advances in genetics and molecular breeding of three legume crops of semi-arid tropics using next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies.

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Vibha Tandon. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 37 Issue 3 July 2012 pp 493-502 Articles. Inhibition of HIV-1 Integrase gene expression by 10-23 DNAzyme · Nirpendra Singh Atul Ranjan Souvik Sur Ramesh Chandra Vibha Tandon · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  20. Variation in meroplankton along 78 degrees E Meridian

    Balachandran, T.; Peter, K.J.

    Variations along the meridian 78 degrees E between 8 degrees N and 25 degrees S, based on 43 zooplankton samples were studied. Fish larvae exhibited fluctuations in abundance (26 to 57 specimens/IOSN haul) in the three zones studied (8 degrees N-5...

  1. 78 FR 30331 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies

    2013-05-22

    ... Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies By Notice dated March 7, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on March 13, 2013, 78 FR 15974, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis... that the registration of Meridian Medical Technologies to import the basic class of controlled...

  2. 77 FR 31388 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies

    2012-05-25

    ... Registration; Meridian Medical Technologies By Notice dated March 23, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on April 2, 2012, 77 FR 19716, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...) and 952(a), and determined that the registration of Meridian Medical Technologies to import the basic...

  3. African American Perceptions about Crime in Cincinnati, Ohio since the 2001 Riots: Over a Decade Later

    Derrick J. Jenkins, Sr. Ph.D.

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that there was little difference in African American perceptions of violence in Cincinnati in 2001 and 11 years later in 2012. Most people felt that violence in Cincinnati is a very serious problem, with more than half of the respondents indicating that in the past 3 years violence in Cincinnati stayed the same. More importantly, these findings emphasize that the riots in Cincinnati is not a central event in the African American community, instead for some, it represents another example of why violence always seem to exist and there is a low morale among the African American community and police officers.

  4. [Theoretical and clinical application of insomnia caused by "stomach disorder could lead to excess of yang-qiao meridian"].

    Ren, Jian-Ning

    2013-02-01

    To explore the mechanism of insomnia caused by "stomach disorder could lead to excess of yang-qiao meridian" and clinical application of treating insomnia with acupoints in qiao meridian as the main points. From meridian theory, intersection between stomach meridian of Foot-Yangming and yang-qiao meridian is through Chengqi (ST 1). Qiao meridian for sleep is mainly because it is connected with eyes through the Bladder Meridian of Foot-Taiyang. For Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming is intersected with the Bladder Meridian of Foot-Taiyang in Jingming (BL 1), and intersected with yin and yang qiao meridian beside the mouth and under the eye, once functional disorder of the stomach, it can affect qi movements of the whole body and give rise to various pathological changes that cause insomnia. Meanwhile examples are given to explain the clinical application of treating subborn insomnia with corresponding acupoint of stomach and yang-qiao meridian.

  5. Planning for a Sustainable Future of the Cincinnati Union Terminal

    None, None

    2012-04-30

    The Cincinnati Museum Center invited a number of local stakeholders, political leaders, nationally and internationally recognized design professionals and the Design Team, that has been engaged to help shape the future of this remarkable resource, to work together in a Workshop that would begin to shape a truly sustainable future for both the Museum and its home, the Union Terminal, one of the most significant buildings in America. This report summarizes and highlights the discussions that took place during the Workshop and presents recommendations for shaping a direction and a framework for the future.

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 5 ... Department of Physiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon ... Faculty of Applied Marine Science, Cheju National University, Jeju 690-756, Republic ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 1 ... an overview of the implications of such a phenomenon for basic and applied research. ... Department of Crop Biology, Section of Plant Physiology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 38; Issue 4 ... Department of Plant Physiology, UPSC, Umeå University, S-90187 Umea, Sweden; Ecologie ... Lyon, France; Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Botany, University of Sri ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4 ... of stochastic differential equation; spectral density; Tchebycheff's inequality ... Estimation of maximum harvesting effort has a great impact on the economics of fisheries and other ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    A model for cell type localization in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum based on differential ... a progressive maturation of chemotactic properties during the transdifferentiation of slug cell types. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2 ... The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure of the brain reward circuit, is implicated in ... Reduction in the conductance of KIR channels evokes facilitatory effects on EPSPs ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 2 ... From about 6000 brain sub-oesophageal ganglion complexes, the neuropeptide was isolated; and purified ... Radiochemical bioassay confirmed the pheromonotropic effect of the ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 1. A songbird forebrain area potentially involved in auditory discrimination and memory formation ... a set of interconnected ascending and descending auditory brain pathways that ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats ... whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Apoptosis; bee; brain; cell division; nervous system ... have a distinct morphology, physiology and behaviour that correlate with their roles in the society and are characterized by some brain polymorphisms. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Zinc finger protein 521 is highly expressed in brain, neural stem cells and early ... Fndc5, a precursor of Irisin has inducing effects on the expression level of brain derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Brain; differential proteomics; ICAT; LCM; neuron; tandem mass spectrometry ... but also for gaining valuable understanding into brain function and deciphering proteomics from the workbench to the bedside. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Role of sound stimulation in reprogramming brain connectivity. Sraboni Chaudhury Tapas C Nag Suman Jain Shashi Wadhwa ... Keywords. Auditory pathway; avian; brain; sound stimulation; synaptic plasticity ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Amelioration of altered antioxidant status and membrane linked functions by vanadium and Trigonella in alloxan diabetic rat brains ... determined in different fractions of whole brain after 21 days of treatment. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    HPLC analysis reveals the presence of beta amyloid in the OVX and HCL mice brain. Congo red staining analysis revealed the extent of amyloid deposition in OVX and hypercholesterolemia mice brain. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and early-life stress: Multifaceted interplay. NATALYA P ... Abstract. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neural development and plasticity. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    In the same brain areas, VBM results also showed reduced grey and white matter volumes. ... alterations and disturbed functional brain activation during empathy task in persons affected with schizophrenia. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Insights into brain development and disease from neurogenetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster ... operate in neural stem cells during normal brain development and during abnormal brain tumorigenesis. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Information for Authors ... Submission of a manuscript will be held to imply that the work reported in it is original, that .... when essential should be numbered consecutively and typed on a separate sheet.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 4 ... the clusters obtained by a clustering algorithm applied on cancer gene expression data. ... In this context, we have used biochemical pathways, -value statistics of GO attributes, ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5 ... A genomic library was generated using HindIII and the positive clones were sequenced and ... People's Republic of China; School of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suzhou ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2 ... (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. ... School of Medicine and Pharmaceutics, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122, ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 4 ... Plant Biotechnology Research Center, School of Agriculture and Biology, ... D Center, School of Life Sciences, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2 ... School of Life Sciences, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, ... of China; Plant Biotechnology Research Center, School of Agriculture and Biology, ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 2 ... R & D Center, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, ... School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 1 ... and Plant Breeding, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore 560 065, India; Biometrics and Bioinformatics Unit, International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Philippines ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3 ... International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru 502 ... Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141 027, India; RAK College of Agriculture, ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2 ... School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, ... D Center, Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2 ... Department of Horticulture, Agriculture Faculty, Ilam University, Ilam, Iran; Plant Molecular Biology Group, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-10-26

    Oct 26, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 5 ... the Early Pleistocene of East Africa, Western Asia and Southeast Asia, thus indirectly ... Centre of Advanced Studies in Geology, Panjab University, Chandigarh ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2007-06-28

    Jun 28, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 5 ... These methods suffer from disadvantages such as the lack of availability of ... In this work, we have constructed a library of local conformation classes purely ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 1 ... profiling combined with physiological analysis at two time points for soybean seedlings in ... waterlogging through the management of carbohydrate consumption and by regulating ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2011-08-07

    Aug 7, 2011 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 3 ... pathways in animal models of human disease and in patients to provide insights ... progression of metastasis, immune cell trafficking, stem cell therapy, transgenic ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-08-10

    Aug 10, 2009 ... A ubiquitous cue eliciting these plastic phenotypic responses is ... Among the conclusions that emerge from this exploration is the perspective that the plant cell is phenotypically plastic. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 3 ... Asthma is a chronic disease due to inflammation of the airways of lungs that is clinically ... ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism, rs4646994, in asthma in Pakistani patients.

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 2 ... whole animal was studied after adaptation to low and high concentrations of riboflavin. ... India; Department of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biotechnology, Madurai Kamaraj ...

  2. Late Ordovician pelecypod faunas from the Cincinnati, Ohio area

    Frey, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of pelecypod faunas in the Late Ordovician strata exposed in the Cincinnati, Ohio area, points to a close relationship between lithofacies type and the life habits of these Ordovician bivalves. Muddy clastic shallow marine facies of Edenian, Maysvillian, and early Richmondian age support faunas dominated by endobyssate filter-feeding species, including a variety of modiomorphids and the genus Ambonychia, plus infaunal filter-feeding orthonotids, and in faunal deposit-feeding palaeotaxodonts. These pelecypod groups occur in claystones with a fauna of calymenid and asaphid trilobites, nautiloids, cyclomyan monoplacophorans, and occasionally crinoids and asterozoans. Younger Richmondian strata in the area are predominantly carbonate platform facies and support pelecypod faunas dominated by robust endobyssate and epibyssate ambonychiids, cyrtodontids, and colpomyids. These pelecypods are associated with diverse assemblage of articulate brachiopods, trepostome ectoprocts, solitary rugose corals, and mollusks in skeletal limestones representing storm-reworked thickets or ramos ectoprocts. This fundamental dichotomy in Late Ordovician pelecypod faunas is recognized not only in the Cincinnati area, but in Late Ordovician strata exposed on Manitoulin Island in Ontario and eastward into Quebec. Reconstructions of the life habits of these pelecypods demonstrates the dominance of the endobyssate mode of life in these Early Paleozoic pelecypods.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Branka I Ognjanović. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 39 Issue 5 December 2014 pp 859-866 Articles. Prooxidative effects of aspartame on antioxidant defense status in erythrocytes of rats · Marko D Prokić Milica G Paunović Miloš M Matić Nataša Z Djordjević ...

  4. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.20 Section 81.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  5. High accurate time system of the Low Latitude Meridian Circle.

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhiming

    In order to obtain the high accurate time signal for the Low Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC), a new GPS accurate time system is developed which include GPS, 1 MC frequency source and self-made clock system. The second signal of GPS is synchronously used in the clock system and information can be collected by a computer automatically. The difficulty of the cancellation of the time keeper can be overcomed by using this system.

  6. African American Perceptions about Crime in Cincinnati, Ohio since the 2001 Riots: Over a Decade Later

    Derrick J. Jenkins, Sr. Ph.D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 1994, the city of Cincinnati, Ohio was named the most livable city in America by Places Rated Almanac (Clark, 1993. Couched within this distinction is the variance of perceived categorizations as the building blocks of a utopian-esque society such as a robust job market, low cost of living, affordable housing, highly educated populous, high arts and recreation and low crime rates. What happened within under a decade that transformed the national perception of the queen city from the most livable city in 1994 to the most recent and largest urban hot bed of racial and civil unrest since the Los Angeles riots? However, no study has explicitly assessed the perceptions of crime in Cincinnati, Ohio. The purpose of this study is to assess perceptions about crime in the local community since the 2001 Cincinnati riots. Methods: We surveyed 71 participants as part of a cross-sectional study designed to assess perception of crime in Cincinnati, Ohio. We conducted a questionnaire of a random sample of African American residents in Cincinnati, Ohio. The city of Cincinnati was chosen because of its large African American community and in part due to its long lasting history of police violence and riots in the African American community.  Analyses: Most participants felt the level of crime in Cincinnati, Ohio was a very serious problem. However, a large majority of both males (22.6% and females (10% believed crime in Cincinnati, Ohio was somewhat serious. The remaining respondents perceived crime in Cincinnati as serious (males: 16.1%, females: 12.5% or not at all serious (males 3.2%, females: 0%. A larger portion of the males (54.8% than females (40% responded that in the last 3- year’s crime in Cincinnati, Ohio relatively stayed the same.  Conclusion: The results indicate that there was little difference in African American perceptions of violence in Cincinnati in 2001 and 11 years later in 2012. Most people felt that violence in

  7. East Midlands healthcare and bioscience sector strategy appendix 1: healthcare and bioscience res implementation plan

    East Midlands Development Agency

    2007-01-01

    The healthcare and bioscience sector is one of four priority sectors identified in the regional economic strategy, A Flourishing Region. This document sets out the implementation plan for maximising the contribution of the healthcare and biosciences sector to the economic development of the East Midlands.

  8. Cincinnati, Ohio: Two environmental projects in danger of being misunderstood

    DeJong, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mill Creek Flood Control and the Fernald Decontamination projects are major environmental issues in the (sub)urban setting of Cincinnati. Flood control of the Mill Creek, a tributary of the Ohio River that bisects Cincinnati, was initiated after a flood with $3 million damage in 1959. Its costs were originally estimated at $42 million (1970) and later at $106 million (1976); $110 million has now been spent and the total cost may reach $313 million in the year 2000 (1992 dollars). Benefit/cost ratios ranging between 2.6:1 and 1.6:1 were used to rationalize this project. Flood frequency of the Mill Creek will be discussed. Decontamination of the suburban Fernald site follows manufacturing of nuclear materials from 1953 until 1989. 149 tons of uranium and thorium wastes were released in the air, 83.5 tons to the Greater Miami River and 5,975 tons were placed in pits, all of which are leaking. The cost to cleanup up the local contamination may exceed $10 billion over a time period of 20--30 years, and the calculation of benefit/cost ratios is complex. The hydrology of the Fernald site will be examined. These two environmental projects are run respectively by the Army Corps of Engineers and the US Department of Energy through large industrial contractors. The projects are in danger of becoming like projects of the ''Military-Industrial Complex'' because of the public's ignorance or misinterpretation of the facts; the argument of public safety, and the huge costs. The role of geologists should include edification of the public about the geological aspects of environmental projects

  9. [Action mechanism of electroacupuncture at stomach meridian acupoints for oxidative damage in rats with gastric ulcer].

    Yang, Zongbao; Wang, Yadong; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Mi; Chen, Huijuan; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-06-12

    To observe the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) at stomach meridian acupoints on expression of oxidation damage factors in serum and gastric mucosal cells in rats with gastric ulcer, and to explore the mechanism of EA at stomach meridian acupoints for oxidative damage in rats with gastric ulcer. Forty clean-grade SD rats were randomly divided into a normal group, a model group, a stomach meridian group and a gallbladder meridian group, ten rats in each one. Except the normal group, rats in the remaining groups were applied the restraint-cold stress method to establish the model of gastric ulcer. Rats in the normal group and model group received no treatment; rats in the stomach meridian group were treated with EA at "Liangmen" (ST 21) and "Zusanli" (ST 36); rats in the gallbladder meridian group were treated with EA at "Riyue" (GB 24) and "Yanglingquan" (GB 34). The EA was given for 30 min, once a day for 7 days totally. The change of gastric mucosal morphology was observed by routine light microscope; enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the expressions of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-2(IL-2), interleukin-6(IL-6) in serum and gastric mucosal cells of rats. After treatment, compared with the model group, the gastric mucosal damage index was decreased in the stomach meridian group and gallbladder meridian group (both P stomach meridian group (all P stomach meridian group rats ( P stomach meridian acupoints is likely to inhibit the expressions of oxidative damage factors to promote the repair of gastric mucosal injury, which indicates the correlation between meridians and zang-fu .

  10. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors [fr

  11. Acupuncture meridians demythified. A study using the radioactive tracer method

    Simon, J.; Esquerre, J.P.; Guiraud, R.; Guiraud, G.; Lazorthes, Y.

    1988-07-01

    Radioactive trajectories can be visualized by injecting a radioactive tracer, technetium 99 m, at the site of acupuncture points. To determine the exact nature of these trajectories we performed several experiments on healthy volunteers, and our results may be summarized as follows. The target organs of technetium 99 m, and notably the thyroid gland, were always visualized. The circulating radioactivity, visible on scintiscans and confirmed by venous blood counts, was not negligible. The radioactive trajectories we observed were often divided at their starting point and did not extend along the whole length of the acupuncture meridians they might have made visible. The radioactive trajectories disappeared after venous blockade to reappear when the blockade was lifted. Finally, the radioactive trajectories obtained were very similar after injection at the acupuncture point and at a control point. These findings indicate a lymphatic and venous drainage of the radioactive tracer at the site of injection followed by transportation through the veins, rather than visualization of acupuncture meridians as suggested by some authors.

  12. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  13. Environmental Biosciences First Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-09-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  14. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  15. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2008-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  16. Building a partnership to evaluate school-linked health services: the Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project.

    Rose, Barbara L; Mansour, Mona; Kohake, Kelli

    2005-12-01

    The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project was a 3-year collaboration that evaluated school-linked health services in 6 urban elementary (kindergarten to eighth grade) schools. Partners from the Cincinnati Health Department, Cincinnati Public Schools, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati wanted to determine if levels of school-linked care made a difference in student quality of life, school connectedness, attendance, emergency department use, and volume of referrals to health care specialists. School nurses, principals and school staff, parents and students, upper-level managers, and health service researchers worked together over a 2.5-year period to learn about and use new technology to collect information on student health, well-being, and outcome measures. Varying levels of school health care intervention models were instituted and evaluated. A standard model of care was compared with 2 models of enhanced care and service. The information collected from students, parents, nurses, and the school system provided a rich database on the health of urban children. School facilities, staffing, and computer technology, relationship building among stakeholders, extensive communication, and high student mobility were factors that influenced success and findings of the project. Funding for district-wide computerization and addition of school health staff was not secured by the end of the demonstration project; however, relationships among the partners endured and paved the way for future collaborations designed to better serve urban school children in Cincinnati.

  17. 78 FR 15974 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Meridian Medical Technologies

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Meridian Medical Technologies Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on January 8, 2013, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...

  18. 77 FR 19716 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Meridian Medical Technologies

    2012-04-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Meridian Medical Technologies Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall, prior to... is notice that on January 4, 2012, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-08-19

    Aug 19, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 3. What history tells us XVIII. When functional biologists propose mechanisms of evolution. Michel Morange. Series Volume 34 Issue 3 September 2009 pp 373-376. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 5. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome reveal novel transcripts and variants in the Asian elephant Elephas maximus. Puli Chandramouli Reddy Ishani Sinha Ashwin Kelkar Farhat Habib Saurabh J Pradhan Raman Sukumar Sanjeev ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 3. A rapidly progressing, deadly disease of Actias selene (Indianmoonmoth) larvae associated with a mixed bacterial and baculoviral infection. Marta A Skowron Beata Guzow-Krzemińska Sylwia Barańska Paulina Jędrak Grzegorz Węgrzyn. Articles Volume 40 ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 5. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 40, Issue 5. December 2015, pages 829-968. pp 829-832 Series. What history tells us XXXIX. CRISPR-Cas : From a prokaryotic immune system to a universal genome editing tool · Michel Morange · More Details Fulltext PDF.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 35, Issue 2. June 2010, pages 163-325. pp 163-165. Clipboard: Heat shock protein 90: a capacitor or a mutator? Ritwick Sawarkar Renato Paro · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 167-169. Clipboard: The small subunit of geranyl ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 43; Issue 2 ... The ErbB signalling pathway has been studied extensively owing to its role in normal physiology ... When applied to drug studies, the efficacy of a drug can be investigated in silico ...

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 4 ... areas, so the data used to make such comparisons should be comparable in quality and quantity. ... data include museums, herbariums and natural resource management agencies. Issues of data precision, accuracy and sampling bias in data sets from such ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 3 .... HUWE1 (the HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing protein 1) is an ubiquitin E3 ligase which plays .... pp 487-496 Review ... Galectin-9: From cell biology to complex disease dynamics ... Application of aptamers in diagnostics, drug-delivery and imaging.

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 2. Effects of quercetin on predator stress-related hematological and behavioral alterations in pregnant rats and their offspring. Mohamed ... Keywords. Prenatal stress; Anxiety-like behavior; Memory performance; Hematological analysis; Periadolescence; Quercetin ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 33, Issue 2. June 2008, pages 157-307. pp 157-158. Clipboard: Recovery from amblyopia in adults via decreased visual cortical inhibition caused by experience in an enriched environment · Liisa A Tremere Raphael Pinaud.

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2007-02-09

    Feb 9, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2. What history tells us VIII. The progressive construction of a mechanism for prion diseases. Michel Morange. Series Volume 32 Issue 2 March 2007 pp 223-227. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 4. Helicobacter urease: Niche construction at the single molecule level ... Departments of Lifesciences and # Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore 54792, Punjab, Pakistan ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 1 ... Department of Safety and Environmental Management, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2008-12-09

    Dec 9, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 4. Phenotypic plasticity ... Articles Volume 34 Issue 4 October 2009 pp 605-611 ... Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity.

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, CP 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS, Brazil; Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture, Bodø University College, NO-8049 Bodø, Norway; Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, CP 474, ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. What history tells us XLII. A 'new' view of proteins. MICHEL MORANGE. Series Volume 42 Issue 1 March 2017 pp 11-14. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/042/01/0011-0014. Keywords. Allostery ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 4. Combating emerging infectious diseases in India: Orchestrating a symphony. Lalit Kant. Volume 33 Issue 4 November 2008 pp 425-427. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 27, Issue 1. February 2002, pages a-70. Genome Analysis. pp a-a. Preface · Alok Bhattacharya · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 1-6. SWORDS: A statistical tool for analysing large DNA sequences · Probal Chaudhuri Sandip Das.

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Here two very different kinds of organisms are considered: the volvocine algae that become ... that there is a perfect correlation with size: the forms with two cell types are significantly larger than those with one. ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 3 ... miR-200a-3p have been reported in the brains of Alzheimer'sdisease (AD) patients in recent researches. ... Knockdown of SIRT1 decreased theinhibitory effect of Ab25-35 on cell ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to better understand the function of milk. Sanjana Kuruppath Swathi Bisana Julie A Sharp Christophe Lefevre Satish Kumar Kevin R Nicholas. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 581-588 ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light acclimation in a marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Olimpio Montero Alberto Sánchez-Guijo Luis M Lubián Gonzalo Martínez-Rodríguez. Articles Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 635-645 ...

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 31, Issue 2. June 2006, pages 177-292. pp 177-179. Clipboard: Simple laboratory tests of ecological theories: what we can learn from them, and when we should be cautious · Mike S Fowler Lasse Ruokolainen · More Details ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Alok Bhattacharya1. School of Life Sciences and Information Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 007, India. Journal of Biosciences. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 1 · Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 1. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Gallery of Cover Art ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 41; Issue 2. Toward the 'new century' of handedness in biology: In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Francis Crick. Koji Tamura. Clipboard Volume 41 Issue 2 June 2016 pp 169-170 ...

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Search ... part of the email address of all email addresses used by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2. Genetic transformation of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) using cotyledonary node as explant and a promoterless gus::nptII fusion gene based vector. T Swathi Anuradha S K Jami R S Datla P B Kirti. Articles Volume 31 Issue 2 June 2006 pp 235-246 ...

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 4. Is there a role for contraceptive vaccines in fertility control? A Jagannadha Rao. Volume 26 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 425-427. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/026/04/0425-0427. Keywords. Fertility ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 6. A skeletochronological study of growth, longevity, and age at sexual maturity in a population of Rana latastei (Amphibia, Anura). Fabio M Guarino Silvia Lunardi Michela Carlomagno Stefano Mazzotti. Articles Volume 28 Issue 6 December 2003 pp 775-782 ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 1. Clipboard: New paradigm for ATP synthesis and consumption. C Channakeshava. Volume 36 Issue 1 March 2011 pp 3-4. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/036/01/0003-0004 ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 3. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 28, Issue 3. April 2003, pages 248-358. Viral Evasion of Host Responses. pp 248-248. Preface · Shahid Jameel · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 249-264 Articles. Viral mimicry of the complement system · John Bernet Jayati ...

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 6. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 27, Issue 6. November 2002, pages 552-627. Special Issue on Suppl. 3: The Biology of Entamoeba histolytica. pp 552-552a. Preface · Anuradha Lohia · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 553-557 Articles.

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 6 ... and suitable teaching methods have been of great importance in the progress of knowledge. ... And what is valid for the learning of anatomy can be generalized to ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 4. Molecular cloning and expression of the C-terminus of spider flagelliform silk protein from Araneus ventricosus. Kwang Sik Lee Bo Yeon Kim Yeon Ho Je Soo Dong Woo Hung Dae Sohn Byung Rae Jin. Articles Volume 32 Issue 4 June 2007 pp 705-712 ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 6. Identification and ... Alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that GbAGL2 shared high homology with AG-subfamily genes and belonged to a C-class gene family. DNA gel blot analysis showed that GbAGL2 belonged to a low-copy gene family. Reverse ...

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 1. P1 peptidase – a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae. Jana Rohožková Milan Navrátil ... The coding region for P1 peptidase is located at the very beginning of the viral genome of the family Potyviridae. Until recently P1 was thought of as serine peptidase with ...

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 4. RET gene mutations and ... Articles Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 603-611 ... Further, 39 family members of seven index cases were analysed, wherein four of the seven index cases showed identical mutations, in 13 of 25 family members. We also ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 2. Splicing ... Articles Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 281-287 ... One proband had mutation at the canonical splice site at +5 position of IVS22, and analysis of the transcripts in this family revealed skipping of exon 22 in three members of this family. In one proband ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2 ... Review Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 313-320 ... Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc (Zn)-dependent endopeptidases that are collectively capable of cleaving virtually all extracellular matrix (ECM) substrates and play an important role in ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. Diverse roles of WDR5-RbBP5-ASH2L-DPY30 (WRAD) complex in the functions of the SET1 histone methyltransferase family. AAMIR ALI SHWETA TYAGI. Mini-Review Volume 42 Issue 1 ... Keywords. Cell cycle regulation; SET1 family; transcription; WRAD ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 5. Evolution and expression analysis of the soybean glutamate decarboxylase gene family ... Although plant GAD plays important roles in GABA biosynthesis, our knowledge concerning GAD gene family members and their evolutionary relationship remains limited.

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-02-24

    Feb 24, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 1. Classical embryology to molecular biology: a personal view of amphibian embryonic development. Horst Grunz. Perspectives Volume 34 Issue 1 March 2009 pp 5-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Hypervariable spacer regions are good sites for developing specific PCR-RFLP markers and PCR primers for screening actinorhizal symbionts. Rajani Varghese Vineeta S Chauhan Arvind K Misra. Articles Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 437-442 ...

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 1 ... In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of platelet aggregation and ... cirrhosis found in our study is of clinical importance, and the underlying mechanism of such ... Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Proctology, Stanley Medical College ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 4. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 26, Issue 4. November 2001, pages 390a-545. Population of India. pp 390a-390a. Preface · Partha P Majumder A Jagannadha Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 391-405. Current status of fertility control methods in India.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2 .... mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues ... However, due to inconsistency in the results of empirical studies, the relationship between FA and ... MMP-1 polymorphism and its relationship to pathological processes.

  5. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 2. Clipboard: Snakes and ladders: the ups and downs of animal segmentation. Ramray Bhat Stuart A Newman. Volume 34 Issue 2 June 2009 pp 163-166. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol bacterium on rice growth and disease resistance. Haiying Ren Ganyu Gu Juying Long Qian Yin Tingquan Wu Tao Song Shujian Zhang Zhiyi Chen Hansong Dong. Reviews Volume 31 Issue 5 ...

  7. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 4. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic data sets. Monzoorul Haque Mohammed Sudha Chadaram Dinakar Dinakar Komanduri Tarini Shankar Ghosh Sharmila S Mande. Articles Volume 36 Issue 4 September 2011 pp 709- ...

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Volume 28, Issue 4. June 2003, pages 359-528. pp 359-360. Clipboard: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus jumping into a new host or a new creation? M S Shaila · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 361-362. Clipboard: Blueprint of a red mould: ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 2. The roots of ancient medicine: an historical outline. B V Subbarayappa. Perspectives Volume 26 Issue 2 June 2001 pp 135-143. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/026/02/0135-0143. Author Affiliations.

  10. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Cytomixis impairs meiosis and influences reproductive success in Chlorophytum comosum (Thunb) Jacq. – an additional strategy and possible implications. S K Lattoo S Khan S Bamotra A K Dhar. Reviews Volume 31 Issue 5 December 2006 pp 629-637 ...

  11. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. Overexpression of hsa-miR-939 follows by NGFR down-regulation and apoptosis reduction. FAHIMEH HOSSEINI AGHDAEI BAHRAM M SOLTANI SADAT DOKANEHIIFARD SEYED JAVAD MOWLA MASOUD SOLEIMANI. Article Volume 42 Issue 1 March 2017 ...

  12. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 31, Issue 1. March 2006, pages 1-176e. pp 1-2. Clipboard: Ancient Indian roots? Denise R Carvalho-Silva Tatiana Zerjal Chris Tyler-Smith · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 3-4. Commentary: Magic with moulds: Meiotic and ...

  13. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 1. What impact, if any, has feminism had on science? Evelyn Fox Keller. Perspectives Volume 29 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 7-13. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/029/01/0007-0013. Author Affiliations.

  14. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 1. Transgene transmission in South American catfish (Rhamdia quelen) larvae by sperm-mediated gene transfer. Tiago Collares Vinicius Farias Campos Fabiana Kömmling Seixas Paulo V Cavalcanti Odir A Dellagostin Heden Luiz M Moreira João Carlos Deschamps.

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2010-11-09

    Nov 9, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 4. What history tells us XXII. The French neo-Lamarckians. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 515-517. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/035/04/0515-0517 ...

  16. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2006-05-06

    May 6, 2006 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 2. Kenneth Raper, Elisha Mitchell and Dictyostelium. Eugene R Katz. Perspectives Volume 31 Issue 2 June 2006 pp 195-200. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/031/02/0195-0200 ...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2008-01-31

    Jan 31, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 1. Biological time is fractal: Early events reverberate over a life time. David Lloyd. Perspectives Volume 33 Issue 1 March 2008 pp 9-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/033/01/0009- ...

  18. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Anandasankar Ray1 2 Wynand Van Der Goes Van Naters2 3 John R Carlson2. Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA; Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2010-02-10

    Feb 10, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 1. What history tells us XX. Felix Haurowitz (1896–1987) – A difficult journey in the political and scientific upheavals of the 20th century. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 1 March 2010 pp 17-20 ...

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2005-11-15

    Nov 15, 2005 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5. What history tells us III. André Lwoff: From protozoology to molecular definition of viruses. Michel Morange. Series Volume 30 Issue 5 December 2005 pp 591-594. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    2005-11-23

    Nov 23, 2005 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5. Commentary: Neuronal survival in epilepsy: to die or not to die? Subramaniam Ganesh Shweta Singh. Volume 30 Issue 5 December 2005 pp 561-566. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 6 ... of R. solani (35 colony-forming units/g dry soil) was relatively high in the soil we studied, and ... School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, ...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 2. Integrative microbiology – the third Golden Age. Moselio Schaechter. Perspectives Volume 28 Issue 2 March 2003 pp 149-154 ...

  4. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2009-01-30

    Current research projects have focused Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP) talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene, low-dose ionizing radiation (gamma and neutron) and alpha radiation from plutonium. Trichloroethylene research has been conducted as a joint collaborative effort with the University of Georgia. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Laboratory work has been completed on several trichloroethylene risk assessment projects, and these projects have been brought to a close. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the remaining trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A comprehensive manuscript on the scientific basis of trichloroethylene risk assessment is in preparation. Work on the low-dose radiation risk assessment projects is also progressing at a slowed rate as a result of funding uncertainties. It has been necessary to restructure the proponency and performance schedule of these projects, with the project on Low-Dose Radiation: Epidemiology Risk Models transferred to DOE Office of Science proponency under a separate funding instrument. Research on this project will continue under the provisions of the DOE Office of Science funding instrument, with progress reported in accordance with the requirements of that funding instrument. Progress on that project will no longer be reported in quarterly reports for DE-FC09-02CH11109. Following a meeting at the Savannah River Site on May 8, 2008, a plan was submitted for development of an epidemiological cohort study and prospective medical surveillance system for the assessment of disease rates among workers at the Savannah River

  5. An information entropy model on clinical assessment of patients based on the holographic field of meridian

    Wu, Jingjing; Wu, Xinming; Li, Pengfei; Li, Nan; Mao, Xiaomei; Chai, Lihe

    2017-04-01

    Meridian system is not only the basis of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) method (e.g. acupuncture, massage), but also the core of TCM's basic theory. This paper has introduced a new informational perspective to understand the reality and the holographic field of meridian. Based on maximum information entropy principle (MIEP), a dynamic equation for the holographic field has been deduced, which reflects the evolutionary characteristics of meridian. By using self-organizing artificial neural network as algorithm, the evolutionary dynamic equation of the holographic field can be resolved to assess properties of meridians and clinically diagnose the health characteristics of patients. Finally, through some cases from clinical patients (e.g. a 30-year-old male patient, an apoplectic patient, an epilepsy patient), we use this model to assess the evolutionary properties of meridians. It is proved that this model not only has significant implications in revealing the essence of meridian in TCM, but also may play a guiding role in clinical assessment of patients based on the holographic field of meridians.

  6. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian.

  7. Object-oriented programming for the biosciences.

    Wiechert, W; Joksch, B; Wittig, R; Hartbrich, A; Höner, T; Möllney, M

    1995-10-01

    The development of software systems for the biosciences is always closely connected to experimental practice. Programs must be able to handle the inherent complexity and heterogeneous structure of biological systems in combination with the measuring equipment. Moreover, a high degree of flexibility is required to treat rapidly changing experimental conditions. Object-oriented methodology seems to be well suited for this purpose. It enables an evolutionary approach to software development that still maintains a high degree of modularity. This paper presents experience with object-oriented technology gathered during several years of programming in the fields of bioprocess development and metabolic engineering. It concentrates on the aspects of experimental support, data analysis, interaction and visualization. Several examples are presented and discussed in the general context of the experimental cycle of knowledge acquisition, thus pointing out the benefits and problems of object-oriented technology in the specific application field of the biosciences. Finally, some strategies for future development are described.

  8. Nitrogen-15 reference book: medicine and biosciences

    Faust, H.

    1983-04-01

    A comprehensive bibliography on the application of the stable nitrogen isotope 15 N in medicine, animal nutrition and physiology, biosciences, and related disciplines is presented. The literature pertaining to this paper covers the period from 1977 to 1981. The references are completed by an index of all authors and a subject index with special emphasis to the used organisms, labelled compounds, and tracer techniques, respectively. (author)

  9. Has bioscience reconciled mind and body?

    Davies, Carmel; Redmond, Catherine; Toole, Sinead O; Coughlan, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this discursive paper is to explore the question 'has biological science reconciled mind and body?'. This paper has been inspired by the recognition that bioscience has a historical reputation for privileging the body over the mind. The disregard for the mind (emotions and behaviour) cast bioscience within a 'mind-body problem' paradigm. It has also led to inherent limitations in its capacity to contribute to understanding the complex nature of health. This is a discursive paper. Literature from the history and sociology of science and psychoneuroimmunology (1975-2015) inform the arguments in this paper. The historical and sociological literature provides the basis for a socio-cultural debate on mind-body considerations in science since the 1970s. The psychoneuroimmunology literature draws on mind-body bioscientific theory as a way to demonstrate how science is reconciling mind and body and advancing its understanding of the interconnections between emotions, behaviour and health. Using sociological and biological evidence, this paper demonstrates how bioscience is embracing and advancing its understanding of mind-body interconnectedness. It does this by demonstrating the emotional and behavioural alterations that are caused by two common phenomena; prolonged, chronic peripheral inflammation and prolonged psychological stress. The evidence and arguments provided has global currency that advances understanding of the inter-relationship between emotions, behaviour and health. This paper shows how bioscience has reconciled mind and body. In doing so, it has advanced an understanding of science's contribution to the inter-relationship between emotions, behaviour and health. The biological evidence supporting mind-body science has relevance to clinical practice for nurses and other healthcare professions. This paper discusses how this evidence can inform and enhance clinical practice directly and through research, education and policy. © 2015 John Wiley

  10. Developing Research Capabilities in Energy Biosciences

    Brown, Donald D.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists founded the Life Sciences Research Foundation (LSRF) in 1983 as a non-profit pass through foundation that awards post doctoral fellowships in all areas of the life sciences. LSRF scientists review hundreds of applications each year from PhDs seeking support. For example this year, our 26th, we received 800 applications and our peer review committee will choose about 50 finalists who are eligible for these awards. We have no endowment so we solicit sponsors each year. The fellowships are sponsored by research oriented companies, foundations, philanthropists, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other organizations who believe in the value of awarding fellowships to the best and the brightest young scientists. Our web site has a complete listing of all details about LSRF (http://www.lsrf.org/). In the late 1980s the Division of Bioscience in the Office of Basic Energy Science, a granting agency of the Department of Energy, joined this partnership. Bioscience's mandate was to support non-medical microbiology and plant sciences. LSRF received a series of 5 year grants from DOE to award fellowships to our top applicants in these fields of research. We began to support DOE-Energy Bioscience post doctoral fellows in 1989. From 1989 through 2004 when DOE funding ended our partnership awarded 41 DOE-Energy Bioscience Fellows of the Life Sciences Research Foundation. Each of these was a three year fellowship. DOE-Energy Biosciences was well matched with LSRF. Our extensive peer review screened applicants in all areas of the life sciences. Most LSRF sponsors are interested in supporting fellows who work on diseases. At the time that we began our partnership with DOE we had no sponsors willing to support plant biology and non medical microbiology. For 15 years DOE played a major role in the training of the very best young scientists in these important fields of research simply through its support of LSRF post doctoral fellows. Young scientists interested in

  11. Effective acupuncture practice through diagnosis based on distribution of meridian pathways & related syndromes.

    Chen, Yemeng; Zheng, Xin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qunce; Wang, Tianfang

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of acupuncture practice utilizing diagnosis and distribution of various meridians and connecting channels based on meridian theory. The meridian system is considered as basic anatomy for acupuncture, so the corresponding pathways and related syndromes of different channels should play a key role in differentiation, known as meridian-related pattern differentiation. Since this doctrine originated in ancient times and was not so well developed in later generations, many acupuncturists are not able to utilize it efficiently. The authors survey how this doctrine was weakened during the past century, especially in acupuncture education for foreigners, and how this important method is currently being reinvigorated. This article also lays out the ways this doctrine can be applied clinically and introduces examples of a variety of indications including some difficult cases, such as whiplash injury, intervertebral disc herniation, oculomotor nerve paralysis, and eczema, etc.

  12. Systems Biology of Meridians, Acupoints, and Chinese Herbs in Disease

    Li-Ling Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meridians, acupoints, and Chinese herbs are important components of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. They have been used for disease treatment and prevention and as alternative and complementary therapies. Systems biology integrates omics data, such as transcriptional, proteomic, and metabolomics data, in order to obtain a more global and complete picture of biological activity. To further understand the existence and functions of the three components above, we reviewed relevant research in the systems biology literature and found many recent studies that indicate the value of acupuncture and Chinese herbs. Acupuncture is useful in pain moderation and relieves various symptoms arising from acute spinal cord injury and acute ischemic stroke. Moreover, Chinese herbal extracts have been linked to wound repair, the alleviation of postmenopausal osteoporosis severity, and anti-tumor effects, among others. Different acupoints, variations in treatment duration, and herbal extracts can be used to alleviate various symptoms and conditions and to regulate biological pathways by altering gene and protein expression. Our paper demonstrates how systems biology has helped to establish a platform for investigating the efficacy of TCM in treating different diseases and improving treatment strategies.

  13. Intradermal Alcian-Blue Injection Method to Trace Acupuncture Meridians

    Baeckkyoung Sung

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : In this article, we report on the intradermal Alcian blue staining method for tracing the meridians of acupuncture. Methods : 1% Alcian blue solution was injected into acupoints by using a 0.5mL insulin syringe with a 31-gauge needle, then the skin was incised and was observed under a stereoscopic microscope. The specimens were examined by using immunohistochemical methods and were observed under a confocal laser scanning microscope. Results : A threadlike structure, which was visualized with Alcian blue, existed in dermis layer and proceeded to hypodermis. In this structure, characteristic alignments of rod- shaped nuclei and 1-2μm sized DNA granules were observed. Furthermore, abundant blood capillary plexuses, peripheral nerve endings, and a corpusclelike structure(about 300μm in diameter were visualized in the skin tissues of acupoints. Conclusion : It was concluded that the specific threadlike and corpuscle-like structures corresponded to superficial Bonghan duct and corpuscle, respectively.

  14. Bioceramic Resonance Effect on Meridian Channels: A Pilot Study

    Ting-Kai Leung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioceramic is a kind of material which emits nonionizing radiation and luminescence, induced by visible light. Bioceramic also facilitates the breakup of large clusters of water molecules by weakening hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bond weakening, which allows water molecules to act in diverse ways under different conditions, is one of the key mechanisms underlying the effects of Bioceramic on biophysical and physical-chemical processes. Herein, we used sound to amplify the effect of Bioceramic and further developed an experimental device for use in humans. Thirteen patients who suffered from various chronic and acute illnesses that severely affected their sleep patterns and life quality were enrolled in a trial of Bioceramic resonance (i.e., rhythmic 100-dB sound waves with frequency set at 10 Hz applied to the skin surface of the anterior chest. According to preliminary data, a “Propagated Sensation along Meridians” (PSM was experienced in all Bioceramic resonance-treated patients but not in any of the nine control patients. The device was believed to enhance microcirculation through a series of biomolecular and physiological processes and to subject the specific meridian channels of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM to coherent vibration. This noninvasive technique may offer an alternative to needle acupuncture and other traditional medical practices with clinical benefits.

  15. Multimedia Interactive eBooks in Laboratory Bioscience Education

    Morris, Neil P.; Lambe, James

    2017-01-01

    Bioscience students in the UK higher education system are making increasing use of technology to support their learning within taught classes and during private study. This experimental study was designed to assess the role for multimedia interactive eBooks in bioscience laboratory classes, delivered using a blended learning approach. Thirty-nine…

  16. [Study on meridian tropism of medicinal property theory for Chines medicines by supramolecular chemistry (I)].

    He, Fu-yuan; Deng, Kai-wen; Yang, Yan-tao; Zhou, Yi-qun; Shi, Ji-lian; Liu, Wen-long; Tang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, based on the special influence of supramolecular chemistry on the basic theory of Chinese medicines ( CM) , the authors further analyzed the history of meridian tropism and natural origins of CM organisms and explained CM ingredients and the universal regularity of the automatic action of the supramolecular "imprinting templates" hole channel structure. After entering human bodies, CMs, as the aggregation of supramolecular "imprinting templates" , automatically seek supramolecular subjects that are matched with their "imprinting templates" in human meridians and organs for the purpose of self-recognition, self-organization, self-assembly and self-replication, so as to generate specific efficacy in meridians and organs, which is reflected as the meridian tropism phenomena at macro level. This regularity can be studied by in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. In vitro methods are mostly supra molecular structure analysis and kinetic and thermodynamic parameter calculation; Whereas in vivo methods are dominated by the analysis on object component distribution, chromatopharmacodynamic parameters and network chromatopharmacodynamic parameters; Particularly, the acupoint-medicine method can simplify to study the supramolecular subject-object relations. Consequently, CM's'meridian tropism reveals the universal regularity for interactions of macromolecular and micromolecular "imprinting templates" of subjects and objects in natural organisms. As the first barrier for the material base of the CM theory and breakthrough in the modernization of the basic CM theory, meridian tropism plays an important role in studies on basic theories of the basic CM theory.

  17. Cincinnati's Bold New Venture: A Unified K-12 Reading/Communication Arts Program.

    Green, Reginald Leon

    1989-01-01

    Describes a unified reading/communication arts program in the Cincinnati Public School System which uses new basal texts, support materials, and a customized instructional system for each grade level, integrating listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking skills into a unified language approach. Discusses intervention strategies,…

  18. Cherish Our Differences: A Source Book for Cincinnati's Ethnic Heritage. A Bibliographical Guide.

    Simon, Paul L.; Simon, Regina A.

    This selective bibliography lists books and some dissertations and theses relating to ethnicity. It is intended for junior and senior high school students, undergraduate college students, and the general public. The objective is to help ethnic groups, community agencies, and individuals in Cincinnati locate relevant source material concerning…

  19. Holistic Analysis of the Urban Water Systems in Greater Cincinnati Region

    Urban water and wastewater systems with two utilities in Greater Cincinnati region were evaluated as a case study to elucidates a bigger picture of a typical centralized urban water system. Two different integrated assessment metrics were used to analyze the same system. LCA an...

  20. Introducing bioinformatics, the biosciences' genomic revolution

    Zanella, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    The general audience for these lectures is mainly physicists, computer scientists, engineers or the general public wanting to know more about what’s going on in the biosciences. What’s bioinformatics and why is all this fuss being made about it ? What’s this revolution triggered by the human genome project ? Are there any results yet ? What are the problems ? What new avenues of research have been opened up ? What about the technology ? These new developments will be compared with what happened at CERN earlier in its evolution, and it is hoped that the similiraties and contrasts will stimulate new curiosity and provoke new thoughts.

  1. A primary study on meridian-stretching of injected FDG using PET MPItool

    He Yijie; Tian Jiahe; Chen Yingmao; Yin Dayi; Zhang Jinming; Zhang Shuwen; Shao Mingzhe; Yao Shulin; Ding Weimin; Liu Zilai

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To show the images of tracer-stretching along the acupuncture meridian by use of PET with multipurpose imaging tool (MPItool's) fusion function. Methods: On 5 healthy volunteers, the authors measured the classical acupuncture points accurately with the biophysical measuring method. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was injected into the selected points, the others points along the same meridian were labelled with 18 F-FDG applied on the correspondent skin area of 2 . With the same body position, the transmission image and emission image was acquired respectively and fused with MPItool and its 3D display system. Results: The authors clearly showed not only the meridian-stretching images of the tracer, but also figured out the depth of the study points. The depth at SHANGJUXU point was about 3.8 cm and at ZUSANLI point was about 5,0 cm. The depths basically fit the classically documented ones of the correspondent acupuncture points. Conclusions: Using PET MPItool the authors preliminarily demonstrated that the tracer injected at the acupuncture point stretches along the correspondent meridian, and the depths of the meridian and the points (SHANGJUXU, ZUSANLI) detected are almost accordant with the classically documented ones

  2. [Effects of gap junction blocking on the oxygen partial pressure in acupoints of the bladder meridian].

    Wang, Qi; Yu, Wei-Chang; Jiang, Hong-Zhi; Chen, Sheng-Li; Zhang, Ming-Min; Kong, E-Sheng; Huang, Guang-Ying

    2010-12-01

    To explore the relation between gap junction and meridian phenomenon. The oxygen partial pressure in acupoints [see text for formula] and in their corresponding non-acupoints of the Bladder Meridian was observed with the needle-type tissue oxygen tension sensor in the gap junction blocking goats by 1-Heptanol injection and the Connexin 43 (Cx43) gene knockout mice. (1) The oxygen partial pressure in acupoints of Bladder Meridian on goats was higher than that in non-acupoints after 1-Heptanol injection with significant differences between them (both P oxygen partial pressure in acupoints of Bladder Meridian on goats increased significantly after injecting 1-Heptanol as compare with that either injecting normal saline or injecting nothing with significant differences between them (all P oxygen partial pressure in acupoints of the Bladder Meridian was significantly higher than that in the non-acupoint controls in Cx43 wild type (WT) mice (all P oxygen partial pressure between acupoints and non-acupoint controls showed no significant differences (all P > 0.05). (4) In acupoints, the oxygen partial pressure in Cx43 WT mice was significantly higher than that in Cx43 HT mice (all P 0.05). Gap junction maybe the essential factor in signal transduction of acupuncture.

  3. The existence of propagated sensation along the meridian proved by neuroelectrophysiology

    Xu, Jinsen; Zheng, Shuxia; Pan, Xiaohua; Zhu, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Xianglong

    2013-01-01

    Propagated sensation along the meridian can occur when acupoints are stimulated by acupuncture or electrical impulses. In this study, participants with notable propagated sensation along the dian were given electro-acupuncture at the Jianyu (LI15) acupoint of the large intestine meridian. When participants stated that the sensation reached the back of their hand, regular nervous system action discharge was examined using a physiological recording electrode placed on the superficial branch of the radial nerve. The topographical maps of brain-evoked potential in the primary cortical somatosensory area were also detected. When Guangming (GB37) acupoint in the lower limb and Hegu (LI4) acupoint in the upper limb were stimulated, subjects without propagated sensation along the meridian exhibited a high potential reaction in the corresponding area of the brain cortical so-matosensory area. For subjects with a notable propagated sensation along the meridian, the tion area was larger and extended into the face representative area. These electrophysiological measures directly prove the existence of propagated sensation along the meridian, and the pheral stimulated site is consistent with the corresponding primary cortical somatosensory area, which presents a high potential reaction. PMID:25206574

  4. [Application of problem-based learning in teaching practice of Science of Meridians and Acupoints].

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Jiqin; Ying, Zhenhao; Zhang, Yongchen

    2015-02-01

    Science of Meridians and Acupoints is the bridge between basic medicine and clinical medicine of acupuncture and moxibustion. This teaching practice was conducted in reference to the teaching mode of problembased learning (PBL), in association with the clinical design problems, by taking as the students as the role and guided by teachers. In order to stimulate students' active learning enthusiasm, the writers implemented the class teaching in views of the typical questions of clinical design, presentation of study group, emphasis on drawing meridian running courses and acupoint locations, summarization and analysis, as well as comprehensive evaluation so that the comprehensive innovative ability of students and the teaching quality could be improved.

  5. Quantification of Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Wastewater Collection Systems (Cincinnati, Ohio, USA)

    Fries, A. E.; Townsend-Small, A.; Shuster, W.; Schifman, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas is an emerging topic in environmental science, but source apportionment of these emissions, particularly for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), is still underway. Here we present an analysis of CH4 and N2O sources from urban pipelines in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Leaks from manholes and sewer grates in Cincinnati are found by using a Bascom Turner Gas Rover to indicate CH4 enhancements, along with spatial data for CH4 enhancements at street level from previously published work. When possible, the atmospheric flux of CH4 and N2O of these leaks are quantified by using a flux chamber method. Source apportionment is determined by using carbon and hydrogen stable isotope ratios (13C and D) and CH4 to N2O ratios. Biogenic CH4 has a δ13C of approximately -55‰ and δD of approximately -270‰, whereas thermogenic CH4 has a δ13C of approximately -45‰ and δD of approximately -150‰. Biogenic CH4 may also co-occur with N2O, whereas thermogenic natural gas does not contain N2O. Contrary to our expectations, we found a portion of CH4 enhancements that are biogenic CH4, presumably from sewer gas, whereas most studies have assumed them to be natural gas leaks. In the future we will be working on determining the exact proportion of biogenic and thermogenic CH4 in street leaks and further quantifying CH4 and N2O emissions throughout Cincinnati. Our work indicates that CH4 leaks in cities may be a mixture of sewer gas and natural gas, especially in cities like Cincinnati where natural gas pipelines have been replaced with less leak-prone pipe materials.

  6. Theoretical basis, application, reliability, and sample size estimates of a Meridian Energy Analysis Device for Traditional Chinese Medicine Research

    Ming-Yen Tsai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The Meridian Energy Analysis Device is currently a popular tool in the scientific research of meridian electrophysiology. In this field, it is generally believed that measuring the electrical conductivity of meridians provides information about the balance of bioenergy or Qi-blood in the body. METHODS AND RESULTS: PubMed database based on some original articles from 1956 to 2014 and the authoŕs clinical experience. In this short communication, we provide clinical examples of Meridian Energy Analysis Device application, especially in the field of traditional Chinese medicine, discuss the reliability of the measurements, and put the values obtained into context by considering items of considerable variability and by estimating sample size. CONCLUSION: The Meridian Energy Analysis Device is making a valuable contribution to the diagnosis of Qi-blood dysfunction. It can be assessed from short-term and long-term meridian bioenergy recordings. It is one of the few methods that allow outpatient traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis, monitoring the progress, therapeutic effect and evaluation of patient prognosis. The holistic approaches underlying the practice of traditional Chinese medicine and new trends in modern medicine toward the use of objective instruments require in-depth knowledge of the mechanisms of meridian energy, and the Meridian Energy Analysis Device can feasibly be used for understanding and interpreting traditional Chinese medicine theory, especially in view of its expansion in Western countries.

  7. The effects of meridian exercise on anxiety, depression, and self-esteem of female college students in Korea.

    Kim, Kwuy Bun; Cohen, Susan M; Oh, Hye Kyung; Sok, Sohyune R

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of meridian exercise on anxiety, depression, and self-esteem of female college students in Korea. The effects of meridian exercise on anxiety, depression, and self-esteem were statistically significant (t = -7.982, P= .000; t= -8.814, P = .000; t = 9.649, P = .000) between the experimental and control group.

  8. Blue whale sightings in Antarctica west of the Greenwich meridian, Januart 2015

    Geelhoed, S.C.V.; Feij, B.; Franeker, van J.A.; Herr, H.; Janinhoff, N.; McKay, S.J.; Muller, S.; Thomisch, K.; Verdaat, J.P.; Viquerat, S.

    2015-01-01

    During the RV Polarstern PS 89 (ANT-XXX/2) expedition from Cape Town to Atka Bay and back, 20 sightings of 26 individual blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were recorded in Antarctic waters west of the Greenwich Meridian between 16-20 January 2015. These observations suggest a more westerly

  9. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) and Frisson: Mindfully Induced Sensory Phenomena That Promote Happiness

    del Campo, Marisa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    There are many important phenomena involved in human functioning that are unnoticed, misunderstood, not applied, or do not pique the interest of the scientific community. Among these, "autonomous sensory meridian response" ("ASMR") and "frisson" are two very noteworthy instances that may prove to be therapeutically…

  10. Is There Volume Transmission Along Extracellular Fluid Pathways Corresponding to the Acupuncture Meridians?

    Weibo Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Volume transmission is a new major communication signaling via extracellular fluid (interstitial fluid pathways. It was proposed by the current authors that such pathways can explain the meridian phenomena and acupuncture effects. To investigate whether meridian-like structures exist in fish body and operate via volume transmission in extracellular fluid pathways, we injected alcian blue (AB under anesthesia into Gephyrocharax melanocheir, which has a translucent body. The migration of AB could be seen directly and was recorded by a digital camera. The fish was then embedded and cut transversely to observe the position of tracks in three dimensions. Eight longitudinal threadlike blue tracks were recognized on the fish. The positions of these threadlike tracks were similar to meridians on the human body. Transverse sections showed that these tracks distributed to different layers of distinct subcutaneous loose connective tissues and intermuscular septa. Lymphatic vessels were sometimes associated with the extracellular blue tracks where the migration of AB occurred. Extracellular fluid pathways were found on fish through their transport of AB. These pathways operating via volume transmission appeared to be similar in positions and functions to the acupuncture meridians in Chinese medicine.

  11. Tapping Their Patients' Problems Away? Characteristics of Psychotherapists Using Energy Meridian Techniques

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Brown, Lily A.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to learn about the characteristics of psychotherapists who use energy meridian techniques (EMTs). Methods: We conducted an Internet-based survey of the practices and attitudes of licensed psychotherapists. Results: Of 149 survey respondents (21.4% social workers), 42.3% reported that they frequently use or are inclined…

  12. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  13. [Construction of the study platform for Meridians and Acupoints and the application in the flipped classroom].

    Hu, Rong

    2016-11-12

    To construct the study platform for meridians and acupoints by analyzing the status and current problems of teaching Meridians and Acupoints and in accordance with the principles as "knowledge fragmentation, game breakthrough and overall assessment" and observe the application effect in the flipped classroom. Totally two hundred and five 2014 grade bachelor candidates from four classes of the department of acupuncture-moxibustion and tuina were selected from Hunan Junior College of TCM. They were randomized into an observation group (102 cases) and a control group (103 cases). in the observation group, the flipped classroom was performed by adopting the study platform of meridians and acupoints. Additionally, the team cooperation learning and overall assessment were conducted. In the control group, the traditional teaching system was adopted, in which, the mode of "teacher's demonstration-to-discussion in group-to-teachers' assessment" and the operation check at the end of the semester were applied. The learning effect and the self-learning ability were evaluated at the end of semester in the two groups. The satisfaction survey was conducted in the observation group. In the observation group, the drawing of meridian running course and locating the acupoints, as well as the self-learning ability were better than those in the control group, indicating the significant differences (all P flipped classroom and the satisfaction of participation were slightly low. The study platform of learning Meridians and Acupoints was applied in the flipped classroom and has effectively improved the practical manipulation results and self-learning ability. However, the interestingness and interactivity of the platform are expected to be improved. The effective teaching design should be adopted in the flipped classroom to improve the students' desire of participation.

  14. [Analysis of clinical characteristics of traditional Chinese and Western medicine in Professor Jiang Liangduo's theory of "sanjiao meridian stasis"].

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Liang-Duo; Ma, Qing; Xu, Dong; Tang, Shi-Huan; Luo, Zeng-Gang

    2017-12-01

    In the clinical practice, Professor Jiang Liangduo, a national senior Chinese medicine doctor, has created the theory of "sanjiao meridian stasis" from the theory of meridian dialectics and from the overall state. In this paper, the traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine clinical characteristics of sanjiao meridian stasis theory which is often used by Professor Jiang Liangduo in the treatment of out-patient syndrome differentiation, were first studied and summarized to investigate its inherent regularity. First, the source of data and research methods were introduced, and then the Traditional Chinese Medicine Inheritance Support System was used with the method of data mining to retrospectively analyze the disease characteristics of Chinese and Western medicine in 279 patients with sanjiao meridian stasis diagnosed by Professor Jiang in 2014. Then the following main conclusions were made after research: sanjiao meridian stasis was more common in women as well as young and middle-aged population. Often manifested by prolonged treatment course, red tongue with yellowishfur, with good correlation between modern Western medicine diagnosis and TCM differentiation syndrome. The symptoms of sanjiao meridian stasis syndrome are mostly of heat syndromes, and middle-aged patients are the most common patients with stasis and stasis of sanjiao. Related information of Western medicine diagnosis can help to diagnose the "sanjiao meridian stasis". Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. The (Mathematical) Modeling Process in Biosciences.

    Torres, Nestor V; Santos, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we introduce a general framework and discussion on the role of models and the modeling process in the field of biosciences. The objective is to sum up the common procedures during the formalization and analysis of a biological problem from the perspective of Systems Biology, which approaches the study of biological systems as a whole. We begin by presenting the definitions of (biological) system and model. Particular attention is given to the meaning of mathematical model within the context of biology. Then, we present the process of modeling and analysis of biological systems. Three stages are described in detail: conceptualization of the biological system into a model, mathematical formalization of the previous conceptual model and optimization and system management derived from the analysis of the mathematical model. All along this work the main features and shortcomings of the process are analyzed and a set of rules that could help in the task of modeling any biological system are presented. Special regard is given to the formative requirements and the interdisciplinary nature of this approach. We conclude with some general considerations on the challenges that modeling is posing to current biology.

  16. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Boumenthal, D.K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US); Kennedy, M.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Moore, G.J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  17. Conference scene: Select Biosciences Epigenetics Europe 2010.

    Razvi, Enal S

    2011-02-01

    The field of epigenetics is now on a geometric rise, driven in a large part by the realization that modifiers of chromatin are key regulators of biological processes in vivo. The three major classes of epigenetic effectors are DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications (such as acetylation, methylation or phosphorylation) and small noncoding RNAs (most notably microRNAs). In this article, I report from Select Biosciences Epigenetics Europe 2010 industry conference held on 14-15 September 2010 at The Burlington Hotel, Dublin, Ireland. This industry conference was extremely well attended with a global pool of delegates representing the academic research community, biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical companies, as well as the technology/tool developers. This conference represented the current state of the epigenetics community with cancer/oncology as a key driver. In fact, it has been estimated that approximately 45% of epigenetic researchers today identify cancer/oncology as their main area of focus vis-à-vis their epigenetic research efforts.

  18. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report, September - December, 2005

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  19. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year Three

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  20. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 2

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-10-15

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  1. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  2. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.d.

    2003-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  3. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  4. Second Quarter Report Environmental Biosciences Program

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2002-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  5. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  6. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  7. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 3

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation s need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  9. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  10. Environmental Biosciences Report for Year 3

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this

  11. Statistical analysis of 4 types of neck whiplash injuries based on classical meridian theory.

    Chen, Yemeng; Zhao, Yan; Xue, Xiaolin; Li, Hui; Wu, Xiuyan; Zhang, Qunce; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Tianfang

    2015-01-01

    As one component of the Chinese medicine meridian system, the meridian sinew (Jingjin, (see text), tendino-musculo) is specially described as being for acupuncture treatment of the musculoskeletal system because of its dynamic attributes and tender point correlations. In recent decades, the therapeutic importance of the sinew meridian has become revalued in clinical application. Based on this theory, the authors have established therapeutic strategies of acupuncture treatment in Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD) by categorizing four types of neck symptom presentations. The advantage of this new system is to make it much easier for the clinician to find effective acupuncture points. This study attempts to prove the significance of the proposed therapeutic strategies by analyzing data collected from a clinical survey of various WAD using non-supervised statistical methods, such as correlation analysis, factor analysis, and cluster analysis. The clinical survey data have successfully verified discrete characteristics of four neck syndromes, based upon the range of motion (ROM) and tender point location findings. A summary of the relationships among the symptoms of the four neck syndromes has shown the correlation coefficient as having a statistical significance (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), especially with regard to ROM. Furthermore, factor and cluster analyses resulted in a total of 11 categories of general symptoms, which implies syndrome factors are more related to the Liver, as originally described in classical theory. The hypothesis of meridian sinew syndromes in WAD is clearly supported by the statistical analysis of the clinical trials. This new discovery should be beneficial in improving therapeutic outcomes.

  12. An Examination of Personality Traits Associated with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR)

    Fredborg, Beverley; Clark, Jim; Smith, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual condition in which the presentation of particular audio-visual stimuli triggers intense, pleasurable tingling sensations in the head and neck regions, which may spread to the periphery of the body. These triggering stimuli are often socially intimate in nature, and usually involve repetition of movements and/or sounds (e.g., hearing whispering, watching someone brush her hair). Reports of ASMR experiences first appeared in online com...

  13. Autonomous Meridian Sensory Response – from Internet subculture to audiovisual therapy

    Garro, D

    2017-01-01

    ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response) is the name given to a pleasant sensation that can be felt most commonly on the scalp and can be triggered by various gentle sounds (like whispers, crinkles or tapping), smooth and repetitive visual stimuli, personal attention (like the touch of a hairdresser or a masseur) or other events. ASMR is often associated with a general feeling of relaxation and peace. Whilst academic research on the sociological, artistic, sensory and cognitive dimensions ...

  14. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state

    Emma L. Barratt; Nick J. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a previously unstudied sensory phenomenon, in which individuals experience a tingling, static-like sensation across the scalp, back of the neck and at times further areas in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli. This sensation is widely reported to be accompanied by feelings of relaxation and well-being. The current study identifies several common triggers used to achieve ASMR, including whispering, personal attention, crisp s...

  15. Sensory determinants of the autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR): Understanding the triggers

    Barratt, EL; Spence, CJ; Davis, NJ

    2017-01-01

    The autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is an atypical sensory phenomenon involving electrostatic-like tingling sensations in response to certain sensory, primarily audio-visual, stimuli. The current study used an online questionnaire, completed by 130 people who self-reported experiencing ASMR. We aimed to extend preliminary investigations into the experience, and establish key multisensory factors contributing to the successful induction of ASMR through online media. Aspects such as...

  16. On the totality of periodic motions in the meridian plane of a magnetic dipole

    Markellos, V.V.; Halioulias, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The structure of the periodic solutions of the Stoermer problem, representing the magnetic field of the Earth, is examined by considering the equatorial oscillations of the charged particle and their 'vertical' bifurcations with meridian periodic oscillations. An infinity of new families of simple-periodic oscillations are found to exist in the vicinity of the 'thalweg' and four such new families are actually established by numerical integration. (Auth.)

  17. Patterns of Energy Imbalance of the Meridians in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction.

    Rasera Zotelli, Vera L; Grillo, Cássia M; Bressiani Gil, Maria L; Wada, Ronaldo S; Sato, Jorge E; de Sousa, Maria da Luz R

    2018-02-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a set of changes that affects the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, teeth, and associated periodontal and orofacial structures. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the imbalance of energy (Qi) circulating in the acupuncture meridians is always the primary etiologic cause of any physical manifestation. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of Qi imbalance in patients with TMD by means of an objective measurement. The clinical study was conducted at the Piracicaba Dental School (FOP/Unicamp), in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. We evaluated 40 adult volunteers with TMD. The Qi measurement was carried out by the researcher using the Ryodoraku method using 24 points representing the 12 acupuncture meridians: LU9 (Taiyuan), PC7 (Daling), HT7 (Shemen), SI5 (Yanggu), TE4 (Yangchi), LI5 (Yangxi), SP3 (Taibai), LR3 (Taichong), KI3 (Taixi), BL64 (Jinggu), GB40 (Qiuxu), and ST42 (Chongyang). The average total Qi of 40 volunteers (21.7 μA ± 1.5), was below the normal range (40-60 μA) and was classified as deficiency of Qi (empty). The coupled meridians that showed the highest Qi imbalance were the kidney (29.4 μA ± 2.8) and bladder (13.8 μA ± 1). The Qi planes with greatest imbalance were the Shao Yang and Shao Yin. In conclusion, volunteers with TMD presented a pattern of Qi deficiency, and the most prevalent imbalance patterns identified were in the kidney and bladder coupled meridians and in the energetic planes Shao Yin (heart/kidney) and Shao Yang (triple energizer/gall bladder). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Patterns of Energy Imbalance of the Meridians in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction

    Vera L. Rasera Zotelli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD is a set of changes that affects the muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, teeth, and associated periodontal and orofacial structures. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the imbalance of energy (Qi circulating in the acupuncture meridians is always the primary etiologic cause of any physical manifestation. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of Qi imbalance in patients with TMD by means of an objective measurement. The clinical study was conducted at the Piracicaba Dental School (FOP/Unicamp, in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. We evaluated 40 adult volunteers with TMD. The Qi measurement was carried out by the researcher using the Ryodoraku method using 24 points representing the 12 acupuncture meridians: LU9 (Taiyuan, PC7 (Daling, HT7 (Shemen, SI5 (Yanggu, TE4 (Yangchi, LI5 (Yangxi, SP3 (Taibai, LR3 (Taichong, KI3 (Taixi, BL64 (Jinggu, GB40 (Qiuxu, and ST42 (Chongyang. The average total Qi of 40 volunteers (21.7 μA ± 1.5, was below the normal range (40–60 μA and was classified as deficiency of Qi (empty. The coupled meridians that showed the highest Qi imbalance were the kidney (29.4 μA ± 2.8 and bladder (13.8 μA ± 1. The Qi planes with greatest imbalance were the Shao Yang and Shao Yin. In conclusion, volunteers with TMD presented a pattern of Qi deficiency, and the most prevalent imbalance patterns identified were in the kidney and bladder coupled meridians and in the energetic planes Shao Yin (heart/kidney and Shao Yang (triple energizer/gall bladder.

  19. Trace elements in bottom sediments of the Barents Sea on the standard section "Kola Meridian"

    Lapteva A. M.; Plotitsyna N. F.

    2017-01-01

    The levels of trace metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Mn, Co, Pb, Cd, Hg) and arsenic (As) in samples of bottom sediments from the Barents Sea on eight stations of the standard section "Kola Meridian" have been investigated. Trace elements have been determined on atomic absorption spectrophotometer AA-6800 with mercury-hydride attachment HVG-1 of the company Shimadzu (Japan) by the methods of flaming (acetylene – air) and electrothermal atomization. Common and very toxic trace elements incl...

  20. Effects of Meridian Acupressure Massage on Body Composition, Edema, Stress, and Fatigue in Postpartum Women.

    Jung, Geum-Sook; Choi, In-Ryoung; Kang, Hee-Young; Choi, Eun-Young

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of meridian acupressure massage on body composition, edema, stress, and fatigue in postpartum women. A quasi-experimental design with a nonequivalent control group was utilized. The Postpartum Care Center of Women's Hospital in Gwangju City, Republic of Korea. The study group consisted of 39 postpartum women, 19 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group, recruited from the postpartum care center of Women's Hospital in Gwangju city, South Korea. The experimental group was provided with meridian acupressure massage for 90 min daily over 5 days as an experimental therapy. Body composition (body weight, BMI, total body water, ECW ratio, LBM, and body fat) Edema (subjective edema, average girth of the upper limbs, and average girth of the lower limbs), Stress (psychological stress and physical stress), and Fatigue. The experimental group demonstrated a significantly larger decrease compared with the control group in measures of body composition, edema, total subjective stress, psychological stress, and subjective fatigue. Meridian acupressure massage can hasten the return to original body composition after childbirth.

  1. Possible role of epidermal keratinocytes in the construction of acupuncture meridians.

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Tsutsumi, Moe

    2014-04-01

    Acupuncture meridians consist of a network of acupuncture points on the skin, stimulation of which is well established to have a variety of physiological effects. We have previously demonstrated that epidermal keratinocytes contain multiple sensory systems for temperature, mechanical stimuli, electric potentials and other stimuli. These sensory systems generate changes in the calcium-ion concentration in the epidermis, so epidermal keratinocytes can generate spatially-localized electro-physiological patterns in the skin. We have previously demonstrated signaling between epidermal keratinocytes and peripheral nerve systems. Therefore, stimuli sensed by epidermal keratinocytes might be transferred to the unmyelinated nerve fibers that are known to exist in the epidermis and, thence, to the spinal cord and brain. We propose that epidermal keratinocytes form an information-gathering network in the skin and that this network plays a key role in whole-body homeostasis in response to the changing environment. We also hypothesize that this network corresponds to the acupuncture meridians. As supporting examples, we present some striking calcium propagation patterns observed in cultured human keratinocytes after adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) stimulation. These results support the ideas that keratinocytes can generate spatially-restricted signaling patterns after environmental stimulation and that the cultures might be in-vitro models of meridians as an information-gathering network in skin. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Surveying the Vienna Meridian from Brno to Varaždin

    Miljenko Solarić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction provides a brief overview of using trigonometric chains for determining meridian arc lengths in Europe, as well as their extension to trigonometric networks in order to produce contemporary accurate maps in France. After Ruđer Bošković had visited Croatian-Hungarian Queen and Roman-German Empress Maria Theresa, she ordered Jesuit Joseph Liesganig to survey the meridian from Brno (Soběšice, over Vienna and Graz to Varaždin by establishing and surveying a trigonometric chain. That distance amounts to 320 km, i.e. the difference between latitude of the starting and finishing points of the chain equaled 2° 56' 45.85''. Two baselines were measured directly between Wiener Neustadt and Neunkirchen of 6410.903 Vienna fathom (12 158.175 m and between Seyring and Glizendorf in the Moravian field (Moravské pole, Marchfeld of 6387.862 Vienna fathom (12 114.478 m. Liesganig published previous Vienna Meridian survey results in Philosophical Transactions in London in 1768 and the final results in Latin in Dimensio Graduum Meridiani Viennensis et Hungarici in 1770. His results were quickly criticized and subsequently subjected to validation. Trigonometric point Varaždin is the first and oldest trigonometric point in Croatia.

  3. Full Meridian of Glory Perilous Adventures in the Competition to Measure the Earth

    Murdin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Paris Meridian is the name of the line running north-south through the astronomical observatory in Paris. One of the original intentions behind the founding of the Paris Observatory was to determine and measure this line. To that end, the French government financed the Paris Academy of Sciences to do so in the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries employing both astronomers – people who study and measure the stars – and geodesists – people who study and measure the Earth. This book is about what they did and why. Full Meridian of Glory is the first English language presentation of this historical material in its entirety. It is an attractively written story of the scientists who created the Paris Meridian. They collaborated and worked together in alliances, like scientists everywhere; they also split into warring factions. They transcended national and political disputes, as scientists do now, their eyes fixed on ideals of accuracy, truth and objectivity. Yet also when their work served national inter...

  4. [Characteristics of supramolecular imprinting template on liver meridian tropism of traditional Chinese medicine based on molecular connectivity index].

    Fan, Shi-Qi; Li, Sen; Liu, Jin-Ling; Yang, Jiao; Hu, Chao; Zhu, Jun-Ping; Xiao, Xiao-Qin; Liu, Wen-Long; He, Fu-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The molecular connectivity index was adopted to explore the characteristics of supramolecular imprinting template of herbs distributed to liver meridian, in order to provide scientific basis for traditional Chinese medicines(TCMs) distributed to liver meridian. In this paper, with "12th five-year plan" national planning textbooks Science of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Chemistry of Traditional Chinese Medicine as the blueprint, literatures and TCMSP sub-databases in TCM pharmacology of northwest science and technology university of agriculture and forestry were retrieved to collect and summarize active constituents of TCM distributed to liver meridian, and calculate the molecular connectivity index. The average molecular connectivity index of ingredients distributed to liver meridian was 9.47, which was close to flavonoid glycosides' (9.17±2.11) and terpenes (9.30±3.62). Therefore, it is inferred that template molecule of liver meridian is similar to physicochemical property of flavonoid glycosides and terpenes, which could be best matched with imprinting template of liver meridian. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Erratum Journal of Biosciences Volume 34, Number 2, November ...

    Prakash

    (1) Page 709, Introduction, 4th line from top: 3500 m to be read as 500 m. (2) Page 710, Figure 2 caption, line 1: 3500 m to be read as 500 m. The above corrections require to be made in the printed version of the article. The article that appear on the Journal of. Biosciences Web site will contain these corrections.

  6. Challenges in Understanding Photosynthesis in a University Introductory Biosciences Class

    Södervik, Ilona; Virtanen, Viivi; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2015-01-01

    University students' understanding of photosynthesis was examined in a large introductory biosciences class. The focus of this study was to first examine the conceptions of photosynthesis among students in class and then to investigate how a certain type of text could enhance students' understanding of photosynthesis. The study was based on pre-…

  7. Integrating anticipated nutrigenomics bioscience applications with ethical aspects

    Levesque, L.; Ozdemir, V.; Gremmen, B.; Godard, B.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrigenomics is a subspecialty of nutrition science which aims to understand how gene-diet interactions influence individuals' response to food, disease susceptibility, and population health. Yet ethical enquiry into this field is being outpaced by nutrigenomics bioscience. The ethical issues

  8. 75 FR 16900 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Cincinnati/Northern...

    2010-04-02

    ... To Release Airport Property at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, Hebron, KY.../Northern Kentucky International Airport in the city of Hebron, Kentucky. This property, approximately 75.88... Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21). DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 3...

  9. Comparing complementary alternative treatment for chronic shoulder pain of myofascial origin: Collateral meridian therapy versus local tender area-related meridians therapy.

    Pan, Ru-Yu; Hsu, Yung-Chi; Wong, Chih-Shung; Lin, Shinn-Long; Li, Tsung-Ying; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Ko, Shan-Chi; Yeh, Chun-Chang

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the short-term outcomes between 2 different treatments for unilateral chronic shoulder pain of myofascial origin, that is, local tender area related meridians (LTARMs) treatment and collateral meridian therapy (CMT), which were performed 6 times over a period of 4 weeks.Seventy patients with unilateral shoulder pain of chronic myofascial origin were enrolled. The patients were randomly assigned to 2 different treatment groups: 1 group received CMT (n = 35) and the other received LTARM (n = 35). Before and after the 2 treatment processes, all patients rated their overall pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a validated 13-question shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) questionnaire was used to measure shoulder pain and functional impairment after therapy for 4 weeks.After CMT, the pain intensity was reduced after CMT. VAS score is reduced from 5.90 ± 2.07 (a mean of 5.90 and standard deviation of 2.07) to 3.39 ± 1.2. This was verified by the SPADI pain subscale scores (from 0.58 ± 0.193 to 0.33 ± 0.14). The pain-relief effect of CMT was significantly better than that of LTARM (VAS score from 5.78 ± 1.64 to 4.58 ± 1.40; P pain subscale score from 0.58 ± 0.16 to 0.45 ± 0.14, P pain, whereas the VAS scores for moderate pain were even higher in the LTARM group in 75% of patients (P chronic shoulder pain of myofascial origin than the LTARM treatment, where treatment with the former resulted in better functional recovery after 4 weeks than the latter.

  10. Status of University of Cincinnati reactor-site nuclear engineering graduate programs

    Anno, J.N.; Christenson, J.M.; Eckart, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati (UC) nuclear engineering program faculty has now had 12 yr of experience in delivering reactor-site educational programs to nuclear power plant technical personnel. Currently, with the sponsorship of the Toledo-Edison Company (TED), we are conducting a multiyear on-site graduate program with more than 30 participants at the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant. The program enables TED employees with the proper academic background to earn a master of science (MS) degree in nuclear engineering (mechanical engineering option). This paper presents a brief history of tile evolution of UC reactor-site educational programs together with a description of the progress of the current program

  11. Faith-based HIV prevention and counseling programs: findings from the Cincinnati census of religious congregations.

    Szaflarski, Magdalena; Ritchey, P Neal; Jacobson, C Jeffrey; Williams, Rhys H; Baumann Grau, Amy; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Ellison, Christopher G; Tsevat, Joel

    2013-06-01

    Congregations are well positioned to address HIV in their communities, but their response to HIV has been mixed. An emerging literature describes HIV programming in urban, predominantly black congregations, but population-based data remain limited. This study examined the levels of HIV prevention and counseling programs and associated factors (e.g., religious, organizational) by using data from a phone census of congregations in the Greater Cincinnati area (N = 447). Over 10 % of congregations (36 % of Black Protestant and 5-18 % of other types of congregations) offered HIV education/prevention alone or in combination with counseling or with counseling and testing. Path analysis results showed notable significant (p theology-polity on HIV prevention/counseling programs, but these effects were fully mediated by other factors, including other community work and racial composition. The levels of HIV programming in this study were high by national standards, but further outreach is needed in high-risk African American communities.

  12. 湖湘五经配伍"推经治脏"治疗CFS的理论与应用%The Treatment of"Push Meridians to Treat Organs"in Huxiang Five Meridians Compatibility for CFS--Theory and Application

    李武; 彭亮; 刘小卫; 王德军; 杨舟; 于隽; 李铁浪; 章薇

    2015-01-01

    Push meridians to treat organs, which has significant curative effect on CFS, is an important branch of"acupuncture and massage academ-ic school of Huxiang five meridians compatibility", which is guided by theory of"five meridians compatibility"in infantile massage then combined with the characteristics of adult massage, and has developed into adult"big five meridians"that can regulate the each organ's function totally from the thought of Xiangxi Liu's infantile massage five meridians compatibility for the whole regulation of organs' function and the theory of internal or-gans and channels in traditional Chinese medicine.%推经治脏是"湖湘五经配伍针推学术流派"的重要分支,其在小儿推拿"五经配伍"理论指导下结合成人推拿特点,基于湘西刘氏小儿推拿五经配伍对脏腑功能的整体调节思想和传统中医脏腑经络理论发展为成人"大五经"调节脏腑功能,从整体上调节各脏腑功能,对慢性疾病CFS疗效显著.

  13. [Comparison of the compilation features of Science of Meridians and Acupoints among different editions].

    Chen, Xiaojun

    The compilation features of Jingluo Shuxue Xue ( Science of Meridians and Acupoints ) among different editions were summarized and analyzed. Jingluo Xue ( Science of Meridians ) and Shuxue Xue ( Science of Acupoints ) published by Shanghai Scientific and Technical Publishers in 1984 are the pioneer as the textbook for the education of acupuncture discipline for the bachelor degree, but there is the big controversy for the editions in 1996. These two books were combined as one, titled Science of Meridians and Acupoints , 2013 edition, published by China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is concise and coherent in content and is regarded as the milestone in the history of textbook compilation. This book was re-edited in 2007 without major changes in content. The one in 2009 was revised a lot on the basis of the original several editions, published by Shanghai Scientific and Technical Publishers. But unfortunately, it did not bring the big impacts in China. The edition in 2012, published by China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine had made the innovations besides integrating the achievements of the previous editions, characterized as preciseness and conciseness. By contrast, the edition in 2012, published by People's Medical Publishing House was accomplished by simple modification on the basis of the editions in 2003 and in 2007, without great innovation. Regarding the on-going publication of the textbooks in "the 13th five-year plan", it is viewed that the new edition of textbook should maintain the general framework of "the 12th five-year plan", based on which, a few questions should be revised appropriately. Additionally, "less words, more illustration" should be the basic principle for the revision of the new edition.

  14. Tolerance and nature of residual refraction in symmetric power space as principal lens powers and meridians change.

    Abelman, Herven; Abelman, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Unacceptable principal powers in well-centred lenses may require a toric over-refraction which differs in nature from the one where correct powers have misplaced meridians. This paper calculates residual (over) refractions and their natures. The magnitude of the power of the over-refraction serves as a general, reliable, real scalar criterion for acceptance or tolerance of lenses whose surface relative curvatures change or whose meridians are rotated and cause powers to differ. Principal powers and meridians of lenses are analogous to eigenvalues and eigenvectors of symmetric matrices, which facilitates the calculation of powers and their residuals. Geometric paths in symmetric power space link intended refractive correction and these carefully chosen, undue refractive corrections. Principal meridians alone vary along an arc of a circle centred at the origin and corresponding powers vary autonomously along select diameters of that circle in symmetric power space. Depending on the path of the power change, residual lenses different from their prescription in principal powers and meridians are pure cross-cylindrical or spherocylindrical in nature. The location of residual power in symmetric dioptric power space and its optical cross-representation characterize the lens that must be added to the compensation to attain the power in the prescription.

  15. Bioscience methodologies in physical chemistry an engineering and molecular approach

    D'Amore, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The field of bioscience methodologies in physical chemistry stands at the intersection of the power and generality of classical and quantum physics with the minute molecular complexity of chemistry and biology. This book provides an application of physical principles in explaining and rationalizing chemical and biological phenomena. It does not stick to the classical topics that are conventionally considered as part of physical chemistry; instead it presents principles deciphered from a modern point of view, which is the strength of this book.

  16. What's the Original Concept of Meridian and Acupuncture Point in Oriental Medicine? - A Perspective of Medical History

    YIN Chang- Shik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Meridian and acupuncture point(MAP is a core theory of acupuncture and essential building blocks of oriental medicine. There still continue theoretic or experimental arguments and controversies on the origination or original concept of MAP, without any definite approval or disapproval of a hypothesis. The theory of MAP is an historic product and has never been outside of historic influences. This study discusses the original concept of meridian and acupuncture point theory and its historical evolution, based on the review of classic literatures on meridian including the mawangdui medical texts of Han dynasty. The concept of MAP served as a empirical reference system in clinical settings irrespective of the anatomical entity of MAP.

  17. [SONG's theory on mast cells and meridian-acupoint and its research prospect].

    Li, Yongming

    2016-10-12

    The historical origin of researches regarding acupuncture and mast cells (MCs) is reviewed, and the hypothesis that dermal MCs might be correlated with the acupuncture phenomena proposed by SONG Jimei in 1977 is introduced. This hypothesis, for the first time, suggests MCs could be the cellular basis of meridian sensation and arrival of qi ( deqi ) of acupoints. With independent tests of several research institutes, currently sufficient evidences prove the scientific values of SONG 's theory as well as its potential values for the basic research and clinical practice of acupuncture. It is reported recently that MCs might receive signals from central nerve system and acupoint stimulation, showing cross-talk effects, therefore, MCs can be sensitized at acupoints. In this paper, with a review of 40-year research evidence, 15 biological characteristics regarding mast cells and acupuncture phenomena are identified, in the meanwhile, 10 key questions and research direction, including the distribution of MCs in skin and its general relationship with meridian-acupoint, etc. are proposed.

  18. Interstitial Fluid Flow: The Mechanical Environment of Cells and Foundation of Meridians

    Wei Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using information from the deep dissection, microobservation, and measurement of acupoints in the upper and lower limbs of the human body, we developed a three-dimensional porous medium model to simulate the flow field using FLUENT software and to study the shear stress on the surface of interstitial cells (mast cells caused by interstitial fluid flow. The numerical simulation results show the following: (i the parallel nature of capillaries will lead to directional interstitial fluid flow, which may explain the long interstitial tissue channels or meridians observed in some experiments; (ii when the distribution of capillaries is staggered, increases in the velocity alternate, and the velocity tends to be uniform, which is beneficial for substance exchange; (iii interstitial fluid flow induces a shear stress, with magnitude of several Pa, on interstitial cell membranes, which will activate cells and lead to a biological response; (iv capillary and interstitial parameters, such as capillary density, blood pressure, capillary permeability, interstitial pressure, and interstitial porosity, affect the shear stress on cell surfaces. The numerical simulation results suggest that in vivo interstitial fluid flow constitutes the mechanical environment of cells and plays a key role in guiding cell activities, which may explain the meridian phenomena and the acupuncture effects observed in experiments.

  19. [Study on characteristics of pharmacological effects of traditional Chinese medicines distributing along lung meridian based on medicinal property combination].

    Gu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Medicinal properties are the basic attribute of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM), while the medicinal property theory is the core theoretical foundation of TCM formula combination. In this particle, authors studied the characteristics of pharmacological effects of property combination of traditional Chinese medicines distributing along meridians, with the aim to introduce the medicinal property combination regularity into the design and optimization process of compound TCMs, and bring the medicinal property theory into full play in guiding the formula combination. In this paper, TCMs distributing along "the lung meridian" was taken for example. The medicinal property combinations of TCMs distributing along "the lung meridian" recorded in Pharmacopeia (2010) was collected and processed. Besides, Chinese journal full-text database (CNKI) was used to collect all of pharmacological study literatures concerning the above TCMs that have been published since 1980. The pharmacological information was also supplemented by reference to Science of Chinese Materia Medica and Clinical Science of Chinese Materia Medica. TCMs distributing along the lung meridian with different properties and tastes showed significant differences in pharmacological effects. For example, mild-sweet-lung medicines could lower blood sugar levels, decrease anoxia and enhance immunity; Mild-bitter-lung medicines showed anti-bacterial, anti-hypertension, anti-oxidation effects; Hot-sweet-lung medicines showed antibechic and anti-bacterial effects. And Hot-bitter-lung medicines showed phlegm eliminating and anti-inflammatory effects. Meanwhile, TCMs distributing along the lung meridian had similar pharmacological characteristics, such as anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, which is consistent with lung's feature in susceptibility to exogenous pathogenic factors. In this study, authors discovered pharmacological characteristics of different TCMs distributing along the lung meridian, which

  20. 75 FR 64733 - Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Safflower Seed Meal

    2010-10-20

    ...] Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Safflower Seed Meal AGENCY: Food... announcing that Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., has filed a petition proposing that the food additive regulations..., Davis, CA 95618. The petition proposes to amend the food additive regulations in part 573 Food Additives...

  1. Converting campus waste into renewable energy - a case study for the University of Cincinnati.

    Tu, Qingshi; Zhu, Chao; McAvoy, Drew C

    2015-05-01

    This paper evaluates the implementation of three waste-to-energy projects at the University of Cincinnati: waste cooking oil-to-biodiesel, waste paper-to-fuel pellets and food waste-to-biogas, respectively. The implementation of these waste-to-energy (WTE) projects would lead to the improvement of campus sustainability by minimizing waste management efforts and reducing GHG emissions via the displacement of fossil fuel usage. Technical and economic aspects of their implementation were assessed and the corresponding GHG reduction was estimated. Results showed that on-site implementation of these projects would: (1) divert 3682L (974 gallons) of waste cooking oil to 3712L (982 gallons) of biodiesel; (2) produce 138tonnes of fuel pellets from 133tonnes of waste paper (with the addition of 20.75tonnes of plastics) to replace121tonnes of coal; and (3) produce biogas that would be enough to replace 12,767m(3) natural gas every year from 146tonnes of food waste. The economic analysis determined that the payback periods for the three projects would be 16months for the biodiesel, 155months for the fuel pellet, and 74months for the biogas projects. The reduction of GHG emission from the implementation of the three WTE projects was determined to be 9.37 (biodiesel), 260.49 (fuel pellets), and 11.36 (biogas) tonnes of CO2-eq per year, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comprehension and explanation of meridians and collaterals theory in the background of the spread of western medicine into the East in the Ming and Qing Dynasties].

    Li, Su-Yun

    2010-06-01

    In the background of the spread of western medicine into the East in the Ming and Qing Dynasties, Chinese doctors who had accepted western medicine referred to western medical knowledge and began to use the methods of anatomical observation and demonstrating to explain the objective structure of meridians and collaterals. They tried to adopt the artery and vessel explaining the shape of meridian and the blood circle and pulmonary respiration explaining the circulation of Ying-Wei. When the anatomy structures could not perfectly equal to meridians and collaterals, some doctors put forward the gasification feature of meridian to explain the reason. These results suggest that there are difference between meridians and collaterals and pure anatomy concepts, which serves as significant reference and edification for later generations.

  3. An Evaluation of the Fitness, Academic, and Self-Esteem Training Program at Meridian School 1984-1985.

    Christie, Samuel G.; Saccone, Peter P.

    This paper reports the results of a pilot program, "Fitness, Academics, and Self-Esteem Training" (FAST), conducted during the 1984/85 school year at Meridian School to test the hypotheses that a program of aerobic exercise with the focus on running, conducted by the classroom teacher, would result in a higher rate of academic achievement, better…

  4. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR: a flow-like mental state

    Emma L. Barratt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR is a previously unstudied sensory phenomenon, in which individuals experience a tingling, static-like sensation across the scalp, back of the neck and at times further areas in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli. This sensation is widely reported to be accompanied by feelings of relaxation and well-being. The current study identifies several common triggers used to achieve ASMR, including whispering, personal attention, crisp sounds and slow movements. Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR. A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9% within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia. Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

  5. Sensory determinants of the autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR): understanding the triggers.

    Barratt, Emma L; Spence, Charles; Davis, Nick J

    2017-01-01

    The autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is an atypical sensory phenomenon involving electrostatic-like tingling sensations in response to certain sensory, primarily audio-visual, stimuli. The current study used an online questionnaire, completed by 130 people who self-reported experiencing ASMR. We aimed to extend preliminary investigations into the experience, and establish key multisensory factors contributing to the successful induction of ASMR through online media. Aspects such as timing and trigger load, atmosphere, and characteristics of ASMR content, ideal spatial distance from various types of stimuli, visual characteristics, context and use of ASMR triggers, and audio preferences are explored. Lower-pitched, complex sounds were found to be especially effective triggers, as were slow-paced, detail-focused videos. Conversely, background music inhibited the sensation for many respondents. These results will help in designing media for ASMR induction.

  6. Sensory determinants of the autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR: understanding the triggers

    Emma L. Barratt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR is an atypical sensory phenomenon involving electrostatic-like tingling sensations in response to certain sensory, primarily audio-visual, stimuli. The current study used an online questionnaire, completed by 130 people who self-reported experiencing ASMR. We aimed to extend preliminary investigations into the experience, and establish key multisensory factors contributing to the successful induction of ASMR through online media. Aspects such as timing and trigger load, atmosphere, and characteristics of ASMR content, ideal spatial distance from various types of stimuli, visual characteristics, context and use of ASMR triggers, and audio preferences are explored. Lower-pitched, complex sounds were found to be especially effective triggers, as were slow-paced, detail-focused videos. Conversely, background music inhibited the sensation for many respondents. These results will help in designing media for ASMR induction.

  7. Numerical simulation of the subsolar magnetopause current layer in the sun-earth meridian plane

    Okuda, H.

    1993-01-01

    The formation and stability of the magnetopause current layer near the subsolar point in the sun-earth meridian plane are examined using a 2D electromagnetic particle simulation. For the case of zero IMF, the simulation results show that the current layer remains stable and is essentially the same as in the 1D simulation. The width of the current layer is given by the electron-ion hybrid gyroradius which is much smaller than the ion gyroradius. The current layer is found to remain stable for the northward IMF as well. As in the 1D simulation, the jump of the magnetic field at the current layer for the northward IMF remains small. For the southward IMF, collisionless magnetic reconnection is found to develop, leading to the formation of magnetic islands and density peaking within the current layer.

  8. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state.

    Barratt, Emma L; Davis, Nick J

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a previously unstudied sensory phenomenon, in which individuals experience a tingling, static-like sensation across the scalp, back of the neck and at times further areas in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli. This sensation is widely reported to be accompanied by feelings of relaxation and well-being. The current study identifies several common triggers used to achieve ASMR, including whispering, personal attention, crisp sounds and slow movements. Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR. A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9%) within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia. Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

  9. From Fragments to a museum display: restoration of a Gautier meridian circle

    Granato, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    The Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins (MAST), which opened to the public in 1985, is a research institute of the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology. One of its main activities is to preserve its collections, especially the most important one, its collection of scientific instruments, which grants MAST its identity as a museum of science and technology. Among the 2,000 objects in the collection there is a Gautier meridian circle that has a 190-mm diameter objective lens and a focal distance of 2,400 mm, with its axis aligned east-west. It should be noted that this instrument was at great risk of being lost to the collection, as it had been left dismantled since the 1960s, and the top part of the dome that sheltered it had been demolished in the 1980s, leaving just a vestibule and the base of the dome, which was in danger of completely collapsing. The intervention philosophy applied was not to put the instrument back in working order, but to allow it to be viewed and understood by the public within a coherent display space. As for the dome, a shelter was built for the instrument using a metal cover of a similar volume and appearance to the original, but with a different function, i.e. it is no longer designed to permit astronomical investigations, but rather to protect the exhibition space and merge harmoniously with the rest of the listed architectural complex. This paper presents information about the history of this meridian circle and its restoration, as well as about the Imperial Observatório do Rio de Janeiro/Observatório Nacional where this instrument was originally used.

  10. Trace elements in bottom sediments of the Barents Sea on the standard section "Kola Meridian"

    Lapteva A. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The levels of trace metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Mn, Co, Pb, Cd, Hg and arsenic (As in samples of bottom sediments from the Barents Sea on eight stations of the standard section "Kola Meridian" have been investigated. Trace elements have been determined on atomic absorption spectrophotometer AA-6800 with mercury-hydride attachment HVG-1 of the company Shimadzu (Japan by the methods of flaming (acetylene – air and electrothermal atomization. Common and very toxic trace elements include Pb, Cd, As, and Hg. It is believed that 90 % of lead, 70–80 % of cadmium, and arsenic, over 30 % of mercury in the atmosphere are of anthropogenic origin, and emissions of these elements in the atmosphere are almost completely manufactured in the Northern Hemisphere. The main sources of income in the Barents Sea are waters of the North Atlantic current and the large-scale atmospheric transport from industrialized Central Europe. As a rule the spatial distribution of trace elements is in good agreement with the granulometric composition of bottom sediments and the content of organic carbon. The contents of most of the listed trace elements in samples of bottom sediments on the standard section "Kola Meridian" in the Norwegian classification are consistent with background levels with the exception of Ni, Cr, and As. Their content in bottom sediments at some stations has met the criteria for "slight" and "moderate" pollution. The obtained results confirm the insignificant levels of contamination of bottom sediments of some trace elements. On the status of stocks of commercial species of aquatic biological resources, the observed levels of contamination of bottom sediments in the investigated areas of the Barents Sea will have no significant effect

  11. Anatomical study on The Arm Greater Yang Small Intestine Meridian Muscle in Human

    Kyoung-Sik, Park

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried to identify the component of Small Intestine Meridian Muscle in human, dividing the regional muscle group into outer, middle, and inner layer. the inner part of body surface were opened widely to demonstrate muscles, nerve, blood vessels and the others, displaying the inner structure of Small Intestine Meridian Muscle. We obtained the results as follows; 1. Small Intestine Meridian Muscle is composed of the muscle, nerve and blood vessels. 2. In human anatomy, it is present the difference between a term of nerve or blood vessels which control the muscle of Meridian Muscle and those which pass near by Meridian Muscle. 3. The inner composition of meridian muscle in human arm is as follows ; 1 Muscle ; Abd. digiti minimi muscle(SI-2, 3, 4, pisometacarpal lig.(SI-4, ext. retinaculum. ext. carpi ulnaris m. tendon.(SI-5, 6, ulnar collateral lig.(SI-5, ext. digiti minimi m. tendon(SI-6, ext. carpi ulnaris(SI-7, triceps brachii(SI-9, teres major(SI-9, deltoid(SI-10, infraspinatus(SI-10, 11, trapezius(Sl-12, 13, 14, 15, supraspinatus(SI-12, 13, lesser rhomboid(SI-14, erector spinae(SI-14, 15, levator scapular(SI-15, sternocleidomastoid(SI-16, 17, splenius capitis(SI-16, semispinalis capitis(SI-16, digasuicus(SI-17, zygomaticus major(Il-18, masseter(SI-18, auriculoris anterior(SI-19 2 Nerve ; Dorsal branch of ulnar nerve(SI-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, br. of mod. antebrachial cutaneous n.(SI-6, 7, br. of post. antebrachial cutaneous n.(SI-6,7, br. of radial n.(SI-7, ulnar n.(SI-8, br. of axillary n.(SI-9, radial n.(SI-9, subscapular n. br.(SI-9, cutaneous n. br. from C7, 8(SI-10, 14, suprascapular n.(SI-10, 11, 12, 13, intercostal n. br. from T2(SI-11, lat. supraclavicular n. br.(SI-12, intercostal n. br. from C8, T1(SI-12, accessory n. br.(SI-12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, intercostal n. br. from T1,2(SI-13, dorsal scapular n.(SI-14, 15, cutaneous n. br. from C6, C7(SI-15, transverse cervical n.(SI-16, lesser occipital n. & great auricular n. from

  12. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Divoli, Anna; Wooldridge, Michael A; Hearst, Marti A

    2010-04-14

    When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  13. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Anna Divoli

    Full Text Available When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  14. Converting campus waste into renewable energy – A case study for the University of Cincinnati

    Tu, Qingshi; Zhu, Chao; McAvoy, Drew C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A case study to show the benefits of waste-to-energy projects at a university. • Evaluated the technical and economic feasibilities as well as GHG reduction. • A tool for other universities/communities to evaluate waste-to-energy projects. - Abstract: This paper evaluates the implementation of three waste-to-energy projects at the University of Cincinnati: waste cooking oil-to-biodiesel, waste paper-to-fuel pellets and food waste-to-biogas, respectively. The implementation of these waste-to-energy (WTE) projects would lead to the improvement of campus sustainability by minimizing waste management efforts and reducing GHG emissions via the displacement of fossil fuel usage. Technical and economic aspects of their implementation were assessed and the corresponding GHG reduction was estimated. Results showed that on-site implementation of these projects would: (1) divert 3682 L (974 gallons) of waste cooking oil to 3712 L (982 gallons) of biodiesel; (2) produce 138 tonnes of fuel pellets from 133 tonnes of waste paper (with the addition of 20.75 tonnes of plastics) to replace121 tonnes of coal; and (3) produce biogas that would be enough to replace 12,767 m 3 natural gas every year from 146 tonnes of food waste. The economic analysis determined that the payback periods for the three projects would be 16 months for the biodiesel, 155 months for the fuel pellet, and 74 months for the biogas projects. The reduction of GHG emission from the implementation of the three WTE projects was determined to be 9.37 (biodiesel), 260.49 (fuel pellets), and 11.36 (biogas) tonnes of CO 2 -eq per year, respectively

  15. Converting campus waste into renewable energy – A case study for the University of Cincinnati

    Tu, Qingshi; Zhu, Chao; McAvoy, Drew C., E-mail: mcavoydm@ucmail.uc.edu

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A case study to show the benefits of waste-to-energy projects at a university. • Evaluated the technical and economic feasibilities as well as GHG reduction. • A tool for other universities/communities to evaluate waste-to-energy projects. - Abstract: This paper evaluates the implementation of three waste-to-energy projects at the University of Cincinnati: waste cooking oil-to-biodiesel, waste paper-to-fuel pellets and food waste-to-biogas, respectively. The implementation of these waste-to-energy (WTE) projects would lead to the improvement of campus sustainability by minimizing waste management efforts and reducing GHG emissions via the displacement of fossil fuel usage. Technical and economic aspects of their implementation were assessed and the corresponding GHG reduction was estimated. Results showed that on-site implementation of these projects would: (1) divert 3682 L (974 gallons) of waste cooking oil to 3712 L (982 gallons) of biodiesel; (2) produce 138 tonnes of fuel pellets from 133 tonnes of waste paper (with the addition of 20.75 tonnes of plastics) to replace121 tonnes of coal; and (3) produce biogas that would be enough to replace 12,767 m{sup 3} natural gas every year from 146 tonnes of food waste. The economic analysis determined that the payback periods for the three projects would be 16 months for the biodiesel, 155 months for the fuel pellet, and 74 months for the biogas projects. The reduction of GHG emission from the implementation of the three WTE projects was determined to be 9.37 (biodiesel), 260.49 (fuel pellets), and 11.36 (biogas) tonnes of CO{sub 2}-eq per year, respectively.

  16. SBBN 2010: 7. Congress of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Radiations in biosciences: advances and trends

    2010-01-01

    Advance and new perspectives related to the use of ionizing and no ionizing radiations in nuclear biosciences are presented. Multidisciplinary approach, including radiopharmacy, radioprotection and dosimetry, cytogenetic, biosafety, radioecology, environmental toxicology are studied. Topics of Nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and image diagnosis, such as computerized tomography, PET scan, phantoms, biomedical radiography, are reported. Use of radioisotopes, evaluation of radiation dose rates, radiation dose distribution, radiation monitoring is considered. Environmental impact of radiation are also in human beings, animals and for several purposes are analyzed. (MAC)

  17. So, What is Actually the Distance from the Equator to the Pole? – Overview of the Meridian Distance Approximations

    Adam Weintrit

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the author presents overview of the meridian distance approximations. He would like to find the answer for the question what is actually the distance from the equator to the pole - the polar distance. In spite of appearances this is not such a simple question. The problem of determining the polar distance is a great opportunity to demonstrate the multitude of possible solutions in common use. At the beginning of the paper the author discusses some approximations and a few exact expressions (infinite sums to calculate perimeter and quadrant of an ellipse, he presents convenient measurement units of the distance on the surface of the Earth, existing methods for the solution of the great circle and great elliptic sailing, and in the end he analyses and compares geodetic formulas for the meridian arc length.

  18. Review of Evidence Suggesting That the Fascia Network Could Be the Anatomical Basis for Acupoints and Meridians in the Human Body

    Yu Bai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical basis for the concept of meridians in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has not been resolved. This paper reviews the evidence supporting a relationship between acupuncture points/meridians and fascia. The reviewed evidence supports the view that the human body's fascia network may be the physical substrate represented by the meridians of TCM. Specifically, this hypothesis is supported by anatomical observations of body scan data demonstrating that the fascia network resembles the theoretical meridian system in salient ways, as well as physiological, histological, and clinical observations. This view represents a theoretical basis and means for applying modern biomedical research to examining TCM principles and therapies, and it favors a holistic approach to diagnosis and treatment.

  19. THE STUDY OF DYNAMICS OF CHANGE OF THE ABSCISSA AND ORDINATE OF THE POINT AT THE FAR MERIDIAN SIX DEGREE ZONE IN THE PROJECTION GAUSS-KRUGER

    S. N. Mamedbekov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the dynamics of the abscissa and ordinate points in the far zone meridian six degree conformal Gauss-Kruger projection. Performed calculations and graphical representation of the classic formulas of conformal projection. 

  20. A single point acupuncture treatment at large intestine meridian: a randomized controlled trial in acute tonsillitis and pharyngitis.

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Lill, Christian; Lüdtke, Rainer; Gleditsch, Jochen; Rasp, Gerd; Irnich, Dominik

    2009-09-01

    One out of 4 patients visiting a general practitioner reports of a sore throat associated with pain on swallowing. This study was established to examine the immediate pain alleviating effect of a single point acupuncture treatment applied to the large intestine meridian of patients with sore throat. Sixty patients with acute tonsillitis and pharyngitis were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial. They either received acupuncture, or sham laser acupuncture, directed to the large intestine meridian section between acupuncture points LI 8 and LI 10. The main outcome measure was the change of pain intensity on swallowing a sip of water evaluated by a visual analog scale 15 minutes after treatment. A credibility assessment regarding the respective treatment was performed. The pain intensity for the acupuncture group before and immediately after therapy was 5.6+/-2.8 and 3.0+/-3.0, and for the sham group 5.6+/-2.5 and 3.8+/-2.5, respectively. Despite the articulation of a more pronounced improvement among the acupuncture group, there was no significant difference between groups (Delta=0.9, confidence interval: -0.2-2.0; P=0.12; analysis of covariance). Patients' satisfaction was high in both treatment groups. The study was prematurely terminated due to a subsequent lack of suitable patients. A single acupuncture treatment applied to a selected area of the large intestine meridian was no more effective in the alleviation of pain associated with clinical sore throat than sham laser acupuncture applied to the same area. Hence, clinically relevant improvement could be achieved. Pain alleviation might partly be due to the intense palpation of the large intestine meridian. The benefit of a comprehensive acupuncture treatment protocol in this condition should be subject to further trials.

  1. An examination of the default mode network in individuals with autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR).

    Smith, Stephen D; Katherine Fredborg, Beverley; Kornelsen, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual condition in which specific visual and auditory stimuli consistently trigger tingling sensations on the scalp and neck, sometimes spreading to the back and limbs. These triggering stimuli are often social, almost intimate, in nature (e.g., hearing whispering, or watching someone brush her hair), and often elicit a calm and positive emotional state. Surprisingly, despite its prevalence in the general population, no published study has examined the neural underpinnings of ASMR. In the current study, the default mode network (DMN) of 11 individuals with ASMR was contrasted to that of 11 matched controls. The results indicated that the DMN of individuals with ASMR showed significantly less functional connectivity than that of controls. The DMN of individuals with ASMR also demonstrated increased connectivity between regions in the occipital, frontal, and temporal cortices, suggesting that ASMR was associated with a blending of multiple resting-state networks. This atypical functional connectivity likely influences the unique sensory-emotional experiences associated with ASMR.

  2. An Examination of Personality Traits Associated with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR).

    Fredborg, Beverley; Clark, Jim; Smith, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual condition in which the presentation of particular audio-visual stimuli triggers intense, pleasurable tingling sensations in the head and neck regions, which may spread to the periphery of the body. These triggering stimuli are often socially intimate in nature, and usually involve repetition of movements and/or sounds (e.g., hearing whispering, watching someone brush her hair). Reports of ASMR experiences first appeared in online communities in 2010; since this time, these communities have expanded, with some groups consisting of over 100,000 members. However, despite the apparent prevalence of ASMR, there is currently no research on the personality characteristics that co-occur with this condition. In the current study, 290 individuals with ASMR and 290 matched controls completed the Big Five Personality Inventory (BFI; John et al., 1991); participants with ASMR also completed a questionnaire related to their ASMR phenomenology. Individuals with ASMR demonstrated significantly higher scores on Openness-to-Experience and Neuroticism, and significantly lower levels of Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Agreeableness compared to matched controls. Further, ratings of subjective ASMR intensity in response to 14 common ASMR stimuli were positively correlated with the Openness-to-Experience and Neuroticism dimensions of the BFI. These results provide preliminary evidence that ASMR is associated with specific personality traits and suggest avenues for further investigation.

  3. Gnomon shadow lengths recorded in the Zhoubi Suanjing: the earliest meridian observations in China?

    Li Yong; Sun Xiaochun

    2009-01-01

    The Zhoubi Suanjing, one of the most important ancient Chinese books on mathematical astronomy, was compiled about 100 BC in the Western Han dynasty (BC 206 - AD 23). We study the gnomon shadow lengths for the 24 solar terms as recorded in the book. Special attention is paid to the so-called law of 'cun qian li', which says the shadow length of a gnomon of 8 chi (about 1.96 m) high will increase (or decrease) 1 cun (1/10 chi) for every 1000 li (roughly 400 km) the gnomon moves northward (or southward). From these data, one can derive the time and location of the observations. The results, however, do not fit historical facts. We suggest that compilers of the Zhoubi Suanjing must have modified the original data according to the law of 'cun qian li'. Through reversing the situation, we recovered the original data, our analysis of which reveals the best possible observation time as 564 BC and the location of observation as 35.78 deg. N latitude. We conclude that this must be the earliest records of solar meridian observations in China. In the meantime, we give the errors of solar altitudes for the 24 solar terms. The average deviation is 5.22 deg., and the mean absolute deviation is 5.52 deg., signifying the accuracy of astronomical calculations from that time.

  4. A birdcage model for the Chinese meridian system: part III. Possible mechanism of magnetic therapy.

    Yung, Kaung-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic model of the transmission line for the channel and the birdcage resonator for the meridian network, we interpret two effects, seemingly incomprehensible in terms of current Western physiology, the lasting effect and the remote effect. For the lasting effect, acupuncture enhances the amplitude of the Qi standing wave, and this increased amplitude is retained and thus is able to sustain a gradual remodeling of the extracellular matrix in interstitial connective tissues, resulting in a lasting therapeutic effect. For the remote effect (acupuncture effect far from the site of needle insertion), our model puts the mechanism of magnetic therapy on an equal footing with that of acupuncture. It may not be a coincidence that accounts of investigators in both acupuncture and magnetotherapy about the depth of the effective site--along cleavage planes between muscles, or between muscle and bone or tendon--are in accord with that of the Huang Di Nei Jing about the course of channels: "they are embedded and travel between interstitial muscles, deep and invisible." A possible magnetic field generated outside the birdcage may be manipulated to produce local areas of higher temperature or very strong fields.

  5. Anders Celsius’ Contributions to Meridian Arc Measurements and the Establishment of an Astronomical Observatory in Uppsala

    Stempels H. C.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Astronomy has been on the curriculum of Uppsala University from at least the middle of the 15th century. However, since Uppsala also was the ecclesiastical centre of Sweden, the acceptance of new ideas, such as the Copernican heliocentric system, was slow. At the same time, more peripheral universities in the Swedish empire, including Dorpat/Tartu, enjoyed a larger freedom. It was not until the early 18th century that a ‘modern’ astronomy emerged in Uppsala. This effort was to a large extent led by Anders Celsius (1701-1744, who was able to establish good international contacts with astronomers in continental Europe. Celsius participated in De Maupertuis’ expedition to the far north of Sweden, in order to measure the meridian arc and determine the shape of the Earth. This paper explores how Celsius became involved in De Maupertuis’ expedition, and how this effort paved the way to the establishment of a fully equipped astronomical observatory, including an extensive collection of books and instruments, most of which survives up to this day.

  6. Acupuncture Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain by Using the Jingjin (Meridian Sinews) Model.

    Legge, David

    2015-10-01

    This case report details the unexpected and sustained relief from chronic low back pain in a patient after a single acupuncture treatment. The treatment administered on that occasion was based on the jingjin (i.e., "meridian sinew") model of traditional acupuncture. Treatments based on the jingjin model involve needling the ah shi (i.e., locally tender) points in myofascial tissue along the jingjin pathway. Tight chains can be needled to treat symptoms that are either close to or at some distance from the site of the needling treatment. In this patient, the points were in the gastrocnemius muscle and the hamstring muscles, which are part of the Bladder jingjin pathway. The patient, a 69-year-old woman, had had back pain for more than 40 years. The relief from the pain occurred within a day after the treatment and, at the time of this report, the relief has persisted for 5 months. This report examines two possible mechanisms for such a result: (1) a local increase in the extensibility of the hamstrings could be responsible or (2) the complex interactions within the central nervous system that are involved in acupuncture treatment could be more important factors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture: a comparative review. Part 3: Mechanisms of acupuncture therapies.

    Chang, Shyang

    2013-06-01

    The human body is a hierarchical organism containing many levels of mutually interacting oscillatory systems. From the viewpoint of traditional Chinese medicine, health is a state of harmony emergent from the interactions of these systems and disease is a state of discord. Hence, human diseases are considered as disturbed functions rather than changed structures. Indeed, the change from normal to abnormal structure may be beneficent rather than maleficent. For example, when one kidney becomes twice the normal size following the destruction of the other kidney, it is good and not bad for us because we might be dead otherwise. Therefore, in Part 3 of this three-part series, emphasis is mainly laid on the acupuncture mechanisms of treating disturbed physiological functions rather than disordered structures. At first, the basic tenets of conventional neuroscience and cardiology are reevaluated so that clear understanding of how nervous and cardiovascular systems work together can be obtained. Then, the general principles of diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine from the integrative perspective of complex dynamic systems are proposed. Finally, mechanisms of acupuncture therapies for treating 14 different categories of disorders will be elucidated via the magneto-electric inductive effects of the meridian system. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. [From Bonghan system to primo vascular system:the thought on the substantial study on meridian points].

    Lin, Dong; Huang, Xiaozhen; Zhuang, Wanyu; Lin, Lili

    2017-01-12

    Through the systematic analysis on the primo vascular system (PVS) in recent years, we believe that in recent years, more and more studies have indicated that PVS is distributed in reticulate structure in every part of body, such as vessels, lymphangions, nerves, brain, spinal cords and internal organs, and it contains a large amount of immunocytes and has involved in the physiological or pathological process of the immunity and circulation in the body. There are the evidences to prove that in morphology and cytobiology. But, nowadays, there is no way to explain its effect characters. On the basis of the study on living matter characteristics, a breakthrough is possibly made through the systematic cooperation even though it is the difficulty to detect the life function effect. It is especially displayed in the substantial study on meridian points. Hence, the study on the law of meridian point effects on the basis of clinical practice has to be focused on in the substantial study on meridian points.

  9. [Study on pharmacologic action characteristics of traditional Chinese medicines distributed along liver meridian based on medicinal properties combinations].

    Guo, Hong-Ling; Gu, Hao; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-07-01

    To establish a characterization system of traditional Chinese medicinal properties in line with modern scientific cognition regularity, in order to reveal properties of traditional Chinese medicines distributed along liver meridian and relations of effects of medicinal properties. By collecting data about traditional Chinese medicinal properties recorded in the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (2005 Edition), literature and data about pharmacological effects of traditional Chinese medicines recorded in the Chinese Materia Medica, by using the method of association rules, the authors dug pharmacological effect rules corresponds to relevant medicinal property combinations, with the medicinal property combination of traditional Chinese medicines distributed along liver meridian as the target. It was found that either obvious different pharmacological effects or identical pharmacological characteristics existed in traditional Chinese medicines distributed along liver meridian. With the aim to explore the correlations between traditional Chinese medicine medicinal properties and pharmacological effects, the authors linked the traditional Chinese medicine theory with modern research achievements, in order to provide the ideas and methods for interpreting mechanisms of medicinal properties.

  10. A case study of pediatric asthma alerts from the beacon community program in cincinnati: technology is just the first step.

    Trudnak, Tara; Mansour, Mona; Mandel, Keith; Sauers, Hadley; Pandzik, Gerry; Donisi, Carl; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Community in Cincinnati, Ohio was an innovative, community-wide initiative to use technology to transform care. One important feature was the development of regional alerts to notify practices when patients were hospitalized or seen in the emergency department. The purpose of this paper is to describe the way in which technology engages the improvement process, and to describe the early stages of learning how to use technology to enhance quality improvement. We interviewed key Beacon leaders as well as providers and office staff in selected practices. We also collected preliminary data from practices that reflected handling of alerts, including the number of asthma related alerts received and followed up. Regional alerts, supplied by the community-wide health information exchange, were a significant addition to the quality improvement effort in that they enabled practices to identify and follow up with additional children at risk. An important finding was the substantial effort at the practice level to integrate technology into ongoing patient care. Developing the technology for community wide alerts represented a significant endeavor in the Cincinnati Beacon Community. However, the technology was just the first step. Despite extra effort and time required on the part of individual practices, they reported that the value of having alerts was high. Hospital and ED visits represent some of the most costly aspects of care, and an efficient process for intervening with children using these costly services was seen as of significant value.

  11. Modeling a Spatio-Temporal Individual Travel Behavior Using Geotagged Social Network Data: a Case Study of Greater Cincinnati

    Saeedimoghaddam, M.; Kim, C.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding individual travel behavior is vital in travel demand management as well as in urban and transportation planning. New data sources including mobile phone data and location-based social media (LBSM) data allow us to understand mobility behavior on an unprecedented level of details. Recent studies of trip purpose prediction tend to use machine learning (ML) methods, since they generally produce high levels of predictive accuracy. Few studies used LSBM as a large data source to extend its potential in predicting individual travel destination using ML techniques. In the presented research, we created a spatio-temporal probabilistic model based on an ensemble ML framework named "Random Forests" utilizing the travel extracted from geotagged Tweets in 419 census tracts of Greater Cincinnati area for predicting the tract ID of an individual's travel destination at any time using the information of its origin. We evaluated the model accuracy using the travels extracted from the Tweets themselves as well as the travels from household travel survey. The Tweets and survey based travels that start from same tract in the south western parts of the study area is more likely to select same destination compare to the other parts. Also, both Tweets and survey based travels were affected by the attraction points in the downtown of Cincinnati and the tracts in the north eastern part of the area. Finally, both evaluations show that the model predictions are acceptable, but it cannot predict destination using inputs from other data sources as precise as the Tweets based data.

  12. Applications of computational tools in biosciences and medical engineering

    Altenbach, Holm

    2015-01-01

     This book presents the latest developments and applications of computational tools related to the biosciences and medical engineering. It also reports the findings of different multi-disciplinary research projects, for example, from the areas of scaffolds and synthetic bones, implants and medical devices, and medical materials. It is also shown that the application of computational tools often requires mathematical and experimental methods. Computational tools such as the finite element methods, computer-aided design and optimization as well as visualization techniques such as computed axial tomography open up completely new research fields that combine the fields of engineering and bio/medical. Nevertheless, there are still hurdles since both directions are based on quite different ways of education. Often even the “language” can vary from discipline to discipline.

  13. Division of Agro technology and Biosciences: Past, Present and Future

    Khairuddin Abdul Rahim

    2012-01-01

    In presenter speech, he outlined several topics regarding development of Agro technology and Biosciences Division from 31 years ago. This division started with Unit Sains Hidupan Liar under PUSPATI in 1981 and change their names to Program Isotop dan Sinaran dalam Biologi dan Pertanian under Nuclear Technology Unit (UTN) (1983). In 1990 their premise change to MINT-Tech Park. This program responsible for conducting research in agro technology using nuclear technology. Several achievements achieved by this division since established. They also succeed in mutating banana namely Novaria banana (1994), Tongkat Ali rice (1990), ground nut (2003), orchids, organic fertilizer and foliage in 2000. The vision of this division are to promote and enhance innovation and applications in nuclear technology to achieve security in food productivity, safety and quality and ecological awareness for economics competitiveness and vibrancy in agrobioindustry and community development. (author)

  14. Structural Dynamics in Metal Tris-hydroxyquinolines: Interconversion of Meridianal and Facial Alq3 Isomers

    Ferris, Kim; Sapochak, Linda; Burrows, Paul; Rodovsky, Deanna; Marmolejo, Theresa

    2004-03-01

    While previous work investigating the charge transport properties of Alq3 has indicated that the meridianal (mer) conformation of Alq3 is predominant species, recent work suggesting identification of a facial (fac) form raises again the question of heterogeneity. Electronic structure computations from our group have noted that the energy difference(in parenthesis) between the mer and fac conformations is highly sensitive to basis set description (8.6 kcal/mol//3-21g*/SCF; 6.9 kcal/mol//6-31g*/SCF), electron correlation (6.0 kcal/mol//3-21g*/MP2; 4.7 kcal/mol//6-31g*/MP2), and solvent effects (4.4 kcal/mol/3-21g*/SCF/DMSO). Given these small energy differences, we have conducted a series of Hartree-Fock and first principles electronic structure computations on the interconversion of these structural forms, and will report on the structural and energetic aspects of the transformation. The likely reaction path involves lengthening of the Al-N bond to the point where a pentacoordinate intermediate or transition state would be formed, followed by flipping of the ligand through rotation around the Al-O bond. Following Schmidbauer's earlier work, we note that transformation involving only one ligand will actually lead to a facial isomer. Preliminary characterization of this transition state suggests that the activation energy is approximately 20-25 kcal/mol above the mer conformation. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from PNNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences Division.

  15. Is LabTutor a helpful component of the blended learning approach to biosciences?

    Swift, Amelia; Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Lameu, Paula

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the use of LabTutor (a physiological data capture and e-learning package) in bioscience education for student nurses. Knowledge of biosciences is important for nurses the world over, who have to monitor and assess their patient's clinical condition, and interpret that information to determine the most appropriate course of action. Nursing students have long been known to find acquiring useable bioscience knowledge challenging. Blended learning strategies are common in bioscience teaching to address the difficulties students have. Student nurses have a preference for hands-on learning, small group sessions and are helped by close juxtaposition of theory and practice. An evaluation of a new teaching method using in-classroom voluntary questionnaire. A structured survey instrument including statements and visual analogue response format and open questions was given to students who participated in Labtutor sessions. The students provided feedback in about the equipment, the learning and the session itself. First year (n = 93) and third year (n = 36) students completed the evaluation forms. The majority of students were confident about the equipment and using it to learn although a few felt anxious about computer-based learning. They all found the equipment helpful as part of their bioscience education and they all enjoyed the sessions. This equipment provides a helpful way to encourage guided independent learning through practice and discovery and because each session is case study based and the relationship of the data to the patient is made clear. Our students helped to evaluate our initial use of LabTutor and found the sessions enjoyable and helpful. LabTutor provides an effective learning tool as part of a blended learning strategy for biosciences teaching. Improving bioscience knowledge will lead to a greater understanding of pathophysiology, treatments and interventions and monitoring. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Role of crude oil in the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type deposits. Evidence from the Cincinnati arch

    Kesler, S.E.; Jones, H.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Furman, F.C. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)); Sassen, R. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)); Anderson, W.H. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)); Kyle, J.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) sulfide minerals and oil from deposits along the Cincinnati arch have almost identical [delta][sup 34]S values (-9% to +9% for MVT sulfides, -12% to +9% for oils). These values are very similar to those for MVT sulfides and oil in the Illinois-Kentucky district and support their proposed inclusion in a regional hydrothermal system. Many MVT deposits with low [delta][sup 34]S values are closely associated with oil, whereas MVT deposits with high [delta][sup 34]S values often contain bitumen. Reduced sulfur in MVT deposits with high [delta][sup 34]S values probably came from thermochemical sulfate reduction, whereas that in MVT deposits with low [delta][sup 34]S values probably came from oil and related organic matter. Oil-related sulfur could have been derived from oil fields or disseminated oil and other organic matter in regional wallrocks. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Serum biomarkers of polyfluoroalkyl compound exposure in young girls in Greater Cincinnati and the San Francisco Bay Area, USA

    Pinney, Susan M.; Biro, Frank M.; Windham, Gayle C.; Herrick, Robert L.; Yaghjyan, Lusine; Calafat, Antonia M.; Succop, Paul; Sucharew, Heidi; Ball, Kathleen M.; Kato, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    PFC serum concentrations were measured in 6–8 year-old girls in Greater Cincinnati (GC) (N = 353) and the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) (N = 351). PFOA median concentration was lower in the SFBA than GC (5.8 vs. 7.3 ng/mL). In GC, 48/51 girls living in one area had PFOA concentrations above the NHANES 95th percentile for children 12–19 years (8.4 ng/mL), median 22.0 ng/mL. The duration of being breast fed was associated with higher serum PFOA at both sites and with higher PFOS, PFHxS and Me-PFOSA-AcOH concentrations in GC. Correlations of the PFC analytes with each other suggest that a source upriver from GC may have contributed to exposures through drinking water, and water treatment with granular activated carbon filtration resulted in less exposure for SWO girls compared to those in NKY. PFOA has been characterized as a drinking water contaminant, and water treatment systems effective in removing PFCs will reduce body burdens. -- Highlights: • PFC serum concentrations were measured in 6–8 year-old girls. • Study sites in Greater Cincinnati (N = 353) and the San Francisco Bay Area (N = 351). • The duration of being breast fed was associated with higher serum PFOA. • Lower PFOA in girls living in areas with granular activated carbon water treatment. -- Serum concentrations of PFCs in young girls were higher in girls who had been breast fed longer, and lower in girls in areas with granular activated carbon municipal water treatment

  18. Randomised clinical trial: an assessment of acupuncture on specific meridian or specific acupoint vs. sham acupuncture for treating functional dyspepsia.

    Ma, T T; Yu, S Y; Li, Y; Liang, F R; Tian, X P; Zheng, H; Yan, J; Sun, G J; Chang, X R; Zhao, L; Wu, X; Zeng, F

    2012-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a common disease without an established optimal treatment. To determine (i) the effect of acupuncture in relieving FD symptoms and improving life quality; (ii) the effect difference between acupoint and non-acupoint; and (iii) the effect difference among different acupoints. A total of 712 eligible patients were included and randomly assigned to six groups (Group A: specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; Group B: non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; Group C: specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; Group D: specific acupoints of the gallbladder meridian; Group E: sham acupuncture of non-acupoints; and Group F: itopride). A treatment period of 4 weeks (continuous five sessions per week), and a follow-up period of 12 weeks were arranged. The outcomes were the (i) patients' response, (ii) symptoms improvement measured using the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia and (iii) quality-of-life improvement based on Nepean Dyspepsia Index. All groups had an improvement in dyspepsia symptoms and the QoL at the end of treatment, and the improvement was sustained for 4 weeks and 12 weeks. The overall response rate was significantly higher in acupuncture group A (70.69%), and lower in sham acupuncture group (34.75%), compared with itopride and other acupuncture groups. Similarly, the difference in symptoms and QoL improvement was significant between group A and the other acupuncture groups. Acupuncture is effective in the treatment of functional dyspepsia, and is superior to non-acupoint puncture. The benefit of acupuncture relies on acupoint specificity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. On the evaluation of the capacitance of toroidal capacitors with a moon-shape meridian cross section

    Gongora T, A.; Ley-Koo, E.

    1997-01-01

    The toroidal capacitors studied in this paper consist of electrodes with meridian cross sections that are circular arcs meeting at the axis, and separated from each other by two small insulating spheres at their meeting points. The description and analysis of such capacitors is carried out by using bi spherical coordinates. The R-separability of the Laplace equation in these coordinates requires the use of the Green function technique, just like in the related problems of toroidal, spherical-cap-electrode, and bi spherical capacitors (1-3). An overall comparison of the solutions of the four problems is specially instructive. (Author)

  20. Probing the mystery of Chinese medicine meridian channels with special emphasis on the connective tissue interstitial fluid system, mechanotransduction, cells durotaxis and mast cell degranulation

    Fung Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article hypothesizes that the Chinese medicine meridian system is a special channel network comprising of skin with abundant nerves and nociceptive receptors of various types, and deeper connective tissues inside the body with the flowing interstitial fluid system. These meridian channels provide efficient migratory tracks mainly due to durotaxis (also including chemotaxis for mast cells, fibroblasts and other cells to migrate and carry out a number of physiological functions. Acupuncture acting on meridian channel causes cytoskeletal remodeling through mechanotransduction, leading to regulation of gene expression and the subsequent production of related proteins. Also, stimulation on cell surface can trigger Ca2+ activities, resulting in a cascade of intra- and inter-cellular signaling. Moreover, nerve endings in the meridian channels interact with mast cells and induce the degranulation of these cells, leading to the release of many specific biomolecules needed for homeostasis, immune surveillance, wound healing and tissue repair. Acupoint along a meridian channel is a functional site to trigger the above functions with specificity and high efficiency.

  1. Reflective Writing as a Tool for Assessing Teamwork in Bioscience: Insights into Student Performance and Understanding of Teamwork

    Mayne, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    To ensure a modern bioscience curriculum that responds to the current needs of stakeholders, there is a need to embed a range of generic capabilities that enables graduates to succeed in and contribute to a rapidly changing world, as well as building strong bioscience skills and knowledge. The curriculum must also prepare students for a rapidly…

  2. Foods: Where Innovation, Agriculture, Molecular Biosciences and Human Nutrition Meet

    Charles Brennan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There is one commodity the world over that unites mankind—food. In 2011 the United Nations claimed that the world’s population had reached the seven billion mark, a number which is set to increase dramatically in the decades to come. Food security, supply and sustainability are of paramount concern to the future economic and social progress of humanity. It is the responsibility of the food industry, together with food scientists and technologists, to shoulder the burden of ensuring an adequate supply of nutritious, safe and sensorially acceptable foods for a range of demanding consumers. In responding to this challenge, we need to understand the link between agriculture, engineering, food processing, molecular biosciences, human nutrition, commercialisation and innovation. Access to information concerning the composition and quality of foods has never been so easy for consumers and technologists alike. A plethora of research publications are made available each month to scientists and associated interested parties. The outcomes of these research manuscripts are often distilled and disseminated into messages available to everyone through bulletin boards, forums and the popular press. Newspapers and new agencies constantly report on the latest pharma-medical finding, or news regarding food safety and security concerns. We live in an age where information is so readily available to everyone that the task of finding credible and reputable data can be difficult at times. Providing sound evidenced based research is where a peer-reviewed journal can provide clarity. [...

  3. Foods: Where Innovation, Agriculture, Molecular Biosciences and Human Nutrition Meet.

    Brennan, Charles

    2012-11-21

    There is one commodity the world over that unites mankind-food. In 2011 the United Nations claimed that the world's population had reached the seven billion mark, a number which is set to increase dramatically in the decades to come. Food security, supply and sustainability are of paramount concern to the future economic and social progress of humanity. It is the responsibility of the food industry, together with food scientists and technologists, to shoulder the burden of ensuring an adequate supply of nutritious, safe and sensorially acceptable foods for a range of demanding consumers. In responding to this challenge, we need to understand the link between agriculture, engineering, food processing, molecular biosciences, human nutrition, commercialisation and innovation. Access to information concerning the composition and quality of foods has never been so easy for consumers and technologists alike. A plethora of research publications are made available each month to scientists and associated interested parties. The outcomes of these research manuscripts are often distilled and disseminated into messages available to everyone through bulletin boards, forums and the popular press. Newspapers and new agencies constantly report on the latest pharma-medical finding, or news regarding food safety and security concerns. We live in an age where information is so readily available to everyone that the task of finding credible and reputable data can be difficult at times. Providing sound evidenced based research is where a peer-reviewed journal can provide clarity. [...].

  4. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report for Year 3

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  5. MUSC Environmental Biosciences Program First Quarter Report May - June, 2002

    Lawrence C. Mohr

    2002-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  6. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report, Year 2

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  7. Anatomical Features of the Interscapular Area Where Wet Cupping Therapy Is Done and Its Possible Relation to Acupuncture Meridians.

    Ghods, Roshanak; Sayfouri, Nasrin; Ayati, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Although wet cupping has been a treatment for centuries, its mechanism of action is not well understood. Because the anatomical features of the wet-cupping area might play a role in its mechanism, we focus on the features of the interscapular area in which a common type of wet-cupping therapy (WCT), called Hijamat-e-Aam in Iranian medicine, is usually applied and discuss the possible relation of those features to the acupuncture meridians. We gathered and analyzed data from reliable textbooks on modern medicine with a focus on the anatomical features of the interscapular area, topics related to WTC in Iranian medicine, and acupuncture sources obtained by searching PubMed, Google-Scholar, and Science Direct. The interscapular area used for WCT was found to have special features: brown adipose tissue, immediate proximity to sympathetic ganglia, passage of the thoracic duct, two important acupuncture meridians, and proximity to the main vessel divisions carrying blood from the heart and the brain. These features indicate that the interscapular application of WCT not only discharges waste materials through a shifting of blood to the site after application of a traction force but also invigorates the body's metabolism, increases immunity, and regulates blood biochemistry, which are desired therapeutic effects of WCT. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Anatomical Features of the Interscapular Area Where Wet Cupping Therapy Is Done and Its Possible Relation to Acupuncture Meridians

    Roshanak Ghods

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although wet cupping has been a treatment for centuries, its mechanism of action is not well understood. Because the anatomical features of the wet-cupping area might play a role in its mechanism, we focus on the features of the interscapular area in which a common type of wet-cupping therapy (WCT, called Hijamat-e-Aam in Iranian medicine, is usually applied and discuss the possible relation of those features to the acupuncture meridians. We gathered and analyzed data from reliable textbooks on modern medicine with a focus on the anatomical features of the interscapular area, topics related to WTC in Iranian medicine, and acupuncture sources obtained by searching PubMed, Google-Scholar, and Science Direct. The interscapular area used for WCT was found to have special features: brown adipose tissue, immediate proximity to sympathetic ganglia, passage of the thoracic duct, two important acupuncture meridians, and proximity to the main vessel divisions carrying blood from the heart and the brain. These features indicate that the interscapular application of WCT not only discharges waste materials through a shifting of blood to the site after application of a traction force but also invigorates the body’s metabolism, increases immunity, and regulates blood biochemistry, which are desired therapeutic effects of WCT.

  9. Refractive variation under accommodative demand: curvital and scaled torsional variances and covariance across the meridians of the eye.

    van Gool, R D; Harris, W F

    1997-06-01

    Autorefractor measurements were taken on the right eye of 10 students with an external target at vergences -1.00 and -3.00 D. The refractive errors in the form of sphere, cylinder, and axis were converted to vectors h and variance-covariance matrices calculated for different reference meridians. Scatter plots are drawn in symmetric dioptric power space. The profiles of curvital and scaled torsional variances, the scaled torsional fraction, and the scaled torsional-curvital correlation are shown using a polar representation. This form of representation provides a meridional pattern of variation under accommodative demand. The profile for scaled torsional variance is characteristically in the form of a pair of rabbit ears. At both target vergences curvital variance is larger than scaled torsional variance in all the meridians of the eye: the relative magnitudes are quantified by the scaled torsional fraction. An increase in accommodative demand generally results in an increase in variance. The rabbit ears usually become larger but less well divided. The correlation between curvital and torsional powers is usually positive in the first quadrant and negative in the second quadrant. Typical, atypical, and mean typical responses are discussed.

  10. Analysis of Double Meridian Distance for a Closed Traverse Area towards Developing a Contour Map and Land Title

    T. U. Ganiron Jr

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to analyze double meridian distance for a closed traverse area in developing a land title for a propose gymnasium in Qassim University. Theodolite, leveling rod and steel tape plays an important role in measuring elevations, bearings and distances of the boundaries of a lot. Contour map is necessary to determine the traces of level surfaces of successive elevation. This will enable to identify the type of contour map and type of contour lines necessary for this project. Corel draw software is used to draw contour map and guide to interpret the significance of the variables. It is essential to check the error of closure for interior angles and for both latitude and departure before applying the Double Meridian Distance (DMD method to obtain the total area of the lot. Technical descriptions of the land such as distance, bearing, boundaries and area are necessary to visualize the shape & exact location of the land. Developing a land title will be obtained using the technical descriptions of the lot in preparation for the type of gymnasium necessary for Qassim University.

  11. DYSLIPIDEMIAS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH CHRONIC NON-INFECTIOUS DISEASES (MERIDIAN-RO STUDY

    E. V. Filippov

    2016-01-01

    .1 %. Adverse outcomes of NCD associated with elevated levels of apoB in the MERIDIAN-RO study, which should be considered when assessing the atherogenic dyslipidemia.

  12. [Comparison of the effects of the intervention with electric thermal bian stone and air suction cup on blood perfusion at meridian points].

    Zhao, Pengna; Wang, Yanping; Gu, Feifei; Li, Chaozheng; Wei, Yulong; Wang, Guangjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2018-02-12

    To observe the impacts of the intervention with electric thermal bian stone and air suction cup on blood perfusion (BP) at meridian points and explore the approach of accurate measurement and regulation of meridian qi and blood balance in "precise acupuncture". The laser Doppler line scanner (LDLS) was used to measure BP at bilateral yua n-primary points at the pericardium meridian, the triple energizer meridian, the gallbladder meridian and the liver meridian (small cycle of jueyin to shaoyang meridians) at 31 healthy receptors. The bias ratio of blood perfusion (BPBR) deviated to the reference value was calculated. The electric thermal bian stone and air suction cup were used in the intervention at the he -sea points of the affected meridians in which BPBR was relatively higher at the yuan -primary points. The electric thermal bian stone therapy was used when BPBR was less than -30% and the air suction cupping therapy was used when BPBR was higher than 30%. BP was measured twice before intervention and it was measured separately at the moment after intervention and in 20 min after intervention. The means of BP before and after intervention and the change ratio of blood perfusion (BPCR) before intervention, at the moment after intervention and 20 min after intervention were calculated. 1. After the intervention of electric thermal bian stone, BP mean was increased from (103.51±41.21) PU to (121.97±56.22) PU ( P 0.05), but the change ratio was highly remained. 2. After intervention with air suction cup, BP mean was reduced from (194.83±81.14) PU to (173.88±88.26) PU. Before intervention, at the moment after intervention and 20 min after intervention, separately, BPCR were (7.62±30.49)%, (-12.12±18.20)% and (-14.35±21.25)%. BPCR at the moment after intervention and in 20 min after intervention were significantly different from that before intervention (both P cup is opposite.

  13. The challenge of the Biosciences in Nurse Education: A literature review.

    Jensen, Kari Toverud; Knutstad, Unni; Fawcett, Tonks N

    2018-03-25

    To review relevant literature that address the challenges of the biosciences in nurse education. More precisely the review aims to explore the literature, concerning students' learning, learning contexts and methodological issues and identify any significant gaps. Knowledge of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry are essential for the understanding of human beings and for full appreciation of the concepts of illness and disease. The current status would seem to be that the required competencies within bioscience subjects are difficult to acquire and students have high rates of failure. Integrative review. The research were performed on Cinahl, ERIC, Medline and British Nursing Index databases in a period from 2013 until 2017. Descriptive analytical methods were used for the initial research trawl. The search strategy resulted in 23 papers. The results of this review shed light on certain deficiencies in the research field looking at the biosciences in nurse education. There is a distinct lack of intervention studies, and thereby knowledge of how best to support students' learning in effective ways. Of note is that there are no field study approaches identified in the review sample. Many of the papers are single studies and course evaluations which may be seen as too narrow and inadequate a perspective. Students appear satisfied with the courses in the biosciences but there seems to be no correlation between satisfaction and achievement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of an Integrated Team Project as Bachelor Thesis in Bioscience Engineering

    Peeters, Marie-Christine; Londers, Elsje; Van der Hoeven, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    Following the decision at the KU Leuven to implement the educational concept of guided independent learning and to encourage students to participate in scientific research, the Faculty of Bioscience Engineering decided to introduce a bachelor thesis. Competencies, such as communication, scientific research and teamwork, need to be present in the…

  15. Youtube for millennial nursing students; using internet technology to support student engagement with bioscience.

    Johnston, Amy Nb; Barton, Matthew J; Williams-Pritchard, Grant A; Todorovic, Michael

    2018-06-09

    Undergraduate nursing programs typically include students with limited 'on-campus' time who need learning resources that are flexible, technologically appropriate, remotely-accessible (mobile smart devices), and above all, engaging. This has presented academics with challenges surrounding institutional security firewalls, password-access requirements, intellectual property/ownership and staff/student privacy. To overcome these challenges a collection of evidence-based YouTube videos, posted on the Biological Sciences YouTube Channel, supported by the Biosciences in Nurse Education, and underpinned by Benner's pedagogical framework, were developed with the intention of moving students from novice to competent clinical bioscience users. The videos are highly successful; with over 310,000 views, 1.5 million minutes of viewing and more than 5000 subscribers since its inception (YouTube videos was enhanced by their familiarity with the presenter and the breadth of information available in small portions, creating a solid basis for the development of bioscience-competent nursing graduates. Moreover, these open source videos provide a free resource for continual revision and professional development informed by an international minimum bioscience standard for nurses post registration. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper: a retrospective qualitative study.

    Khareedi, R

    2018-05-01

    The cohort of students enrolled in the discipline-specific bioscience paper reflects a structural diversity in that it includes students of multiple ethnicities, varied age groups, differing scholastic and life experiences. These divergent identities of students are known to influence academic performance. The purpose of this retrospective quantitative study was to determine the ability of a set of variables such as age, gender, ethnicity, level of prior education, the place from which prior education was obtained, work experience and prior academic achievement to predict academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper. The sample for this study was a purposive sample of all oral health students who had enrolled in the paper at the Auckland University of Technology from 2011 to 2014. The desensitised empirical data of 116 students from the University's database were subject to multivariable regression analysis. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated. Prior academic achievement was a statistically significant predictor variable (P academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper and was also positively correlated (r = 0.641, P academic achievement was the only variable that was demonstrated to be correlated to and predictive of the academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 77 FR 56175 - Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    2012-09-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 [Docket No. FDA-2012-F-0949] Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use) AGENCY: Food... 573 Food Additives Permitted in Feed and Drinking Water of Animals (21 CFR part 573) to provide for...

  18. 创伤视角下的《梅丽迪安》%A Study of Meridian from Trauma Theory

    董薇

    2014-01-01

    艾丽丝∙沃克的《梅丽迪安》揭示了在20世纪60年代,种族主义和性别主义带给人们的伤害。从创伤理论视角出发,聚焦小说中的两位女性人物,通过比较分析,探索小说中体现的个人创伤,集体创伤以及创伤的恢复。%Alice Walker’s Meridian reveals the trauma caused by racism and sexism in 1960s.The thesis focus on two female characters to explore the individual,collective and recovery of trauma in the novel.

  19. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature

    2012-01-01

    Background Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM). This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. Results We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI). It is being used in the curation work flow at

  20. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature

    Fang Ruihua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM. This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD. We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. Results We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI. It is being used in

  1. Automatic categorization of diverse experimental information in the bioscience literature.

    Fang, Ruihua; Schindelman, Gary; Van Auken, Kimberly; Fernandes, Jolene; Chen, Wen; Wang, Xiaodong; Davis, Paul; Tuli, Mary Ann; Marygold, Steven J; Millburn, Gillian; Matthews, Beverley; Zhang, Haiyan; Brown, Nick; Gelbart, William M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-01-26

    Curation of information from bioscience literature into biological knowledge databases is a crucial way of capturing experimental information in a computable form. During the biocuration process, a critical first step is to identify from all published literature the papers that contain results for a specific data type the curator is interested in annotating. This step normally requires curators to manually examine many papers to ascertain which few contain information of interest and thus, is usually time consuming. We developed an automatic method for identifying papers containing these curation data types among a large pool of published scientific papers based on the machine learning method Support Vector Machine (SVM). This classification system is completely automatic and can be readily applied to diverse experimental data types. It has been in use in production for automatic categorization of 10 different experimental datatypes in the biocuration process at WormBase for the past two years and it is in the process of being adopted in the biocuration process at FlyBase and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). We anticipate that this method can be readily adopted by various databases in the biocuration community and thereby greatly reducing time spent on an otherwise laborious and demanding task. We also developed a simple, readily automated procedure to utilize training papers of similar data types from different bodies of literature such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify papers with any of these data types for a single database. This approach has great significance because for some data types, especially those of low occurrence, a single corpus often does not have enough training papers to achieve satisfactory performance. We successfully tested the method on ten data types from WormBase, fifteen data types from FlyBase and three data types from Mouse Genomics Informatics (MGI). It is being used in the curation work flow at WormBase for

  2. What is provided and what the registered nurse needs--bioscience learning through the pre-registration curriculum.

    Davis, Geraldine M

    2010-11-01

    Registered nurses undertaking programmes of study to become non-medical prescribers appear to have limited biological science knowledge. A case study was undertaken to determine whether the nurses entering Prescriber programmes considered studies in bioscience in their pre-registration nursing courses had been sufficient, linked to practice, and had prepared them for their roles as registered nurses. The literature identifies a continuing trend amongst nursing students describing a lack of sufficient bioscience in initial nurse education; there is limited literature on the views of experienced registered nurses. The participants in this study were 42 registered nurses from adult and mental health nursing, community and inpatient services. The results obtained from questionnaires and interviews are described. Questionnaire analysis identified that 57.1% of participants indicated bioscience in their pre-registration nursing programme had been limited and 40.5% stated the bioscience content had not prepared them for their roles on registration. Those reporting extensive coverage of bioscience were all aged over 41 years and had qualified before 1995. Greatest coverage of bioscience in pre-registration programmes was reported in relation to anatomy and physiology, with relatively limited coverage of microbiology, pharmacology or biochemistry. Respondents considered all five topics to be important. Interviews supported the questionnaire findings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Clinical observation of peptic ulcer treated with acupuncture based on theory of "the compatibility of the five meridians" in Huxiang].

    Li, Cuiying; Li, Jinxiang; Pan, Shimin; Zhang, Xi; Li, Ying

    2017-08-12

    To compare the effects differences for peptic ulcer between acupuncture based on the theory of "the compatibility of the five meridians" in Huxiang and conventional western medication. Sixty patients with peptic ulcer of liver-stomach disharmony type (LSDT) and weakness of spleen and stomach type (WSST) were assigned into an observation group and a control group by block randomization according to syndrome differentiation.Finally,28 cases (17 with LSDT and 11 with WSST) in the observation group,29 cases (18 with LSDT and 11 with WSST) in the control group were included.In the observation group,patients with LSDT were treated with acupuncture at Zhongwan (CV 12),Taichong (LR 3),Xingjian (LR 2),Qimen (LR 14),Zusanli (ST 36),Gongsun (SP 4),Shaofu (HT 8),Jingqu (LU 8),Neiguan (PC 6); those with WSST,at Zhongwan (CV 12),Dadu (SP 2),Taibai (SP 3),Yinlingquan (SP 9),Zusanli (ST 36),Shaofu (HT 8), Taichong (LR 3),Yingu (KI 10),Taixi (KI 3),Taiyuan (LU 9) according to the theory of "the compatibility of the five meridians" in Huxiang .Reinforcing and reducing were according to syndrome differentiation.The treatment was given once a day with needle retained for 30 min,5 days a week,2 days at interval.In the control group,the conventional triple drugs (omeprazole,amoxicillin and clarithromycin) were prescribed orally for Hp positive patients,and omeprazole for Hp negative patients.All the patients were treated for 4 weeks.The clinical syndrome score,ulcer healing under gastroscope,anti-Hp infection and Hp negative conversion ratio rate were observed in the two groups before and after treatment as well as 1 month after treatment.The total effects were evaluated. The syndrome scores after treatment and at 1 month ofter treatment decreased in the two groups (all P 0.05).The scores within the group between the two syndromes showed no significance in the two groups (both P >0.05).The cure rates under gastroscope,anti-Hp infection rates and the total rates had no statistically

  4. [Antirheumatic substance and meridian tropism of Loranthus parasiticus based on "syndrome-efficacy-analysis of biological samples"].

    Li, Ling-Ling; Wang, Jing; Cui, Ying; Wen, Pu; Guan, Jun; Yang, Shu; Ma, Kai

    2016-05-01

    To study the antirheumatic substance of Loranthus parasiticus and observe the relationship between its in vivo distribution and meridian tropism in rats by establishing adjuvant arthritis models corresponding to effectiveness. All rats except the negative control group were injected with 0.1 mL Freund's complete adjuvant on the left foot. After 8 days, the rats in negative control group and model group were given with normal saline while the rats in positive control group were given with tripterygium glycosides suspension 10 mg•kg-1, and the rats in L. parasiticus treatment groups were given with high(10 g•kg ⁻¹), medium(5 g•kg ⁻¹) and low(2.5 g•kg ⁻¹) dose decoction for 21 days. The left rear ankle joint diameter of rats were measured every 7 days from the 9th day of modeling. On the 22nd day, eyeball blood of part rats in L. parasiticus high-dose group was taken at different time points, and then they were sacrificed to take heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, large intestine, small intestine and brain tissues. For the remaining rats, eyeball blood was taken 30 min after drug treatment, and their left rear ankle joints were taken to detect interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in serum by ELISA method; rutin, avicularin and quercitrin levels in the tissues of high-dose group were detected by HPLC; pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by using DAS 2.0. Our results showed that L. parasiticus decoction could significantly improve the paw edema situation of adjuvant arthritis model rats, and reduce IL-1β and TNF-α levels in rat serum. The in vivo efficacy substance analysis in rats showed that rutin was only present in the stomach with a small amount. AUC0-t of avicularin was stomach > small intestine > kidney, and the duration time in vivo was kidney=stomach > small intestine > lung > heart. AUC0-t of quercitrin was stomach > kidney > liver > heart > lung > spleen > small intestine > brain > large intestine

  5. Preface for the special issue of Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering, BIOCOMP 2012.

    Buonocore, Aniello; Di Crescenzo, Antonio; Hastings, Alan

    2014-04-01

    The International Conference "BIOCOMP2012 - Mathematical Modeling and Computational Topics in Biosciences'', was held in Vietri sul Mare (Italy), June 4-8, 2012. It was dedicated to the Memory of Professor Luigi M. Ricciardi (1942-2011), who was a visionary and tireless promoter of the 3 previous editions of the BIOCOMP conference series. We thought that the best way to honor his memory was to continue the BIOCOMP program. Over the years, this conference promoted scientific activities related to his wide interests and scientific expertise, which ranged in various areas of applications of mathematics, probability and statistics to biosciences and cybernetics, also with emphasis on computational problems. We are pleased that many of his friends and colleagues, as well as many other scientists, were attracted by the goals of this recent event and offered to contribute to its success.

  6. Division of energy biosciences: Annual report and summaries of FY 1995 activities

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The mission of the Division of Energy Biosciences is to support research that advances the fundamental knowledge necessary for the future development of biotechnologies related to the Department of Energy`s mission. The departmental civilian objectives include effective and efficient energy production, energy conservation, environmental restoration, and waste management. The Energy Biosciences program emphasizes research in the microbiological and plant sciences, as these understudied areas offer numerous scientific opportunities to dramatically influence environmentally sensible energy production and conservation. The research supported is focused on the basic mechanisms affecting plant productivity, conversion of biomass and other organic materials into fuels and chemicals by microbial systems, and the ability of biological systems to replace energy-intensive or pollutant-producing processes. The Division also addresses the increasing number of new opportunities arising at the interface of biology with other basic energy-related sciences such as biosynthesis of novel materials and the influence of soil organisms on geological processes.

  7. Street-level emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from the wastewater collection system in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    Fries, Anastasia E; Schifman, Laura A; Shuster, William D; Townsend-Small, Amy

    2018-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that urban streets can be hotspots for emissions of methane (CH 4 ) from leaky natural gas lines, particularly in cities with older natural gas distribution systems. The objective of the current study was to determine whether leaking sewer pipes could also be a source of street-level CH 4 as well as nitrous oxide (N 2 O) in Cincinnati, Ohio, a city with a relatively new gas pipeline network. To do this, we measured the carbon (δ 13 C) and hydrogen (δ 2 H) stable isotopic composition of CH 4 to distinguish between biogenic CH 4 from sewer gas and thermogenic CH 4 from leaking natural gas pipelines and measured CH 4 and N 2 O flux rates and concentrations at sites from a previous study of street-level CH 4 enhancements (77 out of 104 sites) as well as additional sites found through surveying sewer grates and utility manholes (27 out of 104 sites). The average isotopic signatures for δ 13 C-CH 4 and δ 2 H-CH 4 were -48.5‰ ± 6.0‰ and -302‰ ± 142‰. The measured flux rates ranged from 0.0 to 282.5 mg CH 4 day -1 and 0.0-14.1 mg N 2 O day -1 (n = 43). The average CH 4 and N 2 O concentrations measured in our study were 4.0 ± 7.6 ppm and 392 ± 158 ppb, respectively (n = 104). 72% of sites where fluxes were measured were a source of biogenic CH 4 . Overall, 47% of the sampled sites had biogenic CH 4 , while only 13% of our sites had solely thermogenic CH 4 . The other sites were either a source of both biogenic and thermogenic CH 4 (13%), and a relatively large portion of sites had an unresolved source (29%). Overall, this survey of emissions across a large urban area indicates that production and emission of biogenic CH 4 and N 2 O is considerable, although CH 4 fluxes are lower than those reported for cities with leaky natural gas distribution systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Moxibustion in Early Chinese Medicine and Its Relation to the Origin of Meridians: A Study on the Unearthed Literatures

    Chang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Moxibustion is an integral part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM. It achieved higher level of recognition and had more general application in ancient times than in contemporary life. As the vital historical sources, the records of unearthed literatures offered precious insights to Chinese social life pattern and medical practice in Qin and Han dynasties (221 BC–220 AD. There was no surprise that the bamboo and silk documents excavated from Mawangdui (马王堆 tomb, Hantanpo (旱滩坡 tomb, and other relics had a large amount of texts relevant to moxibustion. This research sorted moxibustion recordings from seven unearthed literatures and discovered that moxibustion had been developed into different modalities and utilized to treat many diseases at that time. In addition, the indications, contraindications of moxibustion, and the method of postmoxibustion care were also discussed. On this basis, some hints were provided to support the hypothesis that the practice of moxibustion led to the discovery of meridians. All our preliminary results in the research have drawn attention for this old therapy and given a new source for its application in clinic and scientific research.

  9. Research advances in treatment of neurological and psychological diseases by acupuncture at the Acupuncture Meridian Science Research Center

    Bombi Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic intervention that can be traced back at least 2100 years and is emerging worldwide as one of the most widely used therapies in the field of complementary and alternative medicine. Due to limitations associated with Western medicine's focus on the treatment of diseases rather than on their causes, interests are shifting to complementary and alternative medicines. The Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center (AMSRC was established in 2005 to elucidate the neurophysiological mechanisms of acupuncture for neurological diseases based on multidisciplinary research supported by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. In the AMSRC, resultant research articles have shown that acupuncture can improve neurological and psychological problems, including Parkinson's disease, pain, and depression, in animal models. Basic research studies suggest its effectiveness in treating various problems such as depression, drug addiction, epilepsy, ischemia, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and pain. We strongly believe that these effects, evident from the AMSRC research results, can play leading roles in the use of acupuncture for treating neurological diseases, based on collaboration among various academic fields such as neurophysiology, molecular genetics, and traditional Korean medicine.

  10. Can active learning principles be applied to the bioscience assessments of nursing students? A review of the literature.

    Bakon, Shannon; Craft, Judy; Christensen, Martin; Wirihana, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    To explore if active learning principles be applied to nursing bioscience assessments and will this influence student perception of confidence in applying theory to practice? A review of the literature utilising searches of various databases including CINAHL, PUBMED, Google Scholar and Mosby's Journal Index. The literature search identified research from twenty-six original articles, two electronic books, one published book and one conference proceedings paper. Bioscience has been identified as an area that nurses struggle to learn in tertiary institutions and then apply to clinical practice. A number of problems have been identified and explored that may contribute to this poor understanding and retention. University academics need to be knowledgeable of innovative teaching and assessing modalities that focus on enhancing student learning and address the integration issues associated with the theory practice gap. Increased bioscience education is associated with improved patient outcomes therefore by addressing this "bioscience problem" and improving the integration of bioscience in clinical practice there will subsequently be an improvement in health care outcomes. From the literature several themes were identified. First there are many problems with teaching nursing students bioscience education. These include class sizes, motivation, concentration, delivery mode, lecturer perspectives, student's previous knowledge, anxiety, and a lack of confidence. Among these influences the type of assessment employed by the educator has not been explored or identified as a contributor to student learning specifically in nursing bioscience instruction. Second that educating could be achieved more effectively if active learning principles were applied and the needs and expectations of the student were met. Lastly, assessment influences student retention and the student experience and as such assessment should be congruent with the subject content, align with the learning

  11. [Observation on changes of oxygen partial pressure in the deep tissues along the large intestine meridian during acupuncture in healthy subjects].

    Chen, Ming; Hu, Xiang-long; Wu, Zu-xing

    2010-06-01

    To observe changes of the partial oxygen pressure in the deep tissues along the Large Intestine Meridian (LIM) during acupuncture stimulation, so as to reveal the characteristics of energy metabolism in the tissues along the LIM. Thirty-one healthy volunteer subjects were enlisted in the present study. Partial oxygen pressure (POP) in the tissues (at a depth of about 1.5 cm) of acupoints Binao (LI 14), Shouwuli (LI 13), Shousanli (LI 10), 2 non-acupoints [the midpoints between Quchi (LI 11) and LI 14, and between Yangxi (LI 5) and LI 11) of the LIM, and 10 non-meridian points, 1.5-2.0 cm lateral and medial to each of the tested points of the LIM was detected before, during and after electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of Hegu (LI 4) by using a tissue oxygen tension needle-like sensor. In normal condition, the POP values in the deep tissues along the LIM were significantly higher than those of the non-meridian control points on its bilateral sides. During and after EA of Hegu (LI 4), the POP levels decreased significantly in the deep tissues along the LIM in comparison with pre-EA (P 0.05). POP is significantly higher in the deep tissues along the LIM of healthy subjects under normal conditions, which can be downregulated by EA of Hegu (LI 4), suggesting an increase of both the utilization rate of oxygen and energy metabolism after EA.

  12. An initial investigation of multidimensional flow and transverse mixing characteristics of the Ohio River near Cincinnati, Ohio

    Holtschlag, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport models were applied to a 34-mile reach of the Ohio River from Cincinnati, Ohio, upstream to Meldahl Dam near Neville, Ohio. The hydrodynamic model was based on the generalized finite-element hydrodynamic code RMA2 to simulate depth-averaged velocities and flow depths. The generalized water-quality transport code RMA4 was applied to simulate the transport of vertically mixed, water-soluble constituents that have a density similar to that of water. Boundary conditions for hydrodynamic simulations included water levels at the U.S. Geological Survey water-level gaging station near Cincinnati, Ohio, and flow estimates based on a gate rating at Meldahl Dam. Flows estimated on the basis of the gate rating were adjusted with limited flow-measurement data to more nearly reflect current conditions. An initial calibration of the hydrodynamic model was based on data from acoustic Doppler current profiler surveys and water-level information. These data provided flows, horizontal water velocities, water levels, and flow depths needed to estimate hydrodynamic parameters related to channel resistance to flow and eddy viscosity. Similarly, dye concentration measurements from two dye-injection sites on each side of the river were used to develop initial estimates of transport parameters describing mixing and dye-decay characteristics needed for the transport model. A nonlinear regression-based approach was used to estimate parameters in the hydrodynamic and transport models. Parameters describing channel resistance to flow (Manning’s “n”) were estimated in areas of deep and shallow flows as 0.0234, and 0.0275, respectively. The estimated RMA2 Peclet number, which is used to dynamically compute eddy-viscosity coefficients, was 38.3, which is in the range of 15 to 40 that is typically considered appropriate. Resulting hydrodynamic simulations explained 98.8 percent of the variability in depth-averaged flows, 90.0 percent of the

  13. Closing the Knowledge Gap: Effects of Land Use Conversion on Belowground Carbon near the 100th Meridian

    Waldron, S. E.; Phillips, R. L.; Dell, R.; Suddick, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    Native prairie of the northern Great Plains near the 100th meridian is currently under land use conversion pressure due to high commodity prices. From 2002 to 2007, approximately 303,515 hectares of prairie were converted to crop production in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) from Montana to the Dakotas. The spatiotemporal effects of land-use conversion on soil organic matter are still unclear for the PPR. Effects will vary with management, soil properties and time, making regional experiments and simulation modeling necessary. Grassland conservationists are interested in soil carbon data and soil carbon simulation models to inform potential voluntary carbon credit programs. These programs require quantification of changes in soil carbon associated with land-use conversion and management. We addressed this issue by 1) designing a regional-scale experiment, 2) collecting and analyzing soil data, and 3) interviewing producers about land management practices, as required for regional, process-based biogeochemical models. We selected farms at random within a 29,000 km2 area of interest and measured soil properties at multiple depths for native prairie and adjacent annual crop fields. The cores were processed at six different depths (between 0 and 100 cm) for bulk density, pH, texture, total carbon, inorganic carbon, and total nitrogen. We found that the largest difference in soil organic carbon occurred at the 0-10 cm depth, but the magnitude of the effect of land use varied with soil properties and land management. Results from this project, coupled with regional model simulations (Denitrification-Decomposition, DNDC) represent the baseline data needed for future voluntary carbon credit programs and long-term carbon monitoring networks. Enrollment in such programs could help ranchers and farmers realize a new income stream from maintaining their native prairie and the carbon stored beneath it.

  14. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) - Better Buildings Neighborhood Program at Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training

  15. Acupuncture Effect on Pain, Mouth Opening Limitation and on the Energy Meridians in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Vera LR. Zotelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders (TMD, recognized as the most common conditions of chronic orofacial pain, have a multifactorial etiology. Acupuncture can help to relieve the pain and discomfort associated with these conditions, because it can rebalance the energy (Qi circulating in the meridians. The aim of the study was to verify the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating the pain; mouth opening limitation, and energy circulating in the meridians of patients with TMD of muscular or mixed origin. This was a controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trial conducted at the Piracicaba Dental School (FOP/Unicamp, in Piracicaba SP, Brazil. The Treatment Group received acupuncture with real penetration of the needle, and the Placebo Group received a sham treatment without needle penetration. The acupoints used were: ST6, ST7, SI18, GV20, GB20, BL10, and LI4, during treatment performed for four weekly sessions. The TMD and mouth opening were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC. The measurements of the energy at the meridians were performed by the Ryodoraku method, before and after acupuncture in all of the sessions in both groups. The results showed no decrease in pain in the Treatment Group when compared with the Placebo Group (p = 0.2261. There was no increase in the oral opening limit in the Treatment Group compared with the Placebo Group (p > 0.05. Regarding the energy levels, after acupuncture, there was a decrease in Yang energy in all sessions (p < 0.05, in both groups, however, only real acupuncture was effective in maintaining the Yin energy average throughout the four sessions, with significant difference between groups (p = 0.0198. In conclusion, volunteers with TMD presented a pattern of energy deficiency and the most prevalent imbalance patterns identified were in the meridians coupled to the kidney and bladder, and in the Shao Yin (heart/kidney and Shao Yang (triple

  16. Observation of intensity of cosmic rays and daily magnetic shifts near meridian 70° in the South America

    Cordaro, E. G.; Gálvez, D.; Laroze, D.

    2016-05-01

    In analysis of experiments carried during September 2008 using secondary cosmic ray detectors located in Chacaltaya (Bolivia) and Niteroi (Brazil), Augusto et al. (2010) showed an increase in the intensity of charged particles which takes place 3 h after sunrise and lasts until 1 h after sunset, furthermore they said that during this period the solar magnetic field lines overtake the Earth‧s surface. These stations are located within the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA), having both different magnetic rigidities. To reproduce data from the Niteroi and Chacaltaya stations, we record data during the same hours and days using our neutron monitors, muon telescopes and magnetometers within the stations Putre and Los Cerrillos. Our observation stations in Putre and Cerrillos are located at 18°11‧47.8″S, 69°33‧10.9″W at an altitude of 3600 m and 33°29‧42.3″S, 70°42‧59.81″W with 570 m height above sea level, respectively. These stations are located within the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAMA) and are separated approximately 1700 km from each other and 1700 km from the center of the anomaly. Our network is composed furthermore by two auxiliary Cosmic Ray and/or Geomagnetic stations located at different latitudes along 70°W meridian, LARC and O'Higgins stations, which are located within Antarctic territory, covering a broad part of the Southern Hemisphere. Our magnetometer data shows that for each of the components, shifts in the magnetic field intensity for every station (even for those out of the SAMA) lasted between 3 and 4 h after sunrise and 1 and 2 h past sunset, which are the periods when the geomagnetic field is modulated by the transit of the dayside to nightside and nightside to dayside. We believe that, although the magnetometric data indicates the magnetic reconnection for the Chilean region, there is no direct influence from the SAMA other than the lower rigidity cut-off that leads to an increased count rate. Other details about the

  17. Division of Energy Biosciences annual report and summaries of FY 1996 activities

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The mission of the Division of Energy Biosciences is to support research that advances the fundamental knowledge necessary for the future development of biotechnologies related to the Department of Energy`s mission. The departmental civilian objectives include effective and efficient energy production, energy conservation, environmental restoration, and waste management. The Energy Biosciences program emphasizes research in the microbiological and plant sciences, as these understudied areas offer numerous scientific opportunities to dramatically influence environmentally sensible energy production and conservation. The research supported is focused on the basic mechanism affecting plant productivity, conversion of biomass and other organic materials into fuels and chemicals by microbial systems, and the ability of biological systems to replace energy-intensive or pollutant-producing processes. The Division also addresses the increasing number of new opportunities arising at the interface of biology with other basic energy-related sciences such as biosynthesis of novel materials and the influence of soil organisms on geological processes. This report gives summaries on 225 projects on photosynthesis, membrane or ion transport, plant metabolism and biosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism lipid metabolism, plant growth and development, plant genetic regulation and genetic mechanisms, plant cell wall development, lignin-polysaccharide breakdown, nitrogen fixation and plant-microbial symbiosis, mechanism for plant adaptation, fermentative microbial metabolism, one and two carbon microbial metabolism, extremophilic microbes, microbial respiration, nutrition and metal metabolism, and materials biosynthesis.

  18. Ontologies and standards in bioscience research: for machine or for human

    Huaiyu eMi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies and standards are very important parts of today’s bioscience research. With the rapid increase of biological knowledge, they provide mechanisms to better store and represent data in a controlled and structured way, so that scientists can share the data, and utilize a wide variety of software and tools to manage and analyze the data. Most of these standards are initially designed for computers to access large amounts of data that are difficult for human biologists to handle, and it is important to keep in mind that ultimately biologists are going to produce and interpret the data. While ontologies and standards must follow strict semantic rules that may not be familiar to biologists, effort must be spent to lower the learning barrier by involving biologists in the process of development, and by providing software and tool support. A standard will not succeed without support from the wider bioscience research community. Thus, it is crucial that these standards be designed not only for machines to read, but also to be scientifically accurate and intuitive to human biologists.

  19. Effect of A-Level Subject Choice and Entry Tariff on Final Degree and Level 1 Performance in Biosciences

    King, Nicola C.; Aves, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Following the publication of the higher education white paper increasing entry tariff and widening participation have become even more important issues for universities. This report examines the relationship between entry tariff and undergraduate achievement in Biosciences at the University of Exeter. We show that, whilst there is a significant…

  20. A preliminary exploration of Advanced Molecular Bio-Sciences Research Center

    Yamada, Yutaka; Yanai, Takanori; Onodera, Jun'ichi; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Sakata, Hiroshi; Sota, Masahiro; Takemura, Tatsuo; Koyama, Kenji; Sato, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    Low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation effects on life-span, pathological changes, hemopoiesis and cytokine production in experimental animals have been investigated in our laboratory. In the intermediate period of the investigation, an expert committee on radiation biology, which was composed of two task groups, was organized. The purposes of the committee were to assess of previous studies and plan future research for Advanced Molecular Bio-Sciences Research Center (AMBIC). In its report, the committee emphasized the necessity of molecular research in radiation biology and ecology, and proposed six subjects for the research: 1) Molecular carcinogenesis of low-dose radiation; 2) Radiation effects on the immune system and hemopoietic system; 3) Molecular mechanisms of hereditary effect; 4) Non cancer effect of low-dose radiation; 5) Gene targeting for ion transport system in plants; 6) Bioremediation with transgenic plant and bacteria. Exploration of the AMBIC project will continue under the committee's direction. (author)

  1. Assessment of Collaboration and Interoperability in an Information Management System to Support Bioscience Research

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often have to work on massive, detailed, and heterogeneous datasets that raise new challenges of information management. This study reports an investigation into the nature of the problems faced by the researchers in two bioscience test laboratories when dealing with their data management applications. Data were collected using ethnographic observations, questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews. The major problems identified in working with these systems were related to data organization, publications, and collaboration. The interoperability standards were analyzed using a C4I framework at the level of connection, communication, consolidation, and collaboration. Such an analysis was found to be useful in judging the capabilities of data management systems at different levels of technological competency. While collaboration and system interoperability are the “must have” attributes of these biomedical scientific laboratory information management applications, usability and human interoperability are the other design concerns that must also be addressed for easy use and implementation. PMID:20351900

  2. A preliminary exploration of the advanced molecular bio-sciences research center

    Yanai, Takanori; Yamada, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kimio; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Sota, Masahiro; Takemura, Tatsuo; Koyama, Kenji; Sato, Fumiaki

    2001-01-01

    Low dose and low dose rate radiation effects on lifespan, pathological changes, hemopoiesis and cytokine production in mice have been investigated in our laboratory. In the intermediate period of the investigation, an expert committee on radiation biology was organized. The purposes of the committee were to assess previous studies and advise on a future research plan for the Advanced Molecular Bio-Sciences Research Center (AMBIC). The committee emphasized the necessity of molecular research in radiation biology, and proposed the following five subjects: 1) molecular carcinogenesis by low dose radiation; 2) radiation effects on the immune and hemopoietic systems; 3) molecular mechanisms of hereditary effect; 4) noncancer diseases of low dose radiation, and 5) cellular mechanisms by low dose radiation. (author)

  3. Contentious problems in bioscience and biotechnology: a pilot study of an approach to ethics education.

    Berry, Roberta M; Borenstein, Jason; Butera, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    This manuscript describes a pilot study in ethics education employing a problem-based learning approach to the study of novel, complex, ethically fraught, unavoidably public, and unavoidably divisive policy problems, called "fractious problems," in bioscience and biotechnology. Diverse graduate and professional students from four US institutions and disciplines spanning science, engineering, humanities, social science, law, and medicine analyzed fractious problems employing "navigational skills" tailored to the distinctive features of these problems. The students presented their results to policymakers, stakeholders, experts, and members of the public. This approach may provide a model for educating future bioscientists and bioengineers so that they can meaningfully contribute to the social understanding and resolution of challenging policy problems generated by their work.

  4. Francis Crick, cross-worlds influencer: A narrative model to historicize big bioscience.

    Aicardi, Christine

    2016-02-01

    The essay is an empirical case study of famed British scientist Francis Crick. Viewing him as a 'cross-worlds influencer' who was moreover dedicated to a cause, I have tried to understand how these two characteristics influenced the trajectory of his long career and how they shaped his contributions to the diverse research fields in which he was active, and concluded that these characteristics reconfigure Crick's career into a coherent whole. First, I identify a major thread running through Crick's career: helping organise 'un-disciplined' new research fields, and show that his successive choices were not serendipitous but motivated by what he construed as a crusade against 'vitalism': anti-vitalism was a defining driver of his career. I then examine how Crick put his skills as a crossworlds influencer to the service of his cause, by helping organise his chosen fields of intervention. I argue that his activities as a cross-worlds influencer were an integral part of his way of 'doing science' and that his contributions to science, neuroscience in particular, should be re-evaluated in this light. This leads me to advance a possible strategy for historians to investigate big bioscience fields. Following Abir-Am, I propose to trace their genealogies back to the fluctuating semi-institutional gatherings and the institutional structures that sustained them. My research on Crick supports the view that such studies can bring insights into the question of why the contours of contemporary big bioscience endeavours have come to be shaped the way they are. Further, the essay provides a heuristic device for approaching these enquiries: 'follow the cross-worlds influencers' who worked to build and organise these semi-institutional gatherings and institutional structures. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Francis Crick, cross-worlds influencer: A narrative model to historicize big bioscience

    Aicardi, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The essay is an empirical case study of famed British scientist Francis Crick. Viewing him as a ‘cross-worlds influencer’ who was moreover dedicated to a cause, I have tried to understand how these two characteristics influenced the trajectory of his long career and how they shaped his contributions to the diverse research fields in which he was active, and concluded that these characteristics reconfigure Crick's career into a coherent whole. First, I identify a major thread running through Crick's career: helping organise ‘un-disciplined’ new research fields, and show that his successive choices were not serendipitous but motivated by what he construed as a crusade against ‘vitalism’: anti-vitalism was a defining driver of his career. I then examine how Crick put his skills as a crossworlds influencer to the service of his cause, by helping organise his chosen fields of intervention. I argue that his activities as a cross-worlds influencer were an integral part of his way of ‘doing science’ and that his contributions to science, neuroscience in particular, should be re-evaluated in this light. This leads me to advance a possible strategy for historians to investigate big bioscience fields. Following Abir-Am, I propose to trace their genealogies back to the fluctuating semi-institutional gatherings and the institutional structures that sustained them. My research on Crick supports the view that such studies can bring insights into the question of why the contours of contemporary big bioscience endeavours have come to be shaped the way they are. Further, the essay provides a heuristic device for approaching these enquiries: ‘follow the cross-worlds influencers’ who worked to build and organise these semi-institutional gatherings and institutional structures. PMID:26383132

  6. Radiation pre-vulcanization of transitional layer of all-steel load meridian tyre and performance tests of the tyre products

    Zhang Benshang; Zhu Chengshen; Ying Shizhou; Liu Kebo; Li Zhaopeng; Li Kunhao; Zhang Hongna; Zhao Meihong; Yang Mingcheng

    2012-01-01

    In this article, natural rubber is chosen as transitional layer of all-steel load meridian tyre, which is pre-vulcanized by 500 keV E-beam irradiation of up to 60 kGy. The results show that the Green strength of transitional layer increases with the dose, reaching four times at 60 kGy as much as the control (without irradiation). The viscosity of transitional layer increases rapidly below about 29 kGy, but changes little at higher doses. The final mechanical properties do not differ significantly from those of the control. However, thickness of the natural rubber transitional layer for an average single tire can be reduced by 1 mm (or 1.5 kg), without obvious adverse effect on the tyre performance. (authors)

  7. Stratum Corneum Hydration and Skin Surface pH Variation Indicate that Organ Blood Flow Is Regulated by Meridian Activity at Certain Hours

    Li-Fan Chuang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Day and night are regular occurrences in nature, and the organs and tissues in living bodies follow this cycle. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS at various time points regulates organ excitation to maintain healthy functions in the living body. The energy required from basal metabolism can be used to explain living organisms according to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM concept of relationships between meridian directions and organs at various times (organs “at rest” and organs “in operation”. By monitoring skin reactions after applying a cream, we speculated regular blood flow changes, and established an animated hourglass-shaped trajectory diagram to visualize these changes. A combination of TCM and physiological perspectives were considered to explain how the cardiovascular system produces energy. These two perspectives were applied to interpret the correlation between the SNS and organ metabolism.

  8. Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. In the Ivaí Indigenous Land, Brazil.

    Nishi, Letícia; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas; Falavigna, Dina Lúcia Morais; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Mota, Lúcio Tadeu; Falavigna-Guilherme, Ana Lúcia

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of cysts of Giardia spp. and oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. in waters of the Ivaí Indigenous Land, Brazil. Samples of river and spring water and of treated water were filtered and analyzed by direct immunofluorescence (Merifluor kit, Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, Ohio). Of 21 samples, 7 from each locality, 3 (3/7, 42.8%) from a river were positive for Giardia (mean concentration 2.57 cysts/L), and 1 (1/7, 14.3%) was positive for Cryptosporidium (6 oocysts/L). From springs, 1 sample (1/7, 14.3%) was positive for Cryptosporidium (6 oocysts/L). One sample (1/7, 14.3%) from treated water was positive for both, with 4 oocysts/L and 2 cysts/L. Giardia was the more frequent protozoan present.

  9. Comparison of premier CAMPY enzyme immunoassay (EIA), ProSpecT Campylobacter EIA, and ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY tests with culture for laboratory diagnosis of Campylobacter enteric infections.

    Granato, Paul A; Chen, Li; Holiday, Iris; Rawling, Russell A; Novak-Weekley, Susan M; Quinlan, Tammy; Musser, Kimberlee A

    2010-11-01

    Campylobacter enteritis is a food-borne or waterborne illness caused almost exclusively by Campylobacter jejuni and, to a lesser extent, by Campylobacter coli. These organisms produce indistinguishable clinical diseases and together represent the second most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in the United States and the leading cause of enteric infection throughout the world. The conventional approach to the laboratory diagnosis of Campylobacter enteritis is based on the recovery of the organism from a stool specimen, which requires the use of a specialized medium incubated at 42°C for several days in an artificially created microaerophilic environment. Recently, several commercially available enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been developed for the direct detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in stool specimens. This study compared conventional culture with three EIA methods, the Premier CAMPY EIA (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH), the ProSpecT Campylobacter EIA (Remel, Lenexa, KS), and the ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY test (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH), for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in 485 patient stool samples. Discordant results were arbitrated by using an in-house, real-time PCR assay that was developed and validated by a public health reference laboratory. Following analyses of the discrepant specimens by PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of both the Premier CAMPY and ProSpecT Campylobacter EIAs were 99.3% and 98%, respectively, while the ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY test had a sensitivity of 98.5% and a specificity of 98.2%. By use of the PCR test as the reference standard, culture detected 127 of 135 Campylobacter-positive stool specimens, yielding a sensitivity of 94.1%. These results showed that the three EIAs evaluated in this study provide a rapid and reliable alternative for the laboratory diagnosis of enteric infections with C. jejuni and C. coli and that conventional culture may no longer be recognized as the "gold standard" for

  10. Comparison of Premier CAMPY Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA), ProSpecT Campylobacter EIA, and ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY Tests with Culture for Laboratory Diagnosis of Campylobacter Enteric Infections ▿ †

    Granato, Paul A.; Chen, Li; Holiday, Iris; Rawling, Russell A.; Novak-Weekley, Susan M.; Quinlan, Tammy; Musser, Kimberlee A.

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter enteritis is a food-borne or waterborne illness caused almost exclusively by Campylobacter jejuni and, to a lesser extent, by Campylobacter coli. These organisms produce indistinguishable clinical diseases and together represent the second most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in the United States and the leading cause of enteric infection throughout the world. The conventional approach to the laboratory diagnosis of Campylobacter enteritis is based on the recovery of the organism from a stool specimen, which requires the use of a specialized medium incubated at 42°C for several days in an artificially created microaerophilic environment. Recently, several commercially available enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been developed for the direct detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in stool specimens. This study compared conventional culture with three EIA methods, the Premier CAMPY EIA (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH), the ProSpecT Campylobacter EIA (Remel, Lenexa, KS), and the ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY test (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH), for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in 485 patient stool samples. Discordant results were arbitrated by using an in-house, real-time PCR assay that was developed and validated by a public health reference laboratory. Following analyses of the discrepant specimens by PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of both the Premier CAMPY and ProSpecT Campylobacter EIAs were 99.3% and 98%, respectively, while the ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY test had a sensitivity of 98.5% and a specificity of 98.2%. By use of the PCR test as the reference standard, culture detected 127 of 135 Campylobacter-positive stool specimens, yielding a sensitivity of 94.1%. These results showed that the three EIAs evaluated in this study provide a rapid and reliable alternative for the laboratory diagnosis of enteric infections with C. jejuni and C. coli and that conventional culture may no longer be recognized as the “gold standard” for

  11. Stratigraphy of the Silurian outcrop belt on the east side of the Cincinnati Arch in Kentucky, with revisions in the nomenclature

    McDowell, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Silurian rocks form a narrow arcuate outcrop belt about 100 mi long on the east side of the Cincinnati Arch in Kentucky. They range from as much as 300 ft thick in the north to a pinchout edge in the south. The nomenclature of this sequence is revised to reflect mappability and lithologic uniformity on the basis of detailed mapping at a scale of 1:24,000 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kentucky Geological Survey. The Silurian rocks are divided into two parts: the Crab Orchard Group, raised in rank from Crab Orchard Formation and redefined, in the lower part of the Silurian section, and Bisher Dolomite in the upper part of the section. The Crab Orchard Group is subdivided into the Drowning Creek Formation (new name) at the base of the Silurian, overlain by the Alger Shale (adopted herein) south of Fleming County and by the Estill Shale (elevated to formational rank) north of Bath County. The Brassfield Member (reduced in rank from Brassfield Dolomite or Formation) and the Plum Creek Shale and Oldham Members of the former Crab Orchard Formation are included as members of the Drowning Creek; the Lulbegrud Shale, Waco, and Estill Shale Members of the former Crab Orchard Formation are now included in the Alger. The Drowning Creek Formation, 20 to 50 ft thick, is composed mainly of gray fine to coarse-grained dolomite with shale interbeds. The dolomite beds average several inches thick, with bedding surfaces that are locally smooth but generally irregular and are fossiliferous in many places; fossils include brachiopods, crinoid columnals, horn corals, colonial corals, trilobites, pelecypods, and bryozoans. The shale interbeds average several inches thick, except for its Plum Creek Shale Member which is entirely shale and as much as 12 ft thick, and are most abundant in the upper half of the formation. The members of the Drowning Creek intergrade and are indistinguishable in the northern part of the area. The Alger Shale, as much as 170 feet thick

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome: proceedings from the 2016 Cincinnati International Turner Syndrome Meeting.

    Gravholt, Claus H; Andersen, Niels H; Conway, Gerard S; Dekkers, Olaf M; Geffner, Mitchell E; Klein, Karen O; Lin, Angela E; Mauras, Nelly; Quigley, Charmian A; Rubin, Karen; Sandberg, David E; Sas, Theo C J; Silberbach, Michael; Söderström-Anttila, Viveca; Stochholm, Kirstine; van Alfen-van derVelden, Janielle A; Woelfle, Joachim; Backeljauw, Philippe F

    2017-09-01

    Turner syndrome affects 25-50 per 100,000 females and can involve multiple organs through all stages of life, necessitating multidisciplinary approach to care. Previous guidelines have highlighted this, but numerous important advances have been noted recently. These advances cover all specialty fields involved in the care of girls and women with TS. This paper is based on an international effort that started with exploratory meetings in 2014 in both Europe and the USA, and culminated with a Consensus Meeting held in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA in July 2016. Prior to this meeting, five groups each addressed important areas in TS care: 1) diagnostic and genetic issues, 2) growth and development during childhood and adolescence, 3) congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease, 4) transition and adult care, and 5) other comorbidities and neurocognitive issues. These groups produced proposals for the present guidelines. Additionally, four pertinent questions were submitted for formal GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) evaluation with a separate systematic review of the literature. These four questions related to the efficacy and most optimal treatment of short stature, infertility, hypertension, and hormonal replacement therapy. The guidelines project was initiated by the European Society for Endocrinology and the Pediatric Endocrine Society, in collaboration with The European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology, The Endocrine Society, European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology, The American Heart Association, The Society for Endocrinology, and the European Society of Cardiology. The guideline has been formally endorsed by the European Society for Endocrinology, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the Endocrine Society. Advocacy groups appointed representatives who participated in pre-meeting discussions and in the

  13. Improving Bioscience Research Reporting: The ARRIVE Guidelines for Reporting Animal Research

    Carol Kilkenny

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the number of bioscience journals has increased enormously, with many filling specialised niches reflecting new disciplines and technologies. The emergence of open-access journals has revolutionised the publication process, maximising the availability of research data. Nevertheless, a wealth of evidence shows that across many areas, the reporting of biomedical research is often inadequate, leading to the view that even if the science is sound, in many cases the publications themselves are not “fit for purpose”, meaning that incomplete reporting of relevant information effectively renders many publications of limited value as instruments to inform policy or clinical and scientific practice [1–21]. A recent review of clinical research showed that there is considerable cumulative waste of financial resources at all stages of the research process, including as a result of publications that are unusable due to poor reporting [22]. It is unlikely that this issue is confined to clinical research [2–14,16–20].

  14. Division of Energy Biosciences annual report and summaries of FY 1991 activities

    1991-09-01

    As a component of the Department of Energy, the Energy Biosciences (EB) program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences supports long-term research aimed at addressing energy-related problems utilizing biological systems. There are three main components of the EB program. The first, Primary Biological Energy Conversion, concentrates on research on plant and microbial photosynthesis, but also deals with plant growth control, stress reactions, and interaction with pathogens. The second, Bioconversion of Products, concentrates on utilization of the products of primary energy conversion. Specific examples include biosynthesis of potential fuels or chemicals, biodegradation of lignocellulose into potentially useful compounds, plant/microbe symbiosis, microbial methanogenesis and fermentation. The third main component of the EB program involves providing the basic research infrastructure to support future discoveries. The emphasis here is on investigation of basic genetic mechanisms, both in novel systems and extensively studied systems such as maize; development of critical databases, techniques, and instrumentation; and support of training in areas that are important but underpopulated. Brief descriptions of currently supported research projects are provided. 186 refs., 1 tab

  15. Course-based undergraduate research experiences in molecular biosciences-patterns, trends, and faculty support.

    Wang, Jack T H

    2017-08-15

    Inquiry-driven learning, research internships and course-based undergraduate research experiences all represent mechanisms through which educators can engage undergraduate students in scientific research. In life sciences education, the benefits of undergraduate research have been thoroughly evaluated, but limitations in infrastructure and training can prevent widespread uptake of these practices. It is not clear how faculty members can integrate complex laboratory techniques and equipment into their unique context, while finding the time and resources to implement undergraduate research according to best practice guidelines. This review will go through the trends and patterns in inquiry-based undergraduate life science projects with particular emphasis on molecular biosciences-the research-aligned disciplines of biochemistry, molecular cell biology, microbiology, and genomics and bioinformatics. This will provide instructors with an overview of the model organisms, laboratory techniques and research questions that are adaptable for semester-long projects, and serve as starting guidelines for course-based undergraduate research. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. An Internship May Not Be Enough: Enhancing Bioscience Industry Job Readiness through Practicum Experiences

    Jason M. Cramer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the narrowing of options in academic careers, the bioscience industry offers robust employment opportunities for STEM-trained workers, especially those who display both scientific and business talent. Unfortunately, traditional science programs typically lack curricular features that develop this type of worker. The North Carolina State University Master of Microbial Biotechnology (MMB program facilitates industry-specific experiential learning to fill this training gap. Similar programs often rely on a single industry internship to provide students relevant work experience, but completion of one internship might not suffice to position students for employment in a highly competitive job market. The MMB program requires students to complete an internship and three practicum projects in an industry setting, to promote development of key skills in a variety of areas, to build confidence in the ability to perform initial job duties, and to establish a more extensive work history in industry. In this Perspective we discuss an unmet need in undergraduate and graduate STEM education that can be filled by incorporating a similar set of industry-specific work experiences for students who desire to transition from academe into the life science industry.

  17. Division of Energy Biosciences annual report and summaries of FY 1991 activities

    1991-09-01

    As a component of the Department of Energy, the Energy Biosciences (EB) program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences supports long-term research aimed at addressing energy-related problems utilizing biological systems. There are three main components of the EB program. The first, Primary Biological Energy Conversion, concentrates on research on plant and microbial photosynthesis, but also deals with plant growth control, stress reactions, and interaction with pathogens. The second, Bioconversion of Products, concentrates on utilization of the products of primary energy conversion. Specific examples include biosynthesis of potential fuels or chemicals, biodegradation of lignocellulose into potentially useful compounds, plant/microbe symbiosis, microbial methanogenesis and fermentation. The third main component of the EB program involves providing the basic research infrastructure to support future discoveries. The emphasis here is on investigation of basic genetic mechanisms, both in novel systems and extensively studied systems such as maize; development of critical databases, techniques, and instrumentation; and support of training in areas that are important but underpopulated. Brief descriptions of currently supported research projects are provided. 186 refs., 1 tab (MHB)

  18. Annual report and summaries of FY 1993 activities: Division of Energy Biosciences

    1993-09-01

    The mission of the Energy Biosciences program is to generate fundamental information about plants and non-health related microorganisms that will constitute the base for new biotechnologies as well as supply information to improve usages of such organisms in their current form. The collective aims are totally consistent with the Department of Energy`s objectives of developing alternate energy sources, replacements for otherwise fossil energy derived products and providing critical fundamental information for the preservation and restoration of environmental conditions affected by energy related activities. The EB program takes full advantage of its organizational locale in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences to directly interact with such disciplines as Materials Sciences, Chemistry, Engineering and Geosciences to promote cross-disciplinary research and planning activities. One of the major specific objectives of the EB program is to probe the enormous capabilities of the specified organisms to carry out biochemical conversions. The limitation to realization of entirely new products and processes via biotechnology is the lack of basic understanding of natural processes. Such knowledge will then afford the advantage of developing procedures to the benefit of people and their society in providing new products along with providing new employment possibilities. This document consists of abstracts of projects supported in FY 1993.

  19. SBBN 2010: 7. Congress of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Radiations in biosciences: advances and trends; SBBN 2010: 7. Congresso da Sociedade Brasileira de Biociencias Nucleares. Radiacoes em biociencias: avancos e perspectivas

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Advance and new perspectives related to the use of ionizing and no ionizing radiations in nuclear biosciences are presented. Multidisciplinary approach, including radiopharmacy, radioprotection and dosimetry, cytogenetic, biosafety, radioecology, environmental toxicology are studied. Topics of Nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and image diagnosis, such as computerized tomography, PET scan, phantoms, biomedical radiography, are reported. Use of radioisotopes, evaluation of radiation dose rates, radiation dose distribution, radiation monitoring is considered. Environmental impact of radiation are also in human beings, animals and for several purposes are analyzed. (MAC)

  20. The past that was differs little from the past that was not: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthys Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West

    Dilg, Cami Ann

    2017-01-01

    This literary analysis expands the scholarly canon concerning Cormac McCarthy’s regional writing by identifying the purpose of pictographs and petroglyphs in Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West (1985). Not only do pictographs and petroglyphs tie the narrative to place, but they create a commentary regarding the erasure of Native American histories in the United States. These images record Native American memory and presence in the landscape, and by referencing them, McCarthy con...