WorldWideScience

Sample records for mercury cadmium telluride

  1. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  2. Characterization of microstructural stability for nanotwinned mercury cadmium telluride under cyclic nanoindentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Nianmin; Ma, Guojun; Kang, Renke

    2013-01-01

    Nanotwinned (nt) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) was prepared using nanoindentations. The hardness of nt-MCT is 100 times higher than that of monocrystalline counterparts. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the twin lamellae of nt-MCT prior to cyclic nanoindentations are distributed along two directions, intersecting at an angle of 76°. The nanotwinned microstructure of nt-MCT is stable after 100 cyclic nanoindentations. The loading–unloading curves of nt-MCT are basically invariable after 50 cycles, and have elastic characteristics

  3. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  4. Atomic resolution on the (111 )B surface of mercury cadmium telluride by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fang-Xing; Hong, Feng; Pan, Bi-Cai; Wang, Yin; Shao, Jun; Shen, Xue-Chu

    2018-01-01

    The real-space atomic surface structure of mercury cadmium telluride was successfully achieved on the (111 )B surface of H g0.78C d0.22Te by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The work casts light on the reconstructions of the (111 )B surface unraveling a (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction induced by adatom adsorption of Cd. The other (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction is clarified to be induced by the single Te vacancy, which is more stable than the reconstruction of multivacancies in contrast to the prevailing view. The simulated STM images are in good agreement with the experiments. We also observed an in situ morphology transition from the (1 ×1 ) structure to those (2 ×2 ) reconstructions, implying the stability of the reconstructions.

  5. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  6. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Martin, B. G.

    1980-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride crystals were prepared by the Bridgman method with a wide range of crystal growth rates and temperature gradients adequate to prevent constitutional supercooling under diffusion-limited, steady state, growth conditions. The longitudinal compositional gradients for different growth conditions and alloy compositions were calculated and compared with experimental data to develop a quantitative model of the crystal growth kinetics for the Hg(i-x)CdxTe alloys, and measurements were performed to ascertain the effect of growth conditions on radial compositional gradients. The pseudobinary HgTe-CdTe constitutional phase diagram was determined by precision differential thermal analysis measurements and used to calculate the segregation coefficient of Cd as a function of x and interface temperature. Computer algorithms specific to Hg(1-x)CdxTe were developed for calculations of the charge carrier concentrations, charge carrier mobilities, Hall coefficient, optical absorptance, and Fermi energy as functions of x, temperature, ionized donor and acceptor concentrations, and neutral defect concentrations.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Current status and issues in the surface passivation technology of mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, O. P.; Musca, C. A.; Faraone, L.

    1998-08-01

    Surface passivation has been recognized as a crucial step in the fabrication of mercury cadmium telluride photoconductive as well as photovoltaic detectors. The subject has attracted considerable attention in the past and several reviews existed by 1991. The subject matter, however, received added impetus with the development of techniques like MOCVD and MBE and recently there has been considerable work on MCT passivation using in situ grown II-VI semiconductors. In this report, we have tried to give the present status and identify the issues particularly with reference to the recent work on the subject.

  8. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  9. Bandgap-Engineered Mercury Cadmium Telluride Infrared Detector Structures for Reduced Cooling Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsuno, Anne M.

    State-of-the-art mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) high performance infrared (IR) p-n heterojunction technology remains limited by intrinsic, thermal Auger generation-recombination (C-11.) mechanisms which necessitate strict cooling requirements, and challenges related to processing technology, particularly those associated with achieving stable, controllable in situ p-type doping in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown HgCdTe. These limitations motivate the need to firstly, increase device operating temperatures, and secondly, address material processing issues. This work investigates three alternative HgCdTe IR device architectures as proposed solutions 1) the high operating temperature (HOT) detector, 2) the nBn detector, and 3) the NBnuN detector. The HOT detector is designed to suppress Auger processes, in turn, reducing the detector noise and cryogenic cooling requirements. A simulation study comparing the device behavior and performance metrics of the Auger-suppressed HOT structure to those obtained for the conventional double layer planar heterostructure (DLPH) device predicts the HOT detector can provide a significant advantage over conventional detectors with an increased operating temperature of ˜40-50 K for devices with cutoff wavelengths in the range of 5-12 mum. In a related study, a series of experiments is conducted to examine arsenic (As) deep diffusion in HgCdTe with the goal of achieving controllable low p-type doping in the HOT absorber layer to reduce Auger G-R processes by increasing minority carrier lifetimes. Furthermore, a unipolar, barrier-integrated nBn detector structure is proposed to address the challenges associated with p-type doping in MBE grown HgCdTe. Numerically simulated performance characteristics of the HgCdTe nBn device predict values similar to comparable DLPH structures for a range of temperatures, motivating the experimental demonstration of mid- and long-wave IR HgCdTe nBn detectors. Fabricated nBn detectors successfully

  10. Computational analysis of interfacial attachment kinetics and transport phenomena during liquid phase epitaxy of mercury cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasin, Igal; Brandon, Simon [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ben Dov, Anne; Grimberg, Ilana; Klin, Olga; Weiss, Eliezer [SCD-Semi-Conductor Devices, P.O. Box 2250/99, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-07-01

    Deposition of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) thin films, on lattice matched cadmium zinc telluride substrates, is often achieved via Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE). The yield and quality of these films, required for the production of infrared detector devices, is to a large extent limited by lack of knowledge regarding details of physical phenomena underlying the deposition process. Improving the understanding of these phenomena and their impact on the quality of the resultant films is therefore an important goal which can be achieved through relevant computational and/or experimental studies. We present a combined computational and experimental effort aimed at elucidating physical phenomena underlying the LPE of MCT via a slider growth process. The focus of the presentation will be results generated by a time-dependent three-dimensional model of mass transport, fluid flow, and interfacial attachment kinetics, which we have developed and applied in the analysis of this LPE process. These results, combined with experimental analyses, lead to an improved understanding of the role of different transport and kinetic phenomena underlying this growth process.

  11. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  12. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  13. Rapid long-wave infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements using a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Eiei; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Jia, Yingqing; Trivedi, Sudhir; D'souza, Arvind I; Decuir, Eric A; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S; Samuels, Alan C

    2015-11-20

    In this work, we develop a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing (∼1-5  s) a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (∼5.6-10  μm). Similar to the conventional UV-Vis LIBS, a broadband emission spectrum of condensed phase samples covering the whole 5.6-10 μm region can be acquired from just a single laser-induced microplasma or averaging a few single laser-induced microplasmas. Atomic and molecular signature emission spectra of solid inorganic and organic tablets and thin liquid films deposited on a rough asphalt surface are observed. This setup is capable of rapidly probing samples "as is" without the need of elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous UV-Vis and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  14. Rise time spectroscopy in cadmium telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, Claude; Siffert, Paul; Carnet, Bernard; Le Meur, Roger.

    1980-11-01

    By a simultaneous analysis of rise time and pulse amplitude distributions of the signals issued from various cadmium telluride detectors, it is possible to obtain informations about surface and bulk trapping, field distribution within the detectors, as well as charge collection and transport properties. These investigations have been performed on both pure and chlorine doped and materials for various surfaces preparation conditions [fr

  15. Growth and Characterization of (211)B Cadmium Telluride Buffer Layer Grown by Metal-organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy on Nanopatterned Silicon for Mercury Cadmium Telluride Based Infrared Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintri, Shashidhar S.

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT or Hg1-xCdxTe) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is presently the material of choice for fabricating infrared (IR) detectors used in night vision based military applications. The focus of MCT epitaxy has gradually shifted since the last decade to using Si as the starting substrate since it offers several advantages. But the ˜19 % lattice mismatch between MCT and Si generates lots of crystal defects some of which degrade the performance of MCT devices. Hence thick CdTe films are used as buffer layers on Si to accommodate the defects. However, growth of high quality single crystal CdTe on Si is challenging and to date, the best MBE CdTe/Si reportedly has defects in the mid-105 cm -2 range. There is a critical need to reduce the defect levels by at least another order of magnitude, which is the main motivation behind the present work. The use of alternate growth technique called metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) offers some advantages over MBE and in this work MOVPE has been employed to grow the various epitaxial films. In the first part of this work, conditions for obtaining high quality (211)B CdTe epitaxy on (211)Si were achieved, which also involved studying the effect of having additional intermediate buffer layers such as Ge and ZnTe and incorporation of in-situ thermal cyclic annealing (TCA) to reduce the dislocation density. A critical problem of Si cross-contamination due to 'memory effect' of different reactant species was minimized by introducing tertiarybutylArsine (TBAs) which resulted in As-passivation of (211)Si. The best 8-10 µm thick CdTe films on blanket (non-patterned) Si had dislocations around 3×105 cm-2, which are the best reported by MOVPE till date and comparable to the highest quality films available by MBE. In the second part of the work, nanopatterned (211)Si was used to study the effect of patterning on the crystal quality of epitaxial CdTe. In one such study, patterning of ˜20 nm holes in SiO2

  16. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toney, J.E.; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance

  17. Use of cadmium telluride solar cells and environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karus, M.; Wittassek, R.; Linden, W.

    1990-05-01

    Cadmium telluride solar cells for power generation may give rise to environmental pollution with cadmium in the event of incidents during fabrication, fires during operation or inappropriate disposal after use. Fires may liberate more than 50% of cadmium contained; disposal at municipal landfills and sufficient contact with water may even release 100% of cadmium. According to the waste disposal regulations in force, cadmium telluride cells, because of their cadmium content and the high risk of cadmium liberation on contact with water, must be disposed of in underground storages of category six. (orig.) [de

  18. Apparent resistivity of detector grade cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siffert, P.; Rabin, B.; Tabatabai, H.Y.; Stuck, R.

    1977-01-01

    The resistivity of both chlorine compensated and undoped cadmium telluride, grown by the THM or programmed solution growth techniques, have been measured by several methods. Values up to 10 9 Ω.cm have been reached for these P-type samples, in agreement with the literature. However, when used in the detector manufacturing, the total depletion layer thickness at a certain voltage was much less as expected, indicating much lower real resistivities. The origin of this effect is probably due to fast polarization. A procedure is proposed to evaluate quickly the real extension of the depletion layer thickness

  19. Mercury telluride as a zero-gap semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchenko, N.N.; Pashkovskij, M.V.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a review of main properties of mercury telluride which is a representative of a new class of substances - gapless semiconductors. The causes leading to the appearance of a gapless state in mercury chalcogenides are considered; it is demonstrated that the main role in the formation of the inverse band structure belongs to relativistic corrections. The specific properties of mercury telluride are associated with the zero forbidden band, p-like nature of electron states of the conduction band and its nonparabolicity, resonance states of impurities and anomalies of dielectric permittivity. Conditions of forbidden band appearing in mercury telluride under the effect external factors are analyzed

  20. Thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1987-10-01

    Cadmium telluride, with a room-temperature band-gap energy of 1.5 eV, is a promising thin-film photovoltaic material. The major objective of this research has been to demonstrate thin-film CdTe heterojunction solar cells with a total area greater than 1 sq cm and photovoltaic efficiencies of 13 percent or more. Thin-film p-CdTe/CdS/SnO2:F/glass solar cells with an AM1.5 efficiency of 10.5 percent have been reported previously. This report contains results of work done on: (1) the deposition, resistivity control, and characterization of p-CdTe films by the close-spaced sublimation process; (2) the deposition of large-band-gap window materials; (3) the electrical properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions; (4) the formation of stable, reproducible, ohmic contacts (such as p-HgTe) to p-CdTe; and (5) the preparation and evaluation of heterojunction solar cells.

  1. Surface tension and contact angles of molten cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    The surface tension and contact angle of molten cadmium telluride (CdTe) were measured as a function of temperature by the sessile drop technique. A FORTRAN code was developed to calculate the surface tension of sessile drops, with the contact angle ranging from O to 180°. The wetting of cadmium telluride melt was studied on different surfaces. The surface tension of cadmium telluride was about 160 ±5 dynes · cm-1[1.6 m-1] at the melting point of 1093°C. The contact angle of CdTe melt was about 65° on a quartz optical flat, 75° on commercial fused quartz, and 125° on boron nitride coated quartz.

  2. Thin films and solar cells of cadmium telluride and cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferekides, Christos Savva

    The objectives of this dissertation are to investigate (1) the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (Cd(1-x)Zn(z)Te) films and junctions, and their potential application to solar cells, and (2) the fabrication and characterization of CdTe solar cells by the close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CdTe and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te films have been deposited by MOCVD on a variety of substrates at 300-400 C. The effect of the deposition parameters and post deposition heat treatments on the electrical, optical, and structural properties have been investigated. Heterojunctions of the configuration CdTe/transparent conducting semiconductor (TCS) and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te/TCS have been prepared and characterized. CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te(E sub g = 1.65eV)/Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S solar cells with efficiencies of 9.9 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively have been fabricated. The as-deposited CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS junctions exhibited high dark current densities due to deflects at the interface associated with small grain size. Their characteristics of the Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te junctions degraded with increasing Zn concentration due to the crystalline quality and very small grain size (0.3 microns) in films with high ZnTe contents (greater than 25 percent). No effective post-deposition heat treatment has been developed. CdTe/CdS solar cells have also been fabricated by the close spaced sublimation (CSS). Significant improvements in material and processing have been made, and in collaboration with fellow researchers an AM1.5 conversion efficiency of 13.4 percent has been demonstrated, the highest efficiency ever measured for such devices. The highest conversion efficiency for the CdTe(CSS)/CdS solar cell was achieved by reaching high open-circuit voltages and fill factors, while the short-circuit current densities were moderate. These results indicate that further improvements to increase the short-circuit current densities

  3. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Vibhute, A.; Pawar, P.; Rao, A. R.; Hingar, M. K.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Patil, M. H.; Arora, Y. K.; Sinha, S.; Priya, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Navalgund, K. H.; Sarma, K. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2017-06-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZTI's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to >200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17^' over a 4.6° × 4.6° (FWHM) field-of-view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarization above ˜ 100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarization studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  4. Thin film cadmium telluride and zinc phosphide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T.

    1984-10-01

    The deposition of cadmium telluride films by direct combination of the cadmium and tellurium vapor on foreign substrates is described. Nearly stoichiometric p-type cadmium telluride films and arsenic-doped p-type films were prepared reproducibly. Major efforts were directed to the deposition and characterization of heterojunction window materials, indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, cadmium oxide, and zinc oxide. A number of heterojunction solar cells were prepared, and the best thin-film ITO/CdTe solar cells had an AMI efficiency of about 7.2%. Zinc phosphide films were deposited on W/steel substrated by the reaction of zinc and phosphine in a hydrogen flow. Films without intentional doping had an electrical resistivity on the order of 10(6) ohm-cm, and this resistivity may be reduced to about 5 x 10(4) ohm-cm by adding hydrogen chloride or hydrogen bromide to the reaction mixture. Lower resistivity films are deposited by adding a controlled amount of silver nitrate solution on to the substrate surface. Major efforts are directed to the deposition of low-resistivity zinc selenide to prepare ZnSe/An3P2 heterojunction thin-film solar cells. The zinc selenide films deposited by vaccum evaporation and chemical vapor deposition techniques are all of high resistivity.

  5. Characterization of nanocrystalline cadmium telluride thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Structural, electrical and optical characteristics of CdTe thin films prepared by a chemical deposi- tion method, successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), are described. For deposition of CdTe thin films, cadmium acetate was used as cationic and sodium tellurite as anionic precursor in aqueous me-.

  6. Bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride and pyridyl tellurolate complexes of zinc, cadmium, mercury: Synthesis, characterization and their conversion to metal telluride nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedarnath, G; Jain, Vimal K; Wadawale, Amey; Dey, Gautam K

    2009-10-21

    Treatment of an acetonitrile solution of metal chloride with bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride, [Te(2)(pyMe)(2)], in the same solvent yielded complexes of composition [MCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] (M = Zn or Cd) whereas reactions of [MCl(2)(tmeda)] with NaTepyR (R = H or Me) gave tellurolate complexes of the general formula [M(TepyR)(2)] (M = Cd or Hg). When the cadmium complex [Cd(Tepy)(2)] was crystallized in the presence of excess tmeda, [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] was formed exclusively. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, uv-vis, (1)H NMR data. The crystal structures of [ZnCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] and [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the former zinc is coordinated to nitrogen atoms of the pyridyl group, while in the latter the coordination environment around tetrahedral cadmium is defined by the two neutral nitrogen atoms of tmeda, and two pyridyl tellurolate ligands. Thermal behavior of some of these complexes was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis of [M(Tepy)(2)] in a furnace or in coordinating solvents such as hexadecylamine/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (HDA/TOPO) at 350 and 160 degrees C, respectively gave MTe nanoparticles, which were characterized by uv-vis, photoluminiscence, XRD, EDAX and TEM.

  7. Preparation and characterization of cadmium telluride. Study of nuclear spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, Alain.

    1976-01-01

    Cadmium telluride single crystals have been grown by three different methods: zone refining, Bridgman and travelling heater method (THM). Characterization has been undertaken especially on the THM ingots by different methods, including time of flight, thermally stimulated current and thermoluminescence. A theoretical level scheme approach has been used to establish the mechanism of self-compensation with halogens. Finally nuclear radiation detection has been prepared and investigated. The following parameters have been considered: detector efficiency, energy resolution, stability in time and under irradiation. Structure suppressing polarization effects in chlorine compensated THM samples are presented [fr

  8. Spectral analysis techniques for characterizing cadmium zinc telluride polarization modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, William R.; Taherion, Saeid; Kumar, F. Joseph; Giles, David; Hore, Dennis K.

    2018-04-01

    The low frequency electro-optic characteristics of cadmium zinc telluride are demonstrated in the mid-infrared, in the spectral range 2.5-11 μm. Conventional methods for characterizing the dynamic response by monitoring the amplitude of the time-varying light intensity do not account for spatial variation in material properties. In such cases, a more revealing method involves monitoring two distinct frequency components in order to characterize the dynamic and static contributions to the optical retardation. We demonstrate that, while this method works well for a ZnSe photo-elastic modulator, it does not fully capture the response of a cadmium zinc telluride electro-optic modulator. Ultimately, we show that acquiring the full waveform of the optical response enables a model to be created that accounts for inhomogeneity in the material that results in an asymmetric response with respect to the polarity of the driving voltage. This technique is applicable to broadband and fixed-wavelength applications in a variety of spectral ranges.

  9. The study and development of cadmium telluride detectors for gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knispel, Gerard

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the study of possibility of cadmium telluride's utilisation in gamma ray spectroscopy. This material has some superiorities in comparison with germanium which is utilised in (Ge Li) structures. In a first chapter we study the interaction of rays with matter in the particular case of cadmium telluride. The range of α and β rays in the some way as the effect cross section of gamma ray versus energy are deducted from data tabulated for tin which has a density and an atomic weight very near. The problems related with creation and collection of charges in a cadmium telluride structure are discussed in the same way as the resolution in nuclear spectroscopy, acting the different parameters characterising the detector. In the second chapter, after some indications in the metallurgy of cadmium telluride, we describe the realisation of several structures types, evaporation of a cadmium telluride's layer, diffusion of gold or copper, metal semiconductor contact. Measures of current-voltage characteristics and capacity allow the determination of possibility of nuclear detection with this structures and state precisely some parameters. In the third chapter range's measures of α rays are compared with the first chapter's theoretical results. Results of α ray spectroscopy obtained with three detectors are described and show the possibility of cadmium telluride in this way. Detection of gamma ray at last justify the choice of this material, but the results obtained here show the progress to do in cadmium telluride metallurgy. (author) [fr

  10. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  11. Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Zinc Telluride Films for Back Contact to Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Tushar M.; Drayton, Jennifer; Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) films have been deposited onto uncoated glass superstrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) sputtering with different amounts of nitrogen introduced into the process gas, and the structural and electronic transport properties of the resulting nitrogen-doped ZnTe (ZnTe:N) films characterized. Based on transmission and x-ray diffraction measurements, it was observed that the crystalline quality of the ZnTe:N films decreased with increasing nitrogen in the deposition process. The bulk carrier concentration of the ZnTe:N films determined from Hall-effect measurements showed a slight decrease at 4% nitrogen flow rate. The effect of ZnTe:N films as back contact to cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells was also investigated. ZnTe:N films were deposited before or after CdCl2 passivation on CdTe/CdS samples. Small-area devices were characterized for their electronic properties. Glancing-angle x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed substantial loss of zinc from the samples where CdCl2 passivation was carried out after ZnTe:N film deposition.

  12. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaics: ES and H issues, solutions, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, K.; Moskowitz, P.; Fthenakis, V.

    1998-02-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a growing business worldwide, with new technologies evolving towards potentially large-volume production. PV use produces no emissions, thus offsetting many potential environmental problems. However, the new PV technologies also bring unfamiliar environment, safety, and health (ES and H) challenges that require innovative solutions. This is a summary of the issues, solutions, and perspectives associated with the use of cadmium in one of the new and important PV technologies: thin-film, cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV, which is being developed and commercialized by several companies including Solar Cells Inc. (Toledo, Ohio), BP Solar (Fairfield, California), and Matsushita (Japan). The principal ES and H issue for thin-film cadmium telluride PV is the potential introduction of cadmium--a toxic heavy metal--into the air or water. The amount of cadmium in thin-film PV, however, is quite small--one nickel cadmium flashlight battery has about as much cadmium (7 g) as a square meter of PV module using current technology--and a typical cordless power tool will have 5--10 batteries. CdTe modules are also very well sealed, limiting the chance of release. Nonetheless, minimizing the amount of cadmium in cadmium telluride modules and preventing the introduction of that cadmium into the environment is a top priority for National Renewable Energy Laboratory researchers and cadmium telluride PV manufacturers

  13. Theoretical study of bismuth-doped cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Proupin, E.; Rios-Gonzalez, J. A.; Pena, J. L.

    Cadmium telluride heavily doped with bismuth has been proposed as an absorber with an intermediate band for solar cells. Increase in the photocurrent has been shown recently, although the overall cell efficiency has not improved. In this work, we study the electronic structure and the formation energies of the defects associated to bismuth impurities. We have performed electronic structure calculations within generalized density functional theory, using the exchange-correlation functional HSE(w) , where the range-separation parameter w has been tuned to reproduce the CdTe bandgap. Improving upon previous reports, we have included the spin-orbit interaction, which modifies the structure of the valence band and the energy levels of bismuth. We have found that interstitial Bi (Bii) tends to occupy Cd vacancies, cadmium substitution (BiCd) creates single donor level, while tellurium substitution (BiTe) is a shallow single acceptor. We investigate the interaction between these point defects and how can they be combined to create a partially filled intermediate band. Supported by FONDECYT Grant 1130437, CONACYT-SENER SUSTENTABILIDAD ENERGETICA/project CeMIE-Sol PY-207450/25 and PY-207450/26. JARG acknowledges CONACYT fellowship for research visit. Powered@NLHPC (ECM-02).

  14. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  15. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, H. R.; Quam, W.; DeVore, T.; Vogle, R.; Weslowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5

  16. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  17. Deposition and characterization of p-type cadmium telluride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.; Firszt, F.; Naseem, H. A.; Stawski, R.

    1985-08-01

    Cadmium telluride is a direct-gap semiconductor with a room-temperature energy gap of 1.5 eV. It is a promising photovoltaic material, and single-crystalline homojunction and heterojunction solar cells have been prepared and characterized. Relatively short minority carrier diffusion length (1-2 microns) can be tolerated due to a short optical absorption length, and, for this reason, CdTe is particularly suited for thin-film devices. The fabrication of thin-film solar cells is based on the use of p-type CdTe films. The present investigation has the objective to prepare CdTe films with controlled properties in a reproducible manner, taking into account a utilization of the reaction of Cd and Te vapor on the surface of heated substrates in a hydrogen (or helium) atmosphere in a gas-flow system. Attention is given to details of film deposition, and CdTe films on graphite, W/graphite, mullite, and glass substrates.

  18. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  19. Electron beam evaporation deposition of cadmium sulphide and cadmium telluride thin films: Solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Li; Chen Jing; Xu Ling; Xu Jun; Ma Zhong-Yuan; Su Wei-Ning; Yu Yao

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films are deposited by electron beam evaporation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the root mean square (RMS) roughness values of the CdS films increase as substrate temperature increases. The optical band gap values of CdS films increase slightly with the increase in the substrate temperature, in a range of 2.42–2.48 eV. The result of Hall effect measurement suggests that the carrier concentration decreases as the substrate temperature increases, making the resistivity of the CdS films increase. CdTe films annealed at 300°C show that their lowest transmittances are due to their largest packing densities. The electrical characteristics of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells are investigated in dark conditions and under illumination. Typical rectifying and photovoltaic properties are obtained. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  20. A method and device for generating semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marfaing, Yves; Triboulet, Robert; Marfaing, Gerard; Cornet, Alain; Siffert, Paul.

    1973-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for preparing cadmium telluride in precise stoichiometric proportions. The invention consists in carrying out a series of three syntheses and re-crystallizations of cadmium telluride starting from a mixture in stoichiometric proportions, the last two crystallization steps being characterized in that one of them is carried out at high temperature whereas the other is carried out at a lower temperature, in the presence of a tellurium bath so as to minimize crystal defects. This applies to the manufacture of diodes for ionization chambers, nuclear of infrared detectors and electro-optical modulators [fr

  1. Cadmium zinc telluride detector for low photon energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Wook; Wang, Kai; Reznic, Alla; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a polycrystalline radiation detector that has been investigated over the years for a variety of applications including Constellation X-ray space mission [1] and direct-conversion medical imaging such as digital mammography [2]. Due to its high conversion gain and low electron-hole pair creation energy (~4.43 eV) [3], it has found use in high end, photon counting medical imaging applications including positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, its potential in low photon energy applications has not been fully explored. In this work, we explore the capacity of the CZT material to count low photon energies (6 keV - 20 keV). These energies are of direct relevance to applications in gamma ray breast brachytheraphy and mammography, X-ray protein crystallography, X-ray mammography and mammography tomosynthesis. We also present a design that integrates the CZT direct conversion detector with an inhouse fabricated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) array. A CZT photoconductor (2 cm x 2 cm size, 5-mm-thick) prepared by the traveling heat method (THM) from RedlenTM is characterized. The current-voltage characteristics reveal a resistivity of 3.3 x 1011 Ω•cm and a steady state dark current in the range of nA. Photocurrent transients under different biases and illumination pulses are studied to investigate photogeneration and the charge trapping process. It is found that charge trapping plays a more significant role in transient behavior at low biases and low frequency.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of cadmium manganese telluride: a semimagnetic ternary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, T.; Basu, S.

    1993-01-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium manganese telluride (Cd ( 1-x)Mn x Te) was synthesized by the vertical Bridgman method. Compositional analysis was done by X-ray studies and optical absorption to indicate x=0.23. XPS, ac and dc susceptibility studies are also presented. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  3. Preparation and study of the properties of lead telluride and cadmium telluride diodes for use in nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancon, R.

    1969-01-01

    This work studies the possibility of using high atomic number compound semiconductors, like lead telluride and cadmium telluride as to realize nuclear radiation detectors, specially in gamma ray spectrometry because of their high absorption coefficient. The problems related to the preparation of binary compounds are exposed. Experiments on PbTe show the influence of the conditions of preparation on the electrical properties of the semiconductor which are greatly dependent on the stoichiometry of the compound. PbTe surface-barrier diodes were realized and have been used to study the surface properties of this semiconductor. These diodes cannot detect nuclear radiations because of the too weak resistivity of our material. Different types of devices made of Cd Te have been studied. One of these diodes has been used as an alpha particle detector. We explain the relative poor performances of that detector by the presence of lattice defects in Cd Te where charge carriers may recombine themselves. By analysing the properties of gold diffused Cd Te diodes we identified this defect, the cadmium vacancy, the presence of which is due to the deviation from stoichiometry during the preparation of the material. (author) [fr

  4. One-Dimensional Fast Transient Simulator for Modeling Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Da

    Solar energy, including solar heating, solar architecture, solar thermal electricity and solar photovoltaics, is one of the primary alternative energy sources to fossil fuel. Being one of the most important techniques, significant research has been conducted in solar cell efficiency improvement. Simulation of various structures and materials of solar cells provides a deeper understanding of device operation and ways to improve their efficiency. Over the last two decades, polycrystalline thin-film Cadmium-Sulfide and Cadmium-Telluride (CdS/CdTe) solar cells fabricated on glass substrates have been considered as one of the most promising candidate in the photovoltaic technologies, for their similar efficiency and low costs when compared to traditional silicon-based solar cells. In this work a fast one dimensional time-dependent/steady-state drift-diffusion simulator, accelerated by adaptive non-uniform mesh and automatic time-step control, for modeling solar cells has been developed and has been used to simulate a CdS/CdTe solar cell. These models are used to reproduce transients of carrier transport in response to step-function signals of different bias and varied light intensity. The time-step control models are also used to help convergence in steady-state simulations where constrained material constants, such as carrier lifetimes in the order of nanosecond and carrier mobility in the order of 100 cm2/Vs, must be applied.

  5. Single-phase cadmium telluride thin films deposited by electroless electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrypunov, G.; Klochko, N.; Lyubov, V.; Li, T.; Volkova, N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : Today cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a leading base material for the fabrication of thin film solar cells. Equally with the creation of traditional thin film photovoltaic devices on the base of CdTe in recent years several approaches have been investigated to develop solar cells with extremely thin (80-500 nm) CdTe absorber (so-called ηE(eta)-solar cells) that offer the potential to reduce recombination losses in the base layers and thus use low cost materials. Until today the CdTe depositions for the η-solar cells manufacture were performed by vapour phase epitaxy under dynamical vacuum at working temperature 750 degrees Celsium or by electrodeposition in the special electrochemical cell equipped with the potentiostat. Development research of simple and inexpensive method for obtaining of the single-phase stoichiometric cadmium telluride films has required an improvement of the electroless electrodeposition technique, which theretofore was characterized by some disadvantages, namely, the CdTe films were polluted by free tellurium additions and the composition of the films was Cd:Te=55:45. So, for the showing up the synthesis of doped or stoichiometric cadmium telluride films conditions and in order to decide the problem of the deposition of single-phase CdTe layers it was researched the electrochemical processes going during electroless electrolysis in sulfate solutions with different acidities and CdSO 4 concentrations. Some film samples during deposition were illuminated by 500 W halogen lamp. Deposition time was 10-15 min. The phase composition and structure of the deposited films were determined by XRD-method, the average sizes of the crystalline grains in the films were estimated using Debye-Scherer formula. The transmittance spectra of the samples were measured by double beam spectrophotometer in the spectral range of 0.6-1.1 μm. Surface morphology of the films was researched by scanning electron microscopy. By means of analysis of the

  6. Percolation of cadmium across a mercury film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, K.; Gobal, F.

    2003-01-01

    Electrodeposition/dissolution of cadmium onto a film of mercury shows some deviations from the natural liquidity of mercury caused by the reduction of Cd onto it. Percolation and fractal analyzes were done on the surface and the bulk of the mercury film during diffusion of Cd species (atoms). These show that the fractal dimensions of the Cd-inserted mercury film are about 2.11 and 2.54 near the surface of the mercury film and at deeper points inside the film, respectively. The insertion process has a negligible effect on the surface morphology of the mercury film and there is a phase transition in the bulk, as well as a geometrical transition during the Cd-insertion (de-insertion) process. This corresponds to a percolation threshold of about 0.2 mol l -1 Cd content

  7. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  8. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  9. Portable cadmium telluride detectors and their applicability for external measurement of 51Cr-EDTA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.; Groth, S.; Rossing, N.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of portable cadmium telluride detectors and a solid state memory have been examined with reference to point and volume source sensitivities and the equivalent, effective detector thickness. Based on the i.v. injection of 51 Cr-EDTA, the glomerular filtration rate in 23 patients has been measured by external detection of the disappearance rate of the tracer and only one blood sample. Correlation to conventional blood sampling technique is r = 0.992. The glomerular filtration rate determined from the externally measured disappearance rate constant only, is discussed. (author)

  10. Mercury, arsenic and cadmium in the unfried and fried fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, S.J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Determination of mercury, arsenic and cadmium in unfried and fried fish samples has been carried out by neutron activation followed by chemical separation to remove the interfering activies of copper, zinc etc. This paper presents results of finding on losses of mercury, arsenic and cadmium in the unfried and fried fish. (author)

  11. Validation with the thallium 201 of a cadmium-zinc-telluride semiconductor camera (C.Z.T.); Validation avec le thallium 201 d'une camera a semi-conducteur cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Songy, B.; Guernou, M.; Geronazzo, R.; Lussato, D. [Centre cardiologique du Nord, 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2010-07-01

    With thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl), the cadmium-zinc-telluride (C.Z.T.) NM530c discovery camera allows acquisition of 5 min with enhanced imaging quality and reliable diagnosis, in the prone or supine position. (N.C.)

  12. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  13. Theoretical Investigation of Point Defects of Mercury Cadmium Telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    STANDARDS M93 A bL )% SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of T HIS PAGE (W~ henl Date Enteed) MSL OY -FRiE’UUiU ’zuL REPOT DCUMNTATON AGEREAD INSTRUCTIONSREPOT RE RT...TEMPERATURE, K ’t iIs Figure 15: Theoretical results of electron mobility asa function of temperature for three different Hg8 CdxTe samples in Fig. 14

  14. Mercury cadmium telluride implanted junction profile measurement and depth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Songmin; Lin, Chun; Li, Haibin; Wei, Yanfeng; Ye, Zhenhua; Ding, Ruijun; He, Li

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a novel junction profile measurement method is proposed. A serial of junctions were fabricated by B+ implantation. Then a beveled bar which was about 10mm long and several micrometers deep was formed by carefully controlled wet-etching. The remaining depth of n region changes from the full depth that is about 5.3mm after ion implantation to zero depending on its lateral position and the slope of the etching bar. Voltage-current and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) measurements were applied to determine the HgCdTe junction edge. The LBIC signal orrectification characteristic indicates the existence of a PN junction. The junction depth is extracted from the position where the PN junction disappears and the slope of the etching bar. The junction depth of intrinsic doped HgCdTe was measured, which is about 2.4μm. A significant 0.4mm thick N-region was observed. Moreover, junction depths of samples annealed for different time were also investigated. By this method, it's possible to measure the three dimensional profile of a planar PN junction.

  15. Cadmium telluride quantum dots as pH-sensitive probes for tiopronin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yunqing; Ye Chao; Zhu Zhenghui [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu Yuzhu [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China) and Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: njhuyuzu@126.com

    2008-03-03

    The pH-sensitive cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) were used as proton probes for tiopronin determination. Based on the fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs caused by tiopronin, a simple, rapid and specific quantitative method was proposed. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration plot of ln(F{sub 0}/F) with concentration of tiopronin was linear in the range of 0.15-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92-122.5 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) with correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) (3{sigma}/k) was 0.15 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92 {mu}mol mL{sup -1}). The content of tiopronin in pharmaceutical tablet was determined by the proposed method and the result agreed with that obtained from the oxidation-reduction titration method and the claimed value.

  16. A miniature cadmium telluride detector module for continuous monitoring of left-ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, P B; Berger, H J; Steidley, J; Brendel, A F; Gottschalk, A; Zaret, B L

    1981-02-01

    The authors describe a miniature cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector module for continuous monitoring of ventricular function using an equilibrium radionuclide blood-pool label. The detector and collimator are small, light, and suitable for direct attachment to the chest wall. Clinical studies in 18 patients using a prototype system demonstrated reasonably good correlation with left-ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) determined by first-pass studies performed with a multicrystal scintillation camera (r = 0.74) and gated equilibrium studies performed with a computerized sodium iodide (Nal) probe (r = 0.76). The CdTe device may prove to be useful in patients in intensive and coronary care units as well as in ambulatory patients.

  17. Electronic properties of chlorine doped cadmium telluride used as high energy photoconductive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, L.; Cuzin, M.; Gaude, G.; Glasser, F.; Mathy, F.; Rustique, J.; Schaub, B.

    1991-01-01

    A new high energy X-ray chlorine doped Cadmium Telluride (CdTe:Cl) photoconductor is described. We discuss different deposition techniques (Sputtering, Evaporation, Electroless) to realize ohmic contacts which have low leakage current and which allow high applied electric field. The temperature dependence of the dark current give an activation energy of 0.6 eV for standard CdTe:Cl. The transient response of photoconductors under high X-ray energy beams has been characterized using three different pulse duration 150 ps, 30 ns and 4 μs. Sensitivity and speed of response are studied as a function of neutron pre-irradiated doses (0, 10 14 , 10 15 , 10 16 n/cm 2 ): neutron irradiations reduce the carrier lifetime at the expense of a lower sensitivity

  18. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh; Rahighi, Reza; Feizi, Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with 68Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with 68Ga NPs (68Ga@ CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The 68Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the 68Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of 68Ga radionuclide, the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots embedded chitosan nanoparticles: a stable, biocompatible preparation for bio-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghormade, Vandana; Gholap, Haribhau; Kale, Sonia; Kulkarni, Vaishnavi; Bhat, Suresh; Paknikar, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are an optically attractive option for bioimaging, but are known to display high cytotoxicity. Nanoparticles synthesized from chitosan, a natural biopolymer of β 1-4 linked glucosamine, display good biocompatibility and cellular uptake. A facile, green synthetic strategy has been developed to embed green fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) in biocompatible CNPs to obtain a safer preparation than 'as is' QDs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the crystal lattice corresponding to CdTe QDs embedded in CNPs while thermogravimetry confirmed their polymeric composition. Electrostatic interactions between thiol-capped QDs (4 nm, -57 mV) and CNPs (~300 nm, +38 mV) generated CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs that were stable up to three months. Further, viability of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells in vitro increased in presence of QDs-embedded CNPs as compared to bare QDs. At the highest concentration (10 μg/ml), the former shows 34 and 39% increase in viability at 24 and 48 h, respectively, as compared to the latter. This shows that chitosan nanoparticles do not release the QDs up to 48 h and do not cause extended toxicity. Furthermore, hydrolytic enzymes such as lysozyme and chitinase did not degrade chitosan nanoparticles. Moreover, QDs-embedded CNPs show enhanced internalization in NIH3T3 cells as compared to bare QDs. This method offers ease of synthesis and handling of stable, luminescent, biocompatible CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs with a favorable toxicity profile and better cellular uptake with potential for bioimaging and targeted detection of cellular components.

  20. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SILICON AND CADMIUM TELLURIDE BASED SOLAR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Al QASSEM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A compartive analzsis of silicon solar cells and of those containing a CdTe thin film which are widely used in solar energetics, particullarilly, in photovoltaic modules fabrication, is brought in this paper. The silicon is largely used in solar cells fabrication due to the low cost of solar cells production related to the low cost of the semiconductor fabrication and to the advanced material processing technology, when at the same time cadmium telluride has the wide use due to the fact that its fundamental parameters can provide theoretically a high value of efficiency of solar energy conversion into electrical one of 30%. The structure and photoelectrical parameters of silicon solar cells and of those cotaining a thin cadmium telluride layer are considered.ANALIZA COMPARATIVĂ A CELULELOR SOLARE DIN SILICIU ŞI TELURURA DE CADMIUÎn lucrarea de faţă este prezentată analiza comparativă a celulelor solare fabricate din siliciu şi a celor cu strat subţire de CdTe, care sunt pe larg utilizate în energetica solară, în particular la producerea modulelor fotovoltaice. Siliciul este intens folosit în fabricarea celulelor solare datorită costului redus al materialului semiconductor şi tehnologiei avansate de procesare, pe când telurura de cadmiu are o utilizare tot mai largă care, datorită parametrilor fundamentali, poate asigura teoretic o valoare înaltă a eficienţei conversiei energiei solare în cea electrică de (30%. Sunt considerate structura şi parametrii fotoelectrici ai celulelor solare din siliciu şi ai celor cu strat subţire de telurură de cadmiu.

  1. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Radiation Application Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh [Yazd University, Department of Physics, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, Reza [Sharif University of Technology, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with {sup 68}Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with {sup 68}Ga NPs ({sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The {sup 68}Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the {sup 68}Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of {sup 68}Ga radionuclide, the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  2. Ground-based experiments and theory in preparation for floating zone melting and directional solidification of cadmium telluride in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Carlson, F. M.; Aidun, D. K.; White, V.; Rosch, W.; Chang, W. M.; Shetty, R.; Fritz, A.; Balasubramanian, R.; Rosen, G.; Kweeder, J.; Wen, C.

    The objective of this program is to apply theoretical and experimental methods to optimize the equipment and procedures for floating zone melting and Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of cadmium telluride crystals in space. Computer codes were developed for the computation of heat transfer in the furnace and thermal stress in the resulting crystal. The predictions for the temperature field are being compared with experimental measurements. It was found that if the crystal sticks to the ampoule wall, differential thermal expansion between crystal and ampoule contributes much more to the stress than does the temperature field in the crystal. Thus, one goal of solidification of cadmium telluride in space is to reduce or eliminate contact of the crystal with the ampoule wall. Another goal is to find coatings and linings which reduce sticking of the grown crystal onto the ampoule. We developed techniques for measuring the surface tension and contact angle of molten cadmium telluride vs temperature and stoichiometry. The surface tension decreased with increasing temperature and with decreasing cadmium concentration. Wetting increased in the following order: pyrolytic boron nitride, carbon-coated quartz, sandblasted quartz, HF-etched quartz, and plain quartz. Additional coatings and potential ampoule lining materials are being developed and will be tested both for wetting by the melt and for sticking by the solid. Techniques are being developed for measuring sticking. We are also developing techniques for measuring the mechanical properties of cadmium telluride and for the direct observation of defect formation and evolution vs temperature. X-ray topography will be done in real time using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Techniques are being developed for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride in space. We have successfully float zoned 5 mm rods on Earth

  3. Variation of resistivity of copper doped cadmium telluride prepared by electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Windheim, J.A.; Cocivera, M.

    1990-01-01

    Thin film cadmium telluride is an attractive material because its band gap makes it suitable for a number of applications. The authors have prepared this material by electrodeposition both in the dark and under illumination. The resultant films, which are p-type as deposited and after heat treatment, have been used with electrodeposited cadmium sulfide to form pn junction photovoltaic cells. Light-to-electric power conversion efficiencies for a number of samples average around 3.5%. To increase this efficiency, the authors have initiated a program to reduce film resistivity by the incorporation of dopants using electrochemical and vapour techniques. The electrical characterization of electrodeposited thin film materials by Hall effect or resistance measurements is difficult because the sample must be removed from the conducting substrate before studies can be done. In this paper, results are presented for copper incorporated by two methods, electrochemical codeposition and electromigration and the effect is discussed in terms of a model in which the conductivity is controlled by the relative magnitudes of the dopant density and the density of interface states at the grain boundary

  4. Neutron activation analysis of manganese-mercury telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadykov, I. I.

    2003-01-01

    The triple semiconductor compound Mn x Hg 1-x Te is a worthwhile material for the development of infra-red detectors. It's properties, as well as other semiconductors ones depend on impurity elements content. So, analytical Purity control of Mn x Hg 1-x Te is required. Some procedures of the neutron activation analysis of Te[1], Hg [2] and that of their compounds (Cd x Hg 1-x Te [3], for instance) have been developed recently. However, no papers on the NAA of Mn x Hg 1-x Te have been found. This paper describes the procedure of the NAA of Mn x Hg 1-x Te based on anion-exchange chromatographic separation of impurity and matrix elements. Experimental The following reagents were used: commerciality available strongly based anion-exchange resin AW-17 (50-100 meash), hydrochloride hydrasine of analytical grade, solutions of HCl and HNO 3 prepared from concentrated acids of reagent grade. Separation processes were studied by radioactive tracers. The gamma-activity was measured on a HPGe detector GC1518 (efficiency 15 %, resolution 1,7 keV at 1332,5 keV line of 6 0C o) using DSA-1000 digital multichannel analyzer (Canberra, USA). Radioactive tracers were produced by irradiation of metals, salts or oxides of corresponding elements in WWR-SM water-water nuclear reactor. Irradiation of Mn x Hg 1-x Te samples and standards was carried out in a channel of WWR-SM reactor with a neutron flux density of 1.10 14 cm 2 .s -1 for 10 h. Solutions of manganese and mercury were prepared by dissolving their oxides in concentric hydrochloric acid. Solutions of tellurium were prepared by dissolving metallic tellurium in HCl:HNO 3 (3:1) mixture. Solution obtained was evaporated to dryness, the reside was dissolved in conc. HCl. To reduce tellurium to Te(IV) 1-2 mg of hydrazine were dissolved in solution at slight heating. Then, distilled water was added in a required quantities to get a desired concentration of HCl. The chromatographic behaviour of matrix and impurity elements was studied

  5. Analysis and determination of mercury, cadmium and lead in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to determine mercury, cadmium and lead concentrations in 60 canned tuna fish samples produced and distributed in Iran after digestion by the standard methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. Mercury contents in canned tuna fish were determined by cold vapor atomic ...

  6. Characterization of Mercury Cadmium Telluride and Mercury Cadmium Selenium Materials for Third Generation Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenfeng

    HgCdTe is the dominant material currently in use for infrared (IR) focal-plane-array (FPA) technology. In this dissertation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for the characterization of epitaxial HgCdTe epilayers and HgCdTe-based devices. The microstructure of CdTe surface passivation layers deposited either by hot-wall epitaxy (HWE) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on HgCdTe heterostructures was evaluated. The as-deposited CdTe passivation layers were polycrystalline and columnar. The CdTe grains were larger and more irregular when deposited by HWE, whereas those deposited by MBE were generally well-textured with mostly vertical grain boundaries. Observations and measurements using several TEM techniques showed that the CdTe/HgCdTe interface became considerably more abrupt after annealing, and the crystallinity of the CdTe layer was also improved. The microstructure and compositional profiles of CdTe(211)B/ZnTe/Si(211) heterostructures grown by MBE was investigated. Many inclined {111}-type stacking faults were present throughout the thin ZnTe layer, terminating near the point of initiation of CdTe growth. A rotation angle of about 3.5° was observed between lattice planes of the Si substrate and the final CdTe epilayer. Lattice parameter measurement and elemental profiles indicated that some local intermixing of Zn and Cd had taken place. The average widths of the ZnTe layer and the (Cd, Zn)Te transition region were found to be roughly 6.5 nm and 3.5 nm, respectively. Initial observations of CdTe(211)B/GaAs(211) heterostructures indicated much reduced defect densities near the vicinity of the substrate and within the CdTe epilayers. HgCdTe epilayers grown on CdTe(211)B/GaAs(211) composite substrate were generally of high quality, despite the presence of precipitates at the HgCdTe/CdTe interface. The microstructure of HgCdSe thin films grown by MBE on ZnTe/Si(112) and GaSb(112) substrates were investigated. The quality of the HgCdSe growth was dependent on the growth temperature and materials flux, independent of the substrate. The materials grown at 100°C were generally of high quality, while those grown at 140°C had {111}-type stacking defects and high dislocation densities. For epitaxial growth of HgCdSe on GaSb substrates, better preparation of the GaSb buffer layer will be essential in order to ensure that high-quality HgCdSe can be grown.

  7. Study on damage of DNA in mice induced by mercury cadmium and/or lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaopan; Zhou Jianhua; Shi Xijing; Yan Liping

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the joint injury actions of mercury, cadmium and/or lead on DNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice. Methods: The blood specimens were obtained from mice at the 2 day after the peritoneal injections. DNA damages were determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and 3 H-TdR incorporation. Results: Acquired by SCGE technique, tail movement of DNA in mercury-cadmium-lead group was significantly greater than that in the single exposure group, the difference was significant too between mercury-cadmium group and cadmium group, cadmium-lead group and cadmium group. The results of 3 H-TdR incorporation showed: the values of DPM in mercury-cadmium group and cadmium-lead group were lower than that in the single exposure group and the value of DPM lowered more significantly after exposure to mercury-cadmium-lead. Conclusion: The combined effects of mercury, cadmium, lead on DNA damage are more significant. (author)

  8. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  9. N-hydroxysuccinimide-mediated photoelectrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols based on cadmium telluride nanoparticles decorated graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaee, Aso; Salimi, Abdollah

    2013-01-01

    A simple nonenzymatic electrochemical protocol is proposed for the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols using formed N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) radical cation on the graphene nanosheets/L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite (GNs/Cys/CdTe) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. At first, graphene oxide (GO) is chemically synthesized from graphite after which Cys is covalently functionalized to GO through formation of amide bonds between carboxylic acid groups of GO and amine groups of Cys. The resulting GNs/Cys is used as a capping agent to synthesize CdTe QD nanoparticles. After the characterization of the as-made nanocomposite which confirmed the successful attachment of CdTe nanoparticles to the GNs, the ability of the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified GC electrode toward the nonenzymatic ethanol electrooxidation is examined in the presence of NHS as an effective mediating system. Our results revealed that the proposed system possess a good activity to NHS electrooxidation and subsequently, ethanol oxidation. Moreover, the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified electrode displayed a significant photoelectrocatalytic activity toward the ethanol oxidation upon illumination by visible light. The photoactive GNs/Cys/CdTe nanohybrid presented here showing favorable photoelectrochemical features for nonenzymatic aliphatic alcohols oxidation may hold great promise to the development of electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells

  10. Investigations of Cadmium Manganese Telluride Crystals for Room-Temperature Radiation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Carcelen, V.; Gul, R.; James, R.

    2009-10-06

    Cadmium manganese telluride (CMT) has high potential as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors. We investigated indium-doped CMT crystals taken from the stable growth region of the ingot, and compared its characteristics with that from the last-to-freeze region. We employed different techniques, including synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), current-voltage (I-V) measurements, and low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and we also assessed their responses as detectors to irradiation exposure. The crystal from the stable growth region proved superior to that from the last-to-freeze region; it is a single-grain crystal, free of twins, and displayed a resistivity higher by two orders-of-magnitude. The segregation of indium dopant in the ingot might be responsible for its better resistivity. Furthermore, we recorded a good response in the detector fabricated from the crystal taken from the stable growth region; its ({mu}{tau}){sub e} value was 2.6 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V, which is acceptable for thin detectors, including for applications in medicine.

  11. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  12. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunett, B.A.; Lund, J.C.; Van Scyoc, J.M.; Hilton, N.R.; Lee, E.Y.; James, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors

  13. Topology of Electron Density of Cadmium Telluride Determined from Relief and Contour Plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.P.; Gopir, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The topology of the electron density yields a faithful and a reliable mapping of the concepts of atoms, molecular structure, bonds and structure, besides providing the basis for a theory of structural stability. In quantum mechanics, and in particular quantum chemistry, the electron density is a measure of the probability of an electron occupying an infinitesimal element of space surrounding any given point. Contour plots of electron density distribution of cadmium telluride (CdTe) were obtained using the density functional theory (DFT) method and were used as the basis to qualitatively study the bond, structure and stability of the molecule when it is in bulk. We looked at the way the electron density, ρ of CdTe defines the gradient field and hence the bonding type. We identified the bond paths that coincide with the contours of electron sharing. These bond paths indicated that the molecule was slightly covalent. Our topological analysis led us to conclude that CdTe was an n-type semiconductor with covalent bond and slight ionic character. (author)

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  15. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, J.

    2007-04-01

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented

  16. Fluorescence Stability of Mercaptopropionic Acid Capped Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots in Various Biochemical Buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Vivek; Kashikar, Adisha; Srivastava, Rohit

    2018-04-01

    Quantum dots are the semiconductor nanocrystals having unique optical and electronic properties. Quantum dots are category of fluorescent labels utilized for biological tagging, biosensing, bioassays, bioimaging and in vivo imaging as they exhibit very small size, signal brightness, photostability, tuning of light emission range, longer photoluminescence decay time as compared to organic dyes. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized mercaptopropionic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (MPA-CdTe QDs) using hydrothermal method. The study further reports fluorescence intensity stability of quantum dots suspended in different buffers of varying concentration (1-100 mM), stored at various photophysical conditions. Fluorescence intensity values were reduced with increase in buffer concentration. When the samples were stored at room temperature in ambient light condition the quantum dots suspended in different buffers lost the fluorescence intensity after day 15 (except TRIS II). Fluorescence intensity values were found stable for more than 30 days when the samples were stored in dark condition. Samples stored in refrigerator displayed modest fluorescence intensity even after 300 days of storage. Thus, storage of MPA-CdTe QDs in refrigerator may be the suitable choice to maintain its fluorescence stability for longer time for further application.

  17. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Kriegner, Christopher J.; Schew, William A.; Kaczmar, Swiatoslav W.; Traister, Matthew; Wilson, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted

  18. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Kriegner, Christopher J.; Schew, William A.; Kaczmar, Swiatoslav W.; Traister, Matthew; Wilson, David J. [O' Brien and Gere, Ecological Sciences, E. 512 Township Line Road, Two Valley Square, Suite 120, Blue Bell, PA 19422 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted. (author)

  19. Influence of a front buffer layer on the performance of flexible Cadmium sulfide/Cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaduge, Hasitha Padmika

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells have been developing as a promising candidate for large-scale application of photovoltaic energy conversion and have become the most commercially successful polycrystalline thin-film solar module material. In scaling up from small cells to large-area modules, inevitably non-uniformities across the large area will limit the performance of the large cell or module. The effects of these non-uniformities can be reduced by introducing a thin, high-resistivity transparent buffer layer between the conductive electrodes and the semiconductor diode. ZnO is explored in this dissertation as a high-resistivity transparent buffer layer for sputtered CdTe solar cells and efficiencies over 15% have been achieved on commercially available Pilkington TEC15M glass substrates. The highest open-circuit voltage of 0.858V achieved using the optimized ZnO buffer layer is among the best reported in the literature. The properties of ZnO:Al as a buffer are also investigated. We have shown that ZnO:Al can serve both as a transparent conducting oxide layer as well as a high-resistivity transparent layer for CdTe solar cells. ZnO:Al reactively sputtered with oxygen can give the necessary resistivities that allow it to be used as a high-resistivity transparent layer. Glass is the most common choice as the substrate for solar cells fabricated in the superstrate configuration due to its transparency and mechanical rigidity. However flexible substrates offer the advantages of light weight, high flexibility, ease of integrability and higher throughput through roll-to-roll processing over glass. This dissertation presents significant improvements made to flexible CdTe solar cells reporting an efficiency of 14% on clear KaptonRTM flexible polyimide substrates. Our efficiency of 14% is, to our knowledge, the best for any flexible CdTe cell reported in literature.

  20. Investigations of portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors for clinical studies with radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of small, portable γ-radiation-sensitive Cadmium Telluride (CdTE(Cl)) crystal detectors and portable solid state data storage memories makes it feasible to extend the measuring period in a number of clinical investigations based on the use of various radioisotopes and external detection. Blood sampling can be avoided in some cases. Continuous ambulatory monitoring of relevant physiological parameters is practicable, e.g. kidney function (GFR), left ventricular ejection fraction, subcutaneous blood flow, muscle blood flow and insulin absorption in diabetic patients. In the present methodological study the applicability of the 133-Xe washout technique to subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue blood flow (SBF) has been investigated and adapted to the use of CdTe(Cl) detectors attached to the skin surface for the measurement of local 133-Xe-disappearance rate constants (k). Physical characterization of CdTe(Cl) detectors as γ-sensitive devices has been performed, and adequate counting sensitivities were found without detector energy-resolution properties. The CdTe(Cl) detectors are therefore suitable for single indicator studies. The measuring geometry of CdTe(Cl) detectors was studied and compared with that of stationary Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors in both phantom and in vivo investigations. The spatial properties of CdTe(Cl) detectors could to some extent be adjusted by pulse height discrimination and lead collimation. When long-term measurements were complicated by for instance physical activity of the patients, the small CdTe(Cl) detectors in general showed equal or better performance than the heavy and voluminous NaI(Tl) detectors. The free movement of the ambulatory patient and the avoidance of cable connections to stationary data-collecting systems gave improved possibilities for measurements of the relevant parameters. From this point of view, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors must be considered an important advance for radioactivity studies in

  1. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Salazar, Jessica G.; Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A.

    2015-01-01

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  2. Lead, mercury, and cadmium in breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Yurdakök

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxic heavy metals are the major source of environmental pollution in this new millennium. Lead, mercury, and cadmium are the most common toxic heavy metals in the environment. There is no known function of these toxic heavy metals in the human body. In females, toxic heavy metals can be accumulated in maternal body before pregnancy and may be transferred to fetus through placenta and later, via breast milk. Lead previously accumulated in maternal bones can be mobilized along with calcium in order to meet increased calcium needs of the fetus in pregnant women and for the calcium needs in human milk during lactation. Human fetus and infants are susceptible to heavy metal toxicity passing through placenta and breastmilk due to rapid growth and development of organs and tissues, especially central nervous system. However most of the damage is already done by the time the infant is born. Intrauterine lead exposure can cause growth retardation, cognitive dysfunction, low IQ scores on ability tests, and low performance in school. Biological samples, such as umbilical cord blood and breast milk, and less commonly infant hair, are used for biomonitoring of intra-uterine exposure to these toxic chemicals. Although toxic metals and other pollutants may be excreted into breast milk, their effects are unknown and this topic is subject of a growing body of research. Despite the possibility of harm from environmental contaminants in breast milk, breastfeeding is still recommended as the best infant feeding method. In fact, the species-specific components present in breast milk protect infants against infections; promote immune and neurologic system development; and may decrease the risk of disease, including allergies, obesity, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, inflammatory bowel disease, and sudden infant death syndrome. Breastfeeding also facilitates maternal-infant attachment. The potential risk of environmental contaminants that can be transferred from

  3. Prospects of novel front and back contacts for high efficiency cadmium telluride thin film solar cells from numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matin, M.A. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology (CUET), Chittagong (Bangladesh); Mannir Aliyu, M.; Quadery, Abrar H. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Nowshad [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials (CEREM), College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-09-15

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film solar cell has long been recognized as a leading photovoltaic candidate for its high efficiency and low cost. A numerical simulation has been performed using AMPS-1D simulator to explore the possibility of higher efficiency and stable CdS/CdTe cell among several cell structures with indium tin oxide (ITO) and cadmium stannate (Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as front contact material, tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}), zinc oxide (ZnO) and zinc stannate (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as buffer layer, and silver (Ag) or antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with molybdenum (Mo) or zinc telluride (ZnTe) with aluminium (Al) as back contact material. The cell structure ITO/i-ZnO/CdS/CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x}/CdTe/Ag has shown the best conversion efficiency of 16.9% (Voc=0.9 V, Jsc=26.35 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF=0.783). This analysis has shown that ITO as front contact material, ZnO as buffer layer and ZnTe or Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} back surface reflector (BSR) are suitable material system for high efficiency (>15%) and stable CdS/CdTe cells. The cell normalized efficiency linearly decreased at a temperature gradient of -0.25%/ C for ZnTe based cells, and at -0.40%/ C for other cells. (author)

  4. Metabolism and toxicity of cadmium, mercury, and lead in animals: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neathery, M.W.; Miller, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Cadmium, mercury, and lead are toxic to humans and animals. Although cadmium and inorganic mercury toxicities occur in humans, they have not been observed in domestic livestock under practical conditions. In contrast, cattle, especially young calves, are extremely susceptible to lead toxicity. Apparently, cattle are more tolerant of cadmium than are other animal species. Due partially to higher absorption and longer retention times in the body, the alkyl mercuries, especially methyl mercury, are more toxic than inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic forms of cadmium, mercury, and lead are poorly absorbed from the intestine. However, due to lack of effective homeostasis, after absorption retention time is long. Injected cadmium, mercury, and lead are metabolized differently from that naturally absorbed. Most cadmium and mercury are in kidney and liver (50 and 23 percent of total body in goats); but highest total load of methyl mercury is in muscle (72 percent in cows). With low to moderate body burden, most lead is retained in the skeleton. However, beyond a certain point, the kidney accumulates large quantities. Only minute amounts of cadmium and mercury are secreted into milk, but milk is only moderately well protected from dietary lead. Likewise, little cadmium and inorganic mercury pass the placental barrier whereas lead and methyl mercury pass more readily

  5. Scientific/Technical Report: Improvement in compensation and crystal growth of cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin G. Lynn; Kelly A. Jones

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives: (1) Growth of 12 ingots--Washington State University (WSU) more than met this goal for the project by growing 12 final ingots for the year. Nine of the twelve crystal growth ingots resolved gamma radiation at room temperature. The other three ingots where resistivity of ∼ 3 x 10 8 Ohm*cm for CG32a, CG36, and CG42 lower than expected, however none of these were tried with blocking contacts. All ingots were evaluated from tip to heel. In these three cases, the group III, dopant Aluminum (Al) was not detected to a level to compensate the Cd vacancies in the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) thus the ingots were lower resistivity. The nine ingots that were successful radiation detectors averaged a bulk resistivity of 1.25 x 10 10 Ohm*cm and with a average μτ product for electrons of ∼ 2 x 10 -4 cm 2 /V with a 1/4 microsecond shaping time with samples ∼2 mm in thickness. (2) Attempt new compensations techniques--WSU also met this goal. Several doping schemes were attempted and investigated with various amounts of excess Tellurium added to the growth. The combination of Al and Erbium (Er) were first attempted for these ingots and subsequently CG34 was grown with Al, Er and Holmium. These compensation techniques produced radiation detectors and are currently under investigation. These growths were made with significant different doping levels to determine the affect of the dopants. CG43 was doped with Indium and Er. Indium was introduced instead of Al to determine if Indium is more soluble than Al for CZT and was less oxidized. This may decrease the amount of low resistivity ingots grown by doping with Indium instead of Al. (3) Grow large single crystals--Several changes in approach occurred in the crystal growth furnace. Steps were taken to maximize the crystal growth interface during growth by modifying liners, quartz, heat sinks, crucibles and various growth steps and temperature profiles. CG39 ingot

  6. Monte Carlo and least-squares methods applied in unfolding of X-ray spectra measured with cadmium telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moralles, M. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Caixa Postal 11049, CEP 05422-970, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)], E-mail: moralles@ipen.br; Bonifacio, D.A.B. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Caixa Postal 11049, CEP 05422-970, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Bottaro, M.; Pereira, M.A.G. [Instituto de Eletrotecnica e Energia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, 1289, CEP 05508-010, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2007-09-21

    Spectra of calibration sources and X-ray beams were measured with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. The response function of the detector was simulated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Trapping of charge carriers were taken into account using the Hecht equation in the active zone of the CdTe crystal associated with a continuous function to produce drop of charge collection efficiency near the metallic contacts and borders. The rise time discrimination is approximated by a cut in the depth of the interaction relative to cathode and corrections that depend on the pulse amplitude. The least-squares method with truncation was employed to unfold X-ray spectra typically used in medical diagnostics and the results were compared with reference data.

  7. Monte Carlo and least-squares methods applied in unfolding of X-ray spectra measured with cadmium telluride detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralles, M.; Bonifácio, D. A. B.; Bottaro, M.; Pereira, M. A. G.

    2007-09-01

    Spectra of calibration sources and X-ray beams were measured with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. The response function of the detector was simulated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Trapping of charge carriers were taken into account using the Hecht equation in the active zone of the CdTe crystal associated with a continuous function to produce drop of charge collection efficiency near the metallic contacts and borders. The rise time discrimination is approximated by a cut in the depth of the interaction relative to cathode and corrections that depend on the pulse amplitude. The least-squares method with truncation was employed to unfold X-ray spectra typically used in medical diagnostics and the results were compared with reference data.

  8. Analysis of the accelerated crucible rotation technique applied to the gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divecha, Mia S.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2017-06-01

    We employ finite-element modeling to assess the effects of the accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals grown from a gradient freeze system. Via consideration of tellurium segregation and transport, we show, for the first time, that steady growth from a tellurium-rich melt produces persistent undercooling in front of the growth interface, likely leading to morphological instability. The application of ACRT rearranges melt flows and tellurium transport but, in contrast to conventional wisdom, does not altogether eliminate undercooling of the melt. Rather, a much more complicated picture arises, where spatio-temporal realignment of undercooled melt may act to locally suppress instability. A better understanding of these mechanisms and quantification of their overall effects will allow for future growth optimization.

  9. Zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Central East Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, R. [Greenland Environmental Research Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Born, E.W. [Greenland Fisheries Research Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Agger, C.T. [National Environmental Research Institute, Roskilde (Denmark); Nielsen, C.O. [Ravnsnaesvej, Birkerod (Denmark)

    1995-02-01

    Muscle, liver, and kidney tissues from 38 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) caught in the Scoresby Sound area, Central East Greenland, were analysed for zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium. In general, cadmium concentrations were low in muscle, liver and kidney tissue. This finding can be explained by low cadmium levels in the blubber of ringed seals. The concentration of mercury in muscle tissue was low, whereas concentrations in liver and kidney tissue were relatively high. Mercury and cadmium were positively correlated with age in liver and kidney. Zinc was positively correlated with in kidney, and selenium was correlated with age in liver. Contrary to other marine mammals, polar bears had higher mercury levels in the kidneys than in the liver. In all three tissues polar bears had significantly lower cadmium levels than ringed seals from the same area. Mercury levels were significantly lower in the muscle tissue of polar bears than in ringed seals, where-as levels in the liver and kidney were significantly higher. The previous geographic trend for cadmium and mercury found in Canadian polar bears could be extended to cover East Greenland as well. Hence cadmium levels were higher in Greenland than in Canada, while the opposite was the case for mercury. Greenland polar bears had higher mercury and cadmium contents in livers and kidneys than polar bears from Svalbard. The mercury levels in muscle and liver tissue from polar bears from East Greenland were twice as high as found in bears from western Alaska, but half the levels found in northern Alaska. Cadmium and zinc were partially correlated in kidney tissue, and this was found for mercury and selenium as well. Cadmium and zinc showed molar ratios close to unity with the highest concentrations occurring in kidney tissue, while the levels of zinc exceeded cadmium in muscle and liver tissue by up to several decades. Mercury and selenium showed molar ratios close to unity in liver and kidneys. 56 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Translocation of mercury and cadmium into the fruiting bodies of six higher fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnert, H.; Zadrazil, F.

    1983-01-01

    The species- and metal-specific translocation of cadmium and mercury from the substrate to the fruiting bodies of 6 higher fungi has been investigated. The 6 species differed greatly in their ability to translocate cadmium and mercury. The highest translocation rates displayed Pleurotus flabellatus: 75.0% of the applied cadmium and 38.5% of the mercury could be recovered from the fruiting bodies. High translocation rates also found with Pleurotus ostreatus (19.3 and 38.5% for cadmium and mercury, respectively). This compares with only 1.27% of cadmium and 8.42% of mercury in Agaricus bisporus or 3.71% of cadmium and 3.63% of mercury in Pleurotus sajor caju. For Agaricus bisporus it was shown that there was proportionality of translocation over a 1:10 concentration range. In 4 out of 6 species there was a tendency towards higher heavy metal contents in later crops, when calculated on the basis of ..mu..g/g of dry fruiting body. In 4 out of 6 more mercury than cadmium was translocated into the fruiting bodies, the Cd/Hg ratios being 6.6, 2.0, 5.6, and 3.2, respectively. In Pleurotus sajor caju the ratio was about 1. Only in Pleurotus flabellatus more cadmium than mercury was found in the fruiting bodies (Cd/Hg ratio 0.65).

  11. Validation of a low dose {sup 201}thallium protocol with a cadmium-zinc-telluride (C.Z.T.) semiconductor camera;Validation d'un protocole thallium 201 faible dose avec une camera a semi-conducteur cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Songy, B.; Geronazzo, R.; Guernou, M.; Queneau, M.; Lussato, D. [Centre cardiologique du Nord, 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of the study was to reduce the dosimetry with thallium 201 in myocardium scintigraphy with the new cadmium-zinc-telluride (C.Z.T.) semi-conductors cameras. As results it appears with a low dose of thallium 201 ( less 30%) and then a reduced dosimetry, the C.Z.T. camera provides reliable and high quality images. (N.C.)

  12. Uptake, release, and incorporation of radioactive cadmium and mercury by the fresh water alga phormidium fragile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, I.Y.; Khalil, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of radioactive cadmium and mercury by the fresh water alga phormidium fragile was studied at different time intervals. Cadmium was taken up in amounts significantly greater than mercury and although the rate of uptake of both metals was more or less constant, the bound fraction of cadmium showed a continuous increase. It has also been found that cadmium is more readily released from the algal cells than mercury. Chromatographic analysis of the organic soluble fractions for both metals, the R values as well as their percentages of occurrence are presented and discussed.3 tab

  13. Survey of mercury, cadmium and lead content of household batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, Sebastian; Radant, Hendrik; Kohlmeyer, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A well selected sample of 146 batteries was analysed for its heavy metals content. • A comparison was made between heavy metals contents in batteries in 2006 and 2011. • No significant change after implementation of the new EU Batteries Directive. • Severe differences in heavy metal contents were found in different battery-types. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to provide updated information on the development of the potential impact of heavy metal containing batteries on municipal waste and battery recycling processes following transposition of the new EU Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC. A representative sample of 146 different types of commercially available dry and button cells as well as lithium-ion accumulators for mobile phones were analysed for their mercury (Hg)-, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contents. The methods used for preparing the cells and analysing the heavy metals Hg, Cd, and Pb were either developed during a former study or newly developed. Several batteries contained higher mass fractions of mercury or cadmium than the EU limits. Only half of the batteries with mercury and/or lead fractions above the marking thresholds were labelled. Alkaline–manganese mono-cells and Li-ion accumulators, on average, contained the lowest heavy metal concentrations, while zinc–carbon batteries, on average, contained the highest levels

  14. Survey of mercury, cadmium and lead content of household batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recknagel, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.recknagel@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Reference Materials, Richard-Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Radant, Hendrik [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Reference Materials, Richard-Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kohlmeyer, Regina [German Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Section III 1.6 Extended Producer Responsibility, Wörlitzer Platz 1, D-06844 Dessau-Roßlau (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • A well selected sample of 146 batteries was analysed for its heavy metals content. • A comparison was made between heavy metals contents in batteries in 2006 and 2011. • No significant change after implementation of the new EU Batteries Directive. • Severe differences in heavy metal contents were found in different battery-types. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to provide updated information on the development of the potential impact of heavy metal containing batteries on municipal waste and battery recycling processes following transposition of the new EU Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC. A representative sample of 146 different types of commercially available dry and button cells as well as lithium-ion accumulators for mobile phones were analysed for their mercury (Hg)-, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contents. The methods used for preparing the cells and analysing the heavy metals Hg, Cd, and Pb were either developed during a former study or newly developed. Several batteries contained higher mass fractions of mercury or cadmium than the EU limits. Only half of the batteries with mercury and/or lead fractions above the marking thresholds were labelled. Alkaline–manganese mono-cells and Li-ion accumulators, on average, contained the lowest heavy metal concentrations, while zinc–carbon batteries, on average, contained the highest levels.

  15. Cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Together with zinc and mercury, cadmium belongs to group IIb of the periodic table. It can be found in rocks, soil, water, coal, zinc ore, lead ore, and copper ore. In the environment, cadmium is present predominantly as the oxide or as the chloride, sulfide, or sulfate salt. It has no recognizable

  16. Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Sears

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposures are ubiquitous. These toxic elements have no physiological benefits, engendering interest in minimizing body burden. The physiological process of sweating has long been regarded as “cleansing” and of low risk. Reports of toxicant levels in sweat were sought in Medline, Embase, Toxline, Biosis, and AMED as well as reference lists and grey literature, from inception to March 22, 2011. Of 122 records identified, 24 were included in evidence synthesis. Populations, and sweat collection methods and concentrations varied widely. In individuals with higher exposure or body burden, sweat generally exceeded plasma or urine concentrations, and dermal could match or surpass urinary daily excretion. Arsenic dermal excretion was severalfold higher in arsenic-exposed individuals than in unexposed controls. Cadmium was more concentrated in sweat than in blood plasma. Sweat lead was associated with high-molecular-weight molecules, and in an interventional study, levels were higher with endurance compared with intensive exercise. Mercury levels normalized with repeated saunas in a case report. Sweating deserves consideration for toxic element detoxification. Research including appropriately sized trials is needed to establish safe, effective therapeutic protocols.

  17. Thermoelectrically-cooled Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors (CZT) for X-ray and gamma-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanov, V.T.; Pantazis, J.A.; Huber, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) became one of the most promising room temperature semiconductor detectors. Although significant progress has been made in the growth and characterization of CZT crystals, the energy resolution of CZT detectors at room temperature is still limited by leakage current and the charge transport effects. To optimize the performance of the room temperature CZT detectors a compromise should be made when selecting the shaping time constant of the spectroscopy amplifier. A short shaping time constant reduces leakage current fluctuations. However, the short pulse shapes are more sensitive to ballistic deficit and charge collection fluctuations. In addition, when short shaping time constants are used, the charge sensitive preamplifier noise limits the energy resolution, especially when low energy X-rays are detected. It is therefore important to reduce the leakage current of the detector and to keep the preamplifier noise as low as possible. One way to do this is to cool the detector, the front stage, and the feedback components of the preamplifier. This paper describes a compact, thermoelectrically-cooled radiation detector using a CZT crystal, designated the XR-100T-CZT. (J.P.N.)

  18. Diagnostic performance of a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera system assessed using fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Chikamori, Taishiro; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hida, Satoshi; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Ogawa, Masashi; Shiba, Chie; Usui, Yasuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Although the novel cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera system provides excellent image quality, its diagnostic value using thallium-201 as assessed on coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) has not been validated. METHODS AND RESULTS: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the CZT ultrafast camera system (Discovery NM 530c), 95 patients underwent stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and then CAG within 3 months. Image acquisition was performed in the supine and prone positions after stress for 5 and 3 min, respectively, and in the supine position at rest for 10 min. Significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or a lesion with <90% and ≥50% stenosis and FFR ≤0.75. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 90%, 64%, and 78% for left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis, 78%, 84%, and 81% for left circumflex stenosis, and 83%, 47%, and 60% for right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis. The combination of prone and supine imaging had a higher specificity for RCA disease than supine imaging alone (65% vs. 47%), with an improvement in accuracy from 60% to 72%. Using thallium-201 with short acquisition time, combined with prone imaging, CZT SPECT had a high diagnostic yield in detecting significant coronary stenosis as assessed using FFR.

  19. Conventional X-ray fluorescence camera with a cadmium-telluride detector and its application to cancer diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Toshiyuki [3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Eiichi, E-mail: dresato@iwate-med.ac.j [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba 028-3694 (Japan); Abderyim, Purkhet [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba 028-3694 (Japan); Abudurexiti, Abulajiang [Faculty of Software and Information Science, Iwate Prefectural University, 152-52 Sugo, Takizawa 020-0193 (Japan); Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro [3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Shigehiro [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-0023 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-0023 (Japan); Onagawa, Jun [Department of Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Chuo, Tagajo, Miyagi 985-8537 (Japan)

    2011-04-11

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is useful for mapping various molecules in objects. Bremsstrahlung X-rays are selected using a 3.0-mm-thick aluminum filter, and these rays are absorbed by iodine, cerium, and gadolinium molecules in objects. Next, XRF is produced from the objects, and photons are detected by a cadmium-telluride detector. The K{alpha} photons are discriminated using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. The objects are moved and scanned by an x-y stage in conjunction with a two-stage controller, and X-ray images obtained by molecular mapping are shown on a personal computer monitor. The scan steps of x and y axes were both 2.5 mm, and the photon-counting time per mapping point was 0.5 s. We carried out molecular mapping using the X-ray camera, and K{alpha} photons from cerium and gadolinium molecules were produced from cancerous regions in nude mice.

  20. Mechanistic study of the accelerated crucible rotation technique applied to vertical Bridgman growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divecha, Mia S.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2017-08-01

    With cadmium zinc telluride's (CZT) success as a gamma and x-ray detector material, there is need for high-quality, monocrystalline CZT in large volumes. Bridgman and gradient freeze growth methods have consistently produced material containing significant amounts of micron-sized, tellurium-rich inclusions, which are detrimental to device performance. These inclusions are believed to arise from a morphological instability of the growth interface driven by constitutional undercooling. Repeatedly rotating the crucible back and forth via the accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) has been shown to reduce the size and number of inclusions. Via numerical techniques, we analyze the impact of two different applied temperature gradients, 10 K/cm and 30 K/cm, on the flow, temperature, tellurium distribution, and undercooling during growth with and without applied ACRT. Under growth without rotation, a higher axial thermal gradient results in stronger thermal-buoyancy driven flows, faster interface growth velocity, greater tellurium segregation, and stronger undercooling. ACRT improves the stability of the growth interfaces for both systems; however, contrary to conventional wisdom, the case of the shallow thermal gradient is predicted to exhibit a more stable growth interface, which may result in fewer inclusions and higher quality material.

  1. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  2. Cadmium, lead and mercury exposure in non smoking pregnant women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinwood, A.L., E-mail: a.hinwood@ecu.edu.au [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Callan, A.C.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Heyworth, J. [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McCafferty, P. [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia); Odland, J.Ø. [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2013-10-15

    Recent literature suggests that exposure to low concentrations of heavy metals may affect both maternal and child health. This study aimed to determine the biological heavy metals concentrations of pregnant women as well as environmental and dietary factors that may influence exposure concentrations. One hundred and seventy three pregnant women were recruited from Western Australia, each providing a sample of blood, first morning void urine, residential soil, dust and drinking water samples. Participants also completed a questionnaire which included a food frequency component. All biological and environmental samples were analysed for heavy metals using ICP-MS. Biological and environmental concentrations of lead and mercury were generally low (Median Pb Drinking Water (DW) 0.04 µg/L; Pb soil <3.0 µg/g; Pb dust 16.5 µg/g; Pb blood 3.67 µg/L; Pb urine 0.55; µg/L Hg DW <0.03; Hg soil <1.0 µg/g; Hg dust <1.0 µg/g; Hg blood 0.46 µg/L; Hg urine <0.40 µg/L). Cadmium concentrations were low in environmental samples (Median CdDW 0.02 µg/L; Cdsoil <0.30 ug/g; Cddust <0.30) but elevated in urine samples (Median 0.55 µg/L, creatinine corrected 0.70 µg/g (range <0.2–7.06 µg/g creatinine) compared with other studies of pregnant women. Predictors of increased biological metals concentrations in regression models for blood cadmium were residing in the Great Southern region of Western Australia and not using iron/folic acid supplements and for urinary cadmium was having lower household annual income. However, these factors explained little of the variation in respective biological metals concentrations. The importance of establishing factors that influence low human exposure concentrations is becoming critical in efforts to reduce exposures and hence the potential for adverse health effects. -- Highlights: • Biological heavy metals concentrations in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. • Exposure assessment including environmental, lifestyle and activity

  3. Cadmium, lead and mercury exposure in non smoking pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinwood, A.L.; Callan, A.C.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M.; Heyworth, J.; McCafferty, P.; Odland, J.Ø.

    2013-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that exposure to low concentrations of heavy metals may affect both maternal and child health. This study aimed to determine the biological heavy metals concentrations of pregnant women as well as environmental and dietary factors that may influence exposure concentrations. One hundred and seventy three pregnant women were recruited from Western Australia, each providing a sample of blood, first morning void urine, residential soil, dust and drinking water samples. Participants also completed a questionnaire which included a food frequency component. All biological and environmental samples were analysed for heavy metals using ICP-MS. Biological and environmental concentrations of lead and mercury were generally low (Median Pb Drinking Water (DW) 0.04 µg/L; Pb soil <3.0 µg/g; Pb dust 16.5 µg/g; Pb blood 3.67 µg/L; Pb urine 0.55; µg/L Hg DW <0.03; Hg soil <1.0 µg/g; Hg dust <1.0 µg/g; Hg blood 0.46 µg/L; Hg urine <0.40 µg/L). Cadmium concentrations were low in environmental samples (Median CdDW 0.02 µg/L; Cdsoil <0.30 ug/g; Cddust <0.30) but elevated in urine samples (Median 0.55 µg/L, creatinine corrected 0.70 µg/g (range <0.2–7.06 µg/g creatinine) compared with other studies of pregnant women. Predictors of increased biological metals concentrations in regression models for blood cadmium were residing in the Great Southern region of Western Australia and not using iron/folic acid supplements and for urinary cadmium was having lower household annual income. However, these factors explained little of the variation in respective biological metals concentrations. The importance of establishing factors that influence low human exposure concentrations is becoming critical in efforts to reduce exposures and hence the potential for adverse health effects. -- Highlights: • Biological heavy metals concentrations in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. • Exposure assessment including environmental, lifestyle and activity

  4. Occupational and Community Exposures to Toxic Metals: Lead, Cadmium, Mercury and Arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Landrigan, Philip J.

    1982-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are widely dispersed in the environment. Adults are primarily exposed to these contaminants in the workplace. Children may be exposed to toxic metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food.

  5. Selenium protection against toxicity from cadmium and mercury studied at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, U; Danersund, A; Lindvall, A

    1996-02-01

    Interaction between selenium and the heavy metals cadmium and mercury was studied in an experimental rat model (Sprague-Dawley). The rats were administered either one single trace element or combinations of selenium and cadmium as well as selenium and mercury. Salts of these trace elements were administered intraperitoneally daily during thirty days. Thereafter the animals were sacrificed and kidneys and livers excised rapidly. Thin sections were produced by a cryotome and subsequently freeze-dried. Nuclear microscopy of the sections showed that in the combination groups there was a co-localization of selenium and the heavy metals. None of the expected pathological signs of cadmium and mercury toxicity were observed. The conclusion was that selenium exerted a protective effect against the toxicity of cadmium and mercury through mechanisms still to be unveiled.

  6. Complexes of zinc, cadmium and mercury with some schiff bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallomi, I. J.; Al-Shaheen, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    Two type of complexes with different stoichiometries were isolated for zinc (II), cadmium(II) and mercury (II). These complexes having the general formulate [M (H 2 L)] X 2 and [M(L)] (where H 2 L and L represent the neutral and dibasic from of the ligand derived from the condensation of benzoin with o-phenylene diamine and X 2 CI - or NO 3 - ) were prepared by the reaction of the mentioned metal salts with the ligand in both neutral and alkaline solutions. Characterization of the complexes was carried out by analytical, spectral and physical studies. In type I complexes, the ligand coordinates through both azomethine nitrogen and alcohlic oxygen atoms acting as neutral tetradentate. For type II complexes, the coordination occurs through both azomethine nitrogen and deprotonated alcoholic oxygen atoms, for which the ligand acts as dibasic tetradentate. In all complexes, the metal ions are tetracoordinated with the most probable tetrahedral geometry (author). 17 refs.; 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. Effect of zinc, cadmium and mercury salts on the growth of Lactic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savel, J.; Prokopova, M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of zinc, cadmium, and mercury salts on the growth of lactic bacteria. The organisms used in the study were Pediococcus and Lactobacillus. Both organisms were equally sensitive to mercury. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of Cadmium chloride were 200-1400 mg/l for the Lactobacillus and 1.6-200 mg/l for Pediococcus. The inhibitory effects of zinc salts were similar but occurred at much higher concentrations. 5 tables.

  8. Leaching of cadmium and tellurium from cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film solar panels under simulated landfill conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Wilkening, Jean V.; Field, James A.; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2017-01-01

    A crushed non-encapsulated CdTe thin-film solar cell was subjected to two standardized batch leaching tests (i.e., Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and California Waste Extraction Test (WET)) and to a continuous-flow column test to assess cadmium (Cd) and tellurium (Te) dissolution under conditions simulating the acidic- and the methanogenic phases of municipal solid waste landfills. Low levels of Cd and Te were solubilized in both batch leaching tests (leaching behavior of CdTe in the columns is related to different aqueous pH and redox conditions promoted by the microbial communities in the columns, and is in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. PMID:28472709

  9. Critical loads of Cadmium, Lead and Mercury and their exceedances in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettelingh, J.P.; Schutze, G.; Vries, W. de; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Ilyin, I.; Reinds, G.J.; Slootweg, J.; Travnikov, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) are known to be transported over relatively long distances from their sources. Deposited metals may accumulate over time in soils and catchments, and then follow varying pathways to endpoints in humans and the environment. Cadmium and lead, that are emitted

  10. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging with a cadmium-telluride semiconductor detector gamma camera in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Kawaguchi, Tsuneaki; Maruyama, Takatoshi; Kawasaki, Yoshiyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Since myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with conventional sodium iodine (NaI) device has low spatial resolution, there have been some cases in which small structures such as non-transmural myocardial infarction could not be properly detected. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential usefulness of cadmium-telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector-based high spatial resolution gamma cameras in detecting myocardial infarction sites, especially non-transmural infarction. A total of 38 patients (mean age ± SD: 64 ± 21 year) who were clinically diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction were included. Twenty-eight cases of them were with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 10 cases with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). In all patients, myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography images were acquired with Infinia (NaI device) and R1-M (CdTe device), and the images were compared concerning the detectability of acute myocardial infarction sites. The detection rates of the myocardial infarction site in cases with STEMI were 100% both by NaI and CdTe images. In cases with NSTEMI, detection rate by NaI images was 50%, while that of CdTe images was 100% (p=0.033). The summed rest score (SRS) value derived from CdTe images was significantly higher than that from NaI images in cases with STEMI [NaI images: 12 (7-18) versus CdTe images: 14 (9-20)] (p < 0.001). SRS derived from CdTe images was significantly higher than that derived from NaI images in cases with NSTEMI [NaI images: 2 (0-5) versus CdTe images: 6 (6-8)] (p=0.006). These results indicate that MPI using CdTe-semiconductor device will provide a much more accurate assessment of acute myocardial infarction in comparison to current methods. (author)

  11. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Fourquet, Nicolas [Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique [AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); INSERM U 773 Inserm and Denis Diderot University, Paris (France); Koehl, Gregoire; Roch, Veronique [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Imbert, Laetitia [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Centre Alexis Vautrin, Department of Radiotherapy, Vandoeuvre (France); Poussier, Sylvain [INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Fay, Renaud [INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique CIC-P 9501, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM U961, Nancy (France); Hopital de Brabois, CHU-Nancy, Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-03-15

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving {sup 201}Tl (n = 120) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, {sup 201}Tl 92 %, {sup 99m}Tc-Low 86 %, {sup 99m}Tc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p < 0.001). This larger extent was mainly observed in 50 obese patients who were in the {sup 201}Tl or {sup 99m}Tc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 {+-} 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 {+-} 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  12. Cadmium, mercury and selenium concentrations in mink (Mustela vison) from Yukon, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamberg, Mary [Gamberg Consulting, Box 10460, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 7A1 (Canada)]. E-mail: mary.gamberg@northwestel.net; Boila, Gail [Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N6 (Canada); Stern, Gary [Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N6 (Canada); Roach, Patrick [Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Suite 300, 300 Main Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5 (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Mercury (total and methyl), cadmium and selenium concentrations were measured in liver, kidney and brain tissue from mink trapped from the Yukon Territory from 2001-2002. None of these metals was found at levels of toxicological concern. Total mercury averaged 0.66, 0.92 and 0.22 {mu}g g{sup -1} in mink kidney, liver and brain tissue respectively, while methyl mercury averaged 0.77, 0.85 and 0.21 {mu}g g{sup -1} in the same tissues. Selenium averaged 2.07, 1.40 and 0.39 {mu}g g{sup -1} in mink kidney, liver and brain tissue, while cadmium was only measured in kidneys and averaged 0.22 {mu}g g{sup -1}. All element concentrations are presented on a wet weight basis. Concentrations of total mercury in all tissues were significantly higher in female than male mink, possibly reflecting proportionally greater food consumption by the smaller females. Total mercury concentrations were inversely related to the proportion of mercury present as methylmercury, and positively related to concentrations of selenium, consistent with increasing demethylation of methylmercury, and the formation of mercuric selenide as total concentrations of mercury increased. This relationship was seen most strongly in mink liver, less so in kidneys and not at all in brains where most of the mercury was maintained in the methyl form. There did not appear to be any geographical areas in which mink had obviously higher concentrations of mercury, and there was frequently a relatively large range of mercury levels found in mink from a given trapline. Mink diet may be a factor in this variation. Local environmental levels of cadmium were not reflected in cadmium concentrations in mink tissues. Mercury, cadmium and selenium do not appear to constitute environmental hazards to mink in the Yukon.

  13. Carrier Transport, Recombination, and the Effects of Grain Boundaries in Polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride Thin Films for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Mohit

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), a chalcogenide semiconductor, is currently used as the absorber layer in one of the highest efficiency thin film solar cell technologies. Current efficiency records are over 22%. In 2011, CdTe solar cells accounted for 8% of all solar cells installed. This is because, in part, CdTe has a low degradation rate, high optical absorption coefficient, and high tolerance to intrinsic defects. Solar cells based on polycrystalline CdTe exhibit a higher short-circuit current, fill factor, and power conversion efficiency than their single crystal counterparts. This is despite the fact that polycrystalline CdTe devices exhibit lower open-circuit voltages. This is contrary to the observation for silicon and III-V semiconductors, where material defects cause a dramatic drop in device performance. For example, grain boundaries in covalently-bonded semiconductors (a) act as carrier recombination centers, and (b) lead to localized energy states, causing carrier trapping. Despite significant research to date, the mechanism responsible for the superior current collection properties of polycrystalline CdTe solar cells has not been conclusively answered. This dissertation focuses on the macro-scale electronic band structure, and micro scale electronic properties of grains and grain boundaries in device-grade CdTe thin films to answer this open question. My research utilized a variety of experimental techniques. Samples were obtained from leading groups fabricating the material and devices. A CdCl 2 anneal is commonly performed as part of this fabrication and its effects were also investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed to study the band structure and defect states in CdTe polycrystals. Cadmium vacancy- and chlorine-related states lead to carrier recombination, as in CdTe films grown by other methods. Comparing polycrystalline and single crystal CdTe, showed that the key to explaining the improved performance of polycrystalline CdTe does

  14. Growth rate and properties of cadmium telluride heteroepitaxy films during plasmochemical deposition from organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyushis, T.I.; Vasilevskij, M.I.; Gurylev, B.V.; Ershov, S.N.; Ozerov, A.B.; Parker, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The results of studying the peculiarities of growth and properties of CdTe films grown by precipitation from organometallic compound (OMC) vapors in the inductive high-frequency (HF) discharge, are given. The effect on the growth process of such parameters as substrate temperature, discarge characteristics, the correlation of partial component pressures, is studied. The epitaxial growth is observed starting from a certain threshold value of HF-power connected to the inductor up to T ≅ 150 deg C. The films of stoichiometric composition are prepared with the correlation of partial pressures of tellurium and cadmium OMC equalling 1.5. The temperature dependence of growth rate is anomalous for the gas phase epitaxy and is comparable with that usually observed during molecular-beam epitaxy

  15. Leaching of cadmium and tellurium from cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film solar panels under simulated landfill conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Wilkening, Jean V; Field, James A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2017-08-15

    A crushed non-encapsulated CdTe thin-film solar cell was subjected to two standardized batch leaching tests (i.e., Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and California Waste Extraction Test (WET)) and to a continuous-flow column test to assess cadmium (Cd) and tellurium (Te) dissolution under conditions simulating the acidic- and the methanogenic phases of municipal solid waste landfills. Low levels of Cd and Te were solubilized in both batch leaching tests (<8.2% and <3.6% of added Cd and Te, respectively). On the other hand, over the course of 30days, 73% of the Cd and 21% of the Te were released to the synthetic leachate of a continuous-flow column simulating the acidic landfill phase. The dissolved Cd concentration was 3.24-fold higher than the TCLP limit (1mgL -1 ), and 650-fold higher than the maximum contaminant level established by the US-EPA for this metal in drinking water (0.005mgL -1 ). In contrast, the release of Cd and Te to the effluent of the continuous-flow column simulating the methanogenic phase of a landfill was negligible. The remarkable difference in the leaching behavior of CdTe in the columns is related to different aqueous pH and redox conditions promoted by the microbial communities in the columns, and is in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Calculation of critical loads for cadmium, lead and mercury; background document to a mapping manual on critical loads of cadmium, lead and mercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Schütze, G.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Meili, M.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.; Groenenberg, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    This report on heavy metals provides up-to-date methodologies to derive critical loads for the heavy metals cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) for both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. It presents background information to a Manual on Critical Loads for those metals. Focus is given to the

  17. Influence of proton-pump inhibitors on stomach wall uptake of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouden, Mohamed; Rijkee, Karlijn S; Schreuder, Nanno; Timmer, Jorik R; Jager, Pieter L

    2015-02-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) induce potentially interfering stomach wall activity in single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-sestamibi. However, no data are available for (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin. We assessed the influence of prolonged (>2 weeks) PPI use on the stomach wall uptake of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in patients referred for stress MPI with a cadmium-zinc-telluride-based SPECT camera and its relation with dyspepsia symptoms. Consecutive patients (n=127) underwent a 1-day adenosine stress-first SPECT-MPI with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, of whom 54 (43%) patients had been on PPIs for more than 2 weeks. Stomach wall activity was identified on stress SPECT using computed tomographic attenuation maps and was scored using a four-point grading scale into clinically relevant (scores 2 or 3) or nonrelevant (scores 0 or 1).Patients on PPIs had stomach wall uptake more frequently as compared with patients not using PPIs (22 vs. 7%, P=0.017). Dyspepsia was similar in both groups. Prolonged use of PPIs is associated with stomach wall uptake of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in stress cadmium-zinc-telluride-SPECT images. Gastric symptoms were not associated with stomach wall uptake.

  18. Effect of Gallium Doping on the Characteristic Properties of Polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, A. A.; Dharmadasa, I. M.

    2017-08-01

    Ga-doped CdTe polycrystalline thin films were successfully electrodeposited on glass/fluorine doped tin oxide substrates from aqueous electrolytes containing cadmium nitrate (Cd(NO3)2·4H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2). The effects of different Ga-doping concentrations on the CdTe:Ga coupled with different post-growth treatments were studied by analysing the structural, optical, morphological and electronic properties of the deposited layers using x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, photoelectrochemical cell measurement and direct-current conductivity test respectively. XRD results show diminishing (111)C CdTe peak above 20 ppm Ga-doping and the appearance of (301)M GaTe diffraction above 50 ppm Ga-doping indicating the formation of two phases; CdTe and GaTe. Although, reductions in the absorption edge slopes were observed above 20 ppm Ga-doping for the as-deposited CdTe:Ga layer, no obvious influence on the energy gap of CdTe films with Ga-doping were detected. Morphologically, reductions in grain size were observed at 50 ppm Ga-doping and above with high pinhole density within the layer. For the as-deposited CdTe:Ga layers, conduction type change from n- to p- were observed at 50 ppm, while the n-type conductivity were retained after post-growth treatment. Highest conductivity was observed at 20 ppm Ga-doping of CdTe. These results are systematically reported in this paper.

  19. Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) nanowire sensors for detection of low energy gamma-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, T.; Raja, K. S.; Misra, M.

    2008-04-01

    Bulk single crystals of CdZnTe compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection in commercial radiation sensors. A large volume of detector material with low defect density is required for increasing the detection efficiency. Manufacture of such a bulky detector-quality material with low defect density is expensive. In this communication, synthesis of nanowires arrays of CdZnTe that can be used for detecting low energy radiation is reported for the first time. CdZnTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO II nanotubular template in non-aqueous electrolytes using a pulse-reverse process at 130 °C. Very high electrical resistivity of the CZT nanowires (in the order of 10 10 Ω-cm) was obtained. Such a high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were impressed with different bias potentials. The leakage current was in the order of tens of PicoAmperes. When exposed to a radiation source (Am -241, 60 keV), the current flow in the circuit increased. The preliminary results indicate that the CZT nanowire arrays can be used as radiation detector materials at room temperature with a much low bias potential (0.7 - 2.3 V) as against 300 - 500 V applied to the bulk detector materials.

  20. Selective extraction of trace mercury and cadmium from drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Jianlong; Yun, Guichun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new alternative method, i.e., selective extraction by weakly basic anion exchange resin, has been developed for the removal of trace cadmium and mercury ions from drinking water sources. The mechanism of heavy metal removal is based on selective extraction as the results of LEWIS-base-acid interactions. Transfer of trace mercury species from liquid to resin phase coincides well with the performance of film diffusion. The results demonstrated that the presence of chlorine has a negligible influence on the removal of mercury. However, humic acids can strongly bind mercury by the formation of complex compounds and therefore become the obstacle in the diffusion progress. At neutral or base pH, the resin material exhibits the favorable uptake of heavy metals. In filter experiments, the studied resin material offers favorable properties in the selective extraction of trace mercury and cadmium.

  1. The determination of levels of mercury, cadmium and lead in water samples from Naivasha area, Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muigai, P.G.; Kamau, G.N.; Kinyua, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of mercury, cadmium and lead in water samples from different environments (Lake Naivasha, River Malewa boreholes and Olkaria geothermal wells) in Naivasha region and their possible origins are reported. The levels of mercury and lead in the water samples were above the maximum permissible limits of 0.005 mg/1 and 0.1 mg/1 respectively, as stipulated by the WHO. On the other hand, 83.3% of the samples had cadmium levels above the maximum permissible limit of 0.01mg/1 in drinking water by WHO. The mercury and lead levels were also higher than those previously obtained from different regions of Kenya, while those for cadmium were within the corresponding range. Possible sources of elevated values were the geology of the surrounding area, sewage treatment works, use of phosphate rock fertilizers and lead fuels.(author)

  2. Hall effect and photoconductivity lifetime studies of gallium nitride, indium nitride, and mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Craig H.

    A deep understanding of both carrier recombination and transport is necessary for semiconductor engineering, particularly in defining the ultimate limits of performance for a given device before spending the resources to perfect its fabrication. Hall effect measurements utilizing a variable magnetic field are necessary to discriminate between conduction in epitaxial layers and conduction originating at the surface or at an interfacial layer. For thick hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) grown GaN, variable field Hall measurements revealed the presence of small but significant lower mobility surface and interface electrons which would otherwise lead to errors in interpreting the electrical properties. In addition, QMSA analysis of the measurements indicates that thick GaN samples contain a large spread in electron mobility values, most likely with depth. For molecular beam epitaxial InN, it was found that electrical measurements are affected by surface charge conduction, as well as the non-uniformity of mobility and carrier concentration with depth. Both of these effects mask the surprisingly high quality of the material close to the surface. Photoconductance lifetime and variable-magnetic-field Hall and transient measurements were performed on a series of undoped, In-doped and As-doped HgCdTe grown by MBE and MOCVD. N-type layers often significantly influence the interpretation of the electrical measurements. Even the best Low Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) n-type material still appears to be dominated by defect-related recombination, as intrinsic lifetimes calculated with full band structure can be well above those measured. Mid-Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) lifetimes increase somewhat with carrier concentration, as if the n-type doping process were passivating Schockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. P-type MWIR films lie mainly below the predicted values, and their relationship between concentration and lifetime is essentially unchanged by growth technique, indicating that a fundamental native defect is responsible for the recombination. Those with lifetimes above the predicted values have anomalous temperature dependences when measured, and often a non-exponential photoconductive decay characteristic of minority carrier traps. Deep level trap concentrations in GaN can harm performance in many desired applications. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) measurement on MBE GaN suggest that the trapping center concentration drops with temperature below 770°C.

  3. Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) thin films fabricated by close spaced sublimation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, M.A.; Basharat, M.; Ali, A.; Shah, N.A.; Maqsood, A.

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of HgCdTe were fabricated by deposition of HgTe on the CdTe thin film substrates. Both depositions were carried out through close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. The structural investigation performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the deposited films exhibit a polycrystalline structure with large number of sharp grain boundaries. The samples were then characterized optically to determine the refractive index. Absorption coefficient and the optical band gaps. The estimated band gap decreased, typically from 1.46 to 1.43 Ev as Hg content in the films increased from 1.41 to 3.29-wt. the deposited films showed high value of resistivity. Which decreased with increasing temperature showing the semiconducting behavior of the films. The prepared films gave response to infrared radiation. (author)

  4. Investigation of the Internal Electric Field in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors Using the Pockels Effect and the Analysis of Charge Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Michael; Krawczynski, Henic; Garson, Alfred, III; Martin, Jerrad W.; Lee, Kuen; Li, Qiang; Beilicke, Matthias; Cui, Yunlong; Buliga, Vladimir; Guo, Mingsheng; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Pockels electro-optic effect can be used to investigate the internal electric field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) single crystals that are used to fabricate room temperature x and gamma radiation detectors. An agreement is found between the electric field mapping obtained from Pockels effect images and the measurements of charge transients generated by alpha particles. The Pockels effect images of a CZT detector along two mutually perpendicular directions are used to optimize the detector response in a dual anode configuration, a device in which the symmetry of the internal electric field with respect to the anode strips is of critical importance. The Pockels effect is also used to map the electric field in a CZT detector with dual anodes and an attempt is made to find a correlation with the simulated electric potential in such detectors. Finally, the stress-induced birefringence effects seen in the Pockels images are presented and discussed.

  5. and Cadmium Zinc Telluride

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    ABSTRACT. In this study, the structural and electronic properties of CdnTen and Cd(n−m)ZnmTen clusters have been studied using the plane wave based density functional theory (DFT). The QUANTUM. ESPRESSO/PWSCF package employing the local density approximation (LDA) for the exchange correlation potential is ...

  6. Mercury, cadmium, lead and selenium content of mushroom species belonging to the genus Agaricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stijve, T.; Besson, R.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of the mushroom genus Agaricus were collected in areas strongly influenced by human activities, lawns, gardens, parks, etc., and analyzed for mercury methylmercury, selenium, cadmium, and lead. The rate of accumulation of selenium was enormous, but not the maximum possible. Boletus edulis had a concentration factor of approximately 600. The mechanism by which the elements are accumulated is still obsure, but it appears probable that mercury is chelated by reaction with the sulfhydryl groups of protein. It also seems that mercury and selenium concentrations in these fungi are closely related to the methionine fraction. (JTE)

  7. Critical loads of cadmium, lead and mercury and their exceedances in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettelingh, J.P.; Schütze, G.; Vries, de W.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Ilyin, I.; Reinds, G.J.; Slootweg, J.; Travnikov, O.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter information is summarized on the assessment of the risk of impacts of cadmium, lead and mercury emissions and related depositions of these metals, with an emphasis on natural areas in Europe. Depositions are compared to critical loads to identify areas in Europe where critical loads

  8. European Critical Loads of Cadmium, Lead and Mercury and their Exceedances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, J.; Hettelingh, J.P.; Posch, M.; Schutze, G.; Spranger, T.; Vries, de W.; Reinds, G.J.; Zelfde, van 't M.; Dutchak, S.; Ilyin, I.

    2007-01-01

    Critical loads of cadmium, lead and mercury were computed by 18 countries of the LRTAP Convention. These national data were collated into a single database for the purpose of identifying sensitive areas in Europe. Computing exceedances, i.e. comparing the critical loads to atmospheric deposition,

  9. Mushroom contamination by mercury, cadmium and lead; Contaminazione di funghi commestibili con mercurio, cadmio e piombo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojmi Di Delupis, G.; Dojmi Di Delupis, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Comparata ed Ecotossicologia

    1996-12-01

    Occurrence and bioaccumulation of mercury, cadmium and lead were found in mushrooms by various researchers. Such mushrooms were often found in polluted areas. Pollution was mainly caused by industrial or mining plants, by some agricultural treatments and by road traffic. Considerations and recommendations concerning food consumption are made.

  10. Photocurrent spectroscopy of cadmium sulfide/plastic, cadmium sulfide/glass, and zinc telluride/gallium arsenide hetero-pairs formed with pulsed-laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Krishna Prasad

    This dissertation presents photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy of thin-film cadmium sulfide (CdS) on plastic, CdS on glass, and zinc telluride (ZnTe) on gallium arsenide (GaAs) hetero-pairs. All samples have been prepared with pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) and the thesis is organized into three principal sections. The first section presents the PLD essentials and characterization of CdS thin films on transparent plastic substrates. The second part focuses on the exploitation of CdS films on glass to quench or modulate alternating photocurrent (APC) by additional constant blue light illumination. Finally, PC spectra modification of n-GaAs due to ZnTe PLD will be investigated. First, the merger of a transparent plastic substrate with thin-film CdS for photonic application was realized using low-temperature PLD, where low-temperature PLD means the substrates were not externally heated. Although plastic is not considered to be a favored substrate material for semiconductor thin-film formation, the deposited CdS film possessed good adhesion to the plastic substrates and showed a blue-shifted photosensitivity with peak at 2.54 eV. The CdS deposition rate was monitored at different laser fluences and the maximum rate was found at 2.68 J/cm2. The visualization of the surface using an atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed its mosaic structure and electron probe microanalysis showed that target composition was maintained in the film. The study of thickness distribution revealed that the film deposition area is significantly increased with increase in laser fluence. The achieved results demonstrate the capability of PLD to form novel heterostructures with appealing and useful technological properties such as plasticity and low weight. In the second part, APC control via blue light illumination employing thin-film PLD CdS on a glass is introduced. In fact, the APC driven through the CdS film in conjunction with bias was quenched when the sample was additionally illuminated with a

  11. Accumulation of mercury and cadmium in rice from paddy soil near a mercury mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W C; Ouyang, Y; Ye, Z H

    2014-11-01

    Paddy soil and rice (Oryza sativa L.) in the Wanshan mining area in Guizhou Province, China, have been contaminated by toxic trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg). The present study examined correlations between the types and physicochemical parameters of the soil and the contents of trace metals and the different forms of Hg in rice. The health risks of consuming contaminated rice from the Wanshan mining area were also assessed. Sequential extraction procedures were used to investigate the chemical behavior of Hg in the soil. The results showed that Hg and Cd were the most abundant trace metals in the Wanshan mining area. The toxic methylmercury (MeHg) content was substantial in brown rice, and the total amounts of total Hg (THg), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-Hg, and water-soluble Hg varied in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils. An antagonistic interaction between Mn in brown rice, straw, and husk and MeHg in brown rice was also shown. An analysis of calculated dietary intake, target hazard quotients, and hazard indexes showed a potential risk of transferring Hg, MeHg, and Cd to humans when rice from the Wanshan mining area is consumed. Therefore, it must be concluded that consuming contaminated rice near the Wanshan mining area is a potential threat to human health. © 2014 SETAC.

  12. Analysis on the structural, vibrational and defect states of chlorine treated polycrystalline cadmium telluride structures grown by e-beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Sidra; Mukherjee, Souvik; Jung, Hyeson; Stroscio, Michael A; Dutta, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements are performed in order to study the defect states in cadmium chloride treated polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films grown by e-beam evaporation technique. Three luminescence bands are observed including a double peak emission at 1.577 eV and 1.573 eV corresponding to free electron-to- acceptor transition and a donor–acceptor pair (DAP) transition, respectively, along with a broad peak at 1.45 eV. This broad band emission is related to A-center chlorine based complex and also includes longitudinal (LO) phonon emission lines for CdTe spaced by ∼21 meV. Investigation into grain sizes revealed grains of 0.2 μm for as-grown films and ∼2–3 μm for chlorine activated films shown by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman analysis indicates that the films have been grown with excess of Te leading to p-type conductivity in the structure, whereas LO phonon mode of polycrystalline CdTe reveals quasi phonon modes nature. (paper)

  13. Determination of mercury, lead and cadmium in water by the CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry with solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Y.B.; Won, M.S.; Kim, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The method of CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometer with solvent extraction for the determination of mercury, lead and cadmium in water was studied. The optimum extracting conditions for CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry were the following: the complexes of mercury, lead and cadmium with dithizone were separated from the aqueous solution and concentrated into the 10 ml chloroform solution. Back extraction was performed; the concentrated mercury, lead and cadmium was extracted from the chloroform solution into the 10 ml 6-normal aqueous hydrochloric acid solution. In this case, recovery ratios were the following: mercury was 94.7%, lead 97.7% and cadmium 103.6%. The optimum operating conditions for the determination of mercury, lead and cadmium by the CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry also were investigated to test the dry step, ash step and atomization step for each metal. The experimental results of standard addition method were the following: the determination limit of each metal within 6% relative deviation was that lead was 0.04 ppb, and cadmium 0.01 ppb. Especially, mercury has been known impossible to determine by CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometry until now. But in this study, mercury can be determined with CRA-atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Its determination limit was 4 ppb within 8% relative deviation. (author)

  14. Cadmium telluride quantum dots cause oxidative stress leading to extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Kathy C.; Willmore, William G.; Tayabali, Azam F.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity related to human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell exposures to cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) were investigated. CdTe-QDs caused cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treated cells showed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Altered antioxidant levels were demonstrated by depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), a decreased ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and an increased NF-E2-related Factor 2 (Nrf2) activation. Enzyme assays showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was elevated whereas catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were depressed. Further analyses revealed that CdTe-QD exposure resulted in apoptosis, indicated by changes in levels of caspase-3 activity, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage and phosphatidylserine externalization. Extrinsic apoptotic pathway markers such as Fas levels and caspase-8 activity increased as a result of CdTe-QD exposure. Involvement of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was indicated by decreased levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) protein and mitochondrial cytochrome c, and by increased levels of mitochondrial Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and cytosolic cytochrome c. Further, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk1/2), and p38 were all activated. Our findings reveal that CdTe-QDs cause oxidative stress, interfere with antioxidant defenses and activate protein kinases, leading to apoptosis via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Since the effects of CdTe-QDs on selected biomarkers were similar or greater compared to those of CdCl 2 at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, the study suggests that the toxicity of CdTe-QDs arises from a combination of the effects of cadmium and ROS generated from the NPs

  15. Nanolithography on mercury telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, Mathias Josef

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators belong to a new quantum state of matter that is currently one of the most recognized research fields in condensed matter physics. Strained bulk HgTe and HgTe/HgCdTe quantum well structures are currently one of few topological insulator material systems suitable to be studied in transport experiments. In addition HgTe quantum wells provide excellent requirements for the conduction of spintronic experiments. A fundamental requirement for most experiments, however, is to reliably pattern these heterostructures into advanced nano-devices. Nano-lithography on this material system proves to be challenging because of inherent temperature limitations, its high reactivity with various metals and due to its properties as a topological insulator. The current work gives an insight into why many established semiconductor lithography processes cannot be easily transferred to HgTe while providing alternative solutions. The presented developments include novel ohmic contacts, the prevention of metal sidewalls and redeposition fences in combination with low temperature (80 C) lithography and an adapted hardmask lithography process utilizing a sacrificial layer. In addition we demonstrate high resolution low energy (2.5 kV) electron beam lithography and present an alternative airbridge gating technique. The feasibility of nano-structures on HgTe quantum wells is exemplarily verified in two separate transport experiments. We are first to realize physically etched quantum point contacts in HgTe/HgCdTe high mobility 2DEGs and to prove their controllability via external top-gate electrodes. So far quantum point contacts have not been reported in TI materials. However, these constrictions are part of many proposals to probe the nature of the helical quantum spin Hall edge channels and are suggested as injector and detector devices for spin polarized currents. To confirm their functionality we performed four-terminal measurements of the point contact conductance as a function of external gate voltage. Our measurements clearly exhibit quantized conductance steps in 2e 2 /h, which is a fundamental characteristic of quantum point contacts. Furthermore we conducted measurements on the formation and control of collimated electron beams, a key feature to realize an all electrical spin-optic device. In a second study several of the newly developed lithography techniques were implemented to produce arrays of nano-wires on inverted and non-inverted HgTe quantum well samples. These devices were used in order to probe and compare the weak antilocalization (WAL) in these structures as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Our measurements reveal that the WAL is almost an order of magnitude larger in inverted samples. This observation is attributed to the Dirac-like dispersion of the energy bands in HgTe quantum wells. The described lithography has already been successfully implemented and adapted in several published studies. All processes have been optimized to guarantee a minimum effect on the heterostructure's properties and the sample surface, which is especially important for probing the topological surface states of strained HgTe bulk layers. Our developments therefore serve as a base for continuous progress to further establish HgTe as a topological insulator and give access to new experiments.

  16. The Determination of Lead, Arsenic, Mercury, Cadmium Contents in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this present study was to measure the contributions of some toxic heavy metals; namely lead, cadmium, arsenic and chromium in some edible fishes of marine origin (seafood) to the overall dietary intake of heavy metals in Ibadan, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The samples under investigation ...

  17. Dielectric properties of some cadmium and mercury amino alcohol complexes at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALAA E. ALI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric properties of some cadmium and mercury amino alcohol complexes were studied within the temperature range of 100–300 K at the frequencies of 100, 300 and 1000 kHz. The polarization mechanisms are suggested and the dependence of both e and tg d on both temperature and frequency are analyzed. The analysis of the data reveals semi-conducting features based mainly on the hopping mechanism.

  18. Test for Acute Toxicity of Copper, Cadmium, and Mercury in Five Marine Species

    OpenAIRE

    PRATO, Ermelinda; BIANDOLINO, Francesca; SCARDICCHIO, Christian

    2006-01-01

    : The acute toxicity of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) to the marine invertebrates Gammarus aequicauda, Corophium insidiosum, Idotea baltica, Sphaeroma serratum, and Mytilus galloprovincialis were evaluated by static bioassays and calculation of the LC50 (lethality concentration for 50%). Hg was more toxic to Gammarus aequicauda, Corophium insidiosum, Idotea baltica, Sphaeroma serratum, and Mytilus galloprovincialis than Cu and Cd. Cu was the least toxic of the metals tested.

  19. Determination of mercury, arsenic and cadmium in fish by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, S.J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Determination of mercury, arsenic and cadmium in fish has been carried out by neutron activation followed by chemical separation to remove the interfering activities of copper, zinc etc. The standard and the samples were counted for 77 keV gamma-rays of 65 hr 197 Hg, 336 keV gamma-rays of 115 In from 53,5 hr 115 Cd (after equilibrium) and 559 keV gamma-rays of 26.4 hr 76 As on a NaI(Tl) crystal in conjunction with a 400-channel pulse-height analyser. The minimum detection limit was one nanogram pro mercury, 15 nanograms for cadmium and one nanogram for arsenic for the total sample volume. The counting errors at the detection limits were around 15%, 9% and 6%, respectively. Some of the common varieties of fish have been analysed and their results are presented. The mean concentrations of mercury, cadmium and arsenic in fish are 43.7 ng/g, 47.3 ng/g and 543.1 ng/g, respectively. Only the edible muscle tissue samples were used for analysis. (T.G.)

  20. Preparation and study of the properties of lead telluride and cadmium telluride diodes for use in nuclear spectrometry; Preparation et etude des proprietes de diodes au tellurure de plomb et au tellurure de cadmium en vue d'une utilisation en spectrometrie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancon, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    This work studies the possibility of using high atomic number compound semiconductors, like lead telluride and cadmium telluride as to realize nuclear radiation detectors, specially in gamma ray spectrometry because of their high absorption coefficient. The problems related to the preparation of binary compounds are exposed. Experiments on PbTe show the influence of the conditions of preparation on the electrical properties of the semiconductor which are greatly dependent on the stoichiometry of the compound. PbTe surface-barrier diodes were realized and have been used to study the surface properties of this semiconductor. These diodes cannot detect nuclear radiations because of the too weak resistivity of our material. Different types of devices made of Cd Te have been studied. One of these diodes has been used as an alpha particle detector. We explain the relative poor performances of that detector by the presence of lattice defects in Cd Te where charge carriers may recombine themselves. By analysing the properties of gold diffused Cd Te diodes we identified this defect, the cadmium vacancy, the presence of which is due to the deviation from stoichiometry during the preparation of the material. (author) [French] Ce travail etudie la possibilite d'utiliser des semiconducteurs composes d'elements a numero atomique eleve, tels que le tellurure de plomb et le tellurure de cadmium pour la realisation de detecteurs de rayonnements nucleaires, grace notamment a la section efficace de capture elevee qu'ils presentent vis-a-vis des rayons gamma. On souligne les problemes relatifs a la preparation des composes binaires. Les experiences realisees sur PbTe mettent en evidence l'influence des conditions de preparation sur les proprietes electriques du semiconducteur qui dependent fortement de la stoechiometrie du compose. Nous avons realise des diodes au PbTe a barriere de surface qui ont permis de preciser les proprietes de surface de ce semiconducteur

  1. Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Denis [CHU Caen and Normandy University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Normandy University, Caen (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, CHU Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); Ben-Haim, Simona [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ramat Gan (Israel); Rouzet, Francois [University Hospital of Paris-Bichat, UMR 1148, Inserm et Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Paris (France); Songy, Bernard [Centre Cardiologique du Nord, Saint-Denis (France); Giordano, Alessandro [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo A. Gemelli, Department of Bioimages and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Hyafil, Fabien [Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Florence (Italy); Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Verberne, Hein J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, Enschede (Netherlands); Lindner, Oliver [Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Collaboration: Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    2016-12-15

    The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient's radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims (1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; (2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally (3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure. (orig.)

  2. Investigation of quad-energy high-rate photon counting for X-ray computed tomography using a cadmium telluride detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Yuichi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2017-12-01

    To obtain four kinds of tomograms at four different X-ray energy ranges simultaneously, we have constructed a quad-energy (QE) X-ray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and microcomputers (MCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses produced using amplifiers are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 33, 50 and 65keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-33, 33-50, 50-65 and 65-100keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. We performed QE computed tomography (QE-CT) at a tube voltage of 100kV. Using a 0.5-mm-diam lead pinhole, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously at four energy ranges. K-edge CT using iodine and gadolinium media was carried out utilizing two energy ranges of 33-50 and 50-65keV, respectively. At a tube voltage of 100kV and a current of 60 μA, the count rate was 15.2 kilocounts per second (kcps), and the minimum count rates after penetrating objects in QE-CT were regulated to approximately 2 kcps by the tube current. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic Performance of a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography System With Low-Dose Technetium-99m as Assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikamori, Taishiro; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Shiba, Chie; Murata, Naotaka; Hoshino, Kou; Hokama, Yohei; Yamashina, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Although stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera facilitates radiation dose reduction, only a few studies have evaluated its diagnostic accuracy in Japanese patients by applying fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. We prospectively evaluated 102 consecutive patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease with a low-dose stress/rest protocol ((99m)Tc radiotracer 185/370 MBq) using CZT SPECT. Within 3 months, coronary angiography was performed and a significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or as a lesion of <90% and ≥ 50% stenosis with FFR ≤0.80. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 75%, and 82% for left anterior descending artery stenosis, 76%, 81%, and 79% for left circumflex artery stenosis, and 87%, 92%, and 90% for right coronary artery stenosis. When limited to 92 intermediate stenotic lesions in which FFR was measured, stress SPECT showed 77% sensitivity, 91% specificity, and 84% accuracy, whereas the diagnostic value decreased to 52% sensitivity, 68% specificity, and 58% accuracy based only on visual estimation of ≥75% diameter narrowing. CZT SPECT demonstrated a good diagnostic yield in detecting hemodynamically significant coronary stenoses as assessed by FFR, even when using a low-dose (99m)Tc protocol with an effective dose ≤5 mSv. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1217-1224).

  4. Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, Denis; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Ben-Haim, Simona; Rouzet, Francois; Songy, Bernard; Giordano, Alessandro; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Sciagra, Roberto; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A.; Lindner, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient's radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims (1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; (2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally (3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure. (orig.)

  5. Iodine X-ray fluorescence computed tomography system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector in conjunction with a cerium-target tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Osahiko, E-mail: osahiko.hagiwara@gmail.co [3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Watanabe, Manabu [The 3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Eiichi [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro [The 3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Shigehiro [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Onagawa, Jun [Department of Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Chuo, Tagajo, Miyagi 985-8537 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    An X-ray fluorescence computed tomography system (XRF-CT) is useful for determining the main atoms in objects. To detect iodine atoms without using a synchrotron, we developed an XRF-CT system utilizing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and a cerium X-ray generator. CT is performed by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object. When cerium K-series characteristic X-rays are absorbed by iodine atoms in objects, iodine K fluorescence is produced from atoms and is detected by the CdTe detector. Next, event signals of X-ray photons are produced with the use of charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Iodine K{alpha} fluorescence is isolated using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted using a counter card. In energy-dispersive XRF-CT, the tube voltage and tube current were 70 kV and 0.40 mA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity was 115.3 {mu}Gy/s at a distance of 1.0 m from the source. The demonstration of XRF-CT was carried out by the selection of photons in an energy range from 27.5 to 29.5 keV with a photon-energy resolution of 1.2 keV.

  6. Cadmium, lead, and mercury levels in feathers of small passerine birds: noninvasive sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Nicola; Ancora, Stefania; di Fazio, Noemi; Leonzio, Claudio

    2008-10-01

    Bird feathers have been widely used as a nondestructive biological material for monitoring heavy metals. Sources of metals taken up by feathers include diet (metals are incorporated during feather formation), preening, and direct contact with metals in water, air, dust, and plants. In the literature, data regarding the origin of trace elements in feathers are not univocal. Only in the vast literature concerning mercury (as methyl mercury) has endogenous origin been determined. In the present study, we investigate cadmium, lead, and mercury levels in feathers of prey of Falco eleonorae in relation to the ecological characteristics (molt, habitat, and contamination by soil) of the different species. Cluster analysis identified two main groups of species. Differences and correlations within and between groups identified by cluster analysis were then checked by nonparametric statistical analysis. The results showed that mercury levels had a pattern significantly different from those of cadmium and lead, which in turn showed a significant positive correlation, suggesting different origins. Nests of F. eleonorae proved to be a good source for feathers of small trans-Saharan passerines collected by a noninvasive method. They provided abundant feathers of the various species in a relatively small area--in this case, the falcon colony on the Isle of San Pietro, Sardinia, Italy.

  7. Arsenic, lead, mercury and cadmium: Toxicity, levels in breast milk and the risks for breastfed infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Fernanda Maciel; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2016-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous in nature, being found in all environmental compartments, and have a variety of applications in human activities. Metals are transferred by maternal blood to the fetus via the placenta, and exposure continues throughout life. For the general population, exposure comes mainly from water and food consumption, including breast milk. In this paper, we reviewed studies on the toxicity of arsenic, lead, mercury and cadmium, the toxic metals of most concern to human health, focusing on the potential risks to newborns and infants. A total of 75 studies published since 2000 reporting the levels of these metals in breast milk were reviewed. Lead was the metal most investigated in breast milk (43 studies), and for which the highest levels were reported (up to 1515 µg/L). Arsenic was the least investigated (18 studies), with higher levels reported for breast milk (up to 149 µg/L) collected in regions with high arsenic concentrations in water (>10 µg/L). Data from 34 studies on mercury showed that levels in breast milk were generally higher in populations with high fish consumption, where it may be present mainly as MeHg. Cadmium levels in breast milk were the lowest, with means <2 µg/L in most of the 29 studies reviewed. Results of risk assessments indicated that the intake of arsenic, lead and mercury by infants through breastfeeding can be considered a health concern in most regions of the world. Although the potential risks to infants are mostly outweighed by the benefits of breast milk consumption, it is essential that contaminants be continuously monitored, especially in the most critical regions, and that measures be implemented by health authorities to reduce exposure of newborns and infants to these metals, and thus avoid unnecessary health risks. - Highlights: • Review of 75 studies that analyzed arsenic, lead, mercury and/or cadmium levels. • Higher levels of arsenic found in India; of mercury found in Brazil. • Lead was the most

  8. Cadmium and mercury effects on cellular immunity in terrestrial arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, J.E.; Klaine, S.J. [Inst. of Wildlife and Environmental Toxicology, Pendleton, SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Toxicology

    1995-12-31

    The field cricket, Acheta domesticus, was used as a test organism to determine the effects of heavy metal exposure on cellular immunity. Insects were separated by sex and exposed to cadmium chloride or mercuric chloride at concentrations of 0, 2.5, and 5.0 ug/g. Exposures consisted of injecting the chemicals into the hemocoel of each insect on days 0, 2, and 4. Hemolymph was collected on day 7 of the study to determine total hemocyte counts, protein levels, and phenoloxidase activity in individual insects. Cadmium chloride decreased the total number of hemocytes in male crickets at 2.5 and 5.0 ug/g and in female crickets at 5.0 ug/g. Protein levels increased in a dose dependent manner in the males but only slightly increased in the females. Mercuric chloride caused a dose-dependent increase in total hemocytes in both male and female crickets. In addition, mercuric chloride caused a dose-dependent increase in protein levels in males but not females.

  9. Exposure of rainbow trout milt to mercury and cadmium alters sperm motility parameters and reproductive success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Grzegorz J., E-mail: dietrich@pan.olsztyn.pl [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dietrich, Mariola; Kowalski, R.K. [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dobosz, Stefan [Department of Salmonid Research, Inland Fisheries Institute, Rutki 83-330 Zukowo (Poland); Karol, Halina; Demianowicz, Wieslaw; Glogowski, Jan [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland)

    2010-05-10

    In the current work, seminal plasma was used for the first time as an incubation medium for monitoring short-time exposure effects of sublethal concentrations of mercury and cadmium ions on rainbow trout sperm. Sperm motility parameters (CASA) and hatching rates were used as gamete quality markers. Additionally live/dead sperm viability test and comet assay of DNA fragmentation were performed. We demonstrated that computer-assisted sperm motility analysis (CASA) may serve as a predictor of reproductive success, when milt contaminated with heavy metals is used. Results presented in this study demonstrate that mercury ions altered sperm motility characteristics at 1-10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l and hatching rates at 10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l after 4 h of exposure. Although mercury ions affected sperm motility parameters immediately after dilution with milt as well as at 4 h of exposure, no differences in sperm motility parameters were found between intact and mercury-treated milt after 24 h of exposure. Our results suggest that rainbow trout seminal plasma has a protective role against the toxic effects of mercury ions of rainbow trout sperm motility.

  10. Uptake of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury from polluted waters by the water hyacinth Eichornia crassipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigbo, F.E.; Smith, R.W.; Shore, F.L.

    1982-01-01

    The water hyacinth Eichornia crassipes was studied as a pollution monitor for the simultaneous accumulation of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mecury. After cultivation of the plants for 2 days in tanks containing 10 ppm of each of the metals in aqueous solution, the plants were harvested and rinsed with tap water. The leaves and stems were separated and analysed for each of the metals. The ratio of the concentration of arsenic and mercury in the leaves to the concentrations in the stems was found to be 2:1. Cadmium and lead showed a concentration ratio in leaves to stems of about 1:1. The leaf concentration of arsenic was the lowest of the metals of 0.3428 mg g/sup -1/ of dried plant material whilst the leaf concentration of cadmium was highest at 0.5740 mg g/sup -1/ of dried plant material. Control plants were grown in unpolluted water. Plants grown in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi sewage lagoon were also analysed. The mercury concentrations of the leaves of plants grown in the sewage lagoon were significantly different from the control sample which had a concentration of 0.0700 mg g/sup -1/ of dried plant material.

  11. Studies on focal alveolar bone healing with technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate and gold-collimated cadmium telluride probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimochi, M.; Hosain, F.; Engelke, W.; Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The benefit of using a collimator for a miniaturized cadmium telluride probe was evaluated by monitoring the bone-healing processes for 13 weeks after the induction of small iatrogenic alveolar bone lesions in one side of the mandible in beagles. Technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate (200 to 300 MBq, 5.1 to 8.1 mCi, in a solution of 0.5 to 1 ml, intravenously) was used as a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical. The radioactivity over the bone lesion (L) and the contralateral normal site (C) in the mandible were measured between 1.5 and 2 hours after injection of the tracer, and the activity ratio L/C served as an index of relative bone uptake. A study of six dogs revealed that the healing response to a hemispheric bone defect of 2 mm diameter in the cortical bone could not be detected by an uncollimated probe, and in a repeated study in two dogs the use of a gold collimator (5 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) did not increase the L/C ratio significantly. A second study in six dogs with 5 mm lesions showed that although systematic trends in the time courses of the L/C ratio obtained both with and without the collimator could be demonstrated, the L/C ratio of collimated versus uncollimated measurements was significantly (p less than 0.005) increased. In three of the latter six dogs, abscesses developed after 9 weeks, leading to a second increase (p less than 0.05) of the L/C ratio with collimation compared with the noninflammation group; without collimation no significant (p greater than 0.15) difference between the two groups could be demonstrated

  12. Validation of early image acquisitions following Tc-99 m sestamibi injection using a semiconductors camera of cadmium-zinc-telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Celine; Weinmann, Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras allow to decrease significantly the acquisition time of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), but the duration of the examination is still long. Therefore, this study was performed to test the feasibility of early imaging following injection of Tc-99 m sestamibi using a CZT camera. Seventy patients underwent both an early and a delayed image acquisition after exercise stress test (n = 30), dipyridamole stress test (n = 20), and at rest (n = 20). After injection of Tc-99 m sestamibi, the early image acquisition started on average within 5 minutes for the exercise and rest groups, and 3 minutes 30 seconds for the dipyridamole group. Two independent observers evaluated image quality and extracardiac uptake on four-point scales. The difference between early and later images for each patient was scored on a five-point scale. The image quality and extracardiac uptake of early and delayed image acquisitions were not different for the three groups (P > .05). There was no significant difference between early and delayed image acquisitions in the exercise, dipyridamole, and rest groups, respectively, in 63%, 40%, and 80% of cases. In the exercise group and rest group, a defect was only present in early MPI, respectively, in 13% and 20% of cases. A defect was only present in delayed images in 10% of cases in the exercise group and in 45% of cases in the dipyridamole group. There was no difference between early and later image acquisitions in terms of quality. This protocol reduces the length of the procedure for the patient. Beginning with early image acquisitions may help to overcome the artifacts that are observed at the delayed time.

  13. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  14. Effects of environmental levels of cadmium, lead and mercury on human renal function evaluated by structural equation modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.; Gardiner, Lesley; Parrish, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between exposure to heavy metals, including lead and cadmium, and renal dysfunction has long been suggested. However, modeling of the potential additive, or synergistic, impact of metals on renal dysfunction has proven to be challenging. In these studies, we used structural equation modeling (SEM), to investigate the relationship between heavy metal burden (serum and urine levels of lead, cadmium and mercury) and renal function using data from the NHANES database. We were able ...

  15. Cadmium, lead, and mercury exposure assessment among croatian consumers of free-living game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Maja; Prevendar Crnić, Andreja; Bilandžić, Nina; Kusak, Josip; Reljić, Slaven

    2014-09-29

    Free-living game can be an important source of dietary cadmium and lead; the question is whether exposure to these two elements is such that it might cause adverse health effects in the consumers. The aim of this study was to estimate dietary exposure to cadmium, lead, and mercury from free-living big game (fallow deer, roe deer, red deer, wild boar, and brown bear), and to mercury from small game (pheasant and hare), hunted in Croatia from 1990 to 2012. The exposure assessment was based on available literature data and our own measurements of metal levels in the tissues of the game, by taking into account different consumption frequencies (four times a year, once a month and once a week). Exposure was expressed as percentage of (provisional) tolerable weekly intake [(P)TWI] values set by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Consumption of game meat (0.002-0.5 % PTWI) and liver (0.005-6 % PTWI) assumed for the general population (four times a year) does not pose a health risk to consumers from the general population, nor does monthly (0.02-6 % PTWI) and weekly (0.1-24 % PTWI) consumption of game meat. However, because of the high percentage of free-living game liver and kidney samples exceeding the legislative limits for cadmium (2-99 %) and lead (1-82 %), people should keep the consumption of certain game species' offal as low as possible. Children and pregnant and lactating women should avoid eating game offal altogether. Free-living game liver could be an important source of cadmium if consumed on a monthly basis (3-74 % TWI), and if consumed weekly (11-297 % TWI), it could even give rise to toxicological concern.

  16. Effect of lead, mercury and cadmium on a sulphate-reducing bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Sathe, V.; Chandramohan, D.

    Hg and 125·1 Jlg ml- 1 Pb (Hg being 137·1 % and Pb 2320/0 of the weight of the Cd used). Thormann and Weyland (1980), in a study of the effect of Cd and Pb, state that Cd causes a stronger growth inhibition than Pb. Also, the relative importance... Pollution 67 (1990) 361-374 Effect of Lead, Mercury and Cadmium on a Sulphate-Reducing Bacterium P. A. Loka Bharathi, V. Sathe & D. Chandramohan National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403004, India (Received 9 March 1990; revised version...

  17. Modelling atmospheric dispersion of mercury, lead and cadmium at european scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roustan, Yelva

    2005-01-01

    Lead, mercury and cadmium are identified as the most worrying heavy metals within the framework of the long range air pollution. Understanding and modeling their transport and fate allow for making effective decisions in order to reduce their impact on people and their environment. The first two parts of this thesis relate to the modeling of these trace pollutants for the impact study at the European scale. While mercury is mainly present under gaseous form and likely to chemically react, the other heavy metals are primarily carried by the fine particles and considered as inert. The third part of this thesis presents a methodological development based on an adjoint approach. It has been used to perform a sensitivity analysis of the model and to carry out inverse modeling to improve boundary conditions which are crucial with a restricted area model. (author) [fr

  18. Survey of cosmetics for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Nancy M; Mindak, William R; Gasper, John W; Thompson, Christopher B; Barrows, Julie N

    2014-01-01

    As part of efforts to assess amounts of inorganic element contamination in cosmetics, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration contracted a private laboratory to determine the total content of seven potentially toxic or allergenic elements in 150 cosmetic products of 12 types (eye shadows, blushes, lipsticks, three types of lotions, mascaras, foundations, body powders, compact powders, shaving creams, and face paints). Samples were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, and nickel by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and for mercury by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The methods used to determine the elements were tested for validity by using standard reference materials with matrices similar to the cosmetic types. The cosmetic products were found to contain median values of 0.21 mg/kg arsenic, 3.1 mg/kg chromium, 0.91 mg/kg cobalt, 0.85 mg/kg lead, and 2.7 mg/kg nickel. The median values for cadmium and mercury were below the limits of detection of the methods. The contract requirements, testing procedures, and findings from the survey are described.

  19. Time-dependent toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots on liver and kidneys in mice: histopathological changes with elevated free cadmium ions and hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mengmeng Wang,1,2,* Jilong Wang,1,2,* Hubo Sun,1,2 Sihai Han,3 Shuai Feng,1 Lu Shi,1 Peijun Meng,1,2 Jiayi Li,1,2 Peili Huang,1,2 Zhiwei Sun1,2 1Department of Toxicology and Sanitary Chemistry, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 3College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A complete understanding of the toxicological behavior of quantum dots (QDs in vivo is of great importance and a prerequisite for their application in humans. In contrast with the numerous cytotoxicity studies investigating QDs, only a few in vivo studies of QDs have been reported, and the issue remains controversial. Our study aimed to understand QD-mediated toxicity across different time points and to explore the roles of free cadmium ions (Cd2+ and hydroxyl radicals (·OH in tissue damage. Male ICR mice were administered a single intravenous dose (1.5 µmol/kg of CdTe QDs, and liver and kidney function and morphology were subsequently examined at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days. Furthermore, ·OH production in the tissue was quantified by trapping ·OH with salicylic acid (SA as 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA and detecting it using a high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence method. We used the induction of tissue metallothionein levels and 2,3-DHBA:SA ratios as markers for elevated Cd2+ from the degradation of QDs and ·OH generation in the tissue, respectively. Our experimental results revealed that the QD-induced histopathological changes were time-dependent with elevated Cd2+ and ·OH, and could recover after a period of time. The Cd2+ and ·OH exhibited delayed effects in terms of histopathological abnormalities. Histological assessments performed at multiple time points might facilitate the evaluation of the biological safety of

  20. Heavy Metals (Mercury, Lead and Cadmium Determination in 17 Species of Fish Marketed in Khorramabad City, West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals entrance to fish body tissues and transferring to human body systems after their consuming makes numerous undesirable effects and health problems. The aim of this study was to determine some heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury in fresh fishes marketed in Khorramabad City, west of Iran. In this descriptive study, five samples of 17 fish species with high consumption were purchased randomly in 2014. Measurement of mercury, lead and cadmium was performed using atomic absorption spectrometry. All measurements were performed three times for each sample. Lead mean levels in fish samples was in the range 0.736 -1.005 ppm, cadmium range was from 0.196 to 0.015 ppm and mean content of mercury was  0.431 - 0.107 ppm. At present mean concentration of lead, mercury and cadmium in supplied fishes muscle is lower than maximum recommended levels according to WHO, EC and FDA guidelines. Based on the obtained results of this study and the importance of heavy metals in foods and their impacts on human health, continuous monitoring of heavy metals levels in foods is necessary.

  1. Time-dependent toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots on liver and kidneys in mice: histopathological changes with elevated free cadmium ions and hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Jilong; Sun, Hubo; Han, Sihai; Feng, Shuai; Shi, Lu; Meng, Peijun; Li, Jiayi; Huang, Peili; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    A complete understanding of the toxicological behavior of quantum dots (QDs) in vivo is of great importance and a prerequisite for their application in humans. In contrast with the numerous cytotoxicity studies investigating QDs, only a few in vivo studies of QDs have been reported, and the issue remains controversial. Our study aimed to understand QD-mediated toxicity across different time points and to explore the roles of free cadmium ions (Cd(2+)) and hydroxyl radicals (·OH) in tissue damage. Male ICR mice were administered a single intravenous dose (1.5 µmol/kg) of CdTe QDs, and liver and kidney function and morphology were subsequently examined at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days. Furthermore, ·OH production in the tissue was quantified by trapping · OH with salicylic acid (SA) as 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and detecting it using a high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence method. We used the induction of tissue metallothionein levels and 2,3-DHBA:SA ratios as markers for elevated Cd(2+) from the degradation of QDs and ·OH generation in the tissue, respectively. Our experimental results revealed that the QD-induced histopathological changes were time-dependent with elevated Cd(2+) and ·OH, and could recover after a period of time. The Cd(2+) and ·OH exhibited delayed effects in terms of histopathological abnormalities. Histological assessments performed at multiple time points might facilitate the evaluation of the biological safety of QDs.

  2. Impact of injection dose, post-reconstruction filtering, and collimator choice on image quality of myocardial perfusion SPECT using cadmium-zinc telluride detectors in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Asuka; Matsunari, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Masato; Nishi, Kodai; Fujita, Wataru; Miyazaki, Yoshiharu; Nekolla, Stephan G; Kawai, Keiichi

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the impact of injection dose, post-reconstruction filtering, and collimator choice on image quality of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors and (2) to determine how these factors affect measured infarct size in the in vivo rat. Twenty-four healthy and eight myocardial infarct (MI) rats underwent myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging after injection of various doses (25 to 200 MBq) of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin using a standard (STD) five-pinhole collimator and high-sensitivity (HS) five-pinhole collimator. Image quality score, contrast-to-noise ratio, sharpness index, coefficient of variation (CV), and measured defect size were assessed as measures of image quality. The image quality score increased and CV decreased as a function of injection dose. The contrast-to-noise ratio increased and sharpness index decreased as a function of Gaussian kernel size. When STD and HS were compared, HS tended to show higher image quality score and lower CV than STD. The use of post-reconstruction filter significantly improved image quality score and lessened CV. The reproducibility of defect size measurements, as assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), between the collimators was poor-to-moderate (ICC = -0.31~0.57) with low (25 MBq) injection dose and with no or light (1.5-mm kernel size) filtering, whereas it was good-to-excellent (ICC = 0.75~0.97) with high (200 MBq) dose or low dose with heavy (2.5-mm kernel size) filtering. The filtering-related reproducibility was poor (ICC = -0.18~0.17) for STD with low injection dose, whereas it was good-to-excellent (ICC = 0.79~0.89) for HS. Furthermore, there was a filtering-related underestimation of defect size particularly with the use of heavy smoothing. Appropriate imaging setting is important to obtain high quality images and thereby reliable measurements using a preclinical myocardial

  3. Digital fast pulse shape and height analysis on cadmium-zinc-telluride arrays for high-flux energy-resolved X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbene, Leonardo; Principato, Fabio; Gerardi, Gaetano; Bettelli, Manuele; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C; Zambelli, Nicola; Benassi, Giacomo; Zappettini, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) arrays with photon-counting and energy-resolving capabilities are widely proposed for next-generation X-ray imaging systems. This work presents the performance of a 2 mm-thick CZT pixel detector, with pixel pitches of 500 and 250 µm, dc coupled to a fast and low-noise ASIC (PIXIE ASIC), characterized only by the preamplifier stage. A custom 16-channel digital readout electronics was used, able to digitize and process continuously the signals from each output ASIC channel. The digital system performs on-line fast pulse shape and height analysis, with a low dead-time and reasonable energy resolution at both low and high fluxes. The spectroscopic response of the system to photon energies below ( 109 Cd source) and above ( 241 Am source) the K-shell absorption energy of the CZT material was investigated, with particular attention to the mitigation of charge sharing and pile-up. The detector allows high bias voltage operation (>5000 V cm -1 ) and good energy resolution at moderate cooling (3.5% and 5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 500 and 250 µm arrays, respectively) by using fast pulse shaping with a low dead-time (300 ns). Charge-sharing investigations were performed using a fine time coincidence analysis (TCA), with very short coincidence time windows up to 10 ns. For the 500 µm pitch array (250 µm pitch array), sharing percentages of 36% (52%) and 60% (82%) at 22.1 and 59.5 keV, respectively, were measured. The potential of the pulse shape analysis technique for charge-sharing detection for corner/border pixels and at high rate conditions (250 kcps pixel -1 ), where the TCA fails, is also shown. Measurements demonstrated that significant amounts of charge are lost for interactions occurring in the volume of the inter-pixel gap. This charge loss must be accounted for in the correction of shared events. These activities are within the framework of an international collaboration on the development of energy

  4. Positioning true coincidences that undergo inter-and intra-crystal scatter for a sub-mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride-based PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig S.

    2018-01-01

    The kinematics of Compton scatter can be used to estimate the interaction sequence of inter-crystal scatter interactions in 3D position-sensitive cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. However, in the case of intra-crystal scatter in a ‘cross-strip’ CZT detector slab, multiple anode and cathode strips may be triggered, creating position ambiguity due to uncertainty in possible combinations of anode–cathode pairings. As a consequence, methods such as energy-weighted centroid are not applicable to position the interactions. In practice, since the event position is uncertain, these intra-crystal scatters events are discarded. In this work, we studied using Compton kinematics and a ‘direction difference angle’ to provide a method to correctly identify the anode–cathode pair corresponding to the first interaction position in an intra-crystal scatter event. GATE simulation studies of a NEMA NU4 image quality phantom in a small animal positron emission tomography under development composed of 192, 40~mm×40~mm×5 mm CZT crystals shows that 47% of total numbers of multiple-interaction photon events (MIPEs) are intra-crystal scatter with a 100 keV lower energy threshold per interaction. The sensitivity of the system increases from 0.6 to 4.10 (using 10 keV as system lower energy threshold) by including rather than discarding inter- and intra-crystal scatter. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) also increases from 5.81+/-0.3 to 12.53+/-0.37 . It was shown that a higher energy threshold limits the capability of the system to detect MIPEs and reduces CNR. Results indicate a sensitivity increase (4.1 to 5.88) when raising the lower energy threshold (10 keV to 100 keV) for the case of only two-interaction events. In order to detect MIPEs accurately, a low noise system capable of a low energy threshold (10 keV) per interaction is desired.

  5. Evaluation and Determination of Heavy Metals (Mercury, Lead and Cadmium in Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, Lead and Cadmium were determined in 100 samples of human breast milk samples from urban and rural mothers in Isfahan (IRAN. A questionnaire about area of residence, nutrition, smoking habits, and dental fillings was filled out by the lactating mothers. The combination of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and perchloric acid was found to be one of the most suitable acids in wet digestion of milk. Cold vapor atomic absorption was used to determine the mercury content in milk after wet digestion. The effect of concentration of nitric acid, influence of flow rate and tin(П chloride were investigated. The mean concentration of mercury in human breast milk samples was 0.96 ppb. Extraction of Pb and Cd were performed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC to methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK and were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The factors influencing, the complex formation, pH, time and buffer were optimized. The mean concentration of Pb and Cd in human breast milk was 0.0147 and 0.0121 ppm, respectively. The maximum concentrations were found in breast milk of rural mothers.

  6. Anodic stripping voltammetry of mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead in a rice farm ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Mundo, F.R.; Vicente-Beckett, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical procedures based on differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry were developed and applied to the analysis of some trace metals in a rice farm ecosystem. A gold wire served as working electrode for the analysis of mercury in 0.1M HNO 3 ; a hanging mercury drop electrode was used for the simultaneous analyses of zinc, cadmium, and lead in 0.1M sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.5). Mercury was pre-concentrated for five minutes at + 0.20 V vs SCE. The area of the anodic stripping peaks varied linearly over the concentration range 3x10 -10 -2x10 -8 M Hg(II); the limit of detection was 0.06 ppb or 3x10 -10 M Hg(II). The simultaneous analytical method involved pre-electrolysis at -1.2 V vs SCE for ten minutes. The heights of the individual anodic stripping peaks varied linearly with concentration in a mixture of the ions over the concentration range 0.020-0.10 ppm for each ion; the limits of detection were 0.004 ppm, 0.01 ppm, and 0.01 ppm for Cd, Pb, Zn, respectively. The developed procedures were used to determine the baseline levels of these metals in soil, water, and rice plant samples from a one-hectare traditional rice farm in San Pedro, Laguna. (auth.). 26 refs.; 4 tabs.; 6 figs

  7. Environmental exposures to lead, mercury, and cadmium among South Korean teenagers (KNHANES 2010-2013): Body burden and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Ahn, Jaeouk; Lee, Byung-Kook; Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho

    2017-07-01

    Limited information is available on the association of age and sex with blood concentrations of heavy metals in teenagers. In addition, factors such as a shared family environment may have an association. We analyzed data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2010-2013) to determine whether blood levels of heavy metals differ by risk factors such as age, sex, and shared family environment in a representative sample of teenagers. This study used data obtained in the KNHANES 2010-2013, which had a rolling sampling design that involved a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the non-institutionalized civilian population in South Korea. Our cross-sectional analysis was restricted to teenagers and their parents who completed the health examination survey, and for whom blood measurements of cadmium, lead, and mercury were available. The final analytical sample consisted of 1585 teenagers, and 376 fathers and 399 mothers who provided measurements of blood heavy metal concentrations. Male teenagers had greater blood levels of lead and mercury, but sex had no association with blood cadmium level. There were age-related increases in blood cadmium, but blood lead decreased with age, and age had little association with blood mercury. The concentrations of cadmium and mercury declined from 2010 to 2013. The blood concentrations of lead, cadmium, and mercury in teenagers were positively associated with the levels in their parents after adjustment for covariates. Our results show that blood heavy metal concentrations differ by risk factors such as age, sex, and shared family environment in teenagers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of environmental levels of cadmium, lead and mercury on human renal function evaluated by structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Gardiner, Lesley; Parrish, Alan R

    2014-07-03

    A relationship between exposure to heavy metals, including lead and cadmium, and renal dysfunction has long been suggested. However, modeling of the potential additive, or synergistic, impact of metals on renal dysfunction has proven to be challenging. In these studies, we used structural equation modeling (SEM), to investigate the relationship between heavy metal burden (serum and urine levels of lead, cadmium and mercury) and renal function using data from the NHANES database. We were able to generate a model with goodness of fit indices consistent with a well-fitting model. This model demonstrated that lead and cadmium had a negative relationship with renal function, while mercury did not contribute to renal dysfunction. Interestingly, a linear relationship between lead and loss of renal function was observed, while the maximal impact of cadmium occurred at or above serum cadmium levels of 0.8 μg/L. The interaction of lead and cadmium in loss of renal function was also observed in the model. These data highlight the use of SEM to model interaction between environmental contaminants and pathophysiology, which has important implications in mechanistic and regulatory toxicology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies of cadmium, mercury and lead in man. The value of X-ray fluorescence measurements in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, J.

    1996-10-01

    Two XRF methods have been used for in vivo studies of mercury, cadmium and lead. Persons with a history of long-term occupational mercury exposure had elevated mercury concentrations in their kidneys (up to 65 {mu}g/g). The minimum detectable concentration varied between 12 and 45 {mu}g/g. Battery plant workers had elevated cadmium concentrations in their kidneys (up to 350 {mu}g/g) and liver (up to 80 {mu}g/g), with mean values about 3-5 times higher than the general population. The mean ratio between concentrations of cadmium in kidney and liver was 7. Levels in kidney and liver indicated that a simple integration of cadmium in work-place air is not sufficient to describe the body burden. Fingerbone lead in smelters was 6-8 times higher than in members of the general population. The half-time of bone lead in active workers was estimated to about 5 years during the accumulation phase. A model for description of a person`s lead exposure in terms of lead in fingerbone, lead in blood and time of exposure has been developed and can be used, e.g. for retrospective blood lead estimates if the period of exposure and the current fingerbone lead is known. This will be of value for the evaluation of toxic effects of long-term lead exposure when data on previous lead levels are lacking. In total, in vivo measurements of mercury, cadmium and lead give unique information, which has shown to be an important tool for understanding of metal kinetics and toxicity. If the precision and accuracy of the method can be further improved, the technique will also have a given place in the clinical practice. 168 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Cadmium, mercury, and lead in kidney cortex of living kidney donors: Impact of different exposure sources,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barregard, Lars, E-mail: lars.barregard@amm.gu.se [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 414, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Fabricius-Lagging, Elisabeth [Department of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Boras Hospital (Sweden); Lundh, Thomas [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital and Lund University (Sweden); Moelne, Johan [Department of Clinical Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Wallin, Maria [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 414, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Olausson, Michael [Department of Transplantation and Liver Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Modigh, Cecilia; Sallsten, Gerd [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 414, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2010-01-15

    Background: Most current knowledge on kidney concentrations of nephrotoxic metals like cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb) comes from autopsy studies. Assessment of metal concentrations in kidney biopsies from living subjects can be combined with information about exposure sources like smoking, diet, and occupation supplied by the biopsied subjects themselves. Objectives: To determine kidney concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb in living kidney donors, and assess associations with common exposure sources and background factors. Methods: Metal concentrations were determined in 109 living kidney donors aged 24-70 years (median 51), using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (Cd and Pb) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Hg). Smoking habits, occupation, dental amalgam, fish consumption, and iron stores were evaluated. Results: The median kidney concentrations were 12.9 {mu}g/g (wet weight) for cadmium, 0.21 {mu}g/g for mercury, and 0.08 {mu}g/g for lead. Kidney Cd increased by 3.9 {mu}g/g for a 10 year increase in age, and by 3.7 {mu}g/g for an extra 10 pack-years of smoking. Levels in non-smokers were similar to those found in the 1970s. Low iron stores (low serum ferritin) in women increased kidney Cd by 4.5 {mu}g/g. Kidney Hg increased by 6% for every additional amalgam surface, but was not associated with fish consumption. Lead was unaffected by the background factors surveyed. Conclusions: In Sweden, kidney Cd levels have decreased due to less smoking, while the impact of diet seems unchanged. Dental amalgam is the main determinant of kidney Hg. Kidney Pb levels are very low due to decreased exposure.

  11. Concentration of Lead, Mercury, Cadmium, Aluminum, Arsenic and Manganese in Umbilical Cord Blood of Jamaican Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen; Dickerson, Aisha S.; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Bressler, Jan; Coore Desai, Charlene; Shakespeare-Pellington, Sydonnie; Reece, Jody-Ann; Morgan, Renee; Loveland, Katherine A.; Grove, Megan L.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns and to explore the possible association between concentrations of these elements and certain birth outcomes. Based on data from 100 pregnant mothers and their 100 newborns who were enrolled from Jamaica in 2011, the arithmetic mean (standard deviation) concentrations of cord blood lead, mercury, aluminum, and manganese were 0.8 (1.3 μg/dL), 4.4 (2.4 μg/L), 10.9 (9.2 μg/L), and 43.7 (17.7 μg/L), respectively. In univariable General Linear Models, the geometric mean cord blood aluminum concentration was higher for children whose mothers had completed their education up to high school compared to those whose mothers had any education beyond high school (12.2 μg/L vs. 6.4 μg/L; p < 0.01). After controlling for maternal education level and socio-economic status (through ownership of a family car), the cord blood lead concentration was significantly associated with head circumference (adjusted p < 0.01). Our results not only provide levels of arsenic and the aforementioned metals in cord blood that could serve as a reference for the Jamaican population, but also replicate previously reported significant associations between cord blood lead concentrations and head circumference at birth in other populations. PMID:25915835

  12. Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Lead, Mercury and Selenium Concentrations in Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) from the New Jersey Pine Barrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Zappalorti, Robert; Pittfield, Taryn; DeVito, Emile

    2017-05-01

    Top trophic level predators are at risk from bioaccumulation of heavy metals from their prey. Using nondestructively collected tissues as a method of assessing metal concentrations in snakes is useful for populations that are threatened or declining. This paper reports concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in tissues of Northern pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) from the New Jersey Pine Barrens, a relatively pristine, undisturbed habitat. We also determined if skin is an appropriate indicator of internal concentrations and identified the factors (tissue, year of collection, length, sex) that might explain variations in metal concentrations. Because they can grow to 2-m long and live for 25 years, we suggest that these snakes might accumulate heavy metals. Multiple regression models were significant, explaining 16% (lead) to 61% (mercury) of variation by tissue type. For mercury and chromium, size also was significant. The highest concentrations were in liver and kidney for all metals, except chromium and lead. Mercury concentrations in tissues were within the range reported for other snakes and were below effects concentrations in reptiles. The concentrations in skin were correlated with all internal tissues for mercury and for all internal tissues except heart for cadmium. These data show that shed skin can be used as an indicator of metals in pine snakes and that, at present, concentrations of heavy metals in this population are within the range of those found in other snake species from uncontaminated sites.

  13. Hair mercury and urinary cadmium levels in Belgian children and their mothers within the framework of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirard, Catherine, E-mail: c.pirard@chu.ulg.ac.be [CHU of Liege, Laboratory of Clinical, Forensic and Environmental Toxicology, CHU (B35), 4000 Liege (Belgium); Koppen, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.koppen@vito.be [Flemish Institute of Technological Research, Environmental Risk and Health Unit, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Cremer, Koen, E-mail: Koen.DeCremer@wiv-isp.be [Scientific Institute of Public Health, Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Van Overmeire, Ilse, E-mail: ilse.vanovermeire@wiv-isp.be [Scientific Institute of Public Health, Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Govarts, Eva, E-mail: eva.govarts@vito.be [Flemish Institute of Technological Research, Environmental Risk and Health Unit, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Dewolf, Marie-Christine, E-mail: marie_christine.dewolf@hainaut.be [Provincial Institute Hainaut Vigilance Sanitaire — Hainaut Hygiène Publique en (HVS-HPH), Boulevard Sainctelette, 55, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Van De Mieroop, Els, E-mail: Els.VanDeMieroop@pih.provant.be [Provincial Institute for Hygiene (PIH), Boomgaardstraat 22 bus 1, 2600 Antwerpen (Belgium); Aerts, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.aerts@milieu.belgie.be [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, Place Victor Horta 40/10, 1060 Brussels (Belgium); Biot, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.biot@environnement.belgique.be [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, Place Victor Horta 40/10, 1060 Brussels (Belgium); Casteleyn, Ludwine, E-mail: Ludwine.Casteleyn@med.kuleuven.be [University of Leuven, Center for Human Genetics, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Kolossa-Gehring, Marike, E-mail: marike.kolossa@uba.de [Federal Environment Agency, Corrensplatz 1, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Schwedler, Gerda, E-mail: Gerda.Schwedler@uba.de [Federal Environment Agency, Corrensplatz 1, 14195 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-02-01

    A harmonized human biomonitoring pilot study was set up within the frame of the European projects DEMOCOPHES and COPHES. In 17 European countries, biomarkers of some environmental pollutants, including urinary cadmium and hair mercury, were measured in children and their mothers in order to obtain European-wide comparison values on these chemicals. The Belgian participant population consisted in 129 school children (6–11 years) and their mothers (≤ 45 years) living in urban or rural areas of Belgium. The geometric mean levels for mercury in hair were 0.383 μg/g and 0.204 μg/g for respectively mothers and children. Cadmium in mother's and children's urine was detected at a geometric mean concentration of respectively 0.21 and 0.04 μg/l. For both biomarkers, levels measured in the mothers and their child were correlated. While the urinary cadmium levels increased with age, no trend was found for hair mercury content, except the fact that mothers hold higher levels than children. The hair mercury content increased significantly with the number of dental amalgam fillings, explaining partially the higher levels in the mothers by their higher presence rate of these amalgams compared to children. Fish or seafood consumption was the other main parameter determining the mercury levels in hair. No relationship was found between smoking status and cadmium or mercury levels, but the studied population included very few smokers. Urinary cadmium levels were higher in both mothers and children living in urban areas, while for mercury this difference was only significant for children. Our small population showed urinary cadmium and hair mercury levels lower than the health based guidelines suggested by the WHO or the JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives). Only 1% had cadmium level slightly higher than the German HBM-I value (1 μg/l for adults), and 9% exceeded the 1 μg mercury/g hair suggested by the US EPA. - Highlights: • Hair mercury and

  14. Hair mercury and urinary cadmium levels in Belgian children and their mothers within the framework of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirard, Catherine; Koppen, Gudrun; De Cremer, Koen; Van Overmeire, Ilse; Govarts, Eva; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Van De Mieroop, Els; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Schwedler, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    A harmonized human biomonitoring pilot study was set up within the frame of the European projects DEMOCOPHES and COPHES. In 17 European countries, biomarkers of some environmental pollutants, including urinary cadmium and hair mercury, were measured in children and their mothers in order to obtain European-wide comparison values on these chemicals. The Belgian participant population consisted in 129 school children (6–11 years) and their mothers (≤ 45 years) living in urban or rural areas of Belgium. The geometric mean levels for mercury in hair were 0.383 μg/g and 0.204 μg/g for respectively mothers and children. Cadmium in mother's and children's urine was detected at a geometric mean concentration of respectively 0.21 and 0.04 μg/l. For both biomarkers, levels measured in the mothers and their child were correlated. While the urinary cadmium levels increased with age, no trend was found for hair mercury content, except the fact that mothers hold higher levels than children. The hair mercury content increased significantly with the number of dental amalgam fillings, explaining partially the higher levels in the mothers by their higher presence rate of these amalgams compared to children. Fish or seafood consumption was the other main parameter determining the mercury levels in hair. No relationship was found between smoking status and cadmium or mercury levels, but the studied population included very few smokers. Urinary cadmium levels were higher in both mothers and children living in urban areas, while for mercury this difference was only significant for children. Our small population showed urinary cadmium and hair mercury levels lower than the health based guidelines suggested by the WHO or the JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives). Only 1% had cadmium level slightly higher than the German HBM-I value (1 μg/l for adults), and 9% exceeded the 1 μg mercury/g hair suggested by the US EPA. - Highlights: • Hair mercury and urinary

  15. Polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Bonnet, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Brief history of CdTe PV devices * Initial attempts towards commercial modules * Review of present commercial industry/device designs * General CdTe material properties * Layer-specific process description for superstrate CdTe devices * Where is the junction? * Considerations for large-scale deployment * Conclusions * Acknowledgements * References

  16. Contamination by mercury and cadmium in the cetacean products from Japanese market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T; Haraguchi, K; Cipriano, F; Simmonds, M P; Hotta, Y; Sakata, M

    2004-03-01

    Cetaceans hunted coastally in Japan include several species of odontocete (dolphins, porpoises and beaked whales), and fresh and frozen red meat and blubber, as well as boiled internal organs, such as liver, lung, kidney and small intestine, are still sold for human consumption. Furthermore, red meat and blubber products originating from mysticete minke whales caught in the Antarctic and Northern Pacific are also sold for human consumption. We surveyed mercury and cadmium contamination levels in boiled liver, lung, kidney and red meat products being marketed in Japanese retail outlets. We also analyzed the DNA of these products to obtain information concerning gender and species. Total mercury (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (M-Hg) contamination levels in all the cetacean products were markedly higher in odontocete species than in mysticete species, and slightly higher in females than in males. T-Hg contamination in the organs was seen in the following order: boiled liver>boiled kidney=boiled lung>red meat. In particular, T-Hg concentrations in the boiled liver were high enough to cause acute intoxication even from a single ingestion: the mean +/-SD (range) of T-Hg was 388+/-543 (0.12-1980) microg/wetg. In contrast, although M-Hg contamination in the liver was not markedly higher than that in other organs, M-Hg contamination was in the following order: boiled liver>odontocete red meat>boiled kidney>boiled lung. The contamination levels of T-Hg and M-Hg in odontocete red meat, the most popular whale product, were 8.94+/-13.3 and 5.44+/-5.72 microg/wetg, respectively. These averages exceeded the provisional permitted levels of T-Hg (0.4 microg/wetg) and M-Hg (0.3 microg/wetg) in marine foods set by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare by 22 and 18 times, respectively, suggesting the possibility of chronic intoxication by T-Hg and M-Hg with frequent consumption of odontocete red meat. Cadmium contamination levels in boiled liver, kidney and lung were 8

  17. Arsenic, cadmium, and mercury in cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagititolium) and watercocoyam (Colocasia esculenta) in Tarkwa a mining community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essumang, D K; Dodoo, D K; Obiri, S; Yaney, J Y

    2007-10-01

    Cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagititolium) and Watercocoyam (Colocasia esculenta) have gained increased importance in the diets of majority of people in developing countries such as Ghana. The concentration levels of arsenic, cadmium, and mercury in Cocoyam (X. sagititolium) and Watercocoyam (C. esculenta) in Tarkwa and its surrounding villages a mining community in Ghana were measured in this study. From the results of the study, the levels of arsenic, cadmium and mercury in X. sagititolium and C. esculenta were higher than the WHO recommended levels. These root tubers absorb or uptake toxic chemicals from the soil as a result of the mining operations. This means that, the consumption of X. sagititolium and C. esculenta by humans from such environments may pose a serious health risk. There is therefore the need for a concerted effort by all to minimize the negative impact of gold mining in the study area.

  18. Lead, cadmium and mercury in the blood of the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) from the coast of Sinaloa, Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Miriam; Castillo-Guerrero, José Alfredo; Ruelas-Inzunza, Jorge; Fernández, Guillermo

    2016-09-15

    We used blood samples of the Blue-footed Booby, considering sex (female and male) and age-class (adult and chick) of individuals at different breeding stages during two breeding seasons (2010-2011 and 2011-2012) in Isla El Rancho, Sinaloa, to determine lead, cadmium, and mercury concentrations. Lead and cadmium concentrations were below our detection limit (0.05 and 0.36ppm, respectively). A higher concentration of mercury was found in early stages of breeding, likely related to changes in mercury environmental availability. Mercury concentrations in adults did not relate with their breeding output. Males and adults had higher mercury concentration than females and chicks. We provide information of temporal, sex and age-related variations in the concentrations of mercury in blood of the Blue-footed Booby. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Concentrations of cadmium, mercury and selenium in common eider ducks in the eastern Canadian arctic: Influence of reproductive stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, Mark; Gilchrist, H. Grant; Neugebauer, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations and total organ content of mercury, selenium and cadmium, as well as liver, kidney and body mass were determined in female common eiders from 1997 to 2000 at the East Bay Migratory Bird Sanctuary in the eastern Canadian arctic. In 1997 and 1999, female eiders were collected during the pre-nesting period when they eat copious amounts of food and gain substantial weight in preparation for the rigours of nesting. In 1998 and 1999, female eiders were collected during the mid to late stages of the nesting period when they eat very little, if at all, and, as a consequence undergo dramatic weight loss. Total body mass, liver mass and kidney mass were highest in pre-nesting birds, especially in 1997. They were significantly lower in nesting birds collected in 1998 and 2000. In contrast, mercury and cadmium concentrations were lowest in pre-nesting birds collected in 1997 and 1999 and increased to significantly higher concentrations in nesting birds collected in 1998 and 2000. In contrast to these results, the total contents of mercury in liver and cadmium in kidney did not change significantly over the 4-year period. Hepatic selenium concentrations were relatively stable over the 4-year study period while changes in the total content of selenium in the liver paralleled changes in liver mass and body mass. The results suggest that mercury and cadmium concentrations in female common eiders change in response to normal changes in body and organ mass that occur during the reproductive period. Thus, it may be important to consider body condition or reproductive stage when using common eiders (and perhaps other species of sea ducks) in biomonitoring studies or when interpreting concentrations of metals in tissues in terms of the risk they pose to these ducks

  20. Red coloration by heat treatment of the coprecipitate of cadmium sulfide and mercury(II) sulfide prepared from the nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Fujiya

    1979-01-01

    The effects of starting salts on the color, particle size and crystal structure of mercury-cadmium-sulfide pigments were investigated. The coprecipitate (N-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was prepared by adding sodium sulfide solution to a mixed cadmium-mercury (II) nitrate solution. The coprecipitate (C-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was also prepared from the mixed solution of their chlorides by the same method as described above. The coprecipitated products were heat-treated (calcination or hydrothermal treatment) at 350 0 C for 2 hours and subsequent changes in powder properties of both products were compared from each other. The powder properties of N-S, C-S and their heat-treated products were investigated by spectral reflectance, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and specific surface area measurements. Sample (N-C) obtained by the calcination of N-S was brown, indicating no red coloration, but the calcined product (C-C) of C-S developed a red color. Cl - and hot water were found to be effective for the red color development of the pigment. The effectiveness was confirmed by calcining N-S in the presence of NaCl or by treating it hydrothermally. It was found that halides other than NaCl, (e.g., NH 4 Cl, KCl, KBr and KI), were also effective for the color development of the pigment. The red samples are solid solutions with a basically hexagonal CdS structure, and it appears that CdS takes up HgS without any apparent structural changes. The particle size of the red samples are larger than those of the non red samples. (author)

  1. Gastrointestinal and in vitro release of copper, cadmium, indium, mercury and zinc from conventional and copper-rich amalgams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, D.; Gjerdet, N.; Paulsen, G.

    1983-01-01

    Particles of a conventional lathe-cut, a spherical non-gamma 2 and a copper amalgam have been gastrointestinally administered to rats for the purpose of evaluation of the dissolution resistance. The animals were sacrificed after 20 hrs. The contents of copper, cadmium, indium, mercury and zinc in kidney, liver, lung or blood were measured using nuclear tracer techniques. From a copper amalgam an extreme release of copper was demonstrated. This study simulates the clinical conditions of elemental release from swallowed amalgam particles after amalgam insertion or after removal of old amalgam fillings. Specimens of the same types of amalgams were also exposed to artificial saliva for a period of 10 days. The amounts of copper and mercury released were measured with flame and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry respectively. The levels of copper and mercury released from the copper amalgam were approximately 50 times those of the two other amalgam types studied. (author)

  2. Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury

  3. Mercury accumulation profiles and their modification by interaction with cadmium and lead in the soft tissues of the Cichlid Oreochromis aureus during chronic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P.

    1994-11-01

    Mercury, cadmium and lead have no well known biological functions in the animal body and are described as ultratrace elements. Their toxicity is due in part to competition with essential metals for binding sites and interference with sulfhydryl groups, essential for the normal functioning of enzymes and structural proteins. Cadmium blocks sulfhydryl groups in enzymes and competes for sites with zinc and calcium. To a lesser extent, lead may replace calcium in structures and react with sulfhydryl groups, while mercury has a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups and is lipid soluble in its methylated form. The chloroalkali industry is a major source of mercury pollution. When fish take up mercury, whether organic or inorganic, most of it accumulates in tissues in the organic form. Minamata disease in humans was first reported in 1956. The form of mercury responsible was found to be methylmercury, which being lipid soluble is much more toxic than inorganic mercury. It is important to monitor and assess the mercury content of fish which are caught, or farmed, for human consumption. Since many commercial animal feeds contain a fishmeal component, there is a risk of contamination of farm animals intended for human consumption. Since Oreochromis aureus (Steindachner) is cultured in North and Latin America, and other regions, it is a suitable model to use for studying the distribution of mercury in different tissues of food fish. Tilapias have been used effectively an constituents of pig food either directly or through fish silage or fishmeal. Laboratory studies of heavy metal pollution often overlook the effects of exposure to more than one heavy metal at the same time and often heavy metals occur in combination. In Jakarta Bay, high levels of cadmium were found together with mercury. The present study Investigates the effects of exposure to combinations of mercury with cadmium or lead on tissue accumulation of mercury. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of plasmid-determined mercury and cadmium resistances in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucifora, G.

    1989-01-01

    The structural basis for induction of the broad spectrum mercurial resistance operon of pDU1358 with inorganic mercury and with phenylmercury acetate was addressed by DNA sequencing analysis (that showed that a major difference occurred in the 3' 29 base pairs of the ital merR gene compared to the merR genes of Tn501 and R100) and by lac-fusion transcription experiments regulated by merR in trans. The lac-fusion results were compared with those from a narrow spectrum operon, and the pDU1358 merR deleted at the 3' end. A hybrid mer operon containing the merR gene from pDU1358 and lacking the merB gene was inducible by both phenylmercury and inorganic Hg 2+ , showing that organomercurial lyase is not needed for induction by organomercurials. A mutant form of pDU1358 merR missing the C-terminal 17 amino acids responded to inorganic Hg 2+ but not to phenylmercury, indicating that the C-terminal region of the MerR protein of the pDU1358 mer operon is required for the recognition of phenylmercury acetate. The down regulation of the mer operon by the merD gene was also measured in trans with complementing mer operons of pDU1358 or R100 or merD - mutants. In the presence of the merD gene, beta-galactosidase activity was lowered by 2 to 4 fold. The merD gene gene product was visualized by autoradiography. The Cd 2+ resistance determinant cadA of S. aureus was investigated. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA fragment containing the cadA determinant revealed two open reading frames the larger one of which is essential for expression of cadmium resistance

  5. Generation of mercury and cadmium cationic complexes from oxidation processes observed in the presence of dimethylmercury and dimethylcadmium at mercury, platinum, and glass carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, A.M.; McLachian, N.M.

    1988-03-01

    Electrochemical oxidation processes at mercury, platinum, and glassy carbon electrodes in the presence of Me/sub 2/Hg generate a mercury-rich cationic complex that is believed to be (Me/sub 2/Hg/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ or a closely related species. At mercury electrodes, direct participation of the electrode is involved in the electrochemical reaction, which is postulated to occur according to Me/sub 2/Hg + 2Hg ..-->.. (Me/sub 2/Hg/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ + 2e/sup -/. Reduction of the mercury-rich cation (Me/sub 2/Hg/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ at a platinum electrode leads to deposition of elemental mercury and regeneration of Me/sub 2/Hg at the mercury-plated platinum electrode: (Me/sub 2/Hg/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ + 2e/sup -/ ..-->.. Me/sub 2/Hg + 2Hg. At platinum and glassy carbon electrodes, (Me/sub 2/Hg/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ is also produced as a product of controlled potential electrolysis experiments. In this case, the initially generated (Me/sub 2/Hg)/sup +/ complex is formed at very positive potentials. (Me/sub 2/Hg)/sup +/ then reacts rapidly to generate the cationic methyl mercury complex. The overall process at platinum and glassy carbon electrodes is proposed as 3Me/sub 2/Hg ..-->.. (Me/sub 2/Hg/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ + 4Me/sup ./ + 2e/sup -/. Oxidation processes associated with the presence of Me/sub 2/Cd are also electrode-dependent. At mercury electrode, alkyl and metal exchange occurs via a bimetallic alkylcadmium-mercury intermediate: Me/sub 2/Cd + Hg ..-->.. Me/sub 2/Hg + Cd/sup 2 +/ + 2e/sup -/. At platinum and glassy carbon electrodes the reaction occurs at more positive potentials than at mercury electrodes and generates inorganic cadmium ions: Me/sub 2/Cd ..-->.. Cd/sup 2 +/ + 2Me/sup ./ + 2e/sup -/.

  6. Cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic in animal feed and feed materials - trend analysis of monitoring results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamse, Paulien; Van der Fels-Klerx, H J Ine; de Jong, Jacob

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to obtain insights into the presence of cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic in feed materials and feed over time for the purpose of guiding national monitoring. Data from the Dutch feed monitoring programme and from representatives of the feed industry during the period 2007-13 were used. Data covered a variety of feed materials and compound feeds in the Netherlands. Trends in the percentage of samples that exceeded the maximum limit (ML) set by the European Commission, and trends in average, median and 90th percentile concentrations of each of these elements were investigated. Based on the results, monitoring should focus on feed material of mineral origin, feed material of marine origin, especially fish meal, seaweed and algae, as well as feed additives belonging to the functional groups of (1) trace elements (notably cupric sulphate, zinc oxide and manganese oxide for arsenic) and (2) binders and anti-caking agents. Mycotoxin binders are a new group of feed additives that also need attention. For complementary feed it is important to make a proper distinction between mineral and non-mineral feed (lower ML). Forage crops in general do not need high priority in monitoring programmes, although for arsenic grass meal still needs attention.

  7. Imprinted genes and the environment: links to the toxic metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E; Nye, Monica D; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-06-11

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  8. Interaction between essential elements selenium and zinc with cadmium and mercury in samples from hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Atif; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah; Shezadi, Mariam; Ali, Jamshed

    2014-08-01

    The abnormal metabolism of metal ions plays an important role in health and disease conditions; hence, the studies about them have received much interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between trace and toxic elements zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg) in biological samples (scalp hair, blood, and urine) of hypertensive patients (n = 257), residents of Hyderabad, Pakistan. For comparison purpose, the biological samples of age-matched healthy controls were selected as referents. The concentrations of trace and toxic elements were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology was checked using certified reference materials and by the conventional wet acid digestion method. The recovery of all studied elements was found in the range of 96.4-99.1 % in certified reference materials. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Cd and Hg were significantly higher in scalp hair, blood, and urine samples of hypertensive patients than in referents (P < 0.001), whilst the concentrations of Zn and Se were lower in the scalp hair and blood, but higher in the urine samples of hypertensive patients. The deficiency of Zn and Se and the high exposure of toxic metals may be synergistic with risk factors associated with hypertension.

  9. Mercury and cadmium in ringed seals in the Canadian Arctic: Influence of location and diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Tanya M.; Fisk, Aaron T.; Wang, Xiaowa; Ferguson, Steven H.; Young, Brent G.; Reimer, Ken J.; Muir, Derek C.G.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (THg) and total cadmium (TCd) were determined in muscle and liver of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from up to 14 locations across the Canadian Arctic. Location, trophic position (TP) and relative carbon source best predicted the THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. THg concentrations in ringed seals were highest in the western Canadian Arctic (Beaufort Sea), whereas TCd was highest in the eastern Canadian Arctic (Hudson Bay and Labrador). A positive relationship between THg and TP and a negative relationship between THg and relative carbon source contributed to the geographical patterns observed and elevated THg levels at certain sites. In contrast, a negative relationship between TCd and TP was found, indicating that high TCd concentrations are related to seals feeding more on invertebrates than fish. Feeding ecology appears to play an important role in THg and TCd levels in ringed seals, with biomagnification driving elevated THg levels and a dependence on low-trophic position prey resulting in high TCd concentrations. The present study shows that both natural geological differences and diet variability among regions explain the spatial patterns for THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. - Highlights: • Diet and location influenced THg and Cd in ringed seals across the Canadian Arctic. • Biomagnification processes contribute to elevated THg levels in the western Arctic. • Consuming low-trophic position prey explains high Cd levels in the eastern Arctic.

  10. Optical behaviour of cadmium and mercury free eco-friendly lamp nanophosphor for display devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnesh Tiwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the synthesis of cadmium and mercury free lamp (Y, GdBO3: Eu3+ phosphor which is in nano range useful for display device application. The phosphor doped with Eu3+ was synthesized by the solid state reaction method which is suitable for large scale production and eco-friendly. The prepared phosphor was characterized by the X-ray diffraction technique (XRD, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The optical behaviour of the prepared phosphor was determined by photoluminescence (PL spectra recorded in room temperature. The PL excitation spectra were found at 470 nm and the emission spectra cover all visible regions (419–625 nm which indicate that the prepared phosphor can act as a single host for white light emitting diode (WLED application and verified by Internationale de I’Eclairage (CIE techniques. The thermoluminescence (TL glow curve was recorded for Eu3+ doped (Y, GdBO3 phosphor. The TL glow curve was recorded for UV, beta and gamma irradiations and also the kinetic parameters were calculated. In addition to this trap parameters of prepared phosphor were studied using computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD.

  11. Genotypic differences in arsenic, mercury, lead and cadmium in milled rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuli; Shi, Chunhai; Wu, Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    The contents of arsenic, mercury, lead and cadmium in milled rice were determined. Among 216 genotypes, the As, Hg, Pb and Cd contents were ranged from 5.06 to 296.45, 2.46 to 65.85, 4.16 to 744.95 and 5.91 to 553.40 ng/g, respectively. Six genotypes with lower contents of toxic metal elements were selected. The averages of As and Pb contents for indica rice were higher than those of japonica rice, while the averages of Hg and Cd contents were in contrast. Compared with white brown rice, the milled rice from black and red brown rice contained lower contents of four elements. Significant negative correlation was found between As content and alkaline spread value. Significant correlations were observed between As and aspartic acid (Asp) content, Hg and Asp or leucine contents, Pb and cysteine or methionine contents. Cd content was significantly negatively correlated with protein and 14 amino acid contents.

  12. Mercury and cadmium in ringed seals in the Canadian Arctic: Influence of location and diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tanya M., E-mail: tanya.brown@mun.ca [Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X9 (Canada); Fisk, Aaron T. [Great Lakes Institute of Environmental Research, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada); Wang, Xiaowa [Environment Canada, Canada Centre for Inland Waters, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada); Ferguson, Steven H. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Young, Brent G. [University of Manitoba, 500 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Reimer, Ken J. [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College of Canada, PO Box 17000, Stn Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Muir, Derek C.G. [Environment Canada, Canada Centre for Inland Waters, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (THg) and total cadmium (TCd) were determined in muscle and liver of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from up to 14 locations across the Canadian Arctic. Location, trophic position (TP) and relative carbon source best predicted the THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. THg concentrations in ringed seals were highest in the western Canadian Arctic (Beaufort Sea), whereas TCd was highest in the eastern Canadian Arctic (Hudson Bay and Labrador). A positive relationship between THg and TP and a negative relationship between THg and relative carbon source contributed to the geographical patterns observed and elevated THg levels at certain sites. In contrast, a negative relationship between TCd and TP was found, indicating that high TCd concentrations are related to seals feeding more on invertebrates than fish. Feeding ecology appears to play an important role in THg and TCd levels in ringed seals, with biomagnification driving elevated THg levels and a dependence on low-trophic position prey resulting in high TCd concentrations. The present study shows that both natural geological differences and diet variability among regions explain the spatial patterns for THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. - Highlights: • Diet and location influenced THg and Cd in ringed seals across the Canadian Arctic. • Biomagnification processes contribute to elevated THg levels in the western Arctic. • Consuming low-trophic position prey explains high Cd levels in the eastern Arctic.

  13. Mercury and cadmium in ringed seals in the Canadian Arctic: Influence of location and diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tanya M; Fisk, Aaron T; Wang, Xiaowa; Ferguson, Steven H; Young, Brent G; Reimer, Ken J; Muir, Derek C G

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (THg) and total cadmium (TCd) were determined in muscle and liver of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from up to 14 locations across the Canadian Arctic. Location, trophic position (TP) and relative carbon source best predicted the THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. THg concentrations in ringed seals were highest in the western Canadian Arctic (Beaufort Sea), whereas TCd was highest in the eastern Canadian Arctic (Hudson Bay and Labrador). A positive relationship between THg and TP and a negative relationship between THg and relative carbon source contributed to the geographical patterns observed and elevated THg levels at certain sites. In contrast, a negative relationship between TCd and TP was found, indicating that high TCd concentrations are related to seals feeding more on invertebrates than fish. Feeding ecology appears to play an important role in THg and TCd levels in ringed seals, with biomagnification driving elevated THg levels and a dependence on low-trophic position prey resulting in high TCd concentrations. The present study shows that both natural geological differences and diet variability among regions explain the spatial patterns for THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Re-evaluation of blood mercury, lead and cadmium concentrations in the Inuit population of Nunavik (Québec: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayotte Pierre

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arctic populations are exposed to mercury, lead and cadmium through their traditional diet. Studies have however shown that cadmium exposure is most often attributable to tobacco smoking. The aim of this study is to examine the trends in mercury, lead and cadmium exposure between 1992 and 2004 in the Inuit population of Nunavik (Northern Québec, Canada using the data obtained from two broad scale health surveys, and to identify sources of exposure in 2004. Methods In 2004, 917 adults aged between 18 and 74 were recruited in the 14 communities of Nunavik to participate to a broad scale health survey. Blood samples were collected and analysed for metals by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and dietary and life-style characteristics were documented by questionnaires. Results were compared with data obtained in 1992, where 492 people were recruited for a similar survey in the same population. Results Mean blood concentration of mercury was 51.2 nmol/L, which represent a 32% decrease (p 2 = 0.20; p 2 = 0.04; p 2 = 0.20.; p 2 = 0.56; p Conclusion Important decreases in mercury, lead and cadmium exposure were observed. Mercury decrease could be explained by dietary changes and the ban of lead cartridges use likely contributed to the decrease in lead exposure. Blood cadmium concentrations remain high and, underscoring the need for intensive tobacco smoking prevention campaigns in the Nunavik population.

  15. Landfill waste and recycling: Use of a screening-level risk assessment tool for end-of-life cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyrs, William D.; Avens, Heather J.; Capshaw, Zachary A.; Kingsbury, Robert A.; Sahmel, Jennifer; Tvermoes, Brooke E.

    2014-01-01

    Grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) power is currently one of the fastest growing power-generation technologies in the world. While PV technologies provide the environmental benefit of zero emissions during use, the use of heavy metals in thin-film PV cells raises important health and environmental concerns regarding the end-of-life disposal of PV panels. To date, there is no published quantitative assessment of the potential human health risk due to cadmium leaching from cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV panels disposed in a landfill. Thus, we used a screening-level risk assessment tool to estimate possible human health risk associated with disposal of CdTe panels into landfills. In addition, we conducted a literature review of potential cadmium release from the recycling process in order to contrast the potential health risks from PV panel disposal in landfills to those from PV panel recycling. Based on the results of our literature review, a meaningful risk comparison cannot be performed at this time. Based on the human health risk estimates generated for PV panel disposal, our assessment indicated that landfill disposal of CdTe panels does not pose a human health hazard at current production volumes, although our results pointed to the importance of CdTe PV panel end-of-life management. - Highlights: • Analysis of possible human health risk posed by disposal of CdTe panels into landfills. • Qualitative comparison of risks associated with landfill disposal and recycling of CdTe panels. • Landfill disposal of CdTe panels does not pose a human health hazard at current production volumes. • There could be potential risks associated with recycling if not properly managed. • Factors other than concerns over toxic substances will likely drive the decisions of how to manage end-of-life PV panels

  16. Impact of synbiotic diets including inulin, Bacillus coagulans and Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal microbiota of rat exposed to cadmium and mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dornoush Jafarpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of two probiotics and a prebiotic (inulin on intestinal microbiota of rats exposed to cadmium and mercury. Fifty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into nine groups. All groups except control group were fed standard rat chow with 5% inulin and treated as follows: i control (standard diet, ii Lactobacillus plantarum- treated group (1×109 CFU/day, iii Bacillus coagulans-treated group (1×109 spores/day, iv cadmium-treated group (200 μg/rat/day, v L. plantarum and cadmium-treated group, vi B. coagulans and cadmium-treated group, vii mercury-treated group (10 μg/rat/day, viii L. plantarum and mercurytreated group, ix B. coagulans and mercurytreated group. Cadmium, mercury and probiotics were daily gavaged to individual rats for 42 days. Treatment effects on intestinal microbiota composition of rats were determined. Data showed that cadmium and mercury accumulation in rat intestine affected the gastrointestinal tract and had a reduction effect on all microbial counts (total aerobic bacteria, total anaerobic bacteria, total Lactic acid bacteria, L. plantarum and B. coagulans counts compared to the control group. It was also observed that application of synbiotics in synbiotic and heavy metals-treated groups had a significant effect and increased the number of fecal bacteria compared to the heavy metals groups. Based on our study, it can be concluded that L. plantarum and B. coagulans along with prebiotic inulin play a role in protection against cadmium and mercury inhibitory effect and have the potential to be a beneficial supplement in rats’ diets.

  17. Crystal structure, DNA interaction and thermal analysis data of two new antimicrobial active binuclear cadmium and mercury complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musavi, S. A.; Montazerozohori, M.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, R.; Joohari, S.; Assoud, A.

    2017-10-01

    Two new binuclear Schiff base complexes with the general formula [CdLBr(μ-Br)]2 (1) and [Hg2L(μ-I)2I2] (2) were prepared by the reaction of 2,2-dimethyl-N,N'- bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine (L), CdBr2 and HgI2. The crystal structure of two complexes was determined by X-ray crystallography. The common structures for four-coordinated compounds are square planar or the tetrahedral geometries, which is evaluated by the Houser angular index (τ4). In [CdLBr(μ-Br)]2 (1), each cadmium center is five-coordinated by two iminic nitrogen atoms from Schiff base ligand, two μ2-bridging bromide anions and one terminal coordinating bromide anion. The metal center in this centrosymmetric dimer has a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. [Hg2L(μ-I)2I2] (2) consists of two four-coordinated mercury centers with different coordination spheres (HgN2I2 for Hg1 and HgI4 for Hg2). The TG/DTG diagrams showed that both complexes were completely decomposed under a nitrogen atmosphere. Furthermore, antibacterial activities of compounds have been screened against various bacteria and fungi by Disk diffusion method. Mercury complex inhibited the growth of the microorganisms more efficient than cadmium complex. DNA cleavage potential of compounds was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis method. Finally, nano-structure cadmium complex was sono-chemically synthesized and applied as precursor for preparation of cadmium oxide nanoparticles.

  18. Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in surface soils, Pueblo, Colorado: Implications for population health risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diawara, D.M.; Litt, J.S.; Unis, D.; Alfonso, N.; Martinez, L.A.; Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Carsella, J.

    2006-01-01

    Decades of intensive industrial and agricultural practices as well as rapid urbanization have left communities like Pueblo, Colorado facing potential health threats from pollution of its soils, air, water and food supply. To address such concerns about environmental contamination, we conducted an urban geochemical study of the city of Pueblo to offer insights into the potential chemical hazards in soil and inform priorities for future health studies and population interventions aimed at reducing exposures to inorganic substances. The current study characterizes the environmental landscape of Pueblo in terms of heavy metals, and relates this to population distributions. Soil was sampled within the city along transects and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb). We also profiled Pueblo's communities in terms of their socioeconomic status and demographics. ArcGIS 9.0 was used to perform exploratory spatial data analysis and generate community profiles and prediction maps. The topsoil in Pueblo contains more As, Cd, Hg and Pb than national soil averages, although average Hg content in Pueblo was within reported baseline ranges. The highest levels of As concentrations ranged between 56.6 and 66.5 ppm. Lead concentrations exceeded 300 ppm in several of Pueblo's residential communities. Elevated levels of lead are concentrated in low-income Hispanic and African-American communities. Areas of excessively high Cd concentration exist around Pueblo, including low income and minority communities, raising additional health and environmental justice concerns. Although the distribution patterns vary by element and may reflect both industrial and non-industrial sources, the study confirms that there is environmental contamination around Pueblo and underscores the need for a comprehensive public health approach to address environmental threats in urban communities. ?? Springer 2006.

  19. Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in surface soils, Pueblo, Colorado: implications for population health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diawara, Moussa M; Litt, Jill S; Unis, Dave; Alfonso, Nicholas; Martinez, Leeanne; Crock, James G; Smith, David B; Carsella, James

    2006-08-01

    Decades of intensive industrial and agricultural practices as well as rapid urbanization have left communities like Pueblo, Colorado facing potential health threats from pollution of its soils, air, water and food supply. To address such concerns about environmental contamination, we conducted an urban geochemical study of the city of Pueblo to offer insights into the potential chemical hazards in soil and inform priorities for future health studies and population interventions aimed at reducing exposures to inorganic substances. The current study characterizes the environmental landscape of Pueblo in terms of heavy metals, and relates this to population distributions. Soil was sampled within the city along transects and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb). We also profiled Pueblo's communities in terms of their socioeconomic status and demographics. ArcGIS 9.0 was used to perform exploratory spatial data analysis and generate community profiles and prediction maps. The topsoil in Pueblo contains more As, Cd, Hg and Pb than national soil averages, although average Hg content in Pueblo was within reported baseline ranges. The highest levels of As concentrations ranged between 56.6 and 66.5 ppm. Lead concentrations exceeded 300 ppm in several of Pueblo's residential communities. Elevated levels of lead are concentrated in low-income Hispanic and African-American communities. Areas of excessively high Cd concentration exist around Pueblo, including low income and minority communities, raising additional health and environmental justice concerns. Although the distribution patterns vary by element and may reflect both industrial and non-industrial sources, the study confirms that there is environmental contamination around Pueblo and underscores the need for a comprehensive public health approach to address environmental threats in urban communities.

  20. Arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury in canned sardines commercially available in eastern Kentucky, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiber, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Total As, Cd, Pb and Hg in canned sardines within ranges of other studies. → As highest in samples from Norway (1.87 μg/g) and Thailand (1.63 μg/g). → Cd highest in Moroccan (0.07 μg/g), Pb in Canadian (0.27 μg/g); Hg not detected. → Lack of established limits for As and Cd in fish restricts interpretation of results. → Rise of small pelagics in human diet warrants more scrutiny on their metal content. - Abstract: Seventeen samples of canned sardines, originating from six countries and sold in eastern Kentucky, USA, were analyzed in composites of 3-4 fish each for total arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and for mercury (Hg) by thermal decomposition amalgamation and AAS. Results in μg/g wet: As 0.49-1.87 (mean: 1.06), Cd < 0.01-0.07 (0.03), Pb < 0.06-0.27 (0.11), Hg ND < 0.09. Values fall generally within readings reported by others, but no internationally agreed upon guidelines have yet been set for As or Cd in canned or fresh fish. The incidence of cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with As ingestion is extraordinarily high here. With the role of food-borne As in human illness presently under scrutiny and its maximum allowable limits in fish being reviewed, more studies of this nature are recommended, especially considering the potential importance of small pelagic fishes as future seafood of choice.

  1. Lead, mercury, and cadmium exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stephani; Arora, Monica; Fernandez, Cristina; Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph; Chen, Aimin

    2013-10-01

    There is limited research examining the relationship between lead (Pb) exposure and medically diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The role of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) exposures in ADHD development is even less clear. To examine the relationship between Pb, Hg, and Cd and ADHD in children living inside and outside a Lead Investigation Area (LIA) of a former lead refinery in Omaha, NE. We carried out a case-control study with 71 currently medically diagnosed ADHD cases and 58 controls from a psychiatric clinic and a pediatric clinic inside and outside of the LIA. The participants were matched on age group (5-8, 9-12 years), sex, race (African American or Caucasians and others), and location (inside or outside LIA). We measured whole blood Pb, total Hg, and Cd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Inside the LIA, the 27 cases had blood Pb geometric mean (GM) 1.89 µg/dL and the 41 controls had 1.51 µg/dL. Outside the LIA, the 44 cases had blood Pb GM 1.02 µg/dL while the 17 controls had 0.97 µg/dL. After adjustment for matching variables and maternal smoking, socioeconomic status, and environmental tobacco exposure, each natural log unit blood Pb had an odds ratio of 2.52 with 95% confidence interval of 1.07-5.92. Stratification by the LIA indicated similar point estimate but wider CIs. No associations were observed for Hg or Cd. Postnatal Pb exposure may be associated with higher risk of clinical ADHD, but not the postnatal exposure to Hg or Cd. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Time trends in burdens of cadmium, lead, and mercury in the population of northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennberg, Maria; Lundh, Thomas; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Hallmans, Goeran; Jansson, Jan-Hakan; Stegmayr, Birgitta; Custodio, Hipolito M.; Skerfving, Staffan

    2006-01-01

    The time trends of exposure to heavy metals are not adequately known. This is a worldwide problem with regard to the basis for preventive actions and evaluation of their effects. This study addresses time trends for the three toxic elements cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb). Concentrations in erythrocytes (Ery) were determined in a subsample of the population-based MONICA surveys from 1990, 1994, and 1999 in a total of 600 men and women aged 25-74 years. The study took place in the two northernmost counties in Sweden. To assess the effect of changes in the environment, adjustments were made for life-style factors that are determinants of exposure. Annual decreases of 5-6% were seen for Ery-Pb levels (adjusted for age and changes in alcohol intake) and Ery-Hg levels (adjusted for age and changes in fish intake). Ery-Cd levels (adjusted for age) showed a similar significant decrease in smoking men. It is concluded that for Pb and maybe also Hg the actions against pollution during recent decades have caused a rapid decrease of exposure; for Hg the decreased use of dental amalgam may also have had an influence. For Cd, the decline in Ery-Cd was seen only in smokers, indicating that Cd exposure from tobacco has decreased, while other environmental sources of Cd have not changed significantly. To further improve the health status in Sweden, it is important to decrease the pollution of Cd, and actions against smoking in the community are important

  3. Selenium in brown bears (Ursus arctos) from Croatia: Relation to cadmium and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Maja; Sekovanić, Ankica; Reljić, Slaven; Kusak, Josip; Kovačić, Jelena; Orct, Tatjana; Jurasović, Jasna; Huber, Đuro

    2014-01-01

    Muscle (n = 111), liver (n = 111), and kidney cortex (n = 101) samples from brown bears (Ursus arctos) were collected in the 2009 and 2010 hunting seasons in Croatia and analysed for selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and total mercury (Hg). The aim was to assess the levels of these elements according to age, sex, and season of collection, and to investigate possible Se/Cd and Se/Hg interactions. Median Se concentrations were 0.139 μg/g in muscle, 0.409 μg/g in liver and 1.75 μg/g wet mass in kidney cortex. Median Cd and Hg were 0.0078 and 0.0018 μg/g in muscle, 1.09 and 0.031 μg/g in liver, and 16.5 and 0.206 μg/g wet mass in the renal cortex, respectively. Se/Cd molar ratios were less than 1 in the kidney cortex, and close to or above 1 in liver and muscle, respectively. Toxic Cd and Hg correlated with Se in all of the studied tissues. Sex differences were found for all three elements (except Se in liver), with females having higher tissue concentration than males. Only Cd showed age-dependence. Bear samples collected in fall had higher Se in muscles, and Hg in muscles and liver compared to samples collected in spring. Element concentrations in brown bear tissues were within the range of previously reported studies. Bear meat is considered a rich source of Se, safe for consumption with regard to its Cd and Hg content. According to the molar ratio and correlation results, we assume that Se binding is not the primary detoxification pathway for Cd and Hg in brown bears.

  4. Lead, mercury, and cadmium exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Stephani; Arora, Monica; Fernandez, Cristina; Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph; Chen, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is limited research examining the relationship between lead (Pb) exposure and medically diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The role of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) exposures in ADHD development is even less clear. Objectives: To examine the relationship between Pb, Hg, and Cd and ADHD in children living inside and outside a Lead Investigation Area (LIA) of a former lead refinery in Omaha, NE. Methods: We carried out a case-control study with 71 currently medically diagnosed ADHD cases and 58 controls from a psychiatric clinic and a pediatric clinic inside and outside of the LIA. The participants were matched on age group (5–8, 9–12 years), sex, race (African American or Caucasians and others), and location (inside or outside LIA). We measured whole blood Pb, total Hg, and Cd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: Inside the LIA, the 27 cases had blood Pb geometric mean (GM) 1.89 µg/dL and the 41 controls had 1.51 µg/dL. Outside the LIA, the 44 cases had blood Pb GM 1.02 µg/dL while the 17 controls had 0.97 µg/dL. After adjustment for matching variables and maternal smoking, socioeconomic status, and environmental tobacco exposure, each natural log unit blood Pb had an odds ratio of 2.52 with 95% confidence interval of 1.07–5.92. Stratification by the LIA indicated similar point estimate but wider CIs. No associations were observed for Hg or Cd. Conclusions: Postnatal Pb exposure may be associated with higher risk of clinical ADHD, but not the postnatal exposure to Hg or Cd. -- Highlights: • Blood Pb levels are associated with ADHD diagnosis in children. • No association was found between blood Cd or Hg levels and ADHD. • Children living close to hazardous waste site need to reduce metal exposure

  5. Lead, mercury, and cadmium exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Stephani [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Arora, Monica [Department of Psychiatry, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States); Fernandez, Cristina [Department of Pediatrics, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States); Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph [Metallomics Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Chen, Aimin, E-mail: aimin.chen@uc.edu [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is limited research examining the relationship between lead (Pb) exposure and medically diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The role of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) exposures in ADHD development is even less clear. Objectives: To examine the relationship between Pb, Hg, and Cd and ADHD in children living inside and outside a Lead Investigation Area (LIA) of a former lead refinery in Omaha, NE. Methods: We carried out a case-control study with 71 currently medically diagnosed ADHD cases and 58 controls from a psychiatric clinic and a pediatric clinic inside and outside of the LIA. The participants were matched on age group (5–8, 9–12 years), sex, race (African American or Caucasians and others), and location (inside or outside LIA). We measured whole blood Pb, total Hg, and Cd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: Inside the LIA, the 27 cases had blood Pb geometric mean (GM) 1.89 µg/dL and the 41 controls had 1.51 µg/dL. Outside the LIA, the 44 cases had blood Pb GM 1.02 µg/dL while the 17 controls had 0.97 µg/dL. After adjustment for matching variables and maternal smoking, socioeconomic status, and environmental tobacco exposure, each natural log unit blood Pb had an odds ratio of 2.52 with 95% confidence interval of 1.07–5.92. Stratification by the LIA indicated similar point estimate but wider CIs. No associations were observed for Hg or Cd. Conclusions: Postnatal Pb exposure may be associated with higher risk of clinical ADHD, but not the postnatal exposure to Hg or Cd. -- Highlights: • Blood Pb levels are associated with ADHD diagnosis in children. • No association was found between blood Cd or Hg levels and ADHD. • Children living close to hazardous waste site need to reduce metal exposure.

  6. Reference intervals of cadmium, lead, and mercury in blood, urine, hair, and nails among residents in Mansoura city, Nile Delta, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortada, Waelin I.; Sobh, Mohamed A.; El-Defrawy, Mohamed M.; Farahat, Sami E.

    2002-01-01

    A random sample of 68 males and 25 females who reside in Mansoura city, Egypt, was examined for concentrations of cadmium, lead, and mercury in blood, urine, hair, and nails. The effect of gender and smoking on such levels was studied. The influence of dental amalgam on the levels of mercury in these biological samples were also examined. The results obtained show that only blood lead, which increased among males, was affected by gender. Blood levels of cadmium and lead as well as hair lead appeared to increase with smoking habit. Mercury levels in blood and urine were related to the presence of dental amalgam fillings. International comparisons between our results and the corresponding levels in other localities in the world showed that there ere environmentally related variations in terms of cadmium levels in hair, lead levels in blood, urine, hair, and nails, and mercury levels in blood, air, and nails. In conclusion, reference intervals of cadmium, lead, and mercury in the biological samples are environmentally related parameters. Some factors, such as gender, smoking habit, and the presence of dental amalgam fillings, may affect such levels and therefore should be considered

  7. Comparison of conventional and cadmium-zinc-telluride single-photon emission computed tomography for analysis of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: an exploratory study in normal databases for different ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Masaru; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Shibutani, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the differences in thallium-201-chloride (thallium-201) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) scans evaluated by conventional anger-type single-photon emission computed tomography (conventional SPECT) versus cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT (CZT SPECT) imaging in normal databases for different ethnic groups. MPI scans from 81 consecutive Japanese patients were examined using conventional SPECT and CZT SPECT and analyzed with the pre-installed quantitative perfusion SPECT (QPS) software. We compared the summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS), and summed difference score (SDS) for the two SPECT devices. For a normal MPI reference, we usually use Japanese databases for MPI created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, which can be used with conventional SPECT but not with CZT SPECT. In this study, we used new Japanese normal databases constructed in our institution to compare conventional and CZT SPECT. Compared with conventional SPECT, CZT SPECT showed lower SSS (p < 0.001), SRS (p = 0.001), and SDS (p = 0.189) using the pre-installed SPECT database. In contrast, CZT SPECT showed no significant difference from conventional SPECT in QPS analysis using the normal databases from our institution. Myocardial perfusion analyses by CZT SPECT should be evaluated using normal databases based on the ethnic group being evaluated.

  8. What do we know of childhood exposures to metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) in emerging market countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Lindsey M; Mortensen, Mary E; Iossifova, Yulia; Wald, Marlena M; Burgess, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury present potential health risks to children who are exposed through inhalation or ingestion. Emerging Market countries experience rapid industrial development that may coincide with the increased release of these metals into the environment. A literature review was conducted for English language articles from the 21st century on pediatric exposures to arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) top 10 Emerging Market countries: Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Turkey. Seventy-six peer-reviewed, published studies on pediatric exposure to metals met the inclusion criteria. The reported concentrations of metals in blood and urine from these studies were generally higher than US reference values, and many studies identified adverse health effects associated with metals exposure. Evidence of exposure to metals in the pediatric population of these Emerging Market countries demonstrates a need for interventions to reduce exposure and efforts to establish country-specific reference values through surveillance or biomonitoring. The findings from review of these 10 countries also suggest the need for country-specific public health policies and clinician education in Emerging Markets.

  9. What Do We Know of Childhood Exposures to Metals (Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Emerging Market Countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey M. Horton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury present potential health risks to children who are exposed through inhalation or ingestion. Emerging Market countries experience rapid industrial development that may coincide with the increased release of these metals into the environment. A literature review was conducted for English language articles from the 21st century on pediatric exposures to arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in the International Monetary Fund's (IMF top 10 Emerging Market countries: Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Turkey. Seventy-six peer-reviewed, published studies on pediatric exposure to metals met the inclusion criteria. The reported concentrations of metals in blood and urine from these studies were generally higher than US reference values, and many studies identified adverse health effects associated with metals exposure. Evidence of exposure to metals in the pediatric population of these Emerging Market countries demonstrates a need for interventions to reduce exposure and efforts to establish country-specific reference values through surveillance or biomonitoring. The findings from review of these 10 countries also suggest the need for country-specific public health policies and clinician education in Emerging Markets.

  10. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsipoura, Nellie [New Jersey Audubon Society, 11 Hardscrabble Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (United States); Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Newhouse, Michael [NJ Meadowlands Commission, One DeKorte Park Plaza, Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 (United States); Jeitner, Christian [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Mizrahi, David [New Jersey Audubon Society, 11 Hardscrabble Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean {+-}SE 4.29{+-}0.30 {mu}g/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910{+-}386 ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249{+-}44.7 ng/g) and eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) may pose a

  11. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipoura, Nellie; Burger, Joanna; Newhouse, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Gochfeld, Michael; Mizrahi, David

    2011-08-01

    The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean ±SE 4.29±0.30μg/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161±36.7ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910±386ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249±44.7ng/g) and eggs (161±36.7ng/g) may pose a risk if consumed

  12. Investigation of the lead-, mercury- and cadmium concentration found in red deer, deer and chamois in an tyrolian preserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, E.

    1984-05-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals, lead, mercury and cadmium were tested in liver, kidney and rib samples taken from 43 red deer, 24 deer and 42 chamois between June 1982 and June 1983. Since the free living animals aquire the damaging substances through food, water and air intake, the determined sediments found in the bodies give information on the environmental pollution. The lead content in liver and kidney showed minimal values averraging between 0.001 and 0.014 ppm in all three animal types. Ribs, as well as all bones, due to the effect of time, served as reservoirs for lead with average values of 0.2-0.4ppm. In two chamois livers the maximal values of 3.007 and 1.006 ppm were detected and can be accounted for in a secondary contaminated originating from the lethal projectile. In reference to age and sex, no differences could be seen. A seasonal dependency was determined such that the concentration increased in spring and summer in examined livers and kidneys. The rumen content and grazing habit analysis showed minimal residue amounts as in the indicator organs. This lies in connection with the locality of the hunting grounds compared to the road. The mercury content in liver and kidney was of the maximal value 0.449 ppm. Deer showed the greatest contamination in the kidneys, which were surprisingly high in the fall. After rumen content and grazing analysis, the high value can be accounted for the deer's preference to eat mushrooms in the fall which contained an average 1.029 ppm Hg. Changes in concentrations could not be determined to be sex and age dependet. The cadmium concentration was highest in the kidney cortex in all three animal types. A highly significant dependency should be observed in the cadmium concentration. Deer showed the greatest amounts in each age class, which can be referred back to the grazing habits, to the preferred herbs and mushrooms which have high cadmium contents. Due to the strong influence of the age factor in cadmium storage

  13. Hair mercury and urinary cadmium levels in Belgian children and their mothers within the framework of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirard, Catherine; Koppen, Gudrun; De Cremer, Koen

    2014-01-01

    A harmonized human biomonitoring pilot study was set up within the frame of the European projects DEMOCOPHES and COPHES. In 17 European countries, biomarkers of some environmental pollutants, including urinary cadmium and hair mercury, were measured in children and their mothers in order to obtain...

  14. Secondary poisoning of cadmium, copper and mercury: implications for the Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations in water, sediment and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit CE; Wezel AP van; Jager T; Traas TP; CSR

    2000-01-01

    The impact of secondary poisoning on the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPCs) and Negligible Concentrations (NCs) of cadmium, copper and mercury in water, sediment and soil have been evaluated. Field data on accumulation of these elements by fish, mussels and earthworms were used to derive

  15. Determining lead, cadmium and mercury in cosmetics using sweeping via dynamic chelation by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ling; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling

    2017-03-01

    International limits have been established for metal impurities in cosmetics to prevent overexposure to heavy metal ions. Sweeping via dynamic chelation was developed using capillary electrophoresis to analyze lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) impurities in cosmetics. The sweeping via dynamic chelation mechanism involves a large volume of metal ions being swept by a small quantity of chelating agents that were electrokinetically injected into the capillary to chelate metal ions and increase the detection sensitivity. The optimized conditions were as follows: Firstly, the capillary was rinsed by a 0.6 mM TTAB solution to reverse the EOF. The sample solution, which was diluted using 25 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6.0), was injected into the capillary using a pressure of 3.5 psi for 99.9 s. Then, EDTA was injected at -25 kV for 1 min from the EDTA buffer (25 mM ammonium acetate containing 0.6 mM TTAB and 5 mM EDTA), and the metal ions were swept and stacked simultaneously. Finally, the separation was performed at -20 kV using a separation buffer (100 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6.0)). A small quantity of chelating agents introduced into the capillary could yield 33-, 50- and 100-fold detection improvements for Pb, Cd and Hg, respectively, more sensitive than conventional capillary zone electrophoresis. Correlation coefficients greater than 0.998 indicated that this method exhibited good linearity. The relative standard deviation and relative error were less than 8.7%, indicating high precision and accuracy. The recovery value of the homemade lotion, which was employed to simulate the real sample matrix, was 93-104%, which indicated that the sample matrix does not affect the quantitative results. Finally, commercial cosmetics were employed to demonstrate the feasibility of the method to determine Pb, Cd and Hg without complicated sample pretreatment. Graphical Abstract The procedure of analyzing metal ions in cosmetics by sweeping via dynamic chelation.

  16. Spectrometry of X-ray beams using Cadmium and Zinc Teluride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Paulo Henriques Bastos

    1997-06-01

    Determination of X-ray spectra to be utilized for medical diagnostics is a complementary process to the development of procedures to be applied to the quality control of radiodiagnostics X-ray equipment. Until some years ago, that was only possible using Germanium or Silicon detectors. Both have an excellent resolution in this energy range, but present also some restrictions as there are high costs and the necessity of operating them at temperature of liquid Nitrogen, which is not always available at the measurement's place. Room temperature detectors like Cadmium Telluride and Mercury Iodine don't have these restrictions. They, however, have a lower resolution and incomplete collection of the charges produced by their interaction with radiation. With technological advance of crystal growth in general and new techniques like cooling the crystal with a Peltier cell and rise time discrimination circuits, today Cadmium Telluride detectors show a resolution very close to that from Germanium detectors. This work relates to the routine use of Cadmium and Zinc Telluride detectors for measuring X-ray spectra in loco of diagnostic X-ray units. It characterizes the properties of a commercially available detector and offers a model for stripping the measured pulse height distribution. It was also developed a collimator to allow the direct measurement of the beam. The model developed and the constructed set-up were applied to two X-ray tubes and the achieved spectra compared with some spectra available from the literature. (author)

  17. The determination, by differential pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry at the thin mercury-film electrode, of cadmium and thallium in six NIMROC reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    A previously reported procedure has been extended to include the determination of thallium. In samples where thallium occurred in the presence of relatively high concentrations of cadmium, the stripping peak for cadmium was first suppressed with non-ionic surface-active agent, Triton X-100. Cadmium and thallium were determined directly in six NIMROC reference materials without interference from iron(III), in a reducing electrolyte, which is also a complexing agent, consisting of 1 M ammonium chloride, 0,1 M citric acid, and 0,025 M ascorbic acid. Interelement interferences were eliminated by the use of a mercury-film electrode of adequate thickness. The limits of detection for cadmium were 10ng/g and those for thallium 20ng/g

  18. Determination of the Heart-to-Mediastinum Ratio of123I-MIBG Uptake Using Dual-Isotope (123I-MIBG/99mTc-Tetrofosmin) Multipinhole Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride SPECT in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaire, Tanguy; Bailliez, Alban; Ben Bouallegue, Fayçal; Bellevre, Dimitri; Agostini, Denis; Manrique, Alain

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) of 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) uptake obtained using a multipinhole cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera with that obtained using conventional planar imaging. Methods: Forty consecutive heart failure patients underwent planar acquisition 4 h after 123 I-MIBG injection (191 ± 41 [mean ± SD] MBq). To localize the heart using the CZT camera, 99m Tc-tetrofosmin (358 ± 177 MBq) was administered and dual-isotope acquisition was performed. The HMRs were calculated with conventional planar imaging (HMR planar ), with anterior reprojection images using the CZT camera (HMR reproj ), and with transaxial reconstructed images using the CZT camera (HMR transaxial ). In a phantom study, we estimated a linear model fitting the CZT camera data to the planar data, and we applied it to provide corrected CZT camera-determined HMRs in patients (cHMR reproj and cHMR transaxial ). Results: Thirty-four men and 6 women (71 ± 9 y old) with ischemic (22 patients) and nonischemic (18 patients) heart failure completed the study. For 22 of the 40 patients (55%), the New York Heart Association classification was class II and the ejection fraction was 35% ± 9%. HMR reproj (1.12 ± 0.19) and HMR transaxial (1.35 ± 0.34) were lower than HMR planar (1.44 ± 0.14) ( P isotope ( 123 I and 99m Tc) acquisition on a multipinhole CZT camera was feasible in patients with heart failure. However, this determination should be performed using transaxial reconstructed images and linear correction based on phantom data acquisitions. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. Evaluation of Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detector-based Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Nuclear Cardiology: a Comparison with Conventional Anger Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Takanaga; Nanasato, Mamoru; Sugimoto, Mitsuo; Maeda, Hisatoshi

    2017-12-01

    The differences in performance between the cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera or collimation systems and conventional Anger single-photon emission computed tomography (A-SPECT) remain insufficient from the viewpoint of the user. We evaluated the performance of the D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) system to provide more information to the cardiologist or radiological technologist about its use in the clinical field. This study evaluated the performance of the D-SPECT system in terms of energy resolution, detector sensitivity, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and collimator resolution in comparison with that of A-SPECT (Bright-View, Philips, Japan). Energy resolution and detector sensitivity were measured for Tc-99m, I-123, and Tl-201. The SPECT images produced by both systems were evaluated visually using the anthropomorphic torso phantom. The energy resolution of D-SPECT with Tc-99m and I-123 was approximately two times higher than that of A-SPECT. The detector sensitivity of D-SPECT was higher than that of A-SPECT (Tc-99m: 4.2 times, I-123: 2.2 times, and Tl-201: 5.9 times). The mean spatial resolution of D-SPECT was two times higher than that of A-SPECT. The MTF of D-SPECT was superior to that of the A-SPECT system for all frequencies. The collimator resolution of D-SPECT was lower than that of A-SPECT; however, the D-SPECT images clearly indicated better spatial resolution than the A-SPECT images. The energy resolution, detector sensitivity, spatial resolution, and MTF of D-SPECT were superior to those of A-SPECT. Although the collimator resolution was lower than that of A-SPECT, the D-SPECT images were clearly of better quality.

  20. Growth, optical, electrical and photoconductivity studies of a novel nonlinear optical single crystal: Mercury cadmium chloride thiocyanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. M. Ravi; Selvakumar, S.; Sagayaraj, P.; Anbarasi, A.

    2015-02-01

    SCN- ligand based organometallic non-linear optical mercury cadmium chloride thiocyanate (MCCTC) crystals are grown from water plus methanol mixed solvent by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystals are confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis which reveals that the MCCTC belongs to rhombohedral system with R3c space group. MCCTC exhibits a SHG efficiency which is nearly 17 times more than that of KDP. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss measurements of the sample have been carried out for different frequencies (100 Hz to 5 MHz) and, temperatures (308 to 388 K) and the results are discussed. Photoconductivity study confirms that the title compound possesses negative photoconducting nature. The surface morphology of MCCTC was also investigated

  1. Concentrations and health risks of lead, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury in rice and edible mushrooms in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yong; Sun, Xinyang; Yang, Wenjian; Ma, Ning; Xin, Zhihong; Fu, Jin; Liu, Xiaochang; Liu, Meng; Mariga, Alfred Mugambi; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hu, Qiuhui

    2014-03-15

    In this study, four common heavy metals, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) in rice and edible mushrooms of China were studied to evaluate contamination level and edible safety. Ninety two (92) rice samples were collected from the main rice growing regions in China, and 38 fresh and 21 dry edible mushroom samples were collected from typical markets in Nanjing City. The analyzed metal concentrations were significantly different between rice and edible mushroom samples (price samples respectively, were above maximum allowable concentration (MAC). In fresh edible mushroom, Pb and Hg contents in 2.6% samples were above MAC, respectively. However, only Hg content in 4.8% dry edible mushroom samples was above its MAC. Therefore, more than 95% rice and edible mushroom samples in our test had high edible safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium lead, and selenium in feathers of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) from Prince William Sound and the Aleutian Islands of Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Sullivan, Kelsey; Irons, David

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium were analyzed in the feathers of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) from breeding colonies in Prince William Sound and in the Aleutian Islands (Amchitka, Kiska) to test the null hypothesis that there were no differences in metal levels as a function of location, gender, or whether the birds were from oiled or unoiled areas in Prince William Sound. Birds from locations with oil from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in the environment had higher levels of cadmium and lead than those from unoiled places in Prince William Sound, but otherwise there were no differences in metal levels in feathers. The feathers of pigeon guillemots from Prince William Sound had significantly higher levels of cadmium and manganese, but significantly lower levels of mercury than those from Amchitka or Kiska in the Aleutians. Amchitka had the lowest levels of chromium, and Kiska had the highest levels of selenium. There were few gender-related differences, although females had higher levels of mercury and selenium in their feathers than did males. The levels of most metals are below the known effects levels, except for mercury and selenium, which are high enough to potentially pose a risk to pigeon guillemots and to their predators

  3. Mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium lead, and selenium in feathers of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) from Prince William Sound and the Aleutian Islands of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082 (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)], E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Sullivan, Kelsey [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1011 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99503 (United States); P.O. Box 801, Bethel, Maine, 04217 (United States); Irons, David [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1011 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99503 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium were analyzed in the feathers of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) from breeding colonies in Prince William Sound and in the Aleutian Islands (Amchitka, Kiska) to test the null hypothesis that there were no differences in metal levels as a function of location, gender, or whether the birds were from oiled or unoiled areas in Prince William Sound. Birds from locations with oil from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in the environment had higher levels of cadmium and lead than those from unoiled places in Prince William Sound, but otherwise there were no differences in metal levels in feathers. The feathers of pigeon guillemots from Prince William Sound had significantly higher levels of cadmium and manganese, but significantly lower levels of mercury than those from Amchitka or Kiska in the Aleutians. Amchitka had the lowest levels of chromium, and Kiska had the highest levels of selenium. There were few gender-related differences, although females had higher levels of mercury and selenium in their feathers than did males. The levels of most metals are below the known effects levels, except for mercury and selenium, which are high enough to potentially pose a risk to pigeon guillemots and to their predators.

  4. Investigate of atmospheric arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in moss species found around Zilkale, by EDXRF Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akçay, Nilay, E-mail: nilay.akcay@erdogan.edu.tr [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Physics, Rize (Turkey); Batan, Nevzat, E-mail: nbatan@ktu.edu.tr [Karadeniz Technical University, Maçka Vocational School, Trabzon (Turkey); Çinar, Yunus, E-mail: yunus.cinar@erdogan.edu.tr [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Vocational School of Technical Studies, Rize (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Zilkale is a castle located in Fırtına Valley and it is one of the most important historical structures in Çamlihemşin district of Rize Province in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. The castle surrounded by very high mountains that poke up into the clouds, and it rains here all year round. Tourism businesses or industrial plants are not so much there yet. In recent years, Zilkale region has begun the attract tourist, people on treaking holidays in the Kaçkar. But many domestic and foreign tourists come to this region by own car or tour buses. The aim of this study is to investigate the atmospheric concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in five different moss species collected around Zilkale by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The average concentrations of heavy metals in moss samples ranged from 0.79-4.63 ppm for arsenic, 54.47-143.39 ppm for chromium, 39.97-81.03 ppm for lead. The values of cadmium and mercury were found below the detection limit. This study has shown that Hypnum cupressiforme, Abietinella abietina, Rhytidium rugosum, Plagiomnium undulate, and Thuidium tamariscinum samples collected around Zilkale were used to assess the potential contamination of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg contamination in the region and made important contributions toward the understanding of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg baseline data can be used for identification of changes in the levels of these heavy metals in the studied area.

  5. Bioassessment of mercury, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides in the Upper Mississippi River with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, W.G.; Bartsch, M.R.; Rada, R.G.; Balogh, S.J.; Rupprecht, J.E.; Young, R.D.; Johnson, D.K.

    1999-12-15

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were sampled from artificial substrates deployed from May 30 to October 19, 1995, at 19 locks and dams from Minneapolis, MN, to Muscatine, IA. Analyses of composite tissue samples of zebra mussels revealed accumulation of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during a 143-d exposure period. Concentrations of total Hg ranged from 2.6 to 6.1 ng/g wet weight and methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg) from 1.0 to 3.3 ng/g wet weight. About 50% of the mean total Hg in zebra mussels was CH{sub 3}Hg. Cadmium ranged from 76 to 213 ng/g wet weight. Concentrations of total PCBs in zebra mussels varied longitudinally, but the composition of PCB congeners was similar throughout the river. Chlordane and dieldrin were the only two pesticides detected of the 15 analyzed. Zebra mussels are sentinels of contaminant bioavailability in the Upper Mississippi River and may be an important link in the trophic transfer of contaminants in the river because of their increasing importance in the diets of certain fish and waterfowl.

  6. Mercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Irma

    2017-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in several physical and chemical forms. Inorganic mercury refers to compounds formed after the combining of mercury with elements such as chlorine, sulfur, or oxygen. After combining with carbon by covalent linkage, the compounds formed are called

  7. Assessment of Four Heavy Metals Mercury, Lead, Copper and Cadmium Levels in Muscles of Import-ed Tilapia to Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behsan Hemmatinezhad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the residues of mercury (Hg, lead (Pb, copper (Cu and cadmium (Cd in the imported tilapia fillets. Thirty random samples from imported tilapia fillets were collected from different markets in Isfahan City, central Iran. They were analyzed using Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (Perkin Elmer 800 for Pb, Cu, Cd and flow injection mercury system (Perkin Elmer 400 for Hg. Out of the 30 tested samples, concentration of Hg, Pb, Cu and Cd in the tilapia fillets samples as mean± standard deviation were 0.083±.016, 0.638±0.067, 0.521± 0.081 and 0.136 ± 0.025 mg/kg, respectively. Among these, amounts obtained for all metals except for lead were lower than the permissible level specified by WHO (P<1%. The Pb concentrations in all examined samples were higher than WHO standards. The continuous consumption of these contaminated fish regularly for long time may lead to health troubles.

  8. Concentrations of mercury, lead, chromium, cadmium, arsenic and aluminum in irrigation water wells and wastewaters used for agriculture in Mashhad, northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S R; Balali-Mood, M; Riahi-Zanjani, B; Yousefzadeh, H; Sadeghi, M

    2013-04-01

    Contamination of water by toxic chemicals has become commonly recognized as an environmental concern. Based on our clinical observation in Mashhad, northeastern Iran, many people might be at risk of exposure to high concentrations of toxic heavy metals in water. Because wastewater effluents as well as water wells have been commonly used for irrigation over the past decades, there has been some concern on the toxic metal exposure of crops and vegetables irrigated with the contaminated water. To measure the concentrations of mercury, lead, chromium, cadmium, arsenic and aluminium in irrigation water wells and wastewaters used for agriculture in Mashhad, northeastern Iran. 36 samples were taken from irrigation water wells and a wastewater refinery in North of Mashhad at four times--May 2008, March 2009, and June and July 2010. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the concentration of toxic metals. Graphite furnace was used for the measurement of lead, chromium, cadmium and aluminum. Mercury and arsenic concentrations were measured by mercury/hydride system. Chromium, cadmium, lead and arsenic concentrations in the samples were within the standard range. The mean±SD concentration of mercury in irrigation wells (1.02±0.40 μg/L) exceeded the FAO maximum permissible levels. The aluminum concentration in irrigation water varied significantly from month to month (p=0.03). All wastewater samples contained high mercury concentrations (6.64±2.53 μg/L). For high mercury and aluminum concentrations, the water sources studied should not be used for agricultural use. Regular monitoring of the level of heavy metals in water and employing the necessary environmental interventions in this area are strongly recommended.

  9. Concentrations of Mercury, Lead, Chromium, Cadmium, Arsenic and Aluminum in Irrigation Water Wells and Wastewaters Used for Agriculture in Mashhad, Northeastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Mousavi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of water by toxic chemicals has become commonly recognized as an environmental concern. Based on our clinical observation in Mashhad, northeastern Iran, many people might be at risk of exposure to high concentrations of toxic heavy metals in water. Because wastewater effluents as well as water wells have been commonly used for irrigation over the past decades, there has been some concern on the toxic metal exposure of crops and vegetables irrigated with the contaminated water. Objective: To measure the concentrations of mercury, lead, chromium, cadmium, arsenic and aluminium in irrigation water wells and wastewaters used for agriculture in Mashhad, northeastern Iran. Methods: 36 samples were taken from irrigation water wells and a wastewater refinery in North of Mashhad at four times—May 2008, March 2009, and June and July 2010. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the concentration of toxic metals. Graphite furnace was used for the measurement of lead, chromium, cadmium and aluminum. Mercury and arsenic concentrations were measured by mercury/hydride system. Results: Chromium, cadmium, lead and arsenic concentrations in the samples were within the standard range. The mean±SD concentration of mercury in irrigation wells (1.02±0.40 μg/L exceeded the FAO maximum permissible levels. The aluminum concentration in irrigation water varied significantly from month to month (p=0.03. All wastewater samples contained high mercury concentrations (6.64±2.53 μg/L. Conclusion: For high mercury and aluminum concentrations, the water sources studied should not be used for agricultural use. Regular monitoring of the level of heavy metals in water and employing the necessary environmental interventions in this area are strongly recommended.

  10. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) and enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation trigger antioxidant enzyme metabolism and programmed cell death in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huize; Gong, Yan; Han, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming increasingly widespread in the environment. Free cadmium ions released from commonly used NPs under ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation are potentially toxic to living organisms. With increasing levels of UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the ozone layer, the potential additive effect of NPs and UV-B radiation on plants is of concern. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-QDs), a common form of NP, and UV-B radiation on wheat seedlings. Graded doses of CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation were tested, either alone or in combination, based on physical characteristics of 5-day-old seedlings. Treatments of wheat seedlings with either CdTe-QDs (200 mg/L) or UV-B radiation (10 KJ/m(2)/d) induced the activation of wheat antioxidant enzymes. CdTe-QDs accumulation in plant root cells resulted in programmed cell death as detected by DNA laddering. CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation inhibited root and shoot growth, respectively. Additive inhibitory effects were observed in the combined treatment group. This research described the effects of UV-B and CdTe-QDs on plant growth. Furthermore, the finding that CdTe-QDs accumulate during the life cycle of plants highlights the need for sustained assessments of these interactions.

  11. Effects of Long-term exposure of Gelatinated and Non-gelatinated Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots on Differentiated PC12 cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prasad, Babu R

    2012-01-20

    Abstract Background The inherent toxicity of unmodified Quantum Dots (QDs) is a major hindrance to their use in biological applications. To make them more potent as neuroprosthetic and neurotherapeutic agents, thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped CdTe QDs, were coated with a gelatine layer and investigated in this study with differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. The QD - cell interactions were investigated after incubation periods of up to 17 days by MTT and APOTOX-Glo Triplex assays along with using confocal microscopy. Results Long term exposure (up to 17 days) to gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs of PC12 cells in the course of differentiation and after neurites were grown resulted in dramatically reduced cytotoxicity compared to non-gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs. Conclusion The toxicity mechanism of QDs was identified as caspase-mediated apoptosis as a result of cadmium leaking from the core of QDs. It was therefore concluded that the gelatine capping on the surface of QDs acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic ions from the core QDs in the long term (up to 17 days).

  12. Determination of lead, mercury and cadmium concentrations in different organs of Barbus grypus and Liza abu of Karoon River in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ghorbani ranjbary

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of heavy metals in fish body causes the destruction of soft tissues and suppression of immune system. Moreover, consumption of contaminated fish causes several consequences in humans. This survey was conducted to determine the concentration of lead, mercury and cadmium in muscle tissue, gill as well as liver of Barbus grypus and Liza abu. These two species are native fishes of Karoon River in Ahvaz area. A total number of 80 sample was obtained during the winter of 2010. After preparation and chemical digestion of fish samples, the amounts of heavy metals were determined by spectrophotometer method. According to the results, the overall lead concentration in different organs of the two species was more than mercury and cadmium concentrations. Furthermore, the accumulation of heavy elements in gills was estimated higher than the other organs. Although a significant difference (P

  13. Secondary poisoning of cadmium, copper and mercury: implications for the Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations in water, sediment and soil

    OpenAIRE

    Smit CE; van Wezel AP; Jager T; Traas TP; CSR

    2000-01-01

    The impact of secondary poisoning on the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPCs) and Negligible Concentrations (NCs) of cadmium, copper and mercury in water, sediment and soil have been evaluated. Field data on accumulation of these elements by fish, mussels and earthworms were used to derive MPCs and NCs for birds and mammals for which these organisms are a food source. Accumulation by aquatic and terrestrial biota seems to be negatively correlated with external concentrations. The correla...

  14. Use of the Spin-Trapping method to establish the radical steps in the reactions of organic compounds of zinc, cadmium, and mercury with various peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.A.; Grishin, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper uses the spin trapping method to investigate the homolytic reactions of group II organometallic compounds (OMC) with organic and heteroorganic peroxides. The radical reactions of the OMC with peroxides was investigated and the reactivity of the spin traps was examined with respect to compounds of zinc, cadmium, and mercury. Phenyl-tert-butylnitron (I), 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (II), and tri-bromonitrobenzene (III) were chosen as spin traps. The radicals formed are aable to initiate the polymerization of vinyl monomers

  15. Biomonitoring of Lead, Cadmium, Total Mercury, and Methylmercury Levels in Maternal Blood and in Umbilical Cord Blood at Birth in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mi Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With rising concerns of heavy metal exposure in pregnancy and early childhood, this study was conducted to assess the relationship between the lead, cadmium, mercury, and methylmercury blood levels in pregnancy and neonatal period. The study population included 104 mothers and their children pairs who completed both baseline maternal blood sampling at the second trimester and umbilical cord blood sampling at birth. The geometric mean maternal blood levels of lead, cadmium, total mercury, and methylmercury at the second trimester were 1.02 ± 1.39 µg/dL, 0.61 ± 1.51 µg/L, 2.97 ± 1.45 µg/L, and 2.39 ± 1.45 µg/L, respectively, and in the newborns, these levels at birth were 0.71 ± 1.42 µg/dL, 0.01 ± 5.31 µg/L, 4.44 ± 1.49 µg/L, and 3.67 ± 1.51 µg/L, respectively. The mean ratios of lead, cadmium, total mercury, and methylmercury levels in the newborns to those in the mothers were 0.72, 0.04, 1.76, and 1.81, respectively. The levels of most heavy metals in pregnant women and infants were higher in this study than in studies from industrialized western countries. The placenta appears to protect fetuses from cadmium; however, total mercury and methylmercury were able to cross the placenta and accumulate in fetuses.

  16. Blood lead, cadmium and mercury in relation to homocysteine and C-reactive protein in women of reproductive age: a panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Anna Z; Mumford, Sunni L; Sjaarda, Lindsey; Perkins, Neil J; Malik, Farah; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2017-08-08

    To examine the relationship between cadmium, lead, and mercury concentrations with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and homocysteine in women. Metals were measured at enrollment in whole blood. Homocysteine and hs-CRP were measured in one (N = 9) or two (N = 250) menstrual cycles up to 3 and 8 times per cycle, respectively. Linear mixed models with inverse probability of exposure weights to account for time varying confounding were used and models were stratified by dietary and serum vitamin status (dietary: vitamin B 6 , B 12 , folate; serum: folate). Geometric mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) concentrations for cadmium, lead, and mercury were 0.29 (0.26-0.31) μg/L, 0.91 (0.86-0.96) μg/dL, and 1.05 (0.93-1.18) μg/L, respectively. Lead was associated with increased homocysteine (0.08; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.15) and this persisted among those in the lower three quartiles of consumption of vitamin B 6 , B 12 , folate, and serum folate but was not significant among those in the upper quartile. No associations were observed between metals and hs-CRP. Blood lead was associated with increased homocysteine in a cohort of healthy, premenopausal women but these associations did not persist among those consuming ≥75th percentile of essential micronutrients. Cadmium, lead, and mercury were not associated with hs-CRP concentrations.

  17. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... build up in fish, shellfish, and animals that eat fish. The nervous system is sensitive to all forms of mercury. Exposure to high levels can damage the brain and kidneys. Pregnant women can pass the mercury in their bodies to their babies. It is important to protect your family from ...

  18. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has set a limit of 2 parts of mercury per billion parts of drinking water (2 ppb). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has set a maximum permissible level of 1 part of methylmercury in a million ... of 0.1 milligram of organic mercury per cubic meter of workplace air (0.1 ...

  19. Maternal and umbilical cord blood levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, and essential trace elements in Arctic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler Walker, Jody; Houseman, Jan; Seddon, Laura; McMullen, Ed; Tofflemire, Karen; Mills, Carole; Corriveau, Andre; Weber, Jean-Philippe; LeBlanc, Alain; Walker, Mike; Donaldson, Shawn G.; Van Oostdam, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Maternal and umbilical cord blood levels of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and the trace elements copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and selenium (Se) are reported for Inuit, Dene/Metis, Caucasian, and Other nonaboriginal participants from Arctic Canada. This is the first human tissue monitoring program covering the entire Northwest Territories and Nunavut for multiple contaminants and establishes a baseline upon which future comparisons can be made. Results for chlorinated organic pesticides and PCBs for these participants have been reported elsewhere. Between May 1994 and June 1999, 523 women volunteered to participate by giving their written informed consent, resulting in the collection of 386 maternal blood samples, 407 cord samples, and 351 cord:maternal paired samples. Geometric mean (GM) maternal total mercury (THg) concentrations ranged from 0.87μg/L (SD=1.95) in the Caucasian group of participants (n=134) to 3.51μg/L (SD=8.30) in the Inuit group (n=146). The GM of the Inuit group was 2.6-fold higher than that of the Dene/Metis group (1.35μg/L, SD=1.60, n=92) and significantly higher than those of all other groups (P 8 cigarettes/day) was 7.4-fold higher and 12.5-fold higher, respectively, than in nonsmokers. The high percentage of smokers among Inuit (77%) and Dene/Metis (48%) participants highlights the need for ongoing public health action directed at tobacco prevention, reduction, and cessation for women of reproductive age. Pb and THg were detected in more than 95% of all cord blood samples, with GMs of 21 μg/L and 2.7μg/L, respectively, and Cd was detected in 26% of all cord samples, with a GM of 0.08μg/L. Cord:maternal ratios from paired samples ranged from 0.44 to 4.5 for THg, from 0.5 to 10.3 for MeHg, and 0.1 to 9.0 for Pb. On average, levels of THg, MeHg, and Zn were significantly higher in cord blood than in maternal blood (P<0.0001), whereas maternal Cd, Pb, Se, and Cu levels were significantly higher than those in cord blood (P<0

  20. Comparative analysis on the effect of Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) in reducing cadmium, mercury and lead accumulation in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka R; Nwokocha, Magdalene I; Aneto, Imaria; Obi, Joshua; Udekweleze, Damian C; Olatunde, Bukola; Owu, Daniel U; Iwuala, Moses O

    2012-06-01

    L. esculentum (tomato) contain compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, able to synthesize metal chelating proteins. We examined the ability of fruit extract to protect against mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the liver. Rats were fed on tomato mixed with rat chow (10% w/w), while Hg (10 ppm), Cd (200 ppm) and Pb (100 ppm) was given in drinking water. Tomato was administered together with the metals (group 2), a week after exposure (group 3) or a week before metal exposure (group 4) for a period of six weeks. The metal accumulations in the liver were determined using AAS. There was a significant (Ptomato to Cd and Hg accumulation but not to Pb (PTomato reduces uptake while enhancing the elimination of these metals in a time dependent manner. The highest hepatoprotective effect was to Cd followed by Hg and least to Pb. Its administration is beneficial in reducing heavy metal accumulation in the liver. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of selenium with cadmium and mercury in semen and reproductive tissues: in vivo and in vitro studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alabi, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were conducted to investigate the metabolism of selenium (Se), and the influences of Se on the metabolism of cadmium (Cd) and inorganic mercury (Hg) in rats, and in ram semen in vitro. Se-deficient (-Se) or Se-adequate (+Se) rats were injected intraperitoneally with either /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ or /sup 203/HgNO/sub 3/. Semen ejaculates from yearling Suffolk rams were used for the in vitro studies. Whole-body retention of Cd and Hg in rats was significantly increased by Se. However, regardless of the Se status, the predominant route of Cd and Hg excretion was feces. Data on whole tissue Cd retention for both -Se and +Se rats gave the following order of decreasing tissue Cd levels: liver > kidney > testis > epididymis > seminal vesicles > prostate > brain. Cd and Hg concentrations ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -2/ M were shown to be injurious to ram sperm in vitro as indicated by the depressed motility and reduced oxygen uptake.

  2. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, and selenium levels in blood of four species of turtles from the Amazon in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Schneider, Larissa; Vogt, Richard; Gochfeld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Using blood as a method of assessing metal levels in turtles may be useful for populations that are threatened or endangered or are decreasing. In this study the levels of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in blood of four species of turtles from the tributaries of the Rio Negro in the Amazon of Brazil were examined. The turtles included the six-tubercled Amazon (river) turtle (Podocnemis sextuberculata), red-headed Amazon (river) turtle (Podocnemis erythrocephala), big-headed Amazon (river) turtle (Peltocephalus dumerilianus), and matamata turtle (Chelus fimbriatus). Blood samples were taken from the vein in the left hind leg of each turtle. There were significant interspecific differences in the sizes of the turtles from the Rio Negro, and in concentrations of Pb, Hg, and Se; the smallest species (red-headed turtles) had the highest levels of Pb in their blood, while Se levels were highest in big-headed turtles and lowest in red-headed turtles. Hg in blood was highest in matamata, intermediate in big-headed, and lowest in the other two turtles. Even though females were significantly larger than males, there were no significant differences in metal levels as a function of gender, and the only relationship of metals to size was for Cd. Variations in metal levels among species suggest that blood may be a useful bioindicator. Metal levels were not high enough to pose a health risk to the turtles or to consumers, such as humans.

  3. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in feathers of Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) and Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) from Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Sullivan, Kelsey; Irons, David; McKnight, Aly

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium were analyzed in the feathers of Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Shoup Bay in Prince William Sound, Alaska to determine if there were age-related differences in metal levels, and in Black Oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani)) from the same region to determine if there were differences in oiled and unoiled birds. Except for mercury, there were no age-related differences in metals levels in the feathers of kittiwakes. Kittiwakes over 13 years of age had the highest levels of mercury. There were no differences in levels of metals in the feathers of oystercatchers from oiled and unoiled regions of Prince William Sound. Except for mercury, the feathers of oystercatchers had significantly higher levels of all metals than those of kittiwakes. Levels of mercury in kittiwake feathers (mean of 2910 ng/g [ppb]) were within the range of many species of seabirds reported for other studies, and were generally below adverse effects levels

  4. Blood levels of lead, cadmium, and mercury in the Korean population: Results from the Second Korean National Human Exposure and Bio-monitoring Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jinheon; Paek, Domyung; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2009-01-01

    In Korea, there have been a number of efforts to measure levels of exposure to environmental pollutants among the population. This paper focuses on investigating the distribution of, extent of, and factors influencing the blood levels of lead, cadmium, and mercury in the Korean population, working from data obtained from the Second Korean National Human Exposure and Bio-monitoring Examination. To that end, blood metal concentrations were analyzed from a total of 2369 participants who were 18 years of age and older. The geometric mean concentrations and their 95% confidence intervals of metals in blood were found to be lead, 1.72 μg/dL (95% CI, 1.68-1.76); cadmium, 1.02 μg/L (95% CI, 1.00-1.05); and mercury, 3.80 μg/L (95% CI, 3.66-3.93). Regression analyses indicate that the levels of metals in the blood are mainly influenced by gender, age, and the education levels of the participants. Current smoking status is also found to be a significant factor for increasing both lead and cadmium levels. Although our study, as the first nationwide survey of exposure to environmental pollutants in Korea, has value on its own, it should be expanded and extended in order to provide information on environmental exposure pathways and to watch for changes in the level of exposure to environmental pollutants among the population.

  5. Association of Dietary Intake and Biomarker Levels of Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury among Asian Populations in the United States: NHANES 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Hiroshi; Linder, Stephen; Mitchell, Laura E.; Delclos, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have recently shown that biomarker levels of selected metals are higher in Asians than in other U.S. ethnic groups, with important differences within selected Asian subgroups. Much of this difference may be dietary in origin; however, this is not well established. Objective: We evaluated dietary intake of toxic metals as a source of increased biomarker levels of metals among U.S. Asians. Methods: We estimated daily food consumption and dietary intake of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury by combining 24-hr dietary intake recall data from the 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with data from the USDA Food Composition Intake Database and FDA Total Dietary Study. We analyzed associations between dietary metal intake and biomarker levels of the metals using linear regression. Further, estimated food consumption and metal intake levels were compared between Asians and other racial/ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican American, and other Hispanic) and within three Asian subgroups (Chinese, Indian Asian, and other Asians). Results: Significant associations (p cadmium and lead were not significantly associated with their corresponding biomarker levels in U.S. Asians. Citation: Awata H, Linder S, Mitchell LE, Delclos GL. 2017. Association of dietary intake and biomarker levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury among Asian populations in the United States: NHANES 2011–2012. Environ Health Perspect 125:314–323; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP28 PMID:27586241

  6. Association of Dietary Intake and Biomarker Levels of Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury among Asian Populations in the United States: NHANES 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Hiroshi; Linder, Stephen; Mitchell, Laura E; Delclos, George L

    2017-03-01

    We have recently shown that biomarker levels of selected metals are higher in Asians than in other U.S. ethnic groups, with important differences within selected Asian subgroups. Much of this difference may be dietary in origin; however, this is not well established. We evaluated dietary intake of toxic metals as a source of increased biomarker levels of metals among U.S. Asians. We estimated daily food consumption and dietary intake of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury by combining 24-hr dietary intake recall data from the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with data from the USDA Food Composition Intake Database and FDA Total Dietary Study. We analyzed associations between dietary metal intake and biomarker levels of the metals using linear regression. Further, estimated food consumption and metal intake levels were compared between Asians and other racial/ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican American, and other Hispanic) and within three Asian subgroups (Chinese, Indian Asian, and other Asians). Significant associations ( p cadmium and lead were not significantly associated with their corresponding biomarker levels in U.S. Asians. Citation: Awata H, Linder S, Mitchell LE, Delclos GL. 2017. Association of dietary intake and biomarker levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury among Asian populations in the United States: NHANES 2011-2012. Environ Health Perspect 125:314-323; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP28.

  7. Effect of irradation on liver and kidney functions in rat subjected to cadmium or mercury ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaie, F.M.; Maharem, T.M.; Yousri, R.M.; Omeran, M.F.; Abdel-Hamid, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    Male albino rats were orally administered a single dose of cadmium chloride or mercuric acetate 5-days before exposure to whole body gamma irradiation at the dose levels 3 and 6 Gy. The biochemical analyses were carried out 3-days post irradiation. The data revealed that radiation exposure and/or Cd or Hg treatment resulted in significant increase in serum aminotransferases (ALT and AST) while SALP and SCHE showed statistical significant decrease as compared with the control group. Gamma irradiation (3 and 6 Gy) induced no changes in serum levels of urea and creatinine while significant increase was observed when the animals were administered Cd or Hg 5-days before gamma-irradiation. Significant decrease in urea and creatinine clearance and TPR could be recorded due to radiation exposure. Level of serum protein was not affected in all animal groups over the experimentation period. 2 tab

  8. Effect of increasing tellurium content on the electronic and optical properties of cadmium selenide telluride alloys CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}: An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, Ali Hussain, E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [Institute of Physical Biology-South Bohemia University, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, Malaysia University of Perlis, P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kityk, I.V. [Electrical Engineering Department, Technical University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 17/19, Czestochowa (Poland); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique de la Matiere (LPQ3 M), universite de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Auluck, S. [National Physical Laboratory Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2011-06-16

    Highlights: > Theoretical study of effect of vary Te content on band structure, density of states, linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}. > Increasing Te content leads to a decrease in the energy band gap. > Significant enhancement of the electronic properties as a function of tellurium concentration - Abstract: An all electron full potential linearized augmented plane wave method, within a framework of GGA (EV-GGA) approach, has been used for an ab initio theoretical study of the effect of increasing tellurium content on the band structure, density of states, and the spectral features of the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of the cadmium-selenide-telluride ternary alloys CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x} (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0). Our calculations show that increasing Te content leads to a decrease in the energy band gap. We find that the band gaps are 0.95 (1.76), 0.89 (1.65), 0.83 (1.56), 0.79 (1.44) and 0.76 (1.31) eV for x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 in the cubic structure. As these alloys are known to have a wurtzite structure for x less than 0.25, the energy gaps are 0.8 (1.6) eV and 0.7 (1.55) eV for the wurtzite structure (x = 0.0, 0.25) for the GGA (EV-GGA) exchange correlation potentials. This reduction in the energy gaps enhances the functionality of the CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x} alloys, at least for these concentrations, leading to an increase in the effective second-order susceptibility coefficients from 16.75 pm/V (CdSe) to 18.85 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.25}), 27.23 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5}), 32.25 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.25}Te{sub 0.75}), and 37.70 pm/V (CdTe) for the cubic structure and from 12.65 pm/V (CdSe) to 21.11 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.25}) in the wurtzite structure. We find a nonlinear relationship between the absorption/emission energies and composition, and a significant enhancement of the electronic properties as a function of tellurium concentration. This variation will help in

  9. Characterization of nanocrystalline cadmium telluride thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 2. Characterization of nanocrystalline ... Structural, electrical and optical characteristics of CdTe thin films prepared by a chemical deposition method, successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), are described. For deposition of CdTe thin films, ...

  10. Zinc telluride-cadmium chalkogenides heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, Ya.A.; Konnikov, S.G.; Supalov, V.A.; Kondaurov, N.M.; Kovalev, A.N.; Vanyukov, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    Heterojunctions ZnTe-CdSe, ZnTe-CdS, ZnTe-CdSsub(x)Sesub(1-x) have been prepared and studied by means of an electron sonde and electroluminescence. Epitaxial layers of CdSe on oriented plates of ZnTe are grown by the method of a chemical transport reaction in the open system where purified hydrogen is used as a carrier and reagent. The substance to be evaporated is CdSe. The study of cathodoluminescence of cleaved surfaces of heterojunctions ZnTe-CdSe and ZnTe-CdS by a thin electron sonde shows that there exists the region of solid solutions in heterojunctions of such a type. Epitaxial heterojunctions ZnTe-CdX are structures of the type p + -p-n-n + . The study of spectra of electroluminescence of heterojunctions which are characterized by the region of negative resistance in the volt-ampere curve and photoluminescence of epitaxial films at 77 deg K allows the presence of radiation maxima to be established both for ZnTe and CdX. Heterojunctions ZnTe-CdSe on the basis of non-alloyed materials change the colour of luminescence from green to red on switching. A possibility is shown of preparation of luminescent diodes with preferential injection into ZnTe (green sources) and into CdSe (red sources)

  11. The direct determination, by differential pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry at the thin mercury-film electrode, of cadmium, lead and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the development and application of a voltammetric procedure for the direct, simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead, and copper in three SAROC reference materials (carbonatite, magnesite, and quartz). The electrolyte was a mixture of 1 M ammonium chloride, 0,1 M citric acid, and 0,025 M ascorbic acid. No interferences were encountered from Fe(III), As(III), Sb(V), Tl(I), or In(III) at the concentrations present in the samples. Intermetallic interferences were eliminated by the use of thin mercury-film electrodes not less than 80nm thick. Limits of detection were determined by the degree to which the supporting electrolyte could be purified, and were estimated to be 10ng/g, 250ng/g, and 150ng/g for cadmium, lead, and copper respectively

  12. Enhanced biosorption of mercury(II) and cadmium(II) by cold-induced hydrophobic exobiopolymer secreted from the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamil, Sheikh Shawkat; Choi, Mun Hwan; Song, Jung Hyun; Park, Hyunju; Xu, Ju; Yoon, Sung Chul [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea). Nano-Biomaterials Science Lab.; Chi, Ki-Whan [Ulsan Univ. (Korea). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-09-15

    The cells of psychrotrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 were found to secrete large amounts of exobiopolymer (EBP) composed of mainly hydrophobic (water insoluble) polypeptide(s) (as contain {proportional_to}50 mol% hydrophobic amino acids, lacking cysteine residue) when grown on fructose containing limited M1 medium at the temperatures as low as 0-10 C but trace amount at high (30 C, optimum growth) temperature. Two types of nonliving BM07 cells (i.e., cells grown at 30 C and 10 C) as well as the freeze-dried EBP were compared for biosorption of mercury (Hg(II)) and cadmium (Cd(II)). The optimum adsorption pH was found 7 for Hg(II) but 6 for Cd(II), irrespective of the type of biomass. Equilibrium adsorption data well fitted the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption (Q{sub max}) was 72.3, 97.4, and 286.2 mg Hg(II)/g dry biomass and 18.9, 27.0, and 61.5 mg Cd(II)/g dry biomass for cells grown at 30 C and 10 C and EBP, respectively, indicating major contribution of heavy metal adsorption by cold-induced EBP. Mercury(II) binding induced a significant shift of infrared (IR) amide I and II absorption of EBP whereas cadmium(II) binding showed only a very little shift. These IR shifts demonstrate that mercury(II) and cadmium(II) might have different binding sites in EBP, which was supported by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric analysis and sorption results of chemically modified biomasses. This study implies that the psychrotrophs like BM07 strain may play an important role in the bioremediation of heavy metals in the temperate regions especially in the inactive cold season. (orig.)

  13. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André; Steiger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun, is different in several respects from the other three terrestrial planets. In appearance, it resembles the heavily cratered surface of the Moon, but its density is high, it has a magnetic field and magnetosphere, but no atmosphere or ionosphere. This book reviews the progress made in Mercury studies since the flybys by Mariner 10 in 1974-75, based on the continued research using the Mariner 10 archive, on observations from Earth, and on increasingly realistic models of its interior evolution.

  14. Representative levels of blood lead, mercury, and urinary cadmium in youth: Korean Environmental Health Survey in Children and Adolescents (KorEHS-C), 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burm, Eunae; Song, Inmyung; Ha, Mina; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Kee Jae; Kim, Hwan-Cheol; Lim, Sinye; Kim, Soo-Young; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kim, Su Young; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Sakong, Joon; Kang, Hee-Tae; Son, Mia; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Kim, Yeni; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Soo-Jong; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kim, Jeongseon; Oh, Seyong; Yu, Jeesuk; Chang, Seong-Sil; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Choi, Youn-Hee; Choi, Wookhee; Kim, Suejin; Yu, Seung Do

    2016-07-01

    This study examined levels of blood lead and mercury, and urinary cadmium, and associated sociodemographic factors in 3-18 year-old Korean children and adolescents. We used the nationally representative Korean Environmental Health Survey in Children and Adolescents data for 2012-2014 and identified 2388 children and adolescents aged 3-18 years. The median and 95th percentile exposure biomarker levels with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Multivariate regression analyses were performed on log transformed exposure biomarker levels adjusted for age, sex, area, household income, and father's education level. The median exposure biomarker levels were compared with data from Germany, the US, and Canada, as well as the levels of Korean children measured at different times. The median levels of blood lead and mercury, as well as urinary cadmium were 1.23μg/dL, 1.80μg/L, and 0.40μg/L (95% CIs, 1.21-1.25, 1.77-1.83, and 0.39-0.41, respectively). The blood lead levels were significantly higher in boys and younger children (pchildren with less educated fathers (p=0.004) after adjusting for covariates. Urinary cadmium level increased with age (pchildren and adolescents than those in their peers in Germany, the US, and Canada. Blood lead levels tended to decrease with increasing age and divergence between the sexes, particularly in the early teen years. Median levels of blood lead and urinary cadmium decreased since 2010. Sociodemographic factors, including age, sex, and father's education level were associated with environmental exposure to heavy metals in Korean children and adolescents. These biomonitoring data are valuable for ongoing surveillance of environmental exposure in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  15. The concentration of heavy metals: zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, mercury, iron and calcium in head hair of a randomly selected sample of Kenyan people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandiga, S.O.; Jumba, I.O.

    1982-01-01

    An intercomparative analysis of the concentration of heavy metals:zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, mercury, iron and calcium in head hair of a randomly selected sample of Kenyan people using the techniques of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPAS) has been undertaken. The percent relative standard deviation for each sample analysed using either of the techniques show good sensitivity and correlation between the techniques. The DPAS was found to be slightly sensitive than the AAs instrument used. The recalculated body burden rations of Cd to Zn, Pb to Fe reveal no unusual health impairement symptoms and suggest a relatively clean environment in Kenya.(author)

  16. Spatial patterns in PCBs, pesticides, mercury and cadmium in the common sole in the NW Mediterranean Sea, and a novel use of contaminants as biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierking, J.; Wafo, E.; Schembri, T.; Lagadec, V.; Nicolas, C.; Letourneur, Y.; Harmelin-Vivien, M.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed spatial patterns in 37 PCB congeners, eight pesticides, and the heavy metals mercury and cadmium in the flatfish Solea solea at four sites in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean). Overall contaminant concentrations generally exceeded those reported for S. solea elsewhere, but fell into the range of other Gulf fishes, testifying of a relatively high contaminant load of this area. Spatial patterns in all three contaminant classes were highly significant, but differed among classes. PCB congener and chlorination class profiles also differed among sites. The observed patterns would be consistent with (1) PCB point-sources in the Eastern Gulf (Marseille, Rhone River) versus dominance of atmospheric input in the West, (2) pesticide input by the Rhone and from agricultural fields in the West, and (3) mercury point-sources near Marseille. The unique, site-specific contaminant profiles prove to be a powerful tool to differentiate between S. solea populations from different sites.

  17. Cadmium, mercury, and lead in kidney cortex of the general Swedish population: a study of biopsies from living kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barregård, L; Svalander, C; Schütz, A; Westberg, G; Sällsten, G; Blohmé, I; Mölne, J; Attman, P O; Haglind, P

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium, mercury, and lead concentrations were determined in deep-frozen kidney cortex biopsies taken from 36 living, healthy Swedish kidney donors (18 males and 18 females), who were 30-71 (mean 53) years of age. Information about occupation, smoking, the presence of dental amalgam, and fish consumption could be obtained for 27 of the donors. The samples (median dry weight 0.74 mg) were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the results were transformed to wet-weight concentrations. The median kidney Cd was 17 micrograms/g (95% confidence interval, 14-23 micrograms/g), which was similar in males and females. In 10 active smokers, the median kidney Cd was 24 micrograms/g, and in 12 who never smoked, it was 17 micrograms/g. The median kidney Hg was 0.29 micrograms/g, with higher levels in females (median 0.54 micrograms/g) than in males (median 0.16 micrograms/g). Subjects with amalgam fillings had higher kidney Hg (median 0.47 micrograms/g, n = 20) than those without dental amalgam (median 0.15 micrograms;g/g, n = 6), but kidney Hg was below the detection limit in some samples. Nearly half of the samples had kidney Pb below the detection limit. The median kidney Pb was estimated as 0. 14 micrograms/g. This is the first study of heavy metals in kidney cortex of living, healthy subjects, and the results are relatively similar to those of a few previous autopsy studies, indicating that results from autopsy cases are not seriously biased in relation to kidney metal concentrations in the general population. Cd concentrations in those who never smoked were relatively high, indicating considerable Cd intake from the diet in Sweden. The effect of dental amalgam on kidney Hg was as expected, although the reason for the difference in Hg levels between males and females is unclear. Images Figure 1 PMID:10544153

  18. Factors Influencing Blood Cadmium and Mercury Concentrations in Residents of Agro-Industries along Nam Phong River, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wannanapa Srathonghon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional analytical study aimed to determine the blood levels of cadmium (B-Cd and mercury (B-Hg and identify the factors influencing heavy metal accumulation in residents of Agro-Industries along the Nam Phong River. Quantitative data were collected, and systematic random sampling was used to obtain 420 samples for questionnaire interview and serum heavy metal testing for B-Cd and B-Hg. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing the accumulation of heavy metals in the population and report mean differences, 95% confidence intervals and p-values. The results indicated that B-Cd levels were within the recommended safety limits for human health (5 µg/dL. However, 4.29% of respondents had Hg levels higher than the recommended safety limits for human health (10 µg/dL. Factors influencing Cd levels included sex (mean difference=0.13 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.03-0.24, p-value=0.02 and smoking (mean difference=0.14 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.09-0.19, p-value<0.001. Factors influencing Hg levels included smoking (mean difference=1.06 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.52-1.61, p-value<0.001, fish consumption (mean difference=1.11 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.22-2.01, p-value=0.01 and river snail consumption (mean difference=0.56 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.03-0.19, p-value=0.03.

  19. Bioaccumulation and metallothionein response in the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) after experimental exposure to cadmium and inorganic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudrimont, M.; Metivaud, J.; Maury-Brachet, R.; Ribeyre, F.; Boudou, A. [Univ. Bordeaux I/CNRS, Talence (France). Lab. d`Ecotoxicologie

    1997-10-01

    The involvement of metallothioneins (MTs) in cadmium (Cd) and inorganic mercury (Hg[II]) bioaccumulation by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was experimentally investigated after 0, 15, 30 and 45 d of exposure from the water column source. Three levels of contamination were studied for each metal: 0, 5, and 35 {micro}g Cd/L and 0, 1.45, and 5 {micro}g Hg/L, with two replicates per condition. Forty eight experimental units (EUs) were conducted simultaneously. The mollusks were fed twice a week by additions of phytoplanktonic algae. Quantification of MTs was done by Hg-saturation assay, using cold Hg(II). A partial purification of these proteins was conducted by gel-filtration chromatography, followed by Cd determinations in the different eluted fractions. Results at the whole organism (soft tissues) and organ or tissue group (gills, mantle, foot, visceral mass) levels show high metal concentrations, with a fourfold greater accumulation of inorganic Hg than Cd after 30 d exposure at the same concentration of 5 {micro}g/L. Gills and visceral mass were the principal storage compartments. A significant increase in MT concentrations was revealed in these two organs after exposure to Cd: ratios between the MT concentrations in contaminated and control mollusks were 2.4 and 2.8, respectively, for 5 and 35 {micro}g Cd/L. Cd burdens in the cytosol and in {le}18-kDa protein fractions, similar to purified mammal MTs, correspond to 30 and 14% of the total Cd accumulated in the whole organisms. No significant increase in MT biosynthesis was observed after exposure to inorganic Hg, despite the high metal concentrations in the organs.

  20. Complexes of cadmium(II) and mercury(II) with polyamines, nucleosides and nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomozik, L.; Bregier-Jarzebowska, R.

    1999-01-01

    Computer analysis of potentiometric titration data was applied for determination of stability constants of Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes in binary systems with polyamines (PA), nucleosides (Nuc) and nucleotides (NMP). For the systems of Hg(II) and PA an untypical increase in the complex stability with increasing ring size was observed and interpreted as the mercury preference to formation of linear complexes. Results of potentiometric and 13 C NMR studies for complexes of both metals indicate the involvement of all donor nitrogen atoms of di- and triamines in the coordination, leading to formation of N2 and N3 type chromophores, respectively. Monodentate complexes of Hg(II) with Cyd are formed already at very low pH (complexes with Cd from pH about 4). In the systems with AMP apart from nitrogen donor atoms, also the phosphate groups are involved in coordination. In the solid complexes of Cd(II) and Hg(II) with PA all donor atoms from the polyamines were found to be involved in the coordination and the presence of nitrate ions was established both in the inner and in the outer coordination spheres. (author)

  1. Determination of mercury, cadmium, lead, zinc, selenium and iron by ICP-OES in mushroom samples from around thermal power plant in Muğla, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Ibrahim; Solak, M Halil; Uğurlu, Mehmet; Işıloğlu, Mustafa; Arslan, Yasin

    2011-09-01

    Scleroderma verrucosum, Stropharia coronilla, Lactarius deterrimus, Chroogomphus rutilus, Russula delica, Laccaria laccata, Clitocybe odora var. alba, Lyophyllum decastes, Coprinus comatus, Helvella leucomelaena, Melanoleuca cognata, Melanoleuca cognata, Paxina acetabulum, Clitocybe vermicularis, Sarcosphaera crassa, Rhizopogon roseolu and Thelephora caryophyllea were collected from different localities in Muğla-Yatağan region of Turkey. Their trace metals concentrations were determined by ICPOES after microwave digestion. The results were 0.37 ± 0.01-5.28 ± 0.21 for cadmium, 467 ± 19-3,280 ± 131 for iron, 0.69 ± 0.03-9.15 ± 0.37 for lead, 18.70 ± 0.75-67.10 ± 2.68 for selenium, 75 ± 3-213 ± 8 for zinc and 0.15 ± 0.01-0.55 ± 0.01 for mercury (as μg/g). The detection limits for ICPOES were found as 0.25 for Cadmium, 0.2 for iron, 0.1 for lead, 0.5 for selenium, 0.2 for zinc and 0.03 for mercury (as mg L(-1)). The Relatively Standard Deviations (R.S.D.) were found below 4.0%. The accuracy of procedure was confirmed by certified reference material.

  2. Cadmium, mercury and lead in the blood of urban women in Croatia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, China, Ecuador and Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pawlas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to make an international comparison of blood levels of cadmium (B-Cd, lead (BPb and mercury (B-Hg of women in seven European, and three non-European cities, and to identify determinants. Materials and Methods: About 50 women (age: 46–62 from each city were recruited (totally 480 in 2006–2009. Interview and questionnaire data were obtained. Blood samples were analysed in one laboratory to avoid interlaboratory variation. Results: Between the European cities, the B-Pb and B-Cd results vary little (range of geometric means: 13.5–27.0 μg/l and 0.25–0.65 μg/l, respectively; the variation of B-Hg was larger (0.40–1.38 μg/l. Between the non-European cities the results for B-Pb, B-Cd and B-Hg were 19.2–68.0, 0.39–0.99 and 1.01–2.73 μg/l, respectively. Smoking was a statistically signifi cant determinant for B-Cd, while fi sh and shellfi sh intakes contributed to B-Hg and B-Pb, amalgam fi llings also contributed to B-Hg. Conclusions: The present results confi rm the previous results from children; the exposure to lead and cadmium varies only little between different European cities suggesting that other factors than the living area are more important. The study also confi rms the previous fi ndings of higher cadmium and lead levels in some non-European cities. The geographical variation for mercury is signifi cant.

  3. Mercury, Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, Chromium and Selenium in Feathers of Shorebirds during Migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey: Comparing the 1990s and 2011/2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Tsipoura, Nellie; Niles, Lawrence J; Gochfeld, Michael; Dey, Amanda; Mizrahi, David

    2015-02-06

    Understanding temporal changes in contaminant levels in coastal environments requires comparing levels of contaminants from the same species from different time periods, particularly if species are declining. Several species of shorebirds migrating through Delaware Bay have declined from the 1980s to the present. To evaluate some contaminants as cause for the declines, we examine levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium and selenium in feathers of red knot ( Calidris canutus , N = 46 individuals), semipalmated sandpiper ( Calidris pusilla , N = 70) and sanderling ( Calidris alba , N = 32) migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA, from 1991 to 1992 ( N = 40), 1995 ( N = 28), and 2011-2012 ( N = 80) to determine if levels have changed. We found: (1) arsenic, chromium, and lead increased in red knot and decreased in semipalmated sandpiper; (2) cadmium decreased in semipalmated sandpipers; (3) mercury decreased in red knot and sanderlings; (4) selenium decreased in red knot and increased in semipalmated sandpipers. In 2011/2012 there were significant interspecific differences for arsenic, mercury and selenium. Except for selenium, the element levels were well below levels reported for feathers of other species. The levels in feathers in red knots, sanderling, and semipalmated sandpipers from Delaware Bay in 2011/2012 were well below levels in feathers that are associated with effect levels, except for selenium. Selenium levels ranged from 3.0 µg·g -1 dry weight to 5.8 µg·g -1 (semipalmated sandpiper), within the range known to cause adverse effects, suggesting the need for further examination of selenium levels in birds. The levels of all elements were well below those reported for other marine species, except for selenium, which was near levels suggesting possible toxic effects.

  4. Mercury, Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, Chromium and Selenium in Feathers of Shorebirds during Migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey: Comparing the 1990s and 2011/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Burger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding temporal changes in contaminant levels in coastal environments requires comparing levels of contaminants from the same species from different time periods, particularly if species are declining. Several species of shorebirds migrating through Delaware Bay have declined from the 1980s to the present. To evaluate some contaminants as cause for the declines, we examine levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium and selenium in feathers of red knot (Calidris canutus, N = 46 individuals, semipalmated sandpiper (Calidris pusilla, N = 70 and sanderling (Calidris alba, N = 32 migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA, from 1991 to 1992 (N = 40, 1995 (N = 28, and 2011–2012 (N = 80 to determine if levels have changed. We found: (1 arsenic, chromium, and lead increased in red knot and decreased in semipalmated sandpiper; (2 cadmium decreased in semipalmated sandpipers; (3 mercury decreased in red knot and sanderlings; (4 selenium decreased in red knot and increased in semipalmated sandpipers. In 2011/2012 there were significant interspecific differences for arsenic, mercury and selenium. Except for selenium, the element levels were well below levels reported for feathers of other species. The levels in feathers in red knots, sanderling, and semipalmated sandpipers from Delaware Bay in 2011/2012 were well below levels in feathers that are associated with effect levels, except for selenium. Selenium levels ranged from 3.0 µg·g−1 dry weight to 5.8 µg·g−1 (semipalmated sandpiper, within the range known to cause adverse effects, suggesting the need for further examination of selenium levels in birds. The levels of all elements were well below those reported for other marine species, except for selenium, which was near levels suggesting possible toxic effects.

  5. Association of lead, cadmium and mercury with paraoxonase 1 activity and malondialdehyde in a general population in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Lopes, Ana Carolina Bertinde; Urbano, Mariana Ragassi; Souza-Nogueira, André de; Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Michelin, Ana Paula; Carvalho, Maria de Fátima H; Camargo, Alissana Ester Iakmiu; Peixe, Tiago Severo; Cabrera, Marcos Aparecido Sarria; Paoliello, Monica Maria Bastos

    2017-07-01

    Metal exposure is associated with increased oxidative stress (OS), which is considered an underlying mechanism of metal-induced toxicity. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a final product of lipid peroxidation, and it has been extensively used to evaluate metal-induced OS. Pro-oxidant effects produced by metals can be mitigated by paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an antioxidant enzyme known to prevent cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Among other factors, the Q192R polymorphism and the exposure to heavy metals have been known to alter PON1 activity. Here, we evaluated the association of blood lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) levels with PON1 activity, and with MDA concentrations in a randomly selected sample of Brazilian adults aged 40 years or older, living in an urban area in Southern Brazil. A total of 889 subjects were evaluated for blood Pb and Cd levels, and 832 were tested for Hg. Geometric mean of blood Pb, Cd and Hg was 1.93μg/dL, 0.06μg/L and 1.40μg/L, respectively. PON1 activity was significantly different among various genotypes: QQ (PON1=121.4U/mL), QR (PON1=87.5U/mL), and RR (PON1=55.2U/mL), p<0.001. PON1 genotypes were associated only with Cd blood levels. Those with QR genotype had Cd concentrations higher (0.07μg/L) than those with the RR genotype (0.04μg/L) with p=0.034. However, PON1 activity was not significantly associated with metal concentrations. Cluster analysis showed that men who reported to be current smokers and drinkers with higher blood Pb and Cd levels, had significantly lower PON1 activity than non-smokers or -drinkers, and women with lower Pb and Cd levels. RR genotype carriers had lower PON1 activity than those with the QR genotype, and had higher levels of Pb and Cd compared with other genotype carriers. For blood Hg, no association with PON1 activity or genotype was noted. We found low levels of Pb, Cd and Hg in environmentally exposed Brazilian adults. Cd concentrations were increased in subjects with QR genotype. Those with

  6. Cadmium Telluride, Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide Core/Shell, and Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide/Zinc Sulfide Core/Shell/Shell Quantum Dots Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yueran

    CdTe, CdTe/CdS core/shell, and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs) are potential candidates for bio-imaging and solar cell applications because of some special physical properties in these nano materials. For example, the band gap energy of the bulk CdTe is about 1.5 eV, so that principally they can emit 790 nm light, which is in the near-infrared range (also called biological window). Moreover, theoretically hot exciton generated by QDs is possible to be caught since the exciton relaxation process in QDs is slower than in bulk materials due to the large intraband energy gap in QDs. In this dissertation, we have synthesized the CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, characterized their structure, and analyzed their photophysical properties. We used organometallic methods to synthesize the CdTe QDs in a noncoordinating solvent. To avoid being quenched by air, ligands, solvent, or other compounds, CdS shell was successfully deposited on the CdTe QDs by different methods, including the slow injection method, the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and thermal-cycling coupled single precursor method (TC-SP). Our final product, quasi-type- II CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were able to emit at 770 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield as high as 70%. We also tried to deposit a second shell ZnS on CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs since some compounds can quench CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs. Even though different methods were used to deposit ZnS shell on the CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs, CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs still can be quenched. Furthermore, the CdTe/CdS core/shell and CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell QDs were transferred into aqueous phase, phosphate buffered saline or deionized water, by switching the hydrophilic ligands (thiol or PEG ligands). The thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs can be kept in aqueous phase with high fluorescence quantum yield (60%--70%) for more than two months. However, some other compounds in organic or aqueous phase can quench CdTe/CdS QDs. Additionally, the stability of the different ligands capped CdTe/CdS QDs was tested by dialysis measurement, the hydrodynamic diameters of CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were measured by dynamic light scattering, and dissolving issue was found when CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were diluted in CHCl3. We have characterized the CdTe core and the CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and ICP-OES measurements. We have found that the CdTe core was of a zincblende structure, and the shell was a wurtzite structure. And the CdTe/CdS QDs were core/shell QDs instead of alloying QDs. We have also analyzed the photophysical properties of CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed the emission decay lifetimes in the tens of nanoseconds. Additionally, ultrafast charge carrier relaxation dynamics of the CdTe core and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs were studied by the femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The transient absorption spectra of CdTe and CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs showed multiple bleaches, which have been assigned to the 1S3/2(h)-1S(e), 2S3/2(h)-1S(e), and 1P3/2(h)-1P(e) transitions. The spectral shifts of these bleaches after shell deposition have been analyzed in the context of a quasi-type-II carrier distribution in the core/shell samples, and interestingly the red shift was only contributed from the conduction band energy levels shifting to lower energy. In addition, the ultrafast evolution of these bleach features has been examined to extract electron cooling rates in these samples. A fast decay component in the 1S3/2(h)-1S(e) transition of the small CdTe QDs was discovered due to the hole being trapped by the defects on the surface of QD. Further, we have studied the PL quenching process of the air exposed CdTe QDs via the PL decay and transient absorption measurements. Oxygen was shown to cause strong PL quenching of the CdTe QDs. There was no significant difference of the

  7. Comparative analysis of concentrations of lead, cadmium and mercury in cord blood, maternal blood, and breast milk, as well as persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in maternal milk samples from Germany and Iran; Vergleichende Untersuchungen ueber die Blei-, Cadmium- und Quecksilberkonzentrationen im Nabelschnurblut, im muetterlichen Blut und in der Frauenmilch sowie ueber einige persistente Organochlorverbindungen in der Milch deutscher und iranischer Muetter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javanmardi, F.

    2001-07-01

    The concentration of the heavy metals lead, cadmium and mercury in cord blood, maternal blood and breast milk has been studied. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury was determined using the flow-injection hydride technique. According to the concentrations of heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons we ascertained for the region of Rendsburg, the toxic risk for infants relative to the consumption of contaminated maternal milk can be viewed as very slight. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die aktuelle Schwermetallbelastung des Nabelschnurblutes, des muetterlichen Blutes und der Muttermilch zu untersuchen. Die Bestimmung von Blei und Cadmium erfolgte mit Hilfe der Atomabsorptionsspektrometrie. Quecksilber wurde mittels der Fliessinjektions-Hydridtechnik bestimmt. Nach den von uns ermittelten Schwermetall- bzw. Chlorkohlenwasserstoffkonzentrationen fuer die Region Rendsburg kann das mit dem Verzehr kontaminierter Muttermilch verbundene toxische Risiko fuer den Saeugling als sehr gering eingeschaetzt werden. (orig.)

  8. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  9. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetrahedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps.

  10. Effects of chronic exposure to mercury and cadmium alone and in combination on the coagulation system of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbi, Sandra; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Van Rooy, Mia Jeanne; Venter, Chantelle; Bester, Megan Jean

    2017-01-01

    Water contamination with heavy metals may adversely affect our health. High metal levels lead to changes in blood coagulation processes, increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease. Exposure is not limited to a single metal but usually involves a mixture of metals. In this study 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg), alone and in combination, for 28 days at dosages equivalent to 1000 times the World Health Organization water limits. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that both metals caused platelet activation. Cd significantly increased fibrin fibers thickness and caused aggregation and formation of dense matted deposits (DMDs). Hg reduced fibrin network formation. In the combination group, Hg appeared to augment the effect of Cd, and the presence of extensive DMDs or aggregates between the fibers, with no changes to the actual fibrin thickness, was observed.

  11. Levels of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium in clays for oral use on the Dutch market and estimation of associated risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, N M; Klerx, W N M; Kooijman, M; Hoogenboom, L A P; Rietjens, I M C M; Martena, M J

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women in Africa, Asia and Suriname, and some immigrants in Western societies, traditionally consume clay products known by a variety of names such as mabele, calabash chalk, sikor and pimba. Furthermore, clay is used for health purposes in Western societies. Because certain clays can contain high levels of metals and metalloids, the aim of this study was to determine lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium in clay products for oral use available on the Dutch market. Traditional clays originating from Africa (n = 10) and Suriname (n = 26), and health clays (n = 27) were sampled from 2004 up to and including 2012. Total metal and metalloid contents were measured by ICP-MS and showed maximum levels of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium of 99.7, 45.1, 2.2 and 0.75 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. In the absence of maximum limits for these type of clays, the potential exposure was estimated from the determined concentration, the estimated daily use level of the clays, and the estimated bioaccessibility of the different metals and arsenic. The intake estimates were compared with existing health-based guidance values. For lead, the use of 34 of the 36 traditional clays and two of the 27 health clays would result in intake levels exceeding the toxicological limit by up to 20-fold. Use of 15 of the 35 traditional clays and 11 of the 27 health clays would result in intake levels exceeding the toxicological limit for inorganic arsenic by up to 19-fold. Although limited bioaccessibility from the clay may limit the exposure and exceedance of the health-based guidance values, it was concluded that lead and arsenic intakes from some clay products could be of concern also because of their use by pregnant women and the potential developmental toxicity. As a result the use of these products, especially by pregnant women, should be discouraged.

  12. Local and interannual variations in mercury and cadmium in eggs of eight seabird species of the Sinaloa coast, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyca, Juan P; Castillo-Guerrero, J Alfredo; García-Hernández, Jaqueline; Fernández, Guillermo; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in eggs of 8 seabird species inhabiting 5 coastal ecosystems in Sinaloa, México were determined during 2 breeding seasons (2012 and 2013): blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii), brown booby (Sula leucogaster), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), magnificent frigatebird (Fregata magnificens), brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), royal tern (Thalasseus maximus), laughing gull (Leucophaeus atricilla), and Heermann's gull (Larus heermanni). The interspecific differences found in the concentrations of both metals were attributed to the diet and foraging ecology of the species. The highest Hg concentrations were detected in piscivorous species (brown pelican, 0.42 µg/g; brown booby, 0.31 µg/g; blue-footed booby, 0.26 µg/g; and double-crested cormorant, 0.23 µg/g); whereas species with more varied diets presented the highest Cd concentrations (Heermann's gull, 0.31 µg/g; laughing gull, 0.27 µg/g; and magnificent frigatebird, 0.27 µg/g). Cadmium concentrations were significantly greater in 2013 than 2012 for most species, and brown pelican and laughing gull also had higher Hg concentrations in 2013 in Santa María Bay, suggesting a relationship as a result of the changes either in oceanographic conditions or in continental runoff. Mercury concentrations in brown pelican and Cd concentrations in Heermann's gull and laughing gull were above threshold levels for adverse effects on reproduction and survival. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2330-2338. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Simultaneous Automatic Electrochemical Detection of Zinc, Cadmium, Copper and Lead Ions in Environmental Samples Using a Thin-Film Mercury Electrode and an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Kudr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a device for automatic electrochemical analysis was designed. A three electrodes detection system was attached to a positioning device, which enabled us to move the electrode system from one well to another of a microtitre plate. Disposable carbon tip electrodes were used for Cd(II, Cu(II and Pb(II ion quantification, while Zn(II did not give signal in this electrode configuration. In order to detect all mentioned heavy metals simultaneously, thin-film mercury electrodes (TFME were fabricated by electrodeposition of mercury on the surface of carbon tips. In comparison with bare electrodes the TMFEs had lower detection limits and better sensitivity. In addition to pure aqueous heavy metal solutions, the assay was also performed on mineralized rock samples, artificial blood plasma samples and samples of chicken embryo organs treated with cadmium. An artificial neural network was created to evaluate the concentrations of the mentioned heavy metals correctly in mixture samples and an excellent fit was observed (R2 = 0.9933.

  14. The Danish contribution to the European DEMOCOPHES project: A description of cadmium, cotinine and mercury levels in Danish mother-child pairs and the perspectives of supplementary sampling and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mørck, Thit A. [Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nielsen, Flemming [Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Nielsen, Jeanette K.S.; Jensen, Janne F.; Hansen, Pernille W.; Hansen, Anne K.; Christoffersen, Lea N. [Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Siersma, Volkert D. [The Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Ida H.; Hohlmann, Linette K. [Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Skaanild, Mette T. [Danish Environmental Protection Agency (Denmark); Frederiksen, Hanne [Department of Growth and Reproduction, University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Biot, Pierre [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, Brussels (Belgium); Casteleyn, Ludwine [University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Schwedler, Gerda [Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Berlin (Germany); Castaño, Argelia [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M. [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (IPA), Bochum (Germany); Esteban, Marta [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-08-15

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an important tool, increasingly used for measuring true levels of the body burdens of environmental chemicals in the general population. In Europe, a harmonized HBM program was needed to open the possibility to compare levels across borders. To explore the prospect of a harmonized European HBM project, DEMOCOPHES (DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale) was completed in 17 European countries. The basic measurements performed in all implemented countries of DEMOCOPHES included cadmium, cotinine and phthalate metabolites in urine and mercury in hair. In the Danish participants, significant correlations between mothers and children for mercury in hair and cotinine in urine were found. Mercury in hair was further significantly associated with intake of fish and area of residence. Cadmium was positively associated with BMI in mothers and an association between cadmium and cotinine was also found. As expected high cotinine levels were found in smoking mothers. For both mercury and cadmium significantly higher concentrations were found in the mothers compared to their children. In Denmark, the DEMOCOPHES project was co-financed by the Danish ministries of health, environment and food safety. The co-financing ministries agreed to finance a number of supplementary measurements of substances of current toxicological, public and regulatory interest. This also included blood sampling from the participants. The collected urine and blood samples were analyzed for a range of other persistent and non-persistent environmental chemicals as well as two biomarkers of effect. The variety of supplementary measurements gives the researchers further information on the exposure status of the participants and creates a basis for valuable knowledge on the pattern of exposure to various chemicals. - Highlights: • Levels of cadmium, mercury and cotinine in the Danish subpopulation are comparable to levels in the

  15. Blood lead, cadmium and mercury among children from urban, industrial and rural areas of Fez Boulemane Region (Morocco: Relevant factors and early renal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawhar Laamech

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe blood lead (Pb-B, cadmium (Cd-B and mercury (Hg-B levels in children living in urban, industrial and rural areas in Fez city (north of Morocco and to identify the determinants and some renal effects of exposure. Material and Methods: The study was conducted from June 2007 to January 2008 in 209 school children (113 girls, 96 boys, aged 6-12 years, from urban, industrial and rural areas in Fez city. Interview and questionnaires data were obtained. Blood and urinary samples were analyzed. Results: The mean of blood lead levels (Pb-B in our population was 55.53 μg/l (range: 7.5-231.1 μg/l. Children from the urban area had higher blood lead levels (BLLs mean (82.36 μg/l than children from industrial and rural areas (48.23 and 35.99 μg/l, respectively; with no significant difference between boys and girls. BLLs were associated with traffic intensity, passive smoking and infancy in the urban area. The mean of blood cadmium levels (BCLs was 0.22 μg/l (range: 0.06-0.68 μg/l, with no difference between various areas. Rural boys had higher BCLs mean than rural girls, but no gender influence was noticed in the other areas. BCLs were associated with the number of cigarettes smoked at children's homes. The blood mercury levels (BMLs mean was 0.49 μg/l (range: 0.01-5.31 μg/l. The BMLs mean was higher in urban and industrial areas than in the rural area with no gender-related difference. BMLs were associated with amalgam fillings and infancy in the urban area. About 8% of the children had BLLs ≥ 100 μg/l particularly in the urban area, microalbuminuria and a decrease in height were noticed in girls from the inner city of Fez and that can be related to high BLLs (89.45 μg/l. Conclusions: There is a need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by these trace elements in children; particularly for lead.

  16. Cadmium, lead and mercury concentrations and their influence on morphological parameters in blood donors from different age groups from southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Monika; Binkowski, Łukasz J; Błaszczyk, Martyna; Paluch, Joanna; Wojtaś, Włodzimierz; Massanyi, Peter; Stawarz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Due to industrial development, environmental contamination with metals increases which leads to higher human exposure via air, water and food. In order to evaluate the level of the present exposition, the concentrations of metals can be measured in such biological materials as human blood. In this study, we assessed the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) in blood samples from male blood donors from southern Poland (Europe) born in 1994 (n=30) and between 1947 and 1955 (n=30). Higher levels of Pb were seen in the group of older men (4.48 vs 2.48μg/L), whereas the Hg levels were lower (1.78 vs 4.28μg/L). Cd concentrations did not differ between age groups (0.56μg/L). The levels of Cd and Pb in older donors were significantly correlated (Spearman R 0.5135). We also observed a positive correlation between the number of red blood cells (RBC) and Hg concentrations in the older group (Spearman R 0.4271). Additionally, we noted numerous correlations among morphological parameters. Based on our results, we can state that metals influence the blood morphology and their concentrations in blood vary among age groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Consumption of homegrown products does not increase dietary intake of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury by young children living in an industrialized area of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, Michael; Wittsiepe, Juergen; Schrey, Petra; Hilbig, Annett; Kersting, Mathilde

    2005-01-01

    The dietary intake of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb) was studied among young German children with different food consumption behaviour (consumption of own grown foodstuffs and of products from the supermarket). The study area comprised an industrialized and a rural area of West Germany. Dietary intake of contaminants was measured by the duplicate method according to the WHO guideline. A total 588 duplicate portions were collected daily from 84 individuals between May and September 1998. Intake of food groups was calculated from dietary records. Determination of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb was performed following high-pressure digestion of lyophilized samples by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Geometric mean weekly intake [μg/(kg bw .week)] was as follows: As 1.4, Cd 2.3, Hg 0.16, and Pb 5.3. Geometric mean intake corresponded to the percentage of the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) as follows: As 9.7%, Cd 32%, Hg 3.3%, Pb 21%. As and Hg intake were mainly influenced by fish consumption. The amount of cereals and bakery wares mainly determined the Cd and Pb intake. Children living in the industrialized area with a substantial food consumption of own grown vegetables or products from domestic animals products had no increased dietary intake of the metals

  18. Bioaccumulation of mercury, cadmium, zinc, chromium, and lead in muscle, liver, and spleen tissues of a large commercially valuable catfish species from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio P. Arantes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amounts of heavy metals entering aquatic environments can result in high accumulation levels of these contaminants in fish and their consumers, which pose a serious risk to ecosystems and human health. We investigated the concentrations of mercury (Hg, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, chromium (Cr, and lead (Pb in muscle, liver, and spleen tissues of Pseudoplatystoma corruscans specimens collected from two sites on the Paraopeba River, Brazil. The level of heavy metals concentrations in the tissues was often higher in viscera (i.e. liver and spleen than in muscle, and thus, the viscera should not be considered for human consumption. Correlations between metal concentrations and fish size were not significant. Although the levels of muscle bioaccumulation of Hg, Cd, Zn, Cr, and Pb, generally do not exceed the safe levels for human consumption, the constant presence of heavy metals in concentrations near those limits considered safe for human consumption, is a reason for concern, and populations who constantly consume fish from polluted rivers should be warned. Our findings also indicate that in a river network where certain areas are connected to other areas with high rates of environmental pollutants, people should be cautious about the regular consumption of fish, even when the fish consumed are caught in stretches of the basin where contamination levels are considered low, since many of the freshwater fish with high commercial value, such as the catfish surubim, are migratory.

  19. Influence of Arsenic (III, Cadmium (II, Chromium (VI, Mercury (II, and Lead (II Ions on Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer (HCC1806 Cell Cytotoxicity and Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsdale F. Mehari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hazardous consequences of heavy metal ions (HMIs on human health necessitate the immediate need to probe fundamentally the interactions and cytotoxic effects of HMIs on humans. This study investigated the influence of five toxic HMIs (arsenic (As (III, cadmium (Cd (II, chromium (Cr (VI, mercury (Hg (II, and lead (Pb (II on human TNBC (HCC 1806 cell viability using optical microscopy, trypan blue dye-exclusion assays, and flow cytometry. The TNBC cells were exposed to varying concentrations of HMIs for 24 and 48 hours. We evaluated the influence of the concentrations and duration of HMIs exposure on TNBC cell viability. Light microscopy, cell viability assays, revealed that after 48-hour treatment of TNBC cells with 1 x 10-5 M of As (III, Cd (II, Hg (II, Cr (IV, and Pb (II resulted in cell viabilities of 23%, 34%, 35%, 56%, 91% respectively, suggesting that As (III has the greatest cytotoxicity (77% cell death while Pb (II showed the least (9% cell death. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that while Pb (II, As (III and Cr (IV had significant increases in cell death, Hg (II caused a G1 arrest. Together, this study revealed that HMIs cause a differential cytotoxic effect on TNBC cells and suggest that they may have very different genotoxic targets and implications in their mutagenic potential.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of cadmium telluride, lead telluride and cadmium telluride/lead telluride superlattice thin films on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)/glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fei

    The objective of this work was to fabricate nanolayer films CdTe, PbTe and CdTe/PbTe superlattice structures on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The purpose of this work is aimed at improving the efficiency of solar cells by enhanced optical absorption of light. The optical bandgap properties of the CdTe/PbTe superlattice structures were engineered to be employed as an absorber layer of a solar cell in order to optimize the absorption of the solar spectrum. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition (EC-ALD) has been used to fabricate CdTe, PbTe and three different superlattice structures of CdTe/PbTe thin films on ITO-coated glass: (CdTe20/PbTe20)3, (CdTe10/PbTe20)3 and (CdTe5/PbTe20)3. These are intended to serve as the absorber layer of a solar cell. In our experiments, Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and current monitoring helped us obtain appropriate deposition potentials. The grain sizes of the superlattices were studied by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The chemical composition of the films was determined by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Optical absorption measurements were made in order to determine the band gap energy of the deposited films. We successfully shifted the bandgaps of CdTe/PbTe superlattices on ITO from 1.9 eV to 3.2 eV by changing the proportion of CdTe in the CdTe/PbTe films.

  1. Semiconductor nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, Bernard

    1976-01-01

    Three semiconductors are nowadays available for nuclear detection (germanium, mercury iodide, cadmium telluride). Their methods of elaboration are briefly described and, as a conclusion, a very close at-hand development of cadmium telluride is foreseen [fr

  2. Changes in mercury and cadmium concentrations and the feeding behaviour of beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) near Somerset Island, Canada, during the 20th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outridge, P.M.; Hobson, K.A.; Savelle, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) continues to be an important food species for Arctic communities, despite concerns about its high mercury (Hg) content. We investigated whether Hg and cadmium (Cd) concentrations had changed during the 20th century in beluga near Somerset Island in the central Canadian Arctic, using well-preserved teeth collected from historical sites (dating to the late 19th century and 1926-1947) and during subsistence hunts in the late 1990s. Mercury concentrations in both historical and modern teeth were correlated with animal age, but 1990s beluga exhibited a significantly more rapid accumulation with age than late 19th century animals, indicating that Hg concentrations or bioavailability in their food chain had increased during the last century. The geometric mean tooth Hg concentration in modern 30 year old animals was 7.7 times higher than in the late 19th century, which corresponds to threefold higher concentrations in muktuk and muscle. Teeth from 1926 to 1947 were similar in Hg content to the late 19th century, suggesting that the increase had occurred sometime after the 1940s. In contrast, tooth Cd was not correlated with animal age and decreased during the last 100 years, indicating that anthropogenic Cd was negligible in this population. Late 19th century beluga displayed a greater range of prey selection (tooth δ 15 N values: 15.6-20.5%o) than modern animals (δ 15 N: 17.2-21.1%o). To prevent this difference from confounding the temporal Hg comparison, the Hg-age relationships discussed above were based on historical animals, which overlapped isotopically with the modern group. Tooth δ 13 C also changed to isotopically more depleted values in modern animals, with the most likely explanation being a significant shift to more pelagic-based feeding. Industrial Hg pollution is a plausible explanation for the recent Hg increase. However, without further investigation of the relationship between the range exploitation of modern beluga and

  3. [Evaluation of human health risk for a population from Cali, Colombia, by exposure to lead, cadmium, mercury, 2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid and diuron associated with water and food consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, Ghisliane; Zapata, Andrés Mauricio; Páez, Martha Isabel; Méndez, Fabián; Peña, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to pollutants such as pesticides and heavy metals has been linked to health problems. Several studies have revealed the presence of these contaminants in Cali; however, there is no information available about the main routes of exposure and risk of these contaminants. To estimate the risk associated with the intake of cadmium, lead and mercury, and pesticides 2,4-D and diuron through the consumption of water and food in a population in Cali. Population and environmental data were obtained, and a risk assessment was performed using United States Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. The concentrations of the evaluated pollutants were below permissible levels as established by the Colombian Ministerio de Ambiente, Vivienda y Desarrollo Territorial (3 µg/L -1 of cadmium; 10 µg/L -1 of lead; 1 µg/L -1 of mercury; 1 µg/L -1 of 2,4 D; 1 µg/L -1 of diuron). Salema butterfish ( Peprilus snyderi ) samples contained levels of cadmium between 20 and 80 µg/kg -1 , which are below the permissible limit set by the World Health Organization (100 µg/kg -1 ). The results of the risk assessment indicated that the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic attributable risk to population health from the intake of food contaminants was below the maximum level permitted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. It is believed that the findings in previous studies on pollutants may have been due to specific contamination events; therefore, monitoring and early warning about water intake is recommended. Furthermore, the report of cadmium being found in fish consumed as food suggests the need for quality control by regulators.

  4. [A comparative study of cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, selenium, manganese, copper and zinc in brown rice and fish by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Harumi; Ueno, Eiji; Saito, Isao; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2004-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of ICP-MS techniques for determination of metals in brown rice and fish. Cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, selenium, manganese, copper and zinc were determined by this method. An open digestion with nitric acid (Method A) and a rapid open digestion with nitric acid and hydrochloric acid (Method B) were used to solubilize analytes in samples, and these procedures were followed by ICP-MS analysis. Recovery of certified elements from standard reference materials by Method A and Method B ranged from 92 to 110% except for mercury (70 to 100%). Analytical results of brown rice and fish samples obtained by this ICP-MS agreed with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The results of this study demonstrate that quadrupole ICP-MS provides precise and accurate measurements of the elements tested in brown rice and fish samples.

  5. Radioactive zinc ( sup 65 Zn), zinc, cadmium, and mercury in the Pacific Hake, Merluccius productus (Ayres), off the West Coast of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.

    1974-06-01

    The Pacific Hake, Merluccius productus (Ayers) was used to monitor the waters off Puget Sound and the West Coast of the US for zinc(Zn), cadmium(Cd), mercury(Hg) and {sup 65}Zn. The Columbia River is not the source of Zn, Cd or Hg contamination, but is the source of {sup 65}Zn, with the concentration in the Hake reflecting the position of the Columbia River plume. Zn and Cd accumulation in the Hake were fit to the equation Y=B{sub 1}+B{sub 2}e{sup B}{sub 3}X where Y is the concentration of the element and X is the length or weight of the fish. Biological attributes were assigned to the other parameters as follows: B{sub 1} is the asymptotic value for Zn or Cd at chemical maturity; B{sub 2} is the location of the curve with respect to the length or weight of the fish; and B{sub 3} is a constant pertaining to the rate of change of Zn or Cd. Although Zn, Cd and Hg are all Group 2B elements, only the concentrations of Zn and Cd were correlated for all locations; Hg concentrations varied as a function of location. Zn and Cd concentrations increase with fish size and approach an asymptotic value at maturity, while Hg concentrations were linear and the slope is a function of sampling location. Zn and Cd levels are regulated in the adult, while Hg continues to increase with age. It may be significant that the age distribution of fish caught commercially coincides with the maximum concentration of Zn and Cd. 195 refs., 30 figs., 10 tabs. (MHB)

  6. Heavy metals and zooplankton with special reference to Minamata (Japan) mercury pollution - A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Hirota, R.

    samples were also analysed for methyl mercury, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, cadmium, lead and nickel. The sediment in Minamata Bay still contained high mercury concentrations. The mercury levels in zooplankton suggested that the Minamata Bay where...

  7. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, R.H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R. H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report.

  9. Short-term metallothionein inductions in the edible cockle Cerastoderma edule after cadmium or mercury exposure: Discrepancy between mRNA and protein responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul-Pont, Ika, E-mail: i.paulpont@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Gonzalez, Patrice, E-mail: p.gonzalez@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Baudrimont, Magalie, E-mail: m.baudrimont@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Nili, Hanane, E-mail: h.nili@etu.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Montaudouin, Xavier de, E-mail: x.de-montaudouin@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France)

    2010-05-05

    Metallothioneins (MT) are essential metal binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. Numerous studies have focused on MT response to metal exposure and showed an important variability according to species, metal, concentration and time of exposure. In this study, the expression of one isoform of MT gene (Cemt1) and associated MT protein synthesis were determined after 1, 3, 9, 24, 72 and 168 h of cadmium (Cd) or mercury (Hg) exposures in gills of the cockle Cerastoderma edule. This experiment, carried out in laboratory conditions, revealed that in Cd-exposed cockles, induction of Cemt1 is time-dependent following a 'pulse-scheme' with significant upregulation at 24 h and 168 h intersected by time point (72 h) with significant downregulation. MT protein concentration increases with time in gills of exposed cockles in relation with the progressive accumulation of Cd in soluble fraction. On contrary, Hg exposure does not lead to any induction of Cemt1 mRNA expression or MT protein synthesis compared to control, despite a higher accumulation of this metal in gills of cockles compared to Cd. The localization of Hg (85-90%) is in insoluble fraction, whereas MT was located in the cytoplasm of cells. This gives us a first clue to understand the inability of Hg to activate MT synthesis. However, other biochemical processes probably occur in gills of C. edule since the remaining soluble fraction of Hg exceeds MT sequestration ability. Finally, since one of the first main targets of metal toxicity in cells was the mitochondria, some genes involved in mitochondria metabolism were also analyzed in order to assess potential differences in cellular damages between two metal exposures. Indeed, until T{sub 168}, no impact on mitochondrial genes was shown following Hg exposure, despite the complete lack of MT response. This result indicated the presence of other effective cellular ligands which sequester the cytosolic fraction of

  10. Bioavailability of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in subtropical coastal lagoons from the southeast Gulf of California using mangrove oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis and Crassostrea palmula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Osuna, Federico; Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were assessed in the edible tissues of Crassrotrea corteziensis oysters collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 27 sites from 8 coastal lagoons of the southeast Gulf of California. In addition, C. palmula oysters were sampled at 9 sites from the same mangrove roots where C. corteziensis oysters were collected. Metal analyses were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Cd, Cu, and Zn), graphite furnace (Pb), and cold vapor detection (Hg). The obtained mean levels were (µg g(-1) dry weight) as follows: Cd 6.05 ± 2.77, Cu 60.0 ± 33.4, Hg 0.38 ± 0.17, Pb 1.11 ± 0.63, and Zn 777 ± 528 µg g(-1). For all metals except Hg, the concentrations were greater during dry season than during rainy seasons. The high levels, particularly that for Cd, were related to upwelling along the eastern Gulf of California. High Hg levels in the rainy season were associated with the transport of materials from the watershed to the lagoon. Shrimp farming, agriculture, and other sources were considered as potential sources to explain the differences in metal bioavailability in the 8 lagoons. The mean concentrations of Cd (Santa María-La Reforma lagoon), Cu [San Ignacio-Navachiste-El Macapule (SINM), Urías (URI), and Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón lagoons], and zinc (Zn) (URI, Santa María-Ohuira-Topolobampo, El Colorado, and SINM lagoons) during the dry season were greater than the maximum permissible limits. C. palmula collected in 8 sites where they were present simultaneously with C. corteziensis had consistently greater metal levels than C. corteziensis, but correlation analyses showed a high and significant (P < 0.05) correlation between metal concentrations in both species. The correlation equations obtained are useful where the same species is not distributed and is necessary to compare results from distinct regions.

  11. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  12. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  13. Associations of blood lead, cadmium, and mercury with estimated glomerular filtration rate in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008–2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yangho; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between blood lead, cadmium, and mercury levels with estimated glomerular filtration rate in a general population of South Korean adults. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on data obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) (2008–2010). The final analytical sample consisted of 5924 participants. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the MDRD Study equation as an indicator of glomerular function. Results: In multiple linear regression analysis of log2-transformed blood lead as a continuous variable on eGFR, after adjusting for covariates including cadmium and mercury, the difference in eGFR levels associated with doubling of blood lead were −2.624 mL/min per 1.73 m² (95% CI: −3.803 to −1.445). In multiple linear regression analysis using quartiles of blood lead as the independent variable, the difference in eGFR levels comparing participants in the highest versus the lowest quartiles of blood lead was −3.835 mL/min per 1.73 m² (95% CI: −5.730 to −1.939). In a multiple linear regression analysis using blood cadmium and mercury, as continuous or categorical variables, as independent variables, neither metal was a significant predictor of eGFR. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI values for reduced eGFR calculated for log2-transformed blood metals and quartiles of the three metals showed similar trends after adjustment for covariates. Discussion: In this large, representative sample of South Korean adults, elevated blood lead level was consistently associated with lower eGFR levels and with the prevalence of reduced eGFR even in blood lead levels below 10 μg/dL. In conclusion, elevated blood lead level was associated with lower eGFR in a Korean general population, supporting the role of lead as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease.

  14. Associations of blood lead, cadmium, and mercury with estimated glomerular filtration rate in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yangho [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Kook, E-mail: bklee@sch.ac.kr [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between blood lead, cadmium, and mercury levels with estimated glomerular filtration rate in a general population of South Korean adults. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on data obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) (2008-2010). The final analytical sample consisted of 5924 participants. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the MDRD Study equation as an indicator of glomerular function. Results: In multiple linear regression analysis of log2-transformed blood lead as a continuous variable on eGFR, after adjusting for covariates including cadmium and mercury, the difference in eGFR levels associated with doubling of blood lead were -2.624 mL/min per 1.73 m Superscript-Two (95% CI: -3.803 to -1.445). In multiple linear regression analysis using quartiles of blood lead as the independent variable, the difference in eGFR levels comparing participants in the highest versus the lowest quartiles of blood lead was -3.835 mL/min per 1.73 m Superscript-Two (95% CI: -5.730 to -1.939). In a multiple linear regression analysis using blood cadmium and mercury, as continuous or categorical variables, as independent variables, neither metal was a significant predictor of eGFR. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI values for reduced eGFR calculated for log2-transformed blood metals and quartiles of the three metals showed similar trends after adjustment for covariates. Discussion: In this large, representative sample of South Korean adults, elevated blood lead level was consistently associated with lower eGFR levels and with the prevalence of reduced eGFR even in blood lead levels below 10 {mu}g/dL. In conclusion, elevated blood lead level was associated with lower eGFR in a Korean general population, supporting the role of lead as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease.

  15. Study and microscopic characterization of the cadmium telluride deep levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, B.

    1989-05-01

    The spectroscopic methods PICTS, QTS and CTS were developed and perfected to investigate deep level analysis of high resistivity CdTe crystals which were either undoped, or doped with chlorine and copper. Crystals which were grown in space were also investigated. The main characterization of defect levels was determined and different correlations were established between the material's resistivity, chemical residues, dopant concentration and the nuclear radiation detector parameters. Using PICTS and CTS techniques, the generation of defects, under strong gamma-ray irradiation and particle bombardment was also studied. The influence of hydrogen on the main electrical characteristics of CdTe, in particular its ability to passivate the electrical activity of many deep defect and impurity states have been demonstrated. The compensation effects of Cl, Cu and H + are interpreted using the qualitative models based on different possibilities of pairing or triplet formation between the ions of these dopants and those of defects [fr

  16. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  17. Acceptors in cadmium telluride. Identification and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molva, E.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown that electronic properties of CdTe are determined by impurities more than by intrinsic defects like vacancies or interstitials in Cd or Te contrary to classical theories. These results are based on annealing, diffusion, implantation and electron irradiation at 4 K. Centers appearing in treated samples are accurately identified by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence infra-red absorption, electrical measurements and magneto-optic properties. Acceptors identified are Li, Na, Cu, Ag and Au impurities in Cd and N, P and As in Te. Energy levels of all acceptors and fine structure of excitons are determined [fr

  18. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Arntz, Y; Dumitresco, B; Eclancher, B; Prat, V

    1999-01-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) wh...

  19. Impurity states of vanadium in cadmium and zinc tellurides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnatenko, Yu.P.; Farina, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    Low-temperature optical (4.5 K) and photoelectrical properties of CdTe and ZnTe crystals doped by vanadium are invetigated. The energies of carrier transition to valence and conduction bands, Mott-Habbard energy for 3d 3 -ion vanadium in both crystals are determined. The resonance of the excited 4 T l ( 4 P)-state of V 2+ -ion with the conduction band of CdTe crystal is found. 8 bibl.; 4 figs

  20. Growth of cadmium zinc telluride by liquid phase electroepitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, N.; Dost, S.; Sheibani, H.

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of growing CdZnTe by liquid phase electroepitaxy. Based on our successful LPEE system of GaInAs, a new crucible to grow CdZnTe was developed. The development presented numerous difficulties. The physical properties of CdZnTe make this material very difficult to grow. All components of the system were investigated. Electromigration of the solute across the solution carries species towards the growth interface. In liquid Cd-Zn-Te, the CdTe and ZnTe species remain associated, contrary to the GaInAs system. Experiments showed that LPEE growth of CdZnTe is possible and the electromigration mechanism functions well in the CdZnTe solution. Despite this, other problems remained with the new LPEE system. The preparation of the solution proved difficult without pressurizing the LPEE crucible. Control of the reaction required the use of pre-compounded CdTe and ZnTe. Proper control of the solution saturation is imperative to ensure minimal dissolution of the seed prior to growth initiation and a reasonable growth rate during growth. The solution remained an issue during the duration of growth due to the high vapor pressures of the constituents. Tellurium evaporation during growth could lower solution volume until electrical contact across the solution is broken. Careful preparation of appropriate solution volume was imperative for successful growth. In LPEE, a uniform electric current passage across the growth interface is necessary for uniform and stable growth interface. This requires the design of a uniform contact zone between the bottom graphite electrode and the seed crystal. The contact zone issue was not adequately resolved in this study. However, a number of successful growth runs were achieved despite the electrical contact problems. Results show that the LPEE of growth CdZnTe is feasible. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Bhalerao

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... In-First-Out (FIFO) data buffer, which are read out by the front-end electronics board (section 3.4). Based on expected count rates from bright sources, we fixed ... amplifiers. The post-amplifier signal is fed to an analog comparator along with lower-level discriminator level. Front-end electronics (section 3.4) ...

  2. Cadmium Telluride and Grain Boundaries: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Michael Evan

    The efficacy of the CdCl2 treatment on polycrystalline CdTe-based solar cells was discovered over a quarter of a century ago; and yet, the exact mechanism of this treatment is still not fully understood to this day. In fact, the lack of understanding stems from a debate on the exact role of grain boundaries in CdCl2-treated CdTe solar cells. Some hypothesize that the CdCl2-treatment causes grain boundaries to become beneficial to solar cell performance while others disagree and claim that the treatment simply mitigates the harmful effects of grain boundaries via passivation. A future goal of this project is to determine which, if either, hypothesis is correct by direct wafer bonding single crystalline CdTe. Direct wafer bonding of single crystalline materials would create only one grain boundary at the bonded interface. This approach allows the orientation and surface chemistry of interfaces to be controlled in order to study the chemistry of grain boundaries methodically. However, before any direct wafer bonding can be done, a preliminary study of single crystalline CdTe is necessary. High-quality direct wafer bonding can only be achieved if the surfaces of each wafer satisfy certain requirements. Additionally, analyzing single crystalline CdTe materials prior to bonding is crucial in order to make any insightful connections between results found from direct bonding of single crystalline CdTe and what is observed in polycrystalline CdTe. First, the surface of an (001) CdTe layer epitaxially grown on an (001) InSb substrate is studied using atomic force microscopy. Stacking faults on the CdTe surface are observed and the thickness of the grown CdTe epilayer is calculated by considering the interplanar angles between the (001) and (111) crystallographic planes as well as the dimensions of the stacking faults. While the stacking faults will inhibit successful wafer bonding, the roughness of the regions outside the stacking faults is 0.9 nm, which is an acceptable roughness for direct wafer bonding. High resolution x-ray diffraction is used to study the strain of the CdTe epilayer at the epilayer-substrate interface by generating reciprocal space maps of the (004), (115), and (335) crystallographic planes. It is found that CdTe grown on an (001) InSb substrate at a low growth temperature exhibits nearly 0% relaxation. As a result, the in-plane lattice parameter of the CdTe layer is maximally strained to match the smaller lattice parameter of the InSb substrate. Consequently, the CdTe lattice is tetragonally strained normal to the substrate surface, which causes the out-of-plane lattice parameter of CdTe to be larger than its intrinsic value. Lastly, a CdCl2-treated CdTe-CdS (p-type CdTe on n-type CdS) solar cell structure is simulated using a semiconductor-heterojunction simulation program. In literature, it has been reported that chlorine atoms from the treatment segregate along grain boundaries in polycrystalline CdTe and cause the formation of local p-n junctions by inverting the grain boundaries to n-type. The simulated structure includes one grain and 2 grain boundaries. The grain/bulk CdTe material is p-type while the grain boundaries are made to be n-type with varying doping concentrations. Both the conduction band and valence band energy exhibit downward sloping from the CdTe surface to the CdTe-CdS interface. This structure assumes that the grain boundaries are parallel to the CdTe-CdS interface. While these simulations do not prove the existence of the local type-inversion hypothesis, they do entertain a novel possibility for future devices fabrication methods.

  3. Blocking contacts for N-type cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, Carl M. (Inventor); Parker, Bradford H. (Inventor); Babu, Sachidananda R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for applying blocking contacts on an n-type CdZnTe specimen includes cleaning the CdZnTe specimen; etching the CdZnTe specimen; chemically surface treating the CdZnTe specimen; and depositing blocking metal on at least one of a cathode surface and an anode surface of the CdZnTe specimen.

  4. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Bhalerao

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... to obtain good background measurements. The final design driven by these considerations ... on 255-element pseudo-noise Hadamard set uniformly redundant arrays. Of sixteen possible such patterns, ..... spacecraft on-board memory are transmitted to ground during the visibility of spacecraft to ground ...

  5. Cadmium-zinc telluride detector arrays for synchrotron radiation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuno, Edson M.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Siddons, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    We have begun a program to develop CZT-based detectors optimized for Synchrotron Radiation (SR) applications. SR provides high brightness beams of hard x-rays, typically in the range 5-100keV. Below 10keV, Peltier-cooled silicon detector arrays can provide high throughput with good spectroscopic resolution. At higher energies, only cryo-cooled germanium detectors or scintillation counters are available. Neither are easily available in large arrays, and scintillation counters lack energy resolution. CZT offers a solution to both these problems. Our development has focused on surface preparation and contact definition technologies which minimize device leakage currents while allowing high-definition contact patterns suitable for SR applications. We have used SR also for diagnostic purposes in these developments, both for detector testing and material characterization. X-ray diffraction, Infrared microscopy and photoemission are all relevant SR-based tools which we are using in our work. As an example, we have observed that bromine remains attached to the CZT surface after chemical etching, and is remarkably persistent in the face of surface cleaning and argon ion sputtering, as revealed by photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Growth of cadmium zinc telluride by liquid phase electroepitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, N.; Dost, S. [Crystal Growth Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Sheibani, H. [Department of Industrial Engineering, Alhosn University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2006-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of growing CdZnTe by liquid phase electroepitaxy. Based on our successful LPEE system of GaInAs, a new crucible to grow CdZnTe was developed. The development presented numerous difficulties. The physical properties of CdZnTe make this material very difficult to grow. All components of the system were investigated. Electromigration of the solute across the solution carries species towards the growth interface. In liquid Cd-Zn-Te, the CdTe and ZnTe species remain associated, contrary to the GaInAs system. Experiments showed that LPEE growth of CdZnTe is possible and the electromigration mechanism functions well in the CdZnTe solution. Despite this, other problems remained with the new LPEE system. The preparation of the solution proved difficult without pressurizing the LPEE crucible. Control of the reaction required the use of pre-compounded CdTe and ZnTe. Proper control of the solution saturation is imperative to ensure minimal dissolution of the seed prior to growth initiation and a reasonable growth rate during growth. The solution remained an issue during the duration of growth due to the high vapor pressures of the constituents. Tellurium evaporation during growth could lower solution volume until electrical contact across the solution is broken. Careful preparation of appropriate solution volume was imperative for successful growth. In LPEE, a uniform electric current passage across the growth interface is necessary for uniform and stable growth interface. This requires the design of a uniform contact zone between the bottom graphite electrode and the seed crystal. The contact zone issue was not adequately resolved in this study. However, a number of successful growth runs were achieved despite the electrical contact problems. Results show that the LPEE of growth CdZnTe is feasible. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411 007, India. S. R. T. M. University, Nanded, 431 606, India. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Babha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India. Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695 022, India. Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad ...

  8. Influence of ampoule coatings on cadmium telluride solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rajaram; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1995-08-01

    CdTe was directionally solidified by the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Quartz ampoules were used uncoated, coated with carbon, or with a transparent film of boron nitride. Wetting by molten CdTe on these surfaces was determined by contact angle measurements. Wetting increased in the following order: BN-coated quartz, carbon-coated quartz, uncoated quartz. Ingots solidified in uncoated ampoules adhered to the ampoule after growth. These ingots exhibited nucleation of new grains throughout the growth. Ingots solidified in carbon-coated or BN-coated ampoules did not adhere to the ampoules. Ingots solidified in BN-coated ampoules had many small elongated indentations along their surface, presumably due to bubbles on the ampoule surface during solidification. These indentations did not affect the grain structure. The dislocation densities measured on the (111)Cd surface using the Nakagawa etchant increased in the following order: BN-coated quartz, carbon-coated quartz, uncoated quartz. A cellular arrangement of dislocations was observed for both uncoated and carbon-coated quartz. No cellular structure was found with BN-coated quartz. A correspondence was seen between the mean etch pit density and the wetting property of the corresponding ampoule surface.

  9. Blood concentrations of lead, cadmium, mercury and their association with biomarkers of DNA oxidative damage in preschool children living in an e-waste recycling area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xijin; Liao, Weitang; Lin, Yucong; Dai, Yifeng; Shi, Zhihua; Huo, Xia

    2017-06-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage occurs in heavy metal exposure, but the simultaneous effect on DNA repair is unknown. We investigated the influence of co-exposure of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) on 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and human repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) mRNA levels in exposed children to evaluate the imbalance of DNA damage and repair. Children within the age range of 3-6 years from a primitive electronic waste (e-waste) recycling town were chosen as participants to represent a heavy metal-exposed population. 8-OHdG in the children's urine was assessed for heavy metal-induced oxidative effects, and the hOGG1 mRNA level in their blood represented the DNA repair ability of the children. Among the children surveyed, 88.14% (104/118) had a blood Pb level >5 μg/dL, 22.03% (26/118) had a blood Cd level >1 μg/dL, and 62.11% (59/95) had a blood Hg level >10 μg/dL. Having an e-waste workshop near the house was a risk factor contributing to high blood Pb (r s  = 0.273, p education had significantly lower 8-OHdG levels (median 242.76 ng/g creatinine, range 154.62-407.79 ng/g creatinine) than did children of fathers who had less education (p = 0.035). However, we did not observe a significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of hOGG1 between the different variables. Compared with children having low lead exposure (quartile 1), the children with high Pb exposure (quartiles 2, 3, and 4) had significantly higher 8-OHdG levels (β Q2  = 0.362, 95% CI 0.111-0.542; β Q3  = 0.347, 95% CI 0.103-0.531; β Q4  = 0.314, 95% CI 0.087-0.557). Associations between blood Hg levels and 8-OHdG were less apparent. Compared with low levels of blood Hg (quartile 1), elevated blood Hg levels (quartile 2) were associated with higher 8-OHdG levels (β Q2  = 0.236, 95% CI 0.039-0.406). Compared with children having low lead exposure (quartile 1), the children with high Pb exposure (quartiles 2, 3, and 4

  10. Induced superconductivity in the topological insulator mercury telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a topological insulator (TI) and a superconductor (S), which together form a TI/S interface, is expected to influence the possible surface states in the TI. It is of special interest, if the theoretical prediction of zero energy Majorana states in this system is verifiable. This thesis presents the experimental realization of such an interface between the TI strained bulk HgTe and the S Nb and studies if the afore mentioned expectations are met. As these types of interfaces were produced for the first time the initial step was to develop a new lithographic process. Optimization of the S deposition technique as well as the application of cleaning processes allowed for reproducible fabrication of structures. In parallel the measurement setup was upgraded to be able to execute the sensitive measurements at low energy. Furthermore several filters have been implemented into the system to reduce high frequency noise and the magnetic field control unit was additionally replaced to achieve the needed resolution in the μT range. Two kinds of basic geometries have been studied: Josephson junctions (JJs) and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). A JJ consists of two Nb contacts with a small separation on a HgTe layer. These S/TI/S junctions are one of the most basic structures possible and are studied via transport measurements. The transport through this geometry is strongly influenced by the behavior at the two S/TI interfaces. In voltage dependent differential resistance measurements it was possible to detect multiple Andreev reflections in the JJ, indicating that electrons and holes are able to traverse the HgTe gap between both interfaces multiple times while keeping phase coherence. Additionally using BTK theory it was possible to extract the interface transparency of several junctions. This allowed iterative optimization for the highest transparency via lithographic improvements at these interfaces. The increased transparency and thus the increased coupling of the Nb's superconductivity to the HgTe results in a deeper penetration of the induced superconductivity into the HgTe. Due to this strong coupling it was possible to enter the regime, where a supercurrent is carried through the complete HgTe layer. For the first time the passing of an induced supercurrent through strained bulk HgTe was achieved and thus opened the area for detailed studies. The magnetic dependence of the supercurrent in the JJ was recorded, which is also known as a Fraunhofer pattern. The periodicity of this pattern in magnetic field compared to the JJ geometry allowed to conclude how the junction depends on the phase difference between both superconducting contacts. Theoretical calculations predicted a phase periodicity of 4π instead of 2π, if a TI is used as weak link material between the contacts, due to the presence of Majorana modes. It could clearly be shown that despite the usage of a TI the phase still was 2π periodic. By varying further influencing factors, like number of modes and phase coherence length in the junction, it might still be possible to reach the 4π regime with bound Majorana states in the future. A good candidate for further experiments was found in capped HgTe samples, but here the fabrication process still has to be developed to the same quality as for the uncapped HgTe samples. The second type of geometry studied in this thesis was a DC-SQUID, which consists of two parallel JJs and can also be described as an interference device between two JJs. The DC-SQUID devices were produced in two configurations: The symmetric SQUID, where both JJs were identical, and the asymmetric SQUID, where one JJ was not linear, but instead has a 90 bent. These configurations allow to test, if the predicted uniformity of the superconducting band gap for induced superconductivity in a TI is valid. While the phase of the symmetric SQUID is not influenced by the shape of the band gap, the asymmetric SQUID would be in phase with the symmetric SQUID in case of an uniform band gap and out of phase if p- or d-wave superconductivity is dominating the transport, due to the 90° junction. As both devices are measured one after another, the problem of drift in the coil used to create the magnetic field has to be overcome in order to decide if the oscillations of both types of SQUIDs are in phase. With an oscillation period of 0.5 mT and a drift rate in the range of 5.5 μT/h the measurements on both configurations have to be conducted in a few hours. Only then the total shift is small enough to compare them with each other. For this to be possible a novel measurement system based on a real time micro controller was programmed, which allows a much faster extraction of the critical current of a device. The measurement times were reduced from days to hours, circumventing the drift problems and enabling the wanted comparison. After the final system optimizations it has been shown that the comparison should now be possible. Initial measurements with the old system hinted that both types of SQUIDs are in phase and thus the expected uniform band gap is more likely. With all needed optimizations in place it is now up to the successors of this project to conclusively prove this last point. This thesis has proven that it is possible to induce superconductivity in strained bulk HgTe. It has thus realized the most basic sample geometry proposed by Fu and Kane in 2008 for the appearance of Majorana bound states. Based on this work it is now possible to further explore induced superconductivity in strained bulk HgTe to finally reach a regime, where the Majorana states are both stable and detectable.

  11. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  12. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  13. Determination of cadmium oxide in and on the surface of high purity cadmium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiba, Toshiyasu; Matsumoto, Ken; Shimizu, Genji

    1975-01-01

    In a 100 ml separating funnel were added 50 ml of 1 M ammonium chloride-aqueous ammonia buffer solution(pH 10) and 2.5 ml mercury; after passing nitrogen gas sufficiently to remove oxygen from the vessel and also from the aqueous solution, several pieces of cadmium metal of high purity were put into the vessel. The content was shaken vigorously; the metal went into mercury forming cadmium-amalgam, while the cadmium oxide dissolved itself in the aqueous solution to form cadmium tetrammine complex cations. After Removal of mercury from the funnel, the solution was submitted to the determination of cadmium dissolved in it by means of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry of the EDTA titration. By the above procedure a minute amount of cadmium oxide could be determined precisely with high reproducibility. The critical experiments were also done to clarify the behaviors of cadmium metal and cadmium oxide in this separation process for the purpose of establishing a suitable procedure. (auth.)

  14. Perturbed Angular Correlation Study of the Static and Dynamic Aspects of Cadmium and Mercury Atoms Inside and Attached to a C60 Fullerene Cage

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Satyendra K; Banerjee, Debasish; Johnston, Karl; Das, Parnika; Butz, Tilman; Amaral, Vitor S; Correia, Joao G; Barbosa, Marcelo B

    2014-01-01

    30 keV Cd-111m and 50 keV Hg-199m beams from ISOLDE were used to implant on preformed targets of C-60 with a thickness of 1 mg cm(-2). Endofullerene compounds, viz. Cd-111m@C-60 and Hg-199m@C-60 formed during implantation were separated by filtration through micropore filter paper followed by solvent extraction. Dried samples of the endofullerene compounds were counted for the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurement using the coincidence of the 151-245 keV cascade of Cd-111m and the 374 158 keV cascade of Hg-199m on a six LaBr3(Ce) detector system coupled with digital electronics. The results for 111mCd@C60 indicate a single static component (27\\%) and a fast relaxing component (73\\%), the latter implying that the cadmium atom moves rapidly inside the cage at room temperature. The quadrupole interaction frequency and asymmetry parameter of the cadmium atom occupying the static site in C60 are omega(Q) = 8.21(36) Mrad s(-1) and eta = 0.41(9), respectively. The fast relaxation con...

  15. Deep level study of cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komin, Valery Vitalyevich

    The goal of this project is to develop a reliable approach to characterize defects in CdTe/CdS solar cells, taking into account the requirements dictated by the polycrystallinity of the device materials, to characterize solar cells prepared in different processing conditions, to develop an understanding on how processing variations correlate with changes in the overall device performance and stability, and to develop recommendations on the optimization of processing conditions based on this analysis. Polycrystalline CdTe/CdS solar cells were studied using double boxcar deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and correlation DLTS measurements to investigate the effect of the post-growth CdCl2 heat treatment, and the effect of the HgTe:Cu-doped graphite and Ni2P-based back contacts. The limitations of each deep-level characterization technique dictated by the polycrystalline nature of the CdTe/CdS heterostructure, were taken in consideration. Dark C-V, dark and illuminated J-V measurements were performed in order to monitor changes in the solar cell parameters during the deep level studies. To avoid issues associated with the metastability of some defects, all experiments were performed in the dark. Twelve traps were detected in the temperature range from 90K to 360K. Preliminary solar cell simulations using AMPS-1D were used to help understand the role of these traps in the current transport mechanism and the impact of their presence on the overall device performance. A donor-like defect with activation energy EA = 0.140 eV was identified as a chlorine-related DX2-state of (VCd2--ClTe+) complex. Its presence in the CdTe layer was associated with significant degradation of overall solar cell performance. An acceptor-like defect with activation energy EA = 0.350 was identified as a defect Cu Cd- or complex (Cui+-2Cu Cd-)-. Recommendations for processing condition optimization are made based on the results of this study.

  16. Different transport mechanisms for cadmium and mercury in Caco-2 cells: inhibition of Cd uptake by Hg without evidence for reciprocal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aduayom, Ismaeel; Campbell, Peter G.C.; Denizeau, Francine; Jumarie, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium/Hg interactions have been studied in the TC7 clone of the enterocytic-like Caco-2 cells to test the hypothesis that these metals may compete for intestinal transport. Comparison of the kinetic parameter values for 203 Hg(II) and 109 Cd(II) uptake in a serum-free medium revealed that Hg is accumulated much more rapidly and to higher concentrations. The very rapid uptake/binding step and the initial uptake rate of 109 Cd were both significantly inhibited by an excess of unlabeled Cd or Hg (apparent K i for Hg of 9.3 ± 1.2 μM) without reciprocal effects. 109 Cadmium uptake was highly sensitive to temperature and a significant fraction of accumulation (12%) was EDTA extractable. 203 Hg uptake remained insensitive to temperature or the EDTA washing procedure. However, the uptake of both tracers was half-decreased when an excess of the respective unlabeled metal was added in the stop solution, suggesting an exchange mechanism for adsorption. Cell pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) led to a 30% decrease or a 73% increase in the 3-min specific transport of 109 Cd when NEM was still present in or removed from the uptake medium, respectively. NEM had no effect on 203 Hg uptake. Overall our results suggest the involvement of a saturable specific mechanism for Cd, which is highly sensitive to inhibition by Hg and NEM under some conditions, and a nonspecific passive diffusion for Hg. The Hg- or NEM-induced inhibition of Cd uptake likely involves a thiol-mediated reaction, but our results suggest that NEM pretreatment may activate other cellular mechanisms leading to a stimulatory effect

  17. Cadmium decontamination using in-house resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sangita; Thalor, K.L; Prabhakar, S.; Srivastava, V.K.; Goswami, J.L.; Tewari, P.K.; Dhanpal, Pranav; Goswami, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    A selective and strong in-house chelator has been studied w.r.t. basic parameters like concentration, time, and elution. De-contamination of cadmium, mercury, chromium, lead etc by using high uptake values fro cadmium ions proves its selectivity with high elution ratio ensures further decontamination of run-off water during natural calamities. In three step cascade use the concentration of original cadmium solution (500 ppm) decocted to safe disposable attribute. This polymeric ligand exchanger displayed outlet effluent concentration to 1 ppm and less than 200 ppb when treated for inlet feed concentration of 50 ppm and 500 ppm respectively. (author)

  18. Tellurium self-diffusion and point defects in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Method of radioactive indicators was used to determine factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride with different deviation of the composition from stoichiometric in the range of enrichment by tellurium. It was found that at 973 K factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride depend slightly on the vapor pressure of tellurium equilibrium with solid phase

  19. Potential of mercury-resistant marine bacteria for detoxification of chemicals of environmental concern

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Bhosle, N.B.; Garg, A.; Vardanyan, L.; Nagle, V.L.; Fukami, K.

    and were successfully used to detoxify mercury-amended growth medium for the culturing of mercury-sensitive Phormidium sp. Over 70% cadmium and 95% of the lead from the growth medium were either cell-bound (cadmium) or precipitated (lead) by some...

  20. Amelioration of cadmium- and mercury-induced liver and kidney damage in rats by genetically engineered probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 producing pyrroloquinoline quinone with oral supplementation of citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Ruma; Chaudhari, Archana; Kumar, G Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidants, chelating agents, and probiotics are used to manage the toxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg). The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of antioxidants, chelating agents, and probiotics against heavy metal toxicity. Genetically modified probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN-20) producing a potent water soluble antioxidant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was supplemented with oral citric acid and compared with another genetically modified probiotic EcN-21 producing PQQ and citric acid against oxidative stress induced by Cd and Hg. Rats were independently given 100 ppm Cd and 80 ppm Hg in drinking water for 4 wk. EcN-20 was found to be more effective than EcN-2 (EcN strain with genomic integration of vgb and gfp genes) with orally given PQQ against oxidative stress induced by Cd and Hg. EcN-20 supplemented with oral citric acid was more effective against Cd and Hg toxicity compared with EcN-2+citric acid (oral), EcN-2+PQQ (oral), EcN-2+PQQ (oral)+citric acid (oral), EcN-20, and EcN-21. However, protection shown by EcN-21 was similar to EcN-20. The combination therapy involving probiotic EcN-20 producing PQQ with citric acid given orally was found to be a moderately effective strategy against toxicity induced by Cd and Hg, whereas the protective effect of EcN-21 was the same as EcN-20. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cadmium exposure induces hematuria in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Seok [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myounghee, E-mail: dkkim73@gmail.com [Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Science, Eulji University, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su Mi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sejoong [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kwon Wook [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Soo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Dong Ki [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Introduction: Toxic heavy metals have adverse effects on human health. However, the risk of hematuria caused by heavy metal exposure has not been evaluated. Methods: Data from 4701 Korean adults were obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2008–2010). Blood levels of the toxic heavy metals cadmium, lead, and mercury were measured. Hematuria was defined as a result of ≥+1 on a urine dipstick test. The odds ratios (ORs) for hematuria were measured according to the blood heavy metal levels after adjusting for multiple variables. Results: Individuals with blood cadmium levels in the 3rd and 4th quartiles had a greater OR for hematuria than those in the 1st quartile group: 3rd quartile, 1.35 (1.019–1.777; P=0.037); 4th quartile, 1.52 (1.140–2.017; P=0.004). When blood cadmium was considered as a log-transformed continuous variable, the correlation between blood cadmium and hematuria was significant: OR, 1.97 (1.224–3.160; P{sub trend}=0.005). In contrast, no significant correlations between hematuria and blood lead or mercury were found in the multivariate analyses. Discussion: The present study shows that high cadmium exposure is associated with a risk of hematuria. -- Highlights: • A high level of blood cadmium is associated with a high risk of hematuria. • This correlation is independent of several confounding factors. • Blood levels of lead and mercury are not associated with risk of hematuria. • This is the first study on the correlation between cadmium exposure and hematuria risk.

  2. Application of Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with high-frequency modulation polarization for the direct determination of aluminum, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, manganese, nickel, lead, and thallium in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Natalya B; Solovyev, Nikolay D; Ivanenko, Anatoly A; Ganeev, Alexander A

    2012-10-01

    Determination of aluminum (Al), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and thallium (Tl) concentrations in human blood using high-frequency modulation polarization Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was performed. No sample digestion was used in the current study. Blood samples were diluted with deionized water or 0.1 % (m/v) Triton X-100 solution for Tl. Dilution factors ranged from 1/5 per volume for Be and Tl to 1/20 per volume for Cd and Pb. For Tl, Cd, and Hg, noble metals (gold, platinum, rhodium, etc.) were applied as surface modifiers. To mitigate chloride interference, 2 % (m/v) solution of NH(4)NO(3) was used as matrix modifier for Tl and Ni assessment. The use of Pd(NO(3))(2) as oxidative modifier was necessary for blood Hg and Tl measurement. Validation of the methods was performed by analyzing two-level reference material Seronorm. The precision of the designed methods as relative SD was between 4 and 12 % (middle of a dynamic range) depending on the element. For additional validation, spiked blood samples were analyzed. Limits of detection (LoDs, 3σ, n = 10) for undiluted blood samples were 2.0 μg L(-1) for Al, 0.08 μg L(-1) for Be, 0.10 μg L(-1) for Cd, 2.2 μg L(-1) for Cr, 7 μg L(-1) for Hg, 0.4 μg L(-1) for Mn, 2.3 μg L(-1) for Ni, 3.4 μg L(-1) for Pb, and 0.5 μg L(-1) for Tl. The LoDs achieved allowed determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Pb at both toxic and background levels. Be, Hg, and Tl could be reliably measured at toxic levels only. The methods developed are used for clinical diagnostics and biological monitoring of work-related exposure.

  3. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  4. Effect of mercury on algal growth rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannan, P.J.; Patouillet, C.

    1972-01-01

    In experiments with one freshwater (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and three marine organisms (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Cyclotella nana, and Chaetoceras gavestonensis), mercury was more toxic than the other metals tested (silver, cadmium, lead, and copper); and its toxicity is comparatively irreversible. Growth was monitored by changes in fluorescence of the cultures over a 3-day test period. The toxicity of the mercury varied inversely with the concentrations of nutrients present. Preliminary experiments indicate that mercury in the form of mercuric chloride is more toxic than as dimethylmercury. 12 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. Got Mercury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou, Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2- xSb xTe 3) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2- xSb xTe 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties.

  7. Cadmium determination in Lentinus edodes mushroom species

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Akiko Maihara; Patricia Landim da Costa Moura; Marília Gabriela Miranda Catharino; Edson Gonçalves Moreira; Lilian Pavanelli Castro; Rubens Cesar Lopes Figueira

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have drawn attention to the occurrence and concentration of toxic elements found in the fruiting body of mushrooms. Some edible mushroom species are known to accumulate high levels of inorganic contaminants, mainly cadmium, mercury, and lead. There are about 2,000 known edible mushroom species, but only 25 of them are cultivated and used as food. In Brazil, the most marketed and consumed mushroom species are Agaricus bisporus, known as Paris champignon, Lentinus edodes, or Shitak...

  8. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Environment Contact Us Share Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  9. with palladium (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Mercury telluride is an important semi conductor with application in infra-red detection (Charlon 1982, Mullin & Irrine. 1985). Photolysis of mixture of the organometallic compounds RHgTeR and. RCdTeR can produce mercury cadmium telluride. Haris and Nissan (1987) prepared. (t-butyl)HgTe(t-butyl) and demonstrated that.

  10. tellurium(ii) with palladium (ii) and platinum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Mercury telluride is an important semi conductor with application in infra-red detection (Charlon 1982, Mullin & Irrine. 1985). Photolysis of mixture of the organometallic compounds RHgTeR and. RCdTeR can produce mercury cadmium telluride. Haris and Nissan (1987) prepared. (t-butyl)HgTe(t-butyl) and demonstrated that.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 ) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties. - Graphical abstract: PbTe nanoparticles introduced into p-type Bi 2 Te 3 by incipient wetness results in decreased lattice thermal conductivity, but also acts as an electronic dopant, resulting in an overall decrease in thermoelectric performance. Highlights: ► Composites of PbTe nanoparticles in Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 were formed by incipient wetness. ► PbTe nanoparticles leads to decreased κ l , consistent with phonon scattering. ► PbTe nanoparticles lead to decreased S and ρ, due to increased carriers. ► Collateral doping from PbTe leads to decreased ZT with increasing concentration. ► Immiscible systems are preferred for improved ZT.

  12. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  13. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using air and chloroform, acetone, ethanol, glycerol, distilled water as liquids having dielectric constants 1, 4·81,. 8·93, 21, 24·55, 42·5 and 80·1, respectively. The results unequivocally prove that copper telluride nanowires can be fabricated as chemical sensors with enhanced sensitivity and reliability. Keywords. CuTe ...

  14. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper telluride (CuTe) nanowires were synthesized electrochemically from aqueous acidic solution of copper (II) sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2) on a copper substrate by template-assisted electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted at 30 °C and the length of nanowires was ...

  15. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride. M P SINGH1 and C M BHANDARI2. 1Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211 002, India. 2Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad 211 002, India. E-mail: singhmps74@rediffmail.com; cmbhandari@yahoo.com. MS received 16 ...

  16. Cadmium and the kidney.

    OpenAIRE

    Friberg, L

    1984-01-01

    The paper is a review of certain aspects of importance of cadmium and the kidney regarding the assessment of risks and understanding of mechanisms of action. The review discusses the following topics: history and etiology of cadmium-induced kidney dysfunction and related disorders; cadmium metabolism, metallothionein and kidney dysfunction; cadmium in urine as indicator of body burden, exposure and kidney dysfunction; cadmium levels in kidney and liver as indicators of kidney dysfunction; cha...

  17. Mercury and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Mercury and pregnancy Mercury and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... vision problems. How can you be exposed to mercury? Mercury has several forms: It can be a ...

  18. About thermo-electric properties of bismuth telluride doped by gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akperov, M.M.; Ismailov, Sh.S.; Shukyurova, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Results of study of the Gd impurities effect on the bismuth telluride thermo-electric properties are presented. The experiment was carried out within the temperature range T=300-700 K. It is determined, that at temperature increase the energy level is appreciably closing up to bismuth telluride forbidden zone which makes up 0.16-0.24 eV. Such anomalous energy properties of gadolinium in telluride affect on material thermoelectric properties

  19. Noiseless Near-Infrared Photon Counting Avalanche Photodiode Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal concerns the research and development of a mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) Avalanche Photodiode (APD) array for use as a low-noise science detector...

  20. Bismuth Telluride and Its Alloys as Materials for Thermoelectric Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Julian Goldsmid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth telluride and its alloys are widely used as materials for thermoelectric refrigeration. They are also the best materials for use in thermoelectric generators when the temperature of the heat source is moderate. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, usually rises with temperature, as long as there is only one type of charge carrier. Eventually, though, minority carrier conduction becomes significant and ZT decreases above a certain temperature. There is also the possibility of chemical decomposition due to the vaporization of tellurium. Here we discuss the likely temperature dependence of the thermoelectric parameters and the means by which the composition may be optimized for applications above room temperature. The results of these theoretical predictions are compared with the observed properties of bismuth telluride-based thermoelements at elevated temperatures. Compositional changes are suggested for materials that are destined for generator modules.

  1. Effects of annealing conditions of electrodes on the photovoltaic properties of sintered cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.S.; Im, H.B.

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline n-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells with a commercial carbon paint on the p-CdTe layer and an In- Ag paint on the n-CdS layer were fabricated by a coating and sintering method. Electrical properties of the conducting paints and solar cell parameters of the heterojunction solar cells were investigated as a function of electrode annealing conditions. The sintered CdS/CdTe solar cells whose electrode contacts were annealed at 350 degrees C for 10 min in nitrogen showed maximum values of short-circuit current density, fill factor, and solar efficiency. Commercial carbon and silver paints can be used as electrodes to fabricate sintered CdS/CdTe solar cells with efficiency over 10%

  2. Fission-product tellurium and cesium telluride chemistry revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    The chemistry of fission-product tellurium is discussed with a focus on conditions in an operating CANDU reactor and in an accident scenario, i.e., a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Cesium telluride, Cs 2 Te, is likely to be one of the most abundant tellurium species released to containment. Available thermodynamic data on gas phase Cs 2 Te is not complete; hence the volatility of cesium telluride was studied by Knudsen-cell mass spectrometry. Cesium telluride was found to vapourize incongruently, becoming more tellurium-rich in the condensed phase as vapourization progressed. Vapour-phase species that were observed were elemental cesium and tellurium, CsTe, Cs 2 Te, Cs 2 Te 2 and Cs 2 Te 3 . Second-law enthalpies and entropies were obtained for many of these species, and a third-law value, ΔH 298 o , of 186 ± 2 kJ·mol -1 was obtained for Cs 2 Te. (author)

  3. Ion exchange of Cobalt and Cadmium in Zeolite X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava M, I.

    1994-01-01

    The growing development in the industry has an important contribution to the environmental damage, where the natural effluents are each day more contaminated by toxic elements, such as: mercury, chromium, lead and cadmium. So as to separate such elements it has sorbent must have enough stability, and have a sharp capacity of sorption. In this work it was studied the sorption behavior of cobalt and on the other hand, cadmium in aqueous solutions, which along with sodic form of the Zeolite X, undergoes a phenomenon of ionic interchange. Such interchange was verify to different concentration of cadmium, cobalt and hydronium ion. The content of cobalt and sodium in the interchanged samples was detected through the neutronic activation analysis. The results disclose a higher selectivity for cadmium than cobalt. (Author)

  4. Aquatic Life Criteria - Cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to 2016 Acute and Chronic Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Cadmium (Freshwater, Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Cadmium in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  5. Optical and magneto-optical phenomena at the absorption edge of elastically stressed cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, G.N.; Koshchug, O.S.; Nesvizhskij, A.I.; Sejsyan, R.P.; Yazeva, T.V.

    1993-01-01

    Investigation into the edge of absorption of thin (d∼1μm) monocrystalline plates of highly perfect CdTe under weak elastic strain created by sample adhesion to a relatively thick glass substrate is conducted in the magnetic fields of up to 7.5 T at T=2 K. Spectra unique by quantity and halfwidths of descrete lines both within the magnetic field and without it are abserved. Magnetic field connection allows one to observe at a time the weak field and intense field effects. The circuit of agreement of 3D and 1D states of an exciton produced in the intense magnetic field is proposed

  6. Non-Uniformities in Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells Using Electroluminescence and Photoluminescence: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaunbrecher, K.; Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Sites, J.

    2011-07-01

    It is the purpose of this research to develop specific imaging techniques that have the potential to be fast, in-line tools for quality control in thin-film CdTe solar cells. Electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) are two techniques that are currently under investigation on CdTe small area devices made at Colorado State University. It is our hope to significantly advance the understanding of EL and PL measurements as applied to CdTe. Qualitative analysis of defects and non-uniformities is underway on CdTe using EL, PL, and other imaging techniques.

  7. Superstrate and substrate type cadmium telluride solar cells and monolithic integration of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionis, Ilvydas

    This dissertation describes the fabrication of polycrystalline CdTe-based solar cells and monolithic integration of photovoltaic devices into modules using laser scribing. We have improved the efficiency of sputtered superstrate type CdTe solar cells, including devices with unconventionally thin absorber, built world-record efficiency substrate type CdTe solar cells, observed effects related to interfacial layers, and investigated the use of 7 different types of lasers for scribing of materials used for CdTe and CuInGaSe2 solar cells. We have fabricated CdTe/CdS solar cells using magnetron sputtering with conversion efficiencies of 12.5%. As the thickness of CdTe is reduced to less than 1 mum, devices still maintain efficiencies near 10%. Thinning of the CdTe layer would make manufacturing of solar modules more economical. We have built inverted (substrate) configuration CdTe solar cells with state-of-the-art efficiencies of 7.8%. We find that tellurium and sulfur interdiffusion is strongly inhibited in substrate type cells due to the fact that the CdS is grown on fully formed CdTe grains. We have optimized a sputtering process for aluminum-doped ZnO, achieved a resistivity of 5 x 10-4 O-cm, and fabricated 5.8% efficient substrate type CdTe solar cells with the ZnO:Al top contact. We have researched the effect of a high resistivity (HR) layer between the CdS and a transparent conducting oxide. Cells with the HR layer maintain higher efficiencies as the thickness of the CdS is reduced to 60 nm and less. We have investigated the use of 7 different types of lasers for scribing of the polycrystalline materials used for CdTe and CuIn(Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin-film solar cells. The lasers included four different Nd:YAG (532 and 1064 nm), a Cu vapor (511 and 578 nm) and two excimers (308 and 248 nm). Pulse durations ranged from 0.1 to 250 ns. We find that most wavelength and pulse duration combinations work well for the thin-film materials. ZnO should be scribed with an ultraviolet wavelength laser. We have achieved best results for CIGS on Mo with longer pulse durations (250 ns). Ridges along the edges of scribe lines can be eliminated by adjustment of focus conditions.

  8. Method for surface passivation and protection of cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Hermon, Haim

    2000-01-01

    A method for reducing the leakage current in CZT crystals, particularly Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te crystals (where x is greater than equal to zero and less than or equal to 0.5), and preferably Cd.sub.0.9 Zn.sub.0.1 Te crystals, thereby enhancing the ability of these crystal to spectrally resolve radiological emissions from a wide variety of radionuclides. Two processes are disclosed. The first method provides for depositing, via reactive sputtering, a silicon nitride hard-coat overlayer which provides significant reduction in surface leakage currents. The second method enhances the passivation by oxidizing the CZT surface with an oxygen plasma prior to silicon nitride deposition without breaking the vacuum state.

  9. Density Functional Study of Electronic and Structural Properties of Gold-Cadmium Selenide/Telluride Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimeles T. Bulbula

    2015-01-01

    gold electrodes decrease as cluster size increases, whereas the binding energy shows a reverse relationship with the cluster size. However, a few clusters show special properties like AuCd2Se3 and AuCd2Te3 clusters.

  10. An ultrasensitive method for the determination of melamine using cadmium telluride quantum dots as fluorescence probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiafei; Li, Jin; Kuang, Huiyan; Feng, Lei; Yi, Shoujun; Xia, Xiaodong; Huang, Haowen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education of China, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Chen, Yong; Tang, Chunran [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Zeng, Yunlong, E-mail: yunlongzeng1955@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education of China, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2013-11-13

    Graphical abstract: Melamine takes place of the TGA on the surface of TGA-CdTe QDs with negative charge to form melamine coated QDs changing the surface charge of the QDs, resulting the fluorescence quenched as the QDs aggregation occurred by electrostatic attraction of the two opposite charged nanocrystals. -- Highlights: •An ultrasensitive and selective method for the determination of melamine was developed at pH 11.0. •The selectivity of the method was improved. •The sensitivity of the method enhanced obviously as the CdTe QDs have higher QYs at pH 11. •The sensitivity and linear range for the analysis are size dependent using QDs PL probes. •Melamine takes the place of TGA resulting fluorescence quenched of QDs. -- Abstract: An ultrasensitive and simple method for the determination of melamine was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) at pH 11.0. In strong alkaline aqueous solution, the selectivity of the method has been greatly improved due to most heavy metal ions show no interference as they are in the precipitation form or in their anion form. Furthermore, CdTe quantum dots have higher quantum yields at higher pH. The method has a wider concentration range and lower detection limit. The influence factors on the determination of melamine were investigated and the optimum conditions were determined. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity change of TGA coated CdTe quantum dots was linearly proportional to melamine over a concentration range from 1.0 × 10{sup −11} to 1.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.9943 and a detection limit of 5 × 10{sup −12} mol L{sup −1}. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching of the QDs has been proposed based on the infrared spectroscopy information and electrophoresis experiments in presence of melamine under alkaline condition. The proposed method was employed to detect trace melamine in milk powder and pet feeds with satisfactory results.

  11. Contribution to cadmium telluride characterizations by ion beams and nuclear detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage-Ali, Makram.

    1980-01-01

    A short survey of the thermodynamics and crystal growth of CdTe is followed by the description of high mass and depth resolution Rutherford backscattering (RBS) with light and heavy ions. Energy losses in CdTe have been measured. Analysis of CdTe surfaces by RBS, SIMS, ellipsometry have also been performed. Diffused, implanted, or simply contacted CdTe junctions have been analyzed and then investigated as gamma spectrometers. The problem of polarization was specially studied [fr

  12. Next Generation Semiconductor-Based Radiation Detectors Using Cadmium Magnesium Telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States); Kutcher, Susan W [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States); Palsoz, Witold [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States); Berding, Martha [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burger, Arnold [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States)

    2014-11-17

    The primary objective of Phase I was to perform extensive studies on the purification, crystal growth and annealing procedures of CdMgTe to gain a clear understanding of the basic material properties to enable production of detector material with performance comparable to that of CdZnTe. Brimrose utilized prior experience in the growth and processing of II-VI crystals and produced high purity material and good quality single crystals of CdMgTe. Processing techniques for these crystals including annealing, mechanical and chemical polishing, surface passivation and electrode fabrication were developed. Techniques to characterize pertinent electronic characteristics were developed and gamma ray detectors were fabricated. Feasibility of the development of comprehensive defect modeling in this new class of material was demonstrated by our partner research institute SRI International, to compliment the experimental work. We successfully produced a CdMgTe detector that showed 662 keV gamma response with energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at room temperature, without any additional signal correction. These results are comparable to existing CdZnTe (CZT) technology using the same detector size and testing conditions. We have successfully demonstrated detection of gamma-radiation from various isotopes/sources, using CdMgTe thus clearly proving the feasibility that CdMgTe is an excellent, low-cost alternative to CdZnTe.

  13. Determination of the mean inner potential of cadmium telluride via electron holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, C.; Dhar, A.; Shintake, T.

    2017-04-01

    Mean inner potential is a fundamental material parameter in solid state physics and electron microscopy and has been experimentally measured in CdTe, a technologically important semiconductor. As a first step, the inelastic mean free path for electron scattering in CdTe was determined, using electron energy loss spectroscopy, to enable precise thickness mapping of thin CdTe lamellae. The obtained value was λi(CdTe, 300 kV) = 192 ± 10 nm. This value is relatively large, given the high density of the material, and is discussed in the text. Next, electron diffraction and specimen tilting were employed to identify weakly diffracting lattice orientations, to enable the straightforward measurement of the electron phase shift. Finally, electron holography was utilized to quantitatively map the phase shift experienced by electron waves passing through a CdTe crystal, with several different propagation vectors. Utilization of both thickness and phase data allowed computation of mean inner potential as V0 (CdTe) = 14.0 ± 0.9 V, within the range of previous theoretical estimates.

  14. Highly sensitive FRET-based fluorescence immunoassay for aflatoxin B1 using cadmium telluride quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekavati, Roya; Bayat, Mansour; Safi, Shahabeddin; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Rahmani-Cherati, Tavoos; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Mohsenifar, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    We report on a competitive immunoassay for the determination of aflatoxin B1 using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody (immobilized on the shell of CdTe quantum dots) to Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123-labeled aflatoxin B1 bound to albumin). The highly specific immuno reaction between the antibody against aflatoxin B1 on the QDs and the labeled-aflatoxin B1 brings the Rho 123 fluorophore (acting as the acceptor) and the QDs (acting as the donor) in close spatial proximity and causes FRET to occur upon photoexcitation of the QDs. In the absence of unlabeled aflatoxin B1, the antigen-antibody complex is stable, and strong emission resulting from the FRET from QDs to labeled aflatoxin B1 is observed. In the presence of aflatoxin B1, it will compete with the labeled aflatoxin B1-albumin complex for binding to the antibody-QDs conjugate so that FRET will be increasingly suppressed. The reduction in the fluorescence intensity of the acceptor correlates well with the concentration of aflatoxin B1. The feasibility of the method was established by the detection of aflatoxin B1 in spiked human serum. There is a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of Rho 123 with increasing concentration of aflatoxin B1 in spike human serum, over the range of 0.1–0.6 μmol·mL −1 . The limit of detection is 2 × 10 −11 M. This homogeneous competitive detection scheme is simple, rapid and efficient, and does not require excessive washing and separation steps. (author)

  15. Determination of deep levels in semi-insulating cadmium telluride by thermally stimulated current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, C.; Muller, J.C.; Stuck, R.; Siffert, P.

    1975-01-01

    Thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements have been performed in high resistivity (rho approximately 10 7 ohms.cm) CdTe γ-ray detectors between 35 and 300K. The TSC curves have been analyzed by different methods, including those taking into account the retrapping of the carriers. The trap characteristics have been determined; especially three levels located at E(v)+0.13eV, E(v)+0.30eV and E(c)-0.55eV have been investigated [fr

  16. Characterization of metal contacts on and surfaces of cadmium zinc telluride

    CERN Document Server

    Bürger, A; Chattopadhyay, K; Shi, D; Morgan, S H; Collins, W E; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    In the past several years significant progress has been made in building a database of physical properties for detector quality Cd sub x Zn sub 1 sub - sub x Te (CZT) (x=0.1-0.2) crystal material. CZT's high efficiency combined with its room temperature operation make the material an excellent choice for imaging and spectroscopy in the 10-200 keV energy range. For detector grade material, superior crystallinity and high bulk resistivity are required. The surface preparation during the detector fabrication plays a vital role in determining the contact characteristics and the surface leakage current, which are often the dominant factors influencing its performance. This paper presents a surface and contact characterization study aimed at establishing the effects of the surface preparation steps prior to contacting (polishing and chemical etching), the choice of the metal and contact deposition technique, and the surface oxidation process. A photoconductivity mapping technique is used for studying the effects of...

  17. Characterization of metal contacts on and surfaces of cadmium zinc telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, A.; Chen, H.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Shi, D.; Morgan, S.H.; Collins, W.E.; James, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    In the past several years significant progress has been made in building a database of physical properties for detector quality Cd x Zn 1-x Te (CZT) (x=0.1-0.2) crystal material. CZT's high efficiency combined with its room temperature operation make the material an excellent choice for imaging and spectroscopy in the 10-200 keV energy range. For detector grade material, superior crystallinity and high bulk resistivity are required. The surface preparation during the detector fabrication plays a vital role in determining the contact characteristics and the surface leakage current, which are often the dominant factors influencing its performance. This paper presents a surface and contact characterization study aimed at establishing the effects of the surface preparation steps prior to contacting (polishing and chemical etching), the choice of the metal and contact deposition technique, and the surface oxidation process. A photoconductivity mapping technique is used for studying the effects of different surface treatments on the surface recombination

  18. Polycrystalline thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trefny, J.U.; Mao, D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1998-01-01

    During the past year, Colorado School of Mines (CSM) researchers performed systematic studies of the growth and properties of electrodeposition CdS and back-contact formation using Cu-doped ZnTe, with an emphasis on low Cu concentrations. CSM also started to explore the stability of its ZnTe-Cu contacted CdTe solar cells. Researchers investigated the electrodeposition of CdS and its application in fabricating CdTe/CdS solar cells. The experimental conditions they explored in this study were pH from 2.0 to 3.0; temperatures of 80 and 90 C; CdCl{sub 2} concentration of 0.2 M; deposition potential from {minus}550 to {minus}600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl electrode; [Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}] concentration between 0.005 and 0.05 M. The deposition rate increases with increase of the thiosulfate concentration and decrease of solution pH. Researchers also extended their previous research of ZnTe:Cu films by investigating films doped with low Cu concentrations (< 5 at. %). The low Cu concentration enabled them to increase the ZnTe:Cu post-annealing temperature without causing excessive Cu diffusion into CdTe or formation of secondary phases. The effects of Cu doping concentration and post-deposition annealing temperature on the structural, compositional, and electrical properties of ZnTe were studied systematically using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, electron microprobe, Hall effect, and conductivity measurements.

  19. Thin film cadmium telluride charged particle sensors for large area neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. W.; Smith, L.; Calkins, J.; Mejia, I.; Cantley, K. D.; Chapman, R. A.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B., E-mail: gnade@utdallas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Kunnen, G. R.; Allee, D. R. [Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona 85284 (United States); Sastré-Hernández, J.; Contreras-Puente, G. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City 07738 (Mexico); Mendoza-Pérez, R. [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Mexico City 09790 (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    Thin film semiconductor neutron detectors are an attractive candidate to replace {sup 3}He neutron detectors, due to the possibility of low cost manufacturing and the potential for large areas. Polycrystalline CdTe is found to be an excellent material for thin film charged particle detectors—an integral component of a thin film neutron detector. The devices presented here are characterized in terms of their response to alpha and gamma radiation. Individual alpha particles are detected with an intrinsic efficiency of >80%, while the devices are largely insensitive to gamma rays, which is desirable so that the detector does not give false positive counts from gamma rays. The capacitance-voltage behavior of the devices is studied and correlated to the response due to alpha radiation. When coupled with a boron-based neutron converting material, the CdTe detectors are capable of detecting thermal neutrons.

  20. Characterization of metal contacts on and surfaces of cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, A.; Chen, H.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Shi, D.; Morgan, S. H.; Collins, W. E.; James, R. B.

    1999-06-01

    In the past several years significant progress has been made in building a database of physical properties for detector quality Cd xZn 1- xTe (CZT) ( x=0.1-0.2) crystal material. CZT's high efficiency combined with its room temperature operation make the material an excellent choice for imaging and spectroscopy in the 10-200 keV energy range. For detector grade material, superior crystallinity and high bulk resistivity are required. The surface preparation during the detector fabrication plays a vital role in determining the contact characteristics and the surface leakage current, which are often the dominant factors influencing its performance. This paper presents a surface and contact characterization study aimed at establishing the effects of the surface preparation steps prior to contacting (polishing and chemical etching), the choice of the metal and contact deposition technique, and the surface oxidation process. A photoconductivity mapping technique is used for studying the effects of different surface treatments on the surface recombination.

  1. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, K.; Das, M. B.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.

    1980-02-01

    Emphasis during the third quarter of the program was on the improvement of the quality of sputtered films, their characterization and use in the fabrication of Schottky barrier type diodes and solar cell structures. Films prepared under different conditions and on different substrates were examined showing modular growths under certain conditions. I-V, C-V, and photovoltaic characteristics were measured on numerous samples based on n- and p-type films on Ni substrates having top metallization of either evaporated Au and Al. The n-type samples showed up to 200 mV V/sub oc/and small short-circuit currents. The characteristics observed are indicative of the presence of interfacial layer and surface states. Surface state's capacitance were measured on p-type samples metalized with Au.

  2. Lead tin selenide(211)/cadmium telluride(211)boron/silicon(211) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulk, Chad

    The Si(211) reconstruction was studied after normal molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) preparation procedures and the subsequent reconstruction after arsenic deposition. The effect of this reconstruction on the CdTe and CdTe/PbSnSe interface is examined. Implications of the strain between the epitaxial materials were explored and for the first time, PbSnSe(211) on CdTe(211)B/Si(211) substrates have been grown. Material quality of PbSnSe on CdTe/Si is compared to material grown on bulk BaF2(111). Samples have been characterized using Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED), Nomarski, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Photoluminescence (PL), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). LEED images indicate the (211) surface is unstable and facets. The degree of faceting and the magnitude of disorder is dependent on preparation procedures. Arsenic deposition beginning at high temperatures controls silicon faceting into a series of 19.2 A rows. This configuration reduces both tetragonal and shear strain at the CdTe/Si interface. At the PbSnSe/CdTe interface the (211) orientation allows the thermal mismatch between silicon and PbSnSe to be accommodated within the first 5 nm of the interface though a network of glide dislocations. It was also observed that the threading dislocations were greatly reduced and gettered to the (111) [01¯1] glide system when compared to the (111) orientation. This allowed the PbSnSe to be grown without cracking even after several thermal cycles.

  3. Surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductor compounds. I. cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rajaram; Balasubramanian, Raghuraman; Wilcox, William R.

    1990-02-01

    The surface tension and contact angle of molten CdTe were measured by the sessile drop technique. The dependence of surface tension and contact angle on temperature and on the deviations from stoichiometry was determined. A computer program was used to calculate the properties from the sessile drop profile. The wetting behaviour of the melt was studied on the following surfaces: quartz, HF-etched quartz, sandblasted quartz, carbon-coated quartz and pyrolytic boron nitride. The surface tension of molten CdTe decreased with increasing temperature, but increased slightly with excess Cd. The degree of wetting increased in the following order: pyrolytic boron nitride, carbon-coated quartz, sandblasted quartz, HF-etched quartz and plain quartz. The contact angle decreased with increasing temperature and seemed to increase slightly with increasing Cd.

  4. Feasibility of a Hand-Held Integrating Dosimeter Using a Cadmium Telluride Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-26

    and photons (in the X-ray and gamma ray energy span). Electronic dosimeters developed for nuclear reactor appli- cations are not satisfactory for...also be added the man-made component due to any nuclear reactors or thermoelectric generators on board the spacecraft. In all cases found in the open...no [with flat (with linear (ft) (R/hr) extrap .] extrap .] extrap .] 19 0.0012 0.00338 0.00451 0.00585 13 0.0026 0.00698 0.00924 0.0121 9 0.0055 0.0148

  5. Calcium enhances cadmium tolerance and decreases cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed at characterizing mechanisms controlling cadmium accumulation in lettuce, which is a food crop showing one of the highest capacities to accumulate this toxic compound. In this study, plants from three lettuce varieties were grown for eight days on media supplemented or not with cadmium (15 μM CdCl2) and ...

  6. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  7. TOXIC EFFECTS OF CADMIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Vukićević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is one of the heavy metals, it is often used in industry, and exerts toxic effects on human health. Cadmium is classified as a carcinogenic substance for humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and is in a group I carcinogen. Cadmium affects the development of cell cycle, proliferation, differentiation, DNA repair, replication and apoptosis, as well as promotion of cancer in tissues. Intoxication with cadmium in people usually occurs by inhalation of cigarette smoke, but it is also possible via water, food and air. Cadmium exerts toxic effects on the kidneys, liver, lungs, cardiovascular system, immune system and reproductive system. Metallothionein protects tissues from the toxicity of cadmium. Cadmium-metallothionein complex is distributed in various tissues. There is no way for natural cadmium elimination from the human body. The main route of cadmium in the body is through binding with metallothionein, low molecular weight protein that participates in the homeostasis of certain metals. Cadmium-metallothionein complex is distributed in various tissues. The role of metallothionein in detoxification of cadmium is primarily in the large binding affinity of metals for metallothionein.

  8. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S

    2002-01-01

    The Greenland marine food chains contain high levels of cadmium, mercury and selenium. Concentrations of cadmium in the kidney of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the municipalities of Qaanaaq and Upernavik (Northwest Greenland) are among the highest recorded in the Arctic. The purpose of the st......The Greenland marine food chains contain high levels of cadmium, mercury and selenium. Concentrations of cadmium in the kidney of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the municipalities of Qaanaaq and Upernavik (Northwest Greenland) are among the highest recorded in the Arctic. The purpose...... of the study was to determine whether cadmium-induced damage in the kidneys and the skeletal system could be detected among 100 ringed seals from Northwest Greenland. The cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex ranged from 0 to 248 microg/g wet weight (mean=44.5, N=100) in the 99 kidneys examined...... or osteodystrophy. This might be explained by the composition of the ringed seals diet, which contains high levels of vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, selenium and protein. These elements are all likely to counteract cadmium-induced damage. It is speculated that ringed seal are not particularly vulnerable...

  9. Mercury contamination in Idaho bald eagles, Haliaeetus leucocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechard, Marc J; Perkins, Dusty N; Kaltenecker, Gregory S; Alsup, Steve

    2009-11-01

    Because mercury contamination is potentially threatening to bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) populations, we collected molted feathers at nests to determine the level of contamination in bald eagles in the state of Idaho, USA. Eagle feathers contained measurable amounts of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), lead (Pb), as well as mercury (Hg). Cadmium, Cr, Se, and Pb levels averaged 0.17, 4.68, 2.02, and 1.29 mg/kg dry weight, respectively, and were at or below concentrations indicated as causing reproductive failure in bald eagles. Mercury contamination was found to be the highest averaging 18.74 mg/kg dry weight. Although a concentration of only 7.5 mg/kg dry weight Hg in bird feathers can cause reduced productivity and even sterility, all of the eagles we sampled bred successfully and the population of bald eagles continues to grow annually throughout the state.

  10. Mercury's Messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  11. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov . Mercury Background Mercury Report Additional Resources Mercury Report - Children's Exposure to Elemental Mercury Recommend on Facebook ... I limit exposure to mercury? Why was the report written? Children attending a daycare in New Jersey ...

  12. On the ''memory'' effect and its relation to the mechanism of formation of mercury-graphite electrode in inversion voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejman, E.Ya.; Petrova, L.G.; Dolgopolova, G.M.; Ignatov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous discharge ionization of lead-copper and cadmium-copper systems on the surface of mercury-plated graphite and graphite electrodes has been studied. A model is suggested of the preparation process of a mercury-plated graphite electrode obtained in simultaneous electroposition of mercury and elements determined as microimpurities. Processes, which occur on the electrode during relaxation time between electrolysis beginning and formation of the mercury phase, may be probable reasons for mutual effects of elements of the mercury-plated graphite electrode

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of cadmium tellurium films for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.S.; Chu, T.L.; Han, K.D.; Liu, Y.Z.; Mantravadi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium telluride films have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS), and their structural and electrical properties have been characterized in detail. The CVD technique has the advantage of controlling the electrical resistivity of p-CdTe films while the CST technique is capable of depositing p-CdTe films at high rates. Thin film heterojunction solar cells of the configuration p-CdTe/CdS/SnO/sub 2/:F/glass have been prepared by the deposition techniques. Solar cells of 1 cm/sup 2/ or larger in area with AM1.5 (global) efficiency of 10.5% have been prepared

  14. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  15. Topological surface states of strained Mercury-Telluride probed by ARPES

    OpenAIRE

    Crauste, Olivier; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Ballet, Philippe; Delplace, Pierre André Louis; Carpentier, David; Bouvier, Clément; Meunier, Tristan; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Lévy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    with supplementary material; The topological surface states of strained HgTe have been measured using high-resolution ARPES measurements. The dispersion of surface states form a Dirac cone, which origin is close to the top of the \\ghh band: the top half of the Dirac cone is inside the stress-gap while the bottom half lies within the heavy hole bands and keeps a linear dispersion all the way to the X-point. The circular dichroism of the photo-emitted electron intensity has also been measured f...

  16. Ore petrology and geochemistry of Tertiary gold telluride deposits of the Colorado mineral belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J.A.; Romberger, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Epithermal gold telluride deposits from the Colorado mineral belt share a number of similarities: relationship to alkalic stocks; high fluorine and CO/sub 2/ content; and similar paragenesis. Petrography of deposits in the Jamestown, Cripple Creek, and La Plata districts has resulted in a composite paragenesis: early Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides + hematite; tetrahedrite; high Te tellurides; low Te tellurides; late native gold. Fluid inclusion studies suggest telluride deposition occurred below 200/sup 0/C from low salinity. Gangue and alteration mineralogy indicates the ore fluids were near neutral pH during telluride deposition. The presence of hematite and locally barite suggest relatively oxidizing conditions. Evaluation of thermodynamic stabilities of tellurides and aqueous tellurium species indicates that progressive oxidation is consistent with the observed ore mineral paragenesis. Available data on gold bisulfide and chloride complexes suggest neither were important in the transport of gold in these systems. Thermodynamic data suggest the ditelluride ion (Te/sub 2//sup 2 -/) predominates in the range of inferred physiochemical conditions for the transport and deposition of gold in these systems. Inferred complexes such as AuTe/sub 2//sup -/ could account for the gold transport, and oxidation would be the most effective mechanism of precipitation of gold telluride or native gold. Published data suggest the associated alkalic stocks may be the ultimate source of the metals, since they are enriched in Au, Ag, Te, As, and Bi.

  17. Synthesis and properties of cadmium-containing quinolinium and pyrylium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, S.P.; Moskalenko, A.I.; Boev, V.I.; Stamova, L.G.; Gulin, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    Successive action on methyl substituted perchlorates of quinolinium cations and 2,6-diarylpyrylium of sodium ethylate and then equimolar amount of anhydrous trifluoroacetate of cadmium(2) 2- and 4-methylene cadmium-containing salts of the enumerated heterocyclic cations were synthesized with the yield of 80-97%. reactions of cadmium-containing quinolinium and pyrylium salts with hydrochloric acid, acetic anhydride, mercury(2) trifluoroacetate, SnCl 2 and nickel(2) trifluoroacetate, resulting in substitution of CdOCOF 3 for hydrogen, Ac, HgOCOCF 3 , SnCl and NiOCOCF 3 respectively, were studied [ru

  18. Environmental and health aspects of lighting: Mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1993-07-01

    Most discharge lamps, including fluorescent lamps, metal halide lamps, and high pressure sodium lamps, contain Mercury, a toxic chemical. Lighting professionals need to be able to respond to questions about the direct hazards of Mercury from accidentally breaking lamps, and the potential environmental hazards of lamp operation and disposal. We calculated the exposures that could occur from an accidental breakage of lamps. Acute poisoning appears almost impossible. Under some circumstances a sealed environment, such as a space station, could be contaminated enough to make it unhealthy for long-term occupation. Mercury becomes a potential environmental hazard after it becomes methylated. Mercury is methylated in aquatic environments, where it may accumulate in fish, eventually rendering them toxic to people and other animals. Lighting causes Mercury to enter the environment directly from lamp disposal, and indirectly from power plant emissions. The environmental tradeoffs between incandescent and discharge lamps depend upon the amounts released by these two sources, their local concentrations, and their probabilities of being methylated. Indirect environmental effects of lighting also include the release of other heavy metals (Cadmium, Lead and Arsenic), and other air pollutants and carbon dioxide that are emitted by fossil fuel power plants. For a given light output, the level of power plant emissions depends upon the efficacy of the light source, and is thus much larger for incandescent lamps than for fluorescent or discharge lamps. As disposal and control technologies change the relative direct and indirect emissions from discharge and incandescent lamps will change.

  19. Environmental mercury problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Itri, F.M.

    1972-01-01

    The urgent need to eliminate or greatly reduce the discharge of mercury into the environment is paramount to the health and well being of man. That all forms of mercury are hazardous is widely recognized, but what is more devastating to our society is that all forms of mercury appear to have the potential to be converted in to highly toxic monomethylmercury, or dimethylmercury. This paper examined the historical uses of mercury, the background concentrations of mercury, the analytical methods for the determination of mercury, the contamination of the food chain by mercury, the biological methylation of mercury, the decontamination and restoration of mercury polluted areas, the epidemiology and toxicology of mercury, and the chronology of the world's mercury poisoning problem.

  20. Functional characterization of Gram-negative bacteria from different genera as multiplex cadmium biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara; Aracic, Sanja; Kannan, Ruban; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley E

    2017-08-15

    Widespread presence of cadmium in soil and water systems is a consequence of industrial and agricultural processes. Subsequent accumulation of cadmium in food and drinking water can result in accidental consumption of dangerous concentrations. As such, cadmium environmental contamination poses a significant threat to human health. Development of microbial biosensors, as a novel alternative method for in situ cadmium detection, may reduce human exposure by complementing traditional analytical methods. In this study, a multiplex cadmium biosensing construct was assembled by cloning a single-output cadmium biosensor element, cadRgfp, and a constitutively expressed mrfp1 onto a broad-host range vector. Incorporation of the duplex fluorescent output [green and red fluorescence proteins] allowed measurement of biosensor functionality and viability. The biosensor construct was tested in several Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Enterobacter. The multiplex cadmium biosensors were responsive to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10µgml -1 , as well as several other heavy metals, including arsenic, mercury and lead at similar concentrations. The biosensors were also responsive within 20-40min following exposure to 3µgml -1 cadmium. This study highlights the importance of testing biosensor constructs, developed using synthetic biology principles, in different bacterial genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heparan sulfate chains potentiate cadmium cytotoxicity in cultured vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Chika; Yoshida, Eiko; Kumagai, Yoshito; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    The monolayer of vascular endothelial cells, which is rich in heparan sulfate chains, is an important target of cadmium cytotoxicity. To investigate the effects of heparan sulfate chains on cadmium cytotoxicity, bovine aortic endothelial cells were cultured in the presence of cadmium, with or without exogenous heparan sulfate. The following results were obtained: (1) Heparan sulfate chains potentiated cadmium cytotoxicity. (2) Such a potentiation did not occur in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells. (3) Heparin chains as well as heparan sulfate chains potentiated cadmium cytotoxicity, while other glycosaminoglycan chains failed to exhibit such an activity. (4) The disaccharide units of heparan sulfate chains did not potentiate cadmium cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. (5) Heparan sulfate chains did not potentiate mercury and arsenite cytotoxicity. (6) Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) also potentiated cadmium cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. (7) Heparan sulfate chains significantly increased intracellular cadmium accumulation by inducing the expression of metallothionein. Taken together, these results suggest that heparan sulfate chains activate FGF-2, which in turn elevates the expression and/or activity of metal transporter(s) that facilitate cadmium influx from the extracellular space into the cytoplasm.

  2. Zinc and cadmium monosalicylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.; Tujebakhova, Z.K.

    1984-01-01

    Zinc and cadmium monosalicylates of the composition MSal, where M-Zn or Cd, Sal - twice deprotonated residue of salicylic acid O-HOC 6 H 4 COOH (H 2 Sal), are singled out and characterized. When studying thermograms, thermogravigrams, IR absorption spectra, roentgenograms of cadmium salicylate compounds (Cd(OC 6 H 4 COO) and products of their thepmal transformations, the processes of thermal decomposition of the compounds have been characterized. The process of cadmium monosalicylate decomposition takes place in one stage. Complete loss of salicylate acido group occurs in the range of 320-460 deg. At this decomposition stage cadmium oxide is formed. A supposition is made that cadmium complex has tetrahedral configuration, at that, each salicylate group plays the role of tetradentate-bridge ligand. The compound evidently has a polymer structure

  3. Cadmium preparation by reduction of zinc-cadmium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Cz.; Malecki, S.; Malchar, B.; Orlicz, J.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation results regarding a possibility of selective reduction process of cadmium and zinc carbonates in order to obtain high purity cadmium metallic or cadmium oxide. The reduction tests performed in CO stream and with coke indicated a possibility of a selective course of this process. The results obtained allowed to determine more precisely the temperature conditions of the reduction process so as to attain cadmium or cadmium oxide of purities required. (author)

  4. Mercury contamination extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Mark [Silver Spring, MD; Heiser, John [Bayport, NY; Kalb, Paul [Wading River, NY

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  5. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  6. Effect of thallium impurity on hole scattering in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hole mobility in PbTe monocrystalline specimens in the temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K has been investigated. Detected is a sharp increase in scattering cross section of light and heavy holes in the specimens having the Hall hole concentration p approximately (5+-9)x10 19 cm -3 explained by resonant scattering into a band of quasilocal states of thallium located lower than the ceiling of heavy carrier zone by 0.01+-0.01 eV. Very large differences in resonant scattering of current carriers into the quasilocal states of In and Tl in PbTe result from the inertial polarizability of a crystal. The same mechanism is used to explain long-lived relaxation of zone electron concentration in lead telluride and Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te doped with indium [ru

  7. Adsorción de cadmio, cromo y mercurio en suelos del Valle del Cauca a varios valores de pH Cadmium, chromium and mercury adsorption on Cauca Valley soils as a function of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García O. Álvaro

    1991-12-01

    were collected and prepared for sorption experiments adjusting the pH to 5.7,6.5 and 7.8 values using, 1,4 and 12% acetic acid or 0.01 N NaOH. Six saturating solution of each metal (0.0, 0.28, 0.56, 1.12 and 2.25 mg L-1 were added to 0.25 g air dried and ground to pass a 2-mm sieve soil samples. The soil solution suspensions were shaken for 25 minutes and then extracted with 0.01N HC1. Cadmium; Cr and Hg concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. The difference between the initial and final metal solution concentration was considered to be soil adsorbed and the amount 0.01 N HC1 extracted as the metal retained by the soil. Cadmium adsorption in all the soils was higher at neutral or alkaline pH values due to the predominance of divalent solubles or insoluble metalanion complexes formed in the soil at pH values higter than 7.0. The Cr and Hg adsorption is higher at acid values of pH due to the formation of complexes with the organic matter (chelation or with Fe, Al or Mn hydrous oxids wich are favoreced at this pH values. The lower 0.01N HC1 extraction (higher retention was observed at pH values 6.4-6.6 in all the soils suggesting that in this range of pH this heavy metals are strongly adsorbed by the exchange complex and are not available to plants.

  8. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury Quick Facts Health Effects of Mercury Exposure What is Elemental Mercury? Elemental (metallic) mercury is the shiny, silver-gray metal found in thermometers, barometers, and thermostats and other ...

  9. Calcium enhances cadmium tolerance and decreases cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... concentrations alleviated the toxic effect of cadmium on the growth and water status of lettuce plants. The three lettuce varieties ... electroplating, in batteries, in electrical conductors, in the manufacture of alloys ..... Handbook on the Toxicology of Metals, Third edition, Salt Lake City, UT: Acad. Press. Österås ...

  10. Cadmium-binding proteins in midgut gland of freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.; Torreblanca, A.; Medina, J.; Diza-Mayans, J.

    1989-02-01

    Metallothioneins, metal binding proteins, were originally isolated and characterized by Margoshes and Vallee. These proteins have a high affinity for various heavy metals, particularly cadmium and mercury and have extensively been studied in mammals. Metal binding proteins have been observed in a variety of marine invertebrates; however, there is very little information available on metal binding proteins in freshwater invertebrates, and particularly in freshwater crustaceans. Cadmium is an ubiquitous non essential element which possesses high toxicity to aquatic organisms. Cadmium binding proteins observed in invertebrates have similar characteristics to mammalian metallothioneins. In 1978, the American red crayfish appeared in Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields (Valencia, Spain). Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. In previous reports the authors studied the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium on Procambarus clarkii of Albufera Lake. This crayfish shows a high resistance to cadmium and a great accumulation rate of this metal in several tissues, including midgut gland. Since Procambarus clarkii shows a high resistance to cadmium, the presence of cadmium binding proteins (Cd-BP) in midgut gland of these crayfish would be expected. This report describes results on the characterization of Cd-BPs obtained from cadmium exposed crayfish Procambarus clarkii, demonstrating their presence in this freshwater crayfish.

  11. Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te (x=0,00 and 0,20) alloying with gallium and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, A.V.; Zlomanov, V.P.; Gas' kov, A.M.; Ryabova, L.I.; Lazarenko, M.A.; Lisina, N.G.

    Investigation results of doping conditions of PbTe and Pbsub(O.8)Snsub(0.2)Te crystals with gallium and cadmium both in the process of growing and diffusional annealing in component vapours are presented. The concentration of the introduced addition in alloyed samples is determined by chemical analysis; homogeneity of its distribution in crystal volume is studied using the Auger-electron microanalysis. Kinetics of gallium solid solution decomposition in lead telluride is investigated. Galvanomagentic and photoelectric properties of the doped crystals are studied in the temperature range of 4-300 K.

  12. Simultaneous determination of oxygen and cadmium in cadmium and cadmium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaeda, K.; Kuriki, T.; Ohsawa, K.; Ishii, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Cadmium and its compounds were analysed for oxygen and cadmium by a modification of the Schutze-Unterzaucher method. Oxygen in some compounds such as cadmium oxide, nitrate and sulphate could not be determined by the usual method. The method of adding carbon was employed for the determination of total oxygen. Total oxygen could be determined by the addition of 5 mg of carbon to a sample boat and heating at 950 0 . The determination was also carried out by addition of naphthalene (2 mg). It was found that the cadmium powder and cadmium flake used contained ca. 1 and 0.15% oxygen, respectively. Oxygen and cadmium in cadmium and its compounds were simultaneously determined by the addition of 2 mg of naphthalene. Cadmium was determined colorimetrically by use of glyoxal-bis-(2-hydroxyanil). Oxygen and cadmium in the samples could be determined simultaneously with an average error of -0.02 and -0.22%, respectively. (author)

  13. Cadmium Transporters in the Kidney and Cadmium-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Shu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Among the organs in which the environmental pollutant cadmium causes toxicity, the kidney has gained the most attention in recent years. Numerous studies have sought to unravel the exact pathways by which cadmium enters the renal epithelial cells and the mechanisms by which it causes toxicity in the kidney. The purpose of this review is to present the progress made on the mechanisms of cadmium transport in the kidney and the role of transporter proteins in cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:25584611

  14. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  15. Optimization of a whole-cell cadmium sensor with a toggle gene circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cindy H; Le, David; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates improvement of a whole-cell cadmium detection sensor through construction of a gene circuit. A cadmium (II) specific regulatory promoter, P(cadR,) from Psuedomonas putida 06909, is used in the assembly of a toggle circuit. The circuit contains the cadR promoter fused to lacIq and gfp, and a divergently transcribed tac promoter and cadR. The toggle sensor exhibits lower background fluorescence, and a 20-fold lower detection limit in comparison to a nontoggle gene circuit. The detection limit of the toggle sensor is 0.01 microM (1.12 ppb) cadmium chloride, and tunable with the addition of isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The toggle sensor is highly specific to cadmium (II), and no response is elicited from zinc, lead, manganese, nickel, copper, and mercury. 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  16. Enhancement of the thermoelectric performance of oxygen substituted bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Quang, Tran; Kim, Miyoung

    2017-12-01

    We carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the semi-classical Boltzmann transport theory to study the effect of oxygen substitution on the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride. The newly formed compound, Bi2O2Te, is found to be a narrow bandgap semiconductor with the bandgap of Eg = 0.13 eV. The presence of a flat band close to the valence band maximum gives rise to a steep slope of density of states near Fermi energy, leading to a significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. As a result, the thermoelectric power factor of Bi2O2Te is significantly improved by controlling the carrier concentration, and the maximum power factor increased with temperature. Assuming the experiment-thermal conductivity, Bi2O2Te exhibits a high figure of merit of ZT ˜1.27 around 600 K for the p-type doping, which matches or exceeds ZT of the state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials in this temperature range. This suggests that Bi2O2Te with p-type doping is a new promising material for use in the moderate-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion.

  17. Mechanical properties of thermoelectric lanthanum telluride from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guodong; Aydemir, Umut; Wood, Max; Goddard, William A., III; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Lanthanum telluride (La3Te4) is an n-type high-performance thermoelectric material in the high temperature range, but its mechanical properties remain unknown. Since we want robust mechanical properties for their integration into industrial applications, we report here quantum mechanics (QM) simulations to determine the ideal strength and deformation mechanisms of La3Te4 under pure shear deformations. Among all plausible shear deformation paths, we find that shearing along the (0 0 1)/ slip system has the lowest ideal shear strength of 0.99 GPa, making it the most likely slip system to be activated under pressure. We find that the long range La-Te ionic interactions play the predominant role in resisting shear deformation. To enhance the mechanical strength, we suggest improving the long ionic La-Te bond stiffness to strengthen the ionic La-Te framework in La3Te4 by a defect-engineering strategy, such as partial substitution of La by Ce or Pr having isotypic crystal structures. This work provides the fundamental information to understand the intrinsic mechanics of La3Te4.

  18. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Banerjee, Dipali, E-mail: dipalibanerjeebesu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah-711103, West Bengal (India); Kargupta, Kajari [Chemical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S{sub 1}) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S{sub 2}). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S{sub 2}) over the pellet (S{sub 1}), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S{sub 2} than the sample S{sub 1} at room temperature.

  19. Aquatic Life Criteria - Cadmium Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to 2016 Acute and Chronic Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Cadmium (Freshwater, Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Cadmium in water that should protect the majority of species.

  20. 76 FR 46288 - Adequacy Determination for Colorado Springs, Cañon City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Springs, Ca[ntilde]on City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride; Carbon Monoxide and PM 10 Maintenance... transportation conformity purposes: ``Revised Carbon Monoxide Attainment/Maintenance Plan Colorado Springs... Springs Attainment/Maintenance Area,'' and ``Revised PM10 Attainment/Maintenance Plan Telluride [[Page...

  1. Mercury in Your Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about mercury, how it gets in the air, how people are exposed to it and health effects associated with exposure; what EPA and other organizations are doing to limit exposures; what citizens should know to minimize exposures and to reduce mercury in the environment; and information about products that contain mercury.

  2. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic, all of which may be toxic with clinical consequences, depending on the type of exposure. Elemental mercury poisoning usually occurs via vapour inhalation, as mercury is well absorbed through the lungs. The central nervous system is then the major site of ...

  3. Flux of Cadmium through Euphausiids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benayoun, G.; Fowler, S.W.; Oregioni, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flux of the heavy metal cadmium through the euphausiid Meganyctiphanes norvegica was examined. Radiotracer experiments showed that cadmium can be accumulated either directly from water or through the food chain. When comparing equilibrium cadmium concentration factors based on stable element measurements with those obtained from radiotracer experiments, it is evident that exchange between cadmium in the water and that in euphausiid tissue is a relatively slow process, indicating that, in the long term, ingestion of cadmium will probably be the more important route for the accumulation of this metal. Approximately 10% of cadmium ingested by euphausiids was incorporated into internal tissues when the food source was radioactive Artemia. After 1 month cadmium, accumulated directly from water, was found to be most concentrated in the viscera with lesser amounts in eyes, exoskeleton and muscle, respectively. Use of a simple model, based on the assumption that cadmium taken in by the organism must equal cadmium released plus that accumulated in tissue, allowed assessment of the relative importance of various metabolic parameters in controlling the cadmium flux through euphausiids. Fecal pellets, due to their relatively high rate of production and high cadmium content, accounted for 84% of the total cadmium flux through M. norvegica. Comparisons of stable cadmium concentrations in natural euphausiid food and the organism's resultant fecal pellets indicate that the cadmium concentration in ingested material was increased nearly 5-fold during its passage through the euphausiid. From comparisons of all routes by which cadmium can be released from M. norvegica to the water column, it is concluded that fecal pellet deposition represents the principal mechanism effecting the downward vertical transport of cadmium by this species. (author)

  4. Special features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Ravich, Yu.I.; Dereza, A.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Specific features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride are investigasted. Lead telluride samples with chlorine additions (with tellurium excess) and, besides, with bromine- and iodine additions were studied in order to reveal general regularities in alloyind with all halogen donor impurities. Experimental dependences of the difference between the electron and hole concentrations (n-p) in PbTe as a function of an amount of introduced halogen impurities (Ni) are presented for samples with a maximum compensation at 295 K. General features of the n-p=f(Ni) dependence are presented for all halogens. The hypothesis on the kinetic mechanism of increasing the efficiency of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride is suggested

  5. Cadmium determination in Lentinus edodes mushroom species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Akiko Maihara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have drawn attention to the occurrence and concentration of toxic elements found in the fruiting body of mushrooms. Some edible mushroom species are known to accumulate high levels of inorganic contaminants, mainly cadmium, mercury, and lead. There are about 2,000 known edible mushroom species, but only 25 of them are cultivated and used as food. In Brazil, the most marketed and consumed mushroom species are Agaricus bisporus, known as Paris champignon, Lentinus edodes, or Shitake and Pleurotus sp, also called Shimeji or Hiratake. In this study, the concentration of cadmium was determined in Lentinus edodes mushrooms from different cities in São Paulo state and some samples imported from Japan and China. The analyses were performed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after HNO3-H2O2 digestion. The results showed a lower concentration of Cd in the mushrooms cultivated in São Paulo (0.0079 to 0.023 mg.kg-1 in natura than that of the mushrooms cultivated abroad (0.125 to 0.212 mg.kg-1 in natura. Although there is no tolerance limit for Cd in mushrooms in Brazil, the results show that Lentinus edodes mushrooms can be safely consumed.

  6. Effects of Cadmium Compounds (Cadmium Para Hydroxybenzoate and Cadmium Chloride) on the Liver of Mature Mice

    OpenAIRE

    ERSAN, Yusuf; ARI, İsmail; KOÇ, Evren

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 4 experimental groups and 1 control group containing adult mice (Mus musculus var. albinos) were used to examine the effects of 2 different cadmium compounds, namely cadmium para hydroxybenzoate, which was newly synthesized, and cadmium chloride on the liver of mice. In various test concentrations, both cadmium compounds were intraperitoneally injected into adult mice every day for 15 days. With standard histological techniques samples were obtained from the livers of the mice...

  7. Fabrication of Nanovoid-Imbedded Bismuth Telluride with Low Dimensional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new fabrication method for nanovoids-imbedded bismuth telluride (Bi--Te) material with low dimensional (quantum-dots, quantum-wires, or quantum-wells) structure was conceived during the development of advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials. Bismuth telluride is currently the best-known candidate material for solid-state TE cooling devices because it possesses the highest TE figure of merit at room temperature. The innovative process described here allows nanometer-scale voids to be incorporated in Bi--Te material. The final nanovoid structure such as void size, size distribution, void location, etc. can be also controlled under various process conditions.

  8. Study of the photochemical oxidation of mercury: application to the separation of mercury isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morand, J.P.

    Investigation of the mechanism of the isotopic photo-oxidation of mercury has enabled the existence of an unstable excited complex (HgO 2 *) to be demonstrated. In the presence of butadiene, this complex gives stable mercuric oxide. Butadiene does not act purely as an interceptor for oxidizing species. By theoretical investigation of the complex HgO 2 *, its electronic structure ( 3 PI) could be determined and its energy of formation (4.6 eV) predicted. The phenomenon of photodecomposition of mercuric oxide was demonstrated and its importance evaluated. The results obtained made it possible to develop an apparatus for the photochemical separation of the isotopes of mercury, whose efficiency is acceptable despite the low quantum yield. Since the method for the photochemical separation of the isotopes has only been studied for mercury, an identical study for other elements, and particularly for elements of the same group as mercury (zinc, cadmium), could lead in the future to new aspects in the study of photochemical mechanisms

  9. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L.; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M.; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  10. The learning machine in quantitative chemical analysis : Part I. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cadmium, Lead and Thallium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; Jasink, G.

    1978-01-01

    The linear learning machine method was applied to the determination of cadmium, lead and thallium down to 10-8 M by anodic stripping voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop electrode. With a total of three trained multicategory classifiers, concentrations of Cd, Pb and Tl could be predicted with an

  11. Oxidation process of cadmium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Koshiro; Toda, Yoshitomo; Sato, Takayori

    1977-01-01

    Complicated thermogravimetric curve was observed on oxidation process of cadmium sulfide precipitate in air. Phases of various oxidation stage were identified by X-ray diffraction method. Cadmium sulfide was first oxidized to cadmium oxide at 400 0 C, while the successive reaction with sulfur dioxide and oxygen gases gave rise to cadmium sulfate. The phases such as 2 CdS. CdSO 4 , Cd 3 SO 6 and β-CdSO 4 appeared during the oxidation process up to 1100 0 C, at which all the particles were converted into cadmium oxide at 1100 0 C. Cadmium sulfide kept in nitrogen gas above 700 0 C was directly converted into cadmium oxide when oxygen gas was introduced into the furnace. (auth.)

  12. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning process using predeposition surface treatment methods for reduced TE-metal contact resistance. As a demonstration vehicle, a 2 × 2 mm2-sized integrated planar thermoelectric generator (TEG) is shown to harvest 0.7 μ W from 21-K temperature gradient. Transistor performance showed no significant change upon post-CMOS TEG integration, indicating, for the first time, the CMOS compatibility of the Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, which could be leveraged for realization of high-performance integrated micro-TE harvesters and coolers. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Mercury evaporation from amalgams with varied mercury contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmoto, K; Nakajima, H; Ferracane, J L; Shintani, H; Okabe, T

    2000-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between mercury content and mercury evaporation from amalgams during setting. Two different types of commercial high-copper amalgams (single composition and admixed types) were used. Cylindrical specimens of each amalgam were prepared with five different mercury contents according to ADA Specification No.1. Specimens were also prepared by hand condensation. Mercury evaporation from amalgam specimens maintained at 37 degrees C was measured using a gold film mercury analyzer from 10 min after the end of trituration until the mercury concentration in air reached an undetectable level. The mercury content more clearly influenced the mercury evaporation from the admixed type amalgam specimens when the mercury content decreased below the manufacturers' recommended trituration conditions. Triturating with less mercury than the manufacturers' recommended amount cannot lower the evaporation of mercury from freshly made amalgam. Proper condensing procedures can minimize the mercury evaporation from the amalgam surface.

  14. Cadmium plating replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  15. zinc, chromium, cadmium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-30

    Jun 30, 2016 ... Cadmium also causes destruction of the immune system, thus, predisposes the consumer to infectious diseases like tuberculosis (Khan et al., 2008). ... years, sputum specimens positive for acid-fast bacilli by microscopy and clinical and radiographic abnormalities consistent with pulmonary tuberculosis.

  16. Speciation of Dissolved Cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Andersen, Sjur; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis and ion exchange methods, as well as computer calculations (GEOCHEM), were applied for speciation of dissolved cadmium (Cd) in test solutions and leachate samples. The leachate samples originated from soil, compost, landfill waste and industrial waste. The ion exchange (IE...

  17. Mercury balance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maag, J.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the consumption of mercury, divided into use areas, was carried out. Disposal and emissions to the environment were also qualified. The assessment is mainly based on data from 1992 - 1993. The most important source of emission of mercury to air is solid waste incineration which is assessed in particular to be due to the supply of mercury in batteries (most likely mercury oxide batteries from photo equipment) and to dental fillings. The second most important source of mercury emission to air is coal-fired power plants which are estimated to account for 200-500 kg of mercury emission p.a. Other mercury emissions are mainly related to waste treatment and disposal. The consumption of mercury is generally decreasing. During the period from 1982/83 - 1992-93, the total consumption of mercury in Denmark was about halved. This development is related to the fact that consumption with regard to several important use areas (batteries, dental fillings, thermometers etc.) has been significantly reduced, while for other purposes the use of mercury has completely, or almost disappeared, i.e. (fungicides for seed, tubes etc.). (EG)

  18. Process for low mercury coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Norman W.; Grimes, R. William; Tweed, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

  19. Disposable sensors for environmental monitoring of lead, cadmium and mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Kátia; Justino, Celine I. L.; Freitas, Ana C.; Gomes, Ana M. P.; Duarte, Armando; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization is an increasing trend in the field of analytical chemistry as a response to the need to develop new analytical techniques for food, clinical, and environmental applications. There is therefore also an increasing trend towards the use of miniaturized disposable sensors, which are inexpensive and designed to be one-shot and do not require pre-treatment prior to use or cleaning between measurements. This review describes disposable sensors for detection of lead, cadm...

  20. Effects of spark plasma sintering conditions on the anisotropic thermoelectric properties of bismuth antimony telluride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Hegelund Spangsdorf, Steeven; Van Nong, Ngo

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3, 0.4 room-temperature thermoelectric power generation. In this work, p-type Bi0.4Sb1.6Te3 samples were prepared under various conditions (temperature, holding time, and ramp...

  1. Atomic layer deposition of metal tellurides and selenides using alkylsilyl compounds of tellurium and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pore, Viljami; Hatanpää, Timo; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2009-03-18

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal selenide and telluride thin films has been limited because of a lack of precursors that would at the same time be safe and exhibit high reactivity as required in ALD. Yet there are many important metal selenide and telluride thin film materials whose deposition by ALD might be beneficial, for example, CuInSe2 for solar cells and Ge2Sb2Te5 for phase-change random-access memories. Especially in the latter case highly conformal deposition offered by ALD is essential for high storage density. By now, ALD of germanium antimony telluride (GST) has been attempted only using plasma-assisted processes owing to the lack of appropriate tellurium precursors. In this paper we make a breakthrough in the development of new ALD precursors for tellurium and selenium. Compounds with a general formula (R3Si)2Te and (R3Si)2Se react with various metal halides forming the corresponding metal tellurides and selenides. As an example, we show that Sb2Te3, GeTe, and GST films can be deposited by ALD using (Et3Si)2Te, SbCl3, and GeCl2 x C4H8O2 compounds as precursors. All three precursors exhibit a typical saturative ALD growth behavior and GST films prepared at 90 degrees C show excellent conformality on a high aspect-ratio trench structure.

  2. Electrodeposition of bismuth telluride thermoelectric films from a nonaqueous electrolyte using ethylene glycol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Wu, M.; Su, J.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol was studied as an electrolyte for the electrodeposition of thermoelectric bismuth telluride films by cyclic voltammetry, rotating ring disk electrode and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The reduction of both Bi3+ and Te4+ ions proceeds in one step without the

  3. Structural Engineering of Vacancy Defected Bismuth Tellurides for Thermo-electric Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumakov Y.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Dynamics and ab-initio simulations are used to find the most stable stoichiometries of Bismuth Tellurides with vacancy defects. The interest is to decrease the thermal conductivity of these compounds a key point to achieve high figure of merits. A reduction of 70% of the thermal conductivity is observed with Te vacancies of only 5%.

  4. High rate deposition of thin film cadmium sulphide by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisco, F., E-mail: F.Lisco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Losurdo, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) is an important n-type semiconductor widely used as a window layer in thin film photovoltaics Copper Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Gallium (di)Selenide, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe). Cadmium Sulphide has been deposited using a number of techniques but these techniques can be slow (chemical bath deposition and Radio Frequency sputtering) or the uniformity and the control of thickness can be relatively difficult (close space sublimation). In this paper we report on the development of a process using pulsed Direct Current magnetron sputtering which allows nanometre control of thin film thickness using time only. The CdS thin films deposited in this process are highly uniform and smooth. They exhibit the preferred hexagonal structure at room temperature deposition and they have excellent optical properties. Importantly, the process is highly stable despite the use of a semi-insulating magnetron target. Moreover, the process is very fast. The deposition rate using 1.5 kW of power to a 6-inch circular magnetron was measured to be greater than 8 nm/s. This makes the process suitable for industrial deployment. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of CdS • High deposition rate deposition • Uniform, pinhole free films.

  5. High rate deposition of thin film cadmium sulphide by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisco, F.; Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G.; Losurdo, M.; Walls, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) is an important n-type semiconductor widely used as a window layer in thin film photovoltaics Copper Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Gallium (di)Selenide, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe). Cadmium Sulphide has been deposited using a number of techniques but these techniques can be slow (chemical bath deposition and Radio Frequency sputtering) or the uniformity and the control of thickness can be relatively difficult (close space sublimation). In this paper we report on the development of a process using pulsed Direct Current magnetron sputtering which allows nanometre control of thin film thickness using time only. The CdS thin films deposited in this process are highly uniform and smooth. They exhibit the preferred hexagonal structure at room temperature deposition and they have excellent optical properties. Importantly, the process is highly stable despite the use of a semi-insulating magnetron target. Moreover, the process is very fast. The deposition rate using 1.5 kW of power to a 6-inch circular magnetron was measured to be greater than 8 nm/s. This makes the process suitable for industrial deployment. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of CdS • High deposition rate deposition • Uniform, pinhole free films

  6. Mercury is Moon's brother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksanfomalifi, L.V.

    1976-01-01

    The latest information on Mercury planet is presented obtained by studying the planet with the aid of radar and space vehicles. Rotation of Mercury about its axis has been discovered; within 2/3 of its year it executes a complete revolution about its axis. In images obtained by the ''Mariner-10'' Mercurys surface differs little from that of the Moon. The ''Mariner-10'' has also discovered the Mercurys atmosphere, which consists of extremely rarefied helium. The helium is continuously supplied to the planet by the solar wind. The Mercury's magnetic field has been discovered, whose strength is 35 x 10 -4 at the Equator and 70 x 10 -4 E at the poles. The inclination of the dipole axis to the Mercury's rotation axis is 7 deg

  7. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  8. Effects of Potash Fertilizer on Cabbage' s Quality in CadmiumPolluted Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xiao-jing

    2015-02-01

    protein. The concentration of heavy metal cadmium and arsenic significantly increased, but lead, chromium and mercury universally decreased in cadmium stress. From this study we found that application of potash fertilizer could effectively improve the quality of cabbage, especially decrease the concentration of various heavy metals in cabbage' s leaves and the recommended dosage was 200~ 400 mg·kg-1 in low cadmium stress and 400~600 mg·kg-1 in high cadmium stress.

  9. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, January 20, 1995--January 19, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Toledo Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1996-05-01

    This annual report covers the second year of a 3-year NREL subcontract with the University of Toledo that is focused on improvements in efficiency for radio frequency (rf)-sputtered CdS/CdTe solar cells. In earlier work supported by NREL, the University of Toledo established the viability of two new deposition methods for CdS/CdTe solar cells by fabricating cells with efficiencies greater than 10% at air mass (AM) 1.5 on soda lime glass for all-sputtered cells and also for all-laser-deposited cells. Most of the effort has been placed on radio frequency sputtering (RFS) because it was judged to be more economical and more easily scaled to large-area deposition. However, laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) has remained the method of choice for the deposition of CdCl{sub 2} layers and also for the exploration of new materials such as the ternary alloys including CdS{sub x} Te{sub 1{minus}x} and dopants such as Cu in ZnTe.

  10. Time-dependent changes in copper indium gallium (di)selenide and cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules due to outdoor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Sato, Ritsuko; Ishii, Tetsuyuki; Chiba, Yasuo; Masuda, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    The performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules deteriorates with time due to outdoor exposure. We investigated the time-dependent changes in PV modules and evaluated the amount of power generated during their lifetime. Once a year, the exposed modules were removed and measured under standard test conditions using a solar simulator. Their outputs were measured indoors and normalized to nominal values. In addition, the relationship between the indoor measurement and the energy yield for thin-film PV modules will be reported. In CIGS PV modules, the normalized maximum power (P MAX) and performance ratio (PR) differ with the type of module. The P MAX and PR of CdTe PV modules significantly decrease after outdoor exposure for three years. These results help to determine the characteristics of the time-dependent changes in the P MAX of PV modules due to outdoor exposure.

  11. Gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera; comparison to traditional gamma cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Maj; Schmidt, Ulla; Huang, Chenxi

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with equilibrium 99MTc-HSA equilibrium radionuclide angiography (MUGA) is frequently used for assessing cardiac function. The purpose of this study was to compare intra- and interobserver variation between three different gamma...

  12. Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkman, H.; Iverfeldt, Aa. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst. (Sweden); Borg, H.; Lithner, G. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Inst. for Applied Environmental Research

    1998-03-01

    This report aims at assessing possible effects of cadmium in the Swedish environment. Swedish soils and soft freshwater systems are, due to a generally poor buffering capacity, severely affected by acidification. In addition, the low salinity in the Baltic Sea imply a naturally poor organism structure, with some important organisms living close to their limit of physiological tolerance. Cadmium in soils is mobilized at low pH, and the availability and toxicity of cadmium in marine systems are enhanced at low salinity. The Swedish environment is therefore extra vulnerable to cadmium pollution. The average concentrations of cadmium in the forest mor layers, agricultural soils, and fresh-waters in Sweden are enhanced compared to `back-ground concentrations`, with a general increasing trend from the north to the south-west, indicating strong impact of atmospheric deposition of cadmium originating from the central parts of Europe. In Swedish sea water, total cadmium concentrations, and the fraction of bio-available `free` cadmium, generally increases with decreasing salinity. Decreased emissions of cadmium to the environment have led to decreasing atmospheric deposition during the last decade. The net accumulation of cadmium in the forest mor layer has stopped, and even started to decrease. In northern Sweden, this is due to the decreased deposition, but in southern Sweden the main reason is increased leakage of cadmium from the topsoil as a consequence of acidification. As a result, cadmium in the Swedish environments is undergoing an extended redistribution between different soil compartments, and from the soils to the aquatic systems. 90 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs. With 3 page summary in Swedish

  13. Cadmium flows and emissions from CdTe PV: future expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride photovoltaic (CdTe PV) technology is growing rapidly, and already represents the largest contributor to non-silicon based photovoltaics worldwide. We assessed the extent to which CdTe PV will play a notable role in the Cd use and emission flows in the future, and whether it will be environmentally beneficial or detrimental. Our results show that while CdTe PV may account for a large percentage of future global Cd demand, its role in terms of Cd sequestration may be beneficial. We calculated that its potential contribution to yearly global Cd emissions to air and water may well be orders-of-magnitude lower than the respective current Cd emissions rates in Europe.

  14. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  15. Cadmium: The deformed metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper, which is a somewhat abridged version of the introductory paper of the 2nd International Cadmium Conference in Cannes on February 6 to 8, 1979, outlines the present trends in production, reserves, consumption, world trade, prices, and cost. Due to the lack of statistics on the USSR and other socialist countries, the review is limited to the non-socialist world. (orig./IHOE) [de

  16. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury

  17. Intentional intravenous mercury injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this case report, intravenous complications, treatment strategies and possible ... Mercury toxicity is commonly associated with vapour inhalation or oral ingestion, for which there exist definite treatment options. Intravenous mercury ... personality, anxiousness, irritability, insomnia, depression and drowsi- ness.[1] However ...

  18. International mercury conference

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leaner, J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg) affects human health and the environment, it calls for immediate action. Action is needed at local, regional and international level to reduce the risk associated with mercury, which is a global international problem, as it is a...

  19. Mercury's shifting, rolling past

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of scalloped-edged cliffs or lobate scarps on Mercury's surface are thrust faults that are consistent with the planet shrinking and cooling with time. However, compression occurred in the planet's early history and Mariner 10 images revealed decades ago that lobate scarps are among the youngest features on Mercury. Why don't we find more evidence of older compressive features?

  20. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  1. Global Mercury Assessment 2013

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    mercury pollution. This summary report and the accompanying. Technical Background Report for the Global. Mercury Assessment 2013 are developed in response to Decision 25/5, paragraph ... The use of different pollution control technologies in different ...... vegetation, snow, freshwater, and seawater. One of the largest ...

  2. Isolation, identification and cadmium adsorption of a high cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphology was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The growth in the 100 mg/l cadmium medium was investigated and the biomass was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results showed that strain M1 which tolerated 80 mM cadmium belong to Paecilomyces lilacinus.

  3. Isolation, identification and cadmium adsorption of a high cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-27

    Sep 27, 2010 ... fertilizers (Udo et al., 2001). Cadmium is a non-essential element and highly toxic .... 250 ml Czapek liquid media contained 0 and 100 mg/l cadmium and were added in 500 ml shake flasks, and 1 ± 0.1 g wet ..... Fungi Intimately Associated with the Brown Seaweed Fucus serratus. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.

  4. Municipal actions to reduce mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-15

    This paper presented proper management practices for products containing mercury. The measures can help reduce mercury releases, occupational exposure and mercury spills, thereby preventing impacts on human health and the environment. Despite mercury's toxic nature, many common products that contain mercury are commercially available. These include thermostats, thermometers, fluorescent lamps, pressure measuring devices, electrical switches and relays, and dental amalgam. Mercury emissions are also associated with base metal smelting, waste incineration and coal-fired power generation. Mercury in the environment is a global issue, because it can travel in the atmosphere on wind currents. The actions taken by municipalities to address the issue include reducing or eliminating mercury releases from internal municipal operations and sources within the community. This document provided guidance on how to develop a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan that will help reduce mercury releases. It presented information and case studies that will help municipalities manage mercury-containing products found in municipal buildings and street lighting. Information on sources of mercury from within the community was presented along with case studies that can help municipalities determine where community action is needed to reduce mercury releases. The 5 modules of this document were intended to help municipalities identify priorities, timelines and budget requirements for mercury initiatives. It was emphasized that municipalities that adopt a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan formally commit to reducing and eliminating mercury from the environment. tabs., figs.

  5. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  6. Cadmium in blood and hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eum, Ki-Do; Lee, Mi-Sun; Paek, Domyung

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:: This study is to examine the effect of cadmium exposure on blood pressure in Korean general population. Methods:: The study population consisted of 958 men and 944 women who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), in which blood pressure and blood cadmium were measured from each participant. Results:: The mean blood cadmium level was 1.67 μg/L (median level 1.55). The prevalence of hypertension was 26.2%. The blood cadmium level was significantly higher among those subjects with hypertension than those without (mean level 1.77 versus 1.64 μg/dL). After adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio of hypertension comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of cadmium in blood was 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were all positively associated with blood cadmium level, and this effect of cadmium on blood pressure was markedly stronger when the kidney function was reduced. Conclusions:: Cadmium exposures at the current level may have increased the blood pressure of Korean general population

  7. Projectbeschrijving Cadmium-informatiepunt (CIP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer PJ

    1989-01-01

    To minimize the use of cadmium the Central Government has decided to perform the purchase of products and materials within the Central Government as much as possible within the Draft Cadmium Decree. The activities to achieve this are as far as could be seen at the start of the project in june

  8. Cadmium exposure in the Swedish environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report gives a thorough description of cadmium in the Swedish environment. It comprises three parts: Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks;, Cadmium in goods - contribution to environmental exposure;, and Cadmium in fertilizers, soil, crops and foods - the Swedish situation. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all three parts

  9. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  10. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for the AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, D.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Yusof, Z.; Harkay, K.; Spentzouris, L.; Terry, J. [Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 and High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Accelerator Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (> 1%), is robust in a photoinjector, and long lifetime. This photocathode is fabricated in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch ({approx}50 nC) in a long bunch train. We present some results from a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV light exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  11. Mechanism of manganese (mono and di) telluride thin-film formation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Kishore; Singh, Gurmeet; Shul, Yong Gun; Kim, Hansung

    2007-03-01

    Mechanistic studies on the electrocrystallization of manganese telluride (MnTe) thin film are reported using aqueous acidic solution containing MnSO 4 and TeO 2. Tartaric acid was used for the inhibition of hydrated manganese oxide anodic growth at counter electrode. A detailed study on the mechanistic aspect of electrochemical growth of MnTe using cyclic voltametry is carried out. Conditions for electrochemical growth of manganese mono and di telluride thin films have been reported using cyclic voltammetric scans for Mn 2+, Te 4+ and combined Mn 2+ and Te 4+. X-ray diffraction showed the formation of polycrystalline MnTe films with cubic, hexagonal and orthorhombic mixed phases. MnTe film morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope. Susceptibility and electrical characterization supports the anti-ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited MnTe thin film.

  12. Joining of Half-Heusler and Bismuth Tellurides for Segmented Thermoelectric Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngan, Pham Hoang; Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn

    2018-01-01

    Segmented generators where the p- or n-type legs are formed by joining materials in series enables each material to operate in their most efficient temperature range. Here, we have fabricated and characterized segmented thermoelectric p- and n-type legs based on bismuth tellurides and half......-Heusler alloys p-type Hf0.5Zr0.5CoSn0.2Sb0.8 and n-type Ti0.6Hf0.4NiSn. A two-step process was introduced to join the half-Heusler to the bismuth tellurides to form a segmented structure which was then characterized for its thermoelectric and structural properties. The output power generation was characterized...

  13. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials.

  14. Donor impurity self-compensation by neutral complexes in bismuth doped lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravich, Yu.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Proshin, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Self-compensation is calculated of impurity doping action in semiconductors of the A 4 B 6 type by neutral complexes, consisting of a vacancy and two impurity atoms. Complexes entropy is estimated and the thermodynamic potential is minimized in the concentration of single two-charge vacancies and complexes. Calculation results are compared with experimental data, obtained when lead telluride doping by bismuth. Account for complex formation improves agreement theory with experiment. 4 refs., 1 fig

  15. Diagnostic Genesis Features of Au-Ag Selenide-Telluride Mineralization of Western Java Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Tintin Yuningsih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.3.1.67-76The ore mineralogy of the westernmost part of West Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cikotok, and Cirotan are characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, whereas the eastern part of West Java including Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. Mineralogy of Se-type deposits at Pongkor, Cikidang, Cibaliung, Cisungsang, and Cirotan and Te-type deposits at Arinem and Cineam shows their different geochemical characteristics. Mineralogical and geochemical differences can be explained by variation of physico-chemical conditions that existed during gold-silver deposition by applying the phase relation among sulfide, telluride, and selenide mineral association in the deposits. The relative values of ƒSe2(g, ƒTe(g, and ƒS2(g control the actual presence of selenide or telluride minerals within the West Java deposits, which also depend on their concentrations in the hydrothermal fluid. Even though the concentration of selenium in the hydrothermal fluid of Te-type deposits might have been similar or even higher than that in the Se-type, early substitution of selenium in the sulfide minerals prevents its concentration in the hydrothermal fluid to the levels for precipitating selenide minerals. Therefore, early sulfide mineral deposition from reduction fluids will not increase the ƒSe2(g/ƒS2(g ratio to form selenide minerals in Te-type deposits of Arinem and Cineam, other than selenium-bearing sulfide mineral such as Se-bearing galena or Se-bearing pyrargyrite-proustite.

  16. Oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B; Svendsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is known to alleviate acute toxicity due to injection of cadmium salts. However, when cadmium chloride was administered by the oral route, DDC enhanced rather than alleviated the acute toxicity; both oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DDC had this effect....... Thus, orally administered DDC enhanced cadmium-induced duodenal and ileal tissue damage and inhibition of peristalsis, as indicated by an increased intestinal transit time. At low cadmium doses, the whole-body retention of cadmium was increased by oral DDC administration. Intraperitoneally administered...... DDC increased cadmium-induced acute mortality and testicular necrosis, and it enhanced cadmium-induced reduction of intestinal motility and increased the whole-body retention of cadmium, indicating increased intestinal cadmium absorption. Also, DDC changed the organ distribution of absorbed cadmium...

  17. Sulfonated Polyaniline Coated Mercury Film Electrodes for Voltammetric Analysis of Metals in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Alves Fungaro

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical polymerization of 2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid with and without aniline has been carried by cyclic potencial sweep in sulfuric acid solution at the glassy carbon electrode. The polymer and copolymer formed have been characterized voltammetrically. The sulfonated polyaniline coated mercury thin-film electrodes have been evaluated for use with anodic stripping voltammetry. The electrodes were tested and compared with a conventional thin-film mercury electrode. Calibration plots showed linearity up to 10-7 mol L-1. Detection limits for zinc, lead and cadmium test species are very similar at around 12 nmol L-1. Applications to analysis of waters samples are demonstrated.

  18. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  19. Biomonitoring of cadmium in pig production

    OpenAIRE

    Lindén, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Cadmium is a nephrotoxic metal with increasing levels in arable soils. The non-smoking population is exposed to cadmium mainly from vegetable food, especially cereal products. The major part of pig feed is cereals, and accumulated cadmium in pig kidney could reflect cadmium in the local agricultural environment. In this thesis, the possibility to use pig kidney as a bioindicator of the availability of cadmium in the agricultural environment was evaluated. There were significant correlations b...

  20. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  1. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  2. Detection of mercury ions using silver telluride nanoparticles as a substrate and recognition element through surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei eWang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we unveil a new sensing strategy for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS using Ag2Te nanoparticles (NPs as a substrate and recognition element and rhodamine 6G (R6G as a reporter. Ag2Te NPs prepared from tellurium dioxide and silver nitrate and hydrazine in aqueous solution containing sodium dodecyl sulfate at 90ºC with an average size of 26.8 ± 4.1 nm (100 counts have strong SERS activity. The Ag2Te substrate provides strong SERS signals of R6G with an enhancement factor of 3.6 × 105 at 1360 cm-1, which is comparable to Ag NPs. After interaction of Ag2Te NPs with Hg2+, some HgTe NPs are formed, leading to decreases in the SERS signal of R6G, mainly because HgTe NPs relative to Ag2Te NPs have weaker SERS activity. Under optimum conditions, this SERS approach using Ag2Te as substrates is selective for the detection of Hg2+, with a limit of detection of 3 nM and linearity over 10-150 nM. The practicality of this approach has been validated for the determination of the concentrations of spiked Hg2+ in a pond water sample.

  3. The tectonics of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melosh, H.J.; Mckinnon, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    The probable tectonic history of Mercury and the relative sequence of events are discussed on the basis of data collected by the Mariner-10 spacecraft. Results indicate that Mercury's tectonic activity was confined to its early history; its endogenic activity was principally due to a small change in the shape of its lithosphere, caused by tidal despinning, and a small change in area caused by shrinkage due to cooling. Exogenic processes, in particular the impact activity, have produced more abundant tectonic features. Many features associated with the Caloris basin are due to loading of Mercury's thick lithosphere by extrusive lavas or subsidence due to magma withdrawal. It is emphasized that tectonic features observed on Mercury yield insight into the earliest tectonic events on planets like Mars and, perhaps, the earth, where subsequent events obscured or erased the most ancient tectonic records

  4. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  5. Mercury in human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapauan, P.A.; Cruz, C.C.; Verceluz, F.P.

    1980-10-01

    The analysis of mercury (Hg) in scalp hair obtained from individuals residing in five different localities in the Philippines - Metro Manila, Naga City in Bicol, Bataan, Oriental Mindoro, and Palawan is presented. An overall mean of 1.46 ug/g of hair was obtained for all samples excluding those from Palawan and represents a baseline value.'' In terms of the mercury levels found in hair, the Honda Bay area in Palawan is, relatively, a ''contaminated area.'' (author)

  6. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  7. Cadmium effects on the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancic, Snezana A; Stosic, Bojan Z

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium has been listed as one of the 126 priority pollutants and a category I carcinogen. Carcinogenic effects of cadmium on the lungs, testicles, and prostate are widely recognized, but there has been insufficient research on the effect of cadmium on the thyroid gland. Cadmium has the affinity to accumulate not only in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas but also in the thyroid gland. It has been established that cadmium blood concentration correlates positively with its accumulation in the thyroid gland. Women of fertile age have higher cadmium blood and urine concentrations than men. In spite of its redox inertia, cadmium brings about oxidative stress and damage to the tissue by indirect mechanisms. Mitochondria are considered to be the main intracellular targets for cadmium. Colloid cystic goiter, adenomatoid follicular hyperplasia with low-grade dysplasia and thyroglobulin hypo- and asecretion, and parafollicular cell diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and hypertrophy are often found in chronic cadmium toxicity. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cadmium-containing waste and recycling possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, V.; Rauhut, A.

    1981-01-01

    To begin with, the processes of cadmium production from zinc ores in smelting plants or from intermediates of other metal works are described. A considerable amount of the cadmium is obtained in the recycling process in zinc, lead, and copper works. The way of the cadmium-containing intermediaries, processing, enrichment, and disposal of cadmium waste are described. Uses of cadmium and its compounds are mentioned, and cadmium consumption in the years 1973-1977 in West Germany is presented in a table. Further chapters discuss the production and the way of waste during production and processing of cadmium-containing products, the problem of cadmium in household refuse and waste incineration plants, and the problem of cadmium emissions. (IHOE) [de

  9. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  10. Fabrication of mercury target vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakui, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Haga, Katsuhiro; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Ryoichi; Uchiyama, Naoyoshi; Okamoto, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Koji

    2010-03-01

    The construction of materials and life science experimental facility in J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Complex) project had been completed and accepted pulsed proton beams with low power. Since 2003, the detailed design, fabrication and examination for the mercury target vessel as a pulsed neutron source were carried out by the vender. The mercury target vessel consists of triple-walled structure in order to prevent the leak of mercury to outside at the failure of the mercury vessel and to remove the heat of the safety hull, which covers the mercury vessel, due to the injection of the pulsed proton beams. The high fabrication accuracy is required for the mercury target vessel assembled by the welding, because there are the relationships between the mercury target vessel and other components (target trolley, target storage container, flange of helium vessel, reflector and water-cooled shield). At each fabrication step, the examinations for the mercury target vessel with multi-walled structure were required. In this report, the required specification and basic structure of parts in the mercury target vessel are described and the fabrication procedure of the mercury target vessel by the vender is reported. In the fabrication of the mercury target vessel, there were many troubles such as large deformation due to the welding and then the vender repaired and brought the mercury target vessel to completion. Furthermore, improvements for the design and fabrication of the mercury target are reported. (author)

  11. Discovery of the cadmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. Cadmium determination in wrapping paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapczuk, P. (Institute of Applied Physical Chemistry, Research Center Juelich (Germany)); Knezevic, G. (Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Verpackung und Lebensmitteltechnologie, Muenchen (Germany)); Matter, L. (Chemisches und Lebensmitteluntersuchungsamt der Stadt Duisburg (Germany)); Steinle, G. (Suedzucker AG, Gruenstadt (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    The determination of cadmium in wrapping paper was carried out by the 'Inorganic Constituents' working group in an interlaboratory comparison. Pressure digestion in PTFE bombs and high pressure ashing in quartz vessels with nitric acid were used. Eleven participants used ET AAS and only two DPASV for cadmium determination. The mean of all (13) participants was 0.059 [+-] 0.027 mg/kg. Individual data are presented. (orig.).

  13. Mercury Emissions: The Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury emissions are a global problem that knows no national or continental boundaries. Mercury that is emitted to the air can travel thousands of miles in the atmosphere before it is eventually deposited back to the earth.

  14. Biological indicators of cadmium exposure and toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Z.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    The increasing environmental and occupational exposure of populations to cadmium creates the need for biological indicators of cadmium exposure and toxicity. The advantages and disadvantages of monitoring blood cadmium, urinary, fecal, hair, and tissue cadmium, serum creatine, beta 2-microglobulin, alpha 1-anti-trypsin and other proteins, and urinary amino acids, enzymes, total proteins, glucose, beta 2-microglobulin, retinol-binding protein, lysozyme, and metallothionein are discussed. It is concluded that urinary cadmium, metallothionein and beta 2-microglubulin may be used together to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. 66 references.

  15. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connerney, J.E.P.; Ness, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain

  16. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  17. Mercury content of edible mushrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woidich, H.; Pfannhauser, W.

    1975-05-01

    The mercury content of edible fungi is different. Relatively high burdened are Boletus and Agaricus campestris. A minimum of mercury is found in Russula, Agaricus bisporus and Cantharellus cibarius. The possibilities of mercury uptake and the potential cumulation mechanism is discussed. 8 references, 3 tables.

  18. Mercury (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Mercury The Basics Mercury — sometimes called quicksilver — is a natural metal. It’s ... to breathe it in without knowing it. When mercury combines with other chemical elements, it creates compounds, ...

  19. Mercury and other element exposure in tree swallows nesting at low pH and neutral pH lakes in northern Wisconsin USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, Thomas W.; Custer, Christine M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Dummer, Paul M.; Rossmann, Ronald; Kenow, Kevin P.; Meyer, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) demonstrate similar responses to lake pH and mercury (Hg) contamination in northern Wisconsin as do common loons (Gavia immer). Similar to common loons, Hg concentrations in the blood of tree swallow nestlings were higher, Hg concentrations in eggs tended to be higher, and egg size tended to be smaller at low (<6.2) pH lakes. In contrast to common loons, tree swallow nestling production was not lower at low pH lakes. Based on modeling associations, Hg concentrations in tree swallow eggs and nestling blood can be used to predict Hg concentrations in common loons without the invasive or destructive sampling of loons. Mean concentrations of cadmium, manganese, and mercury in nestling livers were higher at low pH lakes than neutral pH lakes. Concentrations of cadmium, chromium, mercury, selenium, and zinc were not at toxic levels. - Highlights: ► Mercury concentrations in tree swallow nestling livers were higher in low than neutral pH lakes. ► Tree swallow eggs were smaller at low than neutral pH lakes. ► Tree swallow hatching success was not correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs. ► Mercury concentrations in tree swallows can be used to predict common loon exposure. - Mercury concentrations in tree swallows were higher at low pH lakes.

  20. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Xiaojun Zhao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury.

  1. Tellurides from Sunrise Dam gold deposit, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia: a new occurrence of nagyágite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Y.-H.; Ciobanu, C. L.; Pring, A.; Brügger, J.; Skinner, W.; Cook, N. J.; Nugus, M.

    2007-11-01

    The complex Pb-Sb-Au tellurosulfide nagyágite is found together with eight tellurides (hessite, petzite, calaverite, altaite, tellurantimony (and Bi-bearing tellurantimony), melonite, tetradymite and an unnamed Au(Ag)-As-telluride) in sulfide-sulfosalt assemblages from late, high-grade veins (D4) and post-D4 veinlets in the world-class orogenic gold deposit at Sunrise Dam, Eastern Goldfields Province of the Archaean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. The composition of nagyágite at Sunrise Dam conforms to ideal stoichiometry, with negligible As content and Au/(Au+Te) ratio of 0.325 [i.e., (Pb4.84Sb1.10 As0.05)5.99S5.99(Au0.98 Te2.03)3.01]. The diverse mineralogy of the post-D4 veinlets, relative to the host veins, is attributed to small-scale reaction fronts established along zones of replacement at the polished section scale. The association of telluride assemblages and native gold is interpreted in terms of remobilization of ore components (including Ag, Sb, Te and Au) from the pre-existing assemblages, and their redeposition during subsequent tectonic events. The presence of nagyágite and Au-Ag tellurides in veins, in quantities that may be significant in economic terms, as well as the character of their breakdown products, have implications for ore processing and gold recovery, as well as for the genetic interpretation of the deposit. The strong structural control upon formation of the telluride-bearing assemblages at Sunrise Dam and the ability of these minerals to reflect changes in the local environment, contradicts the current view that these tellurides have a magmatic affiliation.

  2. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  3. Water displacement mercury pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  4. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while

  5. Formation of solid solutions on the boundary of zinc oxidezinc telluride heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurkan, A.E.; Buzhor, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of ZnO x Te 1-x alloy composition on the interface of zinc oxide-zinc telluride heterojunction depending on the production conditions is investigated. A regularity in the formation of an extended area with constant alloy composition is detected. The regularity is explained by the fact that electric Peltier field conditioned by contact of two heterogeneous semiconductors participates in the solid solution formation process. Peltier field levels off the composition at the end length section. So, a possibility of creating a section with the assigned minor thickness alloy constant composition controlled in the interface of heterojunction occurs

  6. Tiny optical fiber temperature sensor based on temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Song, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Bingsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    The temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film can be used to develop a tiny, low cost and film-coated optical fiber temperature sensor. Pulse reference-based compensation technique is used to largely reduce the background noise which makes it possible to detect the minor reflectivity change of the film in different temperatures. The temperature sensitivity is 0.0034dB/° and the background noise is measured to be 0.0005dB, so the resolution can achieve 0.2°.

  7. Zinc-induced protection against cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Early, J.L.; Schnell, R.C.

    1978-02-01

    Pretreatment of male rats with cadmium acetate potentiates the duration of hexobarbital hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal drug metabolism. Pretreatment of rats with zinc acetate protects against these alterations in drug action elicited by cadmium.

  8. Uptake and distribution of cadmium in corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, J.W.; Vetter, R.J.; Christian, J.E.; Kessler, W.V.; McFee, W.W.

    1978-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of cadmium in corn (Zea mays) treated at various time intervals after planting and sampled at various times after treatment were measured. Cadmium was found to accumulate in all parts sampled. As shown in field studies, stems and leaves generally concentrated more cadmium than did husks, cobs, kernels, silks, or tassels. Samples of stems and leaves from corn treated 23 days after planting and sampled 5 days later exhibited higher concentrations of cadmium than samples taken 25, 45, 65, or 85 days after treatment. Concentrations generally decreased with time. Greenhouse studies showed that corn exposed to cadmium for the longest period of time accumulated the greatest total cadmium. The highest cadmium concentrations were found in the base or lowest leaves sampled 45 days after planting; this suggests a useful technique for quick screening corn crops for cadmium pollution

  9. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  10. Cadmium uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghiri, F.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption of /sup 115m/Cd by soybean (Gylcine max l.) plants via foliar and root systems and translocation into the seed was determined. The uptake of /sup 115m/Cd by soybeans via the root system was more efficient than that of the foliar placement. Growth and Cd concentrations of soybean and wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) tops were influenced by soil-applied Cd. In both crops, the Cd concentration of plant tops increased while yield decreased with increasing levels of applied Cd. Cadmium toxicitiy began to occur in both crops at the lowest level of soil applied Cd (2.5 ppM). With soybean plants, Cd toxicity symptoms resembled fe chlorosis. For wheat plants there were no visual symptoms other than the studied growth. The relative concentration of Cd found in several vegetable crops varied depending on the plant species. The relative Cd concentration in descending order for various vegetables was lettuce (Lactuca sativa l.) > radish top (Raphanus sativus l.) > celery stalk (Apium graveolens l.) > celery leaves greater than or equal to green pepper (Capsicum frutescens l.) > radish roots.

  11. antioxidants, cadmium-induced toxicity, serum biochemical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    histopathological parameters of the liver, kidney and testes of the Wister rate were investigated. Cadmium (CD) in the dose range ... and their mechanisms of actions. Key words: vitamin C, cadmium, kidney, testes, hormones, antioxidants ... Cancer (Jarup et al 1998; Kjellstrom 1992;. Waalkes et al 1999), Cadmium has also ...

  12. Bioavailability of cadmium from linseed and cocoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Rasmussen, Rie Romme

    In Denmark and EU the exposure of cadmium from food is at a level that is relatively close to the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI). This report describes an investigation of the bioavailability of cadmium in selected food items known to contain high levels of cadmium. The purpose was to provide data ...... or crushed linseed nor the intake of cocoa and chocolate....

  13. 29 CFR 1928.1027 - Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cadmium. 1928.1027 Section 1928.1027 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR AGRICULTURE Occupational Health § 1928.1027 Cadmium. See § 1910.1027, Cadmium. [61 FR 9255, Mar. 7, 1996] ...

  14. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  15. Mercury analysis in hair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit Karin; Jiménez, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    laboratories. Training sessions were organized for field workers and four external quality-assessment exercises (ICI/EQUAS), followed by the corresponding web conferences, were organized between March 2011 and February 2012. ICI/EQUAS used native hair samples at two mercury concentration ranges (0...

  16. Mercury exposure in Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cullen, Elizabeth; Evans, David S; Davidson, Fred

    2014-01-01

    of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES) pilot biomonitoring study. METHODS: Hair mercury concentrations were determined from a convenience sample of 120 mother/child pairs. Mothers also completed a questionnaire. Rigorous quality assurance within DEMOCOPHES...

  17. Metabolic models for methyl and inorganic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.R.; Purdue, P.

    1984-03-01

    Following the outbreak of mercury poisoning in Minimata, Japan (1953-60), much work has been done on the toxicology of mercury - in particular methyl mercury. In this paper, the authors derive two compartmental models for the metabolism of methyl mercury and inorganic mercury based upon the data which have been collected since 1960.

  18. Coprecipitation of cadmium with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Osamu; Kumagai, Tetsu; Shigematsu, Tsunenobu; Matsui, Masakazu

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of cadmium between precipitates of calcite and saturated aqueous solution was measured at 25 0 C to understand the distribution of cadmium in the bivalves. Calcite was precipitated from calcium bicarbonate solution by the gradual release of carbon dioxide. The cadmium ions were coprecipitated in calcite, obeying the logarithmic distribution law. The apparent distribution coefficient was decreased as α, α'-dipyridyl increased, but the true distribution coefficient was found to be an almost constant value, 560. This value is fairly close to the ratio of solubility product constants K sub(calcite)/K sub(CdCO 3 ), 890. This suggests that the deviation of the present solid solution from ideality is not very large. (auth.)

  19. Upconversion imager measures single mid-IR photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The most sensitive IR detectors today are based on exotic semicoductor technology such as indium antimonide or mercury cadmium telluride. High quality detectors of these sorts are expensive and suffer from high dark currents. Dark current can be somewhat alleviated by extreme cooling. Comparing t...

  20. 15 CFR 743.1 - Wassenaar Arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... level” (sensitivity) lower (better) than 2pT rms per square root Hz), 6A006.c.1, 6A006.d (certain items.... Indium Gallium Arsenide; g. Mercury Cadmium Telluride, as follows: 1. 'Scanning Arrays' having any of the... having 2 elements or less; 2. 'Staring Arrays' less than 256 elements; Technical Notes: 'Scanning Arrays...