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Sample records for mercury resistant mutants

  1. Association of methionine requirement with methyl mercury resistant mutants of yeast

    Singh, A.; Sherman, F.

    1974-01-25

    It has been known for several years that strains resistant to mercury can be obtained in several bacterial species. Soon after the correlation between resistance to antibiotics and to mercury was recognized, it was established that genetic elements conferring resistance to antibiotics, mercury and other heavy metals in Escherichia coli and Samonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus reside on extrachromosomal resistance transfer factors or plasmids. Among fungi, mercury resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium notatum, Sclerotinia fructicola, Stemphylium sarcinaeforme, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported. In most cases, this was accomplished by training the normal strains for growth on media supplemented with successively increasing concentrations of mercury compounds, and in some cases the resistance was lost when subcultured on mercury-free media. It is noteworthy that in none of the mercury-adapted strains of fungi has the genetic basis of resistance been determined. In this report we describe a method of isolation and characterization of methyl mercury resistant mutants of S. cerevisiae. This study was undertaken with the view that the examination of physiological changes associated with genetically defined resistant mutants will be useful in studying the mechanisms of cellular detoxification of organic mercurials.

  2. Biological changes in Barley mutants resistant to powdery mildew disease

    Amer, I. M.; Fahim, M. M.; Moustafa, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    physiological studies showed that all kinds of chlorophyll (a), (b) and (a + b) content in infected plant were decreased while, the carotenes pigment were increased. Infection generally reduced total sugars content of all resistant mutants. Infected resistant mutant showed more phenols content and peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase activities than healthy ones of the mutants. (Author)

  3. Isozyme patterns of powdery mildew resistant wheat mutants

    Xia Wengau; Li Zhengkui; Wang Kefeng

    1989-01-01

    Full Text: Wheat mutants induced by gamma irradiation and showing improved resistance to powdery mildew were analysed for isozymes. The peroxidase band 3A could be related to the disease reaction. The band 3A is absent in resistant mutants, the higher the activity of band 3A the greater the susceptibility. (author)

  4. Isolation, screening and identification of mercury resistant bacteria from mercury contaminated soil

    Kowalczyk Anna; Wilińska Magdalena; Chyc Marek; Bojko Monika; Latowski Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    New bacterial strains resistant to high concentration of mercury were obtained and character iz ed focusing on their potential application in bioremediation. The biological material was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The ability to removal of Hg from the liquid medium and the effect of the various pH and mercury concentrations in the environment on bacterial strains growth kinetics were tested. The selected strains were identified by analysis of the 16S ribosome subunit coding ...

  5. Aerobic Mercury-resistant bacteria alter Mercury speciation and retention in the Tagus Estuary (Portugal).

    Figueiredo, Neusa L; Canário, João; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Duarte, Aida; Carvalho, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic mercury-resistant bacteria were isolated from the sediments of two highly mercury-polluted areas of the Tagus Estuary (Barreiro and Cala do Norte) and one natural reserve area (Alcochete) in order to test their capacity to transform mercury. Bacterial species were identified using 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing techniques and the results indicate the prevalence of Bacillus sp. Resistance patterns to mercurial compounds were established by the determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations. Representative Hg-resistant bacteria were further tested for transformation pathways (reduction, volatilization and methylation) in cultures containing mercury chloride. Bacterial Hg-methylation was carried out by Vibrio fluvialis, Bacillus megaterium and Serratia marcescens that transformed 2-8% of total mercury into methylmercury in 48h. In addition, most of the HgR bacterial isolates showed Hg(2+)-reduction andHg(0)-volatilization resulting 6-50% mercury loss from the culture media. In summary, the results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions indicate that aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria from the Tagus Estuary significantly affect both the methylation and reduction of mercury and may have a dual face by providing a pathway for pollution dispersion while forming methylmercury, which is highly toxic for living organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  7. nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of Aspergillus

    Unknown

    nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of. Aspergillus niger. SAMAR ... gens and UV irradiation to study transportation of cad- mium ion through cell ..... Rowley W S 1993 Yeast bZib proteins mediate pleiotropic drug and metal ...

  8. Mildew resistant and less lodging wheat mutants induced in Iran

    Naghedi-Ahmadi, I.

    1989-01-01

    ''Tabassi'' is a lodging and mildew susceptible cultivar. To induce mutations, seeds were gamma irradiated (50 to 150 Gy) in 1982 and selection for lodging resistance was carried out in M 2 . During field experiments with the mutant lines in 1985/86 there has been a heavy mildew epidemic under which mutant 63-5-I (derived from 50 Gy treatment) exhibited considerable resistance and as a consequence, higher yield. The control was 100% infected, the mutant only 40%. The mutant yielded 31% more grain, 7.5% less straw and 4.5% more protein than the control. Lodging of 63-5-I was only 60% in an experiment under rainfed conditions in the same season, resulting in a relative yield increase of about 11%. In 1986/87 there was no mildew epidemic and the mutant yielded the same as ''Tabassi''

  9. A wheat cold resistance mutant derived from space mutagenesis

    Li Peng; Sun Mingzhu; Zhang Fengyun; Gao Guoqiang; Qiu Denglin; Li Xinhua

    2012-01-01

    A cold resistance mutant, obtained by spaceflight mutagenesis on the seeds of wheat variety Han6172, and the DNA of cold resistance mutant and contrast Han6172 were compared by SRAP technique. 380 pairs of primers were screened, 6 pairs of them had polymorphisms between mutant and contrast, the rate was 1.58%, and this data indicated that there are no obvious DNA differences between mutant and contrast Six specific fragments were obtained, 3 fragments of them were amplified in mutant. Homology analysis in GenBank showed that Me3-Em7-Mt, Me4-Em11-CK, Me7-Em19-CK and Me6-Em9-Mt all had homologous sequences with wheat chromosome 3B-specific BAC library, and this result indicated that the gene and regulator sequences associated with mutant cold resistance might locate on 3B chromosome. It was speculated that space mutation induced the mutation of 3B chromosome primary structure, and influenced the expressions of cold resistance genes, which resulted in the mutation of cold resistance ability. (authors)

  10. A wheat cold resistance mutant derived from space mutagenesis

    Li Peng; Sun Mingzhu; Zhang Fengyun; Gao Guoqiang; Qiu Denglin; Li Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    A cold resistance mutant, obtained by spaceflight mutagenesis on the seeds of wheat variety Han6172, and the DNA of cold resistance mutant and contrast Han6172 were compared by SRAP technique. 380 pairs of primers were screened, 6 pairs of them had polymorphisms between mutant and contrast, the rate was 1.58%, and this data indicated that there are no obvious DNA differences between mutant and contrast. Six specific fragments were obtained, 3 fragments of them were amplified in mutant. Homology analysis in GenBank showed that Me3-Em7-Mt, Me4-Em11-CK, Me7-Em19-CK and Me6-Em9-Mt all had homologous sequences with wheat chromosome 3B-specific BAC library, and this result indicated that the gene and regulator sequences associated with mutant cold resistance might locate on 3B chromosome. It was speculated that space mutation induced the mutation of 3B chromosome primary structure, and influenced the expressions of cold resistance genes, which resulted in the mutation of cold resistance ability. (authors)

  11. Screening oat populations for rust resistant mutants

    McKenzie, R.I.H.; Martens, J.W.; Harder, D.E.; Brown, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    In 1972 a two million M 2 plants were grown at Morden, Manitoba. Thirteen plants which were thought to have possible resistance to race CI0 of oat stem rust were harvested. After extensive seedling and adult plant rust tests the best of the selected plant progenies was crossed and backcrossed to Rodney 0, a stem rust susceptible oat. The resistance in this line M-72-6 was found to be controlled by a single gene. In 1973 another two million M 2 plants were examined for rust resistance at Morden and 38 were harvested. None of the M 2 plants selected in 1973 appeared to have any seedling or adult resistance when examined more thoroughly in the greenhouse and again in the field in 1974. In 1974 one million M 2 plants were examined for resistance and 73 selected. None appeared to have any resistance when tested further. The strain CI3034 which was good adult plant stem rust resistance associated with weak straw and a light green plant colour was treated with gamma radiation and EMS in 1973 and the M 2 grown in the C10 rust nursery at Morden in 1974. A considerable number of dark green plants were present in all treatments but unfortunately all were found to be stem rust susceptible. Thus it would appear to be difficult if not impossible to separate the rust resistance in CI3034 from the undesirable characters, weak straw and light green plant colour. (author)

  12. Selection Of Drought Resistant Mutants In Rice Using DNA Markers

    Nguyen Duc Thanh; Le Thi Bich Thuy; Dang Thi Minh Lua

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the marker - assisted selection (MAS) strategy have been used for selection of traits that are difficult and costly performed measurement and score. Selection for a well-developed root system could improve the drought resistance of rice as the plant would avoid water stress by absorbing water from the soil. There were several reports on map construction and identification of the markers tightly linked to morphological and physiological traits related to drought resistance in rice, in particular, root traits in upland and lowland rice (Champoux et al., 1995; Ray et al., 1996; Price et al., 1997, 2000; Yadav et al., 1997). In this report, we present the results on selection of drought resistance mutants in rice using the DNA markers tightly linked to root traits favorable for drought resistance. The mutant rice lines were obtained from irradiated seeds and calluses by gamma ray. The selection was performed at M2 mutants using the DNA markers linked to maximum root length (MRL), root weight to shoot weight ratio (RW/SR), and weight of deep root to shoot weight ratio (DRW/SR). The obtained results showed that there were many lines possessed drought resistant markers. In addition, there is a number of lines have altered genome. Several lines having drought markers proved to be more resistant to drought in green-house test. These lines could be useful for further test and development of drought resistant varieties. (author)

  13. Unusual rise in mercury-resistant bacteria in coastal environs

    Ramaiah, N.; De, J.

    A sharp rise in mercury-resistant bacteria (MRB) capable of tolerating very high concentration of Hg was observed over the last 3-4 years in the coastal environs of India. While none or negligible colony-forming units (CFU) of bacteria were counted...

  14. Mutant of Japanese pear resistant to Black Spot Disease

    Sanada, T.; Nishida, T.; Ikeda, F.

    1987-01-01

    Full text: Nijisseike is one of the leading cultivars of Japanese pear (Pyrus serotinea Rehd.), but susceptible to black spot disease. Farmers try to prevent this disease by wrapping the fruit with a paper bag and by repeated spraying of fungicides. The disease is caused by a Japanese pear pathotype of Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. Susceptibility is controlled by a single dominant gene. In 1962, grafted trees of this cultivar were planted at a distance between 53 and 93 m from the 60 Co source in the gamma-field (daily dose 15-4 rad). One branch on a tree planted at 53 m was detected as resistant in 1981. Under field conditions, black spots were observed on many fruits and leaves of the original trees by natural infection in early July, however, they were not observed on the mutant. To examine the resistance of the mutant, artificial inoculations were made using spores of the pathogen and the host specific toxin produced by germinating spores. When some drops of the spore suspension are placed on leaves, the formation of black spots depends upon the leaf age. In a resistant cv. as Chojuro, black spot symptoms are formed only when inoculated on young leaves. An intermediate reaction was observed in the mutant, whereas the original Nijisseiki showed severe symptoms. When inoculation was made on matured fruit skins, no black spot was formed on the mutant just like on the resistant cv. Chojuro, while many small black spots were formed and grew into large spots overlapping each other on the susceptible cv. Nijisseiki. In case of the crude toxin inoculation (4-0.04 ppm) of cv. Nijisseiki black spots were formed on the surface of the susceptible fruit skin, and necrotic lesions at the cut end of detached small pieces of leaves, although reaction on fruit skins was weaker compared with inoculation by spores. However, no symptoms were observed from the toxin application on the mutant and the resistant cv. Chojuro. That the resistance of the mutant is classified as

  15. 'CM 88' - A multiple disease resistant chickpea mutant variety

    Haq, M.A.; Hassan, Mahmudul; Sadiq, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Chickpea is the most important grain legume crop of Pakistan. Ascochyta blight (Ascochyta rabiei) and Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum F. sp cicer) are most serious diseases, having the potential to devastate a crop. A multiple disease resistant and high yielding mutant CM 88 has been developed through 100 Gy gamma irradiation treatment of variety 'C 727'. This was once a widely grown and popular variety, which lost its resistance to Ascochyta and was replaced. The selection of mutants was performed in the M2 generation grown in the Ascochyta blight nursery and sixteen mutants were selected. In the subsequent generations CM 88 proved resistant to both Ascochyta blight and Fusarium wilt, and exhibited superiority in agronomic characteristics. CM 88 was also tested for many years in the various yield trials on research stations and farmers fields throughout the country. In these trials it out yielded both the parent and standard varieties. The mutant CM 88 has been approved by the Punjab Seed Council on 27 October 1994 for general cultivation in the Punjab Province, especially the Thal area which accounts for more than 70% of the area under chickpea cultivation. (author)

  16. Mercury

    Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury

  17. X-ray-induced mutants resistant to 8-azaguanine

    Carver, J.H.; Dewey, W.C.; Hopwood, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Asynchronous Chinese hamster ovary cells were irradiated and colony survival in Alpha MEM medium with dialyzed serum was determined with or without 15 μg/ml 8-Azaguanine (AG). Data indicated that a reproducible assay for the system was dependent upon controlling cell density at least two days prior to induction as well as throughout the expression period. Generally, spontaneous and radiation-induced mutant frequencies decreased when cell densities exceeded a critical density of 3-6 x 10 4 cells/cm 2 . Infrequently, the critical density was exceeded by a factor of two with no observed decrease, possibly correlated with a longer cell doubling time. Drug depletion artifacts can occur because of drug degradation, or because wild-type cells utilize the drug or produce conditions which reduce uptake of the drug. Thus, as the effective drug concentration is lowered, the observed mutant frequency increases because a spectrum of mutants resistant to only low concentrations can now survive. In fact, refeeding with AG at intervals during the incubation period lowered spontaneous and radiation-induced frequencies approx. 5-fold. Therefore, to standardize conditions, cells were trypsinized at the end of the expression time and replated at a constant cell number for mutant selection by AG. Over two generations of growth during the expression period were required for optimal manifestation of induced mutants, and when densities were kept below 4 x 10 4 cells/cm 2 at all times, observed mutant frequencies did not change significantly over a period between 80 and 140 h post-induction (over 4 generations for irradiated cells and over 6 generations for controls). Previous reports of observed mutant frequencies decreasing beyond three generations may be due to cell interaction prior to mutant selection

  18. Isolation, screening and identification of mercury resistant bacteria from mercury contaminated soil

    Kowalczyk Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New bacterial strains resistant to high concentration of mercury were obtained and character iz ed focusing on their potential application in bioremediation. The biological material was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The ability to removal of Hg from the liquid medium and the effect of the various pH and mercury concentrations in the environment on bacterial strains growth kinetics were tested. The selected strains were identified by analysis of the 16S ribosome subunit coding sequenc es as Pseudomonas syringae. The analysis of Hg concentration in liquid medium as effect of microbial metabolism demonstrated that P. syringae is able to remove almost entire metal from medium after 120 hours of incubation. Obtained results revealed new ability of the isolated strain P. syringae. Analyzed properties of this soil bacteria species able to reduce concentration of Hg ors immobi lize this metal are promising for industrial wastewater treatment and bioremediation of the soils polluted especially by mercury lamps scrapping, measuring instruments, dry batteries, detonators or burning fuels made from crude oil, which may also contain mercury. Selected bacteria strains provide efficient and relatively low-cost bioremediation of the areas and waters contaminated with Hg.

  19. High yielding and disease resistant mutants of sorghum in Venezuela

    Reinoso, A; Murty, B R; Taborda, F [Faculty of Agronomy, University of Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela)

    1987-07-01

    The programme was assisted by IAEA under project VEN/5/005 since 1978. It aims at improvement of plant type, earliness and resistance to Macrophomina in the locally adapted varieties Criollo Rojo Pequeno (CRP) and Criollo Blanco Alto (CBA). The mutagenic treatment consisted of seed irradiation at 20, 30 and 40 kR of gamma rays and chemical mutagenesis using sodium azide followed by 5000 kR gamma radiation. The 16 best mutants were evaluated in multilocation trials during M{sub 6}-M{sub 9} 1981-1984: Mutants from CRP namely 1279, 1543, 1265, 2085, 1251 and 1359 and four mutant from CBA, 109, 467, 469 and 81-1227 were found to be superior to their parents and the existing commercial hybrids. CRP 1279, 1543 and 2085 are already under large scale cultivation by farmers and under process for cultivar certification by the Ministry of Agriculture.

  20. High yielding and disease resistant mutants of sorghum in Venezuela

    Reinoso, A.; Murty, B.R.; Taborda, F.

    1987-01-01

    The programme was assisted by IAEA under project VEN/5/005 since 1978. It aims at improvement of plant type, earliness and resistance to Macrophomina in the locally adapted varieties Criollo Rojo Pequeno (CRP) and Criollo Blanco Alto (CBA). The mutagenic treatment consisted of seed irradiation at 20, 30 and 40 kR of gamma rays and chemical mutagenesis using sodium azide followed by 5000 kR gamma radiation. The 16 best mutants were evaluated in multilocation trials during M 6 -M 9 1981-1984: Mutants from CRP namely 1279, 1543, 1265, 2085, 1251 and 1359 and four mutant from CBA, 109, 467, 469 and 81-1227 were found to be superior to their parents and the existing commercial hybrids. CRP 1279, 1543 and 2085 are already under large scale cultivation by farmers and under process for cultivar certification by the Ministry of Agriculture

  1. Tolerance to various toxicants by marine bacteria highly resistant to mercury

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Mesquita, A.; Verlecar, X.N.

    of growth in media containing 5 ppm mercury. Plasmid-curing assays done in this study ascertained that resistance to mercury antibiotics, and toxic xenobiotics is mediated by chromosomally borne genes and/or transposable elements rather than by plasmids...

  2. Isolation and characterization of chromium, mercury and cadmium resistant bacteria

    Bhatti, K.P.; Noor, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Ten heavy metal resistant strains were isolated from samples of soil, water and rhizosphere of plant Cynadon Dectylon of Kasur sector. Among these bacteria, four strains Cr-l, Cr- 2, Cr-3 and Cr-4 were showed the resistant to chromium up to 300 mg/L, two strains Cd-1 and Cd-2 resisted cadmium up to 100 mg/L, two strains Cd-3 and Cd-4 resisted cadmium up to 50 mg/L and two strains (Hg-l, Hg-2) were observed resistant to mercury up to 100 mg/L. Their morphological and colonial characteristics were investigated. The families of isolated bacteria are reported i.e. Azotobacteriaceae(C r-l), Enterobacteriacea(eC r-2, Cr-3, Cr-4, Hg-2) and Neisseriaceae(Cd-I, Cd-2, Cd-3, Cd-4, Hg-2). (author)

  3. Isolation of Mercury-Resistant Fungi from Mercury-Contaminated Agricultural Soil

    Reginawanti Hindersah

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Illegal gold mining and the resulting gold mine tailing ponds on Buru Island in Maluku, Indonesia have increased Mercury (Hg levels in agricultural soil and caused massive environmental damage. High levels of Hg in soil lowers plant productivity and threatens the equilibrium of the food web. One possible method of handling Hg-contaminated soils is through bioremediation, which could eliminate Hg from the rhizosphere (root zone. In this study, indigenous fungi isolated from Hg-contaminated soil exhibited Hg-resistance in vitro. Soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere of pioneer plants which grew naturally in areas contaminated with gold mine tailing. The fungi’s capacity for Hg-resistance was confirmed by their better growth in chloramphenicol-boosted potato dextrose agar media which contained various HgCl2 concentrations. Four isolates exhibited resistance of up to 25 mg kg−1 of Hg, and in an experiment with young Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. test plants, two fungi species (including Aspergillus were demonstrated to increase the soil’s availability of Hg. The results suggest that Hg-resistant indigenous fungi can mobilize mercury in the soil and serve as potential bioremediation agents for contaminated agricultural land.

  4. Ultra-violet-resistant mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Jones, D R; Karunakaran, V [Polytechnic of Central London (UK). Faculty of Engineering and Science, School of Biological and Health Sciences; Burges, H D [Institute of Horticultural Research, Littlehampton (UK); Hacking, A J [Reading Univ. (UK). Dextra Labs.Ltd.

    1991-06-01

    One of the main disadvantages of using Bacillus thuringiensis as an insecticide is that the spore and crystal preparations applied to foliage are readily washed away by rain and are inactivated by sunlight. Spores from some strains of B. thuringiensis have been shown to be highly sensitive to u.v. light. This study has demonstrated how mutants with increased resistance to u.v., isolated by successive rounds of u.v. irradiation, and additionally with increased specific pathogenicity can be isolated. These techniques should be applied to strains that are frequently used in the industrial production of B.thuringiensis toxin. (author).

  5. Ultra-violet-resistant mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Jones, D.R.; Karunakaran, V.; Hacking, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main disadvantages of using Bacillus thuringiensis as an insecticide is that the spore and crystal preparations applied to foliage are readily washed away by rain and are inactivated by sunlight. Spores from some strains of B. thuringiensis have been shown to be highly sensitive to u.v. light. This study has demonstrated how mutants with increased resistance to u.v., isolated by successive rounds of u.v. irradiation, and additionally with increased specific pathogenicity can be isolated. These techniques should be applied to strains that are frequently used in the industrial production of B.thuringiensis toxin. (author)

  6. Molecular mechanisms of plasmid-determined mercury and cadmium resistances in bacteria

    Nucifora, G.

    1989-01-01

    The structural basis for induction of the broad spectrum mercurial resistance operon of pDU1358 with inorganic mercury and with phenylmercury acetate was addressed by DNA sequencing analysis (that showed that a major difference occurred in the 3' 29 base pairs of the ital merR gene compared to the merR genes of Tn501 and R100) and by lac-fusion transcription experiments regulated by merR in trans. The lac-fusion results were compared with those from a narrow spectrum operon, and the pDU1358 merR deleted at the 3' end. A hybrid mer operon containing the merR gene from pDU1358 and lacking the merB gene was inducible by both phenylmercury and inorganic Hg 2+ , showing that organomercurial lyase is not needed for induction by organomercurials. A mutant form of pDU1358 merR missing the C-terminal 17 amino acids responded to inorganic Hg 2+ but not to phenylmercury, indicating that the C-terminal region of the MerR protein of the pDU1358 mer operon is required for the recognition of phenylmercury acetate. The down regulation of the mer operon by the merD gene was also measured in trans with complementing mer operons of pDU1358 or R100 or merD - mutants. In the presence of the merD gene, beta-galactosidase activity was lowered by 2 to 4 fold. The merD gene gene product was visualized by autoradiography. The Cd 2+ resistance determinant cadA of S. aureus was investigated. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA fragment containing the cadA determinant revealed two open reading frames the larger one of which is essential for expression of cadmium resistance

  7. Overexpression of SOS genes in ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli mutants.

    Pourahmad Jaktaji, Razieh; Pasand, Shirin

    2016-01-15

    Fluoroquinolones are important antibiotics for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli. Mutational studies have shown that ciprofloxacin, a member of fluoroquinolones induces SOS response and mutagenesis in pathogenic bacteria which in turn develop antibiotic resistance. However, inhibition of SOS response can increase recombination activity which in turn leads to genetic variation. The aim of this study was to measure 5 SOS genes expressions in nine E. coli mutants with different MICs for ciprofloxacin following exposure to ciprofloxacin. Gene expression was assessed by quantitative real time PCR. Gene alteration assessment was conducted by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Results showed that the expression of recA was increased in 5 mutants. This overexpression is not related to gene alteration, and enhances the expression of polB and umuCD genes encoding nonmutagenic and mutagenic polymerases, respectively. The direct relationship between the level of SOS expression and the level of resistance to ciprofloxacin was also indicated. It was concluded that novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits RecA activity would enhance the efficiency of common antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of some garlic (Allium Sativum L.) mutants resistant to white rot disease by RAPD analysis

    Nabulsi, I.; Al-Safadi, B.; Mir ali, N.; Arabi, M.I.E.

    2002-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was used to evaluate genetic diversity among eight garlic mutants resistant to white rot disease (Sclerotium cepivorum) and two controls. Twelve of 13 synthetic random primers were found to identify polymorphism in amplification products. Mutants characterised with moderate resistance to white rot were closely related to the control using cluster and correlation analyses. On the other hand, highly resistant mutants were quite distant from the control with low correlation coefficients. The banding patterns produced by primer OPB-15 (GGAAGGGTGTT) with highly resistant mutants may be used as genetic markers for early selection of resistant plants. (author)

  9. Mercury

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  10. Characterization of marine bacteria highly resistant to mercury exhibiting multiple resistances to toxic chemicals

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.

    , GP15 and GP16) and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CH07) which showed comparatively higher resistance to toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics and were used in more detailed experiments. Antibiotic sensitivity of all three isolates after plasmid curing... using Nucleospin Plasmid isolation kit (Macherey Nagel, Germany) and agarose gel electrophoresis. To further confirm the presence/absence of plasmid, two different plasmid curing assays were performed to note the loss, if any, of mercury resistance...

  11. Transcriptional switching by the MerR protein: Activation and repression mutants implicate distinct DNA and mercury(II) binding domains

    Shewchuk, L.M.; Helmann, J.D.; Ross, W.; Park, S.J.; Summers, A.O.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to mercuric compounds is controlled by the MerR metalloregulatory protein. The MerR protein functions as both a transcriptional repressor and a mercuric ion dependent transcriptional activator. Chemical mutagenesis of the cloned merR structural gene has led to the identification of mutant proteins that are specifically deficient in transcriptional repression, activation, or both. Five mutant proteins have been overproduced, purified to homogeneity, and assayed for ability to dimerize, bind mer operator DNA, and bind mercuric ion. A mutation in the recognition helix of a proposed helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif (E22K) yields protein deficient in both activation and repression in vivo (a - r - ) and deficient in operator binding in vitro. In contrast, mutations in three of the four MerR cysteine residues are repression competent but activation deficient (a - r + ) in vivo. In vitro, the purified cysteine mutant proteins bind to the mer operator site with near wild-type affinity but are variable deficient in binding the in vivo inducer mercury(II) ion. A subset of the isolated proteins also appears compromised in their ability to form dimers at low protein concentrations. These data support a model in which DNA-bound MerR dimer binds one mercuric ion and transmits this occupancy information to a protein region involved in transcriptional activation

  12. Mercury and antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: an experimental study on pigs

    Laub-Kupersztejn, R; Thomas, J; Pohl, P

    1974-01-01

    Tests on faeces from 5 different groups of pigs, showed that 47.2% of the coliforms present were resistant to mercury ions. None of the 3127 bacteria examined were resistant to cadmium ions. The resistance of these strains to mercury was mainly associated with resistance to one or more antibiotics (98%). Feeding the animals with ampicillin (20 ppm) led to modification of the Escherichia coli in the alimentary tract, with ampicillin and mercury resistant strains emerging in great number. These resistance characters could be wholly, or partially, transferred to a sensitive strain of E. coli, thus suggesting that they were mediated by R-factors. The existence of a plasmid resistant only to mercury ions was demonstrated. 9 references, 4 tables.

  13. Characteristics and use of wheat mutants tolerant or resistant to Septoria nodorum Berk

    Fossati, A.; Kleijer, G.; Fried, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Mutation induction was used to obtain mutants tolerant or resistant to Septoria nodorum. This technique is valuable but many genotypes had to be treated because mutants could not be selected from all the genotypes. Short tolerant mutants could be obtained from 3 of the 15 treated tall tolerant lines. Induction of tolerance in susceptible lines of good agronomic value succeeded for 2 of 5 treated varieties. All these mutants showed a reduction in yield potential. One mutant showed partial resistance to S. nodorum. The disease development on the leaves and the spikes of this mutant was much slower than on the original variety. The characteristics of this mutant are discussed in detail. The genetics of tolerance proved to be polygenic and additive, which has consequences on the breeding method. A good way of obtaining a stable system would be the combination of high tolerance and partial resistance in the same cultivar. (author)

  14. Mercury resistant bacteria from effluents of paint factory : characterisation and mercury uptake ability

    Yasmin, A.; Afrasayab, S.; Hasnain, S.

    1998-01-01

    Twelve Hg-resistant strains [SHg-13,SHg-14, SHg-15, SHg-16, SHg-17, SHg-18, SHg-19, SHg-20, SHg-21, SHg-22, SHg-23, SHg-24] were isolated from the polluted water sample taken from the outlets of ICI paint factory. They could tolerate 350-500 mu g ml/sup -1/ of HgCl/sub 2/ in the solid medium and 25-125 mu g mg/sup -1/ of HgCl/sub 2/ in the liquid medium. All strains had off-white, convex [except SHg-20 which had orange flat colonies] and circular colonies. SHg-13, SHg-15 and SHg-17 were Gram variable rods, while rest of strains had Gram -ve rods. They were strictly aerobic bacteria except SHg-16, SHg-18, SHg-22 and SHg-24 which were facilitative anaerobes. On the basis of morphological and biochemical characters strains SHg-13, Shg-14, SHg-15, SHg-17, SHg-19, SHg-20, SHg-21, SHg-23 were affiliated with family Pseudomonadaceae, whereas strains SHg-16, SHg-18, SHg-22 and SHg-24 could be grouped with family Vibranoaceae. All strains could grow in pH range from 6-9 with different optimum, SHg-14 and SHg-16 yielded maximum growth at 28 deg. C while SHg-17, SHg-18, SHg-20, SHg-22 and SHg-23 showed optimum growth at 32 deg. C, whereas rest of the strains yielded maximum growth at 37 deg. C. They conferred resistance to ampicillin and chloramphenicol, but were sensitive to streptomycin [except SHg-20, SHg-23], kanamycin [except SHg-24] and tetracycline [excluding SHg-13, SHg-18]. These isolates could tolerate a number of other metallic salts. Excluding Shg-19 all strains harbor single plasmid. These strains had the ability to uptake/transform mercury. Maximum mercury uptake was observed by SHg-14 and SHg-15. (author)

  15. Mercury

    de Vries, Irma

    2017-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in several physical and chemical forms. Inorganic mercury refers to compounds formed after the combining of mercury with elements such as chlorine, sulfur, or oxygen. After combining with carbon by covalent linkage, the compounds formed are called

  16. PSYCHROPHILIC PSEUDOMONAS SP. RESISTANT TO MERCURY FROM PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    As mercury circulates and deposits globally, the remediation of extensive mercury contamination surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan is critical. High-levels of mercury contamination exist within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and e...

  17. Molecular characterization of mercury resistant bacteria inhabiting polluted water bodies of different geographical locations in India

    Jan, A.T.; Azam, M.; Ali, A.; Haq, Q.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury pollution is a major environmental problem that arises as a result of natural processes as well as from anthropogenic sources. In response to toxic mercury compounds, microbes have developed astonishing array of resistance systems to detoxify them. To address this challenge, this study was

  18. Isolation and characterization of acyclovir-resistant mutants of herpes simplex virus.

    Field, H J; Darby, G; Wildy, P

    1980-07-01

    Mutants of HSV which are resistant to acyclovir (acycloguanosine) have been isolated following serial passages of several herpes simplex virus (HSV) strains in the presence of the drug. The majority of the mutants isolated are defective in induction of thymidine kinase (TK) and this is consistent with the observation that independently isolated TK- viruses are naturally resistant to ACV. One mutant is described (SC16 R9C2) which is resistant in biochemically transformed cells which express HSV TK. This suggests that its resistance resides at a level other than TK. It is also resistant to phosphonoacetic acid, suggesting that the DNA polymerase locus may be involved. A further mutant is described [Cl (101) P2C5] which induces normal levels of TK, although the nature of resistance of this virus is not yet elucidated.

  19. Detoxification of toxic heavy metals by marine bacteria highly resistant to mercury

    De; Ramaiah, N.; Vardanyan, L.

    Pollution in industrial areas is a serious environmental concern, and interest in bacterial resistance to heavy metals is of practical significance. Mercury (Hg), Cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) are known to cause damage to living organisms, including...

  20. Durable resistance to net blotch and agronomic performance in some barley mutants [Hordeum vulgare L.; Syria

    Arabi, M.I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Seeds from the net blotch (Pyrenophora teres) susceptible cultivar Thibaut were treated by gamma ray radiation and subsequently evaluated for reaction to the pathogen in the M2-M5 generations. Grain yield and agronomic characteristics of putative mutants were compared with Thibaut in two different locations. Genetic variation among some mutant lines/cv Thibaut was estimated using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Sixteen mutant lines and their mother cultivar Thibaut were analyzed with 14 EcoR1-Mse1 primer combinations. A total number of 504 AFLP bands were analyzed for each pair mutant/Thibaut. Narrow genetic variation among all genotypes was detected with an average of genetic similarity of 0.96. Cluster analysis with the entire AFLP data divided all genotypes into two major groups. The resistant mutant lines were grouped in one subcluster with 0.98 similarity index. Some resistant mutant lines to net blotch with good agronomic performances were produced [it

  1. OCCURRENCE OF MICROORGANISMS RESISTANT TO MERCURY IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SEDIMENTS IN PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    There is extensive mercury contamination of soil surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan that operated from 1970 to 1990. High-level mercury contamination exists within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and evaporation ponds, and in Balky...

  2. OCCURRENCE OF MERCURY-RESISTANT MICROORGANISMS IN MERCURY-CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SEDIMENTS IN PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    There is extensive mercury contamination of soil surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan that operated from 1970 to 1990. High-level mercury contamination exists within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and evaporation ponds, and in Balky...

  3. Studies on induced partially resistant mutants of barley against powdery mildew

    Roebbelen, G.; Abdel-Hafez, A.G.; Reinhold, M.; Kwon, H.J.; Neuhaus-Steinmetz, J.P.; Heun, M.

    1983-01-01

    After mutagenic seed treatment of three partially resistant cultivars of spring barley with EMS and NaN 3 , 45 mutants in a first and 16 in a second experiment were selected in the M 2 -M 4 generations. The screening was done alternatively under natural infection in the field or controlled infection with a single pathotype in the greenhouse. These mutants exhibited a higher resistance and a higher susceptibility, respectively, than the initial cultivars Asse, Bomi and Vada. Some mutants expressed their altered resistance behaviour particularly during certain stages of development. High-level resistance was conditioned by mutation in the ml-o locus in three cases. For several Bomi mutants pathotype specificity with and without reversed ranking was proven as well as pathotype non-specificity in comparison with the reaction of the original cultivar. In 14 cases studied the inheritance of the involved mutants was monogenic recessive. The laevigatum locus responsible for the intermediate mildew resistance of Bomi was not affected by the mutations. Detection of groups of allelic mutants showed that there are at least two regions in the barley genome in which mutations for mildew resistance can occur rather frequently. In total, the past ten years of this mutation research have given convincing evidence that the strategies of mutant screening applied have yielded promising new material both for breeding and for progress in basic understanding of host-pathogen interactions. (author)

  4. Benomyl-resistant mutant strain of Trichoderma sp. with increased mycoparasitic activity.

    Olejníková, P; Ondrusová, Z; Krystofová, S; Hudecová, D

    2010-01-01

    Application of UV radiation to the strain Trichoderma sp. T-bt (isolated from lignite) resulted in the T-brm mutant which was resistant to the systemic fungicide benomyl. The tub2 gene sequence in the T-brm mutant differed from the parent as well as the collection strain (replacing tyrosine with histidine in the TUB2 protein). Under in vitro conditions this mutant exhibited a higher mycoparasitic activity toward phytopathogenic fungi.

  5. Mutant lines of currant tomato, valuable germplasm with multiple disease resistance

    Govorova, G.F.; Khrustaleva, V.V.; Shcherbakov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were carried out for two years on eight mutant lines of currant tomato at the Krymsk Experimental Breeding Station of the N.I. Vavilov All-Union Scientific Research Institute of Plant-Growing (VIR). The station is situated in an area of commercial field tomato growing (Krasnodar region). The mutant lines of currant tomato (VIR specimen No. k-4053) were obtained through chronic gamma-irradiation. A disease resistance evaluation of the mutants was carried out for Verticillium wilt (Verticillium albo-atrum Rein. and Berth.), for black bacterial spotting (Xanthomonas vesicatoria Dows.), for tobacco mosaic virus Nicotiana 1 Smith), for streak virus (Nicotiana 1), for the combination TMV with X and Y potato viruses, for cucumber virus (Cucumis 1), and also for top rot. Fifty plants of each mutant line were evaluated and checks were made three times in each season. A comparison of the currant tomato mutants with the standard tomato varieties demonstrates the better resistance shown by the mutant germplasm to the main pathogens. The degree to which some currant tomato mutants were affected by Verticillium was lower than that of the most VerticiIlium-resistant samples of tomato evaluated between 1975 and 1981. The mutants of currant tomato should therefore be of interest as germplasm in breeding tomatoes for improved multiple disease resistance

  6. Studies on in vitro induction mutation for wheat mutant of resistance to root rot and its resistance mechanism

    Sun Guangzu

    1992-06-01

    The screening wheat mutant which has the resistance to root rot was completed in 37 varieties by in vitro induction mutation method. The effect of irradiation on in vitro culture of different wheat explants and the effectiveness of screening rude toxin were studied. Two wheat mutants, RB500 and RB501, which have the resistance to root rot, were obtained. Changes of the ultrastructure and defensive enzymes (SOD, ROD and PAL) were investigated by using mutants and parent under the action of rude toxin. The results showed that the rude toxin could induce changes of enzyme activity, isoenzyme pattern and ultrastructure of the mitochondria and chloroplast. These change correspond to their ability of resistance to disease. The mutant under the action of toxin has the ability to increase the defensive enzyme activity and to reduce the damage of cell membrane system that would result in resistance increasing

  7. THE BEHAVIOR OF MICROORGANISMS RESISTANT TO MERCURY FROM PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    There is extensive mercury contamination surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan that operated from 1970 to 1990. High-level mercury contamination exists within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and evaporation ponds, in Balkyldak Lake w...

  8. Evaluation of rice mutant lines for resistance to brown planthopper, nilaparvata lugens stall

    Mugiono

    1985-01-01

    The most important and common insect in rice cultivation in South East Asia is brown planthopper, nilaparvata lugens stall. Seven rice mutant lines produced by the National Atomic Energy Agency, Indonesia, were tested at IRRI, the Philippines for resistance to brown planthopper. Those mutant lines were Atomita 1, 627/10-3/PsJ, Atomita 2 and 627/4-E/PsJ originated from Pelita 1/1 which was irradiated with 0.2 kGy of gamma rays and A227/2/PsJ, A227/3/PsJ and A227/5/PsJ, originated from early maturing mutant A23/PsJ/72K from irradiated Pelita 1/1 which was irradiated with 0.1 kGy of gamma rays. Evaluation of resistance was carried out by seedling bulk screening, honeydew excretion, survival and population build up tests by using brown planthopper biotype 1, 2 and 3. Results of these tests showed that the seven tested mutant lines were resistant to biotype 1 but susceptible to biotype 2. Reaction to biotype 3 showed that six mutant lines tested were moderately resistant and only one mutant of 627/4-E/PsJ was susceptible. Reactions of the mutant lines to biotype 1, 2 and 3 were different from the resistant varieties, Mudgo or ASD-7. This indicated that mutant lines might have gene(s) for resistance which differed from those of resistant varieties. The results showed that resistance to brown planthopper is possible to be introduced in Indonesian rice varieties by means of mutations. (author)

  9. Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2-Mutant Breast Cancers

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0600 TITLE: Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2-Mutant Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2- Mutant Breast Cancers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0600 5b...therapeutic modality for targeting homologous recombination (HR) deficient tumors such as BRCA1 and BRCA2-mutated triple negative breast cancers

  10. Fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant HIV mutants

    Zhu, Qinchang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; El-Mahdy, Ahmed F. M.; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Convenient drug-resistance testing of viral mutants is indispensable to effective treatment of viral infection. We developed a novel fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant mutants of human immunodeficiency virus-I protease (HIV-PR) which uses enzymatic and peptide-specific fluorescence (FL) reactions and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of three HIV-PR substrates. This assay protocol enables use of non-purified enzyme sources and multiple substrates f...

  11. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency (less than 8 x 10(-6)). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTr) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTr mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages

  12. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency ( -6 ). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTsup(r)) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTsup(r) mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages. (author)

  13. Development and characterization of mutant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accessions resistant to the herbicide quizalofop.

    Ostlie, Michael; Haley, Scott D; Anderson, Victoria; Shaner, Dale; Manmathan, Harish; Beil, Craig; Westra, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    New herbicide resistance traits in wheat were produced through the use of induced mutagenesis. While herbicide-resistant crops have become common in many agricultural systems, wheat has seen few introductions of herbicide resistance traits. A population of Hatcher winter wheat treated with ethyl methanesulfonate was screened with quizalofop to identify herbicide-resistant plants. Initial testing identified plants that survived multiple quizalofop applications. A series of experiments were designed to characterize this trait. In greenhouse studies the mutants exhibited high levels of quizalofop resistance compared to non-mutant wheat. Sequencing ACC1 revealed a novel missense mutation causing an alanine to valine change at position 2004 (Alopecurus myosuroides reference sequence). Plants carrying single mutations in wheat's three genomes (A, B, D) were identified. Acetyl co-enzyme A carboxylase in resistant plants was 4- to 10-fold more tolerant to quizalofop. Populations of segregating backcross progenies were developed by crossing each of the three individual mutants with wild-type wheat. Experiments conducted with these populations confirmed largely normal segregation, with each mutant allele conferring an additive level of resistance. Further tests showed that the A genome mutation conferred the greatest resistance and the B genome mutation conferred the least resistance to quizalofop. The non-transgenic herbicide resistance trait identified will enhance weed control strategies in wheat.

  14. Mercury

    ... that mercuric chloride and methylmercury are possible human carcinogens. top How does mercury affect children? Very young ... billion parts of drinking water (2 ppb). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has set a maximum ...

  15. Screening of allyl alcohol resistant mutant of Rhizopus oryzae and ...

    Ethanol is a main by-product in the fermentation broth of Rhizopus oryzae during the production of high-optical purity L-lactic acid. By screening the lower activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) mutant, thus decreasing the flux of pyruvic acid to ethanol may be a virtual method for increasing the conversion rate of glucose ...

  16. Development and evaluation of drought resistant mutant germ ...

    Seed from M2 to M5 generations (M = mutant) were used in the study. The M2 to M4 ... facing food insecurity, such as Africa, peasants or small-scale farmers have .... sandy soil removed by washing and the root system examined. A nail board ...

  17. Evaluation of induced mutants of wheat for resistance to fungal diseases

    Barriga B, P.; Fuentes P, R.; Andrade S, N.; Seeman F, P.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluation of induced mutants of wheat for resistance to fungal diseases. Seeds of spring wheat cultivars Austral and Huenufen were exposed to gamma radiation in doses of 0.10 and 0.25 KGy with the objective of producing genotypes resistant to the main fungal diseases, with a high protein content and grain yield, for the southern region of Chile (39 sup(o)-44 sup(o) Latitude south). The selection process and evaluation up to the generation M sub(8) has made possible to identify mutants with a higher protein content and grain yield. Progress made in improving resistance to Puccinia striiformis and tolerance to Septoria spp., has also been important. Some selected mutants, conditioned to their future performance, could be directly used as commercial varieties and other mutants, on crosses with regionally adapted cultivars. (author)

  18. Mutants of Venturia ineaqualis (Cook) Wint. apple scar resistant to fungicides

    Bedianashvili, Ts.V.; D'yakov, Yu.T.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of apple scab resistant to zineb and bayleton fungicides have been obtained upon action of UV irradiation and nitrosome-thylurea. Using tetrade analysis, two zineb resistence genes have been found. The mutations are pleiotropic and lead to increase in resistance to other fungicides, decrease in growth rate on artificial media, increase in spore size, sporulation, and aggressiveness, decrease in competitiveness at in vitro growth. The resistance is supposed to be determined by decrease in membrane permeability for fungicides

  19. Genetic analysis of the induced mutants of rice resistant to bacterial leaf blight

    Nakai, H.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of the rice cultivar 'Harebare', which is susceptible to bacterial leaf blight (BLB), were treated with thermal neutrons, gamma-rays, ethyleneimine and ethylmethane-sulfonate. In the M2, plants with better resistance to BLB were identified through inoculation at the seedling and the flag leaf stages with an isolate (T7174) of the Japanese differential race I. Several mutant lines resistant to BLB were selected through tests of the M 3 or M 4 lines derived from selected resistant M 2 plants. The frequency of resistant mutants was significantly higher after the thermal neutron treatment than after treatments with other mutagens. Two mutants, which originated from the neutron treatment, showing a highly quantitative resistance to multiple BLB races were analysed for gene(s) for resistance. The resistance of one of them (M41) to the Japanese races I, II, III, IV, and V was found to be conditioned by a single recessive gene. Three other recessive genes for resistance are known, but their reaction to differential races is different. Therefore, this gene was thought to be new and was tentatively designated as xa-nm(t). The resistance of another mutant (M57) was found to be polygenically inherited. (author)

  20. The Cut-off Value of Blood Mercury Concentration in Relation to Insulin Resistance

    Seok-Hoon Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Increased blood mercury concentration is associated with inflammation, and chronic inflammation can cause insulin resistance. We examined the cut-off value of blood mercury in relation to an increased score on the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Methods : We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008–2010. Relevant data from 5,184 subjects (2,523 men and 2,661 women were analyzed cross-sectionally. General linear analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between HOMA-IR score and blood mercury concentration. In addition, we determined the cut-off value of blood mercury concentration in relation to increased HOMA-IR score (> 2.34 using an ROC curve. Results : The mean value of blood mercury concentration in men and women was 5.88 μg/L and 4.11 μg/L, respectively. In men, comparing to the first quartile, HOMA-IR score increased significantly in the third and fourth blood mercury quartiles. In women, however, the increase in HOMA-IR score was not significant. The cut-off value that best represented the association between increased HOMA-IR score and blood mercury concentration in men was found to be 4.71 μg/L. Conclusion : Blood mercury concentration was associated with increased HOMA-IR score in men, and the cut-off value of blood mercury concentration that was correlated with increased HOMA-IR score was around 4.71 μg/L.

  1. Oxidant resistance in a yeast mutant deficient in the Sit4 phosphatase

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to thiol oxidation can arise from mutations altering redox homeostasis. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae sit4-110 mutant is here described, which was isolated as resistant to the thiol-specific oxidant dipyridyl disulfide (DPS) and which contains a single-residue substitution in the SIT4 gene...

  2. In vitro capability of faropenem to select for resistant mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2008-02-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones.

  3. Mercury

    Mahoney, T J

    2014-01-01

    This gazetteer and atlas on Mercury lists, defines and illustrates every named (as opposed to merely catalogued) object and term as related to Mercury within a single reference work. It contains a glossary of terminology used, an index of all the headwords in the gazetteer, an atlas comprising maps and images with coordinate grids and labels identifying features listed in the gazetteer, and appendix material on the IAU nomenclature system and the transcription systems used for non-roman alphabets. This book is useful for the general reader, writers and editors dealing with astronomical themes, and those astronomers concerned with any aspect of astronomical nomenclature.

  4. Mercury

    Balogh, André; Steiger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun, is different in several respects from the other three terrestrial planets. In appearance, it resembles the heavily cratered surface of the Moon, but its density is high, it has a magnetic field and magnetosphere, but no atmosphere or ionosphere. This book reviews the progress made in Mercury studies since the flybys by Mariner 10 in 1974-75, based on the continued research using the Mariner 10 archive, on observations from Earth, and on increasingly realistic models of its interior evolution.

  5. Differential disease resistance response in the barley necrotic mutant nec1

    Kunga Laura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ion fluxes are considered to be an integral part of signal transduction during responses to pathogens, only a few ion channels are known to participate in the plant response to infection. CNGC4 is a disease resistance-related cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel. Arabidopsis thaliana CNGC4 mutants hlm1 and dnd2 display an impaired hypersensitive response (HR, retarded growth, a constitutively active salicylic acid (SA-mediated pathogenesis-related response and elevated resistance against bacterial pathogens. Barley CNGC4 shares 67% aa identity with AtCNGC4. The barley mutant nec1 comprising of a frame-shift mutation of CNGC4 displays a necrotic phenotype and constitutively over-expresses PR-1, yet it is not known what effect the nec1 mutation has on barley resistance against different types of pathogens. Results nec1 mutant accumulated high amount of SA and hydrogen peroxide compared to parental cv. Parkland. Experiments investigating nec1 disease resistance demonstrated positive effect of nec1 mutation on non-host resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst at high inoculum density, whereas at normal Pst inoculum concentration nec1 resistance did not differ from wt. In contrast to augmented P. syringae resistance, penetration resistance against biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh, the causal agent of powdery mildew, was not altered in nec1. The nec1 mutant significantly over-expressed race non-specific Bgh resistance-related genes BI-1 and MLO. Induction of BI-1 and MLO suggested putative involvement of nec1 in race non-specific Bgh resistance, therefore the effect of nec1on mlo-5-mediated Bgh resistance was assessed. The nec1/mlo-5 double mutant was as resistant to Bgh as Nec1/mlo-5 plants, suggesting that nec1 did not impair mlo-5 race non-specific Bgh resistance. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that nec1 mutation alters activation of systemic acquired resistance

  6. Analysis of Powdery Mildew Resistance in Wild Melon MLO Mutants

    Cheng Hong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wild species have a potential value in crop breeding. Explore MLO gene which related with powdery mildew natural resistance is very important for improving the quality of melon. Resistance to powdery mildew was examined in cultivar and wild species by leaf inoculation. The wild germplasms showed resistance to powdery mildew Race1. Cloning and sequence analysis of the CmMLO2 gene identified an 85 bp difference between the wild and cultivated species. The CmMLO2 gene was expressed in the wild germplasm after fluorescence-labeled Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A positive transgenic plant showed successful invasion by powdery mildew Race1. These results suggested that the wild species might have failed to encode the MLO protein, thereby resulting in the MLO-negative regulation of powdery mildew, which in turn resulted in the broad-spectrum resistance of the wild species to powdery mildew.

  7. Sustracted library obtained from mutant sugarcane variety B 4362 resistant to rust

    María I. Oloriz; Luis Rojas; Víctor Gil; Elio Jiménez

    2002-01-01

    The hypersensitive response is one of the most powerful mechanisms for which the plants resist pathogen attack. Mutations carried out previously on the variety B4362, of sugarcane, originated five mutants that express this mechanism towards the attack of rust (Puccinia melanocephala Syd.). By means of a subtractive hybridization among the cDNA obtained starting from the resistant clone inoculated with rust and a pool of cDNA of the susceptible variety (B4362) inoculated and of the resistant c...

  8. Identification and molecular analysis of mercury resistant bacteria in ...

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most important toxic pollutants widespread in the environment. It is being extensively used in industrial applications (chlor-alkali electrolysis, fungicides, disinfectants, dental products, etc), resulting in local hot spots of pollution and serious effects on biota and humans. The aim of this study was to ...

  9. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  10. Counteracting quasispecies adaptability: extinction of a ribavirin-resistant virus mutant by an alternative mutagenic treatment.

    Celia Perales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction promoted by mutagen-induced elevation of mutation rates of viruses, may meet with the problem of selection of mutagen-resistant variants, as extensively documented for standard, non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors. Previously, we characterized a mutant of foot-and-mouth disease virus that included in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase replacement M296I that decreased the sensitivity of the virus to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Replacement M296I in the viral polymerase impedes the extinction of the mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus by elevated concentrations of ribavirin. In contrast, wild type virus was extinguished by the same ribavirin treatment and, interestingly, no mutants resistant to ribavirin were selected from the wild type populations. Decreases of infectivity and viral load of the ribavirin-resistant M296I mutant were attained with a combination of the mutagen 5-fluorouracil and the non-mutagenic inhibitor guanidine hydrocloride. However, extinction was achieved with a sequential treatment, first with ribavirin, and then with a minimal dose of 5-fluorouracil in combination with guanidine hydrochloride. Both, wild type and ribavirin-resistant mutant M296I exhibited equal sensitivity to this combination, indicating that replacement M296I in the polymerase did not confer a significant cross-resistance to 5-fluorouracil. We discuss these results in relation to antiviral designs based on lethal mutagenesis. CONCLUSIONS: (i When dominant in the population, a mutation that confers partial resistance to a mutagenic agent can jeopardize virus extinction by elevated doses of the same mutagen. (ii A wild type virus, subjected to identical high mutagenic treatment, need not select a mutagen-resistant variant, and the population can be extinguished. (iii Extinction of the mutagen-resistant variant can be achieved by a sequential treatment of a

  11. Deoxynybomycins inhibit mutant DNA gyrase and rescue mice infected with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria.

    Parkinson, Elizabeth I; Bair, Joseph S; Nakamura, Bradley A; Lee, Hyang Y; Kuttab, Hani I; Southgate, Emma H; Lezmi, Stéphane; Lau, Gee W; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2015-04-24

    Fluoroquinolones are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics, but fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR) is widespread and increasing. Deoxynybomycin (DNM) is a natural-product antibiotic with an unusual mechanism of action, inhibiting the mutant DNA gyrase that confers FQR. Unfortunately, isolation of DNM is difficult and DNM is insoluble in aqueous solutions, making it a poor candidate for development. Here we describe a facile chemical route to produce DNM and its derivatives. These compounds possess excellent activity against FQR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci clinical isolates and inhibit mutant DNA gyrase in-vitro. Bacteria that develop resistance to DNM are re-sensitized to fluoroquinolones, suggesting that resistance that emerges to DNM would be treatable. Using a DNM derivative, the first in-vivo efficacy of the nybomycin class is demonstrated in a mouse infection model. Overall, the data presented suggest the promise of DNM derivatives for the treatment of FQR infections.

  12. Methylammonium-resistant mutants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia are affected in nitrate transport.

    Godon, C; Krapp, A; Leydecker, M T; Daniel-Vedele, F; Caboche, M

    1996-02-25

    This work reports the isolation and preliminary characterization of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutants resistant to methylammonium. Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants cannot grow on low levels of nitrate in the presence of methylammonium. Methylammonium is not used as a nitrogen source, although it can be efficiently taken up by Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells and converted into methylglutamine, an analog of glutamine. Glutamine is known to repress the expression of the enzymes that mediate the first two steps in the nitrate assimilatory pathway, nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR). Methylammonium has therefore been used, in combination with low concentrations of nitrate, as a selective agent in order to screen for mutants in which the nitrate pathway is de-repressed. Eleven semi-dominant mutants, all belonging to the same complementation group, were identified. The mutant showing the highest resistance to methylammonium was not affected either in the utilization of ammonium, accumulation of methylammonium or in glutamine synthase activity. A series of experiments showed that utilization of nitrite by the wild-type and the mutant was comparable, in the presence or the absence of methylammonium, thus suggesting that the mutation specifically affected nitrate transport or reduction. Although NR mRNA levels were less repressed by methylammonium treatment of the wild-type than the mutant, NR activities of the mutant remained comparable with or without methylammonium, leading to the hypothesis that modified expression of NR is probably not responsible for resistance to methylammonium. Methylammonium inhibited nitrate uptake in the wild-type but had only a limited effect in the mutant. The implications of these results are discussed.

  13. Induction of mutant resistant to alternaria blotch of apple by gamma-ray irradiation

    Yoshioka, Toji; Ito, Yuji; Masuda, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    Apple cultivars resistant to Alternaria blotch disease have been produced by cross-breeding, but it is difficult to produce resistance by crossing without changing the properties of cultivar because the gene composition of the cultivar tree is almost heterozygous. This study aimed to investigate the resistant mutation in Alternaria blotch susceptible and semiresistant cultivars. The resistance to Alternaria blotch pathogen or AM toxin is classified into the following three groups: 1) highly sensitive group including Indo, Redgold and Starking delicious, 2) semi-resistant group including Fuji, Orin and Golden delicious and 3) resistant group including Gala and Tsugaru. After gamma ray exposure of 80 Gy (at 5 Gy/hour), AM-toxin insensitive clones were selected in the VM 6 generation. These selected mutants could be rooted and habituated under field conditions. The degree of disease resistance was assessed by AM toxin treatment and Alternaria blotch fungi spore inoculation test. The leaves of these mutants were changed to variegated at high temperature, suggesting that some mutation related to chloroplast might have occurred. Alternaria blotch resistant strains could be produced by exposing to γray and selecting with AM toxin in shoot-tip culture system, but the functional effects of the AM toxin in Alternaria blotch and also the mechanism in the mutant lines were still unclear. (M.N.)

  14. Studies of antibiotic resistant mutants of Bacteroides fragilis obtained by Cs-137 ionizing radiation

    Azghani, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    The genus Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobic bacillus normally found in the upper respiratory tract, the colon, and the genitourinary system. The project reported here was undertaken because of the high frequency of hospital infections attributed to B. fragilis, and the increased resistance of the bacteria to commonly used antibiotics. Cs-137 gamma irradiation was used to induce antibiotic resistant mutants in B. fragilis in the presence of Escherichia coli B/r membrane fragments, employed as reducing agent. Based on a dose-survival curve, an effective radiation dose of 1.54 x 10 4 R (3.99 C/Kg) was used to induce mutations to rifampicin and tetracycline resistance in the test organism. The antibiotic resistant mutants of B. fragilis were utilized to reveal the mechanism by which this group of organisms becomes resistant to select chemotherapeutic agents. Studies on tetracycline resistant mutants of B. fragilis isolated after irradiation, suggest that the resistance to this antibiotic is associated with the outer membrane permeability. The difference in inhibitory action of rifampicin on RNA polymerase activity, from rifampicin sensitive and resistant strains of B. fragilis, reveals that this enzyme is a possible suitable target for inhibition of bacterial growth in anaerobes by rifampicin

  15. Study on the mechanism of wheat mutants resistance to bi-polaris sorokiniana

    Sun Guangzu; Wang Guangjin; Tang Fenglan; Liu Lijun; Li Zhongjie

    1992-01-01

    The activities and band number of peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and phenylalanine aminolyase (PAL) in plant tissue have been studied after treatment with phytotoxin produced from Bi polaris sorokiniana. The results showed that the activity and band number of these enzymes have been changed markedly. The change in degree of activity for mutants was more than that of the parent, and coincident with the ability of resistance to disease. The authors considered that the toxin tolerance ability and inducibility of SOD and POD by toxin might be one of resistance mechanism of wheat mutant against Bipolaris sorokiniana

  16. Hypermutability of a UV-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    An ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive thymidine auxotroph of Chinese hamster V79 cells that exhibits pleiotropic effects such as a high level of deoxycytidine triphosphate, slow growth, sensitivity to cytidine, and high frequencies of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine-dependent chromosomal aberrations was selected by its resistance to aphidicolin. The UV-induced mutability of this mutant and one of its revertants, which retains some of the phenotypes listed above, was studied in 3 mutation assay systems. The results showed that the mutant was hypermutable for ouabain and diphtheria-toxin-resistant mutations compared to wild-type V79 cells at the same UV dose or the same survival level. The mutant exhibits a delayed expression of maximal frequency of induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants. When maximal frequencies are compared at the same UV dose, the mutant also has higher mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The revertant was similar to the wild-type in UV sensitivity and mutability. (orig./AJ)

  17. SEVERAL MECHANISMS OF MERCURY RESISTANCE FOUND IN SOIL ISOLATES FROM PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN

    Abdrashitova, Svetlava A., M.A. Ilyushchenko, A. Yu Kalmykv, S.A. Aitkeldieva, Wendy J. Davis-Hoover and Richard Devereux. In press. Several Mechanisms of Mercury Resistance Found in Soil Isolates from Pavlodar, Kazakhstan (Abstract). To be presented at the Battelle Conference on...

  18. Genetics of leaf rust-resistant mutant WH 147-LM-1 in hexaploid wheat variety WH 147

    Reddy, V.R.K.; Viswanathan, P.

    1999-01-01

    By applying gamma rays, EMS and their combination in hexaploid wheat variety WH 147, a total of 20 mutants (0.0226%) exhibiting complete leaf rust resistance were isolated from segregating M2 rows.When one of the rust-resistant mutants, WH 147-LM-1 was crossed with the universally susceptible, suggesting that the mutant character is controlled by one dominant gene and one recessive gene.The F2 plants derived by crossing the mutant WH 147-LM with seven near-isogenic wheat lines showed segregation for susceptibility, indicating that the mutant character was indeed generated through induced mutations

  19. Selection of pathogen-resistant mutants in rapeseed

    Spanier, A.; Roebbelen, G.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Significant yield reductions are due to Phoma lingam and Alternaria brassicae. Toxin containing culture filtrates of the pathogens as well as concentrated toxins of Phoma (Sirodesmins) are used for resistance selections in in-vitro cultures of haploid rapeseed materials. A few days after transfer of the in-vitro materials to the selective media the inhibitory effect of both the culture filtrates as well as the Sirodesmins was apparent. Clones were obtained, surviving several transfers onto toxin containing media. Further experiments shall clarify whether the toxin tolerance, selected in vitro at the cell level, is expressed in the differentiated plant in the greenhouse and finally in the field. (author)

  20. Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 with enhanced resistance to ionizing radiation

    Verbenko, V.N.; Akhmedov, A.T.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    By means of one-dimensional electrophoresis, it is shown that in radiation-resistant Gam 444 ad Gam 445 mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 high-molecular weight heat shock proteins are hyperproduced at 32-37 deg C and are induced more intensively during heat shock (in comparison to the parental) wild-tupe strain AB parallel 57). When the missense htp R15 mutation of the positive regulatory htpR gene for heat shock proteins was introduced by transduction into genome of the Gam 444 mutant, its enhanced radiation-resistance disappeared but could not be restored upon introduction of pKV3 plasmid bearing the htpR, gene. These data show that heat shock Protens are participating in the enhanced radioresistance of Gam mutants

  1. Decreased outer membrane permeability in imipenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Trias, J; Dufresne, J; Levesque, R C; Nikaido, H

    1989-01-01

    The outer membrane of imipenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to have decreased permeability to imipenem but not to cephaloridine. These experiments were performed with intact cells and liposomes containing imipenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase derived from Pseudomonas maltophilia, in both cases utilizing an imipenem concentration of 50 microM. In contrast, liposome swelling assays using imipenem at 8 mM detected no significant difference between the imipenem-resistant mu...

  2. Production of mutants of Candida utilis with increased resistence against furfural

    Stehlik, G.; Baron, M.; Turanitz, K.; Schneider, F.

    1978-01-01

    By repeated γ-irradiation treatments and following selections a mutant of Candida utilis weissenbachii was isolated showing increased resistance against furfural as compared to its wild type. Growing and radiation survival behavior of these yeasts are compared. Analysis of furfural was done by gaschromatography on Porapak Q. (author)

  3. In vitro induction, isolation and selection of potato mutants resistant to late blight

    Al-Safadi, B.; Arabi, M.I.E.

    2003-01-01

    A mutation breeding program was conducted to improve potato resistance to late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. In vitro cultured explants from cvs Draga, Diamant, Spunta were irradiated with gamma ray doses 25, 30, and 35 Gy. Growing shoots were cut and re-cultured every 2 weeks until the 4 th generation (MV 4 ) to make sure no chimeral tissues still existed in the mutant material. Plantlets were subsequently propagated to obtain enough explants for in vitro selection pressure. Around 3,000 plantlets from the 3 cultivars were subjected to selection pressure using co-culture technique. MV 4 explants were incubated in jars, containing MS medium, with mycelia of P. infestans. Surviving plantlets were propagated and re-incubated with the pathogen for 3 consecutive generations. Resistant plantlets were acclimatized and transferred to pots and grown under glasshouse conditions. Plants were later inoculated, at the adult stage, with sporangial suspension. Cv Draga produced the highest number of resistant plants. Ten plants of Draga appeared to be resistant to late blight, whereas only one plant from each of the other 2 cvs was resistant. Mutant plants varied in number of produced minitubers from 13 to 70. Also, weight of these minitubers varied from less than 1 to 35 grams. Selected mutant lines will undergo further testing under field conditions for P. infestans resistance and other agronomic characteristics

  4. Phenotypical and biochemical characterisation of resistance for parasitic weed (Orobanche foetida Poir.) in radiation-mutagenised mutants of chickpea.

    Brahmi, Ines; Mabrouk, Yassine; Brun, Guillaume; Delavault, Philippe; Belhadj, Omrane; Simier, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Some radiation-mutagenised chickpea mutants potentially resistant to the broomrape, Orobanche foetida Poir., were selected through field trials. The objectives of this work were to confirm resistance under artificial infestation, in pots and mini-rhizotron systems, and to determine the developmental stages of broomrape affected by resistance and the relevant resistance mechanisms induced by radiation mutagenesis. Among 30 mutants tested for resistance to O. foetida, five shared strong resistance in both pot experiments and mini-rhizotron systems. Resistance was not complete, but the few individuals that escaped resistance displayed high disorders of shoot development. Results demonstrated a 2-3-fold decrease in stimulatory activity of root exudates towards broomrape seed germination in resistant mutants in comparison with non-irradiated control plants and susceptible mutants. Resistance was associated with an induction of broomrape necrosis early during infection. When infested, most of the resistant mutants shared enhanced levels of soluble phenolic contents, phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, guaiacol peroxidase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity, in addition to glutathione and notably ascorbate peroxidase gene expression in roots. Results confirmed enhanced resistance in chickpea radiation-mutagenised mutants, and demonstrated that resistance is based on alteration of root exudation, presumed cell-wall reinforcement and change in root oxidative status in response to infection. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Resistance of some early mutant lines of soybean to rust fungus (Phakospora pachyrhizi Syd)

    Ratma, Rivaie

    1984-01-01

    A trial for resistance to rust fungus (Phakospora pachyrhizi Syd.) was conducted on 11 early mutant lines of soybean M6 (derived from Orba variety with a dose of 0.4 kGy of Co-60) at Citayam Experimental Station, Bogor, in the wet season of 80/81. Based on IWGSR rating system, soybean mutant lines number M6/40/6 was moderately susceptible to rust fungus (Phakospora pachyrhizi Syd). While 10 other soybean mutant lines M6/40/1, M6/40/2, M6/40/3, M6/40/4, M6/40/5, M6/40/7, M6/40/8, M6/40/9, M6/40/10 and M6/40/11 were susceptible to rust fungus. Significant differences in yield were observed between the early mutant lines M6/40/6 (moderate susceptible), 10 other mutant lines (susceptible) and ringgit variety (susceptible). However, a significant lower yield was produced by those mutant lines compared with the yield of orba variety. (author)

  6. ISOELECTRIC FOCUSING OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS OF PROBIOTIC B. COAGULANS AND ITS BACTERIOPHAGE RESISTANT MUTANTS

    Kavita Rajesh Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most notorious type of infection in the probiotic and dairy fermentations. Two phage resistant mutants viz. B. co PIII and B. co MIII (B. coagulans mutants PIII and MIII obtained in previous studies (Dubey and Vakil, 2010, were further characterized for their protein profile in comparison with the parental probiotic strain –B. coagulans. The cell lysates were subjected to ultra-centrifugation and the purified membrane fractions were resolved using 2D gel electrophoresis. The Isoelectric focussing showed 187, 202 and 154 protein spots for the parental strain, mutant B. co PIII and mutant B. co MIII, respectively. Ten and 18 protein spots were missing as compared to parent for mutants B.co PIII and B.co MIII whereas there were 21 and 14 new spots noticed for these two mutants. Eight membrane proteins present only in the phage sensitive parental culture could be tentatively identified by comparison with the complete proteome of B. coagulans by use of UniprotKB and then CELLO database It is quite likely that some of these identified membrane proteins may be also functioning as receptors for phage adsorption followed by entry of nucleic acid into the phage sensitive host cell.

  7. Sustracted library obtained from mutant sugarcane variety B 4362 resistant to rust

    María I. Oloriz

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The hypersensitive response is one of the most powerful mechanisms for which the plants resist pathogen attack. Mutations carried out previously on the variety B4362, of sugarcane, originated five mutants that express this mechanism towards the attack of rust (Puccinia melanocephala Syd.. By means of a subtractive hybridization among the cDNA obtained starting from the resistant clone inoculated with rust and a pool of cDNA of the susceptible variety (B4362 inoculated and of the resistant clone not inoculated, it was possible to reduce the number of genes expressed during the infection with the fungus. A subtractive library was carried out where we hope that most of the genes are involved in the hypersensitive response that present these mutants towards the infection of the pathogen. Key words: Subtractive hybridization, hypersensitive response, Puccinia melanocephala Syd.

  8. Fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant HIV mutants

    Zhu, Qinchang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; El-Mahdy, Ahmed F. M.; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Convenient drug-resistance testing of viral mutants is indispensable to effective treatment of viral infection. We developed a novel fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant mutants of human immunodeficiency virus-I protease (HIV-PR) which uses enzymatic and peptide-specific fluorescence (FL) reactions and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of three HIV-PR substrates. This assay protocol enables use of non-purified enzyme sources and multiple substrates for the enzymatic reaction. In this study, susceptibility of HIV mutations to drugs was evaluated by selective formation of three FL products after the enzymatic HIV-PR reaction. This proof-of-concept study indicates that the present HPLC-FL method could be an alternative to current phenotypic assays for the evaluation of HIV drug resistance. PMID:25988960

  9. Examination of WF9 mutant sublines for lodging and fusarium resistance

    Balint, A.; Bedo, Z.; Kiss, E.

    1977-01-01

    The mutants produced from the maize line WF9 in our department between 1961-67 were considered regarding stem-strength and Fusarium resistance. The treatments have essentially improved the stem strength of the original line in a great many (11 cases out of 29), and the lodging rate has considerably decreased. Regarding the Fusarium contamination, the changes are mostly disadvantageous, but we achieved definite positive changes in the cases of four mutants. This improvement is also interesting because it coincides with the improvement of the step strength in all cases, and with the considerable increase in protein content in three of the four sublines. (author)

  10. Bilateral Comparison of Mercury and Gallium Fixed-Point Cells Using Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometer

    Bojkovski, J.; Veliki, T.; Zvizdić, D.; Drnovšek, J.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of project EURAMET 1127 (Bilateral comparison of triple point of mercury and melting point of gallium) in the field of thermometry is to compare realization of a triple point of mercury (-38.8344 °C) and melting point of gallium (29.7646 °C) between the Slovenian national laboratory MIRS/UL-FE/LMK and the Croatian national laboratory HMI/FSB-LPM using a long-stem 25 Ω standard platinum resistance thermometer (SPRT). MIRS/UL/FE-LMK participated in a number of intercomparisons on the level of EURAMET. On the other hand, the HMI/LPM-FSB laboratory recently acquired new fixed-point cells which had to be evaluated in the process of intercomparisons. A quartz-sheathed SPRT has been selected and calibrated at HMI/LPM-FSB at the triple point of mercury, the melting point of gallium, and the water triple point. A second set of measurements was made at MIRS/UL/FE-LMK. After its return, the SPRT was again recalibrated at HMI/LPM-FSB. In the comparison, the W value of the SPRT has been used. Results of the bilateral intercomparison confirmed that the new gallium cell of the HMI/LPM-FSB has a value that is within uncertainty limits of both laboratories that participated in the exercise, while the mercury cell experienced problems. After further research, a small leakage in the mercury fixed-point cell has been found.

  11. Heat and UV light resistance of vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus subtilis rec-mutants

    Hanlin, J.H.; Lombardi, S.J.; Slepecky, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The heat and UV light resistance of spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus subtilis BD170 (rec+) were greater than those of B. subtilis BD224 (recE4). Strain BD170 can repair DNA whereas BD224 is repair deficient due to the presence of the recE4 allele. Spores of a GSY Rec+ strain were more heat resistant than spores of GSY Rec- and Uvr- mutants. The overall level of heat and UV light resistance attained by spores may in part be determined by their ability to repair deoxyribonucleic acid after exposure to these two physical mutagens

  12. Reduction of FR900525 using an S-(2-aminoethyl) l-cysteine-resistant mutant.

    Shimizu, Shiho; Futase, Ayako; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Ueda, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    FK506 (tacrolimus), a macrolide compound with immunosuppressant activity, has been proven to have clinical importance and has been manufactured industrially since 1993 by using mutants with high FK506-production ability; these mutants have been developed from the wild strain Streptomyces tsukubaensis No. 9993. FR900525 is one of the by-products of FK506 production. However, there was no effective industrial method to separate FR900525 from FK506 due to the structural similarity between the two compounds. Therefore, reducing the level of FR900525 was a serious problem in the industrial strain A. In this study, we aimed to reduce the FR900525 production. We first determined that pipecolic acid level was a critical parameter for controlling FR900525 production in strain A. S-(2-Aminoethyl) l-cysteine (AEC)-resistant mutants has been reported to increase lysine productivity successfully in a variety of lysine-producing microorganisms. Therefore, next, we applied a selection of AEC-resistant mutants to enhance pipecolic acid biosynthesis. Finally, four AEC-resistant mutants were obtained from strain A using ultraviolet irradiation, and three of them showed less FR900525 productivity compared to the parental strain A. Our findings indicated that AEC resistance was effective phenotype marker for increasing pipecolic acid productivity and for reducing FR900525 production in S. tsukubaensis. Thus, our study provides an efficient method for reducing FR90025 level during FK506 biosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enterocin A mutants identified by saturation mutagenesis enhance potency towards vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.

    McClintock, Maria K; Kaznessis, Yiannis N; Hackel, Benjamin J

    2016-02-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci infections are a significant clinical problem. One proposed solution is to use probiotics, such as lactic acid bacteria, to produce antimicrobial peptides at the site of infection. Enterocin A, a class 2a bacteriocin, exhibits inhibitory activity against E. faecium and E. faecalis, which account for 86% of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci infections. In this study, we aimed to engineer enterocin A mutants with enhanced potency within a lactic acid bacterial production system. Peptide mutants resulting from saturation mutagenesis at sites A24 and T27 were efficiently screened in a 96-well plate assay for inhibition of pathogen growth. Several mutants exhibit increased potency relative to wild-type enterocin A in both liquid- and solid-medium growth assays. In particular, A24P and T27G exhibit enhanced inhibition of multiple strains of E. faecium and E. faecalis, including clinically isolated vancomycin-resistant strains. A24P and T27G enhance killing of E. faecium 8 by 13 ± 3- and 18 ± 4-fold, respectively. The engineered enterocin A/lactic acid bacteria systems offer significant potential to combat antibiotic-resistant infections. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nuclear technique for inducing new genetical sources of powdery mildew resistant mutants of wheat

    Shi Jinguo; Hu Xiaoyuan; Fan Qingxia; Wang Linqing; Hong Jisong

    1996-01-01

    Three varieties of winter wheat were treated with γ-rays, electron-beams, NaN 3 , EMS with various doses and intermittent irradiation of γ-rays respectively. 16 pure varieties and 12 hybrids were irradiated by γ-rays with appropriate doses (250∼300 Gy) for inducing mutation resistant to powdery mildew in winter wheat. γ-rays, electron-beams, NaN 3 and EMS were effective mutagens for inducing powdery mildew resistant mutants. The latter two were more effective than the former. It showed that the appropriate doses were as follows: γ-rays 300∼350 Gy, electron-beams 100∼200 Gy, NaN 3 1∼3 mmol/L, EMS about 0.3%. It also showed that the intermittent irradiation of γ-rays was more effective than the continuous irradiation for inducing powdery mildew resistant mutants. Irradiating hybrids were more effective materials than pure varieties for this purpose. 86 mutants with resistance to powdery mildew were obtained

  15. PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERISATION AND GENETIC ANALYSIS OF MUTANTS OF ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS RESISTANT TO THE FUNGICIDE TOLCLOFOS-METHYL

    A CHIBANI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutants of Aspergillus nidulans were recovered from 0,55.10+7  conidia incubated on synthetic medium supplemented with 100 mg tolclofos-methyl/ml. They differed considerably in morphology, growth rate, and level of resistance to two other fungicides. All mutants tested were cross-resistant to quintozene and vinclozolin; they produced fewer conidia than their wild-type parent. Some mutants required fungicides for maximum growth. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutants carried mutations in one gene located on linkage group III.

  16. Preliminary report on the rice blast resistance of space-induced mutants derived from rice cultivar 'Taihang-68'

    Zhang Jingxin; Sun Dayuan; Wang Hui; Liu Yongzhu; Guo Tao; Chen Zhiqiang; Yang Qiyun; Zhu Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    To screen the blast resistance mutants, the resistance of SP 1 progenies derived from rice variety Taihang-68 were evaluated after satellite flight by representative blast isolate GD0193 which had a broad pathogenic spectra, and then primary genetic analysis of resistant mutants and mapping of resistance gene, as well as resistance spectra at seedling and neck blast resistance at maturity were performed. The results showed that space-mutation was effective method to change the blast resistance of Taihang-68. The screened resistant mutants TH1 and TH2 showed that resistance to isolate GD0193 no disjunction and separation respectively, and the resistance separation ratio of TH2 indicated that its resistance was controlled by one pair of major genes, which was preliminary mapped on the long arm of chromosome 11. In blast resistance spectra and neck blast resistance, TH1 and TH2 were both enhanced remarkable compared with the wild-type at seedling and maturity, and their resistance could be inherited, the blast resistance of these two mutants were also increased comparing with several main cultivars in South China. (authors)

  17. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans with increased resistance to the alkylating agent, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    Hooley, P; Shawcross, S G; Strike, P

    1988-05-01

    The isolation and characterisation of mutants of Aspergillus nidulans showing resistance to MNNG is described. Such isolates were stable through prolonged subculture in the absence of the selective agent, and resistance segregated as an allele of a single gene in meiotic and mitotic analysis. MNNG-resistant strains showed an increase in resistance to EMS and UV irradiation but no cross-resistance to MMS was detected. Possible mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents are discussed.

  18. A herbicide-resistant ACCase 1781 Setaria mutant shows higher fitness than wild type.

    Wang, T; Picard, J C; Tian, X; Darmency, H

    2010-10-01

    It is often alleged that mutations conferring herbicide resistance have a negative impact on plant fitness. A mutant ACCase1781 allele endowing resistance to the sethoxydim herbicide was introgressed from a resistant green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv) population into foxtail millet (S. italica (L.) Beauv.). (1) Better and earlier growth of resistant plants was observed in a greenhouse cabinet. (2) Resistant plants of the advanced BC7 backcross generation showed more vigorous juvenile growth in the field, earlier flowering, more tillers and higher numbers of grains than susceptible plants did, especially when both genotypes were grown in mixture, but their seeds were lighter than susceptible seeds. (3) Field populations originating from segregating hybrids had the expected allele frequencies under normal growth conditions, but showed a genotype shift toward an excess of homozygous resistant plants within 3 years in stressful conditions. Lower seed size, lower germination rate and perhaps unexplored differences in seed longevity and predation could explain how the resistant plants have the same field fitness over the whole life cycle as the susceptible ones although they produce more seeds. More rapid growth kinetics probably accounted for higher fitness of the resistant plants in adverse conditions. The likelihood of a linkage with a beneficial gene is discussed versus the hypothesis of a pleiotropic effect of the ACCase resistance allele. It is suggested that autogamous species like Setaria could not develop a resistant population without the help of a linkage with a gene producing a higher fitness.

  19. Resistance to Phytophthora in mutant lines of currant tomato and in their original forms

    Khrustaleva, V.V.; Shcherbakov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Information on the production of currant tomato mutants is contained in a previous report. Evaluation of fruit resistance against Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary was carried out with pathotypes T 0 and T 1 . For artificial infection we used mainly a culture of T 1 (isolate 275), supplied by the Byelorussian Scientific Research Institute of Potato, Fruit and Vegetable Growing at Samokhvalovich. As inoculum for T 0 , a local population of the potato pathotype from the village of Shebantsevo, Moscow province was used. The standard variety 'Gruntovyj gribovskij 1180' was used as the control. Green fruits were taken from the first or second raceme of 20 plants. They were inoculated by spraying in plastic cuvettes with moist filter paper. The cuvettes were covered with glass and maintained at temperature of 18-20 deg. C. The results were checked 5, 9 and 12 days after inoculation. Under natural conditions, each of the 20 plants was also evaluated. As result, three lines with increased resistance to Phytophthora were selected from the original wild-type of currant tomato. Induced mutant forms were tested in the same way for resistance to Phytophthora. Data is presented from 4 years study. Of 26 mutant lines studied, we identified seven whose fruit displayed a stable and enhanced resistance to Phytophthora under both laboratory and field conditions. With regard to leaf infection of these lines, positive results were not obtained. There appears to be no direct relationship between resistance to Phytophthora of the fruit and the leaves. The mutant lines are of determinate type with early and medium ripening time. The average fruit weight is 5-33 g; in the case of the original specimen, it is only 0.9-1.7 g. The fruits have a pleasant sour-sweet taste and a thick skin. It is noteworthy that the mutant lines selected on the basis of their suitability for cultivation not only showed the resistance selected from the wild-type, but in a number of cases even turned out to

  20. Use of resistant mutants to study the interaction of triton X-100 with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Raychaudhuri, D; Chatterjee, A N

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus mutants resistant to the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, isolated from the wild-type strain H and the autolysin-deficient strain RUS3, could grow and divide in broth containing 5% (vol/vol) Triton X-100, while growth of the parental strains was markedly inhibited above the critical micellar concentration (0.02%) of the detergent. Growth-inhibitory concentrations of Triton X-100 killed wild-type cells without demonstrable cellular lysis. Triton X-100 stimulated autolysin...

  1. Isolation of parafluorophenylalanine-resistant mutants from HeLa cell cultures

    Yim, L.K.; Stuart, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a method to isolate temperature-conditional phenylalanine transport mutants from the transformed human cell line HeLa. Using ultraviolet light as a mutagenic agent and DL-parafluorophenylalanine (PFPA), a poisonous analogue of L-phenylalanine, as a selective agent, mutagenized cells were selected for survival in the presence of PFPA at a temperature of 39 degrees C. Survivors of the mutagenesis and selection procedures were removed from the culture dishes by trypsin and cloned at a temperature of 35 degrees C. Seven of these lines isolated demonstrated continued resistance to PFPA at 39 degrees C. These lines were tested for uptake of L-phenylalanine at an external concentration of 100 microM and for continued resistance to PFPA at two concentrations. Cells were tested at 35 and at 39 degrees C. The data were compared to those obtained for the parental HeLa cell line under identical conditions. The seven mutant cell lines demonstrated varying resistances to PFPA and varying levels of accumulation of L-phenylalanine when tested at 35 and 39 degrees C. Three mutant lines were additionally tested for L-phenylalanine tRNA charging levels and for transport of L-arginine. The lines had parental cell levels of tRNA charging and L-arginine transport which suggest that the induced genetic defect affects a specific L-phenylalanine transport system

  2. A molecular dynamics investigation into the mechanisms of alectinib resistance of three ALK mutants.

    He, Muyang; Li, Weikang; Zheng, Qingchuan; Zhang, Hongxing

    2018-01-11

    Alectinib, a highly selective next-genetation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, has demonstrated promising antitumor activity in patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). However, the therapeutic benefits of alectinib is inescapably hampered by the development of acquired resistant mutations in ALK. Despite the availability of ample experimental mutagenesis data, the molecular origin and the structural motifs under alectinib binding affinity deficiencies are still ambiguous. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics generalized born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculation approaches were employed to elucidate the mechanisms of alectinib resistance induced by the mutations I1171N, V1180L, and L1198F. The MD results reveal that the studied mutations could trigger the dislocation of alectinib as well as conformational changes at the inhibitor binding site, thus induce the interactional changes between alectinib and mutants. The most influenced regions are the ligand binding entrance and the hinge region, which are considered to be the dominant binding motifs accounting for the binding affinity loss in mutants. The "key and lock mechanism" between the ethyl group at position 9 of alectinib and a recognition cavity in the hinge region of ALK is presented to illustrate the major molecular origin of drug resistance. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the effect of ALK mutations resistant to alectinib, which could contribute to further rational design of inhibitors to combat the acquired resistance. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Agronomic characters and lodging resistance of plant height mutants of rice

    Zhang Zhonggui; Wu Yuejin; Liu Binmei; Xu Xue; Zhang Lili; Wang Min

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen plant height mutants of Nipponbare were used to study the effect of plant height on the agronomic characters and lodging resistance. The results indicated that the plant height was positively correlated with spike length, third internode length, height of gravity center, fresh weight of main stem, dry weight of main stem, thousand-grain weight, grain-yield per plant and biological yield, and the second internode length. Meanwhile, plant height played an important role in lodging resistance, it was significantly positively correlated with lodging index and negatively correlated with bending moment and culm type index. The correlation between agronomic characters and lodging resistance showed that several agronomic characters had strong impact on the lodging resistance, such as spike length, height of gravity center, basal internode length ( first and second internode), fresh and dry weight of main stem, dry weight of basal internode, seed setting, thousand-grain weight, grain-weight per plant and biological yield. (authors)

  4. Selection of drug resistant mutants from random library of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase in Plasmodium berghei model

    Yuthavong Yongyuth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of drug resistance amongst the human malaria Plasmodium species has most commonly been associated with genomic mutation within the parasites. This phenomenon necessitates evolutionary predictive studies of possible resistance mutations, which may occur when a new drug is introduced. Therefore, identification of possible new Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (PfDHFR mutants that confer resistance to antifolate drugs is essential in the process of antifolate anti-malarial drug development. Methods A system to identify mutations in Pfdhfr gene that confer antifolate drug resistance using an animal Plasmodium parasite model was developed. By using error-prone PCR and Plasmodium transfection technologies, libraries of Pfdhfr mutant were generated and then episomally transfected to Plasmodium berghei parasites, from which pyrimethamine-resistant PfDHFR mutants were selected. Results The principal mutation found from this experiment was S108N, coincident with the first pyrimethamine-resistance mutation isolated from the field. A transgenic P. berghei, in which endogenous Pbdhfr allele was replaced with the mutant PfdhfrS108N, was generated and confirmed to have normal growth rate comparing to parental non-transgenic parasite and also confer resistance to pyrimethamine. Conclusion This study demonstrated the power of the transgenic P. berghei system to predict drug-resistant Pfdhfr mutations in an in vivo parasite/host setting. The system could be utilized for identification of possible novel drug-resistant mutants that could arise against new antifolate compounds and for prediction the evolution of resistance mutations.

  5. Exploring the mechanism of zanamivir resistance in a neuraminidase mutant: a molecular dynamics study.

    Nanyu Han

    Full Text Available It is critical to understand the molecular basis of the drug resistance of influenza viruses to efficiently treat this infectious disease. Recently, H1N1 strains of influenza A carrying a mutation of Q136K in neuraminidase were found. The new strain showed a strong Zanamivir neutralization effect. In this study, normal molecular dynamics simulations and metadynamics simulations were employed to explore the mechanism of Zanamivir resistance. The wild-type neuraminidase contained a 3(10 helix before the 150 loop, and there was interaction between the 150 and 430 loops. However, the helix and the interaction between the two loops were disturbed in the mutant protein due to interaction between K136 and nearby residues. Hydrogen-bond network analysis showed weakened interaction between the Zanamivir drug and E276/D151 on account of the electrostatic interaction between K136 and D151. Metadynamics simulations showed that the free energy landscape was different in the mutant than in the wild-type neuraminidase. Conformation with the global minimum of free energy for the mutant protein was different from the wild-type conformation. While the drug fit completely into the active site of the wild-type neuraminidase, it did not match the active site of the mutant variant. This study indicates that the altered hydrogen-bond network and the deformation of the 150 loop are the key factors in development of Zanamivir resistance. Furthermore, the Q136K mutation has a variable effect on conformation of different N1 variants, with conformation of the 1918 N1 variant being more profoundly affected than that of the other N1 variants studied in this paper. This observation warrants further experimental investigation.

  6. Construction and functional analysis of Trichoderma harzianum mutants that modulate maize resistance to the pathogen Curvularia lunata.

    Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Ma, Jia; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was used to generate an insertional mutant library of the mycelial fungus Trichoderma harzianum. From a total of 450 mutants, six mutants that showed significant influence on maize resistance to C. lunata were analyzed in detail. Maize coated with these mutants was more susceptible to C. lunata compared with those coated with a wild-type (WT) strain. Similar to other fungal ATMT libraries, all six mutants were single copy integrations, which occurred preferentially in noncoding regions (except two mutants) and were frequently accompanied by the loss of border sequences. Two mutants (T66 and T312) that were linked to resistance were characterized further. Maize seeds coated with T66 and T312 were more susceptible to C. lunata than those treated with WT. Moreover, the mutants affected the resistance of maize to C. lunata by enhancing jasmonate-responsive gene expression. T66 and T312 induced maize resistance to C. lunata infection through a jasmonic acid-dependent pathway.

  7. Fission yeast 26S proteasome mutants are multi-drug resistant due to stabilization of the Pap1transcription factor

    Penney, Mary; Samejima, Itaru; Wilkinson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the result of a genetic screen for mutants resistant to the microtubule poison methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) that were also temperature sensitive for growth. In total the isolated mutants were distributed in ten complementation groups. Cloning experiments revealed...

  8. Energetic basis for drug resistance of HIV-1 protease mutants against amprenavir

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Amprenavir (APV) is a high affinity (0.15 nM) HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor. However, the affinities of the drug resistant protease variants V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M to amprenavir are decreased 3 to 30-fold compared to the wild-type. In this work, the popular molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method has been used to investigate the effectiveness of amprenavir against the wild-type and these mutated protease variants. Our results reveal that the protonation state of Asp25/Asp25' strongly affects the dynamics, the overall affinity and the interactions of the inhibitor with individual residues. We emphasize that, in contrast to what is often assumed, the protonation state may not be inferred from the affinities but requires pKa calculations. At neutral pH, Asp25 and Asp25' are ionized or protonated, respectively, as suggested from pKa calculations. This protonation state was thus mainly considered in our study. Mutation induced changes in binding affinities are in agreement with the experimental findings. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying binding and drug resistance. Drug resistance arises from an increase in the energetic contribution from the van der Waals interactions between APV and PR (V32I, I50V, and I84V mutant) or a rise in the energetic contribution from the electrostatic interactions between the inhibitor and its target (I54M and I54V mutant). For the V32I mutant, also an increased free energy for the polar solvation contributes to the drug resistance. For the L90M mutant, a rise in the van der Waals energy for APV-PR interactions is compensated by a decrease in the polar solvation free energy such that the net binding affinity remains unchanged. Detailed understanding of the molecular forces governing binding and drug resistance might assist in the design of new inhibitors against HIV-1 PR variants that are resistant against current drugs.

  9. A Mutator Phenotype Promoting the Emergence of Spontaneous Oxidative Stress-Resistant Mutants in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Tang, Yizhi; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-12-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide. As a microaerophilic organism, C. jejuni must be able to defend against oxidative stress encountered both in the host and in the environment. How Campylobacter utilizes a mutation-based mechanism for adaptation to oxidative stress is still unknown. Here we present a previously undescribed phenotypic and genetic mechanism that promotes the emergence of oxidative stress-resistant mutants. Specifically, we showed that a naturally occurring mutator phenotype, resulting from a loss of function mutation in the DNA repair enzyme MutY, increased oxidative stress resistance (OX R ) in C. jejuni We further demonstrated that MutY malfunction did not directly contribute to the OX R phenotype but increased the spontaneous mutation rate in the peroxide regulator gene perR , which functions as a repressor for multiple genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Mutations in PerR resulted in loss of its DNA binding function and derepression of PerR-controlled oxidative stress defense genes, thereby conferring an OX R phenotype and facilitating Campylobacter survival under oxidative stress. These findings reveal a new mechanism that promotes the emergence of spontaneous OX R mutants in bacterial organisms. IMPORTANCE Although a mutator phenotype has been shown to promote antibiotic resistance in many bacterial species, little is known about its contribution to the emergence of OX R mutants. This work describes the link between a mutator phenotype and the enhanced emergence of OX R mutants as well as its underlying mechanism involving DNA repair and mutations in PerR. Since DNA repair systems and PerR are well conserved in many bacterial species, especially in Gram positives, the same mechanism may operate in multiple bacterial species. Additionally, we developed a novel method that allows for rapid quantification of spontaneous OX R mutants in a bacterial population. This method represents a technical

  10. Categories and inheritance of resistance to Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in mutants of indica rice 'IR64'.

    Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Chen, Yolanda H; Palchamy, Kadirvel; Jahn, Gary C; Maheswaran, M; Adalla, Candida B; Leung, Hei

    2008-04-01

    Varietal mutants can be useful for developing durable resistance, understanding categories of resistance, and identifying candidate genes involved in defense responses. We used mutants of rice 'IR64' to isolate new sources of resistance to the planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). We compared two mutants that showed a gain and loss of resistance to N. lugens, to determine the categories of resistance to this pest. Under choice tests, female planthoppers avoided settling and laid fewer eggs on the resistant mutant 'D518' than on the susceptible mutant D1131, susceptible check 'TN1', and wild-type IR64, indicating that antixenosis was the resistance category. Similarly, under no-choice conditions, planthoppers laid 29% fewer eggs in D518 than in IR64, but they oviposited more in 'D1131' and TN1. Honeydew excretion was greater on D1131 seedlings but slightly lower on D518 than on IR64. Nymphal survival and adult female weight did not differ among rice cultivars. D518 showed higher tolerance of N. lugens infestations than IR64. Genetic analysis of the F1, F2, and F3 populations derived from D518 x IR64 revealed that resistance in D518 is dominant and controlled by a single gene. Despite the variation in resistance to N. lugens, both mutants and IR64 performed similarly in the field. The mutant D518 is a new source of durable resistance to N. lugens, mainly due to enhanced antixenosis to female hoppers for settling and oviposition.

  11. Sucralose Increases Antimicrobial Resistance and Stimulates Recovery of Escherichia coli Mutants.

    Qu, Yilin; Li, Rongyan; Jiang, Mingshan; Wang, Xiuhong

    2017-07-01

    Because of heavy use of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistance in bacteria has become of great concern. The effect of some widely used food additives such as sucralose on bacteria in the gut and the environment has also drawn increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the interaction between antimicrobials and sucralose impacting antimicrobial resistance and mutation of Escherichia coli (E. coli). To examine antimicrobial resistance and mutation frequency, different subinhibitory concentrations of sucralose were added to cultures of E.coli BW25113 that were then treated with antimicrobials, oxolinic acid, or moxifloxacin. Then the E.coli were assayed for bacterial survival and recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Pre-treatment of E.coli BW25113 with 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sucralose increased the survival rate in oxolinic acid or moxifloxacin. A 1/3 MIC of sucralose increased rifampicin-resistant mutation rate of E.coli BW25113 after 72 h, while rifampicin-resistant mutation rate was increased when co-treated with 1/8 MIC, 1/4 MIC, 1/3 MIC sucralose, and oxolinic acid after 24 h. Sucralose can increase the antimicrobial resistance and mutation frequency of E.coli to some antimicrobials.

  12. Sheet resistance effects in mercury cadmium telluride implanted photodiodes

    Fiorito, G.; Gasparrini, G.; Svelto, F.

    1977-01-01

    The frequency response of Hg + implanted Hgsub(1-x)Cdsub(x)Te photodiodes is discussed. This analysis, evaluating both the response to fast laser pulses and the 3 dB rolloff of the diode shot-noise spectrum, showed the necessity of adopting a distributed equivalent circuit model taking into account the implanted layer sheet resistance. Frequency behaviour, in fact, proved not to match a simple p-n junction model based on a lumped standard equivalent circuit. On this basis apparent anomalies previously reported can be explained, and useful suggestions can be obtained for design and fabrication of fast detectors. (author)

  13. Diversity and characterization of mercury-resistant bacteria in snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine from the High Arctic

    Møller, Annette; Barkay, Tamar; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed

    2011-01-01

    It is well-established that atmospheric deposition transports mercury from lower latitudes to the Arctic. The role of bacteria in the dynamics of the deposited mercury, however, is unknown. We characterized mercury-resistant bacteria from High Arctic snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine. Bacterial...... densities were 9.4 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5) and 0.9-3.1 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) in freshwater, brine and snow, respectively. Highest cultivability was observed in snow (11.9%), followed by freshwater (0.3%) and brine (0.03%). In snow, the mercury-resistant bacteria accounted for up to 31% of the culturable bacteria, but...

  14. Analysis of Distinct Roles of CaMKK Isoforms Using STO-609-Resistant Mutants in Living Cells.

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Hiraoka, Yuri; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2015-06-30

    To assess the isoform specificity of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK)-mediated signaling pathway using a CaMKK inhibitor (STO-609) in living cells, we have established A549 cell lines expressing STO-609-resistant mutants of CaMKK isoforms. Following serial mutagenesis studies, we have succeeded in obtaining an STO-609-resistant CaMKKα mutant (Ala292Thr/Leu233Phe) and a CaMKKβ mutant (Ala328Thr/Val269Phe), which showed sensitivity to STO-609 that was 2-3 orders of magnitude lower without an appreciable effect on kinase activity or CaM requirement. These results are consistent with the results obtained for CaMKK activities in the extracts of A549 cells stably expressing the mutants of CaMKK isoforms. Ionomycin-induced 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation at Thr172 in A549 cells expressing either the wild-type or the STO-609-resistant mutant of CaMKKα was completely suppressed by STO-609 treatment but resistant to the inhibitor in the presence of the CaMKKβ mutant (Ala328Thr/Val269Phe). This result strongly suggested that CaMKKβ is responsible for ionomycin-induced AMPK activation, which supported previous reports. In contrast, ionomycin-induced CaMKIV phosphorylation at Thr196 was resistant to STO-609 treatment in A549 cells expressing STO-609-resistant mutants of both CaMKK isoforms, indicating that both CaMKK isoforms are capable of phosphorylating and activating CaMKIV in living cells. Considering these results together, STO-609-resistant CaMKK mutants developed in this study may be useful for distinguishing CaMKK isoform-mediated signaling pathways in combination with the use of an inhibitor compound.

  15. Diversity and characterization of mercury-resistant bacteria in snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine from the High Arctic.

    Møller, Annette K; Barkay, Tamar; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren J; Skov, Henrik; Kroer, Niels

    2011-03-01

    It is well-established that atmospheric deposition transports mercury from lower latitudes to the Arctic. The role of bacteria in the dynamics of the deposited mercury, however, is unknown. We characterized mercury-resistant bacteria from High Arctic snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine. Bacterial densities were 9.4 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5) and 0.9-3.1 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) in freshwater, brine and snow, respectively. Highest cultivability was observed in snow (11.9%), followed by freshwater (0.3%) and brine (0.03%). In snow, the mercury-resistant bacteria accounted for up to 31% of the culturable bacteria, but levels of most isolates were not temperature dependent. Of the resistant isolates, 25% reduced Hg(II) to Hg(0). No relation between resistance level, ability to reduce Hg(II) and phylogenetic group was observed. An estimation of the potential bacterial reduction of Hg(II) in snow suggested that it was important in the deeper snow layers where light attenuation inhibited photoreduction. Thus, by reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), mercury-resistant bacteria may limit the supply of substrate for methylation processes and, hence, contribute to lowering the risk that methylmercury is being incorporated into the Arctic food chains. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selection of mutants resistant to black spot disease by chronic irradiation of gamma-rays in Japanese pear 'Osanijisseiki'

    Masuda, Tetsuo; Yoshioka, Toji; Kotobuki, Kazuo; Sanada, Tetsuro; Inoue, Kosuke; Murata, Kenji; Kitagawa, Kenichi; Tabira, Hiroki; Yoshida, Akira

    1997-01-01

    'Osanijisseiki', a self-compatible, spontaneous bud sport of the Japanese pear 'Nijisseiki' is an excellent cultivar with a smooth skin. However, this cultivar is susceptible to Japanese pear black spot disease caused by Alternaria alternata Japanese pear pathotype. To obtain resistant mutants from 'Osanijisseiki', nursery plants of 'Osanijisseiki' have been irradiated chronically with gamma-rays in the Gamma Field of the Institute of Radiation Breeding, NAR, MAFF, since 1986. Screening tests using AK toxin, a host-specific toxin produced by A. alternata Japanese pear pathotype, were performed form 1988 to 1993. Four branches of young trees planted at a distance of 40 m from the 60 Co source were selected as being resistant mutants in 1991 (IRB 502-13T and IRB 502-14T) and 1993 (IRB 502-17T and IRB 502-18T). Sensitivity of the four resistant mutants to AK-toxin and susceptibility to the pathogen were compared with other of susceptible and resistant cultivars. The results showed that these four mutants possessed intermediate resistance. Furthermore, a mutant, IRB 502-13T, had the same characteristics as the original 'Osanijisseiki', except for the difference in toxin sensitivity. The characteristics of the other mutants, IRB 502 14-T, IRB 502-17T, and IRB 502-18T, care being examined. (author)

  17. Attempts to induce mutants resistant or tolerant to golden mosaic virus in dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    Tulmann Neto, A.; Ando, A.; Costa, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The golden mosaic of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that is present in the tropical parts of the American continent has become a major hindrance for the cultivation of this food legume of great importance to many Latin America countries. Good control measures are not known and bean germ plasm resistant or tolerant to this virus disease is not yet available. Attempts to induce bean mutants with this desirable characteristic were made using gamma radiation and chemical mutagen. Some M 2 plants from one progeny of the cultivar Carioca treated with 0.48% ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), 6 hours of treatment at 20 0 C, showed milder symptoms than the control progenies, and at the same time they showed a tendency to recover. This mutant is being tested under field conditions and used in crosses with other bean types that show a certain degree of tolerance, aiming at adding the favourable characters of both parents. Seeds of the hybrids, as well as those of the parent types, are also being further submitted to mutagenic treatments in order to obtain still better mutants that will be satisfactory for direct or indirect control of bean golden mosaic. (author)

  18. Differential binding of prohibitin-2 to estrogen receptor α and to drug-resistant ERα mutants

    Chigira, Takeru, E-mail: 8120661875@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Nagatoishi, Satoru, E-mail: nagatoishi@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Tsumoto, Kouhei, E-mail: tsumoto@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Endocrine resistance is one of the most challenging problems in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is controlled by several coregulators, including prohibitin-2 (PHB2). Because of its ability to repress the transcriptional activity of activated ERα, PHB2 is a promising antiproliferative agent. In this study, were analyzed the interaction of PHB2 with ERα and three mutants (Y537S, D538G, and E380Q) that are frequently associated with a lack of sensitivity to hormonal treatments, to help advance novel drug discovery. PHB2 bound to ERα wild-type (WT), Y537S, and D538G, but did not bind to E380Q. The binding thermodynamics of Y537S and D538G to PHB2 were favorably altered entropically compared with those of WT to PHB2. Our results show that PHB2 binds to the ligand binding domain of ERα with a conformational change in the helix 12 of ERα. - Highlights: • Molten globule-likeness of an ERα repressor Prohibitin-2 (PHB2) is identified. • The thermodynamics is validated for the interaction between ERα and PHB2. • PHB2 binds to Y537S and D538G mutants of ERα commonly found in breast cancer. • ERα WT and mutants showed different thermodynamic parameters in the binding to PHB2. • ERα binds to PHB2 with conformational change involving packing of helix 12.

  19. Isolation and Cloning of mercuric reductase gene (merA from mercury-resistant bacteria

    Parisa Khoshniyat

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the bacteria having merA gene coding mineral mercury reducing enzyme, has genetic potential of Hg removing via reduction of mineral mercury and transformation of that to gas form and finally bioremediation of polluted area. The aim of this study is the isolation of merA gene from resistance bacteria and cloning of that into suitable expression vector and then the environmental bioremediation by the transformation of bacteria with this vector. Materials and methods: A number of bacteria were collected in contaminated areas with mercury in order to isolate merA genes. Polymerase chain reaction had done on the four bacterial genomes including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli using the specific primers in order to detect merA gene. For cloning, the primers containing restriction enzyme sites are used, merA gene was isolated and amplified. The amplified fragments were cloned in the expression vector pET21a+ and via heat shock method were transformed into E. coli TOP10 competent cell. For clustering of genes, Mega software version 4 was used and bioanformatic studies were achieved for predicted enzyme. Results: merA gene with 1686 bp in length was isolated from K pneumoniae and E. coli. Recombinant vectors in transgenic bacteria were confirmed by various methods and finally were confirmed by sequencing. The result of clustering these genes with existence genes in NCBI showed high similarity. Discussion and conclusion: The existence of merA gene in bacteria that adapted to Hg pollution area is because of resistance, so with cloning this gene into suitable expression vector and transformation of susceptible bacteria with this vector ability of resistance to Hg in bacteria for bioremediation could be given.

  20. A shift to organismal stress resistance in programmed cell death mutants.

    Meredith E Judy

    Full Text Available Animals have many ways of protecting themselves against stress; for example, they can induce animal-wide, stress-protective pathways and they can kill damaged cells via apoptosis. We have discovered an unexpected regulatory relationship between these two types of stress responses. We find that C. elegans mutations blocking the normal course of programmed cell death and clearance confer animal-wide resistance to a specific set of environmental stressors; namely, ER, heat and osmotic stress. Remarkably, this pattern of stress resistance is induced by mutations that affect cell death in different ways, including ced-3 (cell death defective mutations, which block programmed cell death, ced-1 and ced-2 mutations, which prevent the engulfment of dying cells, and progranulin (pgrn-1 mutations, which accelerate the clearance of apoptotic cells. Stress resistance conferred by ced and pgrn-1 mutations is not additive and these mutants share altered patterns of gene expression, suggesting that they may act within the same pathway to achieve stress resistance. Together, our findings demonstrate that programmed cell death effectors influence the degree to which C. elegans tolerates environmental stress. While the mechanism is not entirely clear, it is intriguing that animals lacking the ability to efficiently and correctly remove dying cells should switch to a more global animal-wide system of stress resistance.

  1. Novel mutations in β-tubulin gene in Trichoderma harzianum mutants resistant to methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate.

    Li, M; Zhang, H Y; Liang, B

    2013-01-01

    Twelve-low resistant (LR) mutants of Trichoderma harzianum with the capability of grow fast at 0.8 μg/mL methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) were obtained using UV mutagenesis. MR and HR mutants which could grow fast at 10 and 100 μg/mL MBC, respectively, were isolated by step-up selection protocols in which UV-treated mutants were induced and mycelial sector screening was made in plates with growth medium. Subsequently, β-tubulin genes of 14 mutants were cloned to describe-the molecular lesion likely to be responsible-for MBC resistance. Comparison of the β-tubulin sequences of the mutant and sensitive strains of T. harzianum revealed 2 new MBC-binding sites differed from those in other plant pathogens. A single mutation at-amino acid 168, having Phe (TTC) instead of Ser (TCC)', was demonstrated for the HR mutant; a double mutation in amino acid 13 resulting in the substitution of Gly (GGC) by Val (GTG) was observed in β-tubulin gene of MR mutant. On the other hand, no substitutions were identified in the β-tubulin gene and its 5'-flanking regions in 12 LR mutants of T. harzianum.

  2. Studies on productivity lodge resistance of radiation induced mutants of syrian local durum wheat

    Elfares, A M; Ghazal, H M [Dep. of Radiation Agriculture, Syrian Atomic Energy Commision, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091, (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the research was to induce mutations characterized by lodging resistant and high yielding ability in two syrian local durum wheat land races. This research was carried out at two periods during 1983-1987 and from 1991-1993. At the first period, Kernels of Hourani and Senatore Cappelle were treated with 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 K rad of gamma rays at the Laboratory of the commission of Syrian Atomic Energy to induce mutations. The treated Kernels were planted in 1983/1984 season. After that, selection were practicised on plants which characterized by good performance and lodging resistant. During the successive seasons, screening were made on mutant lines to keep out only lines which show adaptability to intensive cultivation. Second period includes testing of selected lines at two govern orates of syria (Raqqa and Aleppo) during three successive seasons; 1991/1992 and 1992/1993 under intensive cultivation conditions (fertilization, irrigation, stands, etc.).

  3. Imidacloprid does not induce Cyp genes involved in insecticide resistance of a mutant Drosophila melanogaster line.

    Kalajdzic, Predrag; Markaki, Maria; Oehler, Stefan; Savakis, Charalambos

    2013-10-01

    Certain xenobiotics have the capacity to induce the expression of genes involved in various biological phenomena, including insecticide resistance. The induction potential of different chemicals, among them different insecticides, has been documented for a number of insect species. In this study, we have analyzed the induction potential of Imidacloprid, a widely used member of the neonicotinoid insecticide family. Genes Cyp6g1 and Cyp6a2, known to be involved in the resistance of mutant Drosophila melanogaster line MiT[W⁻]3R2 to Imidacloprid and DDT were included in the analyzed sample. We find that Imidacloprid does not induce expression of the analyzed genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Drought resistant rice mutants, characteristics and discussions on possibilities for planting them in some Arab Countries which import rice

    Abo-Hegazi, A.M.T.

    1994-01-01

    A number of drought resistant mutants of rice were produced from ordinary rice varieties being planted in several parts of Egypt through utilization of gamma rays as a mutagen. The mutants have water requirements less than one half of that of their mother varieties. According to official data, authorities in Egypt insure about 18000 M 3 of irrigation water for every hectare (10000 M 2 ) of rice and about 6700 M 3 , 6900 M 3 for every hectare of corn and ground nuts, respectively. Peanuts and corn are summer crops like the drought resistant rice mutants. The mentioned mutants can produce good yield under water requirements very near to that of corn and peanuts. The wide gap in agricultural food stuffs for the Arab Countries (more than 20000 million US $ annually) includes rice imports usually exceeds 700 million US $ per year> Rice imports of Arab Countries such as Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Syria, Libya and the Sudan, reached 180, 47, 21, 16 and 14 million US $ in 1988 as an example. Such countries could make use of the drought resistant rice mutants for plantation on water requirements very near to those of usual summer crops such as corn and peanuts which is significantly less than one half of water requirements of their mother varieties. Some characteristics of such mutants as well as discussions on possibilities for planting them in some of the nominated Arab Countries are presented. However, arrangements for ensuring the minimum water requirements during the growing period irrespective to rain which in many cases did not accord the growing period of the mutants should be taken if such countries wants to make use of the drought resistant rice mutants. The author believe that most if not all requirements of rice of such countries could locally be ensured through planting of the above mentioned rice mutants. In this case, maximizing the efficiency of utilizing the limited water resources of such countries could also be counted as another cause for presenting this

  5. Main agronomic traits and resistance to rice blast of space-induced mutant lines of Zhong-er-ruan-zhan

    Xiao Wuming; Wang Hui; Liu Yongzhu; Guo Tao; Chen Zhiqiang; Yang Qiyun; Zhu Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    The main agronomic traits and resistance to rice blast of 34 space-induced lines from an elite rice cultivar, Zhong-er-ruan-zhan were evaluated at their SP 4 . The resistance to blast of the mutant lines had been tested by two blast isolates previously. It was found that the mutant lines showed significant difference in plant height, effective panicles, panicle length and grains per panicle etc. from their parent. The range of variation in 1000-grain weight the largest, followed by the seed-setting rate, and that of effective panicles was the least among all the traits. Except for the line Z34, 33 mutant lines had broader resistance spectra than the wild-type based on the test with 38 different blast isolates, and all the 33 lines were also resistant to the panicle blast in the field. The result confirmed that selection for resistant to blast in lower generations was reliable. Taking account of agronomic traits and blast resistance, promising lines with resistance to blast and good agronomic characters could be selected from those mutant lines. Therefore, the elite rice germplasm with enhanced disease resistance can be produced. (authors)

  6. In Vitro Capability of Faropenem To Select for Resistant Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae▿ †

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Clark, Catherine; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Beachel, Linda; Ednie, Lois; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    When tested against nine strains of pneumococci and six of Haemophilus influenzae of various resistotypes, faropenem failed to select for resistant mutants after 50 days of consecutive subculture in subinhibitory concentrations. Faropenem also yielded low rates of spontaneous mutations against all organisms of both species. By comparison, resistant clones were obtained with macrolides, ketolides, and quinolones. PMID:18086853

  7. Autoradiographic detection of diphtheria toxin resistant mutants in human diploid fibroblasts

    Gupta, R.S.; Singh, B.

    1985-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure for the detection of diphtheria toxin (DT) resistant (Dip/sub R/) mutants in human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cells has been developed. The assay is based on the observation that when HDFs from confluent cultures are seeded in medium containing 0.01 flocculating units/ml or higher concentration of DT, protein synthesis in sensitive cells is severely inhibited by 4-6 hr. If at this or later time, a radiolabeled protein precursor (eg, 3 H-leucine) is added to the culture, it is almost exclusively incorporated into the resistant cells, which are then readily identified by autoradiography. These studies provide strong evidence that the labeled cells identified by autoradiography are bona fide Dip/sub R/ mutants. The detection of Dip/sub R/ cells by autoradiography is apparently not affected by the presence of the sensitive cells in the mixtures. The spontaneous frequency of Dip/sub R/ cells in HDFs has been found to be in the range of 1-5 x 10 -6 , and this increases in a dose dependent manner upon treatment with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate. These results indicate that the autoradiographic assay could be used for quantitative mutagenesis. Since the autoradiographic assay does not depend on cell division, it may prove useful in estimating the incidence of pre-existing mutations in cell populations that either do not divide or have very limited growth potential (eg, lymphocytes, muscle cells, neurons, senescent fibroblasts, etc.)

  8. Multiplex Sequence Analysis Demonstrates the Competitive Growth Advantage of the A-to-G Mutants of Clarithromycin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori

    Wang, Ge; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Humayun, M. Zafri; Taylor, Diane E.

    1999-01-01

    Clarithromycin resistance in Helicobacter pylori is due to point mutation within the 23S rRNA. We examined the growth rates of different types of site-directed mutants and demonstrated quantitatively the competitive growth advantage of A-to-G mutants over other types of mutants by a multiplex sequencing assay. The results provide a rational explanation of why A-to-G mutants are predominantly observed among clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates.

  9. Multiplex sequence analysis demonstrates the competitive growth advantage of the A-to-G mutants of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Wang, G; Rahman, M S; Humayun, M Z; Taylor, D E

    1999-03-01

    Clarithromycin resistance in Helicobacter pylori is due to point mutation within the 23S rRNA. We examined the growth rates of different types of site-directed mutants and demonstrated quantitatively the competitive growth advantage of A-to-G mutants over other types of mutants by a multiplex sequencing assay. The results provide a rational explanation of why A-to-G mutants are predominantly observed among clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates.

  10. Screening for rice mutant of resistance to piricularia oryzae by irradiation and in vitro technique

    Wang Cailian; Xu Gang; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    The ability of callus formation and green plant regeneration was very different for different rice types and varieties in mature embryo. LS-5 was optimum medium for mature embryo. Increase in plant regeneration capacity was found with 100, 150 Gy gamma rays. The differentiation and regeneration of green plants were obviously improved when the anthers on induction medium were with 30 Gy of gamma rays. The change of free amino acids in subcultured callus tissue in rice were investigated after callus were treated with cultured filtrate from Piricularia oryzae. Fourteen kinds of free amino acid could be quantitatively analysed, among which, contents of serine and glutamate were the highest and made up about 20% of total amino acids respectively. The total amino acids in callus tissue of resistant varieties before treated with cultured filtrate were higher than that of susceptible varieties. However the total amino acids were decreased in the resistant varieties and increased in the susceptible varieties after treatment with the filtrate. Arginine was found in the variety of Zhen Kong No. 13. Disease resistance of R 2 plants screened with toxin was increased. Five mutants with resistance to Piricularia oryzae were selected

  11. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [ 3 H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to γ-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with [ 3 H]leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures

  12. Release of a new lodging-resistant mutant cultivar produced by gamma-rays in glutinous rice

    Yamaguchi, Hikoyuki; Igarashi, Isao; Sato, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    To obtain short culm mutants with lodging resistance, while retaining the other desirable traits, such as an excellent quality of the original variety, dry seeds of a glutinous rice cultivar Mezuru were exposed to gamma-rays. In M3, thirty plants were selected from 4020 plants, based on the short culm length. From the results of the subsequent yield and adaptability tests, a promising mutant line was called by the name of Sakata-Mezuru as a new cultivar in 1996. This mutant variety was mainly characterized by shortening of each internode, especially the lowest internode, and at harvest it was more adaptable to mechanical work due to the lodging resistance than its parent. It was demonstrated that the grain quality of the mutant equals to or slightly surpasses that of the parent. Sakata-Mezuru has been registered in February of 2001 and officially released. (author)

  13. Polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ mutants is dependent on additional two-component regulatory systems

    Gutu, Alina D; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory s......, indicate that addition of 4-amino-L-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance....... with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-L-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for Pho...

  14. Further studies on O2-resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    Zelitch, I.

    1990-01-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M 4 progeny of an O 2 -resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O 2 has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M 3 mutant produced M 4 progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O 2 -resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F 1 progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M 3 mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO 2 as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO 2 -free 21% O 2 and 36% less in CO 2 -free 42% O 2 compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less 14 CO 2 per [1- 14 C]glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O 2 -resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O 2 where the stoichiometry of CO 2 release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H 2 O 2

  15. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  16. Selection of drug resistant mutants from random library of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase in Plasmodium berghei model

    Tipsuwan, Wachiraporn; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Uthaipibull, Chairat

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of drug resistance amongst the human malaria Plasmodium species has most commonly been associated with genomic mutation within the parasites. This phenomenon necessitates evolutionary predictive studies of possible resistance mutations, which may occur when a new drug is introduced. Therefore, identification of possible new Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (PfDHFR) mutants that confer resistance to antifolate drugs is essential in the process of...

  17. Loss of activating EGFR mutant gene contributes to acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer cells.

    Keisuke Tabara

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations attains a meaningful response to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. However, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs could affect long-term outcome in almost all patients. To identify the potential mechanisms of resistance, we established cell lines resistant to EGFR-TKIs from the human lung cancer cell lines PC9 and11-18, which harbored activating EGFR mutations. One erlotinib-resistant cell line from PC9 and two erlotinib-resistant cell lines and two gefitinib-resistant cell lines from 11-18 were independently established. Almost complete loss of mutant delE746-A750 EGFR gene was observed in the erlotinib-resistant cells isolated from PC9, and partial loss of the mutant L858R EGFR gene copy was specifically observed in the erlotinib- and gefitinib-resistant cells from 11-18. However, constitutive activation of EGFR downstream signaling, PI3K/Akt, was observed even after loss of the mutated EGFR gene in all resistant cell lines even in the presence of the drug. In the erlotinib-resistant cells from PC9, constitutive PI3K/Akt activation was effectively inhibited by lapatinib (a dual TKI of EGFR and HER2 or BIBW2992 (pan-TKI of EGFR family proteins. Furthermore, erlotinib with either HER2 or HER3 knockdown by their cognate siRNAs also inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Transfection of activating mutant EGFR complementary DNA restored drug sensitivity in the erlotinib-resistant cell line. Our study indicates that loss of addiction to mutant EGFR resulted in gain of addiction to both HER2/HER3 and PI3K/Akt signaling to acquire EGFR-TKI resistance.

  18. Efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine against antiviral drug-resistant hepatitis B virus mutants in the chimpanzee model.

    Kamili, Saleem; Sozzi, Vitini; Thompson, Geoff; Campbell, Katie; Walker, Christopher M; Locarnini, Stephen; Krawczynski, Krzysztof

    2009-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutants resistant to treatment with nucleoside or nucleotide analogs and those with the ability to escape from HBV-neutralizing antibody have the potential to infect HBV-vaccinated individuals. To address this potential serious public health challenge, we tested the efficacy of immunity induced by a commercial hepatitis B vaccine against a tissue culture-derived, clonal HBV polymerase mutant in HBV seronegative chimpanzees. The polymerase gene mutant contained a combination of three mutations (rtV173L, rtL180M, rtM204V), two of which resulted in changes to the overlapping viral envelope of the hepatitis B surface antigen (sE164D, sI195M). Prior to the HBV mutant challenge of vaccinated chimpanzees, we established virologic, serologic, and pathologic characteristics of infections resulting from intravenous inoculation of the HBV polymerase gene mutant and the sG145R vaccine-escape surface gene mutant. Cloning and sequencing experiments determined that the three mutations in the polymerase gene mutant remained stable and that the single mutation in the surface gene mutant reverted to the wild-type sequence. Immunological evidence of HBV replication was observed in the vaccinated chimpanzees after challenge with the polymerase gene mutant as well as after rechallenge with serum-derived wild-type HBV (5,000 chimpanzee infectious doses administered intravenously), despite robust humoral and cellular anti-HBV immune responses after hepatitis B vaccination. Our data showing successful experimental infection by HBV mutants despite the presence of high anti-HBs levels considered protective in the vaccinated host are consistent with clinical reports on breakthrough infection in anti-HBs-positive patients infected with HBV mutants. In the absence of a protective humoral immunity, adaptive cellular immune responses elicited by infection may limit HBV replication and persistence.

  19. Isolation, characterization, and genetic complementation of a cellular mutant resistant to retroviral infection

    Agarwal, Sumit; Harada, Josephine; Schreifels, Jeffrey; Lech, Patrycja; Nikolai, Bryan; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Chanda, Sumit K.; Somia, Nikunj V.

    2006-01-01

    By using a genetic screen, we have isolated a mammalian cell line that is resistant to infection by retroviruses that are derived from the murine leukemia virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and feline immunodeficiency virus. We demonstrate that the cell line is genetically recessive for the resistance, and hence it is lacking a factor enabling infection by retroviruses. The block to infection is early in the life cycle, at the poorly understood uncoating stage. We implicate the proteasome at uncoating by completely rescuing the resistant phenotype with the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132. We further report on the complementation cloning of a gene (MRI, modulator of retrovirus infection) that can also act to reverse the inhibition of infection in the mutant cell line. These data implicate a role for the proteasome during uncoating, and they suggest that MRI is a regulator of this activity. Finally, we reconcile our findings and other published data to suggest a model for the involvement of the proteasome in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle. PMID:17043244

  20. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  1. Effect of zinc on grain characteristics of draught-resistant rice mutants

    Abo-Hegazi, A.M.T.; Rofail, N.B.; Eissa, E.A.; Hassan, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Through the use of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), zinc concentration was determined in kernels resulted on plants of six drought-resistant rice mutant lines fertilized with zinc sulphate. It was found that zinc fertilization increased zinc residues in the kernels with varying concentrations depending on the line, each line reacted and responded to zinc independently. Zinc content in the kernels ranged from 5.63 to 91.4 ppm in the unfertilized control lines. This range was enlarged due to zinc fertilization of the plants to be from 93.51 to 554.53 ppm. It was also noticed that zinc fertilization increased seed heaviness in varying degrees depending on the line itself. This increase may be due to the increase in kernel thickness rather than in kernel width or length. (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  2. Microbial production of squalene by a nicotinic acid-resistant mutant derived from Fusarium sp. No.5-128B

    Ogawa, T.; Kojima, I.; Takeda, N.; Fukuda, H.

    1994-01-01

    A nicotinic acid-resistant mutant, designated NA201, was obtained from Fusarium sp. no.5-128B by treatment with ultraviolet light. This mutant strain could grow in the presence of up to 500mM nicotinic acid in the culture medium, although the parent strain could not grow at concentrations of nicotinic acid above 200 mM. The Na201 strain exhibited morphological mutations, neither forming aerial hyphae nor secreting a red-brown pigment. However, it retained the resistance to kabicidin at 25 mg-l(-1) of the parent strain. The mutant NA201 cells contained high levels of squalene and low levels of ergosterol, about 53 times higher and five to six times lower, respectively, than those of the parent strain under standard culture conditions. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (Kd) affected the level of squalene in the mutant cells. The Kd for the maximum production of squalene by the mutant was 24 mmol O2 l(-1)h(-1)atm(-1) and the level of squalene in the mutant cells was 26 mg (g cell)(-1) on a dry weight basis. The greatest accumulation of squalene by the Na201 strain, corresponding to 323 mg per liter of culture medium and 35 mg (g cell)(-1) on a dry weight basis, was achieved in a culture in which the Kd was changed from a high to a low value on the third day, with the simultaneous addition of 3% glucose (w/v)

  3. Primisulfuron herbicide-resistant tobacco plants: mutant selection in vitro by adventitious shoot formation from cultured leaf discs

    Harms, C.T.; DiMaio, J.J.; Jayne, S.M.; Middlesteadt, L.A.; Negrotto, D.V.; Thompson-Taylor, H.; Montoya, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure has been developed for the rapid and direct selection of herbicide-resistant mutant plants. The procedure uses adventitious shoot formation from suitable explants, such as leaf discs, on a shoot-inducing culture medium containing a toxic herbicide concentration. Resistant green shoots were thus isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf explants cultured on medium containing 100 μg 1−1 primisulfuron, a new sulfonylurea herbicide. Resistant shoots were recovered from both haploid and diploid explants after UV mutagenesis, as well as without mutagenic treatment. Three mutant plants of separate origin were further analyzed biochemically and genetically. Their acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) enzyme activity was less inhibited by sulfonylurea herbicides than that of unselected, sensitive wild type plants. The extent of inhibition of the AHAS enzyme among the three mutants was different for different sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides suggesting different sites were affected by each mutation. Herbicide tolerance was scored for germinating seedling populations and was found to be inherited as a single dominant nuclear gene. Adventitious shoot formation from cultured leaf discs was used to determine the cross tolerance of mutant plants to various herbicidal AHAS inhibitors. The usefulness of this rapid and direct scheme for mutant selection based on adventitious shoot formation or embryogenesis is discussed. (author)

  4. Potency of carbapenems for the prevention of carbapenem-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the high potency of a new carbapenem doripenem.

    Sakyo, Shihomi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Tanimoto, Koichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The potencies of the carbapenems; doripenem (DRPM), meropenem (MEPM) and imipenem (IPM) in preventing the emergence of carbapenem-resistant mutants were examined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. The carbapenems predominantly selected carbapenem-resistant mutants or carbapenem mutants with reduced susceptibilities that were specifically resistant to carbapenems and had arisen as a result of the reduced level of expression of the outer membrane protein with a molecular weight of about 48,000 (OprD). The potency of carbapenems in preventing the growth of the mutants differed for DRPM, MEPM and IPM. The isolation frequency of the mutant was examined on agar plates containing each of the carbapenems at a concentration of 1/2 or 1/4 MIC of each carbapenem for that mutant. Mutants were not selected on agar containing DRPM at a frequency of greater than 10(-9) per cell per generation, whereas mutants of each strain were selected on agar containing MEPM or IPM at frequencies of 10(-7) to 10(-9) per cell per generation. The drug concentrations and the drug concentration range for the selective increase of carbapenem resistant mutants in the broth culture containing each carbapenem differed for each carbapenem. DRPM exhibited both the lowest drug concentration and the narrowest range of drug concentration for selection of the carbapenem-resistant mutants. The results shown in this report indicated that DRPM exhibited the greatest ability to prevent the emergence of the mutant.

  5. Superconducting Mercury-Based Cuprate Films with a Zero-Resistance Transition Temperature of 124 Kelvin

    Tsuei, C. C.; Gupta, A.; Trafas, G.; Mitzi, D.

    1994-03-01

    The synthesis of high-quality films of the recently discovered mercury-based cuprate films with high transition temperatures has been plagued by problems such as the air sensitivity of the cuprate precursor and the volatility of Hg and HgO. These processing difficulties have been circumvented by a technique of atomic-scale mixing of the HgO and cuprate precursors, use of a protective cap layer, and annealing in an appropriate Hg and O_2 environment. With this procedure, a zero-resistance transition temperature as high as 124 kelvin in c axis-oriented epitaxial HgBa_2CaCu_2O6+δ films has been achieved.

  6. Superconducting mercury-based cuprate films with a zero-resistance transition temperature of 124 Kelvin.

    Tsuei, C C; Gupta, A; Trafas, G; Mitzi, D

    1994-03-04

    The synthesis of high-quality films of the recently discovered mercury-based cuprate films with high transition temperatures has been plagued by problems such as the air sensitivity of the cuprate precursor and the volatility of Hg and HgO. These processing difficulties have been circumvented by a technique of atomic-scale mixing of the HgO and cuprate precursors, use of a protective cap layer, and annealing in an appropriate Hg and O(2) environment. With this procedure, a zero-resistance transition temperature as high as 124 kelvin in c axis-oriented epitaxial HgBa(2)CaCu(2)O(6+delta) films has been achieved.

  7. Mechanisms responsible for imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates exposed to imipenem concentrations within the mutant selection window.

    Vassilara, Foula; Galani, Irene; Souli, Maria; Papanikolaou, Konstantinos; Giamarellou, Helen; Papadopoulos, Antonios

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the propensities of imipenem to select for resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) for 9 unrelated clinical isolates and the accession of any relationship with mechanisms of resistance development. The MPC/MIC ratios ranged from 4 to 16. Detection of resistance mechanisms in the mutant derivatives of the nine isolates mainly revealed inactivating mutations in the gene coding for outer membrane protein OprD. Point mutations leading to premature stop codons or amino acid substitution S278P, ≥1bp deletion leading to frameshift mutations and interruption of the oprD by an insertion sequence, were observed. MPC and mutant selection window (MSW) are unique parameters that may guide the implementation of antimicrobial treatment, providing useful information about the necessary imipenem concentration needed in the infection area, in order to avoid the emergence of resistance, especially in clinical situations with high bacterial load. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impaired renal secretion of substrates for the multidrug resistance protein 2 in mutant transport-deficient (TR-) rats.

    Masereeuw, R.; Notenboom, S.; Smeets, P.H.E.; Wouterse, A.C.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies with mutant transport-deficient rats (TR(-)), in which the multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) is lacking, have emphasized the importance of this transport protein in the biliary excretion of a wide variety of glutathione conjugates, glucuronides, and other organic anions. Mrp2 is

  9. Characterization of the Metabolically Modified Heavy Metal-Resistant Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain MSR33 Generated for Mercury Bioremediation

    Rojas, Luis A.; Yáñez, Carolina; González, Myriam; Lobos, Soledad; Smalla, Kornelia; Seeger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Mercury-polluted environments are often contaminated with other heavy metals. Therefore, bacteria with resistance to several heavy metals may be useful for bioremediation. Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a model heavy metal-resistant bacterium, but possesses a low resistance to mercury compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve inorganic and organic mercury resistance of strain CH34, the IncP-1β plasmid pTP6 that provides novel merB, merG genes and additional other mer genes was introduced into the bacterium by biparental mating. The transconjugant Cupriavidus metallidurans strain MSR33 was genetically and biochemically characterized. Strain MSR33 maintained stably the plasmid pTP6 over 70 generations under non-selective conditions. The organomercurial lyase protein MerB and the mercuric reductase MerA of strain MSR33 were synthesized in presence of Hg2+. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (mM) for strain MSR33 were: Hg2+, 0.12 and CH3Hg+, 0.08. The addition of Hg2+ (0.04 mM) at exponential phase had not an effect on the growth rate of strain MSR33. In contrast, after Hg2+ addition at exponential phase the parental strain CH34 showed an immediate cessation of cell growth. During exposure to Hg2+ no effects in the morphology of MSR33 cells were observed, whereas CH34 cells exposed to Hg2+ showed a fuzzy outer membrane. Bioremediation with strain MSR33 of two mercury-contaminated aqueous solutions was evaluated. Hg2+ (0.10 and 0.15 mM) was completely volatilized by strain MSR33 from the polluted waters in presence of thioglycolate (5 mM) after 2 h. Conclusions/Significance A broad-spectrum mercury-resistant strain MSR33 was generated by incorporation of plasmid pTP6 that was directly isolated from the environment into C. metallidurans CH34. Strain MSR33 is capable to remove mercury from polluted waters. This is the first study to use an IncP-1β plasmid directly isolated from the environment, to generate a novel and stable bacterial strain

  10. Characterization of the metabolically modified heavy metal-resistant Cupriavidus metallidurans strain MSR33 generated for mercury bioremediation.

    Luis A Rojas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mercury-polluted environments are often contaminated with other heavy metals. Therefore, bacteria with resistance to several heavy metals may be useful for bioremediation. Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a model heavy metal-resistant bacterium, but possesses a low resistance to mercury compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve inorganic and organic mercury resistance of strain CH34, the IncP-1β plasmid pTP6 that provides novel merB, merG genes and additional other mer genes was introduced into the bacterium by biparental mating. The transconjugant Cupriavidus metallidurans strain MSR33 was genetically and biochemically characterized. Strain MSR33 maintained stably the plasmid pTP6 over 70 generations under non-selective conditions. The organomercurial lyase protein MerB and the mercuric reductase MerA of strain MSR33 were synthesized in presence of Hg(2+. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (mM for strain MSR33 were: Hg(2+, 0.12 and CH(3Hg(+, 0.08. The addition of Hg(2+ (0.04 mM at exponential phase had not an effect on the growth rate of strain MSR33. In contrast, after Hg(2+ addition at exponential phase the parental strain CH34 showed an immediate cessation of cell growth. During exposure to Hg(2+ no effects in the morphology of MSR33 cells were observed, whereas CH34 cells exposed to Hg(2+ showed a fuzzy outer membrane. Bioremediation with strain MSR33 of two mercury-contaminated aqueous solutions was evaluated. Hg(2+ (0.10 and 0.15 mM was completely volatilized by strain MSR33 from the polluted waters in presence of thioglycolate (5 mM after 2 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A broad-spectrum mercury-resistant strain MSR33 was generated by incorporation of plasmid pTP6 that was directly isolated from the environment into C. metallidurans CH34. Strain MSR33 is capable to remove mercury from polluted waters. This is the first study to use an IncP-1β plasmid directly isolated from the environment, to generate a novel

  11. Metabolic Compensation of Fitness Costs Is a General Outcome for Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutants Overexpressing Efflux Pumps.

    Olivares Pacheco, Jorge; Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Alcalde Rico, Manuel; Martínez, José Luis

    2017-07-25

    It is generally assumed that the acquisition of antibiotic resistance is associated with a fitness cost. We have shown that overexpression of the MexEF-OprN efflux pump does not decrease the fitness of a resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain compared to its wild-type counterpart. This lack of fitness cost was associated with a metabolic rewiring that includes increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain when cells are growing under fully aerobic conditions. It was not clear whether this metabolic compensation was exclusive to strains overexpressing MexEF-OprN or if it extended to other resistant strains that overexpress similar systems. To answer this question, we studied a set of P. aeruginosa mutants that independently overexpress the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, or MexXY efflux pumps. We observed increased expression of the anaerobic nitrate respiratory chain in all cases, with a concomitant increase in NO 3 consumption and NO production. These efflux pumps are proton/substrate antiporters, and their overexpression may lead to intracellular H + accumulation, which may in turn offset the pH homeostasis. Indeed, all studied mutants showed a decrease in intracellular pH under anaerobic conditions. The fastest way to eliminate the excess of protons is by increasing oxygen consumption, a feature also displayed by all analyzed mutants. Taken together, our results support metabolic rewiring as a general mechanism to avoid the fitness costs derived from overexpression of P. aeruginosa multidrug efflux pumps. The development of drugs that block this metabolic "reaccommodation" might help in reducing the persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance elements among bacterial populations. IMPORTANCE It is widely accepted that the acquisition of resistance confers a fitness cost in such a way that in the absence of antibiotics, resistant populations will be outcompeted by susceptible ones. Based on this assumption, antibiotic cycling regimes have been

  12. A Study on Mercury-Resistant Bacteria Isolated from a Gold Mine in Pongkor Village, Bogor, Indonesia

    WAHYU IRAWATI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is one of the major pollutant in the environment which is highly toxic. Bioremediation strategies using bacteria have been proposed as an attractive alternative because this is effective, less expensive and more efficient to remove mercury. Brevundimonas sp. HgP1 and Brevundimonas sp. HgP2 were two highly mercury resistant bacteria isolated from a gold mine in Pongkor village with MIC of 575 ppm. The purposes of the research were to study the effect of mercury on bacterial growth and morphological changes of bacterial colony and to measure the ability of bacterial isolates to accumulate Hg2+. The growth was monitored by measuring optical density at 600 nm, whereas accumulation of Hg2+ was measured by mercury vaporation unit. This present studies revealed that the addition of 50 and 100 ppm HgCl2 in Brevundimonas sp. HgP1 resulted in the decreasing of growth rate and the elongation of lag phase in 8 and 16 hours, respectively. The addition of HgCl2 also affected morphological appearance of the bacterial colony to black. Brevundimonas sp. HgP1 accumulated Hg2+ up to 1.09 and 2.7 mg/g dry weight of cells and removed 64.38 and 57.10% Hg2+ from the medium containing 50 and 100 ppm HgCl2, respectively.

  13. Auxin-dependent microtubule responses and seedling development are affected in a rice mutant resistant to EPC

    Nick, P.; Yatou, O.; Furuya, M.; Lambert, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Mutants in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. japonica) were used to study the role of the cytoskeleton in signal-dependent morphogenesis. Mutants obtained by gamma ray irradiation were selected that failed to show inhibition of coleoptile elongation by the anti microtubular drug ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate (EPC). The mutation EPC-Resistant 31 (ER31), isolated from such a screen, caused lethality in putatively homozygous embryos. Heterozygotes exhibited drug resistance, impaired development of crown roots, and characteristic changes in the pattern of cell elongation: cell elongation was enhanced in mesocotyls and leaf sheaths, but inhibited in coleoptiles. The orientation of cortical microtubules changed correspondingly: for etiolated seedlings, compared with the wild-type, they were more transverse with respect to the long cell axis in mesocotyls and leaf sheaths, but more longitudinal in coleoptiles. In mutant coleoptiles, in contrast to wild-type, microtubules did not reorient in response to auxin, and their response to microtubule-eliminating and microtubule-stabilizing drugs was conspicuously reduced. In contrast, they responded normally to other stimuli such as gibberellins or red light. Auxin sensitivity as assayed by the dose-response for callus induction did not show any significant differences between wild-type and mutant. The mutant phenotype is interpreted in terms of an interrupted link between auxin-triggered signal transduction and microtubule reorientation. (author)

  14. Systematic screen for mutants resistant to TORC1 inhibition in fission yeast reveals genes involved in cellular ageing and growth

    Charalampos Rallis

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1, which controls growth in response to nutrients, promotes ageing in multiple organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe emerges as a valuable genetic model system to study TORC1 function and cellular ageing. Here we exploited the combinatorial action of rapamycin and caffeine, which inhibit fission yeast growth in a TORC1-dependent manner. We screened a deletion library, comprising ∼84% of all non-essential fission yeast genes, for drug-resistant mutants. This screen identified 33 genes encoding functions such as transcription, kinases, mitochondrial respiration, biosynthesis, intra-cellular trafficking, and stress response. Among the corresponding mutants, 5 showed shortened and 21 showed increased maximal chronological lifespans; 15 of the latter mutants showed no further lifespan increase with rapamycin and might thus represent key targets downstream of TORC1. We pursued the long-lived sck2 mutant with additional functional analyses, revealing that the Sck2p kinase functions within the TORC1 network and is required for normal cell growth, global protein translation, and ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation in a nutrient-dependent manner. Notably, slow cell growth was associated with all long-lived mutants while oxidative-stress resistance was not.

  15. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  16. Antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria, antibiotics, and mercury in surface waters of Oakland County, Michigan, 2005-2006

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.; Crowley, Suzanne L.; Hardigan, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Water samples collected from 20 stream sites in Oakland and Macomb Counties, Mich., were analyzed to learn more about the occurrence of cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and the co-occurrence of antibiotics and mercury in area streams. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations exceeded the Michigan recreational water-quality standard of 300 E. coli colony forming units (CFU) per 100 milliliters of water in 19 of 35 stream-water samples collected in Oakland County. A gene commonly associated with enterococci from humans was detected in samples from Paint Creek at Rochester and Evans Ditch at Southfield, indicating that human fecal waste is a possible source of fecal contamination at these sites. E. coli resistant to the cephalosporin antibiotics (cefoxitin and/ or ceftriaxone) were found at all sites on at least one occasion. The highest percentages of E. coli isolates resistant to cefoxitin and ceftriaxone were 71 percent (Clinton River at Auburn Hills) and 19 percent (Sashabaw Creek near Drayton Plains), respectively. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli was detected more frequently in samples from intensively urbanized or industrialized areas than in samples from less urbanized areas. VRE were not detected in any sample collected in this study. Multiple antibiotics (azithromycin, erythromycin, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) were detected in water samples from the Clinton River at Auburn Hills, and tylosin (an antibiotic used in veterinary medicine and livestock production that belongs to the macrolide group, along with erythromycin) was detected in one water sample from Paint Creek at Rochester. Concentrations of total mercury were as high as 19.8 nanograms per liter (Evans Ditch at Southfield). There was no relation among percentage of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and measured concentrations of antibiotics or mercury in the water. Genetic elements capable of exchanging multiple antibiotic-resistance

  17. Phenotypic, fermentation characterization, and resistance mechanism analysis of bacteriophage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus isolated from traditional Chinese dairy products.

    Deng, Kaibo; Fang, Wei; Zheng, Baodong; Miao, Song; Huo, Guicheng

    2018-03-01

    Bacteriophage infection is a large factor in dairy industrial production failure on the basis of pure inoculation fermentation, and developing good commercial starter cultures from wild dairy products and improving the environmental vigor of starter cultures by enhancing their phage resistance are still the most effective solutions. Here we used a spontaneous isolation method to obtain bacteriophage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains that are used in traditional Chinese fermented dairy products. We analyzed their phenotypes, fermentation characteristics, and resistance mechanisms. The results showed that bacteriophage-insensitive mutants (BIM) BIM8 and BIM12 had high bacteriophage resistance while exhibiting fermentation and coagulation attributes that were as satisfying as those of their respective parent strains KLDS1.1016 and KLDS1.1028. According to the attachment receptor detection, mutants BIM8 and BIM12 exhibited reduced absorption to bacteriophage phiLdb compared with their respective bacteriophage-sensitive parent strains because of changes to the polysaccharides or teichoic acids connected to their peptidoglycan layer. Additionally, genes, including HSDR, HSDM, and HSDS, encoding 3 subunits of a type I restriction-modification system were identified in their respective parent strains. We also discovered that HSDR and HSDM were highly conserved but that HSDS was variable because it is responsible for the DNA specificity of the complex. The late lysis that occurred only in strain KLDS1.1016 and not in strain KLDS1.1028 suggests that the former and its mutant BIM8 also may have an activatable restriction-modification mechanism. We conclude that the L. bulgaricus BIM8 and BIM12 mutants have great potential in the dairy industry as starter cultures, and their phage-resistance mechanism was effective mainly due to the adsorption interference and restriction-modification system. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science

  18. Characterization of a marine-isolated mercury-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain SP1 and its potential application in marine mercury reduction

    Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin; Liu, Dongyan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, SD (China). Yantai Inst. of Coastal Zone Research (YICCAS); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, SD (China). Shandong Provincial Key Lab. of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes

    2012-02-15

    The Pseudomonas putida strain SP1 was isolated from marine environment and was found to be resistant to 280 {mu}M HgCl{sub 2}. SP1 was also highly resistant to other metals, including CdCl{sub 2}, CoCl{sub 2}, CrCl{sub 3}, CuCl{sub 2}, PbCl{sub 2}, and ZnSO{sub 4}, and the antibiotics ampicillin (Ap), kanamycin (Kn), chloramphenicol (Cm), and tetracycline (Tc). mer operon, possessed by most mercury-resistant bacteria, and other diverse types of resistant determinants were all located on the bacterial chromosome. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry and a volatilization test indicated that the isolated P. putida SP1 was able to volatilize almost 100% of the total mercury it was exposed to and could potentially be used for bioremediation in marine environments. The optimal pH for the growth of P. putida SP1 in the presence of HgCl{sub 2} and the removal of HgCl{sub 2} by P. putida SP1 was between 8.0 and 9.0, whereas the optimal pH for the expression of merA, the mercuric reductase enzyme in mer operon that reduces reactive Hg{sup 2+} to volatile and relatively inert monoatomic Hg{sup 0} vapor, was around 5.0. LD50 of P. putida SP1 to flounder and turbot was 1.5 x 10{sup 9} CFU. Biofilm developed by P. putida SP1 was 1- to 3-fold lower than biofilm developed by an aquatic pathogen Pseudomonas fluorescens TSS. The results of this study indicate that P. putida SP1 is a low virulence strain that can potentially be applied in the bioremediation of HgCl{sub 2} contamination over a broad range of pH. (orig.)

  19. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-11-01

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. Mercury resistance and mercuric reductase activities and expression among chemotrophic thermophilic Aquificae.

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng; Barkay, Tamar

    2012-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg.

  1. Transcriptomic profiling-based mutant screen reveals three new transcription factors mediating menadione resistance in Neurospora crassa.

    Zhu, Jufen; Yu, Xinxu; Xie, Baogui; Gu, Xiaokui; Zhang, Zhenying; Li, Shaojie

    2013-06-01

    To gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms of oxidative stress responses in filamentous fungi, the genome-wide transcriptional response of Neurospora crassa to menadione was analysed by digital gene expression (DGE) profiling, which identified 779 upregulated genes and 576 downregulated genes. Knockout mutants affecting 130 highly-upregulated genes were tested for menadione sensitivity, which revealed that loss of the transcription factor siderophore regulation (SRE) (a transcriptional repressor for siderophore biosynthesis), catatase-3, cytochrome c peroxidase or superoxide dismutase 1 copper chaperone causes hypersensitivity to menadione. Deletion of sre dramatically increased transcription of the siderophore biosynthesis gene ono and the siderophore iron transporter gene sit during menadione stress, suggesting that SRE is required for repression of iron uptake under oxidative stress conditions. Contrary to its phenotype, the sre deletion mutant showed higher transcriptional levels of genes encoding reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers than wild type during menadione stress, which implies that the mutant suffers a higher level of oxidative stress than wild type. Uncontrolled iron uptake in the sre mutant might exacerbate cellular oxidative stress. This is the first report of a negative regulator of iron assimilation participating in the fungal oxidative stress response. In addition to SRE, eight other transcription factor genes were also menadione-responsive but their single gene knockout mutants showed wild-type menadione sensitivity. Two of them, named as mit-2 (menadione induced transcription factor-2) and mit-4 (menadione induced transcription factor-4), were selected for double mutant analysis. The double mutant was hypersensitive to menadione. Similarly, the double mutation of mit-2 and sre also had additive effects on menadione sensitivity, suggesting multiple transcription factors mediate oxidative stress resistance in an additive manner

  2. Solution NMR structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of influenza A M2 channel

    Pielak, Rafal M. [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Chou, James J., E-mail: chou@cmcd.hms.harvard.edu [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper reports the structure of the V27A drug resistant mutant of the M2 channel of influenza A virus. {yields} High quality NMR data allowed a better-defined structure for the C-terminal region of the M2 channel. {yields} Using the structure, we propose a proton transfer pathway during M2 proton conduction. {yields} Structural comparison between the wildtype, V27A and S31N variants allowed an in-depth analysis of possible modes of drug resistance. {yields} Distinct feature of the V27A channel pore also provides an explanation for its faster rate of proton conduction. -- Abstract: The M2 protein of influenza A virus forms a proton-selective channel that is required for viral replication. It is the target of the anti-influenza drugs, amantadine and rimantadine. Widespread drug resistant mutants, however, has greatly compromised the effectiveness of these drugs. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the highly pathogenic, drug resistant mutant V27A. The structure reveals subtle structural differences from wildtype that maybe linked to drug resistance. The V27A mutation significantly decreases hydrophobic packing between the N-terminal ends of the transmembrane helices, which explains the looser, more dynamic tetrameric assembly. The weakened channel assembly can resist drug binding either by destabilizing the rimantadine-binding pocket at Asp44, in the case of the allosteric inhibition model, or by reducing hydrophobic contacts with amantadine in the pore, in the case of the pore-blocking model. Moreover, the V27A structure shows a substantially increased channel opening at the N-terminal end, which may explain the faster proton conduction observed for this mutant. Furthermore, due to the high quality NMR data recorded for the V27A mutant, we were able to determine the structured region connecting the channel domain to the C-terminal amphipathic helices that was not determined in the wildtype structure. The new structural

  3. Occurrence of large fractions of mercury-resistant bacteria in the Bay of Bengal

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.

    , 1991 , pp. 1 ? 29. 21. Smith, T., Pitts, K., McGarvey, J. A. and Summers, A. O., Bact e- rial oxidation of mercury metal vapor, Hg(0). Appl. Environ. M i cr o biol ., 1998, 64 , 1328 ? 1332. 22. http://in.rediff.com /money/2003/nov/04mercury...

  4. Gamma radiation-induced mutant of NSIC RC144 with broad-spectrum resistance to bacterial blight

    Alfonso, A.A.; Avellanoza, E.S.; Miranda, R.T.; Espejo, E.O.; Garcia, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Mutant lines derived from gamma radiation-treated commercial variety NSIC RC144 were produced and screened for novel resistance to bacterial blight, one of the most serious diseases of rice. Preliminary screening of a bulk M2 population through induced method using race 3 of the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) resulted in the selection of 89 resistant plants. Subsequent repeated bacterial blight screenings and generation advance for five seasons resulted in the selection of two highly resistant M7 sister lines whose origin can be traced to a single M2 plant. DNA fingerprinting using 63 genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers revealed an identical pattern in these lines. Using the same set of markers, they also exhibited 98% similarity to wild type NSIC RC144 indicating that the resistance is due to mutation and not due to genetic admixture or seed impurity. Two seasons of bacterial blight screening using 14 local isolates representing ten races of Xoo revealed an identical reaction pattern in these lines. The reaction pattern was observed to be unique compared to known patterns in four IRBB isolines (IRBB 4, 5, 7 and 21) with strong resistant reaction to bacterial blight suggesting possible novel resistance. The susceptible reaction in F1 testcrosses using Xoo race 6 and the segregation patterns in two F2 populations that fit with the expected 3 susceptible: 1 resistant ratio (P = 0.4, ns) suggest a single-gene recessive mutation in these lines. These mutants are now being used as resistance donor in the breeding program while further molecular characterization to map and characterize the mutated gene is being pursued

  5. Selection of sugarcane mutants with resistance to red-rot disease, water-logging and delayed/non-flowering

    Shaikh, M A.Q.; Shamsuzzaman, K M; Majid, M A; Howlider, M A.R.; Islam, M M [Institute of Nuclear Agriculture, Mymensingh (Bangladesh)

    1997-07-01

    Three batches of sugarcane cuttings were irradiated with gamma-rays in three different years for isolating mutants for delayed flowering, resistance to red-rot disease and water-logged conditions. In the first batch cuttings of cvs. `Isd-2/54`, `Latarijaba` and `Nagarbari` were irradiated with 20-40 Gy gamma-rays. In M{sub 1} V{sub 4} generation, 2,114 canes selected from inoculated M{sub 1}V{sub 3} generation, were re-inoculated with red-hot pathogen. Of these, four canes were resistant and 64 canes were moderately resistant to the disease. The M{sub 1}V{sub 5} generation of the selected clones was grown at two locations for selection. In the second batch, cuttings of cvs. `Isd-16`, `Isd-2/54`, `Nagarbari` and `Latarijaba` were irradiated with 20-60 Gy gamma-rays. The irradiated material was divided into three lots and each lot was put under different selection pressure. For isolating mutants with resistance to red-rot disease, 15,104 canes were artificially inoculated in the M{sub 1}V{sub 3}. Among these, one clone was resistant and 16 were moderately resistant. Of the 10,000 M{sub 1}V{sub 3} canes, grown under water-logged condition and selected for greenness of leaf at harvest, 38 canes were reasonably tolerant. For selecting late flowering mutants, about 8,500 canes were left in a field for a month after normal harvest; of these five showed late flowering. These mutants were grown for further selection in the M{sub 1}V{sub 4}. To screen out non-flowering canes, cvs. `I-291/87`, an early flowering types, and `I525/85`, a late flowering type were irradiated with 20-40 Gy gamma rays. M{sub 1}V{sub 3} generation has been grown in the field. (author). 13 refs, 6 tabs.

  6. Development of new mouse lung tumor models expressing EGFR T790M mutants associated with clinical resistance to kinase inhibitors.

    Regales, Lucia; Balak, Marissa N; Gong, Yixuan; Politi, Katerina; Sawai, Ayana; Le, Carl; Koutcher, Jason A; Solit, David B; Rosen, Neal; Zakowski, Maureen F; Pao, William

    2007-08-29

    The EGFR T790M mutation confers acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in human EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma, is occasionally detected before treatment, and may confer genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. To study further its role in lung tumorigenesis, we developed mice with inducible expression in type II pneumocytes of EGFR(T790M) alone or together with a drug-sensitive L858R mutation. Both transgenic lines develop lung adenocarcinomas that require mutant EGFR for tumor maintenance but are resistant to an EGFR kinase inhibitor. EGFR(L858R+T790M)-driven tumors are transiently targeted by hsp90 inhibition. Notably, EGFR(T790M)-expressing animals develop tumors with longer latency than EGFR(L858R+T790M)-bearing mice and in the absence of additional kinase domain mutations. These new mouse models of mutant EGFR-dependent lung adenocarcinomas provide insight into clinical observations. The models should also be useful for developing improved therapies for patients with lung cancers harboring EGFR(T790M) alone or in conjunction with drug-sensitive EGFR kinase domain mutations.

  7. Development of new mouse lung tumor models expressing EGFR T790M mutants associated with clinical resistance to kinase inhibitors.

    Lucia Regales

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The EGFR T790M mutation confers acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in human EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma, is occasionally detected before treatment, and may confer genetic susceptibility to lung cancer.To study further its role in lung tumorigenesis, we developed mice with inducible expression in type II pneumocytes of EGFR(T790M alone or together with a drug-sensitive L858R mutation. Both transgenic lines develop lung adenocarcinomas that require mutant EGFR for tumor maintenance but are resistant to an EGFR kinase inhibitor. EGFR(L858R+T790M-driven tumors are transiently targeted by hsp90 inhibition. Notably, EGFR(T790M-expressing animals develop tumors with longer latency than EGFR(L858R+T790M-bearing mice and in the absence of additional kinase domain mutations.These new mouse models of mutant EGFR-dependent lung adenocarcinomas provide insight into clinical observations. The models should also be useful for developing improved therapies for patients with lung cancers harboring EGFR(T790M alone or in conjunction with drug-sensitive EGFR kinase domain mutations.

  8. Transcriptomics and knockout mutant analysis of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    Verhagen, B.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A classic example of induced resistance is triggered after infection by a necrotizing pathogen, rendering uninfected,distal parts more resistant to subsequent pathogen attack, and is often referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). A phenotypically comparable type of induced resistance is

  9. The Arabidopsis mutant cev1 has constitutively active jasmonate and ethylene signal pathways and enhanced resistance to pathogens.

    Ellis, C; Turner, J G

    2001-05-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) inhibit plant growth and induce plant defense responses. To define genes in the Arabidopsis JA signal pathway, we screened for mutants with constitutive expression of a luciferase reporter for the JA-responsive promoter from the vegetative storage protein gene VSP1. One mutant, named constitutive expression of VSP1 (cev1), produced plants that were smaller than wild type, had stunted roots with long root hairs, accumulated anthocyanin, had constitutive expression of the defense-related genes VSP1, VSP2, Thi2.1, PDF1.2, and CHI-B, and had enhanced resistance to powdery mildew diseases. Genetic evidence indicated that the cev1 phenotype required both COI1, an essential component of the JA signal pathway, and ETR1, which encodes the ethylene receptor. We conclude that cev1 stimulates both the JA and the ethylene signal pathways and that CEV1 regulates an early step in an Arabidopsis defense pathway.

  10. Mercury-Resistant Marine Bacteria and their Role in Bioremediation of Certain Toxicants

    De, J.

    of heavy metals (mercury, cadmium, lead to name a few). Without efficient retention technologies, toxic chemicals including Hg are let into the environment, endangering ecosystems and public health. The main focus in this section is on literature review... toxicity. For the most sensitive species, Daphnia magna, the NOTEL for reproductive impairment is 3 ppb for inorganic mercury and lesser than 0.04 ppb for methylmercury (Canstein, 2000). Hence it is of great importance for both environment and public health...

  11. Enhanced resistance to fluoroquinolones in laboratory-grown mutants & clinical isolates of Shigella due to synergism between efflux pump expression & mutations in quinolone resistance determining region

    Neelam Taneja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a worldwide emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance, naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and laboratory-induced spontaneous mutants of Shigella spp. were used and the relative contributions of acrAB-tolC efflux pumps, gyrase and topoisomerase target gene mutations towards fluoroquinolone resistance were determined. Methods: Eight Shigella flexneri and six S. dysenteriae clinical isolates were studied. Three consecutive mutants resistant to ciprofloxacin for S. flexneri SFM1 (≥0.25 µg/ml, SFM2 (≥4 µg/ml and SFM3 (≥32 µg/ml were selected in 15 steps from susceptible isolates by serial exposure to increasing concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Similarly, two mutants for S. dysenteriae SDM1 (≥0.25 µg/ml and SDM2 (≥4 µg/ml were selected in eight steps. After PCR amplification sequence analyses of gyrase and topoisomerase target genes were performed. Expression of efflux genes acrA, acrB, acrR and tolC was measured using real-time PCR. Results: Mutations were observed in gyrA Ser [83]→Leu, Asp [87]→Asn/Gly, Val [196]→Ala and in parC Phe [93]→Val, Ser [80]→Ile, Asp [101]→Glu and Asp [110]→Glu. Overall, acrA and acrB overexpression was associated with fluoroquinolone resistance ( p0 <0.05; while tolC and acrR expression levels did not. Interpretation & conclusions: Fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella spp. is the end product of either a single or a combination of mutations in QRDRs and/ or efflux activity. Novel polymorphisms were observed at Val [196]→Ala in gyrA in clinical isolates and Phe [93]→Val, Asp [101]→Glu, Asp [110]→Glu and in parC in majority of laboratory-grown mutants.

  12. Uncoupling of oxidative stress resistance and lifespan in long-lived isp-1 mitochondrial mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Dues, Dylan J; Schaar, Claire E; Johnson, Benjamin K; Bowman, Megan J; Winn, Mary E; Senchuk, Megan M; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2017-07-01

    Mutations affecting components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain have been shown to increase lifespan in multiple species including the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. While it was originally proposed that decreased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from lower rates of electron transport could account for the observed increase in lifespan, recent evidence indicates that ROS levels are increased in at least some of these long-lived mitochondrial mutants. Here, we show that the long-lived mitochondrial mutant isp-1 worms have increased resistance to oxidative stress. Our results suggest that elevated ROS levels in isp-1 worms cause the activation of multiple stress-response pathways including the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, the SKN-1-mediated stress response, and the hypoxia response. In addition, these worms have increased expression of specific antioxidant enzymes, including a marked upregulation of the inducible superoxide dismutase genes sod-3 and sod-5. Examining the contribution of sod-3 and sod-5 to the oxidative stress resistance in isp-1 worms revealed that loss of either of these genes increased resistance to oxidative stress, but not other forms of stress. Deletion of sod-3 or sod-5 decreased the lifespan of isp-1 worms and further exacerbated their slow physiologic rates. Thus, while deletion of sod-3 and sod-5 genes has little impact on stress resistance, physiologic rates or lifespan in wild-type worms, these genes are required for the longevity of isp-1 worms. Overall, this work shows that the increased resistance to oxidative stress in isp-1 worms does not account for their longevity, and that resistance to oxidative stress can be experimentally dissociated from lifespan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism of mercuric chloride resistance in microorganisms. I. Vaporization of a mercury compound from mercuric chloride by multiple drug resistant strains of Escherichia coli

    Komura, I; Izaki, K

    1971-01-01

    Three strains of Escherichia coli possessing the multiple drug resistance were found to be resistant also to HgCl/sub 2/, though they were sensitive to other heavy metal ions such as nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc ions. Like the resistance to drugs such as chloramphenicol and tetracycline, the HgCl/sub 2/ resistance could be transferred from a resistant strain of E. coli to sensitive strains of E. coli and Aerobacter aerogenes. The resistant strains could grow in the presence of 0.02 mM HgCl/sub 2/, whereas a sensitive strain failed to grow in the presence of 0.01 mM HgCl/sub 2/. During cultivation in the presence of HgCl/sub 2/, the cells of resistant strain vaporized a form of radioactive mercury when incubated with /sup 203/HgCl/sub 2/, glucose and NaCl in phosphate buffer while the cells of sensitive strain showed no such activity. This phenomenon seemed to explain the HgCl/sub 2/ resistance of the resistant strains.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants resistant to urea inhibition of growth on acetanilide.

    Gregoriou, M; Brown, P R; Tata, R

    1977-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI 3 was able to grow in medium containing acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide) as a carbon source when NH4+ was the nitrogen source but not when urea was the nitrogen source. AIU mutants isolated from strain AI 3 grew on either medium. Urease levels in bacteria grown in the presence of urea were 10-fold lower when NH4+ or acetanilide was also in the medium, but there were no apparent differences in urease or its synthesis between strain AI 3 and mutant AIU 1N. The first metabolic step in the acetanilide utlization is catalyzed by an amidase. Amidases in several AIU strains showed altered physiochemical properties. Urea inhibited amidase in a time-dependent reaction, but the rates of the inhibitory reaction with amidases from the AIU mutants were slower than with AI 3 amidase. The purified amidase from AIU 1N showed a marked difference in its pH/activity profile from that obtained with purified AI 3 amidase. These observations indicate that the ability of strain AIU 1N and the other mutants to grow on acetanilide/urea medium is associated with a mutation in the amidase structural gene; this was confirmed for strain AIU 1N by transduction.

  15. Characterization of the binding capacity of mercurial species in Lactobacillus strains.

    Alcántara, Cristina; Jadán-Piedra, Carlos; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta; Zúñiga, Manuel; Monedero, Vicente

    2017-12-01

    Metal sequestration by bacteria has been proposed as a strategy to counteract metal contamination in foodstuffs. Lactobacilli can interact with metals, although studies with important foodborne metals such as inorganic [Hg(II)] or organic (CH 3 Hg) mercury are lacking. Lactobacilli were evaluated for their potential to bind these contaminants and the nature of the interaction was assessed by the use of metal competitors, chemical and enzymatical treatments, and mutants affected in the cell wall structure. Lactobacillus strains efficiently bound Hg(II) and CH 3 Hg. Mercury binding by Lactobacillus casei BL23 was independent of cell viability. In BL23, both forms of mercury were cell wall bound. Their interaction was not inhibited by cations and it was resistant to chelating agents and protein digestion. Lactobacillus casei mutants affected in genes involved in the modulation of the negative charge of the cell wall anionic polymer lipoteichoic acid showed increased mercury biosorption. In these mutants, mercury toxicity was enhanced compared to wild-type bacteria. These data suggest that lipoteichoic acid itself or the physicochemical characteristics that it confers to the cell wall play a major role in mercury complexation. This is the first example of the biosorption of Hg(II) and CH 3 Hg in lactobacilli and it represents a first step towards their possible use as agents for diminishing mercury bioaccessibility from food at the gastrointestinal tract. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Mutantes morfológicos de algodoeiro herbáceo como fonte de resistência ao bicudo Morphological mutants of upland cotton as source of boll weevil resistance

    Francisco das Chagas Vidal Neto

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos de três características morfológicas mutantes de linhagens de algodoeiro herbáceo (Gossypium hirsutum L. r. latifolium Hutch., isoladas ou combinadas no mesmo genótipo, como fonte de resistência ao bicudo, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, 1843 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. O experimento foi conduzido em campo, sob infestação natural, com delineamento de blocos ao acaso e arranjo fatorial 2´3 com um tratamento adicional, com quatro repetições. Em teste com chance de escolha, a característica bráctea frego foi a que apresentou maior redução no dano de oviposição pelo bicudo (34,71%, em relação ao equivalente normal. A folha "okra" reduziu o dano apenas quando associada à bráctea frego (40%. A combinação das três características mutantes na mesma planta proporcionou a menor porcentagem de botões com dano de oviposição (23,13%.This work aimed to evaluate the effects of three morphological mutants of upland cotton lines (Gossypium hirsutm L. r. latifolium Hutch., isolated or in combination in the same cotton genotype, as a source of resistance to boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, 1843 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. The experiment was carried out in the field, under natural infestation, with a completely randomized block design arranged in a factorial 2´3 plus an additional treatment, with four replications. In a multiple choice test, the character mutant frego bract presented the higher reduction on boll weevil oviposition damage (34.71%, in relation to the normal equivalent. The okra leaf reduced the boll weevil damage only when associated with frego bract (40%. The combination of the three mutant characters in the same plant presented the least square percent with oviposition damage (23.13%.

  17. Generation of pea mutants for resistance to Ascochyta blight and powdery mildew and their characterization using isozyme markers [Pisum sativum L.; India

    Sharma, R.; Kant, A.; Kaushal, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    To induce resistance in pea against Ascochyta blight and powdery mildew through mutagenesis, two locally grown cultivars Lincoln and Palam Priya were subjected to three doses each of gamma rays (10, 15 and 20 kR) and chemical mutagen ethylmethane sulfonate (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3%). Reduced germination was observed in response to mutagen treatment in both cultivars. Phenotypic changes were observed in M1 and M2 generations of both the cultivars. In M2 generation twenty-seven mutants of Lincoln and sixteen of Palam Priya were found resistant to Ascochyta blight under natural epiphytotic conditions. High level of resistance in M2 generation against powdery mildew could not be achieved. Plant progenies in the M3 generation were also evaluated for resistance to Ascochyta pinodes as well as Erysiphe pisi through detached leaf technique. Six mutants of Lincoln and only one of Palam Priya were found resistant to A. pinodes. One mutant of Palam Priya (P15-3) showed resistance to both the pathogens. Increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity was observed in all the resistant mutants. New isoforms of peroxidase could be detected in the mutant P15-3 (Palam Priya) and also in L0.2-1 (Lincoln). However, not much variation for esterase could be observed [it

  18. Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 with enhanced resistance to ionizing radiation. 4. Peculiarities of recombination in Gamsup(r) mutants

    Bresler, S.E.; Kalinin, V.L.; Laneeva, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    Radioresistant mutant Gam sup(r) 444 differs from a wild type and from Gam sup(r) 445 mutant in decreased frequency of long episome heritage ORF 1 (pur E + -tsx + -proC + -lac + ) and F 14 (ilv + -argE + ), containing hot points of RecRecF - depending recombination and in increased frequency of chromosome mobilization and integrative suppression of temperature sensitive dna A46 mutation by sexual factor F. In this respect Gam sup(r) 444 mutant resembles rec BC sbs B mutant with RecF - recombination type

  19. [Mutant alleles associated to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethanime resistance in Plasmodium falciparum of the Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia borders].

    Arróspide, Nancy; Hijar-Guerra, Gisely; de Mora, Doménica; Diaz-Cortéz, César Eduardo; Veloz-Perez, Raúl; Gutierrez, Sonia; Cabezas-Sánchez, César

    2014-04-01

    The frequency of mutations in pfCRT and DHFR/DHPS genes of Plasmodium falciparum associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was evaluated in 83 strains from the districts of Esmeralda and Machala, located on the borders of Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia in 2002. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), conventional and its variants, was used. Mutations in the pfCRT gene were found in more than 90% of the samples from Esmeralda and Machala. For the DHFR gene, 90% of the strains were mutant samples from Esmeralda, 3 were double mutations and 1 was a triple mutation. In Machala, 25% were simple mutant forms and 75% mixed mutant forms (wild forms/mutant). In conclusion, resistance to chloroquine has been fixed in strains carrying K76T pfCRT mutation, whereas genetic imprinting for resistance to pyrimethamine is evolving, particularly in the district of Esmeralda.

  20. The 7B-1 mutant in tomato shows blue-light-specific resistance to osmotic stress and abscisic acid.

    Fellner, Martin; Sawhney, Vipen K

    2002-03-01

    Germination of wild-type (WT) tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seed is inhibited by mannitol (100-140 mM) in light, but not in darkness, suggesting that light amplifies the responsiveness of the seed to osmotic stress (M. Fellner, V.K. Sawhney (2001) Theor Appl Genet 102:215-221). Here we report that white light (W) and especially blue light (B) strongly enhance the mannitol-induced inhibition of seed germination, and that the effect of red light (R) is weak or nil. The inhibitory effect of mannitol could be completely overcome by fluridone, an inhibitor of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, indicating that mannitol inhibits seed germination via ABA accumulation in seeds. The inhibition of WT seed germination by exogenous ABA was also amplified by W or B, but not by R. In a recessive, ABA-overproducing, 7B-1 mutant of tomato, seed germination and hypocotyl growth were resistant to inhibition by mannitol or exogenous ABA, both in W or B. Experiments with fluridone suggested that inhibition of hypocotyl growth by W or B is also partially via ABA accumulation. De-etiolation in the mutant was especially less in B compared to the WT, and there was no difference in hypocotyl growth between the two genotypes in R. Our data suggest that B amplifies the responsiveness of tomato seeds and hypocotyls to mannitol and ABA, and that W- or B-specific resistance of the 7B-1 mutant to osmotic stress or ABA is a consequence of a defect in B perception or signal transduction.

  1. Abscisic acid and ethylene in mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana differing in their resistance to ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation stress

    Rakitina, T.Ya.; Vlasov, P.V.; Jalilova, F.Kh.; Kefeli, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet irradiation (between 280 and 320 nm) on plant survival, ethylene evolution, and abscisic acid (ABA) content were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heunh. plants. Three genetic lines of Arabidopsis differing in their resistance to ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation stress were used. UV-B irradiation had detrimental effects on plant survival, enhanced ethylene evolution, and increased ABA content in the plants of all three lines. The higher ultraviolet dose was absorbed, the less was the number of surviving plants and the higher were the levels of both phytohormones. The maximum ethylene evolution occurred during the initial two to four hours after irradiation, but the ABA content peaked only after 24 h. The most resistant line showed the highest ABA content and the fastest ethylene evolution, whereas, in the susceptible line, both indices were the lowest. After UV-B treatment, the ABA-deficient Arabidopsis mutant evolved four to six times more ethylene than the plants with normal ABA content. Stress ethylene production evidently did not depend on the level of endogenous ABA as the kinetics of ethylene evolution was similar in the ABA-deficient mutant and in other studied Arabidopsis lines

  2. Association of mutator activity with UV sensitivity in an aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster V79 cells

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rates of an ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant (aphsup(r)-4-2) and its revertants have been determined by 2 techniques. By using the fluctuation analysis, the mutant and its thymidine (TdR)-prototrophic 'revertant' were found to exhibit elevated spontaneous mutation rates at the 6-thioguanine- and diphtheria-toxin-resistant loci. In contrast, the TdR-auxotrophic 'revertant' did not show this property. Similar results were obtained by the multiple replating technique. From these comparative studies and other previous characterizations, it appears that a single gene mutation is responsible for the following pleiotropic phenotype: slow growth, UV sensitivity, high UV-induced mutability, high frequency of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-dependent chromosome breaks and enhanced spontaneous mutation rate. Recent studies indicate that the mutation may be on the gene for DNA polymerase α. The results further indicate that thymidine auxotrophy or imbalance in nucleotide pools is not necessarily associated with the mutator activity in mammalian cells. (orig.)

  3. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Crizotinib-Resistant Mutants of EML4-ALK Identified Through an Accelerated Mutagenesis Screen

    Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaotian; Ning, Yaoyu; Wardwell, Scott D; Moran, Lauren; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Anjum, Rana; Wang, Yihan; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C; Miret, Juan J; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Activating gene rearrangements of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as driver mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, and other cancers. Crizotinib, a dual MET/ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors harboring ALK translocations. Inhibitors of driver kinases often elicit kinase domain mutations that confer resistance, and such mutations have been successfully predicted using in vitro mutagenesis screens. Here, this approach was used to discover an extensive set of ALK mutations that can confer resistance to crizotinib. Mutations at 16 residues were identified, structurally clustered into five regions around the kinase active site, which conferred varying degrees of resistance. The screen successfully predicted the L1196M, C1156Y, and F1174L mutations, recently identified in crizotinib-resistant patients. In separate studies, we demonstrated that crizotinib has relatively modest potency in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A more potent ALK inhibitor, TAE684, maintained substantial activity against mutations that conferred resistance to crizotinib. Our study identifies multiple novel mutations in ALK that may confer clinical resistance to crizotinib, suggests that crizotinib's narrow selectivity window may underlie its susceptibility to such resistance and demonstrates that a more potent ALK inhibitor may be effective at overcoming resistance. PMID:22034911

  5. Use of resistant ACCase mutants to screen for novel inhibitors against resistant and susceptible forms of ACCase from grass weeds.

    Shukla, Amit; Nycholat, Corwin; Subramanian, Mani V; Anderson, Richard J; Devine, Malcolm D

    2004-08-11

    The aryloxyphenoxypropionic acid (AOPP) and cyclohexanedione (CHD) herbicides inhibit the first committed enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis, acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase). The frequent use of AOPP and CHD herbicides has resulted in the development of resistance to these herbicides in many grass weed species. New herbicides that inhibit both the susceptible and resistant forms of ACCase in grass weeds would have obvious commercial appeal. In the present study, an attempt was made to identify molecules that target both the herbicide-sensitive and -resistant forms of ACCase. Seven experimental compounds, either CHD-like or AOPP-CHD hybrids, were synthesized and assayed against previously characterized susceptible and resistant forms of ACCase. All seven compounds inhibited ACCase from sensitive biotypes of Setaria viridis and Eleusine indica (I50 values from 6.4 to >100 microM) but were not particularly potent compared to some commercialized herbicides (I50 values of 0.08-5.6 microM). In almost all cases, the I50 values for each compound assayed against the resistant ACCases were higher than those against the corresponding sensitive ACCase, indicating reduced binding to the resistant ACCases. One compound, a CHD analogue, was almost equally effective against the resistant and susceptible ACCases, although it was not a very potent ACCase inhibitor per se (I50 of 51 and 76 microM against susceptible ACCase from S. viridis and E. indica, respectively). The AOPP-CHD hybrid molecules also inhibited some of the resistant ACCases, with I50 values ranging from 6.4 to 50 microM. These compounds may be good leads for developing ACCase inhibitors that target a wider range of ACCase isoforms, including those found in AOPP- and CHD-resistant weed biotypes.

  6. Comparative studies on physical-chemical properties and major nutritional components of rice grain in dwarf mutant resistant to insect pests and its parent

    Cui Hairui; Wu Dianxing; Shen Shengquan; Shu Qingyao

    2004-01-01

    Starch characteristics and key nutritional compositions in the dwarf mutant from transgenic rice with crylAb gene were compared with its original parent, Xiushuill. It was found that peak viscosity, hot paste viscosity and cool paste viscosity of RVA profile between the dwarf mutant and its parent were significantly different at 1% level, but apparent amylose content, gel consistence existed and breakdown viscosity of RVA profile were similar, and no significant differences existed in contents of crude protein, crude fat, total ash, amino acids and mineral compositions. It was suggested that no notable changes occurred in grain quality traits in the dwarf mutant with insect resistance. (authors)

  7. A high constitutive catalase activity confers resistance to methyl viologen-promoted oxidative stress in a mutant of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Moirangthem, Lakshmipyari Devi; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Stensjö, Karin; Lindblad, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy

    2014-04-01

    A spontaneous methyl viologen (MV)-resistant mutant of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 was isolated and the major enzymatic antioxidants involved in combating MV-induced oxidative stress were evaluated. The mutant displayed a high constitutive catalase activity as a consequence of which, the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in the mutant was lower than the wild type (N. punctiforme) in the presence of MV. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity that consisted of a SodA (manganese-SOD) and a SodB (iron-SOD) was not suppressed in the mutant following MV treatment. The mutant was, however, characterised by a lower peroxidase activity compared with its wild type, and its improved tolerance to externally added H₂O₂ could only be attributed to enhanced catalase activity. Furthermore, MV-induced toxic effects on the wild type such as (1) loss of photosynthetic performance assessed as maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, (2) nitrogenase inactivation, and (3) filament fragmentation and cell lysis were not observed in the mutant. These findings highlight the importance of catalase in preventing MV-promoted oxidative damage and cell death in the cyanobacterium N. punctiforme. Such oxidative stress resistant mutants of cyanobacteria are likely to be a better source of biofertilisers, as they can grow and fix nitrogen in an unhindered manner in agricultural fields that are often contaminated with the herbicide MV, also commonly known as paraquat.

  8. A Dinitroaniline-Resistant Mutant of Eleusine indica Exhibits Cross-Resistance and Supersensitivity to Antimicrotubule Herbicides and Drugs 1

    Vaughn, Kevin C.; Marks, M. David; Weeks, Donald P.

    1987-01-01

    A dinitroaniline-resistant (R) biotype of Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertner. (goosegrass) is demonstrated to be cross-resistant to a structurally non-related herbicide, amiprophosmethyl, and supersensitive to two other classes of compounds which disrupt mitosis. These characteristics of the R biotype were discovered in a comparative test of the effects of 24 different antimitotic compounds on the R biotype and susceptible (S) wild-type Eleusine. The compounds tested could be classified into three groups based upon their effects on mitosis in root tips of the susceptible (S) biotype. Class I compounds induced effects like the well known mitotic disrupter colchicine: absence of cortical and spindle microtubules, mitosis arrested at prometaphase, and the formation of polymorphic nuclei after arrested mitosis. The R biotype was resistant to treatment with some class I inhibitors (all dinitroaniline herbicides and amiprophosmethyl) but not all (e.g. colchicine, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine, and pronamide). Roots of the R biotype, when treated with either dinitroaniline herbicides or amiprophosmethyl, exhibited no or only small increases in the mitotic index nor were the spindle and cortical microtubules affected. Compounds of class II (carbamate herbicides and griseofulvin) cause misorientation of microtubules which results in multinucleated cells. Compounds of class III (caffeine and structually related alkaloids) cause imcomplete cell walls to form at telophase. Each of these last two classes of compounds affected the R biotype more than the S biotype (supersensitivity). The cross-resistance and high levels of resistance of the R biotype of Eleusine to the dinitroaniline herbicides and the structurally distinct herbicide, amiprophosmethyl, indicate that a mechanism of resistance based upon metabolic modification, translocation, or compartmentation of the herbicides is probably not operative. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665371

  9. A Dinitroaniline-Resistant Mutant of Eleusine indica Exhibits Cross-Resistance and Supersensitivity to Antimicrotubule Herbicides and Drugs.

    Vaughn, K C; Marks, M D; Weeks, D P

    1987-04-01

    A dinitroaniline-resistant (R) biotype of Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertner. (goosegrass) is demonstrated to be cross-resistant to a structurally non-related herbicide, amiprophosmethyl, and supersensitive to two other classes of compounds which disrupt mitosis. These characteristics of the R biotype were discovered in a comparative test of the effects of 24 different antimitotic compounds on the R biotype and susceptible (S) wild-type Eleusine. The compounds tested could be classified into three groups based upon their effects on mitosis in root tips of the susceptible (S) biotype. Class I compounds induced effects like the well known mitotic disrupter colchicine: absence of cortical and spindle microtubules, mitosis arrested at prometaphase, and the formation of polymorphic nuclei after arrested mitosis. The R biotype was resistant to treatment with some class I inhibitors (all dinitroaniline herbicides and amiprophosmethyl) but not all (e.g. colchicine, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine, and pronamide). Roots of the R biotype, when treated with either dinitroaniline herbicides or amiprophosmethyl, exhibited no or only small increases in the mitotic index nor were the spindle and cortical microtubules affected. Compounds of class II (carbamate herbicides and griseofulvin) cause misorientation of microtubules which results in multinucleated cells. Compounds of class III (caffeine and structually related alkaloids) cause imcomplete cell walls to form at telophase. Each of these last two classes of compounds affected the R biotype more than the S biotype (supersensitivity). The cross-resistance and high levels of resistance of the R biotype of Eleusine to the dinitroaniline herbicides and the structurally distinct herbicide, amiprophosmethyl, indicate that a mechanism of resistance based upon metabolic modification, translocation, or compartmentation of the herbicides is probably not operative.

  10. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABLT315I mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and pre-clinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multi-targeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABLT315I-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML. PMID:19878872

  11. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim; (OHSU- Cancer Instit.); (ARIAD)

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  12. Control mechanisms of mutability: Studies on the (radiation-resistant) mutant rar-2 of Drosophila melanogaster

    Rudolph, P.

    1981-01-01

    The author attempts a quantitative description of the resistance factor of the 2nd chromosome (rar-2) on the mutation rate after irradiation, an explanation of the mechanism of action via an analysis of induced numerical aberration, and an analysis of the genetic position of this factor and its delimination with the aid of phenotypically visible markers. A comparison of the two strains ROeI 0 and ROeI 40 was to help to investigate possible modifications of the resistance factor in the strain ROeI 40 , obtained by further selection from ROeI 0 . There was no difference between the two strains as far as the effects of the resistance factor rar-2 were concerned. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Cell suspension culture and mutants selection for resistance to PEG induced water stress in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Zhang Xiaodong; Lin Tingan

    1994-01-01

    Elements affecting suspension cell culture in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were studied and a method of rapid establishment of embryogenic suspension cell lines was introduced. Effects of γ ray irradiation on the growth of suspension cells were studied, and the optimum dose of irradiation for inducing mutants from suspension cells was about 20 ∼ 60 Gy. Effects of PEG and NaCl induced water stress on the growth of suspension cells were also investigated, and the results showed that the congregants of preliminary suspension culture were more susceptible than the established suspension cell lines. With 20 Gy of γ ray irradiation on suspension cell line (JL416), six clones were obtained with 70 days of selection on medium of 15% PEG (about-11 bar). A number of regenerated plants were obtained from these clones. One clone was also gained from medium containing 20% PEG (about-15 bar). The selected mutant cell lines (JP15 and JP20) has strong resistances to high concentration of PEG and NaCl induced water stress

  14. Restoration of X-ray resistance and V(D)J recombination in mutant cells by Ku cDNA

    Smider, V.; Rathmell, W.K.; Chu, G.; Lieber, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Three genetic complementation groups of rodent cells are defective for both repair of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks and V(D)J recombination. Cells from one group lack a DNA end-binding activity that is biochemically and antigenically similar to the Ku autoantigen. Transfection of complementary DNA (cDNA) that encoded the 86-kilodalton subunit of Ku rescued these mutant cells for DNA end-binding activity, x-ray resistance, and V(D)J recombination activity. These results establish a role for Ku in DNA repair and recombination. Furthermore, as a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase, Ku may initiate a signaling pathway induced by DNA damage

  15. Mutants with increased resistance to herbicide in Guinea corn Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

    Odeigah, P.G.C.; Adewoyin, A.F.; Obatayo, O.O.

    1990-01-01

    Sorghum is an important staple food in many tropical countries. In Nigeria, it is extensively cultivated for food and, in recent times, as raw material for the brewing, baking and starch-making industries. We have investigated the possibilities of breeding crop cultivars of Sorghum with improved seed protein, amylase activities and resistance to herbicide by means of induced mutation. Seeds were treated by soaking them in an aqueous solution of ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) 8 or 64 mM at room temperature 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 or 24 hours. After the treatment, the seeds were briefly rinsed in water and transferred to petri dishes containing moist filter paper for germination. The seedlings were later transplanted to loamy sand soil in plastic trays. M, seedlings were grown to maturity in the greenhouse. The M 1 contained plants with variegated leaves and other morphological abnormalities. Only the progenies of normal plants were grown for further generations. Resistance to Igran 500 E.G. (2-tert-butylamino-4-ethylamino-6-methylthio-striazine; from Ciba Geigy) was tested in M 2 seedlings by mixing 1 part per 100 (by volume) of the herbicide with the soil a day before sowing the seeds. Preliminary screening of 2,500 M 2 plants revealed a number of morphological and leaf colour mutations. 50 seedlings were more resistant to the herbicide but no seedling resistance was observed in the parent cultivar. There was a 23.43% reduction in seedling weight of the M 2 lines grown in soil treated with Igran 500, whereas the reduction in seedling weight of the original cultivar was 42.46%. The resistant M 2 seedlings had longer and better roots

  16. Breeding wheat mutant Longfu 03D51 with resisting stem rust and genetic analyzation of resisting disease and RAPD maker

    Sun Yan; Yin Jing; Wang Guangjin; Zhang Hongji; Huang Jinghua; Guo Qiang; Diao Yanling; Liu Dongjun

    2007-01-01

    Longfu 03D51 was bred using Long 6239 immature embryo as explants through radiation mutagenesis breeding coupled with tissue culture technique. By artificial inoculation and field breeding identified Longfu 03D51 was identified with high resistance to dominant strain 21C 3 CPH, good quality and high yield. Genetic analysis suggested that stem rust was controlled by a single gene. The DNA polymorphism on Longfu 03D51 and its parents were studied by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), 3 primers out of 60 RAPD primers were found polymorphism between the Longfu 03D51 and its parent Long 6239, and 3 stable polyphymorphic bands amplified in Longfu 03D51 with the size of 380bp, 700bp, 600 bp by random primer E07, E11, E17, respectively. Genetic and RAPD analysis indicated that 3 RAPD primers E07, E11, E17 might be linked to the gene of stem rust resistance. (authors)

  17. Removal of mercury in fixed-bed continuous upflow reactors by mercury-resistant bacteria and effect of sodium chloride on their performance

    De; Leonhauser, J.; Vardanyan, L.

    Urgent need to reduce the amount of toxic mercury compounds in the wastewater of industries and subsequent reuse of metal ions, has led to an increasing interest in microbial bioremediation. Two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, namely, isolate CH07...

  18. Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapies Targeting BRCA-Mutant Breast Cancer

    2015-12-01

    limiting for mutagenic NHEJ but not for physiological CSR. An implication of our results is that deregulation of the RNF168/53BP1 pathway could alter the...resistance in BRCA-deficient tumors. We have also observed that deregulation of the RNF168/53BP1 pathway can alter the chemosensitivity of BRCA1 deficient...FASEB Summer Research Conference. Big Sky, Montana, 2015 g. Invited Speaker, Conference "Chromatin and Cell Fate", Essen, Germany , 2015 h. Invited

  19. Acquired resistance of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas to afatinib plus cetuximab is associated with activation of mTORC1

    Pirazzoli, Valentina; Nebhan, Caroline; Song, Xiaoling; Wurtz, Anna; Walther, Zenta; Cai, Guoping; Zhao, Zhongming; Jia, Peilin; de Stanchina, Elisa; Shapiro, Erik M.; Gale, Molly; Yin, Ruonan; Horn, Leora; Carbone, David P.; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent; Gettinger, Scott; Pao, William; Politi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas (LUADs) who initially respond to first-generation TKIs develop resistance to these drugs. A combination of the irreversible TKI afatinib and the EGFR antibody cetuximab can be used to overcome resistance to first-generation TKIs; however, resistance to this drug combination eventually emerges. We identified activation of the mTORC1 signaling pathway as a mechanism of resistance to dual inhibition of EGFR in mouse models. Addition of rapamycin reversed resistance in vivo. Analysis of afatinib+cetuximab-resistant biopsy specimens revealed the presence of genomic alterations in genes that modulate mTORC1 signaling including NF2 and TSC1. These findings pinpoint enhanced mTORC1 activation as a mechanism of resistance to afatinib+cetuximab and identify genomic mechanisms that lead to activation of this pathway, revealing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating patients with resistance to these drugs. PMID:24813888

  20. BRAF-mutant melanoma: treatment approaches, resistance mechanisms, and diagnostic strategies

    Spagnolo F

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Spagnolo,1 Paola Ghiorzo,2,3 Laura Orgiano,4 Lorenza Pastorino,2,3 Virginia Picasso,4 Elena Tornari,4 Vincenzo Ottaviano,4 Paola Queirolo4 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties (DiMI, University of Genoa, Genova, Italy; 3Genetics of Rare Cancers, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova, Italy; 4Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genova, Italy Abstract: BRAF inhibitors vemurafenib and dabrafenib achieved improved overall survival over chemotherapy and have been approved for the treatment of BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma. More recently, the combination of BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib with MEK inhibitor trametinib has shown improved progression-free survival, compared to dabrafenib monotherapy, in a Phase II study and has received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration. However, even when treated with the combination, most patients develop mechanisms of acquired resistance, and some of them do not achieve tumor regression at all, because of intrinsic resistance to therapy. Along with the development of BRAF inhibitors, immunotherapy made an important step forward: ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody, was approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma; anti-PD-1 agents achieved promising results in Phase I/II trials, and data from Phase III studies will be ready soon. The availability of such drugs, which are effective regardless of BRAF status, has made the therapeutic approach more complex, as first-line treatment with BRAF inhibitors may not be the best choice for all BRAF-mutated patients. The aim of this paper is to review the systemic therapeutic options

  1. Indolyl aryl sulfones (IASs): development of highly potent NNRTIs active against wt-HIV-1 and clinically relevant drug resistant mutants.

    Silvestri, Romano; Artico, Marino

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfones (IASs) are a potent class of NNRTIs developed from L-737,126, a lead agent discovered by Merck AG. IAS derivatives are endowed with inhibitory activities against wt HIV-1 in the low nanomolar concentration range. Introduction of two methyl groups at positions 3 and 5 of the phenyl ring of the aryl sulfonyl moiety furnished IAS derivatives such as 5-chloro- or 5-bromo-3-[(3,5-dimethylphenyl)sulfonyl]indole-2-carboxyamide, which showed very potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity against some mutants carrying NNRTI resistant mutations at positions 103 and 181 of the reverse transcriptase. IAS derivatives bearing 2-hydroxyethylcarboxyamide or 2-hydroxyethylcarboxyhydrazide groups at position 2 of the indole nucleus were more active than L-737,126 against the K103N-Y181C double mutant. A great improvement of antiviral activity against wt HIV-1 and resistant mutants was obtained by coupling 1-3 simple amino acids, such as glycine and alanine, in sequence, with the 3-[(3,5-dimethylphenyl)sulfonyl]-1H-indole-2-carbonyl moiety. The transformation of the chain terminus into amide or hydrazide, produced short peptides with high selectivity and potent activity against wt HIV-1, and the viral mutants Y181C, K103N-Y181C and EFV(R). IAS having two halogen atoms at the indole showed potent inhibitory activity against the Y181C and the EFV(R) resistant mutant strains. In particular, the introduction of a fluorine atom at position 4 of the indole ring notably contributed to improve the antiviral activities against both wt and the related resistant mutants. 5-Nitro-IASs were highly active against wt HIV-1 and exhibited low cytotoxicity. Experimental data highlighted the class IAS derivatives as promising candidates for clinical trials.

  2. Dual Inhibition of EGFR with Afatinib and Cetuximab in Kinase Inhibitor-Resistant EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer with and without T790M Mutations

    Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Smit, Egbert F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Horn, Leora; Gettinger, Scott; Camidge, D. Ross; Riely, Gregory J.; Wang, Bushi; Fu, Yali; Chand, Vikram K.; Miller, Vincent A.; Pao, William

    EGFR-mutant lung cancers responsive to reversible EGFR inhibitors (gefitinib/erlotinib) develop acquired resistance, mediated by second-site EGFR T790M mutation in >50% of cases. Preclinically, afatinib (irreversible ErbB family blocker) plus cetuximab (anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody) overcomes

  3. Validation of the digital PCR system in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant EGFR mutant non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Masago, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Shiro; Hata, Akito; Okuda, Chiyuki; Yoshizumi, Yuko; Kaji, Reiko; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Yukio; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the QuantStudio 3D Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) system and a PCR-based next generation sequencing (NGS) system for detecting a secondary mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene T790M in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients previously diagnosed with EGFR-activating mutations. Twenty-five patients with NSCLC previously treated with EGFR-TKIs were examined. The patients were treated daily with either erlotinib or gefitinib. New biopsies, followed by DNA sequencing on an Ion Torrent systems using the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel and dPCR were performed. A comparison of NGS, sensitive PCR, and dPCR revealed that the sensitivities of NGS and dPCR were similar in this study. As well, T790M was detected in as low as about 5% of mutant allelic frequencies, which represented 5% of the total reads on site mapped reads in NGS and greater than 5% of the dPCR reads, which represented mutant and wild type copies. The strategy in which NGS sequencing is followed by revealed acquired mutation with dPCR may be a reasonable one. We demonstrated the utility of combining NGS and dPCR as a tool for monitoring T790M. NGS and dPCR with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens might become a standard genomic test for exploring acquired resistance to targeted molecular medicines. © 2018 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Statistical optimization for enhanced yields of probiotic Bacillus coagulans and its phage resistant mutants followed by kinetic modelling of the process.

    Pandey, Kavita R; Joshi, Chetan; Vakil, Babu V

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits to the host. A leading pharmaceutical company producing Bacillus coagulans as a probiotic was facing the problem of recurring phage attacks. Two mutants viz. B. co PIII and B. co MIII that were isolated as phage resistant mutants after UV irradiation and MMS treatment of phage sensitive B. coagulans parental culture were characterized at functional and molecular level and were noted to have undergone interesting genetic changes. The non-specific genetic alterations induced by mutagenesis can also lead to alterations in cell performance. Hence, in the current study the parental strain and the two mutants were selected for shake flask optimization. Plackett-Burman design was used to select the significant culture variables affecting biomass production. Evolutionary operation method was applied for further optimization. The study showed wide variations in the nutritional requirements of phage resistant mutants, post exposure to mutagens. An increment of 150, 134 and 152 % was observed in the biomass productions of B. coagulans (parental type) and mutants B.co PIII and B.co MIII respectively, compared to the yield from one-factor-at-a-time technique. Using Logistic and modified Leudeking-Piret equations, biomass accumulation and substrate utilization efficiency of the bioprocess were determined. The experimental data was in agreement with the results predicted by statistical analysis and modelling. The developed model may be useful for controlling the growth and substrate consumption kinetics in large scale fermentation using B. coagulans .

  5. A homozygous recA mutant of Synechocystis PCC6803: construction strategy and characteristics eliciting a novel RecA independent UVC resistance in dark.

    Minda, Renu; Ramchandani, Jyoti; Joshi, Vasudha P; Bhattacharjee, Swapan Kumar

    2005-12-01

    We report here the construction of a homozygous recA460::cam insertion mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that may be useful for plant molecular genetics by providing a plant like host free of interference from homologous recombination. The homozygous recA460::cam mutant is highly sensitive to UVC under both photoreactivating and non-photoreactivating conditions compared to the wild type (WT). The liquid culture of the mutant growing in approximately 800 lx accumulates nonviable cells to the tune of 86% as estimated by colony counts on plates incubated at the same temperature and light intensity. The generation time of recA mutant in standard light intensity (2,500 lx) increases to 50 h compared to 28 h in lower light intensity (approximately 800 lx) that was used for selection, thus explaining the earlier failures to obtain a homozygous recA mutant. The WT, in contrast, grows at faster rate (23 h generation time) in standard light intensity compared to that at approximately 800 lx (26 h). The Synechocystis RecA protein supports homologous recombination during conjugation in recA (-) mutant of Escherichia coli, but not the SOS response as measured by UV sensitivity. It is suggested that using this homozygous recA460::cam mutant, investigations can now be extended to dissect the network of DNA repair pathways involved in housekeeping activities that may be more active in cyanobacteria than in heterotrophs. Using this mutant for the first time we provide a genetic evidence of a mechanism independent of RecA that causes enhanced UVC resistance on light to dark transition.

  6. Resistance to organophosphorus agent toxicity in transgenic mice expressing the G117H mutant of human butyrylcholinesterase

    Wang Yuxia; Ticu Boeck, Andreea; Duysen, Ellen G.; Van Keuren, Margaret; Saunders, Thomas L.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2004-01-01

    Organophosphorus toxicants (OP) include chemical nerve agents and pesticides. The goal of this work was to find out whether an animal could be made resistant to OP toxicity by genetic engineering. The human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) mutant G117H was chosen for study because it has the unusual ability to hydrolyze OP as well as acetylcholine, and it is resistant to inhibition by OP. Human G117H BChE, under the control of the ROSA26 promoter, was expressed in all tissues of transgenic mice. A stable transgenic mouse line expressed 0.5 μg/ml of human G117H BChE in plasma as well as 2 μg/ml of wild-type mouse BChE. Intestine, kidneys, stomach, lungs, heart, spleen, liver, brain, and muscle expressed 0.6-0.15 μg/g of G117H BChE. Transgenic mice were normal in behavior and fertility. The LD50 dose of echothiophate for wild-type mice was 0.1 mg/kg sc. This dose caused severe cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality in wild-type mice, but caused no deaths and only mild toxicity in transgenic animals. The mechanism of protection was investigated by measuring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BChE activity. It was found that AChE and endogenous BChE were inhibited to the same extent in echothiophate-treated wild type and transgenic mice. This led to the hypothesis that protection against echothiophate toxicity was not explained by hydrolysis of echothiophate. In conclusion, the transgenic G117H BChE mouse demonstrates the factors required to achieve protection from OP toxicity in a vertebrate animal

  7. Hypoxic resistance of KRAS mutant tumor cells to 3-Bromopyruvate is counteracted by Prima-1 and reversed by N-acetylcysteine.

    Orue, Andrea; Chavez, Valery; Strasberg-Rieber, Mary; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-11-18

    The metabolic inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is a promising anti-cancer alkylating agent, shown to inhibit growth of some colorectal carcinoma with KRAS mutation. Recently, we demonstrated increased resistance to 3-BrPA in wt p53 tumor cells compared to those with p53 silencing or mutation. Since hypoxic microenvironments select for tumor cells with diminished therapeutic response, we investigated whether hypoxia unequally increases resistance to 3-BrPA in wt p53 MelJuso melanoma harbouring (Q61L)-mutant NRAS and wt BRAF, C8161 melanoma with (G12D)-mutant KRAS (G464E)-mutant BRAF, and A549 lung carcinoma with a KRAS (G12S)-mutation. Since hypoxia increases the toxicity of the p53 activator, Prima-1 against breast cancer cells irrespective of their p53 status, we also investigated whether Prima-1 reversed hypoxic resistance to 3-BrPA. In contrast to the high susceptibility of hypoxic mutant NRAS MelJuso cells to 3-BrPA or Prima-1, KRAS mutant C8161 and A549 cells revealed hypoxic resistance to 3-BrPA counteracted by Prima-1. In A549 cells, Prima-1 increased p21CDKN1mRNA, and reciprocally inhibited mRNA expression of the SLC2A1-GLUT1 glucose transporter-1 and ALDH1A1, gene linked to detoxification and stem cell properties. 3-BrPA lowered CAIX and VEGF mRNA expression. Death from joint Prima-1 and 3-BrPA treatment in KRAS mutant A549 and C8161 cells seemed mediated by potentiating oxidative stress, since it was antagonized by the anti-oxidant and glutathione precursor N-acetylcysteine. This report is the first to show that Prima-1 kills hypoxic wt p53 KRAS-mutant cells resistant to 3-BrPA, partly by decreasing GLUT-1 expression and exacerbating pro-oxidant stress.

  8. The effect of aqueous speciation and cellular ligand binding on the biotransformation and bioavailability of methylmercury in mercury-resistant bacteria.

    Ndu, Udonna; Barkay, Tamar; Schartup, Amina Traore; Mason, Robert P; Reinfelder, John R

    2016-02-01

    Mercury resistant bacteria play a critical role in mercury biogeochemical cycling in that they convert methylmercury (MeHg) and inorganic mercury to elemental mercury, Hg(0). To date there are very few studies on the effects of speciation and bioavailability of MeHg in these organisms, and even fewer studies on the role that binding to cellular ligands plays on MeHg uptake. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thiol complexation on the uptake of MeHg by measuring the intracellular demethylation-reduction (transformation) of MeHg to Hg(0) in Hg-resistant bacteria. Short-term intracellular transformation of MeHg was quantified by monitoring the loss of volatile Hg(0) generated during incubations of bacteria containing the complete mer operon (including genes from putative mercury transporters) exposed to MeHg in minimal media compared to negative controls with non-mer or heat-killed cells. The results indicate that the complexes MeHgOH, MeHg-cysteine, and MeHg-glutathione are all bioavailable in these bacteria, and without the mer operon there is very little biological degradation of MeHg. In both Pseudomonas stutzeri and Escherichia coli, there was a pool of MeHg that was not transformed to elemental Hg(0), which was likely rendered unavailable to Mer enzymes by non-specific binding to cellular ligands. Since the rates of MeHg accumulation and transformation varied more between the two species of bacteria examined than among MeHg complexes, microbial bioavailability, and therefore microbial demethylation, of MeHg in aquatic systems likely depends more on the species of microorganism than on the types and relative concentrations of thiols or other MeHg ligands present.

  9. 2'-Fluoro-6'-methylene carbocyclic adenosine and its phosphoramidate prodrug: A novel anti-HBV agent, active against drug-resistant HBV mutants.

    Singh, Uma S; Mulamoottil, Varughese A; Chu, Chung K

    2018-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, clinically approved nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) are very efficient in reducing the load of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with minimum side effects. However, the long-term administration of antiviral drugs promotes HBV for potential drug resistance. To overcome this problem, combination therapies are administered, but HBV progressively altered mutations remain a threat. Therefore, optimally designed NAs are urgently needed to treat drug-resistant HBV. Herein, 2'-fluoro-6'-methylene carbocyclic adenosine (FMCA) and its phosphoramidate (FMCAP) have been discovered, which may be utilized in combination therapies for curing drug-resistant chronic hepatitis B. In preclinical studies, these carbocyclic NAs demonstrated potential anti-HBV activity against adefovir, as well as lamivudine (LMV/LAM) drug-resistant mutants. In vitro, these molecules have demonstrated significant activity against LMV/entecavir (ETV) triple mutants (L180M + S202G + M204V). Also, preliminary studies of FMCA/FMCAP in chimeric mice and female Non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse models having the LMV/ETV triple mutant have shown a high rate of reduction of HBV DNA levels compared to ETV. In this review, we have summarized preclinical studies of FMCA and its phosphoramidate prodrug (FMCAP). © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Key Components of Different Plant Defense Pathways Are Dispensable for Powdery Mildew Resistance of the Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 Triple Mutant.

    Kuhn, Hannah; Lorek, Justine; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Consonni, Chiara; Becker, Katia; Micali, Cristina; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Bednarek, Paweł; Raaymakers, Tom M; Appiano, Michela; Bai, Yuling; Meldau, Dorothea; Baum, Stephani; Conrath, Uwe; Feussner, Ivo; Panstruga, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O ( MLO ) genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant. We found that this genotype unexpectedly overcomes the requirement for indolic antimicrobials and defense-related secretion, which are critical for incomplete resistance of mlo2 single mutants. Comparative microarray-based transcriptome analysis of mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 mutants and wild type plants upon Golovinomyces orontii inoculation revealed an increased and accelerated accumulation of many defense-related transcripts. Despite the biotrophic nature of the interaction, this included the non-canonical activation of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent transcriptional program. In contrast to a non-adapted powdery mildew pathogen, the adapted powdery mildew fungus is able to defeat the accumulation of defense-relevant indolic metabolites in a MLO protein-dependent manner. We suggest that a broad and fast activation of immune responses in mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 plants can compensate for the lack of single or few defense pathways. In addition, our results point to a role of Arabidopsis MLO2, MLO6, and MLO12 in enabling defense suppression during invasion by adapted powdery mildew fungi.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant of Elvitegravir-resistance HIV-1 integrase.

    Chen, Qi; Cheng, Xiaolin; Wei, Dongqing; Xu, Qin

    2015-03-01

    Although Elvitegravir (EVG) is a newly developed antiretrovirals drug to treat the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), drug resistance has already been found in clinic, such as E92Q/N155H and Q148H/G140S. Several structural investigations have already been reported to reveal the molecular mechanism of the drug resistance. As full length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase is still unsolved, we herein use the crystal structure of the full length prototype foamy virus (PFV) in complex with virus DNA and inhibitor Elvitegravir as a template to construct the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant system of HIV-1 integrase. Molecular dynamic simulations was used to revel the binding mode and the drug resistance of the EVG ligand in E92Q/N155H. Several important interactions were discovered between the mutated residues and the residues in the active site of the E92Q/N155H double mutant pattern, and cross correlation and clustering methods were used for detailed analysis. The results from the MD simulation studies will be used to guide the experimental efforts of developing novel inhibitors against drug-resistant HIV integrase mutants.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant of Elvitegravir-resistance HIV-1 integrase

    Chen, Qi [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology; Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Molecular Biophysics; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology; Wei, Dongqing [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology; Xu, Qin [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology

    2014-11-06

    Although Elvitegravir (EVG) is a newly developed antiretrovirals drug to treat the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), drug resistance has already been found in clinic, such as E92Q/N155H and Q148H/G140S. Several structural investigations have already been reported to reveal the molecular mechanism of the drug resistance. As full length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase is still unsolved, we use in this paper the crystal structure of the full length prototype foamy virus (PFV) in complex with virus DNA and inhibitor Elvitegravir as a template to construct the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant system of HIV-1 integrase. Molecular dynamic simulations was used to revel the binding mode and the drug resistance of the EVG ligand in E92Q/N155H. Several important interactions were discovered between the mutated residues and the residues in the active site of the E92Q/N155H double mutant pattern, and cross correlation and clustering methods were used for detailed analysis. The results from the MD simulation studies will be used to guide the experimental efforts of developing novel inhibitors against drug-resistant HIV integrase mutants.

  13. BAG3-dependent expression of Mcl-1 confers resistance of mutant KRAS colon cancer cells to the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922.

    Wang, Chun Yan; Guo, Su Tang; Croft, Amanda; Yan, Xu Guang; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2018-02-01

    Past studies have shown that mutant KRAS colon cancer cells are susceptible to apoptosis induced by the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922. Nevertheless, intrinsic and acquired resistance remains an obstacle for the potential application of the inhibitor in the treatment of the disease. Here we report that Mcl-1 is important for survival of colon cancer cells in the presence of AUY922. Mcl-1 was upregulated in mutant KRAS colon cancer cells selected for resistance to AUY922-induced apoptosis. This was due to its increased stability mediated by Bcl-2-associated athanogene domain 3 (BAG3), which was also increased in resistant colon cancer cells by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) as a result of chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Functional investigations demonstrated that inhibition of Mcl-1, BAG3, or HSF1 triggered apoptosis in resistant colon cancer cells, and rendered AUY922-naïve colon cancer cells more sensitive to the inhibitor. Together, these results identify that the HSF1-BAG3-Mcl-1 signal axis is critical for protection of mutant KRAS colon cancer cells from AUY922-induced apoptosis, with potential implications for targeting HSF1/BAG3/Mcl-1 to improve the efficacy of AUY922 in the treatment of colon cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. NF-κB signaling is activated and confers resistance to apoptosis in three-dimensionally cultured EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Sakuma, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EGFR-mutant cells in 3D culture resist EGFR inhibition compared with suspended cells. ► Degradation of IκB and activation of NF-κB are observed in 3D-cultured cells. ► Inhibiting NF-κB enhances the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor in 3D-cultured cells. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in suspension undergo apoptosis to a greater extent than adherent cells in a monolayer when EGFR autophosphorylation is inhibited by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This suggests that cell adhesion to a culture dish may activate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway other than the EGFR pathway. Since the microenvironment of cells cultured in a monolayer are substantially different to that of cells existing in three-dimension (3D) in vivo, we assessed whether two EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and H1975, were more resistant to EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis when cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) as compared with in suspension. The ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant cells in 3D were significantly less sensitive to treatment with WZ4002, an EGFR TKI, than the suspended cells. Further, a marked degradation of IκBα, the inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, was observed only in the 3D-cultured cells, leading to an increase in the activation of NF-κB. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-κB with pharmacological inhibitors enhanced EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis in 3D-cultured EGFR-mutant cells. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB signaling would render ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo more susceptible to EGFR TKI-induced cell death.

  15. Frequencies distribution of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum population from Hadhramout Governorate, Yemen.

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-12-22

    Malaria in Yemen is mainly caused by Plasmodium falciparum and 25% of the population is at high risk. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) had been used as monotherapy against P. falciparum. Emergence of chloroquine resistance led to the shift in anti-malarial treatment policy in Yemen to artemisinin-based combination therapy, that is artesunate (AS) plus SP as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria and artemether-lumefantrine as second-line treatment. This study aimed to screen mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps) genes associated with SP resistance among P. falciparum population in Hadhramout governorate, Yemen. Genomic DNA was extracted from dried blood spots of 137 P. falciparum isolates collected from a community-based study. DNA was amplified using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes. Sequences were analysed for mutations in Pfdhfr gene codons 51, 59, 108, and 164 and in Pfdhps gene codons 436, 437, and 540. A total of 128 and 114 P. falciparum isolates were successfully sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes, respectively. Each Pfdhfr mutant allele (I51 and N108) in P. falciparum population had a frequency of 84%. Pfdhfr R59 mutant allele was detected in one isolate. Mutation at codon 437 (G437) in the Pfdhps gene was detected in 44.7% of falciparum malaria isolates. Frequencies of Pfdhfr double mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps triple mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164-S436G437K540) were 82.8 and 39.3%, respectively. One isolate harboured Pfdhfr triple mutant genotype (I51, R59, N108, I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps quadruple mutant genotype (I51R59N108I164-S436G437K540). High frequencies of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles and genotypes in P. falciparum population in Hadhramout, Yemen, highlight the risk of developing resistance for SP, the partner drug of AS, which subsequently will expose the parasite to AS monotherapy increasing then the

  16. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L.D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •N-ion beam bombarded Thai jasmine rice seeds to induce mutation. •Mutants with blast-disease resistance and high yield were screened. •Gene involved in the blast-disease resistance was analyzed. •The gene responsible for the resistance was linked to Spotted leaf protein 11. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60–80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 10 16 –2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 10 6 spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11)

  17. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [School of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@frnf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: burinka@hotmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: •N-ion beam bombarded Thai jasmine rice seeds to induce mutation. •Mutants with blast-disease resistance and high yield were screened. •Gene involved in the blast-disease resistance was analyzed. •The gene responsible for the resistance was linked to Spotted leaf protein 11. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60–80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 10{sup 16}–2 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 10{sup 6} spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11)

  18. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  19. Physiochemical properties and kinetics of glucoamylase produced from deoxy-d-glucose resistant mutant of Aspergillus niger for soluble starch hydrolysis.

    Riaz, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Hamid; Sawyer, Lindsay; Akhtar, Saeed; Javed, Muhammad Rizwan; Nadeem, Habibullah; Wear, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Glucoamylases (GAs) from a wild and a deoxy-d-glucose-resistant mutant of a locally isolated Aspergillus niger were purified to apparent homogeneity. The subunit molecular mass estimated by SDS-PAGE was 93 kDa for both strains, while the molecular masses determined by MALDI-TOF for wild and mutant GAs were 72.876 and 72.063 kDa, respectively. The monomeric nature of the enzymes was confirmed through activity staining. Significant improvement was observed in the kinetic properties of the mutant GA relative to the wild type enzyme. Kinetic constants of starch hydrolysis for A. niger parent and mutant GAs calculated on the basis of molecular masses determined through MALDI-TOF were as follows: k cat = 343 and 727 s -1 , K m = 0.25 and 0.16 mg mL -1 , k cat / K m (specificity constant) = 1374 and 4510 mg mL -1 s -1 , respectively. Thermodynamic parameters for soluble starch hydrolysis also suggested that mutant GA was more efficient compared to the parent enzyme.

  20. Isolation of two independent allyl alcohol resistant Adh-1 null mutants following selection of pollen and seeds.

    Wisman, E.; Ramanna, M.S.; Zabel, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Adh-1 null mutant (B15-1-8) isolated previously was used to establish conditions that allow the selection of ADH-deficient pollen grains and seeds of tomato. New Adh-1 null mutants were then selected among the progenies derived from crosses between the genetically unstable tomato lines Yvms,

  1. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC 50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases

  2. Simulation of Fungal-Mediated Cell Death by Fumonisin B1 and Selection of Fumonisin B1–Resistant (fbr) Arabidopsis Mutants

    Stone, Julie M.; Heard, Jacqueline E.; Asai, Tsuneaki; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2000-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1), a programmed cell death–eliciting toxin produced by the necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen Fusarium moniliforme, was used to simulate pathogen infection in Arabidopsis. Plants infiltrated with 10 μM FB1 and seedlings transferred to agar media containing 1 μM FB1 develop lesions reminiscent of the hypersensitive response, including generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, deposition of phenolic compounds and callose, accumulation of phytoalexin, and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Arabidopsis FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants were selected directly by sowing seeds on agar containing 1 μM FB1, on which wild-type seedlings fail to develop. Two mutants chosen for further analyses, fbr1 and fbr2, had altered PR gene expression in response to FB1. fbr1 and fbr2 do not exhibit differential resistance to the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola (ES4326) expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2 but do display enhanced resistance to a virulent isogenic strain that lacks the avirulence gene. Our results demonstrate the utility of FB1 for high-throughput isolation of Arabidopsis defense-related mutants and suggest that pathogen-elicited programmed cell death of host cells may be an important feature of compatible plant–pathogen interactions. PMID:11041878

  3. Human Lysozyme Synergistically Enhances Bactericidal Dynamics and Lowers the Resistant Mutant Prevention Concentration for Metronidazole to Helicobacter pylori by Increasing Cell Permeability

    Xiaolin Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole (MNZ is an effective agent that has been employed to eradicate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. The emergence of broad MNZ resistance in H. pylori has affected the efficacy of this therapeutic agent. The concentration of MNZ, especially the mutant prevention concentration (MPC, plays an important role in selecting or enriching resistant mutants and regulating therapeutic effects. A strategy to reduce the MPC that can not only effectively treat H. pylori but also prevent resistance mutations is needed. H. pylori is highly resistant to lysozyme. Lysozyme possesses a hydrolytic bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan and a cationic dependent mode. These effects can increase the permeability of bacterial cells and promote antibiotic absorption into bacterial cells. In this study, human lysozyme (hLYS was used to probe its effects on the integrity of the H. pylori outer and inner membranes using as fluorescent probe hydrophobic 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN and the release of aspartate aminotransferase. Further studies using a propidium iodide staining method assessed whether hLYS could increase cell permeability and promote cell absorption. Finally, we determined the effects of hLYS on the bactericidal dynamics and MPC of MNZ in H. pylori. Our findings indicate that hLYS could dramatically increase cell permeability, reduce the MPC of MNZ for H. pylori, and enhance its bactericidal dynamic activity, demonstrating that hLYS could reduce the probability of MNZ inducing resistance mutations.

  4. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  5. Single and combined effects of microplastics and mercury on juveniles of the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Changes in behavioural responses and reduction of swimming velocity and resistance time.

    Barboza, Luís Gabriel Antão; Vieira, Luís Russo; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2018-05-01

    Microplastics and mercury are environmental pollutants of great concern. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of these pollutants, both individually and in binary mixtures, on the swimming performance of juvenile European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. Microplastics alone, mercury alone and all the mixtures caused significant reduction of the swimming velocity and resistance time of fish. Moreover, changes in behavioural responses including lethargic and erratic swimming behaviour were observed. These results highlight that fish behavioural responses can be used as sensitive endpoint to establish the effects of contamination by microplastics and also emphasizes the need to assess the combined effects of microplastics and other environmental contaminants, with special attention to the effects on behavioural responses in fish and other aquatic species. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. [Courtship behavior, communicative sound production and resistance to stress in Drosophila mutants with defective agnostic gene, coding for LIMK1].

    Popov, A V; Kaminskaia, A N; Savvateeva-Popova, E V

    2009-01-01

    -motor circuits of the singing center) decreases, and the rate and stability of pacemakers of the pulse and the sine songs increases. So, the sharply elevated LIMK1 and p-cofilin concentrations in the cells of agn(ts3) mutants, in comparison to wild type males, leading to derangement of learning and memory (Medvedeva et al., 2008) are accompanied by decline of motivation of males but do not seriously influence the neuro-motor coordination during singing. The higher resistance of characterictics of their behavior and communicative sound signals to heat shock is in agreement with the fact that the extremely high LIMK1 and P-cofilin concentrations in their cells go down to normal values after HS. At the same time the amyloid aggregations disappear and normally defective learning and memory are restore.

  7. Potential of mercury-resistant marine bacteria for detoxification of chemicals of environmental concern

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Bhosle, N.B.; Garg, A.; Vardanyan, L.; Nagle, V.L.; Fukami, K.

    -resistant Pseudomonas putida strain. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65: 5279-5284. 11) Champ, M.A. 2000. A review of organotin regulatory strategies: pending actions, related costs and benefits. Sci. Total Environ. 258: 21-71. 12) Chang, J.S., R. Law, and C.C. Chang. 1997... indicating that TBT were degraded by bacterial action. With organic enrichment, the amounts of TBT degraded were similar by both strains but the degradation rate was faster. Discussion Lower costs and higher efficiency at low metal concentrations...

  8. Acquired Resistance of EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinomas to Afatinib plus Cetuximab Is Associated with Activation of mTORC1

    Valentina Pirazzoli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas (LUADs who initially respond to first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs develop resistance to these drugs. A combination of the irreversible TKI afatinib and the EGFR antibody cetuximab can be used to overcome resistance to first-generation TKIs; however, resistance to this drug combination eventually emerges. We identified activation of the mTORC1 signaling pathway as a mechanism of resistance to dual inhibition of EGFR in mouse models. The addition of rapamycin reversed resistance in vivo. Analysis of afatinib-plus-cetuximab-resistant biopsy specimens revealed the presence of genomic alterations in genes that modulate mTORC1 signaling, including NF2 and TSC1. These findings pinpoint enhanced mTORC1 activation as a mechanism of resistance to afatinib plus cetuximab and identify genomic mechanisms that lead to activation of this pathway, revealing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating patients with resistance to these drugs.

  9. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60-80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 1016-2 × 1017 ions/cm2. The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 106 spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11).

  10. An Acquired HER2T798I Gatekeeper Mutation Induces Resistance to Neratinib in a Patient with HER2 Mutant-Driven Breast Cancer.

    Hanker, Ariella B; Brewer, Monica Red; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Koch, James P; Sliwoski, Gregory R; Nagy, Rebecca; Lanman, Richard; Berger, Michael F; Hyman, David M; Solit, David B; He, Jie; Miller, Vincent; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Cross, Darren; Lovly, Christine M; Meiler, Jens; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2017-06-01

    We report a HER2 T798I gatekeeper mutation in a patient with HER2 L869R -mutant breast cancer with acquired resistance to neratinib. Laboratory studies suggested that HER2 L869R is a neratinib-sensitive, gain-of-function mutation that upon dimerization with mutant HER3 E928G , also present in the breast cancer, amplifies HER2 signaling. The patient was treated with neratinib and exhibited a sustained partial response. Upon clinical progression, HER2 T798I was detected in plasma tumor cell-free DNA. Structural modeling of this acquired mutation suggested that the increased bulk of isoleucine in HER2 T798I reduces neratinib binding. Neratinib blocked HER2-mediated signaling and growth in cells expressing HER2 L869R but not HER2 L869R/T798I In contrast, afatinib and the osimertinib metabolite AZ5104 strongly suppressed HER2 L869R/T798I -induced signaling and cell growth. Acquisition of HER2 T798I upon development of resistance to neratinib in a breast cancer with an initial activating HER2 mutation suggests HER2 L869R is a driver mutation. HER2 T798I -mediated neratinib resistance may be overcome by other irreversible HER2 inhibitors like afatinib. Significance: We found an acquired HER2 gatekeeper mutation in a patient with HER2 -mutant breast cancer upon clinical progression on neratinib. We speculate that HER2 T798I may arise as a secondary mutation following response to effective HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in other cancers with HER2 -activating mutations. This resistance may be overcome by other irreversible HER2 TKIs, such as afatinib. Cancer Discov; 7(6); 575-85. ©2017 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 539 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Insight into the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G mutant on physico-chemical properties of SHV type beta-lactamase: a molecular dynamics study.

    Mohd Hassan Baig

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a serious threat to human health. The production of β-lactamase, which inactivates β-lactams is most common cause of resistance to the β-lactam antibiotics. The Class A enzymes are most frequently encountered among the four β-lactamases in the clinic isolates. Mutations in class A β-lactamases play a crucial role in substrate and inhibitor specificity. SHV and TEM type are known to be most common class A β-lactamases. In the present study, we have analyzed the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G point mutation of SHV type Class-A β-lactamase using molecular dynamics and other in silico approaches. Our study involved the use of different in silico methods to investigate the affect of S130G point mutation on the major physico-chemical properties of SHV type class A β-lactamase. We have used molecular dynamics approach to compare the dynamic behaviour of native and S130G mutant form of SHV β-lactamase by analyzing different properties like root mean square deviation (RMSD, H-bond, Radius of gyration (Rg and RMS fluctuation of mutation. The results clearly suggest notable loss in the stability of S130G mutant that may further lead to decrease in substrate specificity of SHV. Molecular docking further indicates that S130G mutation decreases the binding affinity of all the three inhibitors in clinical practice.

  12. Evolving of mutant lines resistant to lodging, blast, and high yield in rice by induce mutation using gamma ray (physical mutagen)

    Majd, F.; Rahimi, M.; Rezazadeh, M.

    2003-01-01

    Induction of mutation for the purpose of producing variations in the gene pool has been used in recent years. In this experiment the locally adapted rice C V Moosa-Tarom was used as a high quality, tall and very lodging susceptible mutation material. The main purpose of this project was to evolve lodging resistant mutants of high yielding. The elite seeds of Moosa-Tarom variety after moisture regulation were exposed to 100, 200 and 300 Gy from Cobalt 60 source at the Nuclear Research Center. The irradiated seeds were sown in the field along with a comparable number of unirradiated seeds taken as control. All the first panicles of M1 plants were individually harvested and classified according to the dose rate as M2 material . Among M2 plant populations 203 plants that appeared from the agronomic point of view, along with a number of on unirradiated seeds, were selected and moved to the next generations. During subsequent screening for three generations (M 3-M 5) and due to lodging resistant, height and efficient factors of yield potential some mutant lines were harvested. From these lines in a preliminary and advanced randomized complete design agronomic traits, 13 promising lines were selected. From the experiment, line 43-3 were confirmed, which is characterized by lodging resistant and high yield. This line showed relative superiority and introduced to Rice Research Institute

  13. The Arabidopsis defence response mutant esa1 as a tool to discover novel resistance traits against Fusarium diseases

    Hemelrijck, van W.; Wouters, P.F.J.; Brouwer, M.; Windelinckx, A.; Goderis, I.J.W.M.; Bolle, De M.F.C.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Delauré, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant esa1 was previously shown to exhibit enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Alternaria brassicicola, Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina. In this work, we tried to elaborate on this susceptibility by investigating whether the esa1

  14. Mercury and Your Health

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  15. Constitutive activation of jasmonate signaling in an Arabidopsis mutant correlates with enhanced resistance to Erysiphe cichoracearum, Pseudomonas syringae, and Myzus persicae.

    Ellis, Christine; Karafyllidis, Ioannis; Turner, John G

    2002-10-01

    In Arabidopsis spp., the jasmonate (JA) response pathway generally is required for defenses against necrotrophic pathogens and chewing insects, while the salicylic acid (SA) response pathway is generally required for specific, resistance (R) gene-mediated defenses against both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. For example, SA-dependent defenses are required for resistance to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum UCSC1 and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and also are expressed during response to the green peach aphid Myzus persicae. However, recent evidence indicates that the expression of JA-dependent defenses also may confer resistance to E. cichoracearum. To confirm and to extend this observation, we have compared the disease and pest resistance of wild-type Arabidopsis plants with that of the mutants coil, which is insensitive to JA, and cev1, which has constitutive JA signaling. Measurements of the colonization of these plants by E. cichoracearum, P. syringae pv. maculicola, and M. persicae indicated that activation of the JA signal pathway enhanced resistance, and was associated with the activation of JA-dependent defense genes and the suppression of SA-dependent defense genes. We conclude that JA and SA induce alternative defense pathways that can confer resistance to the same pathogens and pests.

  16. Isolation of Escherichia coli rpoB mutants resistant to killing by lambda cII protein and altered in pyrE gene attenuation

    Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Poulsen, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants simultaneously resistant to rifampin and to the lethal effects of bacteriophage lambda cII protein were isolated. The sck mutant strains carry alterations in rpoB that allow them to survive cII killing (thus the name sck), but that do not impair either the expression of c......II or the activation by cII of the lambda promoters pE and pI. The sck-1, sck-2, and sck-3 mutations modify transcription termination. The growth of lambda, but not of the N-independent lambda variant, lambda nin-5, is hindered by these mutations, which act either alone or in concert with the bacterial nusA1 mutation....... In contrast to their effect on lambda growth, the three mutations reduce transcription termination in bacterial operons. The E. coli pyrE gene, which is normally regulated by attenuation, is expressed constitutively in the mutant strains. The sck mutations appear to prevent pyrE attenuation by slowing...

  17. Planet Mercury

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10's first image of Mercury acquired on March 24, 1974. During its flight, Mariner 10's trajectory brought it behind the lighted hemisphere of Mercury, where this image was taken, in order to acquire important measurements with other instruments.This picture was acquired from a distance of 3,340,000 miles (5,380,000 km) from the surface of Mercury. The diameter of Mercury (3,031 miles; 4,878 km) is about 1/3 that of Earth.Images of Mercury were acquired in two steps, an inbound leg (images acquired before passing into Mercury's shadow) and an outbound leg (after exiting from Mercury's shadow). More than 2300 useful images of Mercury were taken, both moderate resolution (3-20 km/pixel) color and high resolution (better than 1 km/pixel) black and white coverage.

  18. Wild-type catalase peroxidase vs G279D mutant type: Molecular basis of Isoniazid drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Singh, Aishwarya; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Sonam; Pandey, Bharati; Kumari, Anchala; Grover, Abhinav

    2018-01-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis katG gene is responsible for production of an enzyme catalase peroxidase that peroxidises and activates the prodrug Isoniazid (INH), a first-line antitubercular agent. INH interacts with catalase peroxidase enzyme within its heme pocket and gets converted to an active form. Mutations occurring in katG gene are often linked to reduced conversion rates for INH. This study is focussed on one such mutation occurring at residue 279, where glycine often mutates to aspartic acid (G279D). In the present study, several structural analyses were performed to study the effect of this mutation on functionality of KatG protein. On comparison, mutant protein exhibited a lower docking score, smaller binding cavity and reduced affinity towards INH. Molecular dynamics analysis revealed the mutant to be more rigid and less compact than the native protein. Essential dynamics analysis determined correlated motions of residues within the protein structure. G279D mutant was found to have many residues that showed related motions and an undesirable effect on the functionality of protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High throughput phenotypic selection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants with impaired resistance to reactive oxygen species identifies genes important for intracellular growth.

    Olga Mestre

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis has the remarkable capacity to survive within the hostile environment of the macrophage, and to resist potent antibacterial molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. Thus, understanding mycobacterial resistance mechanisms against ROS may contribute to the development of new anti-tuberculosis therapies. Here we identified genes involved in such mechanisms by screening a high-density transposon mutant library, and we show that several of them are involved in the intracellular lifestyle of the pathogen. Many of these genes were found to play a part in cell envelope functions, further strengthening the important role of the mycobacterial cell envelope in protection against aggressions such as the ones caused by ROS inside host cells.

  20. Mercurial poisoning

    Gorton, B

    1924-01-01

    Cats which had been kept in a thermometer factory to catch rats were afflicted with mercury poisoning. So were the rats they were supposed to eat. The symptoms of mercury poisoning were the same in both species. The source of mercury for these animals is a fine film of the metal which coats floors, a result of accidental spills during the manufacturing process.

  1. Single-step selection of drug resistant Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 mutants reveals a functional redundancy in the recruitment of multidrug efflux systems.

    Anthony J Brzoska

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Acinetobacter have been the focus recent attention due to both their clinical significance and application to molecular biology. The soil commensal bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 has been proposed as a model system for molecular and genetic studies, whereas in a clinical environment, Acinetobacter spp. are of increasing importance due to their propensity to cause serious and intractable systemic infections. Clinically, a major factor in the success of Acinetobacter spp. as opportunistic pathogens can be attributed to their ability to rapidly evolve resistance to common antimicrobial compounds. Whole genome sequencing of clinical and environmental Acinetobacter spp. isolates has revealed the presence of numerous multidrug transporters within the core and accessory genomes, suggesting that efflux is an important host defense response in this genus. In this work, we used the drug-susceptible organism A. baylyi ADP1 as a model for studies into the evolution of efflux mediated resistance in genus Acinetobacter, due to the high level of conservation of efflux determinants across four diverse Acinetobacter strains, including clinical isolates. A single exposure of therapeutic concentrations of chloramphenicol to populations of A. baylyi ADP1 cells produced five individual colonies displaying multidrug resistance. The major facilitator superfamily pump craA was upregulated in one mutant strain, whereas the resistance nodulation division pump adeJ was upregulated in the remaining four. Within the adeJ upregulated population, two different levels of adeJ mRNA transcription were observed, suggesting at least three separate mutations were selected after single-step exposure to chloramphenicol. In the craA upregulated strain, a T to G substitution 12 nt upstream of the craA translation initiation codon was observed. Subsequent mRNA stability analyses using this strain revealed that the half-life of mutant craA mRNA was significantly

  2. Evaluating Andrographolide as a Potent Inhibitor of NS3-4A Protease and Its Drug-Resistant Mutants Using In Silico Approaches

    Vivek Chandramohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current combination therapy of PEG-INF and ribavirin against the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV genotype-1 infections is ineffective in maintaining sustained viral response in 50% of the infection cases. New compounds in the form of protease inhibitors can complement the combination therapy. Asunaprevir is new to the drug regiment as the NS3-4A protease inhibitor, but it is susceptible to two mutations, namely, R155K and D168A in the protein. Thus, in our study, we sought to evaluate Andrographolide, a labdane-diterpenoid from the Andrographis paniculata plant as an effective compound for inhibiting the NS3-4A protease as well as its concomitant drug-resistant mutants by using molecular docking and dynamic simulations. Our study shows that Andrographolide has best docking scores of −15.0862, −15.2322, and −13.9072 compared to those of Asunaprevir −3.7159, −2.6431, and −5.4149 with wild-type R155K and D168A mutants, respectively. Also, as shown in the MD simulations, the compound was good in binding the target proteins and maintains strong bonds causing very less to negligible perturbation in the protein backbone structures. Our results validate the susceptibility of Asunaprevir to protein variants as seen from our docking studies and trajectory period analysis. Therefore, from our study, we hope to add one more option in the drug regiment to tackle drug resistance in HCV infections.

  3. The Aβ6w302 gene and molecular mechanisms of resistance to the spread of lymphoma in a mouse mutant, Survivor-27

    Liu, Y.; Savinov, A.Yu.; McMinimy, D.L.; Kremlev, S.G.; Chapoval, A.I.; Egorov, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    The Aβ6 w302 gene and molecular mechanisms of resistance to the spread of lymphoma induced by γ-radiation ( 60 Co) in a mouse mutant, survivor-27 were studied. Metastatic tumors escape from immune response and spread in the body; survivors are very rare. Novel single exon genes Aβ4-7 and a pseudogene Aβ8Ψ have been cloned from survivors. Their protein coding sequences are similar major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II β H2-Ab cDNA while their promoter is different from MHC promoters. The Aβ4 protein was demonstrated on macrophages (antigen presenting cells). The Aβ gene family is genetically unstable in germ line and somatic cells of survivors. Mutants S-27 and S-87/1 lost the Aβ5 s5 and acquired the Aβ6 w302 gene; the Ab gene mutated in S-27. The proposed mechanism of resistance is molecular instability of the Aβ gene family resulting in somatic mutations and wandering immune responses that destroy the tumor in the survivor [ru

  4. Compartmentalized self-replication under fast PCR cycling conditions yields Taq DNA polymerase mutants with increased DNA-binding affinity and blood resistance.

    Arezi, Bahram; McKinney, Nancy; Hansen, Connie; Cayouette, Michelle; Fox, Jeffrey; Chen, Keith; Lapira, Jennifer; Hamilton, Sarah; Hogrefe, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Faster-cycling PCR formulations, protocols, and instruments have been developed to address the need for increased throughput and shorter turn-around times for PCR-based assays. Although run times can be cut by up to 50%, shorter cycle times have been correlated with lower detection sensitivity and increased variability. To address these concerns, we applied Compartmentalized Self Replication (CSR) to evolve faster-cycling mutants of Taq DNA polymerase. After five rounds of selection using progressively shorter PCR extension times, individual mutations identified in the fastest-cycling clones were randomly combined using ligation-based multi-site mutagenesis. The best-performing combinatorial mutants exhibit 35- to 90-fold higher affinity (lower Kd ) for primed template and a moderate (2-fold) increase in extension rate compared to wild-type Taq. Further characterization revealed that CSR-selected mutations provide increased resistance to inhibitors, and most notably, enable direct amplification from up to 65% whole blood. We discuss the contribution of individual mutations to fast-cycling and blood-resistant phenotypes.

  5. Got Mercury?

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  6. Evidence for functional interaction between domains II and V of 23S ribosomal RNA from an erythromycin-resistant mutant

    Douthwaite, S; Prince, J B; Noller, H F

    1985-01-01

    A mutation affording low levels of erythromycin resistance has been obtained by in vitro hydroxylamine mutagenesis of a cloned ribosomal RNA operon from Escherichia coli. The site of the mutational event responsible for antibiotic resistance was localized to the gene region encoding domain II of ...

  7. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to

  8. Mercury accumulation plant Cyrtomium macrophyllum and its potential for phytoremediation of mercury polluted sites.

    Xun, Yu; Feng, Liu; Li, Youdan; Dong, Haochen

    2017-12-01

    Cyrtomium macrophyllum naturally grown in 225.73 mg kg -1 of soil mercury in mining area was found to be a potential mercury accumulator plant with the translocation factor of 2.62 and the high mercury concentration of 36.44 mg kg -1 accumulated in its aerial parts. Pot experiments indicated that Cyrtomium macrophyllum could even grow in 500 mg kg -1 of soil mercury with observed inhibition on growth but no obvious toxic effects, and showed excellent mercury accumulation and translocation abilities with both translocation and bioconcentration factors greater than 1 when exposed to 200 mg kg -1 and lower soil mercury, indicating that it could be considered as a great mercury accumulating species. Furthermore, the leaf tissue of Cyrtomium macrophyllum showed high resistance to mercury stress because of both the increased superoxide dismutase activity and the accumulation of glutathione and proline induced by mercury stress, which favorited mercury translocation from the roots to the aerial parts, revealing the possible reason for Cyrtomium macrophyllum to tolerate high concentration of soil mercury. In sum, due to its excellent mercury accumulation and translocation abilities as well as its high resistance to mercury stress, the use of Cyrtomium macrophyllum should be a promising approach to remediating mercury polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacillus pumilus KatX2 confers enhanced hydrogen peroxide resistance to a Bacillus subtilis PkatA::katX2 mutant strain.

    Handtke, Stefan; Albrecht, Dirk; Zühlke, Daniela; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Schweder, Thomas; Riedel, Kathrin; Hecker, Michael; Voigt, Birgit

    2017-04-26

    Bacillus pumilus cells exhibit a significantly higher resistance to hydrogen peroxide compared to closely related Bacilli like Bacillus subtilis. In this study we analyzed features of the catalase KatX2 of B. pumilus as one of the most important parts of the cellular response to hydrogen peroxide. KatX2, the vegetative catalase expressed in B. pumilus, was compared to the vegetative catalase KatA of B. subtilis. Data of our study demonstrate that B. pumilus can degrade toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide faster than B. subtilis. By replacing B. subtilis katA gene by katX2 we could significantly enhance its resistance to H 2 O 2 and its potential to eliminate this toxic compound. Mutant cells showed a 1.5- to 2-fold higher survival to toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide compared to wild type cells. Furthermore, we found reversible but also irreversible oxidations of the KatX2 protein which, in contrast to KatA, contains several cysteine residues. Our study indicates that the catalase KatX2 plays a major role in the increased resistance of B. pumilus to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide. Resistance to hydrogen peroxide of other Bacilli can be enhanced by exchanging the native catalase in the cells with katX2.

  10. Sensitivities of baseline isolates and boscalid-resistant mutants of Alternaria alternata from pistachio to fluopyram, penthiopyrad, and fluxapyroxad

    Avenot, H.F.; Biggelaar, van den H.; Morgan, D.P.; Moral, J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Michailides, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance of Alternaria alternata to boscalid, the first succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) fungicide labeled on pistachio, has become a common occurrence in California pistachio orchards and affects the performance of this fungicide. In this study, we established the baseline sensitivities

  11. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (merA) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance Região conservada do gene da mercúrio redutase (merA) como marcador molecular da resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio

    Adriana Sotero-Martins; Michele Silva de Jesus; Michele Lacerda; Josino Costa Moreira; Ana Luzia Lauria Filgueiras; Paulo Rubens Guimarães Barrocas

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains.O mecanismo de resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio mais comum é baseada na redução do Hg(II) a Hg0, através da ativida...

  12. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2004-12-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems.

  13. A yigP mutant strain is a small colony variant of E. coli and shows pleiotropic antibiotic resistance.

    Xia, Hui; Tang, Qiongwei; Song, Jie; Ye, Jiang; Wu, Haizhen; Zhang, Huizhan

    2017-12-01

    Small colony variants (SCVs) are a commonly observed subpopulation of bacteria that have a small colony size and distinctive biochemical characteristics. SCVs are more resistant than the wild type to some antibiotics and usually cause persistent infections in the clinic. SCV studies have been very active during the past 2 decades, especially Staphylococcus aureus SCVs. However, fewer studies on Escherichia coli SCVs exist, so we studied an E. coli SCV during an experiment involving the deletion of the yigP locus. PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that the SCV was attributable to a defect in the yigP function. Furthermore, we investigated the antibiotic resistance profile of the E. coli SCV and it showed increased erythromycin, kanamycin, and d-cycloserine resistance, but collateral sensitivity to ampicillin, polymyxin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampin, and nalidixic acid. We tried to determine the association between yigP and the pleiotropic antibiotic resistance of the SCV by analyzing biofilm formation, cellular morphology, and coenzyme Q (Q 8 ) production. Our results indicated that impaired Q 8 biosynthesis was the primary factor that contributed to the increased resistance and collateral sensitivity of the SCV. This study offers a novel genetic basis for E. coli SCVs and an insight into the development of alternative antimicrobial strategies for clinical therapy.

  14. Combined Targeting of JAK2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL to Cure Mutant JAK2-Driven Malignancies and Overcome Acquired Resistance to JAK2 Inhibitors

    Michaela Waibel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To design rational therapies for JAK2-driven hematological malignancies, we functionally dissected the key survival pathways downstream of hyperactive JAK2. In tumors driven by mutant JAK2, Stat1, Stat3, Stat5, and the Pi3k and Mek/Erk pathways were constitutively active, and gene expression profiling of TEL-JAK2 T-ALL cells revealed the upregulation of prosurvival Bcl-2 family genes. Combining the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 with JAK2 inhibitors mediated prolonged disease regressions and cures in mice bearing primary human and mouse JAK2 mutant tumors. Moreover, combined targeting of JAK2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL was able to circumvent and overcome acquired resistance to single-agent JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Thus, inhibiting the oncogenic JAK2 signaling network at two nodal points, at the initiating stage (JAK2 and the effector stage (Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, is highly effective and provides a clearly superior therapeutic benefit than targeting just one node. Therefore, we have defined a potentially curative treatment for hematological malignancies expressing constitutively active JAK2.

  15. A new system for parallel drug screening against multiple-resistant HIV mutants based on lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN vectors and multi-colour analyses

    Prokofjeva Maria M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite progress in the development of combined antiretroviral therapies (cART, HIV infection remains a significant challenge for human health. Current problems of cART include multi-drug-resistant virus variants, long-term toxicity and enormous treatment costs. Therefore, the identification of novel effective drugs is urgently needed. Methods We developed a straightforward screening approach for simultaneously evaluating the sensitivity of multiple HIV gag-pol mutants to antiviral drugs in one assay. Our technique is based on multi-colour lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN LeGO vector technology. Results We demonstrated the successful use of this approach for screening compounds against up to four HIV gag-pol variants (wild-type and three mutants simultaneously. Importantly, the technique was adapted to Biosafety Level 1 conditions by utilising ecotropic pseudotypes. This allowed upscaling to a large-scale screening protocol exploited by pharmaceutical companies in a successful proof-of-concept experiment. Conclusions The technology developed here facilitates fast screening for anti-HIV activity of individual agents from large compound libraries. Although drugs targeting gag-pol variants were used here, our approach permits screening compounds that target several different, key cellular and viral functions of the HIV life-cycle. The modular principle of the method also allows the easy exchange of various mutations in HIV sequences. In conclusion, the methodology presented here provides a valuable new approach for the identification of novel anti-HIV drugs.

  16. Development of sugarcane mutants with resistance to red rot, water-logging and delayed or non-flowering through induced mutations

    Majid, M.A.; Shamsuzzaman, K.M.; Howlider, M.A.R.; Islam, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Three varieties of sugarcane, 'Isd-2/54', 'Nagarbari' and 'Latarijaba', were irradiated with 20, 30 and 40 Gy gamma rays to induce variation for resistance to red rot disease. The MV 2 population was screened for disease resistance by planting infected canes in between the treated material, and selected plants were further propagated. Among the 2,954 MV 3 hills, inoculated with red rot spore suspension, 37 resistant and 151 moderately resistant plants were isolated. Selection was carried out in the MV 4 to MV 7 propagation. Seven MV 7 selected variants were tested for yield at two locations. Of these, four promising variants were selected on the basis of cane yield, Brix index and disease resistance. In another experiment, four varieties of sugarcane, 'Isd-2/54', 'Isd-16', 'Nagarbari' and 'Latarijaba' were irradiated with 20,40 and 60 Gy gamma rays. Approximately, 10,000 MV 3 canes were planted in a low-lying field, and subjected to water-logging stress. MV 5 and MV 6 populations were inoculated with red rot spore- suspension under waterlogged conditions. Five MV 5 variants were selected on the basis of greenness of the leaves, growth of the canes, number of nodes bearing adventitious roots, Brix index, cane yield and disease reactions, and grown as MV 6 propagation. Three selected variants, SCM-12, SCM-14 and SCM-15, were tolerant to waterlogged conditions in MV 6 . Two additional varieties, 'I-291/87' and 'I-525/85' were treated with 20, 30 and 40 Gy gamma rays to select for delayed/non-flowering types. Four variants were selected in MV 3 for delayed flowering; one mutant, SCM-28 flowered three months later than the parent 'I-291/87'. (author)

  17. Dual Drug Targeting of Mutant Bcr-Abl Induces Inactive Conformation: New Strategy for the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Overcoming Monotherapy Resistance.

    El Rashedy, Ahmed A; Olotu, Fisayo A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2018-03-01

    Bcr-Abl is an oncogenic fusion protein which expression enhances tumorigenesis, and has been highly associated with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Acquired drug resistance in mutant Bcr-Abl has enhanced pathogenesis with the use of single therapy agents such as nilotinib. Moreover, allosteric targeting has been identified to consequentially inhibit Bcr-Abl activity, which led to the recent development of ABL-001 (asciminib) that selectively binds the myristoyl pocket. Experimental studies have revealed that the combination of nilotinib and ABL-001 induced a 'bent' conformation in the C-terminal helix of Bcr-Abl; a benchmark of inhibition, thereby exhibiting a greater potency in the treatment of CML, surmounting the setbacks of drug resistance, disease regression and relapse. Therefore, we report the first account of the dynamics and conformational analysis of oncogenic T334I Bcr-Abl by dual targeting. Our findings revealed that unlike in the Bcr-Abl-Nilotinib complex, dual targeting by both inhibitors induced the bent conformation in the C-terminal helix that varied with time. This was coupled with significant alteration in Bcr-Abl stability, flexibility, and compactness and an overall structural re-orientation inwards towards the hydrophobic core, which reduced the solvent-exposed residues indicative of protein folding. This study will facilitate allosteric targeting and the design of more potent allosteric inhibitors for resistive target proteins in cancer. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  18. A UV-resistant mutant without an increased repair synthesis activity, established from a UV-sensitive human clonal cell line

    Suzuki, N.

    1984-01-01

    When cells of a human clonal cell line, RSa, with high sensitivity to UV lethality, were treated with the mutagen, ethyl methanesulfonate, a variant cell strain, UVr-1, was established as a mutant resistant to 254-nm far-ultraviolet radiation (UV). Cell proliferation studies showed that UVr-1 cells survived and actively proliferated at doses of UV-irradiation that greatly suppressed the proliferation of RSa cells. Colony-formation assays also confirmed the increased resistance of UVr-1 cells to UV. The recovery from a UV-induced inhibition in DNA synthesis, as [methyl- 3 H]thymidine uptake into cellular DNA, was more pronounced in UVr-1 cells than in RSa cells. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference in the activity of UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in either cell line, as estimated by the extent of unscheduled DNA synthesis and DNA repair replication. These characteristics of UVr-1 cells are discussed in the light of a previously reported UV-resistant variant, UVr-10, which had an increased DNA repair synthesis activity. (Auth.)

  19. A chromosome study of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in T lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    Kodama, Yoshiaki; Hakoda, Masayuki; Shimba, Hachiro; Awa, A.A.; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1989-07-01

    Cytogenetic characterizations were made of lymphocyte colonies established from somatic mutation assays for 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. G-banded chromosomes were analyzed in both TG-resistant (TG r ) and wild-type (not TG-selected) colonies. Included were 45 TG r and 19 wild-type colonies derived from proximally exposed A-bomb survivors, as well as colonies from distally exposed control individuals who were not exposed to a significant level of A-bomb radiation (18 TG r and 9 wild-type colonies). Various structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes were observed in both TG r and wild-type colonies. Aberrations of the X chromosome, on which the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus is present, were found in six colonies: two resistant colonies from controls [45,X/46,XX; 46,X,ins(X)], three resistant colonies [45,X/46,XX/46,X,+mar; 46,X,t(Xq+;14q-); 46,Y,t(Xq-;5q+)], and one wild-type colony [45,X/47,XXX] from proximally exposed persons. In cases with exchange aberrations, each of the break points on the X chromosome was situated proximally to band q26 where the HPRT locus is known to be assigned. DNA replicating patterns were also studied, and it was found that abnormal X chromosomes showed early replicating patterns, while normal X chromosomes showed late replicating patterns. (author)

  20. Histone Deacetylase 3 Inhibition Overcomes BIM Deletion Polymorphism-Mediated Osimertinib Resistance in EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer.

    Tanimoto, Azusa; Takeuchi, Shinji; Arai, Sachiko; Fukuda, Koji; Yamada, Tadaaki; Roca, Xavier; Ong, S Tiong; Yano, Seiji

    2017-06-15

    Purpose: The BIM deletion polymorphism is associated with apoptosis resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI), such as gefitinib and erlotinib, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. Here, we investigated whether the BIM deletion polymorphism contributes to resistance against osimertinib, a third-generation EGFR-TKI. In addition, we determined the efficacy of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, vorinostat, against this form of resistance and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Experimental Design: We used EGFR -mutated NSCLC cell lines, which were either heterozygous or homozygous for the BIM deletion polymorphism, to evaluate the effect of osimertinib in vitro and in vivo Protein expression was examined by Western blotting. Alternative splicing of BIM mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR. Results: EGFR -mutated NSCLC cell lines with the BIM deletion polymorphism exhibited apoptosis resistance to osimertinib in a polymorphism dosage-dependent manner, and this resistance was overcome by combined use with vorinostat. Experiments with homozygous BIM deletion-positive cells revealed that vorinostat affected the alternative splicing of BIM mRNA in the deletion allele, increased the expression of active BIM protein, and thereby induced apoptosis in osimertinib-treated cells. These effects were mediated predominantly by HDAC3 inhibition. In xenograft models, combined use of vorinostat with osimertinib could regress tumors in EGFR -mutated NSCLC cells homozygous for the BIM deletion polymorphism. Moreover, this combination could induce apoptosis even when tumor cells acquired EGFR -T790M mutations. Conclusions: These findings indicate the importance of developing HDAC3-selective inhibitors, and their combined use with osimertinib, for treating EGFR -mutated lung cancers carrying the BIM deletion polymorphism. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); 3139-49. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Generation of Trichoderma atroviride mutants with constitutively activated G protein signaling by using geneticin resistance as selection marker

    Gruber Sabine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are important industrial producers of cellulases and hemicellulases, but also widely used as biocontrol agents (BCAs in agriculture. In the latter function Trichoderma species stimulate plant growth, induce plant defense and directly antagonize plant pathogenic fungi through their mycoparasitic capabilities. The recent release of the genome sequences of four mycoparasitic Trichoderma species now forms the basis for large-scale genetic manipulations of these important BCAs. Thus far, only a limited number of dominant selection markers, including Hygromycin B resistance (hph and the acetamidase-encoding amdS gene, have been available for transformation of Trichoderma spp. For more extensive functional genomics studies the utilization of additional dominant markers will be essential. Results We established the Escherichia coli neomycin phosphotransferase II-encoding nptII gene as a novel selectable marker for the transformation of Trichoderma atroviride conferring geneticin resistance. The nptII marker cassette was stably integrated into the fungal genome and transformants exhibited unaltered phenotypes compared to the wild-type. Co-transformation of T. atroviride with nptII and a constitutively activated version of the Gα subunit-encoding tga3 gene (tga3Q207L resulted in a high number of mitotically stable, geneticin-resistant transformants. Further analyses revealed a co-transformation frequency of 68% with 15 transformants having additionally integrated tga3Q207L into their genome. Constitutive activation of the Tga3-mediated signaling pathway resulted in increased vegetative growth and an enhanced ability to antagonize plant pathogenic host fungi. Conclusion The neomycin phosphotransferase II-encoding nptII gene from Escherichia coli proved to be a valuable tool for conferring geneticin resistance to the filamentous fungus T. atroviride thereby contributing to an enhanced genetic

  2. Use of gamma rays to induce mutants resistant to cocoa swollen shoot disease in Theobroma cacao L

    Adu Ampomah, Y.; Owusu, G.K.; Sackey, S.; Padi, B.; Abdul Karimu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Vegetative buds of three cocoa varieties, ‘Amelonado’ (P30), ‘Trinitario’ (K5) and ‘Upper Amazon’ (T85/799) were irradiated with 15, 20 and 25 Gy of γ-rays, respectively, and budded on to rootstocks to generate MV1 shoots. The terminal buds of the shoots were removed to induce the formation of MV2 shoots, from which MV3 shoots were similarly derived. The MV3 plants were screened for resistance to the Cocoa Swollen Shoot Virus (CSSV) by patch-graft inoculation of the root-stocks. Only a few plants from each of the three cocoa varieties were found to be symptomless after indexing. These plants were multiplied by budding to the MV4 and MV5 stages and screened at each stage for CSSV resistance by inoculation using virus-carrying mealybugs. At the MV5 stage, some plants still remained symptomless and this was confirmed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The study reveals that γ-rays can be used to induce genetic variability for resistance to CSSV in cocoa, as well as for other traits such as chlorophyll deficiency. (author)

  3. Protein Expression Modifications in Phage-Resistant Mutants of Aeromonas salmonicida after AS-A Phage Treatment

    Catarina Moreirinha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of infections by pathogenic bacteria is one of the main sources of financial loss for the aquaculture industry. This problem often cannot be solved with antibiotic treatment or vaccination. Phage therapy seems to be an alternative environmentally-friendly strategy to control infections. Recognizing the cellular modifications that bacteriophage therapy may cause to the host is essential in order to confirm microbial inactivation, while understanding the mechanisms that drive the development of phage-resistant strains. The aim of this work was to detect cellular modifications that occur after phage AS-A treatment in A. salmonicida, an important fish pathogen. Phage-resistant and susceptible cells were subjected to five successive streak-plating steps and analysed with infrared spectroscopy, a fast and powerful tool for cell study. The spectral differences of both populations were investigated and compared with a phage sensitivity profile, obtained through the spot test and efficiency of plating. Changes in protein associated peaks were found, and these results were corroborated by 1-D electrophoresis of intracellular proteins analysis and by phage sensitivity profiles. Phage AS-A treatment before the first streaking-plate step clearly affected the intracellular proteins expression levels of phage-resistant clones, altering the expression of distinct proteins during the subsequent five successive streak-plating steps, making these clones recover and be phenotypically more similar to the sensitive cells.

  4. Study of the resistance mechanisms to ultraviolet radiation in Escherichia Coli. II. General characteristics of the mutants resistant to ultraviolet radiation of Escherichia Coli PQ30

    Alcantara D, D.

    1995-12-01

    Inside this second work the results are shown on the preliminary characterization of the 5 populations of Escherichia coli that its were subjected to the light UV, by means of 80 irradiation- growth cycles, the dose of which it was duplicated each 10 cycles. The course that the resistance to UV to those 5 populations continued along the process, that covers some 165 generations, and the level reached at the end by each one of them suggests the presence of different resistance mechanisms to the UV light. (Author)

  5. Adaptation mechanisms of Escherichia Coli to the ultraviolet light I. Isolation of mutants resistant to ultraviolet light

    Alcantara D, D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work is to study the adaptation mechanisms of Escherichia coli to the ultraviolet light of 254 nm (W), a component of the solar light that induces a variety of damages in the DNA of the cells exposed, which should be eliminated in order to avoid its lethal and mutagenic effects. Inside this first report, the results obtained about the resistance to UV radiation of 5 independent populations of Escherichia coli, which were subjected in parallel form to 80 successive exposures of UV light with inserted periods of growth are reported. (Author)

  6. Resistance to nitrofurantoin and UV-irradiation in recA; uvrA; and uvrA, lexA, Escherichia coli mutants conferred by an R-plasmid from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate

    Obaseiki-Ebor, E.E. (Univ. of Benin, Benin City (Nigeria). Faculty of Pharmacy, Dept. of Pharmaceutical Microbiology)

    1984-01-01

    There have been some reports of R-plasmids conferring nitrofuran resistance by decreasing the reduction of nitrofurantoin. The mechanism by which these R-plasmids mediate nitrofurantoin resistance is still not properly understood. Since DNA repair mutants are very sensitive to nitrofurantoin, it was therefore of interest to see whether R-plasmids conferring nitrofurantoin resistance affected the nitrofurantoin sensitivity of recA; uvrA and uvrA, lexA strains of E. coli K-12. Protection against UV-irradiation was also estimated. The experiments showed that the nitrofurantoin resistance conferred by R-plasmid pBN105 was not due to defective nitrofurantoin reduction or altered permeability of the cell. Because it is known that repair-deficient bacteria have increased susceptibility to nitrofurantoin, it may be suggested that the mechanisms of UV and nitrofurantoin protection conferred by pBN105 to the DNA repair mutant strains are related.

  7. Resistance to nitrofurantoin and UV-irradiation in recA; uvrA; and uvrA, lexA, Escherichia coli mutants conferred by an R-plasmid from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate

    Obaseiki-Ebor, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    There have been some reports of R-plasmids conferring nitrofuran resistance by decreasing the reduction of nitrofurantoin. The mechanism by which these R-plasmids mediate nitrofurantoin resistance is still not properly understood. Since DNA repair mutants are very sensitive to nitrofurantoin, it was therefore of interest to see whether R-plasmids conferring nitrofurantoin resistance affected the nitrofurantoin sensitivity of recA; uvrA and uvrA, lexA strains of E. coli K-12. Protection against UV-irradiation was also estimated. The experiments showed that the nitrofurantoin resistance conferred by R-plasmid pBN105 was not due to defective nitrofurantoin reduction or altered permeability of the cell. Because it is known that repair-deficient bacteria have increased susceptibility to nitrofurantoin, it may be suggested that the mechanisms of UV and nitrofurantoin protection conferred by pBN105 to the DNA repair mutant strains are related. (Auth.)

  8. Photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence, light-harvesting system and photoinhibition resistance of a zeaxanthin-accumulating mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Tardy, F; Havaux, M

    1996-06-01

    The abscisic-acid-deficient aba-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is unable to epoxidize zeaxanthin. As a consequence, it contains large amounts of this carotenoid and lacks epoxy-xanthophylls. HPLC analysis of pigment contents in leaves, isolated thylakoids and preparations of the major light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (PSII) (LHC-II) indicated that zeaxanthin replaced neoxanthin, violaxanthin and antheraxanthin in the light-harvesting system of PSII in aba-1. Non-denaturing electrophoretic fractionation of solubilized thylakoids showed that the xanthophyll imbalance in aba-1 was associated with a pronounced decrease in trimeric LHC-II in favour of monomeric complexes, with a substantial increase in free pigments (mainly zeaxanthin and chlorophyll b), suggesting a decreased stability of LHC-II. The reduced thermostability of PSII in aba-1 was also deduced from in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Wild-type and aba-1 leaves could not be distinguished on the basis of their photosynthetic performance: no significant difference was observed between the two types of leaves for light-limited and light-saturated photosynthetic oxygen evolution, PSII photochemistry and PSII to PSI electron flow. When dark-adapted leaves (grown in white light of 80 mumol m-2s-1) were suddenly exposed to red light of 150 mumol m-2s-1, there was a strong nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence, the amplitude of which was virtually identical (at steady state) in aba-1 and wild-type leaves, despite the fact that the xanthophyll cycle pigment pool was completely in the form of zeaxanthin in aba-1 and almost exclusively in the form of violaxanthin in the wild type. A high concentration of zeaxanthin in aba-1 thylakoids did not, in itself, provide any particular protection against the photoinhibition of PSII. Taken together, the presented results indicate the following: (1) zeaxanthin can replace epoxy-xanthophylls in LHC-II without significantly affecting the

  9. Hypoxia-Induced Cisplatin Resistance in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Is Mediated by HIF-1α and Mutant p53 and Can Be Overcome by Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    Deben, Christophe; Deschoolmeester, Vanessa; De Waele, Jorrit; Jacobs, Julie; Van den Bossche, Jolien; Wouters, An; Peeters, Marc; Rolfo, Christian; Smits, Evelien; Lardon, Filip; Pauwels, Patrick

    2018-04-21

    The compound APR-246 (PRIMA-1 MET ) is a known reactivator of (mutant) p53 and inducer of oxidative stress which can sensitize cancer cells to platinum-based chemotherapeutics. However, the effect of a hypoxic tumor environment has been largely overlooked in this interaction. This study focusses on the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the p53 tumor suppressor protein in hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the potential of APR-246 to overcome this resistance. We observed that hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance only occurred in the p53 mutant NCI-H2228 Q331 * cell line, and not in the wild type A549 and mutant NCI-H1975 R273H cell lines. Cisplatin reduced HIF-1α protein levels in NCI-H2228 Q331 * cells, leading to a shift in expression from HIF-1α-dependent to p53-dependent transcription targets under hypoxia. APR-246 was able to overcome hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance in NCI-H2228 Q331 * cells in a synergistic manner without affecting mutant p53 Q331 * transcriptional activity, but significantly depleting total glutathione levels more efficiently under hypoxic conditions. Synergism was dependent on the presence of mutant p53 Q331 * and the induction of reactive oxygen species, with depletion of one or the other leading to loss of synergism. Our data further support the rationale of combining APR-246 with cisplatin in NSCLC, since their synergistic interaction is retained or enforced under hypoxic conditions in the presence of mutant p53.

  10. Hypoxia-Induced Cisplatin Resistance in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Is Mediated by HIF-1α and Mutant p53 and Can Be Overcome by Induction of Oxidative Stress

    Christophe Deben

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The compound APR-246 (PRIMA-1MET is a known reactivator of (mutant p53 and inducer of oxidative stress which can sensitize cancer cells to platinum-based chemotherapeutics. However, the effect of a hypoxic tumor environment has been largely overlooked in this interaction. This study focusses on the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and the p53 tumor suppressor protein in hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the potential of APR-246 to overcome this resistance. We observed that hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance only occurred in the p53 mutant NCI-H2228Q331* cell line, and not in the wild type A549 and mutant NCI-H1975R273H cell lines. Cisplatin reduced HIF-1α protein levels in NCI-H2228Q331* cells, leading to a shift in expression from HIF-1α-dependent to p53-dependent transcription targets under hypoxia. APR-246 was able to overcome hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance in NCI-H2228Q331* cells in a synergistic manner without affecting mutant p53Q331* transcriptional activity, but significantly depleting total glutathione levels more efficiently under hypoxic conditions. Synergism was dependent on the presence of mutant p53Q331* and the induction of reactive oxygen species, with depletion of one or the other leading to loss of synergism. Our data further support the rationale of combining APR-246 with cisplatin in NSCLC, since their synergistic interaction is retained or enforced under hypoxic conditions in the presence of mutant p53.

  11. Inverse dose-rate effect for the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in Chinese hamster V79-S cells by 60Co gamma rays

    Crompton, N.E.; Barth, B.; Kiefer, J.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79-S cells capable of growing in suspension culture were exposed to 60Co gamma rays at a high dose rate (84 Gy/h), low dose rates (200, 50, and 39 mGy/h), and a spectrum of very low dose rates (between 29 and 4.5 mGy/h). Following time for appropriate expression the cultures were assayed for the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants. For a given dose, a decrease in mutation induction occurred as the dose rate was reduced from high dose rates to low dose rates. However, further reduction in dose rate resulted in a reverse dose-rate effect, and an increase in the frequency of mutants was observed. The contribution of background mutation frequency to this reverse dose-rate effect was studied, both by examining fluctuations of mutation frequency in nonirradiated culture and by its impact upon the dose-rate-independent nature of the reversed effect, and it was found to be negligible. The physiological state of the suspension culture under periods of protracted exposure to very low dose rates was also investigated. The effect of doubling time, plating efficiency, cell cycle distribution, and sensitivity on survival and mutation were examined. In no case was a change apparent during the very low-dose-rate exposures. The results are discussed in terms of the possible expression of cryptic radiation damage after prolonged culture times and/or the involvement of an error-free repair system which requires a certain amount of radiation damage to become active

  12. Studies on watermelon somatic cell mutant of resistance to fusaric acid (FA) by low energy Ar+ ion beam irradiation

    Wang Haobo; Gu Yunhong; Cheng Guowang; Yu Zengliang

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of watermelon seeds irradiated by Ar + ion beam (25 keV, 6.24 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 ) were inoculated in MS medium with 15 mg/L FA. Cotyledons from the sterile seedling as explants were inoculated in MS +BA 2.0 mg/L + FA 15 mg/L. And the adventitious shoots of resistance to FA were cultured in MS + NAA 0.2 mg/L + FA 15 mg/L. The results showed that both the irradiation of Ar + and FA affected the germination rate and seedling of watermelon line 3-27 and YH-5, and the joint effect of Ar + and FA showed an enhanced restraint. The adventitious shoot and rootage induction rate from the seeds irradiated by Ar + were respectively bigger than the unirradiated seeds in 3-27 and YH-5. The increasing ranges were different between two watermelon lines and between the shoot and rootage induction rates

  13. Acclimation of subsurface microbial communities to mercury

    de Lipthay, Julia R; Rasmussen, Lasse D; Øregaard, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    of mercury tolerance and functional versatility of bacterial communities in contaminated soils initially were higher for surface soil, compared with the deeper soils. However, following new mercury exposure, no differences between bacterial communities were observed, which indicates a high adaptive potential......We studied the acclimation to mercury of bacterial communities of different depths from contaminated and noncontaminated floodplain soils. The level of mercury tolerance of the bacterial communities from the contaminated site was higher than those of the reference site. Furthermore, the level...... of the subsurface communities, possibly due to differences in the availability of mercury. IncP-1 trfA genes were detected in extracted community DNA from all soil depths of the contaminated site, and this finding was correlated to the isolation of four different mercury-resistance plasmids, all belonging...

  14. Insight into the molecular mechanism of yeast acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase mutants F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R resistant to soraphen A

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Chen, Qingqing; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Tonghui

    2018-02-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) is the first committed enzyme of fatty acid synthesis pathway. The inhibition of ACC is thought to be beneficial not only for diseases related to metabolism, such as type-2 diabetes, but also for infectious disease like bacterial infection disease. Soraphen A, a potent allosteric inhibitor of BC domain of yeast ACC, exhibit lower binding affinities to several yeast ACC mutants and the corresponding drug resistance mechanisms are still unknown. We report here a theoretical study of binding of soraphen A to wild type and yeast ACC mutants (including F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R) via molecular dynamic simulation and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area free energy calculations methods. The calculated binding free energies of soraphen A to yeast ACC mutants are weaker than to wild type, which is highly consistent with the experimental results. The mutant F510I weakens the binding affinity of soraphen A to yeast ACC mainly by decreasing the van der Waals contributions, while the weaker binding affinities of Soraphen A to other yeast ACC mutants including N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R are largely attributed to the decreased net electrostatic (ΔE ele + ΔG GB) interactions. Our simulation results could provide important insights for the development of more potent ACC inhibitors.

  15. Food safety knowledge on the Bt mutant protein Cry8Ka5 employed in the development of coleopteran-resistant transgenic cotton plants.

    Farias, Davi F; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Carvalho, Ana F U

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been exploited in the development of genetically modified (GM) crops for pest control. However, several pests are still difficult to control such as the coleopteran boll weevil Anthonomus grandis. By applying in vitro molecular evolution to the cry8Ka1 gene sequence, variants were generated with improved activity against A. grandis. Among them, Cry8Ka5 mutant protein showed coleoptericidal activity 3-fold higher (LC50 2.83 μg/mL) than that of the original protein (Cry8Ka1). Cry8Ka5 has been used in breeding programs in order to obtain coleopteran-resistant cotton plants. Nevertheless, there is some concern in relation to the food safety of transgenic crops, especially to the heterologously expressed proteins. In this context, our research group has performed risk assessment studies on Cry8Ka5, using the tests recommended by Codex as well as tests that we proposed as alternative and/or complementary approaches. Our results on the risk analysis of Cry8Ka5 taken together with those of other Cry proteins, point out that there is a high degree of certainty on their food safety. It is reasonable to emphasize that most safety studies on Cry proteins have essentially used the Codex approach. However, other methodologies would potentially provide additional information such as studies on the effects of Cry proteins and derived peptides on the indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota and on intestinal epithelial cells of humans. Additionally, emerging technologies such as toxicogenomics potentially will offer sensitive alternatives for some current approaches or methods.

  16. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Correlation between the Resistance Ratios of Platinum Resistance Thermometers at the Melting Point of Gallium and the Triple Point of Mercury

    Singh, Y. P.; Maas, H.; Edler, F.; Zaidi, Z. H.

    1994-01-01

    A set of resistance ratios (W) for platinum resistance thermometers was obtained at the triple point of Hg and the melting point of Ga in order to study their relationship. It was found that using measured values for one of the fixed points, a linear equation will predict the value of the other. These measurements also indicate that the fixed points of Hg and of Ga are inconsistent by about 1,5 mK in the sense that either the melting point of Ga or the triple point of Hg was assigned too high a value on the ITS-90.

  17. Mercury's Messenger

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  18. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    ... gov . Mercury Background Mercury Report Additional Resources Mercury Report - Children's Exposure to Elemental Mercury Recommend on Facebook ... I limit exposure to mercury? Why was the report written? Children attending a daycare in New Jersey ...

  19. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to

  20. Deficiency of toxin-binding protein activity in mutants of sugarcane clone H54-775 as it relates to disease resistance

    Strobel, G.A.; Steiner, G.W.; Byther, R.

    1975-01-01

    Three mutants selected from a population of sugarcane clone H54-775 that had been irradiated with 3 kR γ-radiation all lacked toxin-binding protein activity. This activity previously had been shown to be essential for eye spot disease susceptibility and was demonstrated in the susceptible parent clone H54-775. In one mutant, the biochemical, immunochemical, and electrophoretic mobilities of the toxin-binding protein were all modified

  1. Multidrug Resistance Proteins and the Renal Elimination of Inorganic Mercury Mediated by 2,3-Dimercaptopropane-1-Sulfonic Acid and Meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic Acid

    Bridges, Christy C.; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2008-01-01

    Current therapies for inorganic mercury (Hg2+) intoxication include administration of a metal chelator, either 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (DMPS) or meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). After exposure to either chelator, Hg2+ is rapidly eliminated from the kidneys and excreted in the urine, presumably as an S-conjugate of DMPS or DMSA. The multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) has been implicated in this process. We hypothesize that Mrp2 mediates the secretion of DMPS- or DMSA-S-conjugates of Hg2+ from proximal tubular cells. To test this hypothesis, the disposition of Hg2+ was examined in control and Mrp2-deficient TR− rats. Rats were injected i.v. with 0.5 μmol/kg HgCl2 containing 203Hg2+. Twenty-four and 28 h later, rats were injected with saline, DMPS, or DMSA. Tissues were harvested 48 h after HgCl2 exposure. The renal and hepatic burden of Hg2+ in the saline-injected TR− rats was greater than that of controls. In contrast, the amount of Hg2+ excreted in urine and feces of TR− rats was less than that of controls. DMPS, but not DMSA, significantly reduced the renal and hepatic content of Hg2+ in both groups of rats, with the greatest reduction in controls. A significant increase in urinary and fecal excretion of Hg2+, which was greater in the controls, was also observed following DMPS treatment. Experiments utilizing inside-out membrane vesicles expressing MRP2 support these observations by demonstrating that DMPS- and DMSA-S-conjugates of Hg2+ are transportable substrates of MRP2. Collectively, these data support a role for Mrp2 in the DMPS- and DMSA-mediated elimination of Hg2+ from the kidney. PMID:17940195

  2. Structure and function of starch and resistant starch from corn with different doses of mutant amylose-extender and floury-1 alleles.

    Yao, Ni; Paez, Alix V; White, Pamela J

    2009-03-11

    Four corn types with different doses of mutant amylose-extender (ae) and floury-1 (fl1) alleles, in the endosperm, including no. 1, aeaeae; no. 2, fl1fl1fl1; no. 3, aeaefl1; and no. 4, fl1fl1ae, were developed for use in making Hispanic food products with high resistant starch (RS) content. The RS percentages in the native starch (NS) of 1-4 were 55.2, 1.1, 5.7, and 1.1%, respectively. All NS were evaluated for pasting properties with a rapid viscoanalyzer (RVA) and for thermal properties with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). NS 1 had a low peak viscosity (PV) caused by incomplete gelatinization, whereas NS 3 had the greatest PV and breakdown of all four starch types. On the DSC, NS 2 had the lowest onset temperature and greatest enthalpy. NS 1 and 3 had similar onset and peak temperatures, both higher than those of NS 2 and 4. The gel strength of NS heated with a RVA was evaluated by using a texture analyzer immediately after RVA heating (fresh, RVA-F) and after the gel had been stored at 4 degrees C for 10 days (retrograded, RVA-R). NS 1 gel was watery and had the lowest strength (30 g) among starch gel types. NS 3 gel, although exhibiting syneresis, had greater gel strength than NS 2 and 4. The structures of the NS, the RS isolated from the NS (RS-NS), the RS isolated from RVA-F (RS-RVA-F), and the RS isolated from RVA-R (RS-RVA-R) were evaluated by using size exclusion chromatography. NS 1 had a greater percentage of amylose (AM) (58.3%) than the other NS (20.4-26.8%). The RS from all NS types (RS-NS) had a lower percentage of amylopectin (AP) and a greater percentage of low molecular weight (MW) AM than was present in the original NS materials. The RS-RVA-R from all starches had no AP or high MW AM. The percentages of longer chain lengths (DP 35-60) of NS were greater in 1 and 3 than in 2 and 4, and the percentages of smaller chain lengths (DP 10-20) were greater in 2 and 4 than in 1 and 3. In general, NS 3 seemed to have inherited some pasting

  3. The Swedish mutant barley collection

    1989-01-01

    Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)

  4. The Swedish mutant barley collection

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)

  5. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    Charlene Desbonnet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins” is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2 of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP. Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system.

  6. Spontaneous nisin-resistant Listeria monocytogenes mutants with increased expression of a putative penicillin-binding protein and their sensitivity to various antibiotics

    Gravesen, Anne; Sorensen, K.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2001-01-01

    -molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), a histidine protein kinase, a protein of unknown function, and ClpB (putative functions from homology), The three former proteins had increased expression in a total of six out of 10 independent mutants originating from five different wildtype strains, indicating...

  7. The Arabidopsis mutant iop1 exhibits induced over-expression of the plant defensin gene PDF1.2 and enhanced pathogen resistance

    Penninckx, I.A.M.A.; Eggermont, K.; Schenk, P.M.; Ackerveken, van den G.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Jasmonate and ethylene are concomitantly involved in the induction of the Arabidopsis plant defensin gene PDF1.2. To define genes in the signal transduction pathway leading to the induction of PDF1.2, we screened for mutants with induced over-expression of a β-glucuronidase reporter, under the

  8. Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated SRS soil

    Cicero, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated soil were performed at the SRTC to determine the optimum waste loading obtainable in the glass product without sacrificing durability, leach resistance, and processability. Vitrifying this waste stream also required offgas treatment for the capture of the vaporized mercury. Four soil glasses with slight variations in composition were produced, which were capable of passing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The optimum glass feed composition contained 60 weight percent soil and produced a soda-lime-silica glass when melted at 1,350 C. The glass additives used to produce this glass were 24 weight percent Na 2 CO 3 and 16 weight percent CaCO 3 . Volatilized mercury released during the vitrification process was released to the proposed mercury collection system. The proposed mercury collection system consisted of quartz and silica tubing with a Na 2 S wash bottle followed by a NaOH wash bottle. Once in the system, the volatile mercury would pass through the wash bottle containing Na 2 S, where it would be converted to Hg 2 S, which is a stable form of mercury. However, attempts to capture the volatilized mercury in a Na 2 S solution wash bottle were not as successful as anticipated. Maximum mercury captured was only about 3.24% of the mercury contained in the feed. Mercury capture efforts then shifted to condensing and capturing the volatilized mercury. These attempts were much more successful at capturing the volatile mercury, with a capture efficiency of 34.24% when dry ice was used to pack the condenser. This captured mercury was treated on a mercury specific resin after digestion of the volatilized mercury

  9. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL.

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-06-22

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML.

  10. Screening of in vitro derived mutants of banana against nematodes ...

    The rest of the mutants namely Ro Im V4 6-1-2 and Si Im V4 6-2-5 were found to be susceptible to nematodes. The resistant and moderately resistant mutants of banana could be further used in breeding programmes as well as being recognized as potential cultivars of commerce. Key words: Banana, nematode, resistance, ...

  11. Key components of different plant defense pathways are dispensable for powdery mildew resistance of the arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant

    Kuhn, Hannah; Lorek, Justine; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Consonni, Chiara; Becker, Katia; Micali, Cristina; Themaat, Van Emiel Ver Loren; Bednarek, Paweł; Raaymakers, Tom M.; Appiano, Michela; Bai, Yuling; Feussner, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO) genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant

  12. Key components of different plant defense pathways are dispensable for powdery mildew resistance of the Arabidopsis mlo2 mlo6 mlo12  triple mutant

    Kuhn, Hannah; Lorek, Justine; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Consonni, Chiara; Becker, Katia; Micali, Cristina; van Themaat, Emiel Ver Loren; Bednarek, Pawel; Raaymakers, Tom M.; Appiano, Michela; Bai, Yuling; Meldau, Dorothea; Baum, Stephani; Conrath, Uwe; Feussner, Ivo; Panstruga, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of particular plant MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O (MLO) genes confer durable and broad-spectrum penetration resistance against powdery mildew fungi. Here, we combined genetic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to explore the defense mechanisms in the fully resistant

  13. Mercury contamination extraction

    Fuhrmann, Mark [Silver Spring, MD; Heiser, John [Bayport, NY; Kalb, Paul [Wading River, NY

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  14. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  15. Adaptation mechanisms of Escherichia Coli to the ultraviolet light I. Isolation of mutants resistant to ultraviolet light; Mecanismos de adaptacion de Escherichia Coli a la luz ultravioleta I. Aislamiento de mutantes resistentes a luz ultravioleta

    Alcantara D, D [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1995-09-15

    The objective of this work is to study the adaptation mechanisms of Escherichia coli to the ultraviolet light of 254 nm (W), a component of the solar light that induces a variety of damages in the DNA of the cells exposed, which should be eliminated in order to avoid its lethal and mutagenic effects. Inside this first report, the results obtained about the resistance to UV radiation of 5 independent populations of Escherichia coli, which were subjected in parallel form to 80 successive exposures of UV light with inserted periods of growth are reported. (Author)

  16. Selection individual on mutant genotype of soybean (Glycine maxl.merrill) in m5 generation based on resistance of stem rot disease Athelia rolfsii (curzi)

    Rahmah, M.; Hanafiah, D. S.; Siregar, L. A. M.; Safni, I.

    2018-02-01

    This study was aimed to obtain selected individuals on soybean plant Glycine max L. (Merrill) in M5 generation based on high production character and tolerance of stem rot disease Athelia rolfsii (Curzi). This research was conducted in Plant Disease Laboratory and experimental field Faculty of Agriculture Universitas Sumatera Utara Medan, Indonesia. This research was conducted from December 2016 to June 2017. The treatments were 15 mutant lines genotypes and Anjasmoro variety. The results showed that some lines mutant genotypes can gave the good agronomic appearance character than Anjasmoro variety on inoculation treatment of stem rot disease. Selection performed on population M5 producesselected individuals with tolerance of stem rot disease from 100 and 200 Gy population.

  17. X-ray induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in division arrested, G0/G1 phase Chinese hamster ovary cells

    O' Neill, J.P.; Flint, K.B.

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of X-irradiation was determined with Chinese hamster ovary cells arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle through 9 days incubation in serum-free medium. In comparison with exponential phase cultures, the arrested cells showed increased cytotoxicity and mutation induction over the dose range of 50-800 rad. Exponential cultures showed a linear mutant frequency-survival relationship while the arrested cells showed a biphasic linear relationship. A post irradiation holding period 24 h does not result in any change in the mutant frequency. The increased sensitivity of the arrested cells to the mutagenic effects of X-rays appears to be a cell-cycle phase phenomenon. Upon readdition of serum, the arrested cells re-enter the cell cycle in a synchronous manner, reaching S phase at 10-12 h. Cells irradiated at 5 h after serum addition, i.e. in G1, show a similar dose response for mutant frequency, while those irradiated at 10 h or later, i.e. in late G1, S or G2, show lower mutation induction. These observations are consistent with a chromosome interchange mechanism of mutation induction by X-rays, possibly through interactions between repairing regions of the DNA. Irradiation of cells in the G0/G1 phase allow more time for such interactions in the absence of semiconservative DNA replication. (orig.).

  18. X-rays sensitive mammalian cell mutant

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A phenomenon that in x-ray-sensitive mammalian-cell mutants, cellular death due to x-ray radiation was not increased by caffeine, but on the contrary, the dead cells were resuscitated by it was discussed. The survival rate of mutant cells increased by caffein in a low concentration. This suggested that caffeine may have induced some mechanism to produce x-ray resistant mutant cells. Postirradiation treatment with caffeine increased considerably the survival rate of the mutant cells, and this suggested the existence of latent caffeine-sensitive potentially lethal damage repair system. This system, after a few hours, is thought to be substituted by caffeine-resistant repair system which is induced by caffeine, and this may be further substituted by x-ray-resistant repair system. The repair system was also induced by adenine. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Induction of Mutants in Durum Wheat

    AL-Ubaidi, M.; Ibrahim, I.; AL-Hadithi, A.

    2002-01-01

    This investigation presents a breeding program for induction and development of a new genotype of durum wheat, resistant to lodging with high yield, by irradiation durum wheat hybrids (F2) with gamma rays 100 Gy, during 1990-1997 cultivation seasons. This program involves: induction of variability, selection evaluation of the mutants at three locations: Twaitha (Baghdad) Latifya ( Babylon) and Swari (Kutt). All mutants showed resistance to lodging and there was a significant reduction in plant height. Mutant SIXIZ-22 surpassed other mutants and its origin in lodging resistance and plant height (83.5,82.8 and 89.4 cm) in the three locations at generation M5 and M6, respectively. Also, there were significant differences between mutant and their origin in the number of spikes/M 2 and grain yild during the two successive generation. On the other hand, mutant IZxCO-105 surpassed other mutants in the number of spikes/M 2 (231.8,242.3 and 292) and grain yield (4336,3376 and 5232 kg/ha) in all testing location, respectively . (authors) 14 refs., 4 tabs

  20. Global Trends in Mercury Management

    Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

  1. Basic Information about Mercury

    ... or metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white metal and is liquid at room temperature. It is ... releases can happen naturally. Both volcanoes and forest fires send mercury into the atmosphere. Human activities, however, ...

  2. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  3. From one body mutant to one cell mutant. A progress of radiation breeding in crops

    Nagatomi, Shigeki

    1996-01-01

    An effective method was established to obtain non-chimeral mutants with wide spectrum of flower colors, regenerated from floral organs on which mutated sectors were come out on chronic irradiated plants. By this way, six mutant varieties of flower colors have been selected from one pink flower of chrysanthemum, and cultivated for cut-flower production. By the same method, 3 mutant varieties with small and spray type flowers were selected in Eustoma. Mutant varieties such as a rust disease resistant in sugarcane, 6 dwarfs in Cytisus and pure-white mushroom in velvet shank have been selected successively for short period. (J.P.N.)

  4. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (merA as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance Região conservada do gene da mercúrio redutase (merA como marcador molecular da resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio

    Adriana Sotero-Martins

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains.O mecanismo de resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio mais comum é baseada na redução do Hg(II a Hg0, através da atividade da enzima mercúrio redutase (MerA. O uso do fragmento de 431 pb amplificado de uma região conservada do gene merA, que codifica a enzima MerA,foi utilizado como marcador molecular deste mecanismo, permitindo a identificação de bactérias resistentes ao mercúrio.

  5. Mercury in Your Environment

    Basic information about mercury, how it gets in the air, how people are exposed to it and health effects associated with exposure; what EPA and other organizations are doing to limit exposures; what citizens should know to minimize exposures and to reduce mercury in the environment; and information about products that contain mercury.

  6. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Fichte, B.; Assmann, H.; Ritzau, F.

    1984-01-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report of a patient, who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism. (orig.) [de

  7. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Fichte, B.; Ritzau, F.; Assmann, H.

    1984-02-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report is given of a patient who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism.

  8. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Fichte, B.; Assmann, H.; Ritzau, F.

    1984-02-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report is given of a patient, who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism.

  9. Semi-dwarf mutants for rice improvement

    Othman, Ramli; Osman, Mohammad; Ibrahim, Rusli

    1990-01-01

    Full text: MARDI and the National University of Malaysia embarked on a programme to induce resistance against blast in rice in 1978. MARDI also obtained semi dwarf mutants of cvs 'Mahsuri', 'Muda', 'Pongsu seribu' and 'Jarum Mas', which are under evaluation. The popular local rice variety 'Manik' was subjected to gamma irradiation (15-40 krad) and 101 promising semidwarf mutants have been obtained following selection in M 2 -M 6 . 29 of them show grain yields of 6.0-7.3 t/ha, compared with 5.7t for 'Manik'. Other valuable mutants were found showing long grain, less shattering, earlier maturity, and glutinous endosperm. One mutant, resistant to brown plant hopper yields 6.3t/ha. (author)

  10. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  11. Uptake of mercury vapor by wheat. An assimilation model

    Browne, C.L.; Fang, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    Using a whole-plant chamber and 203 Hg-labeled mercury, a quantitative study was made of the effect of environmental parameters on the uptake, by wheat (Triticum aestivum), of metallic mercury vapor, an atmospheric pollutant. Factors were examined in relation to their influence on components of the gas-assimilation model, U(Hg) = (C/sub A' -- C/sub L')/(r/sub L.Hg/ + r/sub M.Hg/) where U(Hg) is the rate of mercury uptake per unit leaf surface, C/sub A'/ is the ambient mercury vapor concentration, C/sub L'/ is the mercury concentration at immobilization sites within the plant (assumed to be zero), r/sub L.Hg/ is the total leaf resistance to mercury vapor exchange, and r/sub M.Hg/ is a residual term to account for unexplained physical and biochemical resistances to mercury vapor uptake. Essentially all mercury vapor uptake was confined to the leaves. r/sub L.Hg/ was particularly influenced by illumination (0 to 12.8 klux), but unaffected by ambient temperature (17 to 33 0 C) and mercury vapor concentration (0 to 40 μg m -3 ). The principal limitation to mercury vapor uptake was r/sub M.Hg/, which was linearly related to leaf temperature, but unaffected by mercury vapor concentration and illumination, except for apparent high values in darkness. Knowing C/sub A'/ and estimating r/sub L.Hg/ and r/sub M.Hg/ from experimental data, mercury vapor uptake by wheat in light was accurately predicted for several durations of exposure using the above model

  12. Identification of distinct specificity determinants in resistance protein Cf-4 allows construction of a Cf-9 mutant that confers recognition of avirulence protein AVR4

    Hoorn, Van der R.A.L.; Roth, R.; Wit, De P.J.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The tomato resistance genes Cf-4 and Cf-9 confer specific, hypersensitive response-associated recognition of Cladosporium carrying the avirulence genes Avr4 and Avr9, respectively. Cf-4 and Cf-9 encode type I transmembrane proteins with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Compared with Cf-9,

  13. Tributyltin-resistant Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus mutant with mutational substitutions in the A.sub.1./sub.A.sub.0./sub.-ATP synthase operon

    Nováková, Z.; Bobálová, Janette; Vidová, M.; Hapala, I.; Šmigáň, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 298, č. 2 (2009), s. 255-259 ISSN 0378-1097 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : methanoarchaea * bioenergetics * tributyltin resistance Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2009

  14. Primary Infection by Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei of Barley Mutants with Resistance Genes in the ml-o Locus

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Mortensen, K.

    1977-01-01

    by the hosts. An average of about 60% of the germinated conidia formed haustoria, 50% formed hyphae, and 40% formed mildew colonies on the susceptible hosts. In contrast, only about 0.7% formed haustoria, 0.4% formed hyphae, and 0.2% formed colonies on the resistant hosts, on which the great majority...

  15. The Development of “Eldo Ngano 1”: The World’s World’s First Ug99 Resistant Mutant Wheat Variety

    Forster, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The wheat black stem rust disease is a virulent race of fungus, Puccinia graminis, which affects wheat plants and is caused by a strain of fungus known as Ug99. Named for its place and year of origin, Ug99 was first discovered on wheat in Uganda in 1999. The spores of this plant disease are airborne and can be easily spread by wind. If not prevented, the disease can destroy 70 to 100 per cent of the yield of wheat crops. Annually on average 8.3 million tonnes of wheat grain is lost to this disease, costing US $1.23 billion per year. Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda are hot spots for this disease. In 2009, growing international concern regarding the horrific impact of Ug99 on wheat led to the establishment of IAEA project INT/5/150, Responding to the Transboundary Threat of Wheat Black Stem Rust (Ug99). This project has involved over 18 countries and 5 national and international institutions, and examined possible mutation induction treatments to deal with the challenges posed by Ug99. Meetings and workshops to facilitate the project efforts have been held in Kenya and Turkey. Ug99 continues to spread globally and has now reached the Islamic Republic of Iran. There are also reports of suspected disease occurrences in Europe. It is essential that work continues on developing mutant lines for further crop protection that can be utilized worldwide to safeguard the wheat crop from this devastating disease

  16. Effects of spermine on the detection of induced forward mutation at the CAN1 locus in yeast: evidence for selection against canavanine-resistant mutants

    McDougall, K.J.; Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of exogenous spermine tetrahydrochloride (0.5 mg/ml) on hydrazine- and nitrous acid-induced forward mutation to canavanine resistance (CAN1 ..-->.. can1, normal to defective arginine permease) was examined in stationary-phase haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Post-treatment cell division (specifically DNA replication) is required for hydrazine mutagenesis at this locus, whereas nitrous acid mutagenesis exhibits, in addition, a significant post-treatment-independent component.

  17. Deficient BIM Expression as a Mechanism of Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Therapies in EGFR Mutant and ALK Positive Lung Cancers

    2016-10-01

    University Philips Institute for Oral Health Research, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Richmond, Virginia, USA. 12Virginia...resistance. We have gained tremendous new knowledge about this arena thanks to the funding we received from DOD. Specifically, we have studied in detail...we compared the transcriptional profiles parental PC9 cells with those of PC9-GR2 and PC9-GR3. Gene-set enrichment analysis revealed the upregulation

  18. Ninety-nine is not enough: molecular characterization of inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease mutants with insertions in the flap region

    Kožíšek, Milan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Maarseveen van, N. M.; De Jongh, D.; Boucher, Ch. A. B.; Kagan, R. M.; Nijhuis, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 12 (2008), s. 5869-5878 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA MZd NR8571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV protease inhibitors * aspartic proteases * viral resistance * insertions Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.308, year: 2008

  19. Kinetics of high-Level of ß-glucosidase production by a 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutant of Humicola lanuginosa in submerged fermentation Cinética de produção de ß-glucosidase por um mutante de Hemicola lanuginosa resistente a 2-deoxiglucose em fermentação submersa

    Syed Ali Imran Bokhari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutant (M7 of Humicola lanuginosa was obtained by exposing conidia to γ-rays and permitting expression in broth containing 0.6% 2-deoxyglucose (DG and cellobiose (1% before plating on DG esculin-ferric ammonium citrate agar medium from which colonies showing faster and bigger blackening zones were selected. Kinetic parameters for enhanced ß-glucosidase (BGL synthesis by M7 were achieved when corncobs acted as the carbon source. The combination between corncobs and corn steep liquor was the best to support higher values of all product formation kinetic parameters. Effect of temperature on the kinetic and thermodynamic attributes of BGL production equilibrium in the wild organismand M7was studied using batch process at eight different temperatures in shake-flask studies. The best performance was found at 45ºC and 20 g L-1 corncobs in 64 h. Both growth and product formation (17.93 U mL-1 were remarkably high at 45ºC and both were coupled under optimum working conditions. Product yield of BGL from the mutant M7 (1556.5 U g-1 dry corncobs was significantly higher than the values reported on all fungal and bacterial systems. Mutation had thermo-stabilization influence on the organism and mutant required lower activation energy for growth and lower magnitudes of enthalpy and entropy for product formation than those demanded by the wild organism, other mesophilic and thermo-tolerant organisms. In the inactivation phase, the organisms needed lower values of activation energy, enthalpy and entropy for product formation equilibrium, confirming thermophilic nature of metabolic network possessed by the mutant organism.Um mutante de Hemicola lanuginosa resistente a 2-deoxiglucose(M7 foi obtido através de exposição de conídios a raios γ, permitindo a expressão em caldo contendo 0,6% de 2-deoxiglucose (DG e celobiose (1% antes da semeadura em ágar DG esculina citrato de ferro amoniacal, da qual foram selecionadas as col

  20. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    Cancio, Reynel; Silvestri, Romano; Ragno, Rino; Artico, Marino; De Martino, Gabriella; La Regina, Giuseppe; Crespan, Emmanuele; Zanoli, Samantha; Hübscher, Ulrich; Spadari, Silvio; Maga, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfone (IAS) nonnucleoside inhibitors have been shown to potently inhibit the growth of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but their exact mechanism of action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we describe the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by selected IAS derivatives. Our results showed that, depending on the substitutions introduced in the IAS common pharmacophore, these compounds can be made selective for different enzyme-substrate complexes. Moreover, we showed that the molecular basis for this selectivity was a different association rate of the drug to a particular enzymatic form along the reaction pathway. By comparing the activities of the different compounds against wild-type RT and the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutant Lys103Asn, it was possible to hypothesize, on the basis of their mechanism of action, a rationale for the design of drugs which could overcome the steric barrier imposed by the Lys103Asn mutation. PMID:16251294

  1. Mercury balance analysis

    Maag, J.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the consumption of mercury, divided into use areas, was carried out. Disposal and emissions to the environment were also qualified. The assessment is mainly based on data from 1992 - 1993. The most important source of emission of mercury to air is solid waste incineration which is assessed in particular to be due to the supply of mercury in batteries (most likely mercury oxide batteries from photo equipment) and to dental fillings. The second most important source of mercury emission to air is coal-fired power plants which are estimated to account for 200-500 kg of mercury emission p.a. Other mercury emissions are mainly related to waste treatment and disposal. The consumption of mercury is generally decreasing. During the period from 1982/83 - 1992-93, the total consumption of mercury in Denmark was about halved. This development is related to the fact that consumption with regard to several important use areas (batteries, dental fillings, thermometers etc.) has been significantly reduced, while for other purposes the use of mercury has completely, or almost disappeared, i.e. (fungicides for seed, tubes etc.). (EG)

  2. Characterization of mercury bioremediation by transgenic bacteria expressing metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase

    Gonzalez-Ruiz Gloriene

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of transgenic bacteria has been proposed as a suitable alternative for mercury remediation. Ideally, mercury would be sequestered by metal-scavenging agents inside transgenic bacteria for subsequent retrieval. So far, this approach has produced limited protection and accumulation. We report here the development of a transgenic system that effectively expresses metallothionein (mt-1 and polyphosphate kinase (ppk genes in bacteria in order to provide high mercury resistance and accumulation. Results In this study, bacterial transformation with transcriptional and translational enhanced vectors designed for the expression of metallothionein and polyphosphate kinase provided high transgene transcript levels independent of the gene being expressed. Expression of polyphosphate kinase and metallothionein in transgenic bacteria provided high resistance to mercury, up to 80 μM and 120 μM, respectively. Here we show for the first time that metallothionein can be efficiently expressed in bacteria without being fused to a carrier protein to enhance mercury bioremediation. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry analyzes revealed that the mt-1 transgenic bacteria accumulated up to 100.2 ± 17.6 μM of mercury from media containing 120 μM Hg. The extent of mercury remediation was such that the contaminated media remediated by the mt-1 transgenic bacteria supported the growth of untransformed bacteria. Cell aggregation, precipitation and color changes were visually observed in mt-1 and ppk transgenic bacteria when these cells were grown in high mercury concentrations. Conclusion The transgenic bacterial system described in this study presents a viable technology for mercury bioremediation from liquid matrices because it provides high mercury resistance and accumulation while inhibiting elemental mercury volatilization. This is the first report that shows that metallothionein expression provides mercury resistance and

  3. Process for low mercury coal

    Merriam, Norman W.; Grimes, R. William; Tweed, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

  4. Mercury (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    ... in contact with) to mercury is by eating fish or shellfish that have high levels of mercury. You can also get sick from: Touching it Breathing it in Drinking contaminated water How can mercury ...

  5. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol

  6. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  7. Mercury is Moon's brother

    Ksanfomalifi, L.V.

    1976-01-01

    The latest information on Mercury planet is presented obtained by studying the planet with the aid of radar and space vehicles. Rotation of Mercury about its axis has been discovered; within 2/3 of its year it executes a complete revolution about its axis. In images obtained by the ''Mariner-10'' Mercurys surface differs little from that of the Moon. The ''Mariner-10'' has also discovered the Mercurys atmosphere, which consists of extremely rarefied helium. The helium is continuously supplied to the planet by the solar wind. The Mercury's magnetic field has been discovered, whose strength is 35 x 10 -4 at the Equator and 70 x 10 -4 E at the poles. The inclination of the dipole axis to the Mercury's rotation axis is 7 deg

  8. Promising rice mutants

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two induced mutants namely, Mut NS 1 (tall) and Mut NS 5 (semi-dwarf) derived from rice variety Nizersail were evaluated for various agronomic characters at four locations in Bangladesh. Both the mutants matured about three weeks earlier and yielded significantly higher than the parent variety Nizersail. (author). 3 tabs., 9 refs

  9. Induction of somaclonal variation and mutations in sugarcane calli for selecting mutants with resistance to red-rot and tolerance to water-logged conditions

    Shaikh, M.A.Q.; Begum, S.; Samad, M.A.; Shmsuzzaman, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Immature leaves of cv. 'Isd-16' of sugarcane were cultured on modified MS medium supplemented with 3.0 mg/l 2,4-D for callus induction. The calli were transferred to MS medium supplemented with 5.0 mg/l IAA and 2.0 mg/l KIN for shoot regeneration. The shoots were rooted on MS medium supplemented with 5.0 mg/1NAA and 70 g/l sucrose. The regenerated plants were screened against red-rot disease and water-logged condition in a field. Of the 368 plants inoculated with red-rot pathogen, only one was moderately resistant and two were moderately susceptible. In another set of 500 R 1 plants, six clones were tolerant to water-logged condition. Four week-old callus cultures were irradiated with doses of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10 Gy gamma-rays. Survival of calli decreased with increase in radiation dose and ranged from 58 to 91%. Regenerated shoots were obtained from all irradiated calli except those treated with 8 and 10 Gy. Shoot regeneration from the irradiated calli ranged from 8 to 50%, and gave 768 R 1 plants. The highest regeneration of plants was obtained from calli treated with 3 Gy. These plants are being grown in a field for screening against red-rot and water-logged conditions. (author). 10 refs, 2 tabs

  10. Induction of somaclonal variation and mutations in sugarcane calli for selecting mutants with resistance to red-rot and tolerance to water-logged conditions

    Shaikh, M A.Q.; Begum, S; Samad, M A; Shmsuzzaman, K M [Bangladesh Inst. of Nuclear Agriculture, Mymensingh (Bangladesh)

    1997-07-01

    Immature leaves of cv. `Isd-16` of sugarcane were cultured on modified MS medium supplemented with 3.0 mg/l 2,4-D for callus induction. The calli were transferred to MS medium supplemented with 5.0 mg/l IAA and 2.0 mg/l KIN for shoot regeneration. The shoots were rooted on MS medium supplemented with 5.0 mg/1NAA and 70 g/l sucrose. The regenerated plants were screened against red-rot disease and water-logged condition in a field. Of the 368 plants inoculated with red-rot pathogen, only one was moderately resistant and two were moderately susceptible. In another set of 500 R{sub 1} plants, six clones were tolerant to water-logged condition. Four week-old callus cultures were irradiated with doses of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10 Gy gamma-rays. Survival of calli decreased with increase in radiation dose and ranged from 58 to 91%. Regenerated shoots were obtained from all irradiated calli except those treated with 8 and 10 Gy. Shoot regeneration from the irradiated calli ranged from 8 to 50%, and gave 768 R{sub 1} plants. The highest regeneration of plants was obtained from calli treated with 3 Gy. These plants are being grown in a field for screening against red-rot and water-logged conditions. (author). 10 refs, 2 tabs.

  11. Mutant heterosis in rice

    1987-01-01

    In the variety TKM6 a high yielding semidwarf mutant has been induced. This TKM6 mutant was used in test crosses with a number of other varieties and mutants to examine the extent of heterosis of dwarfs in rice and to select superior crosses. An excerpt of the published data is given. It appears from the backcross of the mutant with its original variety, that an increase in number of productive tillers occurs in the hybrid, leading to a striking grain yield increase, while the semi-dwarf culm length (the main mutant character) reverts to the normal phenotype. In the cross with IR8 on the other hand, there is only a minimal increase in tiller number but a substantial increase in TGW leading to more than 30% yield increase over the better parent

  12. Detecting Airborne Mercury by Use of Palladium Chloride

    Ryan, Margaret; Shevade, Abhijit; Kisor, Adam; Homer, Margie; Jewell, April; Manatt, Kenneth; Torres, Julia; Soler, Jessica; Taylor, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Palladium chloride films have been found to be useful as alternatives to the gold films heretofore used to detect airborne elemental mercury at concentrations of the order of parts per billion (ppb). Somewhat more specifically, when suitably prepared palladium chloride films are exposed to parts-per-billion or larger concentrations of airborne mercury, their electrical resistances change by amounts large enough to be easily measurable. Because airborne mercury adversely affects health, it is desirable to be able to detect it with high sensitivity, especially in enclosed environments in which there is a risk of leakage of mercury from lamps or other equipment. The detection of mercury by use of gold films involves the formation of gold/mercury amalgam. Gold films offer adequate sensitivity for detection of airborne mercury and could easily be integrated into an electronic-nose system designed to operate in the temperature range of 23 to 28 C. Unfortunately, in order to regenerate a gold-film mercury sensor, one must heat it to a temperature of 200 C for several minutes in clean flowing air. In preparation for an experiment to demonstrate the present sensor concept, palladium chloride was deposited from an aqueous solution onto sets of gold electrodes and sintered in air to form a film. Then while using the gold electrodes to measure the electrical resistance of the films, the films were exposed, at a temperature of 25 C, to humidified air containing mercury at various concentrations from 0 to 35 ppb (see figure). The results of this and other experiments have been interpreted as signifying that sensors of this type can detect mercury in room-temperature air at concentrations of at least 2.5 ppb and can readily be regenerated at temperatures <40 C.

  13. In chronic myeloid leukemia patients on second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, deep sequencing of BCR-ABL1 at the time of warning may allow sensitive detection of emerging drug-resistant mutants.

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuela; Bavaro, Luana; Machova Polakova, Katerina; Linhartova, Jana; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Domenico; Pane, Fabrizio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Cavo, Michele; Baccarani, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-08-02

    Imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients receiving second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy with dasatinib or nilotinib have a higher risk of disease relapse and progression and not infrequently BCR-ABL1 kinase domain (KD) mutations are implicated in therapeutic failure. In this setting, earlier detection of emerging BCR-ABL1 KD mutations would offer greater chances of efficacy for subsequent salvage therapy and limit the biological consequences of full BCR-ABL1 kinase reactivation. Taking advantage of an already set up and validated next-generation deep amplicon sequencing (DS) assay, we aimed to assess whether DS may allow a larger window of detection of emerging BCR-ABL1 KD mutants predicting for an impending relapse. a total of 125 longitudinal samples from 51 CML patients who had acquired dasatinib- or nilotinib-resistant mutations during second-line therapy were analyzed by DS from the time of failure and mutation detection by conventional sequencing backwards. BCR-ABL1/ABL1%(IS) transcript levels were used to define whether the patient had 'optimal response', 'warning' or 'failure' at the time of first mutation detection by DS. DS was able to backtrack dasatinib- or nilotinib-resistant mutations to the previous sample(s) in 23/51 (45 %) pts. Median mutation burden at the time of first detection by DS was 5.5 % (range, 1.5-17.5 %); median interval between detection by DS and detection by conventional sequencing was 3 months (range, 1-9 months). In 5 cases, the mutations were detectable at baseline. In the remaining cases, response level at the time mutations were first detected by DS could be defined as 'Warning' (according to the 2013 ELN definitions of response to 2nd-line therapy) in 13 cases, as 'Optimal response' in one case, as 'Failure' in 4 cases. No dasatinib- or nilotinib-resistant mutations were detected by DS in 15 randomly selected patients with 'warning' at various timepoints, that later turned into optimal

  14. Generation of herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM)-restricted herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant viruses: resistance of HVEM-expressing cells and identification of mutations that rescue nectin-1 recognition.

    Uchida, Hiroaki; Shah, Waris A; Ozuer, Ali; Frampton, Arthur R; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-04-01

    Both initial infection and cell-to-cell spread by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) require the interaction of the viral glycoprotein D (gD) with an entry receptor on the cell surface. The two major HSV entry receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, mediate infection independently but are coexpressed on a variety of cells. To determine if both receptors are active in these instances, we have established mutant viruses that are selectively impaired for recognition of one or the other receptor. In plaque assays, these viruses showed approximately 1,000-fold selectivity for the matched receptor over the mismatched receptor. Separate assays showed that each virus is impaired for both infection and spread through the mismatched receptor. We tested several human tumor cell lines for susceptibility to these viruses and observed that HT29 colon carcinoma cells are susceptible to infection by nectin-1-restricted virus but are highly resistant to HVEM-restricted virus infection, despite readily detectable HVEM expression on the cell surface. HVEM cDNA isolated from HT29 cells rendered HSV-resistant cells permissive for infection by the HVEM-restricted virus, suggesting that HT29 cells lack a cofactor for HVEM-mediated infection or express an HVEM-specific inhibitory factor. Passaging of HVEM-restricted virus on nectin-1-expressing cells yielded a set of gD missense mutations that each restored functional recognition of nectin-1. These mutations identify residues that likely play a role in shaping the nectin-1 binding site of gD. Our findings illustrate the utility of these receptor-restricted viruses in studying the early events in HSV infection.

  15. Selection of an entecavir-resistant mutant despite prolonged hepatitis B virus DNA suppression, in a chronic hepatitis B patient with preexistent lamivudine resistance : successful rescue therapy with tenofovir

    Leemans, Wilhelmus F; Niesters, Hubert G; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Janssen, Harry L; Schalm, Solko W; de Man, Robert A

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Entecavir has potent activity against hepatitis B virus. Drug resistance has not been reported in nucleoside-naïve patients and is low in lamivudine-refractory patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: A 43-year-old man was treated with lamivudine for hepatitis B e antigen-positive

  16. PNRI mutant variety: Cordyline 'Afable'

    Aurigue, Fernando B.

    2012-01-01

    Cordyline 'Afable', registered by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute as NSIC 2009 Or-83, is an induced mutant developed from Cordyline 'Kiwi' by treating stem cuttings with acute gamma radiation from a Cobalt-60 source. The new mutant is identical to Cordyline 'Kiwi' in growth habit but differs in foliage color, and exhibits field resistance to Phytophthora sp., a fungus that causes leaf blight and rot in Ti plants. Results of this mutation breeding experiment showed that leaf color was altered by gamma irradiation and resistance to fungal diseases was improved. It also demonstrated how mutations that occur in nature may be generated artificially. Propagation of cordyline 'Afable' is true-to-type by vegetative propagation methods, such as separation of suckers and offshoots, shoot tip cutting, and top cutting. Aside from landscaping material, terrarium or dish-garden plant, it is ideal as containerized plant for indoor and outdoor use. The leaves or shoots may be harvested as cut foliage for flower arrangements. (author)

  17. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    In this case report, intravenous complications, treatment strategies and possible ... Mercury toxicity is commonly associated with vapour inhalation or oral ingestion, for which there exist definite treatment options. Intravenous mercury ... personality, anxiousness, irritability, insomnia, depression and drowsi- ness.[1] However ...

  18. Mercury's shifting, rolling past

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of scalloped-edged cliffs or lobate scarps on Mercury's surface are thrust faults that are consistent with the planet shrinking and cooling with time. However, compression occurred in the planet's early history and Mariner 10 images revealed decades ago that lobate scarps are among the youngest features on Mercury. Why don't we find more evidence of older compressive features?

  19. Global Mercury Assessment 2013

    mercury pollution. This summary report and the accompanying. Technical Background Report for the Global. Mercury Assessment 2013 are developed in response to Decision 25/5, paragraph ... The use of different pollution control technologies in different ...... vegetation, snow, freshwater, and seawater. One of the largest ...

  20. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  1. Mercury in Nordic ecosystems

    Munthe, John; Waengberg, Ingvar (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Stockholm (SE)); Rognerud, Sigurd; Fjeld, Eirik (Norwegian Inst. for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo (Norway)); Verta, Matti; Porvari, Petri (Finnish Environment Inst. (SYKE), Helsinki (Finland)); Meili, Markus (Inst. of Applied Environmental Research (ITM), Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    This report provides a first comprehensive compilation and assessment of available data on mercury in air, precipitation, sediments and fish in the Nordic countries. The main conclusion is that mercury levels in Nordic ecosystems continue to be affected by long-range atmospheric transport. The geographical patterns of mercury concentrations in both sediments and fish are also strongly affected by ecosystem characteristics and in some regions possibly by historical pollution. An evaluation of geographical variations in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicates that the influence from anthropogenic sources from Central European areas is still significant. The annual variability of deposition is large and dependant of precipitation amounts. An evaluation of data from stations around the North Sea has indicated a significant decrease in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicating a continuous decrease of emissions in Europe (Waengberg et al., 2007). For mercury in air (TGM), the geographical pattern is less pronounced indicating the influence of mercury emissions and distribution over a larger geographical area (i.e. hemispherical transport). Comparison of recent (surficial) and historical lake sediments show significantly elevated concentrations of mercury most likely caused by anthropogenic atmospheric deposition over the past century. The highest pollution impact was observed in the coastal areas of southern Norway, in south western Finland and in Sweden from the coastal areas in the southwest across the central parts to the north-east. The general increase in recent versus old sediments was 2-5 fold. Data on mercury in Nordic freshwater fish was assembled and evaluated with respect to geographical variations. The fish data were further compared with temporal and spatial trends in mercury deposition and mercury contamination of lake sediments in order to investigate the coupling between atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury and local mercury

  2. Olive-pomace harbors bacteria with the potential for hydrocarbon-biodegradation, nitrogen-fixation and mercury-resistance: promising material for waste-oil-bioremediation.

    Dashti, Narjes; Ali, Nedaa; Khanafer, Majida; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Sorkhoh, Naser; Radwan, Samir

    2015-05-15

    Olive-pomace, a waste by-product of olive oil industry, took up >40% of its weight crude oil. Meanwhile, this material harbored a rich and diverse hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial population in the magnitude of 10(6) to 10(7) cells g(-1). Using this material for bioaugmentation of batch cultures in crude oil-containing mineral medium, resulted in the consumption of 12.9, 21.5, 28.3, and 43% oil after 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, respectively. Similar oil-consumption values, namely 11.0, 29.3, 34.7 and 43.9%, respectively, were recorded when a NaNO3-free medium was used instead of the complete medium. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria involved in those bioremediation processes, as characterized by their 16S rRNA-gene sequences, belonged to the genera Agrococcus, Pseudomonas, Cellulosimicrobium, Streptococcus, Sinorhizobium, Olivibacter, Ochrobactrum, Rhizobium, Pleomorphomonas, Azoarcus, Starkeya and others. Many of the bacterial species belonging to those genera were diazotrophic; they proved to contain the nifH-genes in their genomes. Still other bacterial species could tolerate the heavy metal mercury. The dynamic changes of the proportions of various species during 8 months of incubation were recorded. The culture-independent, phylogenetic analysis of the bacterioflora gave lists different from those recorded by the culture-dependent method. Nevertheless, those lists comprised among others, several genera known for their hydrocarbonoclastic potential, e.g. Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium, Sphingobium, and Citrobacter. It was concluded that olive-pomace could be applied in oil-remediation, not only as a physical sorbent, but also for bioaugmentation purposes as a biological source of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  4. Study of the resistance mechanisms to ultraviolet radiation in Escherichia Coli. II. General characteristics of the mutants resistant to ultraviolet radiation of Escherichia Coli PQ30; Estudio de los mecanismos de resistencia a UV en E. coli. II. Caracteristicas generales de los mutantes resistentes a UV de E. coli PQ30

    Alcantara D, D [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1995-12-15

    Inside this second work the results are shown on the preliminary characterization of the 5 populations of Escherichia coli that its were subjected to the light UV, by means of 80 irradiation- growth cycles, the dose of which it was duplicated each 10 cycles. The course that the resistance to UV to those 5 populations continued along the process, that covers some 165 generations, and the level reached at the end by each one of them suggests the presence of different resistance mechanisms to the UV light. (Author)

  5. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  6. PHAGE RESISTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL MUTANTS

    2001-01-01

    Method of obtaining mutated lactic acid bacteria having a reduced susceptibility towards attack by bacteriophages, the method comprising mutating a gene involved in the pyrimidine metabolism, including pyrG encoding CTP synthetase. Such lactic acid bacteria are useful in starter cultures...

  7. Total Mercury content of skin toning creams

    Administrator

    2008-04-01

    Apr 1, 2008 ... used it for cosmetics (Silberberg, 1995). Mercury- ... Cosmetic preparations containing mercury com- pounds are .... mercury determination by a modified version of an open .... level mercury exposure, which could lead to a.

  8. The potential for Probiotic Bacteria from milkfish intestine in reducing mercury metals in skimmed milk media

    Dwyana, Zaraswati; Priosambodo, D.; Haedar, N.; Erviani, A. E.; Djabura, A. K.; Sukma, R.

    2018-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the heavy metals that is harmful to humans. The accumulation of mercury in the body is generally derived from food. Several types of bacteria from intestine of milkfish are known to reduce mercury concentration. People can take advantage of this bacterial ability by eating it through probiotic foods. This research conducted to figure out the potential for probiotic bacteria from milkfish intestine in reducing mercury. Isolation from probiotic bacteria from milkfish intestine conducted with grown the isolates in MRSA medium with addition of 1% CaCO3. Twelve isolate were obtained from milkfish intestine. Mercury resistance tested was performed by measuring cell density using a spectrophotometer at concentrations of 10, 15 and 20 ppm respectively in skim milk media. Probiotic tests (gastric acid, bile salts and antimicrobial activity) for MRSB media was also conducted. Results showed that seven isolate were resistant to mercury in all concentrations and potential as probiotics. All resistant isolate then tested for skim milk media with addition of 5, 10, 20 ppm mercury acetate respectively. Result showed that only one isolated was able to reduce the concentration of mercury (Hg) in all variations on concentration and potential as mercury reducer probiotic bacteria.

  9. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  10. Metallic mercury recycling. Final report

    Beck, M.A.

    1994-07-01

    Metallic mercury is known to be a hazardous material and is regulated as such. The disposal of mercury, usually by landfill, is expensive and does not remove mercury from the environment. Results from the Metallic Mercury Recycling Project have demonstrated that metallic mercury is a good candidate for reclamation and recycling. Most of the potential contamination of mercury resides in the scum floating on the surface of the mercury. Pinhole filtration was demonstrated to be an inexpensive and easy way of removing residues from mercury. The analysis method is shown to be sufficient for present release practices, and should be sufficient for future release requirements. Data from tests are presented. The consistently higher level of activity of the filter residue versus the bulk mercury is discussed. Recommendations for the recycling procedure are made.

  11. Metallic mercury recycling. Final report

    Beck, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Metallic mercury is known to be a hazardous material and is regulated as such. The disposal of mercury, usually by landfill, is expensive and does not remove mercury from the environment. Results from the Metallic Mercury Recycling Project have demonstrated that metallic mercury is a good candidate for reclamation and recycling. Most of the potential contamination of mercury resides in the scum floating on the surface of the mercury. Pinhole filtration was demonstrated to be an inexpensive and easy way of removing residues from mercury. The analysis method is shown to be sufficient for present release practices, and should be sufficient for future release requirements. Data from tests are presented. The consistently higher level of activity of the filter residue versus the bulk mercury is discussed. Recommendations for the recycling procedure are made

  12. The tectonics of Mercury

    Melosh, H.J.; Mckinnon, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The probable tectonic history of Mercury and the relative sequence of events are discussed on the basis of data collected by the Mariner-10 spacecraft. Results indicate that Mercury's tectonic activity was confined to its early history; its endogenic activity was principally due to a small change in the shape of its lithosphere, caused by tidal despinning, and a small change in area caused by shrinkage due to cooling. Exogenic processes, in particular the impact activity, have produced more abundant tectonic features. Many features associated with the Caloris basin are due to loading of Mercury's thick lithosphere by extrusive lavas or subsidence due to magma withdrawal. It is emphasized that tectonic features observed on Mercury yield insight into the earliest tectonic events on planets like Mars and, perhaps, the earth, where subsequent events obscured or erased the most ancient tectonic records

  13. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    Elemental mercury is the well-known silver liquid and usually causes pulmonary, neurological and ... suicidal ideation or features of major depression. Clinically the patient was .... medically at this stage and consider surgical intervention later.

  14. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Imber, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The global dynamics of Mercury's magnetosphere will be discussed, focussing on observed asymmetries in the magnetotail and on the precipitation of particles of magnetospheric origin onto the nightside planetary surface.

  15. Mercury analysis in hair

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit K; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A

    2015-01-01

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool for assessing actual exposure to chemicals that takes into account all routes of intake. Although hair analysis is considered to be an optimal biomarker for assessing mercury exposure, the lack of harmonization as regards sampling and analytical...... assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating...... laboratories. Training sessions were organized for field workers and four external quality-assessment exercises (ICI/EQUAS), followed by the corresponding web conferences, were organized between March 2011 and February 2012. ICI/EQUAS used native hair samples at two mercury concentration ranges (0...

  16. Mercury's Early Geologic History

    Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Klima, R. L.; Robinson, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    A combination of geologic mapping, compositional information, and geochemical models are providing a better understanding of Mercury's early geologic history, and allow us to place it in the context of the Moon and the terrestrial planets.

  17. Mercury CEM Calibration

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  18. Cutaneous mercury granuloma

    Kalpana A Bothale; Sadhana D Mahore; Sushil Pande; Trupti Dongre

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mercury granuloma is rarely encountered. Clinically it may pose difficulty in diagnosis. Here, we report a 23-year-old male presented with erythematous, nodular lesions over the forearm and anterior aspect of chest wall. Metallic mercury in tissue sections appear as dark black, opaque, spherical globules of varying size and number. They are surrounded by granulomatous foreign-body reaction. It is composed of foreign body giant cells and mixed inflammatory infiltrate composed of hist...

  19. Mercury in human hair

    Kapauan, P.A.; Cruz, C.C.; Verceluz, F.P.

    1980-10-01

    The analysis of mercury (Hg) in scalp hair obtained from individuals residing in five different localities in the Philippines - Metro Manila, Naga City in Bicol, Bataan, Oriental Mindoro, and Palawan is presented. An overall mean of 1.46 ug/g of hair was obtained for all samples excluding those from Palawan and represents a baseline value.'' In terms of the mercury levels found in hair, the Honda Bay area in Palawan is, relatively, a ''contaminated area.'' (author)

  20. Productive mutants of niger

    Misra, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Seeds of six niger (Guizotia abyssinica Cass.) varieties ('GA-10', 'ONS-8', 'IGP-72', 'N-71', 'NB-9' and 'UN-4') were treated with 0.5, 0.75 and 1% ethyl methanesulphonate. After four generations of selection, 29 mutant lines were developed and those were evaluated from 1990-92 during Kharif (July to October) and Rabi (December to March) seasons. Average plant characteristics and yield data of four high yielding mutants along with 'IGP-76' (National Check), GA-10 (Zonal Check) and 'Semiliguda Local' (Local Check) are presented

  1. Association between Blood Mercury Level and Visceral Adiposity in Adults

    Jong Suk Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFew studies have examined the association between mercury exposure and obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between blood mercury concentrations and indices of obesity in adults.MethodsA total of 200 healthy subjects, aged 30 to 64 years, who had no history of cardiovascular or malignant disease, were examined. Anthropometric and various biochemical profiles were measured. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA.ResultsAll subjects were divided into three groups according to blood mercury concentrations. Compared with the subjects in the lowest tertile of mercury, those in the highest tertile were more likely to be male; were current alcohol drinkers and smokers; had a higher body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and VAT; had higher levels of blood pressure, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance; and consumed more fish. The blood mercury concentration was significantly associated with anthropometric parameters, showing relationships with BMI, WC, and VAT. After adjusting for multiple risk factors, the odds ratios (ORs for high mercury concentration was significantly higher in the highest VAT tertile than in the lowest VAT tertile (OR, 2.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.05 to 6.62; P<0.05.ConclusionThe blood mercury concentration was significantly associated with VAT in healthy adults. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  2. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  3. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    ... 2012 What are the Health Effects of Mercury Exposure? The health effects that can be caused by breathing mercury depend ... they breathe faster and have smaller lungs. Health effects caused by long-term exposure to mercury vapors • • Anxiety • • Excessive shyness • • Anorexia • • Sleeping ...

  4. Mercury pOIsonIng

    A case of mercury poisoning is reported and clinical observations of 6 .... fish ingested and occupational exposure. .... exposed to mercury as a result of inadequate industrial safety standards, and ... WHO Tech Rep Ser 1980; No. 674: 102-115.

  5. Mercury Study Report to Congress

    EPA's Report to Congress on Mercury provides an assessment of the magnitude of U.S. mercury emissions by source, the health and environmental implications of those emissions, and the availability and cost of control technologies.

  6. True Polar Wander of Mercury

    Keane, J. T.; Matsuyama, I.

    2018-05-01

    We use new MESSENGER gravity data to investigate how impact basins and volcanic provinces alter Mercury's moments of inertia. We find that Mercury has reoriented tens of degrees over its history, affecting tectonics, volatiles, and more.

  7. Mercury Emissions: The Global Context

    Mercury emissions are a global problem that knows no national or continental boundaries. Mercury that is emitted to the air can travel thousands of miles in the atmosphere before it is eventually deposited back to the earth.

  8. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    Connerney, J.E.P.; Ness, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain

  9. Low molecular weight thiols and thioredoxins are important players in Hg(II) resistance in Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    Norambuena, J; Wang, Y; Hanson, T; Boyd, J M; Barkay, T

    2017-11-17

    Mercury (Hg), one of the most toxic and widely distributed heavy metals, has a high affinity for thiol groups. Thiol groups reduce and sequester Hg. Therefore, low molecular weight and protein thiols may be important cell components used in Hg resistance. To date, the role of low molecular weight thiols in Hg-detoxification remains understudied. The mercury resistance ( mer ) operon of Thermus thermophilus suggests an evolutionary link between Hg(II) resistance and low molecular weight thiol metabolism. This mer operon encodes for an enzyme involved in methionine biosynthesis, Oah. Challenge with Hg(II) resulted in increased expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of multiple low molecular weight thiols (cysteine, homocysteine, and bacillithiol), as well as the thioredoxin system. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacement mutants indicated that Oah contributes to Hg resistance under sulfur limiting conditions, and strains lacking bacillithiol and/or thioredoxins are more sensitive to Hg(II) than the wild type. Growth in presence of either a thiol oxidizing agent or a thiol alkylating agent increased sensitivity to Hg(II). Furthermore, exposure to 3 μM Hg(II) consumed all intracellular reduced bacillithiol and cysteine. Database searches indicate that oah2 is present in all Thermus spp. mer operons. The presence of a thiol related gene was also detected in some alphaprotobacterial mer operons, in which a glutathione reductase gene was present, supporting the role of thiols in Hg(II) detoxification. These results have led to a working model in which LMW thiols act as Hg(II) buffering agents while Hg is reduced by MerA. Importance The survival of microorganisms in presence of toxic metals is central to life's sustainability. The affinity of thiol groups to toxic heavy metals drives microbe-metal interactions and modulate metal toxicity. Mercury detoxification ( mer ) genes likely originated early in microbial evolution among geothermal environments. Little is

  10. MERCURY IN MARINE LIFE DATABASE

    The purpose of the Mercury in Marine Life Project is to organize information on estuarine and marine species so that EPA can better understand both the extent of monitoring for mercury and level of mercury contamination in the biota of coastal environments. This report follows a ...

  11. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  12. Evidence of mercury trapping in biofilm-EPS and mer operon-based volatilization of inorganic mercury in a marine bacterium Bacillus cereus BW-201B.

    Dash, Hirak R; Basu, Subham; Das, Surajit

    2017-04-01

    Biofilm-forming mercury-resistant marine bacterium Bacillus cereus BW-201B has been explored to evident that the bacterial biofilm-EPS (exopolymers) trap inorganic mercury but subsequently release EPS-bound mercury for induction of mer operon-mediated volatilization of inorganic mercury. The isolate was able to tolerate 50 ppm of mercury and forms biofilm in presence of mercury. mer operon-mediated volatilization was confirmed, and -SH was found to be the key functional group of bacterial EPS responsible for mercury binding. Biofilm-EPS-bound mercury was found to be internalized to the bacterial system as confirmed by reversible conformational change of -SH group and increased expression level of merA gene in a timescale experiment. Biofilm-EPS trapped Hg after 24 h of incubation, and by 96 h, the volatilization process reaches to its optimum confirming the internalization of EPS-bound mercury to the bacterial cells. Biofilm disintegration at the same time corroborates the results.

  13. Isoenzymes performance of some rice varieties and their mutants

    Winarno, Ermin; Suliwarno, Ambyah; Ismachin, M.

    1992-01-01

    Isoenzymes performance of some rice varieties and their mutants. Genetics studies on alcohol dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, peroxidase, acid phosphase, and aminopeptidase isoenzymes were carried out on several groups of rice varieties and their mutant lines. The first groups consisted of Atomita I, Pelita I/1, A227/5, Mudgo, TN-1, and IR-26. The second group was Cisadane variety and its five mutants, namely OBS 18, OBS 208, OBS 297, OBS 306, and OBS 330. The third group was mutants line 627-10-3 and its mutants, namely 1063, 1066, 1067, 1076, and 1090. Isoenzymes extracts of the rice leaves were fractionated using polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis. The pattern of acid phosphate isoenzyme shows the specific character of rice mutants susceptible to brown plant hopper biotype 1. The gene(s) controlling malic enzyme in Cisadane's mutants is (are) estimated more resistant toward gamma irradiation than gene(s) responsible for controlling the other enzymes. Generally, the isoenzymes zymograms show that gene(s) controlling the mutants enzyme have undergone mutation. This case is shown by the changes of Rm value, as well as the amount and intensity of mutants bands. (authors). 7 refs., 7 figs

  14. Mechanism of mercuric chloride resistance in microorganisms. II. NADPH-dependent reduction of mercuric chloride and vaporization of mercury from mercuric chloride by a multiple drug resistant strain of Escherichia coli

    Komura, I; Funaba, T; Izaki, K

    1971-01-01

    The activity to vaporize a /sup 203/Hg compound from /sup 203/HgCl/sub 2/ was demonstrated in crude cell-free extracts of a strain of Escherichia coli W2252, which had acquired the multiple drug resistance. NADPH was essential for the vaporization, while NADH had only a slight stimulating effect and NADP/sup +/ had no effect. The oxidation of NADPH dependent on HgCl/sub 2/ was also demonstrated in the crude extracts, but the HgCl/sub 2/-dependent NADH oxidation could be demonstrated only when a partially purified enzyme preparation was used. The rate of NADH oxidation was much slower than that of NADPH oxidation. It was concluded that NADPH, and to a lesser extent NADH, act as electron donors for the enzymatic reduction of HgCl/sub 2/ and the vaporization occurs after this reduction. This reduction and subsequent vaporization seem to provide a mechanism of resistance to HgCl/sub 2/ in E. coli strains having the multiple drug resistance. 15 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  16. Water displacement mercury pump

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  17. Mercury exposure in Ireland

    Cullen, Elizabeth; Evans, David S; Davidson, Fred

    2014-01-01

    of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES) pilot biomonitoring study. METHODS: Hair mercury concentrations were determined from a convenience sample of 120 mother/child pairs. Mothers also completed a questionnaire. Rigorous quality assurance within DEMOCOPHES...... guaranteed the accuracy and international comparability of results. RESULTS: Mercury was detected in 79.2% of the samples from mothers, and 62.5% of children's samples. Arithmetic mean levels in mothers (0.262 µg/g hair) and children (0.149 µg /g hair) did not exceed the US EPA guidance value. Levels were...

  18. Mercury CEM Calibration

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  19. Selection of mutants of capsicum annuum induced by gamma ray

    Lee, Y. I.; Lee, Y. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, E. K. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    For induction and selection of mutations of Capsicum annuum L., dry seeds of pure lines No.1 and No.2 were irradiated with gamma ray of 150Gy, 200Gy and 250Gy. Various mutants were selected such as showing early maturity, short plant height, long fruit and chlorophyll mutations. Mutation frequency of No.1 line was 3.4% in the dose of 150Gy, while the frequency of No.2 line was 2.7% in the dose of 250Gy. For selection of resistant mutant to amino acid analog, the optimum concentration of 5-methyltryptophan (5-MT) and S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine were 25 ppm and 30 ppm, respectively. Four resistant mutant lines to 5-MT were selected among 400 mutant lines.

  20. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  1. Metallothionein expression in chloroplasts enhances mercury accumulation and phytoremediation capability.

    Ruiz, Oscar N; Alvarez, Derry; Torres, Cesar; Roman, Laura; Daniell, Henry

    2011-06-01

    Genetic engineering to enhance mercury phytoremediation has been accomplished by expression of the merAB genes that protects the cell by converting Hg[II] into Hg[0] which volatilizes from the cell. A drawback of this approach is that toxic Hg is released back into the environment. A better phytoremediation strategy would be to accumulate mercury inside plants for subsequent retrieval. We report here the development of a transplastomic approach to express the mouse metallothionein gene (mt1) and accumulate mercury in high concentrations within plant cells. Real-time PCR analysis showed that up to 1284 copies of the mt1 gene were found per cell when compared with 1326 copies of the 16S rrn gene, thereby attaining homoplasmy. Past studies in chloroplast transformation used qualitative Southern blots to evaluate indirectly transgene copy number, whereas we used real-time PCR for the first time to establish homoplasmy and estimate transgene copy number and transcript levels. The mt1 transcript levels were very high with 183,000 copies per ng of RNA or 41% the abundance of the 16S rrn transcripts. The transplastomic lines were resistant up to 20 μm mercury and maintained high chlorophyll content and biomass. Although the transgenic plants accumulated high concentrations of mercury in all tissues, leaves accumulated up to 106 ng, indicating active phytoremediation and translocation of mercury. Such accumulation of mercury in plant tissues facilitates proper disposal or recycling. This study reports, for the first time, the use of metallothioneins in plants for mercury phytoremediation. Chloroplast genetic engineering approach is useful to express metal-scavenging proteins for phytoremediation. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Mercury Information Clearinghouse

    Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

    2006-03-31

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through

  3. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  4. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  5. Some like it cold: microbial transformations of mercury in polar regions

    Niels Kroer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of polar regions with mercury that is transported from lower latitudes as inorganic mercury has resulted in the accumulation of methylmercury (MeHg in food chains, risking the health of humans and wildlife. While production of MeHg has been documented in polar marine and terrestrial environments, little is known about the responsible transformations and transport pathways and the processes that control them. We posit that as in temperate environments, microbial transformations play a key role in mercury geochemical cycling in polar regions by: (1 methylating mercury by one of four proposed pathways, some not previously described; (2 degrading MeHg by activities of mercury resistant and other bacteria; and (3 carrying out redox transformations that control the supply of the mercuric ion, the substrate of methylation reactions. Recent analyses have identified a high potential for mercury-resistant microbes that express the enzyme mercuric reductase to affect the production of gaseous elemental mercury when and where daylight is limited. The integration of microbially mediated processes in the paradigms that describe mercury geochemical cycling is therefore of high priority especially in light of concerns regarding the effect of global warming and permafrost thawing on input of MeHg to polar regions.

  6. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  7. Construindo Marcas Mutantes

    Elizete De Azevedo Kreutz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é o resultado de estudos realizados desde 2000 e busca instrumentalizar os proñssionals para a construção de Marcas Mutantes, que é   uma tendência contemporânea nas estratégias comunicacionais e de branding. Embora esta estratégia ainda não esteja consolidada, observamos que a mesma tem obtido um crescimento constante e tem sido adotadas pelas mais diferentes categorias de marcas e não apenas por aquelas direcionadas aos jovens, ao esporte, ao entretenimento, como era no principia. Com base na Hermenêutica de Profundidade de Thompson (1995, alicerçada nas pesquisas bibliográficas, de intemet, entrevistas e análise semiótica, desenhamos um método de construção de Marcas Mutantes dividido em sete fases. Como resultado, esperamos que este estudo possa auxiliar na compreensão dos processos envolvidos, ao mesmo tempo que provoque a discussão sobreo mesmo e, por consequência, o seu aprimoramento.

  8. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:28085104

  9. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  10. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  11. MERCURY USAGE AND ALTERNATIVES IN THE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS INDUSTRIES

    Many industries have already found alternatives for mercury or have greatly decreased mercury use. However, the unique electromechanical and photoelectric properties of mercury and mercury compounds have made replacement of mercury difficult in some applications. This study was i...

  12. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  13. Effects of methyl mercury exposure on pancreatic beta cell development and function.

    Schumacher, Lauren; Abbott, Louise C

    2017-01-01

    Methyl mercury is an environmental contaminant of worldwide concern. Since the discovery of methyl mercury exposure due to eating contaminated fish as the underlying cause of the Minamata disaster, the scientific community has known about the sensitivity of the developing central nervous system to mercury toxicity. Warnings are given to pregnant women and young children to limit consumption of foods containing methyl mercury to protect the embryonic, fetal and postnatally developing central nervous system. However, evidence also suggests that exposure to methyl mercury or various forms of inorganic mercury may also affect development and function of other organs. Numerous reports indicate a worldwide increase in diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes. Quite recently, methyl mercury has been shown to have adverse effects on pancreatic beta (β) cell development and function, resulting in insulin resistance and hyperglycemia and may even lead to the development of diabetes. This review discusses possible mechanisms by which methyl mercury exposure may adversely affect pancreatic β cell development and function, and the role that methyl mercury exposure may have in the reported worldwide increase in diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes. While additional information is needed regarding associations between mercury exposure and specific mechanisms of the pathogenesis of diabetes in the human population, methyl mercury's adverse effects on the body's natural sources of antioxidants suggest that one possible therapeutic strategy could involve supplementation with antioxidants. Thus, it is important that additional investigation be undertaken into the role of methyl mercury exposure and reduced pancreatic β cell function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  15. Health Effects of Exposures to Mercury

    ... IRIS database Top of Page Elemental (Metallic) Mercury Effects Exposures to metallic mercury most often occur when metallic ... poor performance on tests of mental function Higher exposures may also cause kidney effects, respiratory failure and death. Note that metallic mercury ...

  16. Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products Share Tweet Linkedin ... and, in some situations, criminal prosecution. Dangers of Mercury Exposure to mercury can have serious health consequences. ...

  17. Mercury content in Hot Springs

    Nakagawa, R

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of mercury in hot spring waters by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Further, the mercury content and the chemical behavior of the elementary mercury in hot springs are described. Sulfide and iodide ions interfered with the determination of mercury by the reduction-vapor phase technique. These interferences could, however, be minimized by the addition of potassium permanganate. Waters collected from 55 hot springs were found to contain up to 26.0 ppb mercury. High concentrations of mercury have been found in waters from Shimoburo Springs, Aomori (10.0 ppb), Osorezan Springs, Aomori (1.3 approximately 18.8 ppb), Gosyogake Springs, Akita (26.0 ppb), Manza Springs, Gunma (0.30 approximately 19.5 ppb) and Kusatu Springs, Gunma (1.70 approximately 4.50 ppb). These hot springs were acid waters containing a relatively high quantity of chloride or sulfate.

  18. Non-carbon sorbents for mercury removal from flue gases

    Alptekin, G.O.; Dubovik, M.; Cesario, M. [TDA Research Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)

    2005-07-01

    TDA Research Inc. is developing a new sorbent that can effectively remove mercury from flue gases. It is made of non-carbon based materials and will therefore not alter the properties of the fly ash. The sorbent can be produced as an injectable powder. The paper summarises the initial testing results of the new sorbent. The sorbent exhibited 7.5 to 11.0 mg/g mercury absorption capacity under representative flue gas streams depending on the operating temperature and gas hourly space velocity. The sorbent also showed resistance to sulfur poisoning by sulfur dioxide. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Isozyme differences in barley mutants

    AI-Jibouri, A A.M.; Dham, K M [Department of Botany, Nuclear Research Centre, Baghdad (Iraq)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Thirty mutants (M{sub 11}) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) induced by physical and chemical mutagens were analysed for isozyme composition using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that these mutants were different in the isozymes leucine aminopeptidase, esterase and peroxidase. The differences included the number of forms of each enzyme, relative mobility value and their intensity on the gel. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase isozyme was found in six molecular forms and these forms were similar in all mutants. (author)

  20. Isozyme differences in barley mutants

    AI-Jibouri, A.A.M.; Dham, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Thirty mutants (M 11 ) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) induced by physical and chemical mutagens were analysed for isozyme composition using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that these mutants were different in the isozymes leucine aminopeptidase, esterase and peroxidase. The differences included the number of forms of each enzyme, relative mobility value and their intensity on the gel. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase isozyme was found in six molecular forms and these forms were similar in all mutants. (author)

  1. Interior Volatile Reservoirs in Mercury

    Anzures, B. A.; Parman, S. W.; Milliken, R. E.; Head, J. W.

    2018-05-01

    More measurements of 1) surface volatiles, and 2) pyroclastic deposits paired with experimental volatile analyses in silicate minerals can constrain conditions of melting and subsequent eruption on Mercury.

  2. Mercury in Canadian crude oil

    Hollebone, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates for average mercury concentrations in crude oil range widely from 10 ng/g of oil to 3,500 ng/g of oil. With such a broad range of estimates, it is difficult to determine the contributions of the petroleum sector to the total budget of mercury emissions. In response to concerns that the combustion of petroleum products may be a major source of air-borne mercury pollution, Environment Canada and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute has undertaken a survey of the average total mercury concentration in crude oil processed in Canadian refineries. In order to calculate the potential upper limit of total mercury in all refined products, samples of more than 30 different types of crude oil collected from refineries were measured for their concentration of mercury as it enters into a refinery before processing. High temperature combustion, cold vapour atomic absorption and cold vapour atomic fluorescence were the techniques used to quantify mercury in the samples. The results of the study provide information on the total mass of mercury present in crude oil processed in Canada each year. Results can be used to determine the impact of vehicle exhaust emissions to the overall Canadian mercury emission budget. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Mercury in bryophytes (moss)

    Yeaple, D S

    1972-01-28

    Recent reports in the literature, concerning the ability of certain mosses and lichens to concentrate heavy metals, have led to an investigation of the potential application of mosses as indicators of the transport of mercury through the atmosphere. A number of moss samples were collected to provide information regarding the level of mercury in moss around several types of populated areas. The results reported are from moss collected within an 80 mile radius of Boston, Massachusetts, along the Maine coast, near the tops of Mount Katahdin in Maine and Mount Washington in New Hampshire, and from Walden, New York, a small town located about 60 miles north of New York City. The data are admittedly limited, but provide sufficient insight into the usefulness of moss as an indicator to warrant the pursuit of a more detailed investigation. 6 references, 1 table.

  4. Integrated criteria document mercury

    Sloof, W.; Beelan, P. van; Annema, J.A.; Janus, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains a systematic review and a critical evaluation of the most relevant data on the priority substance mercury for the purpose of effect-oriented environmental policy. Chapter headings are: properties and existing standards; production, application, sources and emissions (natural sources, industry, energy, households, agriculture, dental use, waste); distribution and transformation (cinnabar; Hg 2+ , Hg 2 2+ , elemental mercury, methylmercury, behavior in soil, water, air, biota); concentrations and fluxes in the environment and exposure levels (sampling and measuring methods, occurrence in soil, water, air etc.); effects (toxicity to humans and aquatic and terrestrial systems); emissions reduction (from industrial sources, energy, waste processing etc.); and evaluation (risks, standards, emission reduction objectives, measuring strategies). 395 refs

  5. Method for mercury refinement

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-04-09

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  6. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-07-16

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  7. The planet Mercury (1971)

    1972-01-01

    The physical properties of the planet Mercury, its surface, and atmosphere are presented for space vehicle design criteria. The mass, dimensions, mean density, and orbital and rotational motions are described. The gravity field, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and charged particles in the planet's orbit are discussed. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, and composition data are given along with the surface composition, soil mechanical properties, and topography, and the surface electromagnetic and temperature properties.

  8. Magnetic field of Mercury

    Jackson, D.J.; Beard, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    The geomagnetic field, suitably scaled down and parameterized, is shown to give a very good fit to the magnetic field measurements taken on the first and third passes of the Mariner 10 space probe past Mercury. The excellence of the fit to a reliable planetary magnetospheric model is good evidence that the Mercury magnetosphere is formed by a simple, permanent, intrinsic planetary magnetic field distorted by the effects of the solar wind. The parameters used for a best fit to all the data are (depending slightly on the choice of data) 2.44--2.55 for the ratio of Mercury's magnetic field strength at the subsolar point to that of the earth's subsolar point field (this results in a dipole moment of 170 γR/sub M/ 3 (R/sub M/ is Mercury Radius), i.e., 2.41 x 10 22 G cm 3 in the same direction as the earth's dipole), approx.-113 γR/sub M/ 4 for the planetary quadrupole moment parallel to the dipole moment, 10degree--17degree for the tilt of the planet dipole toward the sun, 4.5degree for the tilt of the dipole toward dawn, and 2.5degree--7.6degree aberration angle for the shift in the tail axis from the planet-sun direction because of the planet's orbital velocity. The rms deviation overall for the entire data set compared with the theoretical fitted model for the magnetic field strength was 17 γ (approx.4% of the maximum field measured). If the data from the first pass that show presumed strong time variations are excluded, the overall rms deviation for the field magnitude is only 10 γ

  9. Method for scavenging mercury

    Chang, Shih-ger [El Cerrito, CA; Liu, Shou-heng [Kaohsiung, TW; Liu, Zhao-rong [Beijing, CN; Yan, Naiqiang [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-20

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  10. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the 196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg 2 Cl 2 . The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg 2 Cl 2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures

  11. Method for mercury refinement

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the 196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg 2 Cl 2 . The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg 2 Cl 2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures

  12. Mercury's Densely Cratered Surface

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10 took this picture (FDS 27465) of the densely cratered surface of Mercury when the spacecraft was 18,200 kilometers (8085 miles) from the planet on March 29. The dark line across top of picture is a 'dropout' of a few TV lines of data. At lower left, a portion of a 61 kilometer (38 mile) crater shows a flow front extending across the crater floor and filling more than half of the crater. The smaller, fresh crater at center is about 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter. Craters as small as one kilometer (about one-half mile) across are visible in the picture.The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  13. Mercury removal sorbents

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  14. Application of a mer-lux biosensor for estimating bioavailable mercury in soil

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.; Turner, R. R.

    2000-01-01

    A previously described bioassay using a mer-lux gene fusion for detection of bioavailable mercury was applied for the estimation of the bioavailable fraction of mercury in soil. The bioavailable fraction is defined here as being part of the water leachable fraction. Due to masking of light emission...... responses. The utility of the mer-lux biosensor assay was tested by relating measurements of bioavailable and total mercury to the response of the soil microbial community to mercury exposure. Two different soil types (an agricultural and a beech forest soil) were spiked with 2.5 µg Hg(II) g-1 in microcosms...... in resistance or diversity. This study showed that the bioassay using the mer-lux biosensor is a useful and sensitive tool for estimation of bioavailable mercury in soil....

  15. Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2010-08-17

    Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

  16. Evaluation of tall rice mutant

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    One tall mutant (Mut NS1) of rice variety Nizersail was put to multilocation on-farm trial. It showed improvement over the parent in respect of by earlier maturity and higher grain yield at all locations and thus it appears as an improved mutant of Nizersail. (author). 6 refs

  17. Probiotic features of Lactobacillus plantarum mutant strains.

    Bove, Pasquale; Gallone, Anna; Russo, Pasquale; Capozzi, Vittorio; Albenzio, Marzia; Spano, Giuseppe; Fiocco, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum wild-type and derivative mutant strains was investigated. Bacterial survival was evaluated in an in vitro system, simulating the transit along the human oro-gastro-intestinal tract. Interaction with human gut epithelial cells was studied by assessing bacterial adhesive ability to Caco-2 cells and induction of genes involved in innate immunity. L. plantarum strains were resistant to the combined stress at the various steps of the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Major decreases in the viability of L. plantarum cells were observed mainly under drastic acidic conditions (pH ≤ 2.0) of the gastric compartment. Abiotic stresses associated to small intestine poorly affected bacterial viability. All the bacterial strains significantly adhered to Caco-2 cells, with the ΔctsR mutant strain exhibiting the highest adhesion. Induction of immune-related genes resulted higher upon incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria rather than with live ones. For specific genes, a differential transcriptional pattern was observed upon stimulation with different L. plantarum strains, evidencing a possible role of the knocked out bacterial genes in the modulation of host cell response. In particular, cells from Δhsp18.55 and ΔftsH mutants strongly triggered immune defence genes. Our study highlights the relevance of microbial genetic background in host-probiotic interaction and might contribute to identify candidate bacterial genes and molecules involved in probiosis.

  18. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-08

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications.

  19. Mercury: Exploration of a Planet

    1976-01-01

    The flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft to Venus and Mercury is detailed in animation and photography. Views of Mercury are featured. Also included is animation on the origin of the solar system. Dr. Bruce C. Murray, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, comments on the mission.

  20. 49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).

    2010-10-01

    ... ounces) of mercury per package; (iv) Tubes which are completely jacketed in sealed leakproof metal cases... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). (a) For...

  1. Role of bacteria in bioaccumulation of mercury in the oyster Crassostrea virginica

    Sayler, G.S.; Nelson, J.D. Jr.; Colwell, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of mercury-resistant bacteria was undertaken to determine their role in the accumulation of mercury in a simplified food chain. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were maintained in a closed system, sealed aquarium with stirred, aerated water containing 10 μg of 203 HgCl 2 per liter. Uptake of 203 Hg by oysters held under control conditions was compared with that of 203 Hg uptake by oysters under similar conditions except that mercury-accumulating and mercury-metabolizing species of Pseudomonsa, isolated from Chesapeake Bay, were added to the experimental oysters. After incubation for 4 days, the major portion of the 203 Hg in the water column was found to be associated with the microparticulate fraction, corresponding to a rise in total viable count. Mercury accumulation in the oysters was significantly higher in the gill and fisceral tissue than other tissues. Mercury concentrations were 200 times greater in tissue fractions of oysters dosed with mercury-metabolizing bacteria compared with the oysters held under control conditions without mercury-metabolizing bacteria. (U.S.)

  2. Methyl mercury in terrestrial compartments

    Stoeppler, M.; Burow, M.; Padberg, S.; May, K.

    1993-09-01

    On the basis of the analytical methodology available at present the state of the art for the determination of total mercury and of various organometallic compounds of mercury in air, precipitation, limnic systems, soils, plants and biota is reviewed. This is followed by the presentation and discussion of examples for the data obtained hitherto for trace and ultratrace levels of total mercury and mainly methyl mercury in terrestrial and limnic environments as well as in biota. The data discussed stem predominantly from the past decade in which, due to significant methodological progress, many new aspects were elucidated. They include the most important results in this area achieved by the Research Centre (KFA) Juelich within the project 'Origin and Fate of Methyl Mercury' (contracts EV4V-0138-D and STEP-CT90-0057) supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Brussels. (orig.) [de

  3. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    Park, Jung-Duck; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability o...

  4. Methods for dispensing mercury into devices

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1987-04-28

    A process for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury.

  5. Determination of mercury in plant material

    Pickard, J A; Martin, J T

    1960-07-01

    An analytical procedure used for the determination of traces of mercury in plant material is described. The conditions of combustion of organic matter are controlled to avoid loss of mercury and EDTA is used to reduce the values for apparent mercury on uncontaminated samples. Satisfactory recoveries of mercury added to apples, tomatoes and coffee are obtained. 10 references, 1 table.

  6. A dwarf wheat mutant is associated with increased drought ...

    ... was significantly higher than Jingdong 6. Most of the s-dwarf seedlings survived in recovering experiement after water loss. The stalk of s-dwarf seedling also showed reduced gravitropism. This is the first report about a new dwarf wheat mutant associated with increased drought resistance and altered stalk gravitropism.

  7. Mercury's Lithospheric Magnetization

    Johnson, C.; Phillips, R. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Al Asad, M.; Plattner, A.; Mast, S.; Kinczyk, M. J.; Prockter, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have been used to demonstrate the presence of lithospheric magnetization on Mercury. Larger amplitude fields resulting from the core dynamo and the strongly time-varying magnetospheric current systems are first estimated and subtracted from the magnetic field data to isolate lithospheric signals with wavelengths less than 500 km. These signals (hereafter referred to as data) are only observed at spacecraft altitudes less than 120 km, and are typically a few to 10 nT in amplitude. We present and compare equivalent source dipole magnetization models for latitudes 35°N to 75°N obtained from two distinct approaches to constrain the distribution and origin of lithospheric magnetization. First, models that fit either the data or the surface field predicted from a regional spherical harmonic representation of the data (see Plattner & Johnson abstract) and that minimize the root mean square (RMS) value of the magnetization are derived. Second, models in which the spatial distribution of magnetization required to fit the data is minimized are derived using the approach of Parker (1991). As seen previously, the largest amplitudes of lithospheric magnetization are concentrated around the Caloris basin. With this exception, across the northern hemisphere there are no overall correlations of magnetization with surface geology, although higher magnetizations are found in regions with darker surfaces. Similarly, there is no systematic correlation of magnetization signatures with crater materials, although there are specific instances of craters with interiors or ejecta that have magnetizations distinct from the surrounding region. For the latter case, we observe no correlation of the occurrence of these signatures with crater degradation state (a proxy for age). At the lowest spacecraft altitudes (source depths less than O(10 km) are unlikely in most regions

  8. Indy mutants: live long and prosper

    Stewart eFrankel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Indy encodes the fly homologue of a mammalian transporter of di and tricarboxylatecomponents of the Krebs cycle. Reduced expression of fly Indy or two of the C. elegansIndy homologs leads to an increase in life span. Fly and worm tissues that play key roles inintermediary metabolism are also the places where Indy genes are expressed. One of themouse homologs of Indy (mIndy is mainly expressed in the liver. It has been hypothesizedthat decreased INDY activity creates a state similar to caloric restriction (CR. Thishypothesis is supported by the physiological similarities between Indy mutant flies on highcalorie food and control flies on CR, such as increased physical activity and decreases inweight, egg production, triglyceride levels, starvation resistance, and insulin signaling. Inaddition, Indy mutant flies undergo changes in mitochondrial biogenesis also observed inCR animals. Recent findings with mIndy knockout mice support and extend the findingsfrom flies. mIndy-/- mice display an increase in hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis, lipidoxidation and decreased hepatic lipogenesis. When mIndy-/- mice are fed high calorie foodthey are protected from adiposity and insulin resistance. These findings point to INDY as apotential drug target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  9. High yielding rice mutants for West Bengal

    Debnath, A.R.; Sen, S.

    1980-01-01

    Four high yielding mutants with specific genetic corrections of the simply inherited characters were developed from IR-8 through X-irradiation. Recurrent selections of the promising isolates were made under diverse agro-climatic conditions in Winter and Summer seasons of West Bengal. The isolates CNM 6 and CNM 25 belonging to early maturity group and CNM 20 and CNM 31, to mid-early maturity group were finally selected at X 5 generation on the basis of their resistance qualities, maturity period and grain yield. They were evaluated upto X 10 qeneration at multi-locations as Pre-release and Minikit Varieties at State level. They were also placed at the National Screening Nursery (NSN) for screening against multiple diseases and pests at the National level. CNM 6 is reported to be promising in IRTP nurseries. It is reported that CNM 25 (IET 5646) ranked 2nd on the basis of average grain yield, CNM 20 (IET 5937) and CNM 31 (IET 5936) were resistant to diseases and with yield comparable to Jaya. These four productive mutants of superior types are widely accepted. CNM 6 is recommended for cultivation in Bankura and Birbhum districts and CNM 25 and CNM 31 in the different agro-climatic zones of West Bengal. (author)

  10. Radar observations of Mercury

    Harmon, J.K.; Campbell, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the radar altimetry profiles of Mercury obtained on the basis of data from the Arecibo Observatory are presented. In these measurements, the delay-Doppler method was used to measure altitudes along the Doppler equator, rather than to map radar reflectivity. The profiles, derived from observations made over a 6-yr period, provide extensive coverage over a restricted equatorial band and permit the identification of radar signatures for features as small as 50-km diameter craters and 1-km-high arcuate scarps. The data allowed identification of large-scale topographic features such as smooth plains subsidence zones and major highland regions

  11. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    Wang, Zidong [Urbana, IL; Lee, Jung Heon [Evanston, IL; Lu, Yi [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  12. Genetical, cytological and physiological studies on the induced mutants with special regard to effective methods for obtaining useful mutants in perennial woody plants

    Kukimura, H.; Ikeda, F.; Fujita, H.; Maeta, T.; Nakajima, K.; Katagiri, K.; Nakahira, K.; Somegou, M.

    1975-01-01

    The study was aimed at elucidating the biological aspects of artificially induced mutations in perennial tree crops and at promoting the utilization of such mutations in a practical breeding programme. A number of mutants obtained particularly in Cryptomeria and mulberry (Morus spp.) by means of gamma radiation were examined for their practical usefulness. Doses from 7.5 to 15.0 kR were used. In mulbery, some mutant strains showed increased shoot growth, and one mutant strain showed a remarkable increase also in rooting ability. Entire leaf mutants were investigated for their breeding behaviour. None of the mutant strains showed acquired disease resistance. Changes in the number of isozyme bands and different staining intensity was observed in all the mutant strains compared to the original strains

  13. JV Task 96 - Phase 2 - Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2008-03-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the mercury issue, it is vital to study mercury's effects on selenium physiology. While mercury present in the environment or food sources may pose health risks, the protective effects of selenium have not been adequately considered in establishing regulatory policy. Numerous studies report that vulnerability to mercury toxicity is inversely proportional to selenium status or level. However, selenium status has not been considered in the development of the reference dosage levels for mercury exposure. Experimental animals fed low-selenium diets are far more vulnerable to mercury toxicity than animals fed normal selenium, and animals fed selenium-rich diets are even more resistant. Selenium-dependent enzymes in brain and endocrine tissues can be impaired by excessive mercury exposure, apparently because mercury has an extremely high binding affinity for selenium. When selenium becomes bound to mercury, it is unable to participate in the metabolic cycling of selenoprotein synthesis. Because of mercury-dependent impairments of selenoprotein synthesis, various antioxidant and regulatory functions in brain biochemistry are compromised. This report details a 2-year multiclient-funded research program designed to examine the interactions between mercury and selenium in animal models. The studies explored the effects of dietary intakes of toxic amounts of methylmercury and the protective effects of the normal dietary range of selenium in counteracting mercury toxicity. This study finds that the amounts of selenium present in ocean fish are sufficient to protect against far larger quantities of methylmercury than those present in typical seafoods. Toxic effects of methylmercury exposure were not directly proportional to mercury concentrations in blood, brain, or any other tissues. Instead, mercury toxicity was proportional to molar ratios of mercury relative to selenium. In order to accurately assess risk associated with

  14. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants with enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress

    Qureshi, Muhammad K.; Radeva, Vesela; Genkov, Todor; Minkov, Ivan; Hille, Jacques; Gechev, Tsanko S.; Liu, J.-H.

    We have previously reported a method for isolation of mutants with enhanced tolerance to the fungal AAL toxin and given a detailed characterization of atr1 (AAL toxin resistant, Gechev et al. in Biochem Biophys Res Commun 375:639-644, 2008). Herewith, we report eight more mutants with enhanced

  15. Removal of mercury (II), elemental mercury and arsenic from simulated flue gas by ammonium sulphide.

    Ning, Ping; Guo, Xiaolong; Wang, Xueqian; Wang, Ping; Ma, Yixing; Lan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A tubular resistance furnace was used as a reactor to simulate mercury and arsenic in smelter flue gases by heating mercury and arsenic compounds. The flue gas containing Hg(2+), Hg(0) and As was treated with ammonium sulphide. The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of varying the concentration of ammonium sulphide, the pH value of ammonium sulphide, the temperature of ammonium sulphide, the presence of SO2 and the presence of sulphite ion on removal efficiency. The prepared adsorption products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the optimal concentration of ammonium sulphide was 0.8 mol/L. The optimal pH value of ammonium sulphide was 10, and the optimal temperature of ammonium sulphide was 20°C.Under the optimum conditions, the removal efficiency of Hg(2+), Hg(0) and As could reach 99%, 88.8%, 98%, respectively. In addition, SO2 and sulphite ion could reduce the removal efficiency of mercury and arsenic from simulated flue gas.

  16. Mercury kinetics in marine zooplankton

    Fowler, S.W.; Heyraud, M.; LaRosa, J.

    1976-01-01

    Mercury, like many other heavy metals, is potentially available to marine animals by uptake directly from water and/or through the organisms food. Furthermore, bioavailability, assimilation and subsequent retention in biota may be affected by the chemical species of the element in sea water. While mercury is known to exist in the inorganic form in sea water, recent work has indicated that, in certain coastal areas, a good portion of the total mercury appears to be organically bound; however, the exact chemical nature of the organic fraction has yet to be determined. Methyl mercury may be one constituent of the natural organically bound fraction since microbial mechanisms for in situ methylation of mercury have been demonstrated in the aquatic environment. Despite the fact that naturally produced methyl mercury probably comprises only a small fraction of an aquatic ecosystem, the well-documented toxic effects of this organo-mercurial, caused by man-made introductions into marine food chains, make it an important compound to study

  17. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg-1) and bark (6.0 μg kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  18. Atmospheric mercury footprints of nations.

    Liang, Sai; Wang, Yafei; Cinnirella, Sergio; Pirrone, Nicola

    2015-03-17

    The Minamata Convention was established to protect humans and the natural environment from the adverse effects of mercury emissions. A cogent assessment of mercury emissions is required to help implement the Minamata Convention. Here, we use an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output model to calculate atmospheric mercury footprints of nations based on upstream production (meaning direct emissions from the production activities of a nation), downstream production (meaning both direct and indirect emissions caused by the production activities of a nation), and consumption (meaning both direct and indirect emissions caused by final consumption of goods and services in a nation). Results show that nations function differently within global supply chains. Developed nations usually have larger consumption-based emissions than up- and downstream production-based emissions. India, South Korea, and Taiwan have larger downstream production-based emissions than their upstream production- and consumption-based emissions. Developed nations (e.g., United States, Japan, and Germany) are in part responsible for mercury emissions of developing nations (e.g., China, India, and Indonesia). Our findings indicate that global mercury abatement should focus on multiple stages of global supply chains. We propose three initiatives for global mercury abatement, comprising the establishment of mercury control technologies of upstream producers, productivity improvement of downstream producers, and behavior optimization of final consumers.

  19. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis.

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg(-1)) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg(-1)). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark-in pyroclastic wounds-and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg(-1)) and bark (6.0 μg kg(-1)) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  20. Method for removal and stabilization of mercury in mercury-containing gas streams

    Broderick, Thomas E.

    2005-09-13

    The present invention is directed to a process and apparatus for removing and stabilizing mercury from mercury-containing gas streams. A gas stream containing vapor phase elemental and/or speciated mercury is contacted with reagent, such as an oxygen-containing oxidant, in a liquid environment to form a mercury-containing precipitate. The mercury-containing precipitate is kept or placed in solution and reacts with one or more additional reagents to form a solid, stable mercury-containing compound.

  1. Exploring Mercury: The Iron Planet

    Stevenson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Planet Mercury is both difficult to observe and difficult to reach by spacecraft. Just one spacecraft, Mariner 10, flew by the planet 30 years ago. An upcoming NASA mission, MESSENGER, will be launched this year and will go into orbit around Mercury at the end of this decade. A European mission is planned for the following decade. It's worth going there because Mercury is a strange body and the history of planetary exploration has taught us that strangeness gives us insight into planetary ori...

  2. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  3. MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  4. Mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus

    Roosien, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the isolation and characterization of a number of mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus, a plant virus with a coat protein dependent genome, is described. Thermo-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected since, at least theoretically, ts mutations can be present in all virus coded functions. It was found that a high percentage of spontaneous mutants, isolated because of their aberrant symptoms, were ts. The majority of these isolates could grow at the non-permissive temperature in the presence of a single wild type (wt) component. To increase the mutation rate virus preparations were treated with several mutagens. After nitrous acid treatment or irradiation with ultraviolet light, an increase in the level of mutations was observed. UV irradiation was preferred since it did not require large amounts of purified viral components. During the preliminary characterization of potential ts mutants the author also obtained one structural and several symptom mutants which were analysed further (chapter 7, 8 and 9). The properties of the ts mutants are described in chapter 3-7. (Auth.)

  5. Root hair mutants of barley

    Engvild, K.C.; Rasmussen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Barley mutants without root hairs or with short or reduced root hairs were isolated among M 2 seeds of 'Lux' barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) after acidified sodium azide mutagenesis. Root hair mutants are investigated intensively in Arabidopsis where about 40 genes are known. A few root hair mutants are known in maize, rice, barley and tomato. Many plants without root hairs grow quite well with good plant nutrition, and mutants have been used for investigations of uptake of strongly bound nutrients like phosphorus, iron, zinc and silicon. Seed of 'Lux' barley (Sejet Plant Breeding, Denmark) were soaked overnight, and then treated with 1.5-millimolarsodium azide in 0.1 molar sodium phosphate buffer, pH 3, for 2.5 hours according to the IAEA Manual on Mutation Breeding (2nd Ed.). After rinsing in tap water and air-drying, the M 2 seeds were sown in the field the same day. Spikes, 4-6 per M 1 plant, were harvested. The mutation frequency was similar to that obtained with other barley cultivars from which low-phytate mutants were isolated [5]. Seeds were germinated on black filter paper in tap water for 3 or 4 days before scoring for root hair mutants

  6. Distribution and retention of organic and inorganic mercury in methyl mercury-treated neonatal rats

    Thomas, D.J.; Fisher, H.L.; Sumler, M.R.; Hall, L.L.; Mushak, P.

    1988-01-01

    Seven-day-old Long Evans rats received one mumol of 203 Hg-labeled methyl mercury/kg sc and whole body retention and tissue distribution of organic and inorganic mercury were examined for 32 days postdosing. Neonates cleared mercury slowly until 10 days postdosing when the clearance rate abruptly increased. During the interval when whole body clearance of mercury was extremely slow, methyl mercury was metabolized to inorganic mercury. Peak concentration of mercury in kidney occurred at 2 days postdosing. At 32 days postdosing, 8% of mercury in kidney was in an organic from. Liver mercury concentration peaked at 2 days postdosing and organic mercury accounted for 38% at 32 days postdosing. Brain concentrations of mercury peaked at 2 days postdosing. At 10 days postdosing, organic mercury accounted for 86% of the brain mercury burden, and, at 32 days postdosing, for 60%. The percentage of mercury body burden in pelt rose from 30 to 70% between 1 and 10 days postdosing. At 32 days postdosing pelt contained 85% of the body burden of mercury. At all time points, about 95% of mercury in pelt was in an organic form. Compartmental analysis of these data permitted development of a model to describe the distribution and excretion of organic and inorganic mercury in methyl mercury-treated neonatal rats

  7. Primary study on lesion mimic mutants of rice (oryza sativa L.)

    Hao Zhongna; Zhang Hongzhi; Tao Rongixang

    2007-01-01

    Nineteen lesion mimic mutants (xsl1-19) of japonica rice Xiushui11 were obtained by γ-rays irradiation treatment. All mutants belonged to whole life lesion mimic. Lesion mimic of mutants didn't largen after tillering stage, leaves didn't wither, and no effect on the plants exsert spikes and seed. When the highest temperature in day exceeded 32 degree C in seedling stage, lesion mimic of all mutant expect xsl19 disappeared. Under 32 degree C, lesion mimic would appear gradually, and symptoms weren't inhibited by high temperature after 5 leaf stage. The plant heights of all lesion mimic mutants were 47.56-63.54 cm in the tillering stage, and that of CK was 83.75 cm; but the dwarf phenomenon of mutants only appeared before tillering stage, and didn't affect plant heights finally; the heading dates of mutants were the same to the CK, the ear length of all mutants were 9.43-15.19 cm, and that of CK was 16.41 cm; the total grain quantity per spike of all mutants were 88.17-165.33, and those of xsl19 and CK were 49.50 and 76.17. The results showed all lesion mimic mutants except xsl19 had short spikes and total grain quantity per spike increasing. All lesion mimic mutants were susceptible to Magnaporthe grisea, and they had no relationship with resistance. (authors)

  8. PATHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDIES ON SOME SOYBEAN MUTANTS INDUCED BY GAMMA RAYS IN RELATION TO CHARCOAL ROT DISEASE

    ASHRY, N.A.; EL-DEMERDASH, H.M.; ABD EL-RAHMAN, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Egyptian soybean cultivar Giza-22 was used to induce resistant mutants for charcoal rot disease using gamma rays. Sixteen mutants and their parental cultivar were evaluated in M3 generation for their agronomic traits and for resistance to charcoal rot disease. Four mutants showed superiority in their agronomic traits as compared with their parental cultivar. Three mutants were significantly resistant to the disease than their parental cultivar (Giza-22). These three resistant mutants showed non-significant improvement in their agronomic traits as compared with Giza-22 cultivar. DNA extractions from the three resistant mutants and their parent were used to test the differences on the molecular level. Seven random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers were used to detect RAPD markers related to charcoal rot resistance in soybean, and to differentiate these mutants. Six RAPD-primers showed molecular markers associated with resistance to charcoal rot in soybean, where five RAPD-primers could differentiate each of the three mutants from each other and from their parental cultivar

  9. The Use of Bacteria for Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Groundwater

    Many processes of mercury transformation in the environment are bacteria mediated. Mercury properties cause some difficulties of remediation of mercury contaminated environment. Despite the significance of the problem of mercury pollution, methods of large scale bioremediation ...

  10. Construction of insertion and deletion mxa mutants of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 by electroporation.

    Toyama, H; Anthony, C; Lidstrom, M E

    1998-09-01

    Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 is a pink-pigmented facultative methylotroph which is widely used for analyzing pathways of C1 metabolism with biochemical and molecular biological techniques. To facilitate this approach, we have applied a new method to construct insertion or disruption mutants with drug resistance genes by electroporation. By using this method, mutants were obtained in four genes present in the mxa methylotrophy gene cluster for which the functions were unknown, mxaR, mxaS, mxaC and mxaD. These mutants were unable to grow on methanol except the mutant of mxaD, which showed reduced growth on methanol.

  11. Reaction of some soybean mutant lines to natural rust fungus caused by (phakopsora pachyrhizi syd)

    Ratma, R.

    1988-01-01

    Reaction of some soybean mutant lines to natural rust fungus caused by (phakopsora pachyhizi syd). Eleven soybean mutant lines of orba variety derived from gamma fungus disease in the wet season 1985/86 at the experimental station of Citayam, Bogor. Based on IWGSR rating system, soybean mutant lines No 18/PsJ was moderately resistant to rust fungus disease. The other mutant lines, 14/PsJ, 15/PsJ, 20/PsJ, 102/PsJ, 106/PsJ, 111/PsJ, 118/PsJ, 119/PsJ and 220/PsJ were susceptible. (author). 4 figs.; 8 refs

  12. Elimination of mercury in health care facilities.

    2000-03-01

    Mercury is a persistent, bioaccumulative toxin that has been linked to numerous health effects in humans and wildlife. It is a potent neurotoxin that may also harm the brain, kidneys, and lungs. Unborn children and young infants are at particular risk for brain damage from mercury exposure. Hospitals' use of mercury in chemical solutions, thermometers, blood pressure gauges, batteries, and fluorescent lamps makes these facilities large contributors to the overall emission of mercury into the environment. Most hospitals recognize the dangers of mercury. In a recent survey, four out of five hospitals stated that they have policies in place to eliminate the use of mercury-containing products. Sixty-two percent of them require vendors to disclose the presence of mercury in chemicals that the hospitals purchase. Only 12 percent distribute mercury-containing thermometers to new parents. Ninety-two percent teach their employees about the health and environmental effects of mercury, and 46 percent teach all employees how to clean up mercury spills. However, the same study showed that many hospitals have not implemented their policies. Forty-two percent were not aware whether they still purchased items containing mercury. In addition, 49 percent still purchase mercury thermometers, 44 percent purchase mercury gastrointestinal diagnostic equipment, and 64 percent still purchase mercury lab thermometers.

  13. Mutants induced in winter rye (Secale cereale L.): Short straw-mutant No. 2714 and late-senescence mutant

    Muszynski, S; Darlewska, M [Department of Plant Breeding and Seed Science, Warsaw Agricultural University, Warsaw (Poland)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutants were induced by treating dormant seeds with ionizing radiation (fast neutrons) or chemicals (N-nitroso-N-ethyl urea or sodium azide). Among several mutants obtained, of special value is the short-straw mutant No. 2714 and a late senescent mutant. (author)

  14. Mercury pollution: a transdisciplinary treatment

    Zuber, Sharon L; Newman, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    .... Also included are smaller case studies, such as the Minamata tragedy, fish consumption, and international treaties"-- "Mercury is the gravest chemical pollutant problem of our time, and this is...

  15. Mercury contamination in the Amazon

    Nancy Minogue

    contamination is mainly caused by deforestation upstream. ... The team expected to find that the mercury levels in the water, sediment, and soil decreased as they ... Methylmercury poisoning — known as Minamata Disease after the Japanese ...

  16. Mercury absorption in aqueous hypochlorite

    Zhao, L.L.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    The absorption of elemental Hg vapor into aqueous hypochlorite was measured in a stirred tank reactor at 25 and 55C. NaOCl strongly absorbs Hg even at high pH. Low pH, high Cl - and high-temperature favor mercury absorption. Aqueous free Cl 2 was the active species that reacted with mercury. However, chlorine desorption was evident at high Cl - and pH 15 M -1 s -1 at 25C and 1.4x10 17 M -1 s -1 at 55C. Gas-phase reaction was observed between Hg and Cl 2 on apparatus surfaces. Strong mercury absorption in water was also detected with Cl 2 present. Results indicate that the chlorine concentration, moisture, and surface area contribute positively to mercury removal. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Origin and composition of Mercury

    Lewis, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The predictions of the expected range of composition of Mercury at the time of its formation made on the basis of a suite of condensation-accretion models of Mercury spanning a range of condensation temperature and accretion sampling functions appropriate to Mercury are examined. It is concluded that these compositonal models can, if modified to take into account the nonselective loss of most of the silicate component of the planet during accretion, provide compositional predictions for the Weidenschilling (1978, 1980) mechanism for the accretion of a metal-rich Mercury. The silicate portion would, in this case, contain 3.6 to 4.5 percent alumina, roughly 1 percent of alkali oxides, and between 0.5 and 6 percent FeO

  18. Localized surface plasmon resonance mercury detection system and methods

    James, Jay; Lucas, Donald; Crosby, Jeffrey Scott; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2016-03-22

    A mercury detection system that includes a flow cell having a mercury sensor, a light source and a light detector is provided. The mercury sensor includes a transparent substrate and a submonolayer of mercury absorbing nanoparticles, e.g., gold nanoparticles, on a surface of the substrate. Methods of determining whether mercury is present in a sample using the mercury sensors are also provided. The subject mercury detection systems and methods find use in a variety of different applications, including mercury detecting applications.

  19. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giri; Green, James; Wilson, Bruce; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily)harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  20. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  1. Comparative study of the mutant prevention concentrations of moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and gemifloxacin against pneumococci.

    Credito, Kim; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; McGhee, Pamela; Pankuch, Glenn A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2010-02-01

    We tested the propensity of three quinolones to select for resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) against 100 clinical strains, some of which harbored mutations in type II topoisomerases. Compared with levofloxacin and gemifloxacin, moxifloxacin had the lowest number of strains with MPCs above the susceptibility breakpoint (P<0.001), thus representing a lower selective pressure for proliferation of resistant mutants. Only moxifloxacin gave a 50% MPC (MPC50) value (1 microg/ml) within the susceptible range.

  2. Comparative Study of the Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Moxifloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Gemifloxacin against Pneumococci▿ †

    Credito, Kim; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; McGhee, Pamela; Pankuch, Glenn A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the propensity of three quinolones to select for resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) against 100 clinical strains, some of which harbored mutations in type II topoisomerases. Compared with levofloxacin and gemifloxacin, moxifloxacin had the lowest number of strains with MPCs above the susceptibility breakpoint (P < 0.001), thus representing a lower selective pressure for proliferation of resistant mutants. Only moxifloxacin gave a 50% MPC (MPC50) value (1 μg/ml) within the susceptible range. PMID:20008781

  3. Isolation of L-methionine-enriched mutant of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii No.2201

    Tani, Y.; Lim, W.J.; Yang, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Six strains of methylotrophic yeast were examined for production of L-methionine-enriched cells. Candida boidinii (kloeckera sp.) No. 2201,which accumulated 0.54 mg/g-dry cell weight (DCW) of free L-methionine (pool methionine), was selected as the parental strain for breeding L-methionine-rich mutants. Ethionine-resistant mutants were derived from the strain by UV irradiation. A mutant strain, E500-78,which was resistant to 500 μg/ml of DL-ethionine, accumulated 6.02 mg/g-DCW of pool methionine. The culture conditions for mutant strain E500-78 to increase pool methionine accumulation were optimized. As a result, the mutant strain accumulated 8.80 mg/g-DCW of pool methionine and contained 16.02 mg/g-DCW total methionine

  4. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Chun, K J; Lee, Y K; Kim, J S; Kim, J K; Lee, S J

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes.

  5. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes

  6. Microbiological stimulation of phytoremediation process using Salvinia natans to mercury contamined water

    Filyarovskaya, Viktoriya; Sitarska, Magdalena; Traczewska, Teodora; Wolf, Mirela

    2017-11-01

    An alternative to traditional cleaning methods of heavy metals in the water environment is phytoremediation. They efficiency depends on used technological process conditions as well as plant species. One of the most dangerous metallic elements mercury plays a particular role, which is a trace element and a physiologically foreign in living organisms. Mercury has a high degree of toxicity with strong affinity to thiol groups. This may cause an adverse effect on the enzymatic processes and consequently inhibiting the physiological functions. Because of high risk for human health, water environment treatment from mercury is essential proecological action. Mercury removal studies were conducted using Salvinia natans pleustofit, sampled from its natural water environment. In the first step, epiphytic bacteria, which was resistant to high concentrations of mercury (0,6 mgHg/l), was isolated from the plant and than selected by the tiles gradient mthod. In the next step, the identification using molecular biology methods was made. In the following step plant Salvinia natans was exposure to high levels of mercury in the presence of the three isolated Pseudomonas strains with exceptional resistance characteristics to environmental factors. Has been found a positive bacteria effect on the plant condition because the selected strains belong to Pseudomonas species producing materials supporting plant growth. The use of microbial stimulation to phytoremediation by hyperaccumulator Salvinia natans can multiply the effectiveness of the process.

  7. Microbiological stimulation of phytoremediation process using Salvinia natans to mercury contamined water

    Filyarovskaya Viktoriya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternative to traditional cleaning methods of heavy metals in the water environment is phytoremediation. They efficiency depends on used technological process conditions as well as plant species. One of the most dangerous metallic elements mercury plays a particular role, which is a trace element and a physiologically foreign in living organisms. Mercury has a high degree of toxicity with strong affinity to thiol groups. This may cause an adverse effect on the enzymatic processes and consequently inhibiting the physiological functions. Because of high risk for human health, water environment treatment from mercury is essential proecological action. Mercury removal studies were conducted using Salvinia natans pleustofit, sampled from its natural water environment. In the first step, epiphytic bacteria, which was resistant to high concentrations of mercury (0,6 mgHg/l, was isolated from the plant and than selected by the tiles gradient mthod. In the next step, the identification using molecular biology methods was made. In the following step plant Salvinia natans was exposure to high levels of mercury in the presence of the three isolated Pseudomonas strains with exceptional resistance characteristics to environmental factors. Has been found a positive bacteria effect on the plant condition because the selected strains belong to Pseudomonas species producing materials supporting plant growth. The use of microbial stimulation to phytoremediation by hyperaccumulator Salvinia natans can multiply the effectiveness of the process.

  8. A high yielding, better quality chickpea mutant variety 'NIFA-95'

    Hassan, S.; Javed, M.A.; Khattak, S.U.K.; Iqbal, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Chickpea or gram (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important legume crop of Pakistan, grown on over one million hectares annually. The national average yield of the crop is very low (0.5 t/ha) and thus the country had to spent about 2 billion rupees ($ 50 million) on import of pulses. The main causes of low yield are non-availability of genetic sources for resistance to various diseases especially gram blight Ascochyta rabiei (Pass.) Lab., insect pest (Pod borer) and non-adoption of proper production technology by the farmers. This calls for earnest efforts of breeders to evolve high yielding and disease resistant varieties of chickpea for provision of quality seeds to the farming community to increase production of this important crop. Seeds of a highly blight susceptible variety '6153' were irradiated at 200 Gy dose of gamma radiation in 1985 and the promising mutant line CMN-446-4 was selected in M3 generation on the basis of disease resistance, greater number of pods and better plant type. After confirmation of its resistance to blight in M 4 and M 5 , the mutant line was evaluated in various trials at different locations. In the advanced and zonal yield trials during 1993-95, the line CMN-446-4 produced the highest grain yield of 2,600 kg/ha as compared to the rest of the mutants and varieties. The line was also evaluated in the chickpea national uniform yield trial, conducted on over 11 locations in the country during 1993-94. In this trial, the mutant line ranked 3rd by producing an average yield of 1,528 kg/ha as compared to the two check varieties 'Punjab-91' (1,316 kg/ha) and 'Paidar-91' (1,391 kg/ha). The mutant line CMN-446-4 is moderately resistant to gram blight, highly resistant to stored pest (pulse beetle), contains 25.3% more protein as compared to the parental variety 6153 and is also better in nitrogen fixing capacity.The proposal for release of the mutant line CMN-446-4 as a new variety under the name 'NIFA-95' for general cultivation in the rainfed

  9. Induction of drought tolerant mutants of rice

    El-Hissewy, A.A.; Abd Allah, A.

    2001-01-01

    The ultimate goal of crop breeding is to develop varieties with a high yield potential and desirable agronomic characteristics. In Egypt, the most important qualities sought by breeders have been high yield potential, resistance to major diseases and insects, and improved grain and eating quality. However, breeding efforts should concentrate on varieties with the potential to minimize yield losses under unfavorable conditions such as drought, and to maximize yields when conditions are favorable. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) in Egypt is completely irrigated and a significant portion of the rice cultivated area is subject to water deficit resulting from an inadequate or insufficient irrigation supply. Drought tolerance is a complex trait in that it results from the interaction of histological and physiological characters of plant with environmental factors, both above-ground and under-ground. Accordingly, root characters are closely related to drought tolerance. Little attention has been paid in Egyptian breeding programs to root characters and their relation to shoot characters. Furthermore, induced mutations are considered as one of the most important methods to induce useful mutants, especially with improved root characters, to overcome the drought problem. The present investigation aimed to study the effect of different doses of gamma rays on several characters of three Egyptian rice varieties, i.e. 'Giza 171', 'Giza 175' and 'Giza 176' and to induce one or more mutants possessing drought tolerance

  10. Performance of Mercury Triple-Point Cells Made in Brazil

    Petkovic, S. G.; Santiago, J. F. N.; Filho, R. R.; Teixeira, R. N.; Santos, P. R. F.

    2003-09-01

    Fixed-points cells are primary standards in ITS-90. They contain reference material with a purity of 99.999 % or more. The gallium in a melting-point cell, for example, can reach a purity of 99.99999 %. This level of purity is not easy to obtain. However, substances like water and mercury can be purified by means of distillation and chemical procedures. This paper presents the results of mercury triple-point cells made in Brazil that were directly compared to a mercury triple-point cell of 99.999% purity. This reference cell, made by Isotech (England), was previously compared to cells from CENAM (Mexico) and NRC (Canada) and the maximum deviation found was approximately 0.4 mK. The purification stage started with a sample of mercury 99.3 % pure, and the repeated use of both mechanical and chemical processes led to a purification grade considered good enough for calibration of standard platinum resistance thermometers. The purification procedures, the method of construction of the cell, the laboratory facilities, the comparison results and the budget of uncertainties are described in this paper. All of the cells tested have a triple-point temperature within 0.25 mK of the triple-point temperature of the Inmetro reference cell.

  11. Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF

    Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

    2014-04-24

    The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

  12. Autometallographic tracing of mercury in frog liver

    Loumbourdis, N.S.; Danscher, G.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of mercury in the liver of the frog Rana ridibunda with the autometallographic method was investigated. The mercury specific autometallographic (HgS/Se AMG ) technique is a sensitive histochemical approach for tracing mercury in tissues from mercury-exposed organisms. Mercury accumulates in vivo as mercury sulphur/mercury selenium nanocrystals that can be silver-enhanced. Thus, only a fraction of the Hg can be visualized. Six animals were exposed for one day and another group of six animals for 6 days in 1 ppm mercury (as HgCI 2 ) dissolved in fresh water. A third group of six animals, served as controls, were sacrificed the day of arrival at the laboratory. First, mercury appears in the blood plasma and erythrocytes. Next, mercury moves to hepatocytes and in the apical part of the cells, that facing bile canaliculi. In a next step, mercury appears in the endothelial and Kupffer cells. It seems likely that, the mercury of hepatocytes moves through bile canaliculi to the gut, most probably bound to glutathione and/or other similar ligands. Most probably, the endothelial and Kupffer cells comprise the first line of defense against metal toxicity. - Frogs can be good bioindicators of mercury

  13. Vaporization of elemental mercury from pools of molten lead at low concentrations

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    investigate its effect upon the mercury vaporization rate in simulation of the aluminum structure in the APT blanket. No effect at all was observed for a case with an argon atmosphere. This suggests that there are no chemical effects of the aluminum on the vaporization kinetics. With an air atmosphere, the presence of aluminum in the melt reduced the mercury vaporization by a factor of six in comparison to the identical test but without aluminum present. This suggests that aluminum in the lead/mercury .melt retards the vaporization of mercury by creating a surface oxide layer in addition to the lead-oxide layer which increases the mass transfer resistance

  14. New principle of chemotherapy resistance

    A laboratory study has revealed an entirely unexpected process for acquiring drug resistance that bypasses the need to re-establish DNA damage repair in breast cancers that have mutant BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

  15. Mercury: Aspects of its ecology and environmental toxicity. [physiological effects of mercury compound contamination of environment

    Siegel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of mercury pollution on the environment. The possible sources of mercury contamination in sea water are identified. The effects of mercury on food sources, as represented by swordfish, are analyzed. The physiological effects of varying concentrations of mercury are reported. Emphasis is placed on the situation existing in the Hawaiian Islands.

  16. 76 FR 13851 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...

    2011-03-14

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali...-5] RIN 2060-AN99 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Supplemental...

  17. Groundwater Modeling Of Mercury Pollution At A Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility In Pavoldar, Kazakhstan

    In Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severly contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this chemical pla...

  18. A proportion of mutations fixed in the genomes of in vitro selected isogenic drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants can be detected as minority variants in the parent culture

    Bergval, Indra; Coll, Francesc; Schuitema, Anja; de Ronde, Hans; Mallard, Kim; Pain, Arnab; McNerney, Ruth; Clark, Taane G.; Anthony, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    We studied genomic variation in a previously selected collection of isogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis laboratory strains subjected to one or two rounds of antibiotic selection. Whole genome sequencing analysis identified eleven single, unique mutations (four synonymous, six non-synonymous, one intergenic), in addition to drug resistance-conferring mutations, that were fixed in the genomes of six monoresistant strains. Eight loci, present as minority variants (five non-synonymous, three synonymous) in the genome of the susceptible parent strain, became fixed in the genomes of multiple daughter strains. None of these mutations are known to be involved with drug resistance. Our results confirm previously observed genomic stability for M. tuberculosis, although the parent strain had accumulated allelic variants at multiple locations in an antibiotic-free in vitro environment. It is therefore likely to assume that these so-called hitchhiking mutations were co-selected and fixed in multiple daughter strains during antibiotic selection. The presence of multiple allelic variations, accumulated under non-selective conditions, which become fixed during subsequent selective steps, deserves attention. The wider availability of 'deep' sequencing methods could help to detect multiple bacterial (sub)populations within patients with high resolution and would therefore be useful in assisting in the detailed investigation of transmission chains.

  19. A proportion of mutations fixed in the genomes of in vitro selected isogenic drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants can be detected as minority variants in the parent culture

    Bergval, Indra

    2015-01-09

    We studied genomic variation in a previously selected collection of isogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis laboratory strains subjected to one or two rounds of antibiotic selection. Whole genome sequencing analysis identified eleven single, unique mutations (four synonymous, six non-synonymous, one intergenic), in addition to drug resistance-conferring mutations, that were fixed in the genomes of six monoresistant strains. Eight loci, present as minority variants (five non-synonymous, three synonymous) in the genome of the susceptible parent strain, became fixed in the genomes of multiple daughter strains. None of these mutations are known to be involved with drug resistance. Our results confirm previously observed genomic stability for M. tuberculosis, although the parent strain had accumulated allelic variants at multiple locations in an antibiotic-free in vitro environment. It is therefore likely to assume that these so-called hitchhiking mutations were co-selected and fixed in multiple daughter strains during antibiotic selection. The presence of multiple allelic variations, accumulated under non-selective conditions, which become fixed during subsequent selective steps, deserves attention. The wider availability of \\'deep\\' sequencing methods could help to detect multiple bacterial (sub)populations within patients with high resolution and would therefore be useful in assisting in the detailed investigation of transmission chains.

  20. Mercury - the hollow planet

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  1. Mercury in dated Greenland marine sediments

    Asmund, G.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age of the sedi......Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age...... indicating that the mercury mainly originates from atmospheric washout. But the large variability indicates that other processes also influence the mercury flux to Arctic marine sediments. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Sorption of mercury on chemically synthesized polyaniline

    Remya Devi, P.S.; Verma, R.; Sudersanan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) and methyl mercury, on chemically synthesized polyaniline, in 0.1-10N HCl solutions has been studied. Hg 2+ is strongly sorbed at low acidities and the extent of sorption decreases with increase in acidity. The sorption of methyl mercury is very low in the HCl concentration range studied. Sorption of Hg 2+ on polyaniline in 0.1-10N LiCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions has also been studied. The analysis of the data indicates that the sorption of Hg 2+ depends on the degree of protonation of polyaniline and the nature of mercury(II) chloride complexes in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) of polyaniline sorbed with mercury show that mercury is bound as Hg 2+ . Sorbed mercury is quantitatively eluted from polyaniline with 0.5N HNO 3 . Polyaniline can be used for separation and pre-concentration of inorganic mercury from aqueous samples. (author)

  3. Genetic effects of organic mercury compounds

    Ramel, C

    1967-01-01

    Studies on the genetic and developmental effects of organic mercury compounds on lilies, drosophila, and ice were carried out. It was found that chromosomal and developmental abnormalities were correlated with the administration of mercury compounds.

  4. Mercury-Containing Devices and Demolition

    Some items inside residential buildings contain mercury, which poses a persistent and toxic human health and environmental threat. These materials should be carefully salvaged for proper recycling to prevent mercury contamination prior to demolition.

  5. EPA Leadership in the Global Mercury Partnership

    The Global Mercury Partnership is a voluntary multi-stakeholder partnership initiated in 2005 to take immediate actions to protect human health and the environment from the releases of mercury and its compounds to the environment.

  6. Mercury in Thana creek, Bombay harbour

    Zingde, M.D.; Desai, B.N.

    weight) with marked increased from harbour to the creek region suggests substantial mercury input in the head region. Chemical extraction by hydrogen peroxide indicated that more than 70% of mercury was leachable and probably organically bound...

  7. Mercury Lander Mission Concept Study Summary

    Eng, D. A.

    2018-05-01

    Provides a summary of the Mercury Lander Mission Concept Study performed as part of the last Planetary Decadal Survey. The presentation will focus on engineering trades and the challenges of developing a Mercury lander mission.

  8. Mercury Emission Measurement in Coal-Fired Boilers by Continuous Mercury Monitor and Ontario Hydro Method

    Zhu, Yanqun; Zhou, Jinsong; He, Sheng; Cai, Xiaoshu; Hu, Changxin; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Le; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa

    2007-06-01

    The mercury emission control approach attaches more importance. The accurate measurement of mercury speciation is a first step. Because OH method (accepted method) can't provide the real-time data and 2-week time for results attained, it's high time to seek on line mercury continuous emission monitors(Hg-CEM). Firstly, the gaseous elemental and oxidized mercury were conducted to measure using OH and CEM method under normal operation conditions of PC boiler after ESP, the results between two methods show good consistency. Secondly, through ESP, gaseous oxidized mercury decrease a little and particulate mercury reduce a little bit, but the elemental mercury is just the opposite. Besides, the WFGD system achieved to gaseous oxidized mercury removal of 53.4%, gaseous overall mercury and elemental mercury are 37.1% and 22.1%, respectively.

  9. Method for the removal and recovery of mercury

    Easterly, Clay E.; Vass, Arpad A.; Tyndall, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

  10. Characterization of MMS-sensitive mutants of Neurospora crassa

    DeLange, A.M.; Mishra, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    Several MMS-sensitive mutants of Neurospora crassa were compared with the wild-type strain for their relative sensitivities to UV, X-ray, and histidine. They were also compared for the frequency of spontaneous mutation at the loci which confer resistance to p-fluorophenylalanine. The mutants were also examined for possible defects in meiotic behavior in homozygous crosses and for any change in the inducible DNA salvage pathways. On the basis of these characterizations, the present MMS-sensitive mutants of Neurospora can be placed into three groups. On the basis of data presented, the MMS sensitivity of the first group mutants cannot be ascertained to arise from a defect in the DNA repair pathways; instead, it may stem from altered cell permeability or other pleotropic effects of the mus mutations. However, it can be suggested that the second and third group of mus mutants may indeed result from a defect in the DNA repair pathways controlled by the mus genes; this conclusion is based on their cross-sensitivity to a number of DNA-damaging agents such as MMS, UV and/or X-rays, high frequencies of spontaneous mutation and defects in meiotic behavior.

  11. Study of the environmental cycling of mercury

    Garcia Frades, J P; Hildebrand, S G; Huckabee, J W; Murias, B; Diaz, F S; Wilson, R H

    1977-01-01

    A study of mercury in the environment is under way near the mercury mine at Almaden, Spain. The main aspects of the project are: ecology; atmospheric monitoring; and human studies. The mercury deposit at Almaden is described. The liquid effluent from the mine and smelter contains high concentrations of mercury that pollute nearby rivers. Sample collection and analytical methods used in the ecological survey are reviewed. Ecological experiments are considered. Air monitoring studies and human studies currently being performed are assessed. (1 map)

  12. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  13. Payload hardware and experimental protocol development to enable future testing of the effect of space microgravity on the resistance to gentamicin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and its σs-deficient mutant

    Matin, A. C.; Wang, J.-H.; Keyhan, Mimi; Singh, Rachna; Benoit, Michael; Parra, Macarena P.; Padgen, Michael R.; Ricco, Antonio J.; Chin, Matthew; Friedericks, Charlie R.; Chinn, Tori N.; Cohen, Aaron; Henschke, Michael B.; Snyder, Timothy V.; Lera, Matthew P.; Ross, Shannon S.; Mayberry, Christina M.; Choi, Sungshin; Wu, Diana T.; Tan, Ming X.; Boone, Travis D.; Beasley, Christopher C.; Piccini, Matthew E.; Spremo, Stevan M.

    2017-11-01

    Human immune response is compromised and bacteria can become more antibiotic resistant in space microgravity (MG). We report that under low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG), stationary-phase uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) become more resistant to gentamicin (Gm), and that this increase is dependent on the presence of σs (a transcription regulator encoded by the rpoS gene). UPEC causes urinary tract infections (UTIs), reported to afflict astronauts; Gm is a standard treatment, so these findings could impact astronaut health. Because LSMMG findings can differ from MG, we report preparations to examine UPEC's Gm sensitivity during spaceflight using the E. coli Anti-Microbial Satellite (EcAMSat) as a free-flying "nanosatellite" in low Earth orbit. Within EcAMSat's payload, a 48-microwell fluidic card contains and supports study of bacterial cultures at constant temperature; optical absorbance changes in cell suspensions are made at three wavelengths for each microwell and a fluid-delivery system provides growth medium and predefined Gm concentrations. Performance characterization is reported here for spaceflight prototypes of this payload system. Using conventional microtiter plates, we show that Alamar Blue (AB) absorbance changes can assess the Gm effect on E. coli viability, permitting telemetric transfer of the spaceflight data to Earth. Laboratory results using payload prototypes are consistent with wellplate and flask findings of differential sensitivity of UPEC and its ΔrpoS strain to Gm. if σs plays the same role in space MG as in LSMMG and Earth gravity, countermeasures discovered in recent Earth studies (aimed at weakening the UPEC antioxidant defense) to control UPEC infections would prove useful also in space flights. Further, EcAMSat results should clarify inconsistencies from previous space experiments on bacterial antibiotic sensitivity and other issues.

  14. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  15. Plain formation on Mercury: tectonic implications

    Thomas, P.

    1980-01-01

    Four major plain units, plus intermediates, are distinguished on Mercury. The chronologic relationships between these plains indicate that plains formation was a permanent process on Mercury. Their location and morphology seem to indicate a possible volcanic origin for these plains. The relationships between tectonism and volcanism seems to indicate the global contraction is not the only tectonic process on Mercury. (Auth.)

  16. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a... dental cavity or a broken tooth. (b) Classification. Class I. ...

  17. Quarter 9 Mercury information clearinghouse final report

    Laudal, D.L.; Miller, S.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.; Ralston, N.; Dunham, G.; Weber, G.

    2005-12-15

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. A total of eight reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. Selected topics were discussed in detail in each quarterly report. Issues related to mercury from coal-fired utilities include the general areas of measurement, control, policy, and transformations. Specific topics that have been addressed in previous quarterly reports include the following: Quarterly 1 - Sorbent Control Technologies for Mercury Control; Quarterly 2 - Mercury Measurement; Quarterly 3 - Advanced and Developmental Mercury Control Technologies; Quarterly 4 - Prerelease of Mercury from Coal Combustion By-Products; Quarterly 5 - Mercury Fundamentals; Quarterly 6 - Mercury Control Field Demonstrations; Quarterly 7 - Mercury Regulations in the United States: Federal and State; and Quarterly 8 - Commercialization Aspects of Sorbent Injection Technologies in Canada. In this last of nine quarterly reports, an update of these mercury issues is presented that includes a summary of each topic, with recent information pertinent to advances made since the quarterly reports were originally presented. In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. 86 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section... Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions. The definitions in § 721.3 apply to this section... elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  19. Mercury bioaccumulation in the Mediterranean

    Cinnirella S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study details mercury pollution within the food chain of the Mediterranean by analysing the most comprehensive mercury dataset available for biota and water measurements. In this study we computed a bioaccumulation factor (BAF for datasets in the existing mercury-related scientific literature, in on-going programs, and in past measurement campaigns. Preliminary results indicate a major lack of information, making the outcome of any assessment very uncertain. Importantly, not all marine eco-regions are (or have ever been covered by measurement campaigns. Most lacking is information associated with the South-Eastern part of the Mediterranean, and in several eco-regions it is still impossible to reconstruct a trophic net, as the required species were not accounted for when mercury measurements were taken. The datasets also have additional temporal sampling problems, as species were often not sampled systematically (but only sporadically during any given sampling period. Moreover, datasets composed of mercury concentrations in water also suffer from similar geographic limitations, as they are concentrated in the North-Western Mediterranean. Despite these concerns, we found a very clear bioaccumulation trend in 1999, the only year where comprehensive information on both methylmercury concentrations in water and biota was available.

  20. Study of the Behavior and Distribution of Mercury in Soil Samples Collected on the Banks of the Valdeazogues River

    Lominchar, M. A.; Sierra, M. J.; Rodiriguez, J.; Millam, R.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the behavior of mercury in the soil of the Valdeazogues river (Almaden, Ciudad Real, Spain) by using a six-step sequential extraction procedure (CIEMAT) and checking the relationship between the percentage of organic matter in soil and the percentage of mercury associated with the exchangeable and oxidizable fractions. The results show that total mercury concentrations in soil range from 116.7 ±24.3 to 245.5 ±59.6 mg kg - 1 of Hg even to concentrations of 350.9 ±68.6 mg kg -1 . However, the available mercury concentration is a smaller percentage of 0.15% of total mercury measured in the samples. Also, the soluble mercury is less than 0,037 mg kg - 1, so that, the leaching process and transport of mercury to surface water and groundwater are very slow. With regard to the distribution of mercury between the different fractions of soil, the metal is associated with more resistant soil fractions, these are: crystalline Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides, organic matter absorbed and the fi nal residue. (Author9) 50 refs.