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Sample records for mercuric ion reductase

  1. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  2. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr). Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and ...

  3. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr) Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and finally mer operon ...

  4. Isolation and characterization of mercuric reductase by newly isolated halophilic bacterium, Bacillus firmus MN8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Noroozi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study was aimed at isolating and identifying the halophilic and halotolerant bacteria which can produce mercuric reductase in Gavkhuni wetland in Iran. Moreover, tracking and sequencing merA gene and kinetic properties of mercuric reductase in the selected strain were performed in this study. Soil samples were taken from Gavkhuni wetland and cultured in nutrient agar medium with 5% NaCl. To examine the tolerance of purified colonies to mercury, agar dilution method was administered. Similarly, the phylogenetic analysis based on 16SrRNA gene sequencing was conducted. To investigate enzyme activity of kinetic parameters, a spectrophotometer was used to measure the NADPH oxidation decrease at 340 n.m. The results showed that among the 21 halophilic and halotolerant strains isolated from Gavkhuni wetland, 4 were resistant to mercuric chloride. A strain designated MN8 was selected for further studies because it showed the highest resistance to mercury. According to phylogenetic sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and phenotypic characteristics, the strain was categorized in the Bacillus genus and nearly related to Bacillus firmus. This strain had merA gene. The mercuric reductase showed Vmax and Km values of 0.106 U/mg and 24.051 µM, respectively. Evaluation of different concentrations of NaCl at 37°C and pH=7.5 in mercuric reductase enzyme activity indicated that the enzyme shows 50% activity in concentration of 1.5 M. Optimum pH and temperature of  enzyme activity were 7.5 and 35 °C, respectively. The results suggested that MN8 strain could be a proper candidate for bioremediation of mercury-contaminated environments such as industrial wastewaters.

  5. Kinetics of mercury reduction by Serratia marcescens mercuric reductase expressed by pseudomonas putida strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Deckwer, W.D. [GBF-Gesellschaft fuer Biotechnologische Forschung mbH, Abteilung TU-BCE, Mascheroder Weg 1, D-38124 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance is widespread among microorganisms and is based on the intracellular transformation of Hg(II) to less toxic elemental Hg(0). The use of microbial consortia to demercurize polluted wastewater streams and environments has been demonstrated. To develop efficient and versatile microbial cleanup strategies requires detailed knowledge of transport and reaction rates. This study focuses on the kinetics of the key enzyme of the microbial transformation, e.g., the mercuric reductase (MerA) under conditions closely resembling the cell interior. To this end, previously constructed and characterized Pseudomonas putida strains expressing MerA from Serratia marcescens were applied. Of the P. putida strains considered in this study P. putida KT2442::mer73 constitutively expressing broad spectrum mercury resistance (merTPAB) yielded the highest mercuric reductase (MerA) activity directly after cell disruption. MerA in the raw extract was further purified (about 100 fold). Reduction rates were measured for various substrates (HgCl{sub 2}, Hg{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and phenyl mercury acetate) up to high concentrations dependent on the purification grade. In all cases, a pronounced substrate inhibition was found. The kinetic constants determined for the cell raw extract are in agreement with those measured for intact cells. However, the rate data exhibit reduced affinity and inhibition with rising purification grade (specific activity). Therefore, the findings seemingly point to reactions preceding the catalytic reduction. Based on simplified assumptions, a kinetic model is suggested which reasonably describes the experimental findings and can advantageously be applied to the bioreactor design. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Mercury resistance and mercuric reductase activities and expression among chemotrophic thermophilic Aquificae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng; Barkay, Tamar

    2012-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg.

  7. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms involved in the transport of mercuric ions in target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury exists in the environment in various forms, all of which pose a risk to human health. Despite guidelines regulating the industrial release of mercury into the environment, humans continue to be exposed regularly to various forms of this metal via inhalation or ingestion. Following exposure, mercuric ions are taken up by and accumulate in numerous organs, including brain, intestine, kidney, liver, and placenta. In order to understand the toxicological effects of exposure to mercury, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that facilitate entry of mercuric ions into target cells must first be obtained. A number of mechanisms for the transport of mercuric ions into target cells and organs have been proposed in recent years. However, the ability of these mechanisms to transport mercuric ions and the regulatory features of these carriers have not been characterized completely. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current findings related to the mechanisms that may be involved in the transport of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in target tissues and organs. This review will describe mechanisms known to be involved in the transport of mercury and will also propose additional mechanisms that may potentially be involved in the transport of mercuric ions into target cells. PMID:27422290

  9. A novel mercuric reductase from the unique deep brine environment of atlantis II in the red sea

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Ahmed Anazadeh

    2013-11-26

    Aunique combination of physicochemical conditions prevails in the lower convective layer (LCL) of the brine pool at Atlantis II (ATII) Deep in the Red Sea. With a maximum depth of over 2000 m, the pool is characterized by acidic pH (5.3), high temperature (68 °C), salinity (26%), low light levels, anoxia, and high concentrations of heavy metals. We have established a metagenomic dataset derived from the microbial community in the LCL, and here we describe a gene for a novel mercuric reductase, a key component of the bacterial detoxification system for mercuric and organomercurial species. The metagenome-derived gene and an ortholog from an uncultured soil bacterium were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The properties of their products show that, in contrast to the soil enzyme, the ATII-LCL mercuric reductase is functional in high salt, stable at high temperatures, resistant to high concentrations of Hg2+, and efficiently detoxifies Hg2+ in vivo. Interestingly, despite the marked functional differences between the orthologs, their amino acid sequences differ by less than 10%. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes, in conjunction with three-dimensional modeling, have identified distinct structural features that contribute to extreme halophilicity, thermostability, and high detoxification capacity, suggesting that these were acquired independently during the evolution of this enzyme. Thus, our work provides fundamental structural insights into a novel protein that has undergone multiple biochemical and biophysical adaptations to promote the survival of microorganisms that reside in the extremely demanding environment of the ATII-LCL. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A novel mercuric reductase from the unique deep brine environment of Atlantis II in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Ferreira, Ari J S; Setubal, João C; Chambergo, Felipe S; Ouf, Amged; Adel, Mustafa; Dawe, Adam S; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B; Siam, Rania; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-17

    A unique combination of physicochemical conditions prevails in the lower convective layer (LCL) of the brine pool at Atlantis II (ATII) Deep in the Red Sea. With a maximum depth of over 2000 m, the pool is characterized by acidic pH (5.3), high temperature (68 °C), salinity (26%), low light levels, anoxia, and high concentrations of heavy metals. We have established a metagenomic dataset derived from the microbial community in the LCL, and here we describe a gene for a novel mercuric reductase, a key component of the bacterial detoxification system for mercuric and organomercurial species. The metagenome-derived gene and an ortholog from an uncultured soil bacterium were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The properties of their products show that, in contrast to the soil enzyme, the ATII-LCL mercuric reductase is functional in high salt, stable at high temperatures, resistant to high concentrations of Hg(2+), and efficiently detoxifies Hg(2+) in vivo. Interestingly, despite the marked functional differences between the orthologs, their amino acid sequences differ by less than 10%. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes, in conjunction with three-dimensional modeling, have identified distinct structural features that contribute to extreme halophilicity, thermostability, and high detoxification capacity, suggesting that these were acquired independently during the evolution of this enzyme. Thus, our work provides fundamental structural insights into a novel protein that has undergone multiple biochemical and biophysical adaptations to promote the survival of microorganisms that reside in the extremely demanding environment of the ATII-LCL.

  11. A thermophilic bacterial origin and subsequent constraints by redox, light and salinity on the evolution of the microbial mercuric reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkay, Tamar; Kritee, K; Boyd, Eric; Geesey, Gill

    2010-11-01

    Mercuric reductase (MerA) is central to the mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) system, catalyzing the reduction of ionic Hg to volatile Hg(0). A total of 213 merA homologues were identified in sequence databases, the majority of which belonged to microbial lineages that occupy oxic environments. merA was absent among phototrophs and in lineages that inhabit anoxic environments. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MerA indicate that (i) merA originated in a thermophilic bacterium following the divergence of the Archaea and Bacteria with a subsequent acquisition in Archaea via horizontal gene transfer (HGT), (ii) HGT of merA was rare across phylum boundaries and (iii) MerA from marine bacteria formed distinct and strongly supported lineages. Collectively, these observations suggest that a combination of redox, light and salinity conditions constrain MerA to microbial lineages that occupy environments where the most oxidized and toxic form of Hg, Hg(II), predominates. Further, the taxon-specific distribution of MerA with and without a 70 amino acid N-terminal extension may reflect intracellular levels of thiols. In conclusion, MerA likely evolved following the widespread oxygenation of the biosphere in a thermal environment and its subsequent evolution has been modulated by the interactions of Hg with the intra- and extracellular environment of the organism. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Radial Flow Assay Using Gold Nanoparticles and Rolling Circle Amplification to Detect Mercuric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tai-Yong; Lim, Min-Cheol; Woo, Min-Ah

    2018-01-01

    A novel colorimetric assay employing oligonucleotide-conjugated gold nanoparticle (AuNP probes) and rolling circle amplification (RCA) was developed for simple detection of mercuric ions (Hg2+). The thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) coordination chemistry makes our detection system selective for Hg2+. In the presence of Hg2+, the thymine 12-mer oligonucleotide is unable to act as a primer for RCA due to the formation of T-Hg2+-T before the RCA reaction. However, in the absence of Hg2+, DNA coils as RCA products are generated during the RCA reaction, and is further labeled with AuNP probes. Colorimetric signals that depend on the amount of DNA coil-AuNP probe complexes were generated by drop-drying the reaction solution on nitrocellulose-based paper. As the reaction solution spread radially because of capillary action, the complexes formed a concentric red spot on the paper. The colorimetric signals of the red spots were rapidly measured with a portable spectrophotometer and determined as the ΔE value, which indicates the calculated color intensity. Our assay displays great linearity (detection limit: 22.4 nM), precision, and reproducibility, thus demonstrating its utility for Hg2+ quantification in real samples. We suggest that our simple, portable, and cost-effective method could be used for on-site Hg2+ detections. PMID:29389877

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanoparticles using one step green approach and their application as mercuric ion sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshni, V.; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been evolved as a promising candidate for the metal sensing applications due to their synthesis from naturally occurring and easily available non-toxic molecular precursors by green chemistry. A simple and one step procedure is reported here for the synthesis of CNPs from coconut milk by thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 120–150 °C for 2–5 min without using any carbonizing or passivating agent. On pyrolysis the coconut oil is separated from the carbon rich residue and the residue when dissolved in water showed blue fluorescence under UV light. The CNPs produced are found to show an emission maximum at 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. Synthesis by green approach makes CNPs a promising substitute for the metal sensing applications. Series of metal ions which have a hazardous impact on the ecological system have been taken for the analysis and it is observed that the fluorescence of CNPs gets remarkably quenched by mercuric ions. Fluorescence quenching was studied using standard Stern–Volmer quenching model. Limit of detection was found to be 16.5 nM Hg{sup 2+} concentration. - Highlights: • Green and economical synthesis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) from naturally abundant material. • Coconut milk is used as molecular precursor, which on thermal pyrolysis at 120 °C yielded CNPs. • Highly fluorescent CNPs show an emission maxima of 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. • Application of CNPs for metal ion sensing using fluorescence quenching phenomena. • Hg{sup 2+} is most effectively sensed with a detection limit of 16.5 nM.

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanoparticles using one step green approach and their application as mercuric ion sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshni, V.; Ottoor, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been evolved as a promising candidate for the metal sensing applications due to their synthesis from naturally occurring and easily available non-toxic molecular precursors by green chemistry. A simple and one step procedure is reported here for the synthesis of CNPs from coconut milk by thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 120–150 °C for 2–5 min without using any carbonizing or passivating agent. On pyrolysis the coconut oil is separated from the carbon rich residue and the residue when dissolved in water showed blue fluorescence under UV light. The CNPs produced are found to show an emission maximum at 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. Synthesis by green approach makes CNPs a promising substitute for the metal sensing applications. Series of metal ions which have a hazardous impact on the ecological system have been taken for the analysis and it is observed that the fluorescence of CNPs gets remarkably quenched by mercuric ions. Fluorescence quenching was studied using standard Stern–Volmer quenching model. Limit of detection was found to be 16.5 nM Hg 2+ concentration. - Highlights: • Green and economical synthesis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) from naturally abundant material. • Coconut milk is used as molecular precursor, which on thermal pyrolysis at 120 °C yielded CNPs. • Highly fluorescent CNPs show an emission maxima of 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. • Application of CNPs for metal ion sensing using fluorescence quenching phenomena. • Hg 2+ is most effectively sensed with a detection limit of 16.5 nM

  15. A scanner-based colorimetric mercuric ion detection using Tween-20-stabilized AuNPs solution in 96-well plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorahong, Sujittra; Niammusik, Anusorn; Chaykleang, Pawinee; Kanatharana, Pproespichaya; Thavarungkul, Panote; Thammakhet-Buranachai, Chongdee

    2017-09-19

    This paper reports the development of a sensitive, high-throughput colorimetric method for the detection of trace mercuric ions (Hg 2+ ). The method is based on the binding of the analyte to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with Tween-20. Tween-20 was used as a nonionic stabilizer to allow a good dispersion of AuNPs in solution. When mercuric ions were added to the solution, they replaced the Tween-20 stabilizer on the surface of the AuNPs due to their stronger binding affinity. This caused the NPs to aggregate and the color of the solution to change from red to blue. The quantitative analysis of Hg 2+ was achieved by plotting the Red Green Blue (RGB) values of the scanned images of the analyte samples in the AuNP solution against concentrations of Hg 2+ . Since the reaction was carried out in 96-well plates, ninety-six samples were analyzed simultaneously, reducing the cost and time of analysis. The experimental parameters optimized were the concentrations of Tween-20 and NaCl, the reactants ratio, and the incubation time. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration plot of the assay was linear over an Hg 2+ concentration range of 0.10-2.00 mg L -1 , and the detection limit was 0.050 mg L -1 (S/N  =  3). The selectivity of the technique was high with no significant colorimetric responses to the presence of 100-fold excesses of other metal ions. Quantification was validated with Hg 2+ standard solutions and spiked tap and waste water samples, and the accuracy of the technique was confirmed. The developed technique is simple and cost effective because it requires no complicated instruments, yet the results demonstrate it to be a very powerful technique with the potential to be developed for on-site mercury detection.

  16. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (merA) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance Região conservada do gene da mercúrio redutase (merA) como marcador molecular da resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Sotero-Martins; Michele Silva de Jesus; Michele Lacerda; Josino Costa Moreira; Ana Luzia Lauria Filgueiras; Paulo Rubens Guimarães Barrocas

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains.O mecanismo de resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio mais comum é baseada na redução do Hg(II) a Hg0, através da ativida...

  17. Toxicological significance of renal Bcrp: Another potential transporter in the elimination of mercuric ions from proximal tubular cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridges, Christy C., E-mail: bridges_cc@mercer.edu; Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Joshee, Lucy

    2015-06-01

    Secretion of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) from proximal tubular cells into the tubular lumen has been shown to involve the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2). Considering similarities in localization and substrate specificity between Mrp2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), we hypothesize that Bcrp may also play a role in the proximal tubular secretion of mercuric species. In order to test this hypothesis, the uptake of Hg{sup 2+} was examined initially using inside-out membrane vesicles containing Bcrp. The results of these studies suggest that Bcrp may be capable of transporting certain conjugates of Hg{sup 2+}. To further characterize the role of Bcrp in the handling of mercuric ions and in the induction of Hg{sup 2+}-induced nephropathy, Sprague–Dawley and Bcrp knockout (bcrp{sup −/−}) rats were exposed intravenously to a non-nephrotoxic (0.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}), a moderately nephrotoxic (1.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}) or a significantly nephrotoxic (2.0 μmol·kg{sup −1}) dose of HgCl{sub 2}. In general, the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} was greater in organs of bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in Sprague–Dawley rats, suggesting that Bcrp may play a role in the export of Hg{sup 2+} from target cells. Within the kidney, cellular injury and necrosis was more severe in bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in controls. The pattern of necrosis, which was localized in the inner cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla, was significantly different from that observed in Mrp2-deficient animals. These findings suggest that Bcrp may be involved in the cellular export of select mercuric species and that its role in this export may differ from that of Mrp2. - Highlights: • Bcrp may mediate transport of mercury out of proximal tubular cells. • Hg-induced nephropathy was more severe in Bcrp knockout rats. • Bcrp and Mrp2 may differ in their ability to transport Hg.

  18. A new rhodamine-based fluorescent chemodosimeter for mercuric ions in water media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quy, Phan Tu; Hien, Nguyen Khoa; Bao, Nguyen Chi; Nhan, Doan Thanh; Khanh, Dang Van; Nhung, Nguyen Thi Ai; Tung, Truong Quy; Luyen, Nguyen Dinh; Quang, Duong Tuan

    2015-05-01

    A new rhodamine-ethylenediamine-nitrothiourea conjugate (RT) was synthesized and its sensing property as a fluorescent chemodosimeter toward metal ions was explored in water media. Analytical results from absorption and fluorescence spectra revealed that the addition of Hg(2+) ions to the aqueous solution of the chemodosimeter RT caused a distinct fluorescence OFF-ON response with a remarkable visual color change from colorless to pink; however, no clear spectral and color changes were observed from other metal ions including: Zn(2+) , Cu(2+) , Cd(2+) , Pb(2+) , Ag(+) , Fe(2+) , Cr(3+) , Co(3+) , Ni(2+) , Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , K(+) and Na(+) . The sensing results and the molecular structure suggested that a Hg(2+) -induced a desulfurization reaction and cyclic guanylation of the thiourea moiety followed by ring-opening of the rhodamine spirolactam in RT are responsible for a distinct fluorescence turn-on signal, indicating that RT is a remarkably sensitive and selective chemodosimeter for Hg(2+) ions in aqueous solution. Hg(2+) within a concentration range from 0.1 to 25 μM can be determined using RT as a chemodosimeter and a detection limit of 0.04 μM is achieved. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (merA as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance Região conservada do gene da mercúrio redutase (merA como marcador molecular da resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sotero-Martins

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains.O mecanismo de resistência bacteriana ao mercúrio mais comum é baseada na redução do Hg(II a Hg0, através da atividade da enzima mercúrio redutase (MerA. O uso do fragmento de 431 pb amplificado de uma região conservada do gene merA, que codifica a enzima MerA,foi utilizado como marcador molecular deste mecanismo, permitindo a identificação de bactérias resistentes ao mercúrio.

  20. Comparative biosorption of mercuric ions from aquatic systems by immobilized live and heat-inactivated Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus sajur-caju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arica, M Y; Arpa, C; Kaya, B; Bektaş, S; Denizli, A; Genç, O

    2003-09-01

    Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus sajur-caju mycelia immobilized in Ca-alginate beads were used for the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous solutions. The sorption of Hg(II) ions by alginate beads and both immobilized live and heat-killed fungal mycelia of T. versicolor and P. sajur-caju was studied in the concentration range of 0.150-3.00 mmol dm(-3). The biosorption of Hg(II) increased as the initial concentration of Hg(II) ions increased in the medium. Maximum biosorption capacities for plain alginate beads were 0.144+/-0.005 mmol Hg(II)/g; for immobilized live and heat-killed fungal mycelia of T. versicolor were 0.171+/-0.007 mmol Hg(II)/g and 0.383+/-0.012 mmol Hg(II)/g respectively; whereas for live and heat-killed P. sajur-caju, the values were 0.450+/-0.014 mmol Hg(II)/g and 0.660+/-0.019 mmol Hg(II)/g respectively. Biosorption equilibrium was established in about 1 h and the equilibrium adsorption was well described by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Between 15 and 45 degrees C the biosorption capacity was not affected and maximum adsorption was observed between pH 4.0 and 6.0. The alginate-fungus beads could be regenerated using 10 mmol dm(-3) HCl solution, with up to 97% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Heat-killed T. versicolor and P. sajur-caju removed 73% and 81% of the Hg(II) ions, respectively, from synthetic wastewater samples.

  1. One-step synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets with the help of melamine and its application for fluorescence detection of mercuric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qianfen; Sun, Liming; Ni, Yongnian

    2017-03-01

    A facile, simple, and relatively environment-friendly hydrothermal approach was developed for one-step synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (GCNNs) using melamine and sodium citrate as the precursors. The prepared GCNNs emit strong fluorescence with a high quantum yield of 48.3%. The GCNNs were then characterized by various techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. In addition, the fluorescence quenching behavior of the GCNNS by mercuric ions (Hg 2+ ) was exploited to fabricate a label-free fluorescence quenching sensor for sensitive and selective detection of Hg 2+ . The results showed that there existed a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Hg 2+ from 0.001 to 1.0μM with a detection limit of 0.3nM. Finally, the sensor was successfully used to detection of Hg 2+ in water and milk samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly sensitive and selective chip-based fluorescent sensor for mercuric ion: development and comparison of turn-on and turn-off systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Liu, Meiying; Lou, Xinhui; Zhao, Tao; Wang, Zheng; Xue, Ying; Zhao, Jianlong; Xu, Yuanshen

    2012-09-18

    Miniaturization is currently an important trend in environmental and food monitoring because it holds great promise for on-site monitoring and detection. We report here two ready-to-use chip-based fluorescent sensors, compatible with microarray technology for reagentless, one-step, fast, highly sensitive and selective detection of the mercuric ion (Hg(2+)) in the turn-on and turn-off operation modes. Both operation modes are based on the highly selective T-Hg(2+)-T coordination between two neighboring polythymine (T) strands at a high probe density and its induced displacement of the complementary polyadenine strand labeled with either fluorophore or quencher, which enables the turn-off and turn-on detection of Hg(2+), respectively. The turn-off sensor is slightly more sensitive than the turn-on sensor, and their detection limits are 3.6 and 8.6 nM, respectively, which are both lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit of [Hg(2+)] for drinkable water (10 nM, 2 ppb). Compared to the turn-off sensor with the dynamic Hg(2+) detection range from 3.6 nM to 10 μM (R(2) = 0.99), the turn-on sensor has a broader dynamic Hg(2+) detection range, from 8.6 nM to 100 μM (R(2) = 0.996). Both sensors exhibited superior selectivity over other reported sensors using thymine-rich probes for Hg(2+) detection over other common metal ions. In addition, the practical application of the chip-based sensors was demonstrated by detecting spiked Hg(2+) in drinking water and fresh milk. The sensor has great potential for on-site practical applications due to its operational convenience, simplicity, speed, and portability.

  3. Targeting the Thioredoxin Reductase-Thioredoxin System from Staphylococcus aureus by Silver Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiangwen; Yang, Fang; Li, Hongyan; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Wei; Sun, Hongzhe

    2017-12-18

    The thioredoxin system, which is composed of NADPH, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), and thioredoxin (Trx), is one of the major disulfide reductase systems used by bacteria against oxidative stress. In particular, this reductase system is crucial for the survival of the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which lacks a natural glutathione/glutaredoxin (Grx) system. Although silver ions and silver-containing materials have been used as antibacterial agents for centuries, the antibacterial mechanism of silver is not well-understood. Herein, we demonstrate that silver ions bind to the active sites of S. aureus TrxR and Trx with dissociation constants of 1.4 ± 0.1 μM and 15.0 ± 5.0 μM and stoichiometries of 1 and 2 Ag + ions per protein, respectively. Importantly, silver ion binding leads to oligomerization and functional disruption of TrxR as well as Trx. Silver also depleted intracellular thiol levels in S. aureus, disrupting bacterial thiol-redox homeostasis. Our study provides new insights into the antibacterial mechanism of silver ions. Moreover, the Trx and TrxR system might serve as a feasible target for the design of antibacterial drugs.

  4. Mercuric iodide sensor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.B.; Anderson, R.J.; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the improvement in the performance and the manufacturing yield of mercuric iodide detectors achieved by identifying the dominant impurities, carrier traps, and processing steps limiting device performance. Theoretical studies of electron and hole transport in this material set fundamental limits on detector performance and provided a standard against which to compare experimental results. Spectroscopy techniques including low temperature photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current spectroscopy were applied to characterize the deep level traps in this material. Traps and defects that can be introduced into the detector during growth, from the contact, and during the various steps in detector fabrication were identified. Trap energy levels and their relative abundances were determined. Variations in material quality and detector performance at the micron scale were investigated to understand the distribution in electric field in large volume detectors suitable for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Surface aging and contact degradation was studied extensively by techniques including atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Preferred handling and processing procedures for maximizing detector performance and yield were established. The manufacturing yield of high resolution gamma-ray detectors was improved from a few percent to more than 30%

  5. Neutron Detection with Mercuric Iodide

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z A

    2003-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a high-density, high-Z semiconducting material useful for gamma ray detection. This makes it convertible to a thermal neutron detector by covering it with a boron rich material and detecting the 478 keV gamma rays resulting from the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li* reaction. However, the 374 barn thermal capture cross section of sup n sup a sup t Hg, makes the detector itself an attractive absorber, and this has been exploited previously. Since previous work indicates that there are no low-energy gamma rays emitted in coincidence with the 368 keV capture gamma from the dominant sup 1 sup 9 sup 9 Hg(n, gamma) sup 2 sup 0 sup 0 Hg reaction, only the 368 keV capture gamma is seen with any efficiency a relatively thin (few mm) detector. In this paper we report preliminary measurements of neutrons via capture reactions in a bare mercuric iodide crystal and a crystal covered in sup 1 sup 0 B-loaded epoxy. The covered detector is an improvement over the bare detector because the presence of both ...

  6. Roles of Glutamates and Metal ions in a Rationally Designed Nitric Oxide Reductase Based on Myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; S Tian; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A structural and functional model of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) has been designed by introducing two glutamates (Glu) and three histidines (His) in sperm whale myoglobin. X-ray structural data indicate that the three His and one Glu (V68E) residues bind iron, mimicking the putative FeB site in NOR, while the second Glu (I107E) interacts with a water molecule and forms a hydrogen bonding network in the designed protein. Unlike the first Glu (V68E), which lowered the heme reduction potential by {approx}110 mV, the second Glu has little effect on the heme potential, suggesting that the negatively charged Glu has a different role in redox tuning. More importantly, introducing the second Glu resulted in a {approx}100% increase in NOR activity, suggesting the importance of a hydrogen bonding network in facilitating proton delivery during NOR reactivity. In addition, EPR and X-ray structural studies indicate that the designed protein binds iron, copper, or zinc in the FeB site, each with different effects on the structures and NOR activities, suggesting that both redox activity and an intermediate five-coordinate heme-NO species are important for high NOR activity. The designed protein offers an excellent model for NOR and demonstrates the power of using designed proteins as a simpler and more well-defined system to address important chemical and biological issues.

  7. Inhibitory effects of calmodulin antagonists on urinary enzyme excretion in rats after nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, S.D. Jr.; Cox, J.L.; Giles, R.C. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Prochlorperazine, a phenothiazine antiemetic, has been reported to protect rats against mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/)-induced nephrotoxicity. Mercuric ion and 12 other divalent metal ions of toxicologic importance inhibit the activity of calmodulin, a ubiquitous intracellular calcium receptor and regulatory protein, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Phenothiazines, including prochlorperazine, are reversible calmodulin antagonists, and as such they interact with divalent calcium at the level of calmodulin. It was of interest therefore to evaluate the comparative effects of several phenothiazines on HgCl/sub 2/-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  8. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are regulated by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-07-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  9. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  10. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... reductase activity and nitrite accumulation depend on the exogenous nitrate. Nitrite itself is reduced to ammonium by palstidic nitrite reductase. Nitrite reductase is activated by both nitrate and nitrite ions by positive feed forward, whereas nitrate metabolites, most likely ammonium and glutamine; down.

  11. Studies on the mercuric chloride resistance of Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaczi, L.; Fodor, M.; Milch, H.; Rethy, A.

    1962-01-01

    Among 409 pathogenic Staph. aureus strains 34% have been found to be sensitive, and 66% resistant, to mercuric chloride. The incidence of mercuric chloride resistant cultures among antibiotic sensitive staphylococci was 20%; among strains resistant to penicillin or to more than one antibiotic, 70%. Mercuric chloride resistant organisms occurred chiefly among phage group I and untypable strains; they were especially common among the so called epidemic strains of phage group I, and among cultures resistant to 4-6 antibiotics. In mercuric chloride sensitivity a thirtyfold, in merthiolate sensitivity only a two-fold difference has been revealed among the strains. The sulfydryl group content of mercuric chloride resistant organisms was only 1 1/2 times higher than that of sensitive bacteria. As to p-chlor mercuric benzoate binding capacity, a twofold difference was found between mercuric chloride sensitive and resistant staphylococci. The differences in the mercuric chloride resistance of various staphylococcal strains might be due to differences in the chemical structure of the cell surface. 9 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  12. Tomato pomace protects against mercuric chloride-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mercuric chloride is an environmental toxicant that causes health hazards. One of the mechanisms of its toxicity is oxidative stress which antioxidants are expected to ameliorate. Tomato is reported to possess antioxidant activity and this study investigated tomato pomace powder's (TPP) effect on mercuric chloride (HgCl2) ...

  13. Synthetic and structural investigations of mercurous and mercuric organophosphonates and phenylarsonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalwar, Nitin Balkrushna; Vidyasagar, Kanamaluru

    2016-11-15

    The following twelve mercurous and mercuric organophosphomates, bis/diphosphonates and phenylarsonates have been isolated and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, {sup 13}C-and {sup 31}P NMR, infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods: Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(1), Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}P(C{sub 6}H{sub 4})PO{sub 3}H)(2), Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}P(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}PO{sub 3}H)(3), Hg{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}PO{sub 3}H)(4), Hg{sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(5), (Hg{sub 2}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}PO{sub 3})(6), (Hg{sub 2}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PO{sub 3})(7), Hg(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(8), Hg(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(9), Hg(O{sub 3}AsC{sub 6}H{sub 5})·H{sub 2}O(10), Hg{sub 3}(O{sub 3}AsC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(HO{sub 3}AsC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(11) and (Hg{sub 2})Hg{sub 3}(O{sub 3}P(C{sub 6}H{sub 4})PO{sub 3}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O(12). Compounds 1–7 are the first examples of mercurous phosphonates and di/bisphosphonates. They contain Hg{sub 2}O{sub 6} units, which consist of Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+} cations with Hg-Hg bond of ~2.5 Å length. Phenylphosphonates 1 and 5 are layered compounds, whereas bis/diphosphonates 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 have pillared-layered and three-dimensional structures. Compounds 8–11 are layered mercuric phosphonates and phenylarsonates. Compound 12 is a three-dimensional mixed-valent mercury phenylenebisphosphonate. - Graphical abstract: The first examples of mercurous organophosphonates and organodiphosphonates have layered, pillared-layered and three-dimensional structures.

  14. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  15. Polarization effects in mercuric iodide crystals used for nuclear detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed-Brahim, T.; Benmalek, M.

    1984-08-01

    The use of the semiconducting mercuric iodide as an X and ..gamma..-ray detector is limited by the polarization taking place in the material. The authors present a study of this polarization and two experimental methods to get rid of it (long time interband illumination or positively polarized MIS structure). Finally, they propose an explanation of the phenomenon.

  16. Isolation and Cloning of mercuric reductase gene (merA from mercury-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Khoshniyat

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the bacteria having merA gene coding mineral mercury reducing enzyme, has genetic potential of Hg removing via reduction of mineral mercury and transformation of that to gas form and finally bioremediation of polluted area. The aim of this study is the isolation of merA gene from resistance bacteria and cloning of that into suitable expression vector and then the environmental bioremediation by the transformation of bacteria with this vector. Materials and methods: A number of bacteria were collected in contaminated areas with mercury in order to isolate merA genes. Polymerase chain reaction had done on the four bacterial genomes including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli using the specific primers in order to detect merA gene. For cloning, the primers containing restriction enzyme sites are used, merA gene was isolated and amplified. The amplified fragments were cloned in the expression vector pET21a+ and via heat shock method were transformed into E. coli TOP10 competent cell. For clustering of genes, Mega software version 4 was used and bioanformatic studies were achieved for predicted enzyme. Results: merA gene with 1686 bp in length was isolated from K pneumoniae and E. coli. Recombinant vectors in transgenic bacteria were confirmed by various methods and finally were confirmed by sequencing. The result of clustering these genes with existence genes in NCBI showed high similarity. Discussion and conclusion: The existence of merA gene in bacteria that adapted to Hg pollution area is because of resistance, so with cloning this gene into suitable expression vector and transformation of susceptible bacteria with this vector ability of resistance to Hg in bacteria for bioremediation could be given.

  17. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  18. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  19. Optical properties and surface morphology studies of palladium contacts on mercuric iodide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, M.A.; Azoulay, M.; Burger, A.; Biao, Y.; Silberman, E. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Nason, D. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations

    1993-05-01

    Palladium is chemically suitable for electric contacts on mercuric iodide detectors for photon and nuclear radiation detection, so the understanding of palladium contacts is important for fundamental and practical scientific purposes. A study has been conducted on the surface morphology of evaporated contacts using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and optical transmission and reflection. Evaporated palladium coatings are typically nonuniform and may deposit selectively on mercuric iodide surface defects. Reflection measurements show that coating thickness and surface treatment affect intensity, position and shape of a reflected peak characteristic of the mercuric iodide structure. Results indicate that the band gap energy in the surface of the mercuric iodide is lowered by palladium contacts.

  20. Direct vapor/solid synthesis of mercuric iodide using compounds of mercury and iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Nathan L.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing high purity mercuric iodide by passing a gaseous source of a mercuric compound through a particulate bed of a low vapor pressure iodide compound which is maintained at an elevated temperature which is the lower of either: (a) just below the melting or volatilization temperature of the iodide compound (which ever is lower); or (b) just below the volatilization point of the other reaction product formed during the reaction; to cause the mercuric compound to react with the iodide compound to form mercuric iodide which then passes as a vapor out of the bed into a cooler condensation region.

  1. Dosage du mercure dans le gaz naturel par absorption atomique sans flammes Mercury Titration in Natural Gas by Flameless Atomic Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Villa F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente la méthode mise au point par l'Institut Français du Pétrole pour déterminer par absorption atomique sans flamme, les traces de mercure métallique contenu dans un gaz naturel. La méthode d'analyse nécessite une extraction du mercure soit sous forme d'ion mercurique en faisant passer le gaz dans une solution oxydante, soit sous forme d'amalgame avec de l'or ou de l'argent. Le premier mode opératoire s'applique aux échantillons dont la concentration en mercure est supérieure à I ttg/Nm3, le second pour des concentrations inférieures à 5 pg/Nm3. Les seuils de détection sont respectivement 10 ng (en solution et 0,3 ng (en amalgame. La répétabilité pour 100 ng de mercure (en amalgame est de ± 7% pour une probabilité de.95 %. En conclusion, dans un échantillon de gaz naturel, compte tenu du volume des prélèvements effectués, il est possible de détecter des concentrations de l'ordre du nanogramme de mercure par mètre cube de gaz. This article describes the method developed by IFP using flameless atomic absorption to determine metallic mercury traces in a natural gas. The analyst method requires a mercury extraction either in the form of mercuric ions by making the gas pass through an oxidizing solution or in the form of an amalgam with gold or silver. The former operating method applies ta samples having a mercury concentration greater than I !ag/Nm3, and the latter for concentrations smaller than 5 (-Lg/Nm3. Detection thresholds are respectively 10 ng (in solution and 0.3 ng (in amalgam. The repeatability for 100 ng of mercury (in amalgam is ± 7 % with a probability of 95%. To conclude, in a sample of natural gas, considering the volume of the samples taken, it is possible ta detect concentrations in the vicinity of one nanogrom of mercury per cubic meter of gas.

  2. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, S.; McGregor Elsa; Ariesanti Bridget Corcoran

    2004-01-01

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers

  3. Ameliorative stroke of selenium against toxicological effects of mercuric chloride in liver of freshwater catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Suresh; Choughule, Neha

    2015-07-08

    Mercury, a prevalent and unrelenting toxin, occurs in a variety of forms in freshwater as well as, in marine life. Mercury is an important inducer of oxidative stress in fish leading to formation of reactive oxygen species. Selenium is an essential micronutrient for animals and has antagonistic effect against mercuric toxicity in fishes. Present study has been made to evaluate toxic effect of HgCl2 (0.15 mg/L) on liver of freshwater catfish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bl.). Protective ability of selenium has been investigated by simultaneous exposure of fish with sodium selenite (0.15 mg/L) along with mercuric chloride. For present study Fishes were divided into three groups of ten fishes each the first group served as control, while the second group fish were exposed to HgCl2 . Animals of third group were treated with HgCl2 and Na2 SeO3 . Results reveal that mercury induced lipid peroxidation and in response to this, antioxidants reduced glutathione (GSH) and Catalase (CAT) were reduced whereas, Glutathione reductase (GR) level was enhanced. These antioxidants scavenge the reactive oxygen radicals. Hg induced histopathological damage and elevation in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and transaminases and reduction in protein and glucose contents were evidently seen in catfish liver. Intriguingly, results indicate that under stress of mercury, the fish actively generate oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, which can be used as biomarkers of pollution. Simultaneous exposure to Selenium along with Hg suppressed Hg uptake and lipid peroxidation. Histological architecture and all biochemical parameters were maintained near normal in the presence of selenium in liver of the catfish. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Localization of gastrointestinal deposition of mercuric chloride studied in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.B.; Andersen, H.L.; Soerensen, J.A.; Andersen, O.

    1992-01-01

    During the last 5 years, the site of gastrointestinal absorption of inorganic mercury has been attempted identified mainly by experiments using perfused intestinal segments in vitro or in situ. The present investigation will discuss the localization of the absorption site for mercuric chloride based on a completely undisturbed in vivo experimental model in mice. As the mice were allowed to eat their normal diet during the experimental period, the present results would independently add to existing knowledge on intestinal absorption sites for inorganic mercury. The mice were given 203 Hg labelled mercuric chloride orally, either through stomach tube or in the drinking water, and were killed after various time intervals. Mercury was localized and quantified in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract by gamma-counting. Time course analysis of the segmental deposition of mercury demonstrated that the deposition mainly takes place in the proximal jejunum and suggested that a larger part of the jejunum than previously reported is involved in absorption of mercury. Using this in vivo model, tetraethylthiuram disulfide was demonstrated to increase the intestinal deposition and absorption without changing the site of deposition. (au)

  5. Toxicokinetics of mercuric chloride and methylmercuric chloride in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J B

    1992-09-01

    Future human exposure to inorganic mercury will probably lead to a few individuals occupationally exposed to high levels and much larger populations exposed to low or very low levels from dental fillings or from food items containing inorganic mercury; human exposure to methylmercury will be relatively low and depending on intake of marine food. Ideally, risk assessment is based on detailed knowledge of relations between external and internal dose, organ levels, and their relation to toxic symptoms. However, human data on these toxicokinetic parameters originate mainly from individuals or smaller populations accidentally exposed for shorter periods to relatively high mercury levels, but with unknown total body burden. Thus, assessment of risk associated with exposure to low levels of mercury will largely depend on data from animal experiments. Previous investigations of the toxicokinetics of mercuric compounds almost exclusively employed parenteral administration of relatively high doses of soluble mercuric salts. However, human exposure is primarily pulmonary or oral and at low doses. The present study validates an experimental model for investigating the toxicokinetics of orally administered mercuric chloride and methylmercuric chloride in mice. Major findings using this model are discussed in relation to previous knowledge. The toxicokinetics of inorganic mercury in mice depend on dose size, administration route, and sex, whereas the mouse strain used is less important. The "true absorption" of a single oral dose of HgCl2 was calculated to be about 20% at two different dose levels. Earlier studies that did not take into account the possible excretion of absorbed mercury and intestinal reabsorption during the experimental period report 7-10% intestinal uptake. The higher excretion rates observed after oral than after intraperitoneal administration of HgCl2 are most likely due to differences in disposition of systemically delivered and retained mercury. After

  6. Improved Stability of Mercuric Iodide Detectors for Anticoincidence Shields, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize guard ring electrode structures and a new film growth technique to create improved polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors for background...

  7. Mercure IV code application to the external dose computation from low and medium level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomassini, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the present work the external dose from low and medium level wastes is calculated using MERCURE IV code. The code utilizes MONTECARLO method for integrating multigroup line of sight attenuation Kernels

  8. Mercuric iodide crystals obtained by solvent evaporation using ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugucioni, J.C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-01-01

    Millimeter-sized mercuric iodide crystals were fabricated by the solvent evaporation technique using pure ethanol as a solvent. Three different conditions for solution evaporation were tested: (i) in the dark at room temperature; (ii) in the presence of light at room temperature and (iii) in an oven at 40 deg. C. Morphology, structure, optical and electrical properties were investigated using several techniques. Crystals fabricated in the dark show better properties and stability than others, possibly because the larger the energy of the system, the larger the number of induced growth defects. The crystals fabricated in the dark have adequate structure for higher resistivity and activation energy close to half the optical band-gap, as desired. With proper encapsulation these crystals might be good candidates for the development of ionizing radiation sensors.

  9. Elemental, mercuric and organic mercury: biological interactions and dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aposhian, H.V. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology

    2002-09-01

    The greatest exposure of the general population to mercury appears to be from the elemental mercury emitted by dental amalgams. The next greatest exposure is from methylmercury in seafood. One of the major sources of this methylmercury is from mercury emitted by power plants burning fossil fuel. After the mercury enters the atmosphere, some of it will be deposited in lakes, rivers, bays, seas and oceans. In an aquatic environment, inorganic mercury is converted to methylmercury by bacteria. Once in the methylmercury form, it is bioaccumulated up the food chain. The bacteria are consumed by other unicellular organisms that are eaten by small fish; small fish are eaten by bigger fish; then bigger fish are eaten by other animals and humans. Methylmercury and elemental mercury are efficiently absorbed by humans and are transported rapidly to and deposited in the brain. In the brain, methylmercury is converted very slow to mercuric mercury while the elemental mercury is converted very quickly. Methylmercury and elemental mercury are extremely toxic to the developing central nervous system. Those at greatest risk are fetuses, very young children, women of childbearing age and pregnant women. There are no safe or reliable methods to remove these two forms of mercury and their biotransformant mercuric mercury from the human brain. The chelating agents DMPS (sodium dimercaptopropanesulfonate) and DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid) decrease the body's burden of mercury but not the brain's. Because of the toxicity of methylmercury, the major source of mercury emissions, namely, emissions from power plants, needs to be curtailed. (orig.)

  10. Brésil : La contamination par le mercure en Amazonie | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    11 janv. 2011 ... ... site d'extraction de l'or. À sa grande surprise, ils sont demeurés stables jusqu'à 400 km du site. De toute évidence, même si l'extraction aurifère contribuait à la contamination par le mercure jusqu'à 50 km autour de la mine, elle n'était pas la principale cause de pollution par le mercure des cours d'eau en ...

  11. Renal Toxicity of Mercuric Chloride at Different Time Intervals in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Al-Madani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to study the renal toxicity of mercuric chloride in rats at different periods of time. The following groups of rats were studied: i control, ii placebo, iii rats injected with a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid, iv rats injected with a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS followed by a single dose ip of 2.0 mg HgCl 2 /kg body weight one hour after DMPS injection v rats injected with a single ip dose of 2.0 mg HgCl 2 /kg body weight. Results indicate that mercuric chloride was more toxic after 48 hours of its administration when compared to 24 hours. Mercuric chloride administration caused an impairment of renal function which was evident from a significant decrease in urine volume, urinary excretion of urea, creatinine and glomerular filteration rate (P < 0.001 when compared to other treated groups. There was an increased excretion of protein, albumin and γ–-glutamyltransferase in the urine of mercuric chloride treated rats. Administration of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid before mercuric chloride treatment caused the altered indices to return to near normal levels.

  12. Renal Toxicity of Mercuric Chloride at Different Time Intervals in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Al-Madani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to study the renal toxicity of mercuric chloride in rats at different periods of time. The following groups of rats were studied: i control, ii placebo, iii rats injected with a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of 2, 3 dimercapto- 1-propanesulfonic acid, iv rats injected with a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS followed by a single dose ip of 2.0 mg HgCl2/kg body weight one hour after DMPS injection v rats injected with a single ip dose of 2.0 mg HgCl2/kg body weight. Results indicate that mercuric chloride was more toxic after 48 hours of its administration when compared to 24 hours. Mercuric chloride administration caused an impairment of renal function which was evident from a significant decrease in urine volume, urinary excretion of urea, creatinine and glomerular filteration rate (P < 0.001 when compared to other treated groups. There was an increased excretion of protein, albumin and γ—glutamyltransferase in the urine of mercuric chloride treated rats. Administration of 2, 3 dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid before mercuric chloride treatment caused the altered indices to return to near normal levels.

  13. A bacterial view of the periodic table: genes and proteins for toxic inorganic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Simon; Phung, Le T

    2005-12-01

    Essentially all bacteria have genes for toxic metal ion resistances and these include those for Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+ Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO3(2-), Tl+ and Zn2+. The largest group of resistance systems functions by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. Fewer involve enzymatic transformations (oxidation, reduction, methylation, and demethylation) or metal-binding proteins (for example, metallothionein SmtA, chaperone CopZ and periplasmic silver binding protein SilE). Some of the efflux resistance systems are ATPases and others are chemiosmotic ion/proton exchangers. For example, Cd2+-efflux pumps of bacteria are either inner membrane P-type ATPases or three polypeptide RND chemiosmotic complexes consisting of an inner membrane pump, a periplasmic-bridging protein and an outer membrane channel. In addition to the best studied three-polypeptide chemiosmotic system, Czc (Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2), others are known that efflux Ag+, Cu+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Resistance to inorganic mercury, Hg2+ (and to organomercurials, such as CH3Hg+ and phenylmercury) involve a series of metal-binding and membrane transport proteins as well as the enzymes mercuric reductase and organomercurial lyase, which overall convert more toxic to less toxic forms. Arsenic resistance and metabolizing systems occur in three patterns, the widely-found ars operon that is present in most bacterial genomes and many plasmids, the more recently recognized arr genes for the periplasmic arsenate reductase that functions in anaerobic respiration as a terminal electron acceptor, and the aso genes for the periplasmic arsenite oxidase that functions as an initial electron donor in aerobic resistance to arsenite.

  14. Scrubbing of iodine from gas streams with mercuric nitrate-conversion of mercuric iodate product to barium iodate for fixation in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, G.C.; Moore, J.G.; Morgan, M.T.

    1980-06-01

    A bench-scale model of a mercuric nitrate scrubber for removal of iodine from off-gas streams was constructed and operated in conjunction with a mercuric iodate-to-barium iodate conversion system to determine the feasibility of total recycle of all processing solutions. The two main aspects of the system examined were (1) the extent of contamination of the barium iodate product, and (2) the effect of cross-contamination of various process solutions on the efficiency of the process. The experimental evidence obtained indicates that, with appropriate control, all solutions can be recycled without significant contamination of the product that would be harmful to the host concrete or to the environment. Mercury contamination was found to be less than or equal to 0.5 wt % of the barium iodate product. The most significant effect on system efficiency was determined to be barium hydroxide contamination of the sodium hydroxide solution used to convert mercuric iodate to sodium iodate. A mole ratio of barium hydroxide to sodium hydroxide of about 1:225 caused a decrease in conversion efficiency of about 45%.

  15. Synthesis of inherently chiral calixarenes via direct mercuration of the partial cone conformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, P.; Kohout, M.; Böhm, S.; Eigner, Václav; Lhoták, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 11 (2016), s. 2366-2369 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12653S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : calix[4]arene * mercuration * brigding * X-ray crystallography * Jana2006 Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  16. Estimation de l'apport en mercure à partir de la consommation de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RevueSN

    poissons (consommation quotidienne de 1,08 kg selon l'OMS), le risque apparaît beaucoup plus élevé car l'apport en mercure est égal à 1703 µg/semaine; soit 7 fois la DHTP. Mots clés : apport ..... mercury, selenium, arsenic, and polychlorinated bisphenol and other organochlorine concentrations in human milk. Environ.

  17. Sexual maturation and productivity of Japanese quail fed graded concentrations of mercuric chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 p.p.m. Hg as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) from the time of hatching up to the age of 1 year. None of the birds manifested any gross signs of mercury poisioning. Food consumption, growth rate, and weight maintenance were unaffected. Initial oviposition tended to occur at a younger age as dietary mercuric chloride increased, e.g., the median age at which egg laying began among hens fed 32 p.p.m. Hg was 6 days younger than for controls. The average rate of egg production was positively related to the concentration of mercuric chloride with the most pronounced differences between treatments occurring among young (less than 9-week-old) hens. Beyond 9 weeks of age production was more uniform among the treatments, but even after 1 year hens on 32 p.p.m. Hg were laying an average of 13.5% more eggs than controls. Rate of egg fertilization was generally depressed for all Hg-treatments above 4 p.p.m. Hatchability of fertilized eggs and eggshell thickness appeared unaffected by mercuric chloride.

  18. A procedure for automatic updating of total cross section libraries of the Mercure IV code for nuclear safeguard applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, C.; Amici, S.

    1991-01-01

    The measuring utilization of Montecarlo codes for the simulation of the measurement techniques used in the field of Nuclear Safeguards and the high performances required (error<1%), needs the implementation of libraries with updated nuclear data. MERCURE IV is a computer code especially developed for the non destructive measurement techniques simulation. In addition to an analysis of the MERCURE IV code features, this work presents an algorithm developed for generating the library of the total gamma cross section used by the code

  19. Voltammetric behavior, biocidal effect and synthesis of some new nanomeric fused cyclic thiosemicarbazones and their mercuric(II salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.T. Makki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available New nanomeric 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6-methyl-9-unsubstituted/substituted-1,2,4-triazino[5,6-b]indoles (2a–c and 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,4-triaino[5,6]-cyclobut-6-ene (3 were prepared via reaction of thiosemicarbazide with 5-unsubstitutedand/substituted-indol-2,3-diones and/or 3,4-dihydroxycyclobutane-1,2-dione in methanol–concentrated HCl at room temperature. A series of mercury(II–ligand salts e.g. compound 4b and Hg(II complexes 5a,b and 6 of cyclic Schiff base were prepared. Structures of these compounds were established by elemental analysis and spectral measurements. The redox characteristics of selected compounds were studied for use as chelating agents for stripping voltammetric determination of mercuric(II ions in aqueous media. The compounds were also screened for their use as molluscicidal agents against Biomophalaria Alexandrina Snails responsible for Bilhariziasis.

  20. Growth of mercuric iodide (HgI2) for nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, L.; Schnepple, W. F.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a material used for the fabrication of the sensing element in solid state X-ray and gamma ray detecting instruments. The operation of the devices is determined to a large degree by the density of structural defects in the single crystalline material used in the sensing element. Since there were strong indications that the quality of the material was degraded by the effects of gravity during the growth process, a research and engineering program was initiated to grow one or more crystals of mercuric iodide in the reduced gravity environment of space. A special furnace assembly was designed which could be accommodated in a Spacelab rack, and at the same time made it possible to use the same growth procedures and controls used when growing a crystal on the ground. The space crystal, after the flight, was subjected to the same evaluation methods used for earth-grown crystals, so that comparisons could be made.

  1. Estimation de l\\'apport en mercure à partir de la consommation de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sur la base des concentrations et de la consommation annuelle de poissons estimée à 16 kg/habitant en Côte d\\'Ivoire, l\\'apport moyen calculé est égal à 73 μg de mercure par semaine; soit 25% de la dose hebdomadaire tolérable provisoire (DHTP) fixée à 300 μg par le comité mixte FAO/OMS. Cependant, pour une ...

  2. Teneurs en Plomb, Cadmium, Mercure et Zinc relevées dans la ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    d'excellents capteurs des polluants métalliques; ces derniers se concentrent sur les organes d'assimilation (équivalents foie et reins), qui sont précisément ce que l'homme mange. Ils accumulent surtout le cadmium et dans une moindre mesure le plomb, mais peu le mercure. Ainsi, le suivi de la contamination côtière par ...

  3. Enhancement of mercuric iodide detector performance through crystal growth in microgravity: The roles of lattice order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, B.; Laor, U.; Berg, L. van den

    1998-01-01

    The hole-mobility·carrier-lifetime product of α mercuric iodide high energy radiation detectors has been enhanced through vapor crystal growth in microgravity. This improvement is closely correlated with specific characteristics of the crystal lattice, which have been identified by high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction imaging. These structural features and the associated performance are now being approached in terrestrial growth of α mercuric iodide. Gravity may affect the uniformity of this crystal lattice in two distinct ways: (1) directly through deformation that it imposes on the lattice during growth and (2) indirectly through convection, which mixes any extraneous material. Inclusions associated with these processes harden the lattice and facilitate lattice folding. These changes affect the electronic parameters of detectors made from the crystals. As purification procedures are optimized, the incorporation of extraneous material is curtailed, enhancing electronic properties in spite of lattice flexing through loss of precipitation hardening. These studies provide insight into the contribution of various aspects of crystalline order in α-mercuric iodide crystals to property improvement. This knowledge has led to modification of requirements for starting materials, adjustment of physical vapor growth procedures, and change in crystal handling procedures. As a result, the electronic performance of terrestrially grown radiation detectors has been improved, and the authors provide evidence that further enhancement is still possible

  4. Mercuric Chloride Induced Cell Death in Spinal Cord of Embryo in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Rastegar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C TIntroduction: Because of more exposure to mercury compounds, the prenatal and postnatal neurotoxic effects of mercury compounds have gained more attention in last decade. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mercuric chloride intoxication on spinal cord development during prenatal period. Methods: 36 adult Sprague-dawley rats after observing vaginal mating plaque (zero day of gestation were divided into six groups: three control groups that received normal saline solution and three experimental groups that injected with mercuric chloride, 2mg/kg/IP, in 8th, 9th and 10th days of gestation. Then, embryos were removed from uterus in 15th day and spinal cord of embryos was studied by histological techniques. Results: Microscopic study of spinal cord showed that cell death, mitosis division, and extracellular spaces were increased and cells accumulation were decreased in experimental groups. Diameter of ventricular zone was increased and diameter of mantle and marginal zones were decreased. Discussion: The present study showed that mercuric chloride intoxication in prenatal period can induce cell death and results in neural tube deficits in prenatal rats.

  5. Hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of mercuric chloride following subchronic exposure through drinking water in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujbiha, Mohamed Ali; Ben Salah, Ghada; Ben Feleh, Abdelraouf; Saoudi, Mongi; Kamoun, Hassen; Bousslema, Ali; Ommezzine, Asma; Said, Khaled; Fakhfakh, Faiza; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2012-07-01

    Erythrocytes are a convenient model to understand the subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules in metal toxicities. The present study examined the variation of hematoxic and genotoxic parameters following subchronic exposure of mercuric chloride via drinking water and their possible association with oxidative stress. Male rats were exposed to 50 ppm (HG1) and 100 ppm (HG2) of mercuric chloride daily for 90 days. A significant dose-dependent decrease was observed in red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and mean cell hemoglobin concentration in treated groups (HG1 and HG2) compared with controls. A significant dose-dependent increase was observed in lipid peroxidation; therefore, a significant variation was found in the antioxidant enzyme activities, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Interestingly, mercuric chloride treatment showed a significant dose-dependent increase in frequency of total chromosomal aberration and in percentage of aberrant bone marrow metaphase of treated groups (p mercury treatment may be the major cause for chromosomal aberration as free radicals lead to DNA damage. These data will be useful in screening the antioxidant activities of natural products, which may be specific to the bone marrow tissue.

  6. Iron reductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C D

    1980-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contain enzyme activities which reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) when iron is provided in certain chelates, but not when the iron is uncomplexed. Iron reductase activities for two substrates, ferripyochelin and ferric citrate, appear to be separate enzymes because of differences in heat stabilities, in locations in fractions of cell-free extracts, in reductant specificity, and in apparent sizes during gel filtration chromatography. Ferric citrate iron reductase is an extremely labile activity found in the cytoplasmic fraction, and ferripyochelin iron reductase is a more stable activity found in the periplasmic as well as cytoplasmic fraction of extracts. A small amount of activity detectable in the membrane fraction seemed to be loosely associated with the membranes. Although both enzymes have highest activity reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced glutathione also worked with ferripyochelin iron reductase. In addition, oxygen caused an irreversible loss of a percentage of the ferripyochelin iron reductase following sparge of reaction mixtures, whereas the reductase for ferric citrate was not appreciably affected by oxygen. PMID:6766439

  7. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  8. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal injury. I. Direct effects of in vitro mercuric chloride on renal cortical mitochondrial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    Increasing data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important early component of nephrotoxin-induced changes in renal cell function and viability. This study was designed to obtain more detailed information about the effects on several basic bioenergetic parameters of the direct interaction of Hg/sup 2 +/ with renal cortical mitochondria in vitro as a necessary prelude to studies of mitochondrial functional changes after treatment with mercuric chloride in vivo. Beginning at a threshhold level of 2 nmol of Hg/sup 2 +//mg of mitochondrial protein Hg/sup 2 +/ induced marked stimulation of State 4 respiration, mild inhibition of State 3 respiration, and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration, a striking increase in atractyloside-insensitive ADP uptake and stimulation of both basal- and Mg/sup 2 +/-activated oligomycin-sensitive mitochondrial ATPase activity. These effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ could be prevented and reversed by the sulfhydryl reagent dithioerythritol and by albumin but were not affected by Mg/sup 2 +/. Detailed studies on the addition of HgCl/sub 2/ to the preparation at different stages of the mitochondrial isolation procedure demonstrated that the presence of other proteins decreased mitochondrial Hg/sup 2 +/ binding, that the Hg/sup 2 +/ was not readily washed off the mitochondria by nonprotein-containing solutions, and that prolonged exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ during the isolation procedure did not markedly alter its functional effects on their reversibility as assessed on the final mitochondrial preparation. These data provide an important basis for critically assessing the changes in function of mitochondria isolated after in vivo treatment with mercuric chloride.

  9. Protective Effect of Virgin Olive Oil (Olea europea L. Against Oxidative Damage Induced by Mercuric Chloride in Rat Albinos Wistar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Necib

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil is beneficial effects are not only related to its high content of oleic acid, but also to the antioxidant potential of its polyphenols. In this study, we assess the effects of virgin olive oil on mercuric chloride induced oxidative damage in the liver of rats. Adult male Albinos Wistar rats randomly divided into four groups, were the first was served as a control, whereas the remaining groups respectively treated with: virgin olive oil (2ml/ kg b.w; by gavage, mercuric chloride (0.5 mg/kg body weight i.p and combination of virgin olive oil and HgCl2. Change in liver enzyme activities, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS level, antioxidants and reduced glutathione (GSH contents were determined after 2 weeks of experimental period. Exposure of rats to mercuric chloride caused a significant increase the lipid peroxidation level along with corresponding decrease in the reduced glutathione and various antioxidant enzymes in liver. And increase in serum: glucose level, APL and transaminases activities and decreased in total protein and albumin levels. Furthermore, treatment with mercuric chloride caused a marked elevation of liver weight and decreased body weight. Supplementation of virgin olive oil resulted in decreased of lipid peroxidation level and in the serum: AST, ALT and APL activities were decreased along with increase in total protein, albumin and liver GSH levels. The activities of antioxidants enzymes: glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and glutathione –S-transferase (GST were also concomitantly restored to near normal level by virgin olive oil supplementation to mercuric chloride intoxicated rats. Liver histological studies have confirmed the changes observed in biochemical parameters and proved the beneficial role of virgin olive oil. The results clearly demonstrate that virgin olive oil treatment augments the antioxidants defense mechanism in mercuric chloride induced toxicity and provides evidence that it may have a

  10. Mercuric dichloride induces DNA damage in human salivary gland tissue cells and lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Katharina; Kroemer, Susanne [University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Sassen, Andrea [University of Regensburg, Department of Pathology, Regensburg (Germany); Staudenmaier, Rainer [Technical University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Reichl, Franz-Xaver [University of Munich, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Harreus, Ulrich [University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Amalgam is still one of the most frequently used dental filling materials. However, the possible adverse effects especially that of the mercuric component have led to continued controversy. Considering that mercury may be released from amalgam fillings into the oral cavity and also reach the circulating blood after absorption and resorption, it eventually may contribute to tumorigenesis in a variety of target cells. The present investigation focuses on genotoxic effects below a cytotoxic dose level of mercuric dichloride (HgCl{sub 2}) in human samples of salivary glands and lymphocytes to elucidate a possible role in tumor initiation. DNA migration due to single strand breaks, alkali labile sites and incomplete excision repair was quantified with the aid of the single cell microgel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. The concepts of Olive Tail Moment, percentage of DNA in the Tail and Tail Length were used as measures of DNA damage. To control for cytotoxic effects, the trypan blue exclusion test was applied. Human samples of the parotid salivary gland and lymphocytes of ten donors were exposed to HgCl{sub 2} concentrations from 1 to 50 {mu}M. N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) served as controls. Increasing dose-dependent DNA migration could be demonstrated after exposure to HgCl{sub 2} in cells of the salivary glands and lymphocytes. In both cell types a significant increase in DNA migration could be shown starting from HgCl{sub 2} concentrations of 5 {mu}M in comparison to the negative control. The viability of the cell systems was not affected except at the highest concentration (50 {mu}M) tested. These data indicate genotoxic effects of mercuric dichloride in human salivary glands and lymphocytes at concentrations not leading to cytotoxic effects or cell death. Consequently, a contributory role in oral salivary gland tumor initiation warrants further investigation. (orig.)

  11. Effects of mercuric chloride on [3H]dopamine release from rat brain striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, M.F.; Minnema, D.J.; Cooper, G.P.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies employing amphibian neuromuscular preparations have shown that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) in vitro increases both spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release. The present study examines the effect of HgCl2 on the release of [ 3 H]dopamine from synaptosomes prepared from mammalian brain tissue. Mercuric chloride (3-10 microM) produces a concentration-dependent increase in spontaneous [ 3 H]dopamine release from ''purified'' rat striatal synaptosomes, in both the presence and absence of extra-synaptosomal calcium. The effects of HgCl2 on transmitter release from amphibian neuromuscular junction preparations resemble those produced by the Na+, K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain. Experiments were performed to determine whether the HgCl2 effects on mammalian synaptosomal dopamine release are a consequence of Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Na+, K+-ATPase activity in lysed synaptosomal membranes is inhibited by HgCl2 (IC50 = 160 nM). However, mercuric chloride in the presence of 1 mM ouabain still increased [3H]dopamine release. The specific inhibitor of Na+-dependent, high-affinity dopamine transport, RMI81,182 inhibited ouabain-induced [3H]dopamine release whereas it had no effect on HgCl2-induced [ 3 H]dopamine release. These data suggest that augmentation of spontaneous [ 3 H]dopamine release by HgCl2 probably is not mediated by an inhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase and HgCl2 does not act directly on the dopamine transporter

  12. Réduction globale des émissions de mercure dans les exploitations ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 avr. 2016 ... L'exploitation aurifère artisanale et à petite échelle est la source la plus importante d'émissions de mercure causées par l'homme et a même dépassé la combustion du charbon. Comme on dénombre plus de 15 millions de prospecteurs d'or à petite échelle répartis dans plus de 70 pays, il est crucial de ...

  13. Complexo-potentiometric determination of mercury (II) in chlormerodrin and mercuric chloride labelled with radioactive mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duek, E.E.

    1976-09-01

    A method is described for determining the amount of mercury (II) in radioactively labelled chlormerodrin and mercuric chloride. By measuring the absolute activity in an ionization chamber, the specific activity is therefore immediately obtained. The determination of Hg (II) is based on a complexometric titration. Because of method characteristics and speed convenience, the end point is observed by means of a pH-meter. A comparison is made with a determination performed by detecting the end point with color-change indicators. The error is estimated, and the results are statistically interpreted. (author) [es

  14. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  15. Resolution of limonene 1,2-epoxide diastereomers by mercury(II) ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M. van der; Jongejan, H.; Franssen, M.C.R.

    2001-01-01

    When HgCl2 was added to a diastereomeric mixture of cis- and trans-(4S)-limonene 1,2-epoxide, the Hg(II) ions stereoselectively complexed to the cis epoxide, enabling ring opening by water. The resulting mercuric salt could be demetalated by treatment with NaBH4, giving a mixture of diastereomeric

  16. Calculation of gamma-rays and fast neutrons fluxes with the program Mercure-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Dupont, C.; Totth, B.

    1978-01-01

    The program MERCURE-4 evaluates gamma ray or fast neutron attenuation, through laminated or bulky three-dimensionnal shields. The method used is that of line of sight point attenuation kernel, the scattered rays being taken into account by means of build-up factors for γ and removal cross sections for fast neutrons. The integration of the point kernel over the range of sources distributed in space and energy, is performed by the Monte-Carlo method, with an automatic adjustment of the importance functions. Since it is operationnal the program MERCURE-4 has been intensively used for many various problems, for example: - the calculation of gamma heating in reactor cores, control rods and shielding screens, as well as in experimental devices and irradiation loops; - the evaluation of fast neutron fluxes and corresponding damage in structural materials of reactors (vessel steels...); - the estimation of gamma dose rates on nuclear instrumentation in the reactors, around the reactor circuits and around spent fuel shipping casks

  17. Impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism of two marine fish by in vitro mercuric chloride exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieiro, C.L.; Pardal, M.; Duarte, A.; Pereira, E.; Palmeira, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hg levels usually found in contaminated environments may compromise fish metabolism. • Hg impairs both the oxidative phosphorylation and the electron transport chain. • The decrease of F1Fo-ATPase activity confirmed Hg inhibition of ADP phosphorylation. • The decrease of SDH activity supported Hg inhibition of the electron transport chain. • Mitochondrial respiration is a suitable biomarker of exposure to Hg. - Abstract: The goal of this work was to understand the extent of mercury toxic effects in liver metabolism under an episode of acute contamination. Hence, the effects of in vitro mercuric chloride in liver mitochondria were assessed in two commercial marine fish: Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata). Liver mitochondria were exposed to 0.2 mg L −1 of mercury, the average concentration found in fish inhabiting contaminated areas. Mercuric chloride depressed mitochondrial respiration state 3 and the maximal oxygen consumption in the presence of FCCP indicating inhibitory effects on the oxidative phosphorylation and on the electron transport chain, respectively. The inhibition of F1Fo-ATPase and succinate-dehydrogenase activities also corroborated the ability of mercury to inhibit ADP phosphorylation and the electron transport chain. This study brings new understanding on the mercury levels able to impair fish mitochondrial function, reinforcing the need for further assessing bioenergetics as a proxy for fish health status

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects.

  19. Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in North Indian population: A hospital based case–control study. Amit Kumar, Shubham Misra, Anjali Hazarika, Pradeep Kumar, Ram Sagar, Abhishek Pathak, Kamalesh Chakravarty, Kameshwar ...

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects of MTHFR ...

  1. Trametes versicolor carboxylate reductase uncovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Margit; Winkler, Christoph K

    The first carboxylate reductase from Trametes versicolor was identified, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli . The enzyme reduces aromatic acids such as benzoic acid and derivatives, cinnamic acid, and 3-phenylpropanoic acid, but also aliphatic acids such as octanoic acid are reduced.

  2. Allyl deprotection of galacturonic acid derivatives: mechanistic aspects of mercuric-catalyzed prop-1-enyl acetal cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Grand, Eric; Kovensky, José

    2007-12-10

    Different deallylation methods were assayed for selective deprotection of allyl galactopyranosiduronic acid derivatives. A two-step procedure using DABCO and (Ph(3)P)(3)RhCl followed by mercuric-assisted cleavage gave quantitative yields. Reaction in the presence of [(18)O]water allowed us to obtain evidence about the mechanism of prop-1-enyl cleavage.

  3. Hepatoprotective and Antioxidant Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaf Extracts against Mercuric Chloride-induced Liver Toxicity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppanan, Muthupillai; Krishnan, Manigandan; Padarthi, Pavankumar

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background To explore the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of ethanolic Mangifera indica (EMI) and methanolic Mangifera indica (MMI) leaf extracts in mercuric chloride (HgCl2) induced toxicity in Swiss albino mice. Materials and methods Toxicity in mice was induced with HgCl2 (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by oral intervention with EMI and MMI extracts (25 mg and 50 mg/kg. body wt.) for 30 days. Results and discussion The extent of liver damage was assessed from the extents of histopathological, morphological, antioxidant and liver enzymes. Mercuric chloride-induced mice showed an increased cellular damage whereas leaf extracts of EMI and MMI-treated mice showed recovery of damaged hepatocytes. Mercuric chloride intoxicated mice exhibited a significant (p Mangifera indica extract remarkably reduces hepatotoxicity in mice possibly through its antioxidant potentials. How to cite this article: Karuppanan M, Krishnan M, Padarthi P, Namasivayam E. Hepatoprotec-tive and Antioxidant Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaf Extracts against Mercuric Chloride-induced Liver Toxicity in Mice. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2014;4(1):18-24. PMID:29264314

  4. Hepatoprotective and Antioxidant Effect ofMangifera IndicaLeaf Extracts against Mercuric Chloride-induced Liver Toxicity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppanan, Muthupillai; Krishnan, Manigandan; Padarthi, Pavankumar; Namasivayam, Elangovan

    2014-01-01

    To explore the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effect of ethanolic Mangifera indica (EMI) and methanolic Mangifera indica (MMI) leaf extracts in mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) induced toxicity in Swiss albino mice. Toxicity in mice was induced with HgCl 2 (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by oral intervention with EMI and MMI extracts (25 mg and 50 mg/kg. body wt.) for 30 days. The extent of liver damage was assessed from the extents of histopathological, morphological, antioxidant and liver enzymes. Mercuric chloride-induced mice showed an increased cellular damage whereas leaf extracts of EMI and MMI-treated mice showed recovery of damaged hepatocytes. Mercuric chloride intoxicated mice exhibited a significant (p Mangifera indica extract remarkably reduces hepatotoxicity in mice possibly through its antioxidant potentials. How to cite this article: Karuppanan M, Krishnan M, Padarthi P, Namasivayam E. Hepatoprotec-tive and Antioxidant Effect of Mangifera Indica Leaf Extracts against Mercuric Chloride-induced Liver Toxicity in Mice. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2014;4(1):18-24.

  5. Reproductivity of Japanese quail fed mercuric chloride in the absence of vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Soares, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was tested at 16 p.p.m. Hg for vitamin D sparing activity by presenting it dietarily in the presence and absence of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-HCC) to Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) for 25 days. No gross signs characteristic of mercury poisoning were observed, but some predictable effects of vitamin D deficiency on avian reproduction were manifested within 10 days. Rate of lay, egg shell thickness, and hatchability of fertile eggs decreased markedly for birds on vitamin D-deficient diets. Shell-less eggs were laid by these birds after 20 days and laying stopped entirely on the 23rd day. Laying resumed within 5 days after diets were refortified with 25-HCC. There was no detectable interaction between HgCl2 and vitamin D.

  6. A study of mercuric oxide and zinc-air battery life in hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, C; Lacey, N K

    1997-09-01

    The requirement to phase out mercuric oxide (mercury) batteries on environmental grounds has led to the widespread introduction of zinc-air technology. The possibility arises that high drain hearing aids may not be adequately catered for by zinc-air cells, leading to poor performance. This study investigated the hearing aid user's ability to perceive differences between zinc-air and mercury cells in normal everyday usage. The data was collected for 100 experienced hearing aid users in field trials. Users report 50 per cent greater life for zinc-air cells in high power aids and 28 per cent in low power aids. The average life of the zinc-air cells range from 15 days in high power to 34 days in low power aids. Users are able to perceive a difference in sound quality in favour of zinc-air cells for low and medium power aids. The hearing aid population is not disadvantaged by phasing out mercury cells.

  7. Le plomb, le cadmium et le mercure dans les produits de la mer

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaud, Yves

    1987-01-01

    Trois contaminants métalliques, toxiques vis-à-vis de l'homme : le plomb, le cadmium et le mercure, sont considérés sous l'angle de leur cheminement dans l'environnement, en particulier celui de l'accès au consommateur par les aliments d'origine marine. En plus des réglementations visant au contrôle des produits de la pêche destinés à la consommation et des mesures visant à limiter lés disséminations, il existe en France un système de surveillance continue des niveaux de contamination du litt...

  8. Mercuric iodide composite films using polyamide, polycarbonate and polystyrene fabricated by casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugucioni, J.C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) composite films were obtained by using the casting technique. Insulator polymers such as polyamide, polycarbonate and polystyrene were mixed to HgI 2 crystallites forming a final sub-millimeter thick self-standing film. Fabrication temperature varied from 10 to 100 o C, and total fabrication time reached at most 5 min. The larger the fabrication temperature, the thinner the film and the smaller its electrical resistivity. Electrical characterization was performed in the dark, under UV illumination and under mammographic X-ray exposure. The final properties of the films are discussed and related to fabrication conditions. The optimized composite film might be a better candidate for use as X-ray detector for medical imaging, in place of the single HgI 2 crystalline device.

  9. Immunocytochemical localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in three Desulfovibrio species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, D.R.; Veenhuis, M.; Fauque, G.; Peck Jr., H.D.; LeGall, J.; Lampreia, J.; Moura, J.J.G.; Hansen, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in Desulfovibrio gigas, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and D. thermophilus was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against the purified enzymes from each strain. Cells fixed with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde were

  10. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  11. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal activity. II. Functional alterations of renal cortical mitochondria isolated after mercuric chloride treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mitochondrial functional defects occurring in the early stages of nephrotoxic renal injury secondary to mercuric chloride have been characterized. No loss of cellular integrity or major mitochondrial structural alterations occurred within the first 3 hr after a subcutaneous injection of 5 mg/kg of HgCl/sub 2/. At 3 h, levels of Hg/sup 2 +/ in renal cortex and isolated renal cortical mitochondria were 1.87 and 0.72 nmol/mg of protein, respectively. Much evidence suggested that this Hg/sup 2 +/ had reached the mitochondria in situ and not during the isolation process. Mitochondria isolated beginning 1 h after treatment with HgCl/sub 2/ showed depressed ADP uptake. At 2 h, inhibitions of State 3 and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration were detected. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrophenol-activated mitochondrial ATPase activity was present when measured on mitochondria isolated at 3 h. These effects were not reversed by 2 mM dithioerythritol, 50 mg/ml of albumin or 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/. Analysis of the data in the context of information available on the in vitro effects of HgCl/sub 2/ (Weinberg, J.M., Harding, P.G., and Humes, H.D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 60-67) indicated that the mitochondrial functional effects could not be attributed to interaction of the mitochondria with Hg/sup 2 +/ during their isolation. These studies implicate compromised mitochondrial bioenergetic function as one of the earliest intracellular effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ in the production of nephrotoxicity but suggest that the intracellular process involves events in addition to those seen with direct exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ in vitro.

  12. Gamma spectroscopy modelization intercomparison of the modelization results using two different codes (MCNP, and Pascalys-mercure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneville, L.; Chiron, M.; Toubon, H.; Dogny, S.; Huver, M.; Berger, L.

    2001-01-01

    The research performed in common these last 3 years by the French Atomic Commission CEA, COGEMA and Eurisys Mesures had for main subject the realization of a complete tool of modelization for the largest range of realistic cases, the Pascalys modelization software. The main purpose of the modelization was to calculate the global measurement efficiency, which delivers the most accurate relationship between the photons emitted by the nuclear source in volume, punctual or deposited form and the germanium hyper pure detector, which detects and analyzes the received photons. It has been stated since long time that experimental global measurement efficiency becomes more and more difficult to address especially for complex scene as we can find in decommissioning and dismantling or in case of high activities for which the use of high activity reference sources become difficult to use for both health physics point of view and regulations. The choice of a calculation code is fundamental if accurate modelization is searched. MCNP represents the reference code but its use is long time calculation consuming and then not practicable in line on the field. Direct line-of-sight point kernel code as the French Atomic Commission 3-D analysis Mercure code can represent the practicable compromise between the most accurate MCNP reference code and the realistic performances needed in modelization. The comparison between the results of Pascalys-Mercure and MCNP code taking in account the last improvements of Mercure in the low energy range where the most important errors can occur, is presented in this paper, Mercure code being supported in line by the recent Pascalys 3-D modelization scene software. The incidence of the intrinsic efficiency of the Germanium detector is also approached for the total efficiency of measurement. (authors)

  13. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultra low energy x-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, A.J.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Barton, J.B.; Huth, G.C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T.E.; Turkevich, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide x-ray spectrometers has been recently improved through new fabrication techniques and further development of low noise associated electronic systems. This progress has extended the range of measurements to the ultra low energy x-ray region at room temperature. This paper reports the study of the effect of contact material on the performance of HgI 2 detectors in the low energy x-ray region

  14. Oxygen and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeptar, A.R.; Scheerens, H.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen reductase and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450 (P450) are reviewed. During the oxygen reductase activity of P450, molecular oxygen is reduced to superoxide anion radicals (O

  15. Drug-enhanced carbon monoxide production from heme by cytochrome P450 reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO formed endogenously is considered to be cytoprotective, and the vast majority of CO formation is attributed to the degradation of heme by heme oxygenases-1 and -2 (HO-1, HO-2. Previously, we observed that brain microsomes containing HO-2 produced many-fold more CO in the presence of menadione and its congeners; herein we explored these observations further. We determined the effects of various drugs on CO production of rat brain microsomes and recombinant human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR; CO was measured by gas chromatography with reductive detection. Brain microsomes of Sprague-Dawley rats or recombinant human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR were incubated with NADPH and various drugs in closed vials in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 and 37°C. After 15 minutes, the reaction was stopped by cooling in dry ice, and the headspace gas was analyzed for CO production using gas chromatography with reductive (mercuric oxide detection. We observed drug-enhanced CO production in the presence of both microsomes and recombinant CPR alone; the presence of HO was not required. A range of structurally diverse drugs were capable of amplifying this CO formation; these molecules had structures consistent with redox cycling capability. The addition of catalase to a reaction mixture, that contained activating drugs, inhibited the production of CO. Drug-enhanced CO formation can be catalyzed by CPR. The mechanism of CPR activation was not through classical drug-receptor mediation. Redox cycling may be involved in the drug-induced amplification of CO production by CPR through the production of reactive oxygen species.

  16. Characterization of xylose reductase from Candida tropicalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Xylose reductase gene, enzyme cofactors and plasmids. E.coli BL21(DE3) was used as host strains for ... C. tropicalis xylose reductase gene was isolated from plasmid. pMD18-T (TaKaRa, Japan). Enzyme ..... the gels is instable, soft and even dissolve in the solution containing multivalent anions or high ...

  17. Mechanism of inhibition of rat brain adenosine triphosphatase by mercuric chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, C.S.; Rajanna, B.; Rajanna, S.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric Chloride (Hg), a neurotoxic compound inhibited ATPase system of rat brain microsomes. Membrane bound enzymes, Na + -K + ATPase (IC 50 = 2.35 x 10 -7M ) and K-paranitrophenyl phosphatase (K-PNPPase) (IC 50 = 2.7 x 10 -7M ) and 3 H-Ouabain binding (IC 50 = 3.3 x 10 -7M ) were inhibited by Hg at micromolar concentrations in a dose dependent manner. Hydrolysis of ATP was linear with time with or without Hg in the reaction mixtures. Altered pH or temperature versus enzyme activity showed higher inhibition by Hg at basic pH (8.0-9.0) and at lower temperatures (17-32 degree C). Activation energy (ΔE) values were increased at 27-37 degree C in the presence of Hg. Kinetic studies of cationic-substrate activation of Na + -K + ATPase and K-PNPPase in the presence of Hg showed significant changes in kinetic constant (K m and V max ). Inhibition of Na + -K + ATPase was partially restored by repeated washings of microsomes. Preincubation with sulfhydryl agents protected Na + -K + ATPase from Hg inhibition. Cumulative inhibition studies with Hg and ouabain indicated possible interaction between the two inhibitors of Na + -K + ATPase by interacting at Na + and K + sites

  18. Effect of mercuric chloride feeding on sexual maturity, egg production and fertility in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1973-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 8, 16 or 32 p.p.m. of mercury as mercuric chloride from 3 days of age through 20 weeks of age. The onset of egg production generally occurred earlier for hens fed HgCl2. Average age in days at first oviposition for the control, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m. and 32 p.p.m. was 48.4, 50.9, 46.9 and 44.0 respectively. The average rate of egg productivity from first oviposition to attainment of full growth (9 weeks of age) correlated positively with in increased dietary mercury (controls, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m., 32 p.p.m. ? 75.2, 69.3, 86.1 and 93.3% respectively). By 20 weeks of age productivity was 81.0, 80.6, 87.5 and 92.9% for control, 8, 16 and 32 p.p.m. groups respectively. Fertility was depressed when hens were fed HgCl2. At 9 weeks of age average control fertility was 59% contrasted with 25% for the 32 p.p.m. group. At 12 weeks fertility increased to 89% and 57% for these groups. From this study it is apparent. that the onset and rate of egg production was stimulated by HgCl2, but fertility was adversely affected.

  19. Mercury Disposition in Suckling Rats: Comparative Assessment Following Parenteral Exposure to Thiomersal and Mercuric Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Blanuša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the facts that thiomersal-containing vaccine is still in use in many developing countries, and all forms of mercury have recognised neurotoxic, nephrotoxic, and other toxic effects, studies on disposition of ethylmercury and other mercury forms are still justified, especially at young age. Our investigation aimed at comparing mercury distribution and rate of excretion in the early period of life following exposure to either thiomersal (TM or mercuric chloride (HgCl2 in suckling rats. Three experimental groups were studied: control, TM, and HgCl2, with 12 to18 pups in each. Both forms of mercury were administered subcutaneously in equimolar quantities (0.81 μmol/kg b.w. three times during the suckling period (on the days of birth 7, 9, and 11 to mimic the vaccination regimen in infants. After the last administration of TM or HgCl2, total mercury retention and excretion was assessed during following six days. In TM-exposed group mercury retention was higher in the brain, enteral excretion was similar, and urinary excretion was much lower compared to HgCl2-exposed sucklings. More research is still needed to elucidate all aspects of toxicokinetics and most harmful neurotoxic potential of various forms of mercury, especially in the earliest period of life.

  20. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  1. Effect of mercuric chloride on the digestive system of Channa punctatus: a histopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.V.; Gupta, P.K.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of LD/sub 50/ (1.8 mg/liter) and a sublethal concentration (0.3 mg/liter) of mercuric chloride on the digestive system of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus, has been studied at intervals of 96 hr and 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 days. The results show that drastic changes are produced in the histological structure of the liver. These include liver cord disarray, connective tissue damage, granulation and vacuolation of the cytoplasm and hypertrophy of the nucleus, necrosis, fatty infiltration, proliferation of connective tissue, glycogen depletion, and cirrhosis. In the digestive system, treatment produced more drastic changes, especially between 15 and 30 days of treatment. The gastric gland cells showed a decrease in pepsinogen granules, followed by degeneration of the entire cells. Pyloric caeca were the most affected portion of the alimentary canal. The villi in this organ and in the intestine were ruptured. Lateral cell boundaries had disintegrated, and cells presented a syncytial appearance. Inflammatory cells collected at a number of places in the mucosa. In the intestine, initially, a hyperactivity of mucus secreting goblet cells was observed. This was followed by release of large amount of mucus into the intestinal lumen. No conspicuous change was observed in the rectal portion.

  2. Mercury Disposition in Suckling Rats: Comparative Assessment Following Parenteral Exposure to Thiomersal and Mercuric Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanuša, Maja; Orct, Tatjana; Vihnanek Lazarus, Maja; Sekovanić, Ankica; Piasek, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Due to the facts that thiomersal-containing vaccine is still in use in many developing countries, and all forms of mercury have recognised neurotoxic, nephrotoxic, and other toxic effects, studies on disposition of ethylmercury and other mercury forms are still justified, especially at young age. Our investigation aimed at comparing mercury distribution and rate of excretion in the early period of life following exposure to either thiomersal (TM) or mercuric chloride (HgCl2) in suckling rats. Three experimental groups were studied: control, TM, and HgCl2, with 12 to18 pups in each. Both forms of mercury were administered subcutaneously in equimolar quantities (0.81 μmol/kg b.w.) three times during the suckling period (on the days of birth 7, 9, and 11) to mimic the vaccination regimen in infants. After the last administration of TM or HgCl2, total mercury retention and excretion was assessed during following six days. In TM-exposed group mercury retention was higher in the brain, enteral excretion was similar, and urinary excretion was much lower compared to HgCl2-exposed sucklings. More research is still needed to elucidate all aspects of toxicokinetics and most harmful neurotoxic potential of various forms of mercury, especially in the earliest period of life. PMID:22899883

  3. Improved yield of high resolution mercuric iodide gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrish, V.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) exhibits properties which make it attractive for use as a solid state nuclear radiation detector. The wide bandgap (E g = 2.1 eV) and low dark current allow room temperature operation, while the high atomic number provides a large gamma-ray cross section. However, poor hole transport has been a major limitation in the routine fabrication of high-resolution spectrometers using this material. This paper presents the results of gamma-ray response and charge transport parameter measurements conducted during the past year at EG ampersand G/EM on 96 HgI 2 spectrometers. The gamma-ray response measurements reveal that detector quality is correlated with the starting material used in the crystal growth. In particular, an increased yield of high-resolution spectrometers was obtained from HgI 2 which was synthesized by precipitation from an aqueous solution, as opposed to using material from commercial vendors. Data are also presented which suggest that better spectrometer performance is tied to improved hole transport. Finally, some initial results on a study of detector uniformity reveal spatial variations which may explain why the correlation between hole transport parameters and spectrometer performance is sometimes violated. 6 refs., 3 figs

  4. Distribution of biotransformation of methyl mercuric chloride in different tissues of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehra, M.; Choi, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of 203 Hg radioactivity has been studied in various organs of adult male and female mice from one hour to 21 days after treating with 203 Hg-labeled methyl mercuric chloride (MMC). The amount of methyl mercury (MeHg) and inorganic mercury (Hg) has also beam determined by injecting single doses of non-radioactive MMC, and subsequently measuring total, organic and inorganic Hg content by atomic absorption technique. In addition, photoemulsion histochemical method (PEHM) was used to demonstrate localization of Hg grains in various cellular compartments of organs and tissues. The highest levels of radioactivity were attained at 7 hours post-treatment on all organs except for brain and testis. The testis showed the highest radioactivity at one day and the brain at two days post-treatment. MeHg persisted in brain over a longer period though the level was not as high. The content of MeHg and inorganic Hg was maximum in kidneys as compared to other organs. The brain and the reproductive organs contained the least amoun of inorganic Hg. By PEHM, Hg grains were most prominently observed in the sinusoids, Kupfer cells, hepatic cells and bile duct epithelium of liver; in the lumen of blood vessels, convoluted and collecting tubules of kidneys; and in the gastrointestinal epithelium. The pattern of uptake and distribution of MeHg correlated well with the morphological demonstration of Hg grains in tissue sections. (author)

  5. Carboxylic acid reductase enzymes (CARs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Margit

    2018-04-01

    Carboxylate reductases (CARs) are emerging as valuable catalysts for the selective one-step reduction of carboxylic acids to their corresponding aldehydes. The substrate scope of CARs is exceptionally broad and offers potential for their application in diverse synthetic processes. Two major fields of application are the preparation of aldehydes as end products for the flavor and fragrance sector and the integration of CARs in cascade reactions with aldehydes as the key intermediates. The latest applications of CARs are dominated by in vivo cascades and chemo-enzymatic reaction sequences. The challenge to fully exploit product selectivity is discussed. Recent developments in the characterization of CARs are summarized, with a focus on aspects related to the domain architecture and protein sequences of CAR enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity in Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1980-01-01

    The release of iron from ferrisiderophores (microbial ferric-chelating iron transport cofactors) by cell-free extracts of Bacillus megaterium was demonstrated. Reductive transfer of iron from ferrisiderophores to the ferrous-chelating agent ferrozine was measured spectrophotometrically. This ferrisiderophore reductase activity (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:ferrisiderophore oxidoreductase) was associated primarily with the cell soluble rather than particulate (membrane) fraction. Ferrisiderophore reductase was inhibited by oxygen and required the addition of a reductant (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate was most effective) for maximal activity. The activity was destroyed by both heat and protease treatments and was inhibited by iodoacetamide treatment. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity for several microbial ferrisiderophores was measured; highest activity was displayed for ferrischizokinen, the ferrisiderophore produced by this organism. The Km and Vmax values of the reductase for ferrischizokinen were 2.5 x 10(-4) M and 35.7 nmol/min per mg of the ferrisiderophore reductase reaction. Preliminary fractionation of the cell soluble material by gel filtration chromatography resulted in the demonstration of ferrisiderophore reductase activity in three peaks of different molecular weight. Ferrisiderophore reductase probably mediates entrance of iron into cellular metabolism. PMID:6444944

  7. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-01-01

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities

  8. Synthèses et supraconductivité de monocristaux à base de mercure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelloquin, D.; Villard, G.; Hardy, V.; Maignan, A.; Raveau, B.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystals (n = 1, 2 and 3) of the Hg_{l-x}M_xBa_2Ca_{n-1}Cu_n O_{2n+2+δ} mercury based cuprates have been grown by using a simple process. The M cations (M = Bi, Cu, Ti) act as stabilizers of the structure which permit to avoid the use of dry box or high gas pressure. The electron microscopy coupled with EDX analyses evidence the regularity of the stacking mode and confirm mixed mercury layers with compositions close to Hg_{0.8} M_{0.2}. Their structural studies based on X-ray diffraction data show a splitting of the oxygen site at the level of the mixed mercury layer. These as-grown superconducting single crystals exhibit T_c close to that of the corresponding pure mercury ceramics. The pinning properties study performed on (Hg_{0.8}Bi_{0.2}) crystals confirms that the n = 1 member is intermediate between the n = 2 and n = 3 members. Moreover, the weak properties of the Hg_{0.6}Ti_{0.4}{-}1223 crystals with regard to the Hg_{0.8}Bi_{0.2}{-}1223 crystals suggest that their different cationic radii Hg/M and their different c-axis values may play a role on these properties. Une méthode de synthèse simple, permettant de faire croître des monocristaux de composition Hg_{l-x}M_xBa_2Ca_{n-1}Cu_n O_{2n+2+δ} (n = 1, 2 et 3) sans utiliser de boîte à gants ou de techniques sous hautes pressions, a été developpée en substituant partiellement le mercure par un cation M (M = Bi, Cu, Ti). Des études par microscopie électronique couplées avec des analyses EDX ont confirmé les modes d'empilement et l'introduction de 1'é1ément M sous la forme de couches mixtes Hg_{0,8}M_{0,2}. Les études structurales réalisées par diffraction de rayons X sur monocristal ont mis en évidence un éclatement du site oxygène lié à la couche mercure. Ces monocristaux, bruts de synthèses, présentent des T_c comparables à celles observées dans les céramiques "tout mercure” correspondantes. L'étude des propriétés d'ancrage des vortex, menée sur les cristaux dopés au

  9. Effects of dietary alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene on lipid peroxidation induced by methyl mercuric chloride in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of male CBA mice to methyl mercuric chloride, CH3HgCl, (10-40 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 weeks resulted in dose-related Hg deposition and enhanced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. Mice were fed well-defined semisynthetic diets containing different levels of alpha......Cl/l of drinking water. High dietary alpha-tocopherol protected against CH3HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation, whereas the alpha-tocopherol deficient diet further enhanced CH3HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation. Similar, though statistically non-significant effects occurred in the kidneys, alpha...

  10. Uptake and distribution of mercury in rats after repeated administration of mercuric chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A T; Atkinson, A; Graham, T C; Shireen, K F

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was under taken to evaluate the effect of repeated exposure of mercuric chloride (MC) on food consumption, body weight gain and tissue distribution of mercury in rats. After two weeks of acclimation, male and female rats (45-50 days old) were orally gavaged with 0.00, 2.0, 4.0 6.0, 8.0 or 10.0 mg/kg/day of MC for 14 consecutive days. The mortality and food consumption were recorded daily. The body weight gains were recorded on day 0, 4, 7, 10, and at day of termination. At the end of the experiment, all surviving rats were euthanized and tissue samples from their brains, gonads, hearts, kidneys, livers, lungs, pancreases and spleens were collected and analyzed for mercury content. Exposure of male and female rats to 4.0 mg/kg/day of MC showed a significant reduction in body weight gain and food consumption when compared to their controls. However, at 2.0 mg/kg/day dose group showed no change of body gain and food consumption. The mercury contents in brains, gonads, hearts, and spleens of male and female rats at 0.0 and 2.0 mg/kg/day were undetectable. Both male and female rats accumulated significantly more mercury in the kidneys than the other organs. Mercury content in the kidneys of females was 39.9 and 40.9 microg/g at 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg/day, respectively and of males was 34.9 and 41.0 microg/g at 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg/day, respectively. However, mercury content in the kidneys and livers of males and females did not show any significant difference. Mercury content in the kidneys of both of sexes was significantly higher than the other organs.

  11. Exposure to mercuric chloride induces developmental damage, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in zebrafish embryos-larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun-Fang; Li, Ying-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a widespread environmental pollutant that can produce severe negative effects on fish even at very low concentrations. However, the mechanisms underlying inorganic Hg-induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the early development stage of fish still need to be clarified. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to different concentrations of Hg 2+ (0, 1, 4 and 16μg/L; added as mercuric chloride, HgCl 2 ) from 2h post-fertilization (hpf) to 168hpf. Developmental parameters and total Hg accumulation were monitored during the exposure period, and antioxidant status and the mRNA expression of genes related to the innate immune system were examined at 168hpf. The results showed that increasing Hg 2+ concentration and time significantly increased total Hg accumulation in zebrafish embryos-larvae. Exposure to 16μg/L Hg 2+ caused developmental damage, including increased mortality and malformation, decreased body length, and delayed hatching period. Meanwhile, HgCl 2 exposure (especially in the 16μg/L Hg 2+ group) induced oxidative stress affecting antioxidant enzyme (CAT, GST and GPX) activities, endogenous GSH and MDA contents, as well as the mRNA levels of genes (cat1, sod1, gstr, gpx1a, nrf2, keap1, hsp70 and mt) encoding antioxidant proteins. Moreover, the transcription levels of several representative genes (il-1β, il-8, il-10, tnfα2, lyz and c3) involved in innate immunity were up-regulated by HgCl 2 exposure, suggesting that inorganic Hg had the potential to induce immunotoxicity. Taken together, the present study provides evidence that waterborne HgCl 2 exposure can induce developmental impairment, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the early development stage of fish, which brings insights into the toxicity mechanisms of inorganic Hg in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  13. MERCURE: a 3D industrial code for gamma rays transport by straight line attenuation method. Shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suteau, C.; Chiron, M.; Luneville, L.; Berger, L.; Huver, M.

    2003-01-01

    The M.E.R.C.U.R.E. calculation code (version 6.3) simulate the photons transport from 15 keV to 10 MeV in three dimensional geometries between volume sources and calculation points. It is based in the integration of attenuation punctual nuclei in straight line with accumulation factors. The accumulation factors take into account the following physical phenomena: photoelectric effect, coherent diffusion, incoherent diffusion, pairs production, radiation secondary sources coming from Bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. The code determines the accumulation factor of a succession of several screens with an innovative iterative method. M.E.R.C.U.R.E. -6.3 integers the punctual nuclei by a Monte Carlo method for which it automatically determines the importance distributions. The results of this code are compared with these ones of the Sn T.W.O.D.A.N.T. code in two one-dimensional configurations. One includes five screens composed of four different materials and the other one three screens. In the configuration with three screens, the second screen is of an infinitesimal thickness. (N.C.)

  14. High resolution diffraction imaging of mercuric iodide: Demonstration of the necessity for alternate crystal processing techniques for highly purified material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, B.; Berg, L. van den; Laor, U.

    1995-01-01

    The overall crystalline lattice uniformity in recently available, highly purified mercuric iodide single crystals has been shown to be impacted by crystal handling techniques that were previously satisfactory. High resolution diffraction imaging of the surface regularity of crystals of various levels of purity and growth orientation shows: (1) that the newer materials have a generally lower level of precipitates, (2) that the incidence of these precipitates is now closely correlated with growth direction, and (3) that the deformation resistance and resulting sensitivity to crystal handling procedures are also closely correlated with these factors in this soft material. As a result, gentler cutting and polishing procedures have been developed and are shown to be effective in preserving overall lattice regularity in the new material. The polishing required to remove residual surface scratches affect the lattice orientation of the softer, precipitate-free regions, while not affecting those regions with detectable levels of precipitates. These results correlate closely with the electrical properties of devices made from these crystals. Mercuric iodide single crystals have proved to be particularly useful for x and γ ray detectors because their room temperature operation allow for simple, efficient, and compact instrumentation

  15. [Manganese-dependent ribonucleotide reductase of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii: partial purification, characterization, and role in DNA biosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordan, E P; Bryukhanov, A L; Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Pryanishnikova, N I; Danilova, I V

    2000-01-01

    Like Lactobacillus leichmanii, Rhizobium meliloti, and Euglena gracilis, P. freudenreichii implicates cobalamin in DNA anabolism via adenosylcobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. However, in the absence of corrinoids, P. freudenreichii is able to synthesize DNA with the involvement of an alternative ribonucleotide reductase, which is independent of adenosylcobalamin. This enzyme is localized in both the cytoplasm (80% of activity) and the cytoplasmic membrane (20% of activity), being loosely bound to the latter. Experiments with crude ribonucleotide reductase isolated from extracts of corrinoid-deficient cells showed that manganese specifically stimulates this enzyme and that it is composed of two protein subunits, a feature that is typical of all metal-containing reductases activated by molecular oxygen. Low concentrations of manganese ions enhanced DNA synthesis in corrinoid-deficient manganese-limited cells. This effect was prevented by the addition of 80 mM hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of metal-containing aerobic ribonucleotide reductases. It was concluded that, in adenosylcobalamin-deficient P. freudenreichii cells, DNA synthesis is provided with deoxyribosyl precursors through the functioning of manganese-dependent aerobic ribonucleotide reductase composed of two subunits.

  16. Development of a mercuric iodide detector array for medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tornai, Martin P.; Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    1995-02-01

    A nineteen element mercuric iodide (HgI 2) detector array has been developed as a prototype for a larger (169 element) array, which is intended for use as an intra-operative gamma camera (IOGC). This work is motivated by the need for identifying and removing residual tumor cells after the removal of bulk tumor, while sparing normal tissue. Prior to surgery, a tumor seeking radiopharmaceutical is injected into the patient, and the IOGC is used to locate and map out the radioactivity. The IOGC can be used with commercially available radioisotopes such as 201Tl, 99mTc, and 123I which have low energy X- and gamma-rays. The use of HgI 2 detector arrays in this application facilitates construction of an imaging head that is very compact and has a high signal-to-noise ratio. The prototype detectors were configured as discrete pixel elements joined by fine wires into novel pseudo crossed-grid arrays to promote improved electric field distribution compared with previous designs, and to maximize the fill factor for the expected circular probe shape. Pixel dimensions are hexagonal with 1.5 mm and 1.9 mm diameters separated by 0.2 mm thick lead septa. The overall detectors are hexagonal with a diameter of ˜1 cm. The sensitive detector thickness is 1.2 mm, which corresponds to >99% efficiency at 59 keV and 67% efficiency at 140 keV. Row, column, and pixel spectra have been measured on the prototypical detector array. Energy resolution was found to vary with the width of the row/column coincidence window that was applied. With the low edge of the coincidence window at 30% below the photopeak, pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% and 3.88% FWHM were obtained on the best individual pixels at 59 keV ( 241Am) and 140 keV ( 99mTc), respectively. To characterize this array as an imaging device, the spatial response of the pixels was measured with stepped point sources. The spatial response corresponded well with the pixel geometry, indicating that the spatial resolution was determined

  17. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  18. Chitosan/nanohydroxyapatite composite based scallop shells as an efficient adsorbent for mercuric ions: Static and dynamic adsorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Asaad F; Hrdina, Radim

    2018-04-01

    Chitosan/nanohydroxyapatite composites based on scallop shells (CP12, CP14 and CP21) were prepared with different chitosan: nanohydroxyapatite ratios (1:2, 1:4 and 2:1, respectively). Nanohydroxyapatite (P), chitosan(C) and their composites were characterized by means of TGA, XRD, N 2 adsorption/desorption analysis, SEM, Zeta potential and FTIR. The BET surface area ranged between 189 and 512 m 2 /g. Static adsorption of Hg +2 was tested for the effect of adsorbent dosage, pH, time and initial Hg +2 concentrations indicating that maximum static adsorption capacity was confirmed by CP12 (111.6 mg/g). Static adsorption well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm and Pseudo-second order kinetic models. CP12 was selected for dynamic adsorption of Hg +2 considering the effect of bed height, flow rate and the effect of Hg +2 concentrations. Maximum dynamic adsorption capacity was confirmed at bed height of 3 cm, 2.0 mL/min flow rate and 300 mg/L as Hg +2 concentration with breakthrough time (t b ) and exhaustion time (t e ) of 9 and 21 h. Yoon-Nelson and Thomas models best described the experimental Hg +2 breakthrough curve model. After static adsorption, EDTA solution confirmed the maximum desorption efficiency. The validity of CP12 was tested through three cycles of column dynamic adsorption-desorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fumarate-mediated inhibition of erythrose reductase, a key enzyme for erythritol production by Torula corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Koo, Bong-Seong; Kim, Sang-Yong

    2002-09-01

    Torula corallina, a strain presently being used for the industrial production of erythritol, has the highest erythritol yield ever reported for an erythritol-producing microorganism. The increased production of erythritol by Torula corallina with trace elements such as Cu(2+) has been thoroughly reported, but the mechanism by which Cu(2+) increases the production of erythritol has not been studied. This study demonstrated that supplemental Cu(2+) enhanced the production of erythritol, while it significantly decreased the production of a major by-product that accumulates during erythritol fermentation, which was identified as fumarate by instrumental analyses. Erythrose reductase, a key enzyme that converts erythrose to erythritol in T. corallina, was purified to homogeneity by chromatographic methods, including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. In vitro, purified erythrose reductase was significantly inhibited noncompetitively by increasing the fumarate concentration. In contrast, the enzyme activity remained almost constant regardless of Cu(2+) concentration. This suggests that supplemental Cu(2+) reduced the production of fumarate, a strong inhibitor of erythrose reductase, which led to less inhibition of erythrose reductase and a high yield of erythritol. This is the first report that suggests catabolite repression by a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate in T. corallina.

  20. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  1. Waste-water assay with continuous algal cultures: the effect of mercuric acetate on the growth of some marine dinoflagellates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, H.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of mercuric acetate was studied in culture experiments with the dinoflagellates Scrippsiella faeroense (Paulsen) Balech et Soares, Prorocentrum micans Ehrenberg and Gymnodinium splendens Lebour. Impairment of growth rates, in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, maximum cell densities and morphological changes served as criteria for assessing sublethal influences. Tests were made using the batch- and continuous-culture techniques. Addition of Hg at concentrations of 0.001 mg.1/sup -1/ and higher resulted in reduction of relative growth rates. In a few cases populations recovered from the initial decline and showed new growth. Cell counts corresponded very closely to in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Morphological variations were observed in S. faeroense, which responded (even in sublethal concentrations) by bursting its thecae, releasing naked motile cells and forming vegetative resting stages. The problems of optimal algal-bioassay methods are discussed also, in the light of results obtained by other authors.

  2. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... nitrate salts supply on nitrate accumulation, amino acid biosynthesis, total protein production, nitrate reductase activity and carbohydrate biosynthesis in the roots and leaves of the plants. The results indicate that both sodium and potassium nitrate supplementation had stimulatory effects on all of the.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism and breast cancer risk: A meta analysis of 33 studies. ... were searched for case‑control studies relating the association between MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and BC risk and estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) with confidence intervals (CIs) for assessment.

  4. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Given the potential application of xylose reductase enzymes that preferentially utilize the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) rather than NADPH in the fermentation of five carbon sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms, the coenzyme selectivity of TeXR was altered by site-directed ...

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vitamin B12 and riboflavin that are required in Hcy metabolic pathway. Gene that encodes the methylenete- trahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme that .... tors like climate, food habits, lifestyle and genetic makeup are common. Validation of the results of the present study in different ethnic groups with larger sample ...

  6. phenotype correlation of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-06-21

    Jun 21, 2014 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Study of genotype–phenotype correlation of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms in a sample of Egyptian autistic children. Rabah M. Shawky a,. *, Farida El-baz b. , Tarek M. Kamal c. , Reham M. Elhossiny b. ,. Mona A. Ahmed b. , Ghada H. El Nady d.

  7. Exposure to Low Dose of Cinnabar (a Naturally Occurring Mercuric Sulfide (HgS Caused Neurotoxicological Effects in Offspring Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fa Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS, has long been used in Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years. Although mercury is well-known for its toxicity, whether cinnabar induces neurotoxicity, especially in infants and children, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the neurotoxic effects of low-dose of cinnabar (10 mg/kg/day on developing mice. The results revealed neurobehavioral defects in F1-C-Cin group, which were associated with Hg accumulation, increased NOx levels in whole blood, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities in brain tissues. F1- and F2-Cin-V groups were found to increase brain Hg contents and prominent neurobehavioral defects compared with F1-C-V group, suggesting that the fetal brain was more susceptible to irreversible effects for cinnabar-induced damage. Moreover, F1- and F2-Cin-Cin groups had severely neurobehavioral dysfunctions, closely correlated with the further alteration of NOx levels and Na+/K+-ATPase activities than F1- and F2-C-Cin groups. Effects in F2-Cin-Cin group were more significant than those in F1-Cin-Cin group. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exposure to low-dose of cinnabar during the perinatal and developmental stages results in irreversible and severe injuries of the neurotoxicity in offspring, and NOx and Na+/K+-ATPase activities may exist potential and useful biomarkers for neurotoxicity-induced by low-doses of mercuric compounds.

  8. Mitochondrial viability and apoptosis induced by aluminum, mercuric mercury and methylmercury in cell lines of neural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toimela, Tarja; Taehti, Hanna [University of Tampere, Medical School, Cell Research Center, Tampere (Finland)

    2004-10-01

    Mercury and aluminum are considered to be neurotoxic metals, and they are often connected with the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, mercuric mercury, methylmercury and aluminum were studied in three different cell lines of neural origin. To evaluate the effects, mitochondrial cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by the metals were measured after various incubation times. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, U 373MG glioblastoma, and RPE D407 retinal pigment epithelial cells were subcultured to appropriate cell culture plates and 0.01-1,000 {mu}M concentrations of methylmercury, mercuric and aluminum chloride were added into the growth medium. In the assay measuring the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, WST-1, the cultures were exposed for 15 min, 24 or 48 h before measurement. Cells were allowed to recover from the exposure in part of the study. Apoptosis induced by the metals was measured after 6-, 24- and 48-h exposure times with the determination of activated caspase 3 enzyme. Mitochondrial assays showed a clear dose-response and exposure time-response to the metals. The most toxic was methylmercury (EC50{proportional_to}0.8{mu}M, 48 h), and the most sensitive cell line was the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Furthermore, there was marked mitochondrial activation, especially in connection with aluminum and methylmercury at low concentrations. This activation may be important during the initiation of cellular processes. All the metals tested induced apoptosis, but with a different time-course and cell-line specificity. In microscopic photographs, glioblastoma cells formed fibrillary tangles, and neuroblastoma cells settled along the fibrilles in cocultures of glial and neuronal cell lines during aluminum exposure. The study emphasized the toxicity of methylmercury to neural cells and showed that aluminum alters various cellular activities. (orig.)

  9. YLL056C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Yu; Xiao, Di-Fan; Zhou, Chang; Wang, Lin-Lu; Wu, Lan; Lu, Ya-Ting; Xiang, Quan-Ju; Zhao, Ke; Li, Xi; Ma, Meng -Gen

    2017-06-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, the largest family in dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, is divided into "classical," "extended," "intermediate," "divergent," "complex," and "atypical" groups. Recently, several open reading frames (ORFs) were characterized as intermediate SDR aldehyde reductase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no functional protein in the atypical group has been characterized in S. cerevisiae till now. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized ORF YLL056C from S. cerevisiae was significantly upregulated under high furfural (2-furaldehyde) or 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde concentrations, and transcription factors Yap1p, Hsf1p, Pdr1/3p, Yrr1p, and Stb5p likely controlled its upregulated transcription. This ORF indeed encoded a protein (Yll056cp), which was grouped into the atypical subgroup 7 in the SDR family and localized to the cytoplasm. Enzyme activity assays showed that Yll056cp is not a quinone or ketone reductase but an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which can reduce at least seven aldehyde compounds. This enzyme showed the best Vmax, Kcat, and Kcat/Km to glycolaldehyde, but the highest affinity (Km) to formaldehyde. The optimum pH and temperature of this enzyme was pH 6.5 for reduction of glycolaldehyde, furfural, formaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and propylaldehyde, and 30 °C for reduction of formaldehyde or 35 °C for reduction of glycolaldehyde, furfural, butyraldehyde, and propylaldehyde. Temperature and pH affected stability of this enzyme and this influence varied with aldehyde substrate. Metal ions, salts, and chemical protective additives, especially at high concentrations, had different influence on enzyme activities for reduction of different aldehydes. This research provided guidelines for study of more uncharacterized atypical SDR enzymes from S. cerevisiae and other organisms.

  10. Distribution of mercury in the eggs of the false melon beetle, Atrachya menetriesi Faldermann (coleoptera: chrysomeridae), treated with mercuric chloride for breaking diapause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Mercuric chloride was effective in breaking diapause in the egg of Atrachya menetriesi. The distribution of mercury in treated eggs was examined quantitatively. To break diapause eggs were dipped in an aqueous solution of mercuric chloride (0.125mM) for 5 min. About 20 ..mu..g of mercury per 100 mg of eggs was found in the chorion and none in other parts. Only a negligible amount was found in the larvae that hatched from treated eggs. Almost all the mercury was removed when eggs were washed in a dilute solution of cysteine hydrochloride or glutathione (reduced). It seems that breaking of diapause is effected even when mercury does not penetrate the chorion.

  11. Advanced radiation detector development mercuric iodide, silicon with internal gain, hybrid scintillator/semiconductor detectors. Comprehensive summary report, 1976-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huth, G.C.; Dabrowski, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are reported in the development of a compound semi-insulator mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) for nuclear radiation detection and spectroscopy, early lung cancer detection and localization in the uranium miner/worker population, computer digital image processing and image reconstruction research, and a concept for multiple, filtered x-ray computed tomography scanning to reveal chemical compositional information. Another area of interest is the study of new advances in the area of silicon detectors with internal gain (''avalanche'')

  12. Lapachol inhibition of vitamin K epoxide reductase and vitamin K quinone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusch, P C; Suttie, J W

    1984-11-01

    Lapachol [2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone] has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of both vitamin K epoxide reductase and the dithiothreitol-dependent vitamin K quinone reductase of rat liver microsomes in vitro. These observations explain the anticoagulant activity of lapachol previously observed in both rats and humans. Lapachol inhibition of the vitamin K epoxide and quinone reductases resembled coumarin anticoagulant inhibition, and was observed in normal strain but not in warfarin-resistant strain rat liver microsomes. This similarity of action suggests that the lactone functionality of the coumarins is not critical for their activity. The initial-velocity steady-state inhibition patterns for lapachol inhibition of the solubilized vitamin K epoxide reductase were consistent with tight binding of lapachol to the oxidized form of the enzyme, and somewhat lower affinity for the reduced form. It is proposed that lapachol assumes a 4-enol tautomeric structure similar to that of the 4-hydroxy coumarins. These structures are analogs of the postulated hydroxyvitamin K enolate intermediate bound to the oxidized form of the enzyme in the chemical reaction mechanism of vitamin K epoxide reductase, thus explaining their high affinity.

  13. NADH-Ferricyanide Reductase of Leaf Plasma Membranes : Partial Purification and Immunological Relation to Potato Tuber Microsomal NADH-Ferricyanide Reductase and Spinach Leaf NADH-Nitrate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerlund, P; Laurent, P; Nakagawa, H; Kader, J C

    1991-01-01

    Plasma membranes obtained by two-phase partitioning of microsomal fractions from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv Medania) and sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) contained relatively high NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) activities. Both of these activities were latent. To investigate whether these activities were due to the same enzyme, plasma membrane polypeptides were separated with SDS-PAGE and analyzed with immunoblotting methods. Antibodies raised against microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase (tentatively identified as NADH-cytochrome b(5) reductase, EC 1.6.2.2), purified from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Bintje) tuber microsomes, displayed one single band at 43 kilodaltons when reacted with spinach plasma membranes, whereas lgG produced against NR from spinach leaves gave a major band at 110 kilodaltons together with a few fainter bands of lower molecular mass. Immunoblotting analysis using inside-out and right-side-out plasma membrane vesicles strongly indicated that NR was not an integral protein but probably trapped inside the plasma membrane vesicles during homogenization. Proteins from spinach plasma membranes were solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio] 1-propane-sulfonate and separated on a Mono Q anion exchange column at pH 5.6 with fast protein liquid chromatography. One major peak of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity was found after separation. The peak fraction was enriched about 70-fold in this activity compared to the plasma membrane. When the peak fractions were analyzed with SDS-PAGE the NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity strongly correlated with a 43 kilodalton polypeptide which reacted with the antibodies against potato microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase. Thus, our data indicate that most, if not all, of the truly membrane-bound NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity of leaf plasma membranes is due to an enzyme very similar to potato tuber

  14. Technical note: Could benzalkonium chloride be a suitable alternative to mercuric chloride for preservation of seawater samples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloël, J.; Robinson, C.; Tilstone, G. H.; Tarran, G.; Kaiser, J.

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental equipment unsuitable or unavailable for fieldwork as well as lack of ship space can necessitate the preservation of seawater samples prior to analysis in a shore-based laboratory. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is routinely used for such preservation, but its handling and subsequent disposal incur environmental risks and significant expense. There is therefore a strong motivation to find less hazardous alternatives. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been used previously as microbial inhibitor for freshwater samples. Here, we assess the use of BAC for marine samples prior to the measurement of oxygen-to-argon (O2 / Ar) ratios, as used for the determination of biological net community production. BAC at a concentration of 50 mg dm-3 inhibited microbial activity for at least 3 days in samples tested with chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations up to 1 mg m-3. BAC concentrations of 100 and 200 mg dm-3 were no more effective than 50 mg dm-3. With fewer risks to human health and the environment, and no requirement for expensive waste disposal, BAC could be a viable alternative to HgCl2 for short-term preservation of seawater samples, but is not a replacement for HgCl2 in the case of oxygen triple isotope analysis, which requires storage over weeks to months. In any event, further tests on a case-by-case basis should be undertaken if use of BAC was considered, since its inhibitory activity may depend on concentration and composition of the microbial community.

  15. The Effects of Chronic Ingestion of Mercuric Chloride on Fertility and Testosterone Levels in Male Sprague Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Heath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although male infertility is well researched, the effects of inorganic mercury on male reproduction and fertility are less well known. Studies pertaining to mercury and male fertility identified reduced concentration of testosterone in the serum of male workers, a toxic influence on fertility of organic mercury compounds within concentrations at the workplace, and increased days to pregnancy. We evaluated the effect of chronic mercuric chloride (HgCl2 exposure in male rats on reproductive endpoints. Thirty-day old male Sprague Dawley rats (n=31 were exposed to 0.0, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg/day of HgCl2 via gavage. After 60 days exposure, they were housed with nonexposed females for 21 days. A survivor analysis revealed the exposed animals took longer to impregnate the females and had a lower rate of impregnation. Further statistical analysis revealed a lower correlation between testicular testosterone levels and days to impregnate, and also lower sperm counts in the epididymis head and body of the exposed males. The results indicate that HgCl2 exposure had significant adverse effects on male rat reproduction endpoints including fertility at a dose that was not clinically toxic.

  16. Sharp dose- and time-dependent toxicity of mercuric chloride at the cellular level in sea urchin embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marc, Julie; Maguer, Cecile; Belle, Robert; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile [Station Biologique de Roscoff, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (UFR 937), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, UMR 7127), BP 74, 29682 Roscoff Cedex (France)

    2002-07-01

    Sea urchin embryos (Sphaerechinus granularis) offer the opportunity to analyse toxicity towards cell division and stages of early development. Mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) arrested early development at the level of the first cell cycle. The toxic effect occurred in a very sharp concentration range around 7 {mu}M HgCl{sub 2}. At sub-toxic concentrations of HgCl{sub 2}, the morphology and kinetics of early development were comparable to control embryos. The time-dependence of toxicity was short; a 5-min exposure to the toxic concentration of 10 {mu}M HgCl{sub 2} was sufficient to provoke developmental dysfunction whereas continuous exposure to 5 {mu}M HgCl{sub 2} allowed development to occur normally. The effects on early development over this range of concentrations were specific to HgCl{sub 2} toxicity since other heavy metal chlorides had no effect at 30 {mu}M. Thus, the sea urchin model may provide new clues to the molecular mechanisms of HgCl{sub 2} toxicity. (orig.)

  17. Structural study of the X-ray-induced enzymatic reaction of octahaem cytochrome C nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, A A; Polyakov, K M; Lazarenko, V A; Popov, A N; Tikhonova, T V; Tikhonov, A V; Popov, V O

    2015-05-01

    Octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens catalyzes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium and of sulfite to sulfide. The reducing properties of X-ray radiation and the high quality of the enzyme crystals allow study of the catalytic reaction of cytochrome c nitrite reductase directly in a crystal of the enzyme, with the reaction being induced by X-rays. Series of diffraction data sets with increasing absorbed dose were collected from crystals of the free form of the enzyme and its complexes with nitrite and sulfite. The corresponding structures revealed gradual changes associated with the reduction of the catalytic haems by X-rays. In the case of the nitrite complex the conversion of the nitrite ions bound in the active sites to NO species was observed, which is the beginning of the catalytic reaction. For the free form, an increase in the distance between the oxygen ligand bound to the catalytic haem and the iron ion of the haem took place. In the case of the sulfite complex no enzymatic reaction was detected, but there were changes in the arrangement of the active-site water molecules that were presumably associated with a change in the protonation state of the sulfite ions.

  18. Human carbonyl reductase 4 is a mitochondrial NADPH-dependent quinone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kitade, Yukio; Ohno, Satoshi; Tajima, Kazuo; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2008-12-26

    A protein encoded in the gene Cbr4 on human chromosome 4q32.3 belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Contrary to the functional annotation as carbonyl reductase 4 (CBR4), we show that the recombinant tetrameric protein, composed of 25-kDa subunits, exhibits NADPH-dependent reductase activity for o- and p-quinones, but not for other aldehydes and ketones. The enzyme was insensitive to dicumarol and quercetin, potent inhibitors of cytosolic quinone reductases. The 25-kDa CBR4 was detected in human liver, kidney and cell lines on Western blotting using anti-CBR4 antibodies. The overexpression of CBR4 in bovine endothelial cells reveals that the enzyme has a non-cleavable mitochondrial targeting signal. We further demonstrate that the in vitro quinone reduction by CBR4 generates superoxide through the redox cycling, and suggest that the enzyme may be involved in the induction of apoptosis by cytotoxic 9,10-phenanthrenequinone.

  19. Structure and mechanism of dimethylsulfoxide reductase, a molybdopterin-containing enzyme of DMSO reductase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, A.G.; Ridge, J.P.; McDevitt, C.A.; Hanson, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Apart from nitrogenase, enzymes containing molybdenum are members of a superfamily, the molybdopterin-containing enzymes. Most of these enzymes catalyse an oxygen atom transfer and two electron transfer reaction. During catalysis the Mo at the active site cycles between the Mo(VI) and Mo(IV) states. The DMSO reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes all contain a bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide)Mo cofactor and over thirty examples have now been described. Over the last five years crystal structures of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase and four other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family have revealed that enzymes of this family have a similar tertiary structure. The Mo atom at the active site is coordinated by four thiolate ligands provided by the dithiolene side chains of the two MGD molecules of the bis(MGD)Mo cofactor as well as a ligand provided by an amino acid side chain. In addition, an oxygen atom in the form of an oxo, hydroxo or aqua group is also coordinated to the Mo atom. In the case of dimethylsulfoxide reductase X-ray crystallography of the product-reduced species and Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated that the enzyme contains a single exchangeable oxo group that is H-bonded to W116

  20. Nitroreductase reactions of Arabidopsis thaliana thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskiniene, V; Sarlauskas, J; Jacquot, J P; Cenas, N

    1998-09-07

    Arabidopsis thaliana NADPH:thioredoxin reductase (TR, EC 1.6.4.5) catalyzed redox cycling of aromatic nitrocompounds, including the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and tetryl, and the herbicide 3,5-dinitro-o-cresol. The yield of nitro anion radicals was equal to 70-90%. Redox cycling of tetryl was accompanied by formation of N-methylpicramide. Bimolecular rate constants of nitroaromatic reduction (kcat/Km) and reaction catalytic constants (kcat) increased upon an increase in oxidant single-electron reduction potential (E(1)7). Using compounds with an unknown E(1)7 value, the reactivity of TR increased parallelly to the increase in reactivity of ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase of Anabaena PCC 7119 (EC 1.18.1.2). This indicated that the main factor determining reactivity of nitroaromatics towards TR was their energetics of single-electron reduction. Incubation of reduced TR in the presence of tetryl or 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene resulted in a loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, most probably due to modification of reduced catalytic disulfide, whereas nitroreductase reaction rates were unchanged. This means that on the analogy of quinone reduction by TR (D. Bironaite, Z. Anusevicius, J.-P. Jacquot, N. Cenas, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1383 (1998) 82-92), FAD and not catalytic disulfide of TR was responsible for the reduction of nitroaromatics. Tetryl, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and thioredoxin increased the FAD fluorescence intensity of TR. This finding suggests that nitroaromatics may bind close to the thioredoxin-binding site at the catalytic disulfide domain of TR, and induce a conformational change of enzymes (S.B. Mulrooney, C.H. Williams Jr., Protein Sci. 6 (1997) 2188-2195). Our data indicate that certain nitroaromatic herbicides, explosives and other classes of xenobiotics may interfere with the reduction of thioredoxin by plant TR, and confer prooxidant properties to this antioxidant enzyme.

  1. Mechanism of inhibition of purified leaping mullet (Liza saliens) NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase by toxic metals: aluminum and thallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozcaarmutlu, Azra

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and thallium may reach life-threatening levels in aquatic systems in the near future because of their extensive use in various industrial fields. It is therefore important to study the mechanism of toxicity of aluminum and thallium on fish enzymes. To this aim, the effects of aluminum and thallium on the activity of purified leaping mullet (Liza saliens) cytochrome P450 reductase, an essential component of the important cytochrome P450 system, have been studied. Results indicated that both metal ions strongly inhibited the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. The IC50 values of AlCl3 and TlCl3 were estimated to be 34 microM and 3 microM, respectively. The Lineweaver-Burk plot and Dixon plot revealed that both metal ions noncompetitively inhibited the purified mullet cytochrome P450 reductase. The K(i) values of Al3+ and Tl3+ were calculated from Dixon plots as 8.9 and 5.6 microM, respectively. The inhibitory effects of Al3+ and Tl3+ on purified cytochrome P450 reductase were partially recovered by 1 mM EDTA. Additionally, tin and magnesium were shown to have no apparent effect on purified mullet cytochrome P450 reductase.

  2. Methemoglobin reductase activity in intact fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Nielsen, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) possess methemoglobin reductase activity that counters the ongoing oxidation of hemoglobin (Hb) to methemoglobin (metHb), which in circulating blood is caused by Hb autoxidation or reactions with nitrite. We describe an assay for determining metHb reductase activity in intact...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... reductase deficiency, or riboflavin deficiency. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). [45 FR...

  4. Geochemical Results of Lysimeter Sampling at the Manning Canyon Repository in the Mercur Mining District, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, John; Choate, LaDonna

    2010-01-01

    This report presents chemical characteristics of transient unsaturated-zone water collected by lysimeter from the Manning Canyon repository site in Utah. Data collected by U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management scientists under an intragovernmental order comprise the existing body of hydrochemical information on unsaturated-zone conditions at the site and represent the first effort to characterize the chemistry of the soil pore water surrounding the repository. Analyzed samples showed elevated levels of arsenic, barium, chromium, and strontium, which are typical of acidic mine drainage. The range of major-ion concentrations generally showed expected soil values. Although subsequent sampling is necessary to determine long-term effects of the repository, current results provide initial data concerning reactive processes of precipitation on the mine tailings and waste rock stored at the site and provide information on the effectiveness of reclamation operations at the Manning Canyon repository.

  5. Comparative study of the effect of acute and chronic mercuric chloride treatment on the activities of a few digestive enzymes of a Teleost fish, Channa punctatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.V.; Gupta, P.K.; Malik, P.V.

    1979-05-01

    In this study a comparison of the effect of exposure of Channa punctatus to LC(50) (1.8 mg/L) and a sublethal concentration (0.30 mg/L) of mercuric chloride on the activities of maltase, lactase leucyl-L-glycine dipeptidase and lipase has been made. After 96 hr of treatment, a slight elevation in maltase activity was recorded in all the portions of the digestive system. Lipase and leucyl-L-glycine dipeptidase showed inhibition in activity. Chronic treatment for 20 days revealed a significant inhibition in the activities of all the four enzymes.

  6. Study of low noise preamplifier systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Del Duca, A.; Schenpple, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of different preamplification systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide x-ray detectors has been performed. Resistor-, drain-, and light-feedback preamplifiers have been studied. Energy resolution of 295 eV (FWHM) for Fe-55 source (5.9 keV) and 225 eV (FWHM) for the pulser have been obtained with both the detector and the input FET at room temperature using the pulsed-light feedback preamplifier. It has been shown that cooling the input FET using a small Peltier element allows the energy resolution to be improved up to 25%

  7. Effects of mercuric chloride and methyl mercury on cholinergic neuromuscular transmission in the guinea-pig ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messori, E.; Liuzzi, M.; Tonini, M.; Candura, S.M.; D'Agostino, G.; Castoldi, A.F.; Manzo, L.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) and methyl mercury (MeHg) were examined on basal mechanical activity and electrically-induced neurogenic cholinergic contractions (twitch contractions) in longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strips from guinea-pig distal ileum. Both compounds at 0.3-3 μM slightly enhanced the amplitude of twitch contractions in ∼50% preparations. This effect was probably due to facilitation of acetylcholine (ACh) release since 0.1 and 1 μM mercurials increased electrically-evoked tritium outflow from [ 3 H]choline preloaded muscle layer with attached myenteric plexus. Conversely, higher mercury concentrations inhibited twitch contractions (HgCl 2 IC 50 = 21.3±6.4 μM; MeHg IC 50 = 45.1±5.5 μM), as well as contractions to exogenous ACh (0.1 μM) in resting preparations, and concomitantly increased the basal tone. The former effects possibly reflected an anti muscarinic activity of mercury, while the latter was related to alterations of calcium homeostasis in the effector cells. Indeed, the effect of HgCl 2 on basal tone was antagonized by the Ca 2+ entry blocker nifedipine (3, 10, 30 nM), indicating Hg-induced facilitation of Ca 2+ influx through voltage-dependent channels. On the whole, our results suggest that cholinergic neuromuscular transmission and Ca 2+ -dependent mechanisms underlying smooth muscle contractility are targets for mercury toxicity in the intestine. (au) 51 refs

  8. Effect of mercuric chloride on fertilization and larval development in the River Frog, Rana heckscheri (Wright) (Anura: Ranidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punzo, F. (Univ. of Tampa, FL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that heavy metals such as copper, cadmium, lead and mercury can act as systemic toxicants in many species of wildlife. Although numerous studies have emphasized the effects of metals and pesticides on metabolism, growth, survivorship, neural processes and reproduction in a number of taxa, little information is available on the effects of sublethal concentrations of metals on the reproductive physiology of amphibians. Industrial processes and mining activities can release substantial concentrations of heavy metals such as mercury into aquatic habitats. Since most amphibians have obligate aquatic larval stages, they are exposed to pollutants discharged into the aquatic environment. Amphibians can act as accumulators of heavy metals and their larval stages are useful indicators of pollution levels in the field. What little data are available, indicate that metals can significantly reduce viability in amphibians through their actions on metabolism, development and gametogenesis. The recent concerns over worldwide declines in amphibian populations and the susceptibility of amphibian populations to environmental toxicants, led me to assess the effect of mercuric chloride, one of the most common and persistent toxicants in aquatic environments, on fertilization and larval development in the river frog, Rana heckscheri (Wright). Although there is some information on fish, very little data are available on the effects of mercury on fertilization in amphibians generally, and no published data exist for R. heckscheri. This species is a conspicuous component of the aquatic fauna of parts of the southeastern United States where mercury levels have increased significantly over the last two decades. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Effects of mercuric chloride and methyl mercury on cholinergic neuromuscular transmission in the guinea-pig ileum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messori, E.; Liuzzi, M.; Tonini, M. [Univ. of Pavia, Dept. of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, Div. of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Pavia (Italy); Candura, S.M. [Univ. of Pavia, Dept. of Preventive, Occupational and Community Medicine, Pavia (Italy); D`Agostino, G. [Univ. of Pavia, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Pavia (Italy); Castoldi, A.F.; Manzo, L. [Pavia Medical Centre, Inst. of Care and Scientific Research, Toxicology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    1997-05-01

    The effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl mercury (MeHg) were examined on basal mechanical activity and electrically-induced neurogenic cholinergic contractions (twitch contractions) in longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strips from guinea-pig distal ileum. Both compounds at 0.3-3 {mu}M slightly enhanced the amplitude of twitch contractions in {approx}50% preparations. This effect was probably due to facilitation of acetylcholine (ACh) release since 0.1 and 1 {mu}M mercurials increased electrically-evoked tritium outflow from [{sup 3}H]choline preloaded muscle layer with attached myenteric plexus. Conversely, higher mercury concentrations inhibited twitch contractions (HgCl{sub 2} IC{sub 50} = 21.3{+-}6.4 {mu}M; MeHg IC{sub 50} = 45.1{+-}5.5 {mu}M), as well as contractions to exogenous ACh (0.1 {mu}M) in resting preparations, and concomitantly increased the basal tone. The former effects possibly reflected an anti muscarinic activity of mercury, while the latter was related to alterations of calcium homeostasis in the effector cells. Indeed, the effect of HgCl{sub 2} on basal tone was antagonized by the Ca{sup 2+} entry blocker nifedipine (3, 10, 30 nM), indicating Hg-induced facilitation of Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent channels. On the whole, our results suggest that cholinergic neuromuscular transmission and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms underlying smooth muscle contractility are targets for mercury toxicity in the intestine. (au) 51 refs.

  10. One-step green synthesis and characterization of plant protein-coated mercuric oxide (HgO) nanoparticles: antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amlan Kumar; Marwal, Avinash; Sain, Divya; Pareek, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    The present study demonstrates the bioreductive green synthesis of nanosized HgO using flower extracts of an ornamental plant Callistemon viminalis. The flower extracts of Callistemon viminalis seem to be environmentally friendly, so this protocol could be used for rapid production of HgO. Till date, there is no report of synthesis of nanoparticles using flower extract of Callistemon viminalis. Mercuric acetate was taken as the metal precursor in the present experiment. The flower extract was found to act as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent. The phytochemicals present in the flower extract act as reducing agent which include proteins, saponins, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, and flavonoids. FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed that the extract had the ability to act as a reducing agent and stabilizer for HgO nanoparticles. The formation of the plant protein-coated HgO nanoparticles was first monitored using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed the formation of HgO nanoparticles by exhibiting the typical surface plasmon absorption maxima at 243 nm. The average particle size formed ranges from 2 to 4 nm. The dried form of synthesized nanoparticles was further characterized using TGA, XRD, TEM, and FTIR spectroscopy. FT-IR spectra of synthesized HgO nanoparticles were performed to identify the possible bio-molecules responsible for capping and stabilization of nanoparticles, which confirm the formation of plant protein-coated HgO nanoparticles that is further corroborated by TGA study. The optical band gap of HgO nanoparticle was measured to be 2.48 eV using cutoff wavelength which indicates that HgO nanoparticles can be used in metal oxide semiconductor-based photovoltaic cells. A possible core-shell structure of the HgO nanobiocomposite has been proposed.

  11. Exploration of strategies for implementation of screen-printed mercuric iodide converters in direct detection AMFPIs for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has become an increasingly important tool in the diagnosis of breast disease. For those DBT imaging systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imager (AMFPI) arrays, the incident radiation is detected directly or indirectly by means of an a-Se or CsI:Tl x-ray converter, respectively. While all AMFPI DBT devices provide clinically useful volumetric information, their performance is limited by the relatively modest average signal generated per interacting X ray by present converters compared to the electronic additive noise of the system. To address this constraint, we are pursuing the development of a screen-printed form of mercuric iodide (SP HgI2) which has demonstrated considerably higher sensitivities (i.e., larger average signal per interacting X ray) than those of conventional a-Se and CsI:Tl converters, as well as impressive DQE and MTF performance under mammographic irradiation conditions. A converter offering such enhanced sensitivity would greatly improve signal-to-noise performance and facilitate quantum-limited imaging down to significantly lower exposures than present AMFPI DBT systems. However, before this novel converter material can be implemented practically, challenges associated with SP HgI2 must be addressed. Most significantly, high levels of charge trapping (which lead to image lag as well as fall-off in DQE at higher exposures) need to be reduced - while improving the uniformity in pixel-to-pixel signal response as well as maintaining low dark current and otherwise favorable DQE performance. In this paper, a pair of novel strategies for overcoming the challenge of charge trapping in SP HgI2 converters are described, and initial results from empirical and calculational studies of these strategies are reported.

  12. Variant Cell Lines of Haplopappus gracilis with Disturbed Activities of Nitrate Reductase and Nitrite Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilissen, L J; Barneix, A J; van Staveren, M; Breteler, H

    1985-07-01

    Selected variant cell lines of Haplopappus gracilis (Nutt) Gray that showed disturbed growth after transfer from an alanine medium to NO(3) (-) medium were characterized. The in vivo NO(3) (-) reductase activity (NRA) was lower in these lines than in the wild type. In vitro NRA assays suggest that decreased in vivo NRA was not caused by a lower amount of active enzyme. Cells of the variant lines revealed up to 75% lower extractable activity of NO(2) (-) reductase as compared with the wild type. This coincided with higher accumulation of NO(2) (-) by the variant than by the wild type cells after transfer from alanine medium to NO(3) (-) medium. NO(2) (-) accumulation was transient or continuous, depending on cell line, metabolic state of the cells, and light conditions.

  13. Structures of mammalian cytosolic quinone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C E; Bianchet, M A; Talalay, P; Faig, M; Amzel, L M

    2000-08-01

    The metabolism of quinone compounds presents one source of oxidative stress in mammals, as many pathways proceed by mechanisms that generate reactive oxygen species as by-products. One defense against quinone toxicity is the enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1), which metabolizes quinones by a two-electron reduction mechanism, thus averting production of radicals. QR1 is expressed in the cytoplasm of many tissues, and is highly inducible. A closely related homologue, quinone reductase type 2 (QR2), has been identified in several mammalian species. QR2 is also capable of reducing quinones to hydroquinones, but unlike QR1, cannot use NAD(P)H. X-ray crystallographic studies of QR1 and QR2 illustrate that despite their different biochemical properties, these enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures. In particular, conserved features of the active sites point to the close relationship between these two enzymes.

  14. Hydroxylated naphthoquinones as substrates for Escherichia coli anaerobic reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothery, R A; Chatterjee, I; Kiema, G; McDermott, M T; Weiner, J H

    1998-01-01

    We have used two hydroxylated naphthoquinol menaquinol analogues, reduced plumbagin (PBH2, 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinol) and reduced lapachol [LPCH2, 2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1, 4-naphthoquinol], as substrates for Escherichia coli anaerobic reductases. These compounds have optical, solubility and redox properties that make them suitable for use in studies of the enzymology of menaquinol oxidation. Oxidized plumbagin and oxidized lapachol have well resolved absorbances at 419 nm (epsilon=3.95 mM-1. cm-1) and 481 nm (epsilon=2.66 mM-1.cm-1) respectively (in Mops/KOH buffer, pH 7.0). PBH2 is a good substrate for nitrate reductase A (Km=282+/-28 microM, kcat=120+/-6 s-1) and fumarate reductase (Km=155+/-24 microM, kcat=30+/-2 s-1), but not for DMSO reductase. LPCH2 is a good substrate for nitrate reductase A (Km=57+/-35 microM, kcat=68+/-13 s-1), fumarate reductase (Km=85+/-27 microM, kcat=74+/-6 s-1) and DMSO reductase (Km=238+/-30 microM, kcat=191+/-21 s-1). The sensitivity of enzymic LPCH2 and PBH2 oxidation to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide inhibition is consistent with their oxidation occurring at sites of physiological quinol binding. PMID:9576848

  15. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Gennis, Robert B; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol: O₂ oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O₂ and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O₂-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O₂, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. On The Regulation of Spinach Nitrate Reductase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Juan; Heldt, Hans W.

    1990-01-01

    A coupled assay has been worked out to study spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) nitrate reductase under low, more physiological concentrations of NADH. In this assay the reduction of nitrate is coupled to the oxidation of malate catalyzed by spinach NAD-malate dehydrogenase. The use of this coupled system allows the assay of nitrate reductase activity at steady-state concentrations of NADH below micromolar. We have used this coupled assay to study the kinetic parameters of spinach nitrate reductase and to reinvestigate the putative regulatory role of adenine nucleotides, inorganic phosphate, amino acids, and calcium and calmodulin. PMID:16667335

  17. Mercuric chloride-induced alterations of levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine esterase activity in different regions of rat brain during postnatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmana, M.K. (Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India)); Desiraju, T. (Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India)); Raju, T.R. (Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India))

    1993-07-01

    Wistar rats were fed mercuric chloride, 4 mg/kg body weight per day chronically from postnatal day 2 to 60 by gastric intubation. Mercury consumption was then discontinued until 170 days to allow time for recovery. Since mercury caused reduction in body weight, an underweight group was also included besides the normal saline group. Levels of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) were assayed in various brain regions in different age groups. By 60 days of age, the mercury group showed elevations of NA levels in olfactory bulb (OB), visual cortex (VC) and brain stem (BS) but not in striatumaccumbens (SA) and hippocampus (HI). DA levels were also increased in OB, HI, VC and BS but not in SA. AChE activity was decreased in the mercury group only in HI and VC at 20 days of age. The Mercury group showed no behavioural abnormality outwardly; however, operant conditioning relevated a dificiency in performance. Nevertheless, all these changes disappeared after discontinuation of mercury intake. Thus the changes occurring in the brain at this level of oral mercuric chloride intake seem to reflect adaptive neural mechanisms rather than pathological damage. (orig.)

  18. Analytical interferences of mercuric chloride preservative in environmental water samples: Determination of organic compounds isolated by continuous liquid-liquid extraction or closed-loop stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, W.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Falres, L.M.; Werner, M.G.; Leiker, T.J.; Rogerson, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical interferences were observed during the determination of organic compounds in groundwater samples preserved with mercuric chloride. The nature of the interference was different depending on the analytical isolation technique employed. (1) Water samples extracted with dichloromethane by continuous liquid-liquid extraction (CLLE) and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed a broad HgCl2 'peak' eluting over a 3-5-min span which interfered with the determination of coeluting organic analytes. Substitution of CLLE for separatory funnel extraction in EPA method 508 also resulted in analytical interferences from the use of HgCl2 preservative. (2) Mercuric chloride was purged, along with organic contaminants, during closed-loop stripping (CLS) of groundwater samples and absorbed onto the activated charcoal trap. Competitive sorption of the HgCl2 by the trap appeared to contribute to the observed poor recoveries for spiked organic contaminants. The HgCl2 was not displaced from the charcoal with the dichloromethane elution solvent and required strong nitric acid to achieve rapid, complete displacement. Similar competitive sorption mechanisms might also occur in other purge and trap methods when this preservative is used.

  19. 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin biosynthesis inhibitors increase erythritol production in Torula corallina, and DHN-melanin inhibits erythrose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Jung, Hyung-Moo; Kim, Sang-Yong

    2003-06-01

    The yeast Torula corallina is a strong erythritol producer that is used in the industrial production of erythritol. However, melanin accumulation during culture represents a serious problem for the purification of erythritol from the fermentation broth. Melanin biosynthesis inhibitors such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin inhibitors were added to the T. corallina cultures. Only the DHN-melanin inhibitors showed an effect on melanin production, which suggests that the melanin formed during the culturing of T. corallina is derived from DHN. This finding was confirmed by the detection of a shunt product of the pentaketide pathway, flaviolin, and elemental analysis. Among the DHN-melanin inhibitors, tricyclazole was the most effective. Supplementation with tricyclazole enhanced the production of erythritol while significantly inhibiting the production of DHN-melanin and DHN-melanin biosynthetic enzymes, such as trihydroxynaphthalene reductase. The erythrose reductase from T. corallina was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. Purified erythrose reductase was significantly inhibited in vitro in a noncompetitive manner by elevated levels of DHN-melanin. In contrast, the level of erythrose reductase activity was unaffected by increasing concentrations of tricyclazole. These results suggest that supplemental tricyclazole reduces the production of DHN-melanin, which may lead to a reduction in the inhibition of erythrose reductase and a higher yield of erythritol. This is the first report to demonstrate that melanin biosynthesis inhibitors increase the production of a sugar alcohol in T. corallina.

  20. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamala Salvamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, nitric oxide (NO, and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  1. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k cat of 610 min -1 and a K m of 610 μM using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k cat is 25% of the k cat of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate

  2. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  3. Reduction of Folate by Dihydrofolate Reductase from Thermotoga maritima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveridge, E Joel; Hroch, Lukas; Hughes, Robert L; Williams, Thomas; Davies, Rhidian L; Angelastro, Antonio; Luk, Louis Y P; Maglia, Giovanni; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian dihydrofolate reductases (DHFR) catalyse the reduction of folate more efficiently than the equivalent bacterial enzymes, despite typically having similar efficiencies for the reduction of their natural substrate dihydrofolate. In contrast, we show here that DHFR from the hyperthermophilic

  4. Effects of dietary α-tocopherol and β-carotene on lipid peroxidation induced by methyl mercuric chloride in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raun Andersen, H.; Andersen, O.

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of male CBA mice to methyl mercuric chloride, CH 3 HgCl, (10-40 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 weeks resulted in dose-related Hg deposition and enhanced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. Mice were fed well-defined semisynthetic diets containing different levels of α-tocopherol (10, 100 or 1000 mg/kg) or β-carotene (1000, 10,000 or 100,000 IU/kg) for four weeks, two groups on each diet. The concentration of α-tocopherol and β-carotene used corresponded to deficient, normal and high levels. During the last two weeks, one group on each diet was given 40 mg CH 3 HgCl/l of drinking water. High dietary α-tocopherol protected against CH 3 HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation, whereas the α-tocopherol deficient diet further enhanced CH 3 HgCl induced hepatic lipid peroxidation. Similar, though statistically non-significant effects occurred in the kidneys, α-tocopherol did not protect against CH 3 HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. Excess dietary β-carotene further enhanced CH 3 HgCl induced lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain. CH 3 HgCl significantly decreased the activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) in the kidneys in all dietary groups. High dietary α-tocopherol enhanced the activity of Se-GSH-Px in liver and kidney compared to the activity in mice fed the normal level of α-tocopherol. This occurred in mice exposed to CH 3 -HgCl as well as in unexposed mice, and the difference between CH 3 HgCl exposed and unexposed mice was not diminished. High dietary α-tocopherol increased the activity of both Se-GSH-Px and T-GSH-Px in the brain of CH 3 HgCl-exposed mice. The dietary level of β-carotene did not affect the activity of the two enzymes in the organs investigated. (au) (43 refs.)

  5. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity and antioxidant capacity of pomegranate extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Karasu, Çimen; Cumaoğlu, Ahmet; Gürpinar, Ali Rifat; Kartal, Murat; Kovacikova, Lucia; Milackova, Ivana; Stefek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., has been the subject of current interest as a medicinal agent with wide-ranging therapeutic indications. In the present study, pomegranate ethanolic seed and hull extracts were tested, in comparison with a commercial sample, for the inhibition of aldose reductase, an enzyme involved in the etiology of diabetic complications. In vitro inhibition of rat lens aldose reductase was determined by a conventional method. Pomegranate ethanolic hull extract and comm...

  6. Engineering Styrene Monooxygenase for Biocatalysis: Reductase-Epoxidase Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Thomas; Tucker, Kathryn; Okonkwo, Nonye; Assefa, Berhanegebriel; Conrad, Catleen; Scholtissek, Anika; Schlömann, Michael; Gassner, George; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and related compounds by two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) has targeted these enzymes for development as biocatalysts. In the present work, we prepare genetically engineered fusion proteins that join the C-terminus of the epoxidase (StyA) to the N-terminus of the reductase (StyB) through a linker peptide and demonstrate their utility as biocatalysts in the synthesis of Tyrain purple and other indigoid dyes. A single-vector expression system offers a simplified platform for transformation and expansion of the catalytic function of styrene monooxygenases, and the resulting fusion proteins are self-regulated and couple efficiently NADH oxidation to styrene epoxidation. We find that the reductase domain proceeds through a sequential ternary-complex mechanism at low FAD concentration and a double-displacement mechanism at higher concentrations of FAD. Single-turnover studies indicate an observed rate constant for FAD-to-FAD hydride transfer of ~8 s -1 . This step is rate limiting in the styrene epoxidation reaction and helps to ensure that flavin reduction and styrene epoxidation reactions proceed without wasteful side reactions. Comparison of the reductase activity of the fusion proteins with the naturally occurring reductase, SMOB, and N-terminally histidine-tagged reductase, NSMOB, suggests that the observed changes in catalytic mechanism are due in part to an increase in flavin-binding affinity associated with the N-terminal extension of the reductase.

  7. Comparative Efficacy of Pre-feeding, Post-feeding and Combined Pre- and Post-feeding of Two Microdoses of a Potentized Homeopathic Drug, Mercurius Solubilis, in Ameliorating Genotoxic Effects Produced by Mercuric Chloride in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Datta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury and its derivatives have become an alarming environmental problem, necessitating the search for effective antagonists, including homeopathic drugs, which are generally used in micro doses and are devoid of any palpable side-effects. On the basis of homeopathic similia principle, two potencies of Mercurius solubilis (Merc Sol-30 and Merc Sol-200 were tested by three administrative modes, i.e. pre-feeding, post-feeding and combined pre- and post-feeding, for their possible efficacy in ameliorating mercuric chloride-induced genotoxicity in mice. Healthy mice, Mus musculus, were intraperitoneally injected with 0.06% solution of mercuric chloride at the rate of 1 ml/100 g of body weight, and assessed for genotoxic effects through conventional endpoints. i.e. chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, mitotic index and sperm head abnormality, keeping suitable controls. Mercuric chloride-treated mice were divided into three sub-groups, which were orally administered with the drug prior to, after and both prior to and after injection of mercuric chloride, and their genotoxic effects were analysed at specific intervals of fixation. Mercuric chloride treatment generally produced more chromosome aberations, micronuclei and sperm head anomaly in mice, but the mitotic index appeared to be slightly reduced. While chromosome aberations, micronuclei and sperm head anomaly were generally reduced in the drug-fed series, the mitotic index showed an apparent increase. In most cases, the combined pre- and post-feeding mode appeared to show the maximum amelioration, followed by post-feeding and pre-feeding, in that order. The amelioration by Merc Sol-200 appeared to be slightly more pronounced. We conclude that potentized homeopathic drugs can serve as possible anti-genotoxic agents against specific environmental mutagens, including toxic heavy metals.

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Activity and Folate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursen Keser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a vital B vitamin which is easily water-soluble. It is a natural source which is found in the herbal and animal foods. Folate has important duties in the human metabolism, one of them is the adjustment of the level of plasma homocysteine. Reduction in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase,which is in charge of the metabolism of homocysteine activity affects the level of homocysteine. Therefore MTHFR is an important enzyme in folate metabolism. Some of the mutations occurring in the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for various diseases and may be caused the hyperhomocysteinemia or the homocystinuria, and they also may lead to metabolic problems. MTHFR is effective in the important pathways such as DNA synthesis, methylation reactions and synthesis of RNA. C677T and A1298C are the most commonly occurring polymorphisms in the gene of MTHFR. The frequency of these polymorphisms show differences in the populations. MTHFR, folate distribution, metabolism of homocysteine and S-adenosylmethionine, by the MTHFR methylation the genetic defects have the potential of affecting the risk of disease in the negative or positive way.

  9. Interactions between inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, K; Hall, A D; Birdsall, B; Feeney, J; Roberts, G C

    1989-03-01

    The binding of substrates and inhibitors to dihydrofolate reductase was studied by steady-state kinetics and high-field 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy. A series of 5-substituted 2,4-diaminopyrimidines were examined and were found to be 'tightly binding' inhibitors of the enzyme (Ki less than 10(-9) M). Studies on the binding of 4-substituted benzenesulphonamides and benzenesulphonic acids also established the existence of a 'sulphonamide-binding site' on the enzyme. Subsequent n.m.r. experiments showed that there are two binding sites for the sulphonamides on the enzyme, one of which overlaps the coenzyme (NADPH) adenine-ring-binding site. An examination of the pH-dependence of the binding of sulphonamides to the enzyme indicated the influence of an ionizable group on the enzyme that was not directly involved in the sulphonamide binding. The change in pKa value from 6.7 to 7.2 observed on sulphonamide binding suggests the involvement of a histidine residue, which could be histidine-28.

  10. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  11. NADH-Ferricyanide Reductase of Leaf Plasma Membranes 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerlund, Per; Laurent, Pascal; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Kader, Jean-Claude

    1991-01-01

    Plasma membranes obtained by two-phase partitioning of microsomal fractions from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv Medania) and sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) contained relatively high NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) activities. Both of these activities were latent. To investigate whether these activities were due to the same enzyme, plasma membrane polypeptides were separated with SDS-PAGE and analyzed with immunoblotting methods. Antibodies raised against microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase (tentatively identified as NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, EC 1.6.2.2), purified from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Bintje) tuber microsomes, displayed one single band at 43 kilodaltons when reacted with spinach plasma membranes, whereas lgG produced against NR from spinach leaves gave a major band at 110 kilodaltons together with a few fainter bands of lower molecular mass. Immunoblotting analysis using inside-out and right-side-out plasma membrane vesicles strongly indicated that NR was not an integral protein but probably trapped inside the plasma membrane vesicles during homogenization. Proteins from spinach plasma membranes were solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio] 1-propane-sulfonate and separated on a Mono Q anion exchange column at pH 5.6 with fast protein liquid chromatography. One major peak of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity was found after separation. The peak fraction was enriched about 70-fold in this activity compared to the plasma membrane. When the peak fractions were analyzed with SDS-PAGE the NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity strongly correlated with a 43 kilodalton polypeptide which reacted with the antibodies against potato microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase. Thus, our data indicate that most, if not all, of the truly membrane-bound NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity of leaf plasma membranes is due to an enzyme very similar to potato tuber

  12. Exposure to silver nanoparticles inhibits selenoprotein synthesis and the activity of thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Milan; Singh, Sanjay; Self, William T

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver (Ag)-based materials are increasingly being incorporated into consumer products, and although humans have been exposed to colloidal Ag in many forms for decades, this rise in the use of Ag materials has spurred interest into their toxicology. Recent reports have shown that exposure to AgNPs or Ag ions leads to oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation. Previous studies have shown that Ag accumulates in tissues as silver sulfides (Ag2S) and silver selenide (Ag2Se). In this study we investigated whether exposure of cells in culture to AgNPs or Ag ions at subtoxic doses would alter the effective metabolism of selenium, that is, the incorporation of selenium into selenoproteins. For these studies we used a keratinocyte cell model (HaCat) and a lung cell model (A549). We also tested (in vitro, both cellular and chemical) whether Ag ions could inhibit the activity of a key selenoenzyme, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). We found that exposure to AgNPs or far lower levels of Ag ions led to a dose-dependent inhibition of selenium metabolism in both cell models. The synthesis of protein was not altered under these conditions. Exposure to nanomolar levels of Ag ions effectively blocked selenium metabolism, suggesting that Ag ion leaching was likely the mechanism underlying observed changes during AgNP exposure. Exposure likewise inhibited TrxR activity in cultured cells, and Ag ions were potent inhibitors of purified rat TrxR isoform 1 (cytosolic) (TrxR1) enzyme. Exposure to AgNPs leads to the inhibition of selenoprotein synthesis and inhibition of TrxR1. Further, we propose these two sites of action comprise the likely mechanism underlying increases in oxidative stress, increases endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation during exposure to Ag.

  13. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  15. Purification and Properties of an NADPH-Aldose Reductase (Aldehyde Reductase) from Euonymus japonica Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Fayek B.

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme aldose (aldehyde) reductase was partially purified (142-fold) and characterized from Euonymus japonica leaves. The reductase, a dimer, had an average molecular weight of 67,000 as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme was NADPH specific and reduced a broad range of substrates including aldoses, aliphatic aldehydes, and aromatic aldehydes. Maximum activity was observed at pH 8 in phosphate and Tris-HCl buffers and at pH 8.6 to 9.0 in glycine-NaOH buffer using dl-glyceraldehyde or 3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde as substrate. NADP was a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH with a Ki of 60 micromolar. Glycerol was an uncompetitive inhibitor to dl-glyceraldehyde (K′i = 460 millimolar). The Euonymus enzyme was inhibited by sulfhydryl inhibitor, phenobarbital, and high concentrations of Li2SO4. Pyrazol and metal chelating agents inhibited the enzyme slightly. Enzyme activity was detected in the leaves and berries of Celastrus orbiculatus and several species of Euonymus. Probable function of this enzyme is to reduce d-galactose to galactitol, a characteristic metabolite in phloem sap of members of the Celastraceae family. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664750

  16. 5α-reductases in human physiology: an unfolding story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2012-01-01

    5α-reductases are a family of isozymes expressed in a wide host of tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in male sexual differentiation, development and physiology. A comprehensive literature search from 1970 to 2011 was made through PubMed and the relevant information was summarized. 5α reductases convert testosterone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, aldosterone and corticosterone into their respective 5α-dihydro-derivatives, which serve as substrates for 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes. The latter transforms these 5α-reduced metabolites into a subclass of neuroactive steroid hormones with distinct physiological functions. The neuroactive steroid hormones modulate a multitude of functions in human physiology encompassing regulation of sexual differentiation, neuroprotection, memory enhancement, anxiety, sleep and stress, among others. In addition, 5α -reductase type 3 is also implicated in the N-glycosylation of proteins via formation of dolichol phosphate. The family of 5α-reductases was targeted for drug development to treat pathophysiological conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical use of 5α-reductase inhibitors was well established, the scope and the magnitude of the adverse side effects of such drugs, especially on the CNS, is still unrecognized due to lack of knowledge of the various physiological functions of this family of enzymes, especially in the CNS. There is an urgent need to better understand the function of 5α-reductases and the role of neuroactive steroids in human physiology in order to minimize the potential adverse side effects of inhibitors targeting 5α-reductases to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenic alopecia.

  17. Purification and characterization of an NADH-hexacyanoferrate(III) reductase from spinach leaf plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérczi, A; Fredlund, K M; Møller, I M

    1995-06-20

    Plasma membranes were purified from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The NADH-hexacyanoferrate(III) reductase was released from the membrane by Chaps solubilization and purified 360-fold by ion-exchange chromatography followed by affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography on FPLC. A major band of 45 kDa and a minor contaminant of 66 kDa were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The band at 45 kDa cross-reacted with antibodies raised against an NADH-hexacyanoferrate(III) reductase from potato tuber microsomes. The native size of the enzyme was 160 kDa as determined by size-exclusion chromatography indicating that it is a tetramer. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, followed by SDS-PAGE revealed three main bands of identical molecular weight with pI of 5.3-5.6. The enzyme contained about one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per 45-kDa subunit as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy, was specific for the beta-hydrogen of NADH, preferred NADH over NADPH as electron donor, and preferred hexacyanoferrate(III) as electron acceptor, e.g., it reduced Fe3+-EDTA, cytochrome c, oxygen, and duroquinone at 70% whereas FAD, flavin mononucleotide, duroquinone, and ubiquinone0 did not affect the activity.

  18. Pancreaticobiliary cancers with deficient methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Skinner, Halcyon G; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Abe, Tadayoshi; Sato, Norihiro; Riall, Taylor Sohn; Yeo, Charles J; Kern, Scott E; Goggins, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Methyl group deficiency might promote carcinogenesis by inducing DNA breaks and DNA hypomethylation. We hypothesized that deficient methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotypes could promote pancreatic cancer development. First, we performed a case-control study of germline MTHFR polymorphisms (C677T, A1298C) in 303 patients with pancreatic cancer and 305 matched control subjects. Pancreatic neoplasms frequently lose an MTHFR allele during tumorigenesis; we hypothesized that such loss could promote carcinogenesis. We therefore evaluated the cancer MTHFR genotypes of 82 patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers and correlated them to genome-wide measures of chromosomal deletion by using 386 microsatellite markers. Finally, MTHFR genotypes were correlated with global DNA methylation in 68 cancer cell lines. Germline MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with an increased likelihood of having pancreatic cancer. Fractional allelic loss (a measure of chromosomal loss) trended higher in cancers with 677T genotypes than in cancers with other genotypes (P = .055). Among cancers with loss of an MTHFR allele, cancers with 677T MTHFR alleles had more deletions at folate-sensitive fragile sites (36.9%) and at tumor suppressor gene loci (68.5%) than 677C cancers (28.7% and 47.8%, P = .079 and .014, respectively). LINE1 methylation was lower in cancers with less functional 677T/TT genotypes (24.4%) than in those with 677CT (26.0%) and CC/C genotypes (32.5%) (P = .014). Cancers with defective MTHFR genotypes have more DNA hypomethylation and more chromosomal losses. Deficient MTHFR function due to loss of an MTHFR allele by an evolving neoplasm might, by promoting chromosomal losses, accelerate cancer development.

  19. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  20. Implementation of a micro-physical scheme for warm clouds in the meteorological model 'MERCURE': Application to cooling tower plumes and to orographic precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzereau, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    A two-moment semi-spectral warm micro-physical scheme has been implemented inside the meteorological model 'MERCURE'. A new formulation of the buoyancy flux () is proposed, which is coherent with the corrigendum of Mellor (1977) but differs from Bougeault (1981). The non-precipitating cloud microphysics is validated by comparing the numerical simulations of fifteen cases of cooling tower plumes with data from a measurement campaign in Bugey in 1980. Satisfactory results are obtained on the plumes shape, on the temperature and vertical velocity fields and on the droplets spectrums, although the liquid water contents tend to be overestimated. The precipitating cloud microphysics is tested by reproducing the academical cases of orographic precipitation of Chaumerliac et al. (1987) and Richard and Chaumerliac (1989). The simulations allow a check of the action of different micro-physical terms. (author) [fr

  1. Histochemical demonstration of mercury in the olfactory system of salmon (Salmo salar L.) following treatments with dietary methylmercuric chloride and dissolved mercuric chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Døving, K B

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of organic and inorganic mercury compounds was studied histochemically in the salmon (Salmo salar L.) olfactory system. One group of salmon was given fodder pellets containing methylmercuric chloride (CH3HgCl, 99 micrograms Hg/g) for 4 weeks. Other groups of fish were exposed...... to dissolved mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 270 micrograms Hg/liter) for 2, 6, and 12 hr, respectively. In both series of experiments, the radioisotope 203Hg was included in order to determine the accumulation of mercury in the olfactory system. Gamma-spectrometry showed that both mercury compounds accumulated...... in the axons and Schwann cells of both methylmercury- and inorganic mercury-exposed fish. On the other hand, the two mercury compounds showed different staining patterns in the sensory epithelium. The silver grains evoked by methylmercury were localized predominantly in lysosome-like inclusions within...

  2. Thermolabile defect of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S S; Passen, E L; Ruggie, N; Wong, P W; Sora, H

    1993-10-01

    To determine whether or not a moderate genetic defect of homocysteine metabolism is associated with the development of coronary artery disease, we studied the prevalence of thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which is probably the most common genetic defect of homocysteine metabolism. Three hundred thirty-nine subjects who underwent coronary angiography were classified into three groups: (1) patients with severe coronary artery stenosis (> or = 70% occlusion in one or more coronary arteries or > or = 50% occlusion in the left main coronary artery), (2) patients with mild to moderate coronary artery stenosis (< 70% occlusion in one or more coronary arteries or < 50% occlusion in the left main coronary artery), and (3) patients with non-coronary heart disease or noncardiac chest pain (nonstenotic coronary arteries). The thermolability of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was prospectively determined in all subjects. Plasma homocyst(e)ine levels were then measured in those with thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. The traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease were thereafter ascertained by chart review of all subjects. The prevalence of thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was 18.1% in group 1, 13.4% in group 2, and 7.9% in group 3. There was a significant difference between the prevalence of thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in groups 1 and 3 (P < .04). All individuals with thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase irrespective of their clinical grouping had higher plasma homocyst(e)ine levels than normal (group 1, 14.86 +/- 5.85; group 2, 15.36 +/- 5.70; group 3, 13.39 +/- 3.80; normal, 8.50 +/- 2.8 nmol/mL). Nonetheless, there was no statistically significant difference in the plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations of these patients with or without coronary artery stenosis. Using discriminant function analysis, thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was predictive of angiographically

  3. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it was swallowed Amount swallowed However, DO NOT delay calling for help if this information is not ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  4. Mercuric oxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it was swallowed Amount swallowed However, DO NOT delay calling for help if this information is not ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  5. The role of biliverdin reductase in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the effects of biliverdin and bilirubin have been studied extensively, and an inhibitory effect of bile pigments in cancer progression has been proposed. In this study we focused on the effects of biliverdin reductase, the enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, in colorectal cancer. For in vitro experiments we used a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and transfected it with an expression construct of shRNA specific for biliverdin reductase, to create cells with stable knock-down of enzyme expression. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the CASY model TT cell counting device. Western blot protein analysis was performed to study intracellular signaling cascades. Samples of human colorectal cancer were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We were able to confirm the antiproliferative effects of bile pigments on cancer cells in vitro. However, this effect was attenuated in biliverdin reductase knock down cells. ERK and Akt activation seen under biliverdin and bilirubin treatment was also reduced in biliverdin reductase deficient cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer showed elevated biliverdin reductase levels. High enzyme expression was associated with lower overall and disease free patient survival. We conclude that BVR is required for bile pigment mediated effects regarding cancer cell proliferation and modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. The role of BVR overexpression in vivo and its exact influence on cancer progression and patient survival need to be further investigated. (author) [de

  6. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  7. Effect of ammonium and nitrate on ferric chelate reductase and nitrate reductase in Vaccinium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonnachit, U; Darnell, R

    2004-04-01

    Most Vaccinium species have strict soil requirements for optimal growth, requiring low pH, high iron availability and nitrogen primarily in the ammonium form. These soils are limited and are often located near wetlands. Vaccinium arboreum is a wild species adapted to a wide range of soils, including high pH, low iron, and nitrate-containing soils. This broader soil adaptation in V. arboreum may be related to increased efficiency of iron or nitrate uptake compared with the cultivated Vaccinium species. Nitrate, ammonium and iron uptake, and nitrate reductase (NR) and ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activities were compared in two Vaccinium species grown hydroponically in either nitrate or ammonia, with or without iron. The species studied were the wild V. arboreum and the cultivated V. corymbosum interspecific hybrid, which exhibits the strict soil requirements of most Vaccinium species. Ammonium uptake was significantly greater than nitrate uptake in both species, while nitrate uptake was greater in the wild species, V. arboreum, compared with the cultivated species, V. corymbosum. The increased nitrate uptake in V. arboreum was correlated with increased root NR activity compared with V. corymbosum. The lower nitrate uptake in V. corymbosum was reflected in decreased plant dry weight in this species compared with V. arboreum. Root FCR activity increased significantly in V. corymbosum grown under iron-deficient conditions, compared with the same species grown under iron-sufficient conditions or with V. arboreum grown under either iron condition. V. arboreum appears to be more efficient in acquiring nitrate compared with V. corymbosum, possibly due to increased NR activity and this may partially explain the wider soil adaptation of V. arboreum.

  8. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  9. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-05-17

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 ..-->.. Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme.

  10. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna

    2003-01-01

    A plasmid-borne diacetyl (acetoin) reductase (butA) from Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides CHCC2114 was sequenced and cloned. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 257 amino acids which had high identity at the amino acid level to diacetyl (acetoin...... diacetyl (acetoin) reductase activity with NADH as coenzyme, but not with NADPH as coenzyme, suggesting the presence of another diacetyl (acetoin)-reducing activity in L. pseudomesenteroides. Plasmid-curing experiments demonstrated that the butA gene is carried on a 20-kb plasmid in L. pseudomesenteroides....

  11. Compensatory periplasmic nitrate reductase activity supports anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in the absence of membrane nitrate reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alst, Nadine E.; Sherrill, Lani A.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Haidaris, Constantine G.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate serves as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite generates a transmembrane proton motive force allowing ATP synthesis and anaerobic growth. Inner membrane-bound nitrate reductase NarGHI is encoded within the narK1K2GHJI operon and the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB is encoded within the napEFDABC operon. The role of the two dissimilatory nitrate reductases in anaerobic growth, and the regulation of their expression were examined by using a set of deletion mutants in P. aeruginosa PAO1. NarGHI mutants were unable to grow anaerobically, but plate cultures remained viable up to 120 hr. In contrast, nitrate sensor-response regulator mutant ΔnarXL displayed growth arrest initially, but resumed growth after 72 hr and reached early stationary phase in liquid culture after 120 hr. Genetic, transcriptional, and biochemical studies demonstrated that anaerobic growth recovery by the NarXL mutant was the result of NapAB periplasmic nitrate reductase expression. A novel transcriptional start site for napEFDABC expression was identified in the NarXL mutant grown anaerobically. Furthermore, mutagenesis of a consensus NarL-binding site monomer upstream of the novel transcriptional start site restored anaerobic growth recovery in the NarXL mutant. The data suggest that during anaerobic growth of wild type P. aeruginosa PAO1, nitrate response regulator NarL directly represses expression of periplasmic nitrate reductase, while inducing maximal expression of membrane nitrate reductase. PMID:19935885

  12. Optimum conditions for cotton nitrate reductase extraction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions of nitrate reductase extraction and activity measurement should be adapted to plant species, and to the organs of the same plant, because of extreme weaknesses and instabilities of the enzyme. Different extraction and reaction media have been compared in order to define the best conditions for cotton callus ...

  13. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... in prostate cancer patients: a potential factor implicated in 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor treatment. LUIS ALBERTO HENRÍQUEZ-HERNÁNDEZ1,2,3∗, ALMUDENA VALENCIANO2, PALMIRA FORO-ARNALOT4,. MARÍA JESÚS ÁLVAREZ-CUBERO5,6, JOSÉ MANUEL COZAR7, JOSÉ FRANCISCO ...

  14. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Herrera-Ramos E., Rodríguez-Gallego C. and Lara P. C. 2015 Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in prostate ... generation. This study was approved by the Research and. Ethics Committee of each institution participant in the study. DNA was isolated from 300 µL of ...

  15. Bioinformatic analysis of dihydrofolate reductase predicted in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 5 alpha helices and 8 beta-strands. Twelve binding site residues were predicted in KCA1_1610 relative to the template protein 2zzaA in protein database (PDB). The predicted structure of KCA1_1610 dihydrofolate reductase can serve as a new template as an addition to structural genomics and generation of models for ...

  16. Dizygotic twinning is not associated with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase haplotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montgomery, GW; Zhao, Z.Z.; Morley, K.I.; Marsh, A.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.; Duffy, DL

    2003-01-01

    Background: Folate metabolism is critical to embryonic development, influencing neural tube defects (NTD) and recurrent early pregnancy loss. Polymorphisms in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) have been associated with dizygotic (DZ) twinning through pregnancy loss. Methods: The C677T

  17. Optimum conditions for cotton nitrate reductase extraction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    mM of glutamine in the extraction buffer stimulates significantly, in vitro, the reduction of nitrate. Enzyme activity is moreover optimal when 1 M of exogenous nitrate, as substrate, is added to the reaction medium. At these optimum conditions of nitrate reductase activity determination, the substrate was completely reduced ...

  18. Cloning and expression analysis of dihydroxyflavonol 4-reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern blot analysis indicate that DFR is presented as a single copy in the Ascocenda spp. genome. The AscoDFR gene was highly expressed in the flower stages 2 and 3 of development as well as in the sepal and petal of the orchid flower. Keywords: Orchid, dihydroxyflavonol 4-reductase, anthocyanins, gene cloning ...

  19. Crystallographic analysis of tricolosan bound to enoyl reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roujeinikova, A.; Levy, C.W.; Rowsell, S.; Sedelnikova, S.; Baker, P.J.; Minshull, C.A.; Mistry, A.; Colls, J.G.; Camble, R.; Stuitje, A.R.; Slabas, A.R.; Rafferty, J.B.; Pauptit, R.A.; Viner, A; Rice, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies with strains of Escherichia coli resistant to triclosan, an ingredient of many anti-bacterial household goods, have suggested that this compound works by acting as an inhibitor of enoyl reductase (ENR) and thereby blocking lipid biosynthesis. We present structural analyses

  20. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity and antioxidant capacity of pomegranate extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, Cimen; Cumaoğlu, Ahmet; Gürpinar, Ali Rifat; Kartal, Murat; Kovacikova, Lucia; Milackova, Ivana; Stefek, Milan

    2012-03-01

    The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., has been the subject of current interest as a medicinal agent with wide-ranging therapeutic indications. In the present study, pomegranate ethanolic seed and hull extracts were tested, in comparison with a commercial sample, for the inhibition of aldose reductase, an enzyme involved in the etiology of diabetic complications. In vitro inhibition of rat lens aldose reductase was determined by a conventional method. Pomegranate ethanolic hull extract and commercial pomegranate hull extract exhibited similar aldose reductase inhibitory activity characterized by IC(50) values ranging from 3 to 33.3 μg/ml. They were more effective than pomegranate ethanolic seed extract with IC(50) ranging from 33.3 to 333 μg/ml. Antioxidant action of the novel compounds was documented in a DPPH test and in a liposomal membrane model, oxidatively stressed by peroxyl radicals. All the plant extracts showed considerable antioxidant potential in the DPPH assay. Pomegranate ethanolic hull extract and commercial pomegranate hull extract executed similar protective effects on peroxidatively damaged liposomal membranes characterized by 10ethanolic seed extract showed significantly lower antioxidant activity compared to both hull extracts studied. Pomegranate extracts are thus presented as bifunctional agents combining aldose reductase inhibitory action with antioxidant activity and with potential therapeutic use in prevention of diabetic complications.

  1. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the.

  2. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  3. Evaluation of the conserve flavin reductase gene from three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... means of PCR technique. The nucleic acid sequences of the PCR primers were designed using conserved nucleic acid sequences of the flavin reductase enzyme from. Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. The oligonucleotide primers were as follows: 5'-GAA TTC ATG TCT GAC. AAG CCG AAT GCC-3' (forward) ...

  4. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  5. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is in...

  6. The Polymorphisms in Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase, Methionine Synthase, Methionine Synthase Reductase, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results. PMID:22719222

  7. Identification of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in canine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi de Souza, Lucilene; Paradis, Manon; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Price, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Alopecia X in dogs is a noninflammatory alopecia that may be caused by a hormonal dysfunction. It may be similar to androgenic alopecia in men that is caused by the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The 5α-reductase isoenzymes, 5αR1 and 5αR2, and a recently described 5αR3, are responsible for the conversion of testosterone into DHT. However, which 5α-reductases are present in canine skin has not yet been described. The main objective of this study was to determine the pattern of expression of 5α-reductase genes in canine skin. Skin biopsies were obtained from healthy, intact young-mature beagles (three males, four females) at three anatomical sites normally affected by alopecia X (dorsal neck, back of thighs and base of tail) and two sites generally unaffected (dorsal head and ventral thorax). Prostate samples (n = 3) were collected as positive controls for 5α-reductase mRNA abundance measurement by real-time PCR. We detected mRNA encoding 5αR1 and 5αR3 but not 5αR2. There were no significant differences in 5αR1 and 5αR3 mRNA levels between the different anatomical sites, irrespective of gender (P > 0.05). Moreover, the mean mRNA abundance in each anatomical site did not differ between males and females (P > 0.05). To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the expression of 5α-reductases in canine skin and the expression of 5αR3 in this tissue. These results may help to elucidate the pathogenesis of alopecia X and to determine more appropriate treatments for this disorder. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; hide

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  9. Triterpenes and meroterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum with inhibitory activity against HMGs reductase, aldose reductase and α-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baosong; Tian, Jin; Zhang, Jinjin; Wang, Kai; Liu, Li; Yang, Bo; Bao, Li; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-07-01

    Seven new compounds including four lanostane triterpenoids, lucidenic acids Q-S (1-3) and methyl ganoderate P (4), and three triterpene-farnesyl hydroquinone conjugates, ganolucinins A-C (5-7), one new natural product ganomycin J (8), and 73 known compounds (9-81) were isolated from fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum. The structures of the compounds 1-8 were determined by spectroscopic methods. Bioactivities of compounds isolated were assayed against HMG-CoA reductase, aldose reductase, α-glucosidase, and PTP1B. Ganolucidic acid η (39), ganoderenic acid K (44), ganomycin J (8), and ganomycin B (61) showed strong inhibitory activity against HMG-CoA reductase with IC 50 of 29.8, 16.5, 30.3 and 14.3μM, respectively. Lucidumol A (67) had relatively good effect against aldose reductase with IC 50 of 19.1μM. Farnesyl hydroquinones ganomycin J (8), ganomycin B (61), ganomycin I (62), and triterpene-farnesyl hydroquinone conjugates ganoleuconin M (76) and ganoleuconin O (79) possessed good inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase with IC 50 in the range of 7.8 to 21.5μM. This work provides chemical and biological evidence for the usage of extracts of G. lucidum as herbal medicine and food supplements for the control of hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic symptoms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  11. Antimicrobial activity and physical characterization of silver nanoparticles green synthesized using nitrate reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Shabani, Mohammadhassan; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Norouzian, Dariush; Amini, Abdolhossein; Gholami-Shabani, Zeynab; Imani, Afshin; Chiani, Mohsen; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures from natural sources have received major attention due to wide array of biological activities and less toxicity for humans, animals, and the environment. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a fungal nitrate reductase, and their biological activity was assessed against human pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The enzyme was isolated from Fusarium oxysporum IRAN 31C after culturing on malt extract-glucose-yeast extract-peptone (MGYP) medium. The enzyme was purified by a combination of ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and its molecular weight was estimated by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. The purified enzyme had a maximum yield of 50.84 % with a final purification of 70 folds. With a molecular weight of 214 KDa, it is composed of three subunits of 125, 60, and 25 KDa. The purified enzyme was successfully used for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a way dependent upon NADPH using gelatin as a capping agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering spectroscopy, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These stable nonaggregating nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average size of 50 nm and a zeta potential of -34.3. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effects of synthesized nanoparticles by disk diffusion method showed strong growth inhibitory activity against all tested human pathogenic fungi and bacteria as evident from inhibition zones that ranged from 14 to 25 mm. Successful green synthesis of biologically active silver nanoparticles by a nitrate reductase from F. oxysporum in the present work not only reduces laborious downstream steps such as purification of nanoparticle from interfering cellular components, but also provides a constant source of safe biologically-active nanomaterials with potential application in agriculture and medicine.

  12. Solution structure of an arsenate reductase-related protein, YffB, from Brucella melitensis, the etiological agent responsible for brucellosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    B. melitensis is a NIAID Category B microorganism that is responsible for brucellosis and is a potential agent for biological warfare. Here, the solution structure of the 116-residue arsenate reductase-related protein Bm-YffB (BR0369) from this organism is reported. Brucella melitensis is the etiological agent responsible for brucellosis. Present in the B. melitensis genome is a 116-residue protein related to arsenate reductases (Bm-YffB; BR0369). Arsenate reductases (ArsC) convert arsenate ion (H 2 AsO 4 − ), a compound that is toxic to bacteria, to arsenite ion (AsO 2 − ), a product that may be efficiently exported out of the cell. Consequently, Bm-YffB is a potential drug target because if arsenate reduction is the protein’s major biological function then disabling the cell’s ability to reduce arsenate would make these cells more sensitive to the deleterious effects of arsenate. Size-exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy indicate that Bm-YffB is a monomer in solution. The solution structure of Bm-YffB shows that the protein consists of two domains: a four-stranded mixed β-sheet flanked by two α-helices on one side and an α-helical bundle. The α/β domain is characteristic of the fold of thioredoxin-like proteins and the overall structure is generally similar to those of known arsenate reductases despite the marginal sequence similarity. Chemical shift perturbation studies with 15 N-labeled Bm-YffB show that the protein binds reduced glutathione at a site adjacent to a region similar to the HX 3 CX 3 R catalytic sequence motif that is important for arsenic detoxification activity in the classical arsenate-reductase family of proteins. The latter observation supports the hypothesis that the ArsC-YffB family of proteins may function as glutathione-dependent thiol reductases. However, comparison of the structure of Bm-YffB with the structures of proteins from the classical ArsC family suggest that the mechanism and possibly the function of Bm

  13. Curcuma longa Linn. extract and curcumin protect CYP 2E1 enzymatic activity against mercuric chloride-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress: A protective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepmala; Mittal, Deepak Kumar; Shukla, Sangeeta; Srivastav, Sunil Kumar; Dixit, Vaibhav A

    2017-07-05

    The present investigation has been conducted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of Curcuma longa (200mgkg -1 , po) and curcumin (80mgkg -1 , po) for their hepatoprotective efficacy against mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 : 12μmolkg -1 , ip; once only) hepatotoxicity. The HgCl 2 administration altered various biochemical parameters, including transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, bilirubin, gamma-glutamyl transferase, triglycerides and cholesterol contents with a concomitant decline in protein and albumin concentration in serum which were restored towards control by therapy of Curcuma longa or curcumin. On the other hand, both treatments showed a protective effect on drug metabolizing enzymes viz. aniline hydroxylase (AH) and amidopyrine-N-demethylase (AND), hexobarbitone induced sleep time and BSP retention. Choleretic, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH)-free radical scavenging activities and histological studies also supported the biochemical findings. The present study concludes that Curcuma longa extract or curcumin has the ability to alleviate the hepatotoxic effects caused by HgCl 2 in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Mercuric chloride-induced gastrin/cholecystokinin 8 immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of the terrestrial slug Semperula maculata: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londhe, Sunil; Kamble, Nitin

    2013-12-01

    We measured the immunoreactivity of the neuropeptide gastrin cholecystokinin 8 (gastrin/CCK 8) in neurons of the terrestrial slug Semperula maculata following acute treatment with mercuric chloride (HgCl2). The distribution of gastrin/CCK 8 was analyzed in neurons of different regions, specifically from cerebral ganglia (procerebrum (pro-c), mesocerebrum (meso-c) and metacerebrum (meta-c). In the control group, neurons of pedal, pleural, parietal and visceral ganglia showed positive immunoreactivity using vertebrate antiserum against gastrin/CCK 8. Gastrin/CCK 8 immunoreactivity was also seen in the fibers and neuropil region of all ganglia. In the cerebral ganglion, 10, 12 and 8 % of the neurons from pro-c, meso-c and meta-c, respectively, were stained with the antibody. The immunostaining was increased in neurons (giant, large, medium and small) after HgCl2 treatment. The treatment greatly increased the mucin content within the neurons. Exposure to HgCl2 enhanced gastrin immunoreactivity in the neurons and this increased with time. Results are discussed in the context of neuropathology in cerebral ganglia associated with the feeding behavior of Semperula maculata.

  15. The effect of selenium on the biliary excretion and organ distribution of mercury in the rat after exposure to methyl mercuric chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.; Norseth, T.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of selenium compounds on the biliary excretion and the organ distribution of mercury after injection of methyl mercuric chloride(4μmol/kg) have been tested. Selenite, seleno-di-N-acetylglycine and seleno-methionine strongly inhibited the biliary excretion of mercury. Selenite even in a molar dose of 1/40 of the methyl mercury dose inhibited the biliary excretion of mercury. The loss toxic seleno-di-N-acetylglycine was needed in larger molar doses and did not act as rapidly as selenite. Biliary excreted methyl mercury is known to be partly reabsorbed in the gut. Subsequently a part of it is deposited in the kidneys since drainage of the bile lowered the kidney content of mercury. Rats given selenium compounds in combination with bile drainage showed further reduction of the kidney mercury content than bile duct drainage alone. Thus the demonstrated lowering effect of selenium compounds on the kidney mercury content cannot be completely explained by an inhibition of biliary excretion of mercury. The mercury concentration in the brain was increased by the selenium compounds; the effect being dependent of the selenium dose reaching a maximum at an equimolar selenite - to methyl mercury dose ratio. The mechanisms by which selenium influences the methyl mercury kinetics are discussed. (author)

  16. Recent structural insights into the function of copper nitrite reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Kekilli, Demet; Strange, Richard W; Hough, Michael A

    2017-11-15

    Copper nitrite reductases (CuNiR) carry out the first committed step of the denitrification pathway of the global nitrogen cycle, the reduction of nitrite (NO 2 - ) to nitric oxide (NO). As such, they are of major agronomic and environmental importance. CuNiRs occur primarily in denitrifying soil bacteria which carry out the overall reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. In this article, we review the insights gained into copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR) function from three dimensional structures. We particularly focus on developments over the last decade, including insights from serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and from the recently discovered 3-domain CuNiRs.

  17. The evolution of the ribonucleotide reductases: much ado about oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Anthony M; Logan, Derek T; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2002-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reduction is the only known biological means for de novo production of deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. These are produced from ribonucleotides, the building blocks of RNA, and the direction of this reaction has been taken to support the idea that, in evolution, RNA preceded DNA as genetic material. However, an understanding of the evolutionary relationships among the three modern-day classes of ribonucleotide reductase and how the first reductase arose early in evolution is still far off. We propose that the diversification of this class of enzymes is inherently tied to microbial colonization of aerobic and anaerobic niches. The work is of broader interest, as it also sheds light on the process of adaptation to oxygenic environments consequent to the evolution of atmospheric oxygen.

  18. Substrate specificity of an aflatoxin-metabolizing aldehyde reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme from rat liver that reduces aflatoxin B1-dialdehyde exhibits a unique catalytic specificity distinct from that of other aldo-keto reductases. This enzyme, designated AFAR, displays high activity towards dicarbonyl-containing compounds with ketone groups on adjacent carbon atoms; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, acenaphthenequinone and camphorquinone were found to be good substrates. Although AFAR can also reduce aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes such as succinic semialdehyde, it is inactiv...

  19. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in prostate cancer patients: a potential factor implicated in. 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor treatment. Luis Alberto Henríquez-Hernández, Almudena Valenciano, Palmira Foro-Arnalot, María Jesús Álvarez-Cubero,. José Manuel Cozar, José Francisco Suárez-Novo, Manel Castells-Esteve, Pablo Fernández-Gonzalo,.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a nitrite reductase gene related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... BL21 (DE3) strain with the recombinant expression vector pET-28A-GhNiR. NiR activity assay showed that the crude GhNiR protein had obvious activity to NaNO2 substrate. Key words: Cotton, nitrite reductase, prokaryotic expression, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, GenBank Accession. No: GQ389691.

  1. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    action of xylose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21) and xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) is required to convert D-xylose to D-xylulose and all enzymes of the D-xylose pathway can be used in the L-arabinose pathway, where arabitol is oxidized by NAD+-dependent arabitol dehydrogenase (EC. 1.1.1.12) producing L-xylulose. This is ...

  2. DIHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE AS A VERSATILE DRUG TARGET IN HEALTHCARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase is one of the important enzymes for thymidylate and purine synthesis. It has been used as a drug target for treatment of various diseases. A large number of pharmaceutical drugs have been designed to inhibit the activity of dihydrofolate reductase. However, over the period of time some organisms have developed resistance against some of these drugs. There is also a chance of cross reactivity for these drugs, as they may target the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme of other organisms. Although using NMR spectroscopy, phylogenetic sequence analysis, comparative sequence analysis between dihydrofolate enzymes of various organisms and molecular modeling studies, a lot has been unraveled about the difference in the structure of this enzyme in various organisms, yet there is a need for deeper understanding of these differences so as to design drugs that are specific to their targets and reduce the chance for cross reactivity. The dihydrofolate enzyme can also be explored for treatment of various other diseases that are associated with the folate cycle.

  3. Nitrate reductase gene involvement in hexachlorobiphenyl dechlorination by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Supriyo; Perkins, Michael; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2006-01-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) degradation usually occurs through reductive dechlorination under anaerobic conditions and phenolic ring cleavage under aerobic conditions. In this paper, we provide evidence of nitrate reductase (NaR) mediated dechlorination of hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) in Phanerochaete chrysosporium under non-ligninolytic condition and the gene involved. The NaR enzyme and its cofactor, molybdenum (Mo), were found to mediate reductive dechlorination of PCBs even in aerobic condition. Tungsten (W), a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme, was found to suppress this dechlorination. Chlorine release assay provided further evidence of this nitrate reductase mediated dechlorination. Commercially available pure NaR enzyme from Aspergillus was used to confirm these results. Through homology search using TBLASTN program, NaR gene was identified, primers were designed and the RT-PCR product was sequenced. The NaR gene was then annotated in the P. chrysosporium genome (GenBank accession no. AY700576). This is the first report regarding the presence of nitrate reductase gene in this fungus with the explanation why this fungus can dechlorinate PCBs even in aerobic condition. These fungal inoculums are used commercially as pellets in sawdust for enhanced bioremediation of PCBs at the risk of depleting soil nitrates. Hence, the addition of nitrates to the pellets will reduce this risk as well as enhance its activity

  4. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    can replace light in eliciting an increase of nitrate reductase mRNA accumulation in dark-adapted green Arabidopsis plants. We show further that sucrose alone is sufficient for the full expression of nitrate reductase genes in etiolated Arabidopsis plants. Finally, using a reporter gene, we show......Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression....... Located in the cytosol, nitrate reductase obtains its reductant not from photosynthesis but from carbohydrate catabolism. This relationship prompted us to investigate the indirect role that light might play, via photosynthesis, in the regulation of nitrate reductase gene expression. We show that sucrose...

  5. Gamma-irradiation activates biochemical systems: induction of nitrate reductase activity in plant callus.

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, K N; Sabharwal, P S

    1982-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation induced high levels of nitrate reductase activity (NADH:nitrate oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.6.1) in callus of Haworthia mirabilis Haworth. Subcultures of gamma-irradiated tissues showed autonomous growth on minimal medium. We were able to mimic the effects of gamma-irradiation by inducing nitrate reductase activity in unirradiated callus with exogenous auxin and kinetin. These results revealed that induction of nitrate reductase activity by gamma-irradiation is mediated through i...

  6. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  7. Histochemical localization of glutathione dependent NBT-reductase in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y

    2001-09-01

    Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. The fresh frozen tissue sections (8 m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  8. Attenuation by methyl mercury and mercuric sulfide of pentobarbital induced hypnotic tolerance in mice through inhibition of ATPase activities and nitric oxide production in cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Huang, Zih-Ning; Yu, Hsun-Hsin; Chang, Liang-Hao [College of Engineering, Southern Taiwan University, Institute of Biotechnology, Tainan (China); Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn [College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei (China)

    2008-06-15

    This study is aimed at exploring the possible mechanism of hypnosis-enhancing effect of HgS or cinnabar (a traditional Chinese medicine containing more than 95% HgS) in mice treated with pentobarbital. We also examined whether the effect of HgS is different from that of the well-known methyl mercury (MeHg). After a short period (7 days) of oral administration to mice, a nontoxic dose (0.1 g/kg) of HgS not only significantly enhanced pentobarbital-induced hypnosis but also attenuated tolerance induction; while a higher dose (1 g/kg) of HgS or cinnabar exerted an almost irreversible enhancing effect on pentobarbital-hypnosis similar to that of MeHg (2 mg/kg) tested, which was still effective even after 10 or 35 days cessation of administration. To study comparatively the effects of different mercury forms from oral administration of MeHg and HgS on membrane ATPase activities of experimental mice, analysis of the Hg content in the cerebral cortex revealed that correlated with the decrease of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities. Furthermore, NO levels of blood but not that of cerebral cortex were also decreased by mercuric compounds. Although pentobarbital alone enhanced cytochrome p450-2C9 in time dependent manner, all of mercurial compounds tested had no such effect. All of these findings indicated that the mercurial compounds including cinnabar, HgS and MeHg exert a long-lasting enhancing hypnotic activity without affecting pentobarbital metabolism, which provides evidence-based sedative effect of cinnabar used in Chinese traditional medicine for more than 2,000 years. The nontoxic HgS dosing (0.1 g/kg/day) for consecutive 7 days is perhaps useful for delaying or preventing pentobarbital-tolerance. (orig.)

  9. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive magnetic solid phase extraction for preconcentration and determination of trace amount of Hg (II) ions from food samples and aqueous solution by magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO/2-PTSC): Central composite design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat, Akram; Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the synthesis of the magnetic graphene oxide modified by 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone groups (Fe 3 O 4 @GO/2-PTSC) was utilized for preconcentration and determination of mercuric ions in a trace amount by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Characterization of the adsorbent was performed using various techniques, such as FT-IR, VSM, SEM and XRD analysis. Central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) was used for obtaining the most important parameters and probable interactions in variables. The variables such as adsorbent dosage, pH, desorption time, and eluent volume was optimized. These values were 8mg, 5.4min, 0.5mL (HCl, 0.1M), respectively. Sonication had an important role in shortening the adsorption time of Hg (II) ions by enhancing the dispersion of adsorbent in solution. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method presented high enrichment factor of 193, an extraction percentage of 96.5, a detection limit of 0.0079µgL -1 and a relative standard deviation (RSD %) of 1.63%. Finally, the application of the synthesized material was evaluated for preconcentration and determination of mercuric ions from foods and environmental waters samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  11. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-05-26

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  12. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  13. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  14. Functions of Flavin Reductase and Quinone Reductase in 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134▿

    OpenAIRE

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Xun, Luying

    2007-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a toxic pollutant. TcpA is a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase that converts 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinone. It has been implied via genetic analysis that TcpX acts as an FAD reductase to supply TcpA with FADH2, whereas the function of TcpB in 2,4,6-TCP degradation is still unclear. In order to provide direct biochemical evidence for t...

  15. Analysis of nitrate reductase mRNA expression and nitrate reductase activity in response to nitrogen supply

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Kavoosi; Sadegh Balotf; Homeira Eshghi; Hasan Hasani

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is one of the major sources of nitrogen for the growth of plants. It is taken up by plant roots and transported to the leaves where it is reduced to nitrite in the. The main objective of this research was to investigate stimulatory effects of sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, ammonia and urea on the production/generation of the nitrate reductase mRNA in Triticum aestivum plants. The plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 21 days and then starved in a media without nitrat...

  16. THE EFFECTS OF AN ALDOSE REDUCTASE INHIBITOR ON THE PROGRESSION OF DIABETIC-RETINOPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TROMP, A; HOOYMANS, JMM; BARENDSEN, BC; VONDOORMAAL, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The polyol pathway has long been associated with diabetic retinopathy. Glucose is converted to sorbitol with the aid of the enzyme aldose reductase. Aldose reductase inhibitors can prevent changes induced by diabetes. A total of 30 patients with minimal background retinopathy were randomly divided

  17. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from L...

  18. HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors and neuropathy : reports to the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Langen, J J; van Puijenbroek, E P

    2006-01-01

    The number of patients taking HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors for hypercholesterolaemia is growing rapidly. Treatment with HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but may rarely cause serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The most serious

  19. Bioactivation of lapachol responsible for DNA scission by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Y; Tsurutani, Y; Shinyashiki, M; Homma-Takeda, S; Nakai, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Shimojo, N

    1997-09-01

    The reduction of the naphthoquinone derivative, lapachol, which is responsible for its bioactivation was examined using microsomal preparations and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450 reductase). Phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment resulted in an induction of enzyme activities for cytochrome c reduction (1.54 times) and lapachol reduction (1.20 times) by hepatic microsomal preparation of rats. The specific activity of lapachol reduction by purified P450 reductase showed 56-fold higher than that by untreated liver microsomes. Addition of antibody against P450 reductase (2 mg of IgG/mg of protein) to the microsomal incubation mixture caused an immunoinhibition of cytochrome c (32%) and lapachol (19%) reduction activities, suggesting that P450 reductase catalyzes lapachol reduction. Generation of superoxide anion radical (1321 nmol/mg per min) in approximately equivalent amounts of with NADPH consumption (941 nmol/mg per min) was detected during metabolism of lapachol by P450 reductase. Electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments confirmed generation of superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical as these 5,5'-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) adducts. Incubation of lapachol with P450 reductase caused a cleavage of DNA which was reduced in the presence of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), catalase(1), and hydroxyl radical scavengers such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and thiourea. Taken together, these results indicate that lapachol is bioactivated by P450 reductase to reactive species, which promote DNA scission through the redox cycling based generation of superoxide anion radical.

  20. Bioinformatics approach of three partial polyprenol reductase genes in Kandelia obovata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.; Sagami, H.; Oku, H.; Baba, S.

    2018-03-01

    This present study describesthe bioinformatics approach to analyze three partial polyprenol reductase genes from mangrove plant, Kandeliaobovataas well aspredictedphysical and chemical properties, potential peptide, subcellular localization, and phylogenetic. The diversity was noted in the physical and chemical properties of three partial polyprenol reductase genes. The values of chloroplast were relatively high, showed that chloroplast transit peptide occurred in mangrove polyprenol reductase. The target peptide value of mitochondria varied from 0.088 to 0.198 indicated it was possible to be present. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity of physicochemical properties of the different amino acids in polyprenol reductase. The subcellular localization of two partial genes located in the plasma membrane. To confirm the homology among the polyprenol reductase in the database, a dendrogram was drawn. The phylogenetic tree depicts that there are three clusters, the partial genes of K. obovata joined the largest one: C23157 was close to Ricinus communis polyprenol reductase. Whereas, C23901 and C24171 were grouped with Ipomoea nil polyprenol reductase, suggested that these polyprenol reductase genes form distinct separation into tropical habitat plants.

  1. The role of thioredoxin reductases in brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Soerensen

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin-dependent system is an essential regulator of cellular redox balance. Since oxidative stress has been linked with neurodegenerative disease, we studied the roles of thioredoxin reductases in brain using mice with nervous system (NS-specific deletion of cytosolic (Txnrd1 and mitochondrial (Txnrd2 thioredoxin reductase. While NS-specific Txnrd2 null mice develop normally, mice lacking Txnrd1 in the NS were significantly smaller and displayed ataxia and tremor. A striking patterned cerebellar hypoplasia was observed. Proliferation of the external granular layer (EGL was strongly reduced and fissure formation and laminar organisation of the cerebellar cortex was impaired in the rostral portion of the cerebellum. Purkinje cells were ectopically located and their dendrites stunted. The Bergmann glial network was disorganized and showed a pronounced reduction in fiber strength. Cerebellar hypoplasia did not result from increased apoptosis, but from decreased proliferation of granule cell precursors within the EGL. Of note, neuron-specific inactivation of Txnrd1 did not result in cerebellar hypoplasia, suggesting a vital role for Txnrd1 in Bergmann glia or neuronal precursor cells.

  2. Interspecific variation for thermal dependence of glutathione reductase in sainfoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, S P; Mahan, J R; Matches, A G

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the biochemical and physiological consequences of species variation would expedite improvement in agronomically useful genotypes of sainfoin (Onobrychis spp.) Information on variation among sainfoin species is lacking on thermal dependence of glutathione reductase (B.C. 1.6.4.2.), which plays an important role in the protection of plants from both high and low temperature stresses by preventing harmful oxidation of enzymes and membranes. Our objective was to investigate the interspecific variation for thermal dependency of glutathione reductase in sainfoin. Large variation among species was found for: (i) the minimum apparent Km (0.4-2.5 μM NADPH), (ii) the temperature at which the minimum apparent Km was observed (15°-5°C), and (iii) the thermal kinetic windows (2°-30°C width) over a 15°-45°C temperature gradient. In general, tetraploid species had narrower (≤17°C) thermal kinetic windows than did diploid species (∼30°C), with one exception among the diploids. Within the tetraploid species, the cultivars of O. viciifolia had a broader thermal kinetic window (≥7°C) than the plant introduction (PI 212241, >2 °C) itself.

  3. Optimisation of nitrate reductase enzyme activity to synthesise silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodashenas, Bahareh; Ghorbani, Hamid Reza

    2016-06-01

    Today, the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is very common since it has many applications in different areas. The synthesis of these nanoparticles is done by means of physical, chemical, or biological methods. However, due to its inexpensive and environmentally friendly features, the biological method is more preferable. In the present study, using nitrate reductase enzyme available in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium, the biosynthesis of Ag NPs was investigated. In addition, the activity of the nitrate reductase enzyme was optimised by changing its cultural conditions, and the effects of silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) concentration and enzyme amount on nanoparticles synthesis were studied. Finally, the produced nanoparticles were studied using ultraviolet -visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering technique, and transmission electron microscopy. UV-Visible spectrophotometric study showed the characteristic peak for Ag NPs at wavelength 405-420 nm for 1 mM metal precursor solution (AgNO(3)) with 1, 5, 10, and 20 cc supernatant and 435 nm for 0.01M AgNO(3) with 20 cc supernatant. In this study, it was found that there is a direct relationship between the AgNO(3) concentration and the size of produced Ag NPs.

  4. A ferric-chelate reductase for iron uptake from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N J; Procter, C M; Connolly, E L; Guerinot, M L

    1999-02-25

    Iron deficiency afflicts more than three billion people worldwide, and plants are the principal source of iron in most diets. Low availability of iron often limits plant growth because iron forms insoluble ferric oxides, leaving only a small, organically complexed fraction in soil solutions. The enzyme ferric-chelate reductase is required for most plants to acquire soluble iron. Here we report the isolation of the FRO2 gene, which is expressed in iron-deficient roots of Arabidopsis. FRO2 belongs to a superfamily of flavocytochromes that transport electrons across membranes. It possesses intramembranous binding sites for haem and cytoplasmic binding sites for nucleotide cofactors that donate and transfer electrons. We show that FRO2 is allelic to the frd1 mutations that impair the activity of ferric-chelate reductase. There is a nonsense mutation within the first exon of FRO2 in frd1-1 and a missense mutation within FRO2 in frd1-3. Introduction of functional FRO2 complements the frd1-1 phenotype in transgenic plants. The isolation of FRO2 has implications for the generation of crops with improved nutritional quality and increased growth in iron-deficient soils.

  5. Crystal structure of human quinone reductase type 2, a metalloflavoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C E; Bianchet, M A; Talalay, P; Zhao, Q; Amzel, L M

    1999-08-03

    In mammals, two separate but homologous cytosolic quinone reductases have been identified: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) (EC 1.6.99.2) and quinone reductase type 2 (QR2). Although QR1 and QR2 are nearly 50% identical in protein sequence, they display markedly different catalytic properties and substrate specificities. We report here two crystal structures of QR2: in its native form and bound to menadione (vitamin K(3)), a physiological substrate. Phases were obtained by molecular replacement, using our previously determined rat QR1 structure as the search model. QR2 shares the overall fold of the major catalytic domain of QR1, but lacks the smaller C-terminal domain. The FAD binding sites of QR1 and QR2 are very similar, but their hydride donor binding sites are considerably different. Unexpectedly, we found that QR2 contains a specific metal binding site, which is not present in QR1. Two histidine nitrogens, one cysteine thiol, and a main chain carbonyl group are involved in metal coordination. The metal binding site is solvent-accessible, and is separated from the FAD cofactor by a distance of about 13 A.

  6. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  7. Characterization of the reductase domain of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase generated in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Calmodulin response is complete within the reductase domain itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachhui, R; Presta, A; Bentley, D F; Abu-Soud, H M; McArthur, R; Brudvig, G; Ghosh, D K; Stuehr, D J

    1996-08-23

    Rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) is comprised of a flavin-containing reductase domain and a heme-containing oxygenase domain. Calmodulin binding to nNOS increases the rate of electron transfer from NADPH into its flavins, triggers electron transfer from flavins to the heme, activates NO synthesis, and increases reduction of artificial electron acceptors such as cytochrome c. To investigate what role the reductase domain plays in calmodulin's activation of these functions, we overexpressed a form of the nNOS reductase domain (amino acids 724-1429) in the yeast Pichia pastoris that for the first time exhibits a complete calmodulin response. The reductase domain was purified by 2',5'-ADP affinity chromatography yielding 25 mg of pure protein per liter of culture. It contained 1 FAD and 0.8 FMN per molecule. Most of the protein as isolated contained an air-stable flavin semiquinone radical that was sensitive to FeCN6 oxidation. Anaerobic titration of the FeCN6-oxidized reductase domain with NADPH indicated the flavin semiquinone re-formed after addition of 1-electron equivalent and the flavins could accept up to 3 electrons from NADPH. Calmodulin binding to the recombinant reductase protein increased its rate of NADPH-dependent flavin reduction and its rate of electron transfer to cytochrome c, FeCN6, or dichlorophenolindophenol to fully match the rate increases achieved when calmodulin bound to native full-length nNOS. Calmodulin's activation of the reductase protein was associated with an increase in domain tryptophan and flavin fluorescence. We conclude that many of calmodulin's actions on native nNOS can be fully accounted for through its interaction with the nNOS reductase domain itself.

  8. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  9. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  10. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  11. Individualized supplementation of folic acid according to polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) reduced pregnant complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiujuan; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Min; Xu, Mei; Yang, Yan; Lu, Wei; Yu, Xuemei; Ma, Jianlin; Pan, Jiakui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, A1298C and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms of pregnant women in Jiaodong region in China, and to investigate whether folic acid supplementation affect the pregnancy complications. A total of 7,812 pregnant women from the Jiaodong region in Shandong province in China. By using Taqman-MGB, 2,928 pregnant women (case group) were tested for the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of MTHFR C677T, A1298C and MTRR A66G polymorphisms. Folic acid metabolism ability was ranked at four levels and then pregnant women in different rank group were supplemented with different doses of folic acid. Their pregnancy complications were followed up and compared with 4,884 pregnant women without folic acid supplementation (control group) in the same hospital. The allele frequencies of MTHFR C677T were 49.1 and 50.9%; those of MTHFR A1298C were 80.2 and 19.8%, and those of MTRR A66G were 74.1 and 25.9%. After supplemented with folic acid, the complication rates in different age groups were significantly reduced, especially for gestational diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation and healthcare following gene polymorphism testing may be a powerful measure to decrease congenital malformations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) gene polymorphisms and adult meningioma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yan-Wen; Shi, Hua-Ping; Wang, Yan-Zhong; Li, Gui-Ling; Yu, Hai-Tao; Xie, Xin-You

    2013-11-01

    The causes of meningiomas are not well understood. Folate metabolism gene polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with various human cancers. It is still controversial and ambiguous between the functional polymorphisms of folate metabolism genes 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) and risk of adult meningioma. A population-based case–control study involving 600 meningioma patients (World Health Organization [WHO] Grade I, 391 cases; WHO Grade II, 167 cases; WHO Grade III, 42 cases) and 600 controls was done for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G variants in Chinese Han population. The folate metabolism gene polymorphisms were determined by using a polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Meningioma cases had a significantly lower frequency of MTHFR 677 TT genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 0.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.74; P = 0.001] and T allele (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.67–0.95; P = 0.01) than controls. A significant association between risk of meningioma and MTRR 66 GG (OR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.02–1.96; P = 0.04) was also observed. When stratifying by the WHO grade of meningioma, no association was found. Our study suggested that MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G variants may affect the risk of adult meningioma in Chinese Han population.

  13. A new cotton SDR family gene encodes a polypeptide possessing aldehyde reductase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Song, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Qin, Yong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    To understand regulatory mechanisms of cotton fiber development, microarray analysis has been performed for upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Based on this, a cDNA (GhKCR3) encoding a polypeptide belonging to short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase family was isolated and cloned. It contains an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding a polypeptide of 328 amino acid residues. Following its overexpression in bacterial cells, the purified recombinant protein specifically uses NADPH to reduce a variety of short-chain aldehydes. A fragment between Gly180 and Gly191 was found to be essential for its catalytic activity. Though the GhKCR3 gene shares low sequence similarities to the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YBR159w that encodes 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR) catalyzing the second step of fatty acid elongation, it was surprisingly able to complement the yeast ybr159wDelta mutant. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that very long-chain fatty acids, especially C26:0, were produced in the ybr159wDelta mutant cells expressing GhKCR3. Applying palmitoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates, GhKCR3 showed KCR activity in vitro. Quantitative real time-PCR analysis indicated GhKCR3 transcripts accumulated in rapidly elongating fibers, roots, and stems. Our results suggest that GhKCR3 is probably a novel KCR contributing to very long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in plants.

  14. Morphologic and functional alterations induced by low doses of mercuric chloride in the kidney OK cell line: ultrastructural evidence for an apoptotic mechanism of damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Said-Fernandez, Salvador; Sepulveda-Saavedra, Julio; Cruz-Vega, Delia E.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2005-01-01

    Mercury produces acute renal failure in experimental animal models, but the mechanism of tubular injury has not completely been clarified. There is an increased interest in the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of renal diseases that result primarily from injury to renal tubular epithelial cells. However, detailed studies of morpho-functional alterations induced by mercuric chloride in kidney cell lines are scarce. This work characterizes these alterations in OK cell cultures. Morphological alterations were profiled using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy, as well as mitochondrial functional assays in the cells exposed to low concentrations of HgCl 2 . At concentrations of 1 and 10 μM of HgCl 2 there were no morphological or ultrastructural alterations, but the mitochondrial function (MTT assay) and intracellular ATP content was increased, especially at longer incubation times (6 and 9 h). At 15 μM HgCl 2 , both the mitochondrial activity and the endogenous ATP decreased significantly. At this concentration the OK cells rounded up, had increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, and detached from the cell monolayer. At 15 μM HgCl 2 ultrastructural changes were characterized by dispersion of the ribosomes, dilatation of the cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, increase of number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, chromatin condensation, invaginations of the nuclear envelope, presence of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, and alterations in the size and morphology of mitochondria. At 15 μM HgCl 2 apoptotic signs included membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial alterations, apoptotic bodies, and nuclear envelope rupture. Using confocal microscopy and the mitochondrial specific dye MitoTracker Red, it was possible to establish qualitative changes induced by mercury on the mitochondrial membrane potential after incubation of the cells for 6 and 9 h with 15 μM HgCl 2 . This effect was not observed at short times

  15. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  16. Thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S S; Wong, P W; Zhou, J M; Sora, J; Lessick, M; Ruggie, N; Grcevich, G

    1988-07-01

    Thermostability of lymphocyte methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was determined in 21 patients aged less than 50 years with proven coronary artery disease, and in 21 age- and sex-matched controls without clinical evidence of vascular disease. The mean +/- SD of residual activity after heat inactivation at 46 degrees C for five minutes was 37.6% +/- 5.6% in the controls. In contrast, patients with coronary artery disease could be divided into two subgroups. Fifteen of them had 38.1 +/- 5.9% residual activity which was similar to that of the controls. In six of them the mean +/- SD residual activity after heat inactivation was 13.6% +/- 5.1% which was below 2 SD of the normal mean. These observations suggested that thermolabile MTHFR was associated with development of coronary artery disease.

  17. Substrate specificity of an aflatoxin-metabolizing aldehyde reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme from rat liver that reduces aflatoxin B1-dialdehyde exhibits a unique catalytic specificity distinct from that of other aldo-keto reductases. This enzyme, designated AFAR, displays high activity towards dicarbonyl-containing compounds with ketone groups on adjacent carbon atoms; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, acenaphthenequinone and camphorquinone were found to be good substrates. Although AFAR can also reduce aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes such as succinic semialdehyde, it is inactive with glucose, galactose and xylose. The enzyme also exhibits low activity towards alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds. Determination of the apparent Km reveals that AFAR has highest affinity for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and succinic semialdehyde, and low affinity for glyoxal and DL-glyceraldehyde. PMID:8526867

  18. Diterpenoids with thioredoxin reductase inhibitory activities from Jatropha multifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Chun-Yang; Dai, Jing-Jing; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Chemical investigation of the Jatropha multifida has led to the isolation of nine diterpenoids (1-9), including a new jatromulone A, four podocarpane diterpenoids (2-5), two lathyrane-type diterpenoids (6 and 7) and two dinorditerpenoids (8 and 9). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, and the absolute configurations of 1 were determined by CD analysis. All of the diterpenoids were screened for inhibitory activity against thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), which is a potential target for cancer chemotherapy with redox balance and antioxidant functions. Compounds 6 and 7 exhibited stronger activity (IC 50 : 23.4 and 10.6 μM, respectively) than the positive control, curcumin (IC 50  = 25.0 μM). Compounds 2-9 were isolated from J. multifida for the first time.

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in myeloid leukemia patients from Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynara Gomes Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR: EC 1.5.1.20 polymorphisms are associated to acute lymphoid leukemia in different populations. We used the polymerase chain reaction and the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP to investigate MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphism frequencies in 67 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 27 with acute myeloid leukemia FAB subtype M3 (AML-M3 and 100 apparently healthy controls. The MTHFR mutant allele frequencies were as follows: CML = 17.2% for C677T, 21.6% for A1298C; AML-M3 = 22.2% for C677T, 24.1% for A1298C; and controls = 20.5% for C677T, 21% for A1298C. Taken together, our results provide evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms have no influence on the development of CML or AML-M3.

  20. Aldose reductase inhibitors from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma applanatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Shim, Sang Hee; Kim, Ju Sun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Sam Sik

    2005-06-01

    The isolation and characterization of rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitors from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma applanatum were conducted. Among the extracts and fractions from G. applanatum tested, the MeOH extract and EtOAc fraction were found to exhibit potent RLAR inhibition in vitro, their IC50 being 1.7 and 0.8 microg/ml, respectively. From the active EtOAc fraction, seven compounds with diverse structural moieties were isolated and identified as D-mannitol (1), 2-methoxyfatty acids (2), cerebrosides (3), daucosterol (4), 2,5-dihydroxyacetophenone (5), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (6), and protocatechualdehyde (7). Among them, protocatechualdehyde (7) was found to be the most potent RLAR inhibitor (IC50=0.7 microg/ml), and may be useful for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  1. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  2. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  3. Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase Is Sensitive to Light Inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Viennet, Thibault; Skjoldager, Nicklas

    2015-01-01

    enzymes belong to the same class of low-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases and display similar kcat values (∼25 s-1) with their cognate thioredoxin. Remarkably, however, the L. lactis enzyme is inactivated by visible light and furthermore reduces molecular oxygen 10 times faster than E. coli Trx......R. The rate of light inactivation under standardized conditions (λmax = 460 nm and 4 °C) was reduced at lowered oxygen concentrations and in the presence of iodide. Inactivation was accompanied by a distinct spectral shift of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) that remained firmly bound. High......-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of heat-extracted FAD from light-damaged TrxR revealed a mass increment of 13.979 Da, relative to that of unmodified FAD, corresponding to the addition of one oxygen atom and the loss of two hydrogen atoms. Tandem mass spectrometry confined the increase in mass...

  4. Aspects of ribonucleotide reductase regulation and genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Berner Nedergaard

    yeast, and Sml1, Hug1, and Dif1 in budding yeast. An elevated, as well as a reduced dNTP pool is shown to lead to an increase in spontaneous mutation rates, hence regulation of RNR is very important in order to maintain genomic stability. No human inhibitory proteins have yet been identified to regulate......In all living cells, synthesis of the DNA building blocks, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), is tightly regulated to ensure a precise DNA replication to maintain genomic stability. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the enzyme responsible for reducing ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms...... the human RNR enzyme. In this study regulation of human RNR was investigated using a fission yeast strain that depended solely on the human genes of R1 and R2 for dNTP synthesis. Even though this strain could grow like wild-type fission yeast it was hypersensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) and depended...

  5. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...... disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism...

  6. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  7. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semsang, Nuananong, E-mail: nsemsang@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, LiangDeng [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  8. Photooxidative Destruction of Chloroplasts Leads to Reduced Expression of Peroxisomal NADH-Dependent Hydroxypyruvate Reductase in Developing Cucumber Cotyledons 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Brain W.; Daniel, Steven G.; Becker, Wayne M.

    1992-01-01

    Photooxidative destruction of chloroplasts by exposure of norflurazon-treated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings to white light leads to reduced levels of the nuclear-encoded, peroxisomal enzyme hydroxypyruvate reductase. The partial reduction in hydroxypyruvate reductase activity under photooxidative conditions is accompanied by reductions in levels of hydroxypyruvate reductase protein and transcript. The low level of hydroxypyruvate reductase gene expression in the dark is not affected by norflurazon, and nonphotooxidizing far-red light is able to induce significant increases in hydroxypyruvate reductase expression even in the presence of norflurazon. We conclude that intact plastids are required for maximal expression of hydroxypyruvate reductase in the light and that the plastids affect hydroxypyruvate reductase gene expression at a pretranslational level. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668940

  9. Comparison of the Stereospecificity and Immunoreactivity of NADH-Ferricyanide Reductases in Plant Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredlund, K. M.; Struglics, A.; Widell, S.; Askerlund, P.; Kader, J. C.; Moller, I. M.

    1994-11-01

    The substrate stereospecificity of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activities in the inner mitochondrial membrane and peroxisomal membrane of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf plasma membrane, and red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) tonoplast were all specific for the [beta]-hydrogen of NADH, whereas the reductases in wheat root (Triticum aestivum L.) endoplasmic reticulum and potato tuber outer mitochondrial membrane were both [alpha]-hydrogen specific. In all isolated membrane fractions one or several polypeptides with an apparent size of 45 to 55 kD cross-reacted with antibodies raised against a microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase on western blots.

  10. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Pegan, Scott D; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identi...

  11. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  12. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  13. Mo and W bis-MGD enzymes: nitrate reductases and formate dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, José J G; Brondino, Carlos D; Trincão, José; Romão, Maria João

    2004-10-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are second- and third-row transition elements, respectively, which are found in a mononuclear form in the active site of a diverse group of enzymes that generally catalyze oxygen atom transfer reactions. Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes have been classified into three families: xanthine oxidase, DMSO reductase, and sulfite oxidase. The proteins of the DMSO reductase family present the widest diversity of properties among its members and our knowledge about this family was greatly broadened by the study of the enzymes nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase, obtained from different sources. We discuss in this review the information of the better characterized examples of these two types of Mo enzymes and W enzymes closely related to the members of the DMSO reductase family. We briefly summarize, also, the few cases reported so far for enzymes that can function either with Mo or W at their active site.

  14. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  15. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  16. Bioinformatics analysis of the predicted polyprenol reductase genes in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.

    2018-03-01

    The present study evaluates the bioinformatics methods to analyze twenty-four predicted polyprenol reductase genes from higher plants on GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, similarity, subcellular localization, and phylogenetic. The physicochemical properties of plant polyprenol showed diversity among the observed genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of plant polyprenol genes followed the ratio order of α helix > random coil > extended chain structure. The values of chloroplast but not signal peptide were too low, indicated that few chloroplast transit peptide in plant polyprenol reductase genes. The possibility of the potential transit peptide showed variation among the plant polyprenol reductase, suggested the importance of understanding the variety of peptide components of plant polyprenol genes. To clarify this finding, a phylogenetic tree was drawn. The phylogenetic tree shows several branches in the tree, suggested that plant polyprenol reductase genes grouped into divergent clusters in the tree.

  17. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    cellular distribution of enzymic activity was investigated after differential centrifugation of Trypanosoma cell extracts. Reductase activity was primarily associated with the cellular soluble fraction because 95% of the total cellular activity was recovered in the supernatant and was particularly...

  18. The 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase gene from Taxus media: Cloning, characterization and functional identification. Y Sun, M Chen, J Tang, W Liu, C Yang, Y Yang, X Lan, M Hsieh, Z Liao ...

  19. Mercury uptake in vivo by normal and acatalasemic mice exposed to metallic mercury vapor (203Hg degrees) and injected with metallic mercury or mercuric chloride (203HgCl2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Meguro, T.; Aikoh, H.

    1985-01-01

    Levels of mercury in the brain and liver of acatalasemic mice immediately following exposure to metallic mercury vapor or injection of metallic mercury were higher than those found in normal mice. Acatalasemic mice had decreased levels of mercury in the blood and kidneys when the levels were compared with those of normal mice, which indicated that catalase plays a role in oxidizing and taking up mercury. Thus, the brain/blood or liver/blood ratio of mercury concentration in acatalasemic mice was significantly higher than that of normal mice. These results suggest that metallic mercury in the blood easily passed through the blood-brain or blood-liver barrier. The levels of mercury distribution to the kidneys of normal and acatalasemic mice, 1 hr after injection of mercuric chloride solution, were higher than that of normal and acatalasemic mice, respectively, 1 hr after injection of metallic mercury

  20. The Importance of Homozygous Polymorphisms of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene in Romanian Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hotoleanu, Cristina; Trifa, Adrian; Popp, Radu; Fodor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms have recently raised the interest as a possible thrombophilic factors. Aims: We aimed to assess the frequency of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a Romanian population and the associated risk of VTE. Study Design: We performed a case-control transversal study including 90 patients diagnosed with VTE and 75 sex- an...

  1. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from??Zea mays L.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1?7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8?12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reducta...

  2. Genome sequence analysis of predicted polyprenol reductase gene from mangrove plant kandelia obovata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Sagami, H.; Baba, S.; Oku, H.

    2018-03-01

    It has been previously reported that dolichols but not polyprenols were predominated in mangrove leaves and roots. Therefore, the occurrence of larger amounts of dolichol in leaves of mangrove plants implies that polyprenol reductase is responsible for the conversion of polyprenol to dolichol may be active in mangrove leaves. Here we report the early assessment of probably polyprenol reductase gene from genome sequence of mangrove plant Kandelia obovata. The functional assignment of the gene was based on a homology search of the sequences against the non-redundant (nr) peptide database of NCBI using Blastx. The degree of sequence identity between DNA sequence and known polyprenol reductase was confirmed using the Blastx probability E-value, total score, and identity. The genome sequence data resulted in three partial sequences, termed c23157 (700 bp), c23901 (960 bp), and c24171 (531 bp). The c23157 gene showed the highest similarity (61%) to predicted polyprenol reductase 2- like from Gossypium raimondii with E-value 2e-100. The second gene was c23901 to exhibit high similarity (78%) to the steroid 5-alpha-reductase Det2 from J. curcas with E-value 2e-140. Furthermore, the c24171 gene depicted highest similarity (79%) to the polyprenol reductase 2 isoform X1 from Jatropha curcas with E- value 7e-21.The present study suggested that the c23157, c23901, and c24171, genes may encode predicted polyprenol reductase. The c23157, c23901, c24171 are therefore the new type of predicted polyprenol reductase from K. obovata.

  3. In vitro effects of selenite and mercuric chloride on liver thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and non-protein thiols from rats: influences of dietary cholesterol and polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Marcelo; Soares, Félix Antunes; Feoli, Ana; Roehring, Cíntia; Brusque, Ana Maria; Rotta, Liane; Perry, Marcos Luis; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Rocha, João Batista T

    2003-06-01

    We measured the in vitro effects of mercuric chloride (Hg2+) and selenite (Se4+) on hepatic 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels of rats fed diets enriched with polyunsaturated or saturated fatty acids with and without cholesterol. Male Wistar rats (21 d old) were assigned to one of four groups and fed diets containing 20% soybean oil, 20% soybean oil plus 1% cholesterol, 20% coconut oil, or coconut oil plus 1% cholesterol. After the feeding period (6 wk), body weight gain was equal in all groups. TBARS levels and NPSH content were measured after in vitro exposure to mercuric chloride (100 microM) and sodium selenite (25 microM) for 1 h. The lipid peroxidation, measured as TBARS levels in the control group, were statistically higher in hepatic homogenates of rats fed diets containing soybean oil than in groups fed coconut oil (P = 0.009). However, cholesterol supplementation did not change TBARS levels. Selenite alone did not modify TBARS production, whereas mercury alone significantly increased TBARS levels. Moreover, Se4+ protected against mercury-induced lipid peroxidation only in rats fed diets containing coconut oil. In the control group, dietary fat acids did not change NPSH levels. Selenite produced higher oxidative effects toward NPSH content, whereas Hg2+ decreased NPSH levels only in liver from rats fed diets containing soybean oil. NPSH levels were higher after concomitant exposure to Se4+ and Hg2+ chloride that after exposure to Se4+ alone, suggesting an interaction between Hg2+ and Se4+. Catalase activity was higher in animals fed diets containing soybean oil. Dietary cholesterol decreased glutathione peroxidase activity. Together these results indicated that the protective effect of Se4+ against mercury-induced lipid peroxidation depends on dietary fat saturation.

  4. Purification and characterization of (+)dihydroflavonol (3-hydroxyflavanone) 4-reductase from flowers of Dahlia variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; Stich, K; Britsch, L; Grisebach, H

    1988-07-01

    Individual flowers from inflorescences of Dahlia variabilis (cv Scarlet Star) in young developmental stages contained relatively high activity of (+)-dihydroflavonol (DHF) 4-reductase. The DHF reductase was purified from such flowers to apparent homogeneity by a five-step procedure. This included affinity adsorption on Blue Sepharose and elution of the enzyme with NADP+. By gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis it was shown that DHF reductase contains only one polypeptide chain with a Mr of about 41,000. The reductase required NADPH as cofactor and catalyzed transfer of the pro-S hydrogen of NADPH to the substrate. Flavanones and dihydroflavonols (3-hydroxyflavanones) were substrates for DHF reductase with pH optima of about 6.0 for flavanones and of about 6.8 for dihydroflavonols. Flavanones were reduced to the corresponding flavan-4-ols and (+)-dihydroflavonols to flavan-3,4-cis-diols. Apparent Michaelis constants determined for (2S)-naringenin, (2S)-eriodicytol, (+)-dihydrokaempferol, (+)-dihydroquercetin, and NADPH were, respectively, 2.3, 2, 10, 15, and 42 microM. V/Km values were higher for dihydroflavonols than for flavanones. Conversion of dihydromyricetin to leucodelphinidin was also catalyzed by the enzyme at a low rate, whereas flavones and flavonols were not accepted as substrates. DHF reductase was not inhibited by metal chelators.

  5. The Tail Wagging the Dog: Insights into Catalysis in R67 Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, Ganesh K [ORNL; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzes a hydride transfer reaction between substrate dihydrofolate (DHF) and its cofactor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). R67 DHFR is a homotetramer that exhibits numerous characteristics of a primitive enzyme, including promiscuity in binding of substrate and cofactor, formation of nonproductive complexes, and the absence of a conserved acid in its active site. Furthermore, R67's active site is a pore, which is mostly accessible by bulk solvent. This study uses a computational approach to characterize the mechanism of hydride transfer. Not surprisingly, NADPH remains fixed in one-half of the active site pore using numerous interactions with R67. Also, stacking between the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor and the pteridine ring of the substrate, DHF, at the hourglass center of the pore, holds the reactants in place. However, large movements of the p-aminobenzoylglutamate tail of DHF occur in the other half of the pore because of ion pair switching between symmetry-related K32 residues from two subunits. This computational result is supported by experimental results that the loss of these ion pair interactions (located >13 {angstrom} from the center of the pore) by addition of salt or in asymmetric K32M mutants leads to altered enzyme kinetics [Hicks, S. N., et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 10569-10578; Hicks, S. N., et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 46995?47002]. The tail movement at the edge of the active site, coupled with the fixed position of the pteridine ring in the center of the pore, leads to puckering of the pteridine ring and promotes formation of the transition state. Flexibility coupled to R67 function is unusual as it contrasts with the paradigm that enzymes use increased rigidity to facilitate attainment of their transition states. A comparison with chromosomal DHFR indicates a number of similarities, including puckering of the nicotinamide ring and changes in the DHF tail

  6. Association study between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Renfang; Fan, Yihui; Zuo, Lulu; Geng, Dongfeng; Meng, Fantao; Zhu, Jing; Li, Qiang; Qiao, Hong; Jin, Yan; Bai, Jing; Fu, Songbin

    2010-10-01

    5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the metabolism of folate and nucleotides, which are essential for DNA synthesis and methylation. It is highly polymorphic, and its variant genotypes result in lower enzymatic activity and higher plasma homocysteine. Previous studies have provided evidence that a high prevalence of MTHFR gene polymorphisms is frequently detected in patients with autoimmune disease, suggesting a novel genetic association with autoimmune disorders. However, the genetic association between MTHFR and Graves' disease (GD), one of the most common autoimmune diseases, has not been studied. Here, we designed a clinic-based case-control study including 199 GD cases and 235 healthy controls to examine the associations between three common MTHFR polymorphisms (i.e., C677T, A1298C, and G1793A) and GD. Surprisingly, logistic regression analysis shows MTHFR 677CT + TT genotypes are associated with an approximately 42% reduction in the risk of GD in women (adjusted OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9), compared to the CC genotype, indicating a significant protective effect of 677CT + TT genotypes. Our result provides epidemiological evidence that MTHFR mutation (C677T) protects women from GD. The protective effect, possibly obtained by influencing DNA methylation, should be confirmed in a large number of cohorts. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A second target of benzamide riboside: dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Breton; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Kerrigan, John E; Scotto, Kathleen W; Banerjee, Debabrata; Felczak, Krzysztof; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Gounder, Murugesan; Lin, HongXia; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Bertino, Joseph R

    2012-11-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is an essential enzyme involved in de novo purine and thymidine biosynthesis. For several decades, selective inhibition of DHFR has proven to be a potent therapeutic approach in the treatment of various cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, osteogenic sarcoma, carcinoma of the breast, and head and neck cancer. Therapeutic success with DHFR inhibitor methotrexate (MTX) has been compromised in the clinic, which limits the success of MTX treatment by both acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms. We report that benzamide riboside (BR), via anabolism to benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) known to potently inhibit inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), also inhibits cell growth through a mechanism involving downregulation of DHFR protein. Evidence to support this second site of action of BR includes the finding that CCRF-CEM/R human T-cell lymphoblasic leukemia cells, resistant to MTX as a consequence of gene amplification and overexpression of DHFR, are more resistant to BR than are parental cells. Studies of the mechanism by which BR lowers DHFR showed that BR, through its metabolite BAD, reduced NADP and NADPH cellular levels by inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinase (NADK). As consequence of the lack of NADPH, DHFR was shown to be destabilized. We suggest that, inhibition of NADK is a new approach to downregulate DHFR and to inhibit cell growth.

  8. Old and new inhibitors of quinone reductase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Gilles; Hecht, Sabrina; Berger, Sylvie; Moulharat, Natacha; Coge, Francis; Guillaumet, Gérald; Leclerc, Véronique; Yous, Saïd; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A

    2010-07-30

    Quinone reductase 2 is a cytosolic enzyme which catalyses the reduction of quinones, such as menadione and coenzymes Q. Despite a relatively close sequence-based resemblance to NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (QR1), it has many different features. QR2 is the third melatonin binding site (MT3). It is inhibited in the micromolar range by melatonin, and does not accept conventional phosphorylated nicotinamides as hydride donors. QR2 has a powerful capacity to activate quinones leading to unexpected toxicity situations. In the present paper, we report the characterization of three QR2 modulators: melatonin, resveratrol and S29434. The latter compound inhibits QR2 activity with an IC(50) in the low nanomolar range. The potency of the modulators ranged as follows, from the least to the most potent: melatonin

  9. Antiproliferative and quinone reductase-inducing activities of withanolides derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Manuela E; Nicotra, Viviana E; Oberti, Juan C; Ríos-Luci, Carla; León, Leticia G; Marler, Laura; Li, Guannan; Pezzuto, John M; van Breemen, Richard B; Padrón, José M; Hueso-Falcón, Idaira; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2014-07-23

    Two new and five known withanolides (jaborosalactones 2, 3, 4, 5, and 24) were isolated from the leaves of Jaborosa runcinata Lam. We also obtained some derivatives from jaborosalactone 5, which resulted to be the major isolated metabolite. The natural compounds as well as derivatives were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity and the induction of quinone reductase 1 (QR1; NQ01) activity. Structure-activity relationships revealed valuable information on the pharmacophore of withanolide-type compounds. Three compounds of this series showed significantly higher antiproliferative activity than jaborosalactone 5. The effect of these compounds on the cell cycle was determined. Furthermore, the ability of major compounds to induce QR1 was evaluated. It was found that all the active test compounds are monofunctional inducers that interact with Keap1. The most promising derivatives prepared from jaborosalactone 5 include (23R)-4β,12β,21-trihydroxy-1,22-dioxo-12,23-cycloergostan-2,5,17,24-tetraen-26,23-olide (18) and (23R)-21-acetoxy-12β-hydroxy-1,22-dioxo-12,23-cycloergostan-2,5,17,24-tetraen-26,23-lactame (20). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure, function, and mechanism of cytosolic quinone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchet, Mario A; Erdemli, Sabri Bora; Amzel, L Mario

    2008-01-01

    Quinone reductases type 1 (QR1) are FAD-containing enzymes that catalyze the reduction of many quinones, including menadione (Vit K3), to hydroquinones using reducing equivalents provided by NAD(P)H. The reaction proceeds with a ping-pong mechanism in which the NAD(P)H and the substrate occupy alternatively overlapping regions of the same binding site and participate in a double hydride transfer: one from NAD(P)H to the FAD of the enzyme, and one from the FADH(2) of the enzyme to the quinone substrate. The main function of QR1 is probably the detoxification of dietary quinones but it may also contribute to the reduction of vitamin K for its involvement in blood coagulation. In addition, the same reaction that QR1 uses in the detoxification of quinones, activates some compounds making them cytotoxic. Since QR1 is elevated in many tumors, this property has encouraged the development of chemotherapeutic compounds that become cytotoxic after reduction by QR1. The structures of QR1 alone, and in complexes with substrates, inhibitors, and chemotherapeutic prodrugs, combined with biochemical and mechanistic studies have provided invaluable insight into the mechanism of the enzyme as well as suggestions for the improvements of the chemotherapeutic prodrugs. Similar information is beginning to accumulate about another related enzyme, QR2.

  11. 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and prostatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, F H

    1994-08-01

    5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors are a new class of substances with very specific effects on type I and type II 5 alpha R which may be of use in the treatment of skin disease, such as male pattern baldness, male acne and hirsutism, as well as prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. At least two types of 5 alpha R inhibitors with a different pH optimum have been described. cDNA encoding for both the type I and the type II enzyme has been cloned. Most of the orally effective 5 alpha R inhibitors belong to the class of 4-azasteroids. The radical substituted in the 17 position of the steroid ring seems to be related to species specific variations and to the types of 5 alpha R enzymes in different species and organ systems. 5 alpha R inhibitors lead to a decrease of plasma DHT by about 65% while there is a slight rise in plasma testosterone. The decrease of tissue DHT in the ventral prostate of the intact rat, the dog and in humans is more pronounced and amounts to about 85%. There is a reciprocal rise of tissue T in these systems. The application of an inhibitor of 5 alpha R type II leads to a shrinkage of BPH in men by about 30%. In the rat a similar shrinkage accompanied by a significant decrease of total organ DNA occurs. This decrease, however, is not as pronounced as can be achieved with castration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Increased 5α-reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5α-reductase activity (5α-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5α-RA. In vitro 5α-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with 14 C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5α-androstane 3α-17β-estradiol (3α-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3α-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3α-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5α-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5α-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5α-RA

  13. Cheminformatics Models for Inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Gaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by a parasite Schistosoma mansoni and affects over 200 million annually. There is an urgent need to discover novel therapeutic options to control the disease with the recent emergence of drug resistance. The multifunctional protein, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR, an essential enzyme for the survival of the pathogen in the redox environment has been actively explored as a potential drug target. The recent availability of small-molecule screening datasets against this target provides a unique opportunity to learn molecular properties and apply computational models for discovery of activities in large molecular libraries. Such a prioritisation approach could have the potential to reduce the cost of failures in lead discovery. A supervised learning approach was employed to develop a cost sensitive classification model to evaluate the biological activity of the molecules. Random forest was identified to be the best classifier among all the classifiers with an accuracy of around 80 percent. Independent analysis using a maximally occurring substructure analysis revealed 10 highly enriched scaffolds in the actives dataset and their docking against was also performed. We show that a combined approach of machine learning and other cheminformatics approaches such as substructure comparison and molecular docking is efficient to prioritise molecules from large molecular datasets.

  14. Determination of Nitrate Reductase Assay Depending on the Microbial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kabbany, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid micro-dilution assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of different bacterial isolates was developed. This assay is based on the ability of the most of viable organisms to reduce nitrates. The MIC or MBC could be determined by nitrate reductase (NR) only after 30 to 90 min of incubation depending on the behaviour of microbial growth. Bacterial viability is detected by a positive nitrite reduction rather than visible turbidity. The nitrate reduction assay was compared with standard micro-assay using 250 isolates of different taxa against 10 antibiotics belonging to different classes. An excellent agreement of 82.5 % was found between the two methods and only 17.5 % of 1794 trials showed difference in the determined MIC by tow-dilution interval above or below the MIC determined by the turbidimetric method under the same test conditions. However, the nitrate reduction assay was more rapid and sensitive in detecting viable bacteria and so, established an accurate estimate of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the minimal bacterial concentration (MBC). The nitrate reduction assay offers the additional advantage that it could be used to determine the MBC without having to subculture the broth. 232 cases of resistance were detected by NR and 4 different media were tested for susceptibility test. The bacterial isolates were exposed to ultra violet (UV) light for different period

  15. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The ion source comprises a cylindrically shaped chamber with a longitudinal outlet slot formed therein and two uniform anode wires which extend along the length of the chamber in the middle region thereof and which are symmetrically introduced with respect to the length axis of the chamber and the outlet groove, characterised in that at each outer end of the outlet groove at a nearly null potential or direct potential is introduced a mask, whereby the lowest distance between the inner and outer ends of the mask is equivalent to the breadth of the ion beam emitted from the source. (G.C.)

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of perakine reductase, a new member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Cindy [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Mueller, Uwe [Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung mbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panjikar, Santosh [European Molecular Biology Laboratory Hamburg, Outstation Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sun, Lianli [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of TCM and Natural Drug Research, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 513 Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); Ruppert, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Zhao, Yu [Department of TCM and Natural Drug Research, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 513 Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); Stöckigt, Joachim, E-mail: stoeckig@mail.uni-mainz.de [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of TCM and Natural Drug Research, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 513 Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China)

    2006-12-01

    Perakine reductase, a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily of higher plants, is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpentina. The enzyme has been crystallized in C-centered orthorhombic space group and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution. Perakine reductase (PR) is a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants. PR from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids by performing NADPH-dependent reduction of perakine, yielding raucaffrinoline. However, PR can also reduce cinnamic aldehyde and some of its derivatives. After heterologous expression of a triple mutant of PR in Escherichia coli, crystals of the purified and methylated enzyme were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 100 mM sodium citrate pH 5.6 and 27% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and diffract to 2.0 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 93.0, c = 143.4 Å.

  17. Nitrate reductase from Spinacea oleracea. FAD and the reactivation of the enzyme treated with p-Hydroxymercuribenzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, F; de la Rosa, F F; Palacián, E

    1977-12-01

    Spinach nitrate reductase complex previously inactivated by treatment with mercurials p-hydroxymercuribenzoate or p-hydroxymercuriphenyl sulphonate can be reactivated by incubation with dithioerythritol. The reactivation of NADH-diaphorase seems to be FAD-dependent, whereas that of FNH2-nitrate reductase is not. The requirement of FAD for NADH-inactivation of nitrate reductase treated with p-hydroxymercuribenzoate disappears after treatment with dithioerythritol.

  18. Induction of aldose reductase and sorbitol in renal inner medullary cells by elevated extracellular NaCl.

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnasco, S M; Uchida, S; Balaban, R S; Kador, P F; Burg, M B

    1987-01-01

    Aldose reductase [aldehyde reductase 2; alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21] catalyzes conversion of glucose to sorbitol. Although its activity is implicated in the progression of ocular and neurological complications of diabetes, the normal function of the enzyme in most cells is unknown. Both aldose reductase activity and substantial levels of sorbitol were previously reported in renal inner medullary cells. In this tissue, the extracellular NaCl concentration normally is high and...

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the Fe(III) chelate reductase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huilan; Li, Lihua; Du, Juan; Yuan, Youxi; Cheng, Xudong; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2005-09-01

    Iron chelate reductase is required for iron acquisition from soil and for metabolism in plants. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana there are eight genes classified into the iron chelate reductase gene family (AtFROs) based on sequence homology with AtFRO2 (a ferric chelate reductase in Arabidopsis). They are localized on chromosome 1 (three AtFROs) and chromosome 5 (five AtFROs) of Arabidopsis and show a high level of amino acid sequence similarity to each other. An assay for ferric chelate reductase activity revealed that AtFRO2, AtFRO3, AtFRO4, AtFRO5, AtFRO7 and AtFRO8 conferred significantly increased iron reduction activity compared with the control when expressed in yeast cells, indicating that the six AtFROs encode iron chelate reductases functioning in iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. AtFRO2 displayed the highest iron reduction activity among the AtFROs investigated, further demonstrating that AtFRO2 is a major iron reductase gene in Arabidopsis. AtFRO2 and AtFRO3 were mainly expressed in roots of Arabidopsis, AtFRO5 and AtFRO6 in shoots and flowers, and AtFRO7 in cotyledons and trichomes, whereas the transcription of AtFRO8 was specific for leaf veins. Considering the tissue-specific expression profiles of AtFRO genes, we suggest that AtFRO2 and AtFRO3 are two Fe(III) chelate reductases mainly functioning in iron acquisition and metabolism in Arabidopsis roots, while AtFRO5, AtFRO6, AtFRO7 and AtFRO8 are required for iron homeostasis in different tissues of shoots.

  20. Ion channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramli, H.; Blondiaux, G.

    1994-01-01

    Channeling phenomenon was predicted, many years ago, by stark. The first channeling experiments were performed in 1963 by Davies and his coworkers. Parallely Robinson and Oen have investigated this process by simulating trajectories of ions in monocrystals. This technique has been combined with many methods like Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (R.B.S.), Particles Induced X-rays Emission (P.I.X.E) and online Nuclear Reaction (N.R.A.) to localize trace elements in the crystal or to determine crystalline quality. To use channeling for material characterization we need data about the stopping power of the incident particle in the channeled direction. The ratios of channeled to random stopping powers of silicon for irradiation in the direction have been investigated and compared to the available theoretical results. We describe few applications of ion channeling in the field of materials characterization. Special attention is given to ion channeling combined with Charged Particle Activation Analysis (C.P.A.A.) for studying the behaviour of oxygen atoms in Czochralski silicon lattices under the influence of internal gettering and in different gaseous atmospheres. Association between ion channeling and C.P.A.A was also utilised for studying the influence of the growing conditions on concentration and position of carbon atoms at trace levels in the MOVPE Ga sub (1-x) Al sub x lattice. 6 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs. (author)

  1. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against NADPH-Cytochrome P-450 Reductases from Helianthus tuberosus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesot, Agnès; Benveniste, Irène; Hasenfratz, Marie-Paule; Durst, Francis

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a plant NADPH-cytochrome P-450 (Cyt P-450) reductase from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tuber were prepared. These antibodies were produced by hybridoma resulting from the fusion of spleen cells from a rat immunized with a purified preparation of the reductase and mouse myeloma cells. The mAbs thus obtained were screened for their interaction with the reductases, first in western dots and then in blots, and for their ability to inhibit the NADPH-cytochrome c (Cyt c) reductase activity from Jerusalem artichoke microsomes. Among the 11 clones giving a positive response on western blots, only 6 were also able to inhibit microsomal NADPH-Cyt c reductase activity, and the microsomal Cyt P-450 monooxygenase activities dependent upon electrons transferred by the reductase. Thus, two families of mAbs were characterized: a family of mAbs that interact with epitopes of the reductase implicated in the reduction of Cyt P-450 by NADPH (binding sites for NADPH, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and Cyt P-450), and a structural family, whose members recognize epitopes outside the active site of the reductases. These mAbs specifically recognize the reductase, and all of them interact with all of the isoforms, indicating that important primary or secondary structural analogies exist between the isoforms, not only at the active site, but also at the level of epitopes not directly associated with catalytic activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16653138

  2. The reactivation of nitrate reductase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) inactivated by NADH and cyanide: effects of peroxidase and associated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J M; Notton, B A; Hewitt, E J

    1982-12-01

    Nitrate reductase of spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves which had been inactivated in vitro by treatment with NADH and cyanide, was reactivated by incubation with oxidant systems and measured as FMNH2-dependent activity. Ferricyanide, a purely chemical oxidant, produced rapid maximal reactivation (100%) which was 90% complete in less than 3 min. Reactivation occurred slowly and less completely (30-75% in 30 or 60 min) when the enzyme was incubated with pure horseradish peroxidase alone, depending on using one or 20 units and time. Addition of glucose and glucose oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide increased reactivation slightly (10-15%) with 20 units of peroxidase but more (30-50%) with one unit and to 75-90% of ferricyanide values. Adding catalase decreased reactivation by more than half either with or without glucose oxidase. Glucose and glucose oxidase alone did not cause reactivation. Addition of superoxide dismutase increased reactivation from 50-75% of ferricyanide values with one unit of peroxidase alone but had no effect on greater reactivation obtained in the presence of glucose oxidase. The addition of p-cresol and manganese together increased reactivation with one unit of peroxidase and in the presence of glucose oxidase by about double, but omission of manganese had no effect. However, as shown previously, although trivalent manganese was formed, the residual presence of manganous ions inhibited reactivation. Nevertheless, peroxidase systems either alone or with additionally generated hydrogen peroxide can induce substantial reactivation of nitrate reductase in physiologically relevant conditions.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype association with the risk of follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Said I; Ababneh, Nida A; Khader, Yousef; Abu-Khader, Ahmad A; Awidi, Abdullah

    2009-12-01

    The metabolism of folate is essential in DNA synthesis, and polymorphisms of genes involved in such metabolism have been implicated in many types of cancer. Among these, the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) encodes an enzyme that converts folate to a methyl donor used for DNA methylation. We studied the association between the different genotypes of the two most common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C, and the risk of follicular lymphoma (FL). For this purpose, 55 previously diagnosed FL patients and 170 normal control subjects were examined using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequency of the A1298C CC homozygous mutant genotype was significantly higher in patients with FL than in control subjects (OR = 3.51, 95% CI = 1.39-8.86, P = 0.008). No such association was found for the heterozygous A1298C AC genotype (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.55-2.12, P = 0.83). On the other hand, no significant association was found for either the C677T CT heterozygous genotype (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.42-1.51, P = 0.49) or the C677T TT homozygous mutant genotype (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.12-2.65, P = 0.46). The present findings add to the very few reports suggesting a link between the A1298C CC homozygous MTHFR genotype and a higher risk of developing FL, and the first such in a Jordanian population.

  4. Sepiapterin Reductase Mediates Chemical Redox Cycling in Lung Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    In the lung, chemical redox cycling generates highly toxic reactive oxygen species that can cause alveolar inflammation and damage to the epithelium, as well as fibrosis. In this study, we identified a cytosolic NADPH-dependent redox cycling activity in mouse lung epithelial cells as sepiapterin reductase (SPR), an enzyme important for the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. Human SPR was cloned and characterized. In addition to reducing sepiapterin, SPR mediated chemical redox cycling of bipyridinium herbicides and various quinones; this activity was greatest for 1,2-naphthoquinone followed by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone, menadione, and 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone. Whereas redox cycling chemicals inhibited sepiapterin reduction, sepiapterin had no effect on redox cycling. Additionally, inhibitors such as dicoumarol, N-acetylserotonin, and indomethacin blocked sepiapterin reduction, with no effect on redox cycling. Non-redox cycling quinones, including benzoquinone and phenylquinone, were competitive inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction but noncompetitive redox cycling inhibitors. Site-directed mutagenesis of the SPR C-terminal substrate-binding site (D257H) completely inhibited sepiapterin reduction but had minimal effects on redox cycling. These data indicate that SPR-mediated reduction of sepiapterin and redox cycling occur by distinct mechanisms. The identification of SPR as a key enzyme mediating chemical redox cycling suggests that it may be important in generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the lung. This activity, together with inhibition of sepiapterin reduction by redox-active chemicals and consequent deficiencies in tetrahydrobiopterin, may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:23640889

  5. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hun Paek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethyl acetate (EtOAc soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens inhibits aldose reductase (AR, the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MSn. The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MSn. A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5 : 5 : 1 : 5, v/v and 3 : 7 : 5 : 5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR. The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2 (IC50 = 3.16 μM, rosmarinic acid (4 (IC50 = 2.77 μM, luteolin (5 (IC50 = 6.34 μM, and methyl rosmarinic acid (6 (IC50 = 4.03 μM.

  6. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase gene polymorphism in children with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, M; Aydin, H; Aktas, A; Cırık, A A

    2015-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms by impairing folate metabolism may influence the development of allergic diseases. The results of studies evaluating the relationship between MTHFR polymorphisms and atopic disease are controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the polymorphisms of C677T and A1298C for MTHFR gene and allergic rhinitis (AR) in children. Ninety patients followed up with diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in our clinic and 30 children with no allergic diseases were included in the study. All participants were genotyped for the MTHFR (C677T) and (A1298C) polymorphisms. Vitamin b12, folate and homocysteine levels were measured. The mean age of patients was 9.2±2.9 years; 66.7% of the patients were male. There was no significant difference between patient and control groups regarding gender, age and atopy history of the family (p>0.05). The frequency of homozygotes for MTHFR C677T polymorphism in the patient and control groups was 3.3% and 10%, respectively. The frequency of homozygotes for MTHFR A1298C polymorphism among groups was 26.7% and 16.7%, respectively. The association between allergic rhinitis and polymorphisms of C677T and A1298C for MTHFR gene was not statistically significant in patients compared with controls (p>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the patients and the control group in terms of serum vitamin b12, folate and homocysteine levels (p>0.05). We found no evidence for an association between allergic rhinitis and polymorphisms of C677T and A1298C for MTHFR gene in children. Further studies investigating the relationship between MTHFR polymorphism and AR are required. Copyright © 2014 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Egyptian Turner Syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Manal F; Zarouk, Waheba A; Ruby, Mona O; Mahmoud, Wael M; Gad, Randa S

    2015-01-01

    Folate metabolism dysfunctions can result in DNA hypomethylation and abnormal chromosome segregation. Two common polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) encoding gene (C677T and A1298C) reduce MTHFR activity, but when associated with aneuploidy, the results are conflicting. Turner Syndrome (TS) is an interesting model for investigating the association between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and nondisjunction because of the high frequency of chromosomal mosaicism in this syndrome. To investigate the association of MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in TS patients and their mothers and to correlate these polymorphisms with maternal risk of TS offspring. MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were genotyped in 33 TS patients, their mothers and 15 healthy females with their mothers as controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing technique. Genotype and allele frequencies of both C677T and A1298C were not significantly different between TS cases and controls. There were no significant differences in C677T genotype distribution between the TS mothers and controls (p=1). The MTHFR 1298AA and 1298AC genotypes were significantly increased in TS mothers Vs. control mothers (p=0.002). The C allele frequency of the A1298C polymorphism was significantly different between the TS mothers and controls (p=0.02). The association of A1298C gene polymorphism in TS patients was found to increase with increasing age of both mothers (p=0.026) and fathers (p=0.044) of TS cases. Our findings suggest a strong association between maternal MTHFR A1298C and risk of TS in Egypt.

  8. The Reaction Mechanism of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is a nickel tetrahydrocorphinoid (coenzyme F430) containing enzyme involved in the biological synthesis and anaerobic oxidation of methane. MCR catalyzes the conversion of methyl-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (methyl-SCoM) and N-7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate (CoB7SH) to CH4 and the mixed disulfide CoBS-SCoM. In this study, the reaction of MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis, with its native substrates was investigated using static binding, chemical quench, and stopped-flow techniques. Rate constants were measured for each step in this strictly ordered ternary complex catalytic mechanism. Surprisingly, in the absence of the other substrate, MCR can bind either substrate; however, only one binary complex (MCR·methyl-SCoM) is productive whereas the other (MCR·CoB7SH) is inhibitory. Moreover, the kinetic data demonstrate that binding of methyl-SCoM to the inhibitory MCR·CoB7SH complex is highly disfavored (Kd = 56 mm). However, binding of CoB7SH to the productive MCR·methyl-SCoM complex to form the active ternary complex (CoB7SH·MCR(NiI)·CH3SCoM) is highly favored (Kd = 79 μm). Only then can the chemical reaction occur (kobs = 20 s−1 at 25 °C), leading to rapid formation and dissociation of CH4 leaving the binary product complex (MCR(NiII)·CoB7S−·SCoM), which undergoes electron transfer to regenerate Ni(I) and the final product CoBS-SCoM. This first rapid kinetics study of MCR with its natural substrates describes how an enzyme can enforce a strictly ordered ternary complex mechanism and serves as a template for identification of the reaction intermediates. PMID:25691570

  9. Methylenetetrahy-drofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphism in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermina Kiseljaković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR is key enzyme in metabolism of homocysteine. Homozygotes for mutation (TT genotype have hyperhomocysteinemia, risk factor for atherosclerosis development. The aim of the study was to find out distribution of genotype frequencies of C677T MTHFR among patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Possible association of alleles and genotypes of C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene with age of onset, duration of dialysis and cause of kidney failure was studied also. Cross-sectional study includes 80 patients from Clinic of Hemodialysis KUCS in Sarajevo. In order to perform genotyping, isolated DNA was analyzed by RFLP-PCR and gel-electrophoresis. From total of 80 patients, 42.5% (n=24 were female, 57.5% (n=46 were male, mean age 54.59±1.78 years and duration of dialysis 79.92±6.32 months. Genotype distribution was: CC 51.2% (n=41, CT 37.5% (n=30 and TT 11.2% (n=9. Patients with wild-type genotype have longer duration of dialysis in month (87.1 ± 63.93 comparing to TT genotype patients (67.06 ± 39.3, with no statistical significance. T allele frequency was significantly higher in group of vascular and congenital cause of kidney failure (Pearson X2 =6.049, P<0.05 comparing to inflammation etiology group. Genotype distribution results are within the results other studies in Europe. Obtained results indicate that C677T polymorphism is not associated with onset, duration and cause of kidney failure in our hemodialysis population. There is an association of T allele of the MTHFR gene and vascular and congenital cause kidney failure.

  10. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism and risk of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkeni, Mohsen; Addad, Faouzi; Chauffert, Maryline; Myara, Anne; Gerhardt, Marie; Chevenne, Didier; Trivin, François; Farhat, Mohamed Ben; Miled, Abdelhedi; Maaroufi, Khira

    2006-05-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia is an independent, graded risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism is associated with hyperhomcysteinaemia and may therefore influence individual susceptibility to CAD. We have investigated this risk factor in a Tunisian Arab population. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to detect the C677T and A1298C variants of the MTHFR gene in 100 patients with CAD and 120 healthy controls. The severity of CAD was expressed as the number of affected vessels. Plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration was determined using a direct chemiluminescence assay. MTHFR CC, CT and TT genotype frequencies in the CAD group were significantly different from those observed in the control group (49%, 35% and 16% versus 48.3%, 45.8% and 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.031). However, MTHFR AA, AC and CC genotypes frequencies in the CAD group were not significantly different from the control group ( P = 0.568). Patients with CAD showed higher plasma tHcy concentrations than patients without CAD (15.86 +/- 8.63 micromol/L versus 11.90 +/- 3.25 micromol/L, P MTHFR polymorphisms and the number of stenosed vessels. Patients with the MTHFR TT genotype had higher plasma tHcy, serum creatinine, cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations than patients with the MTHFR CC genotype. The C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene is associated with hyperhomocysteinaemia, lipid dysregulation and the presence of CAD in this Tunisian Arab population.

  11. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  12. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MSn. The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MSn. A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC) isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5 : 5 : 1 : 5, v/v and 3 : 7 : 5 : 5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2) (IC50 = 3.16 μM), rosmarinic acid (4) (IC50 = 2.77 μM), luteolin (5) (IC50 = 6.34 μM), and methyl rosmarinic acid (6) (IC50 = 4.03 μM). PMID:24308003

  13. Association of Suicidality and Depression With 5α-Reductase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Blayne; McArthur, Eric; Ordon, Michael; Anderson, Kelly K; Hayward, Jade; Dixon, Stephanie

    2017-05-01

    There have been concerns raised by patients and regulatory agencies regarding serious psychiatric adverse effects associated with 5α-reductase inhibitors. To determine if there is an increased risk of suicide, self-harm, or depression among older men starting a 5α-reductase inhibitor for prostatic enlargement. A population-based, retrospective, matched cohort study using linked administrative data for 93 197 men ages 66 years or older (median [IQR] age, 75 [70-80] years) in Ontario, Canada, who initiated a new prescription for a 5α-reductase inhibitor during the study period (2003 through 2013). Participants were matched (using a propensity score that included 44 of our 96 covariates that included medical comorbidities, medication usage, and health care system utilization) to an equal number of men not prescribed a 5α-reductase inhibitor. Duration of finasteride or dutasteride usage. Suicide. Secondary outcomes were self-harm and depression. Men who used 5α-reductase inhibitors were not at a significantly increased risk of suicide (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.53-1.45). Risk of self-harm was significantly increased during the initial 18 months after 5α-reductase inhibitor initiation (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.34-2.64), but not thereafter. Incident depression risk was elevated during the initial 18 months after 5α-reductase inhibitor initiation (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.73-2.16), and continued to be elevated, but to a lesser degree, for the remainder of the follow-up period (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.37). The absolute increases in the event rates for these 2 outcomes were 17 per 100 000 patient-years and 237 per 100 000 patient-years, respectively. The type of 5α-reductase inhibitor (finasteride or dutasteride) did not significantly modify the observed associations with suicide, self-harm, and depression. In a large cohort of men ages 66 years or older, we did not demonstrate an increased risk of suicide associated with 5α-reductase inhibitor use. However, the risk of

  14. Recombinant pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) catalyze opposite enantiospecific conversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-01-08

    Although the heartwood of woody plants represents the main source of fiber and solid wood products, essentially nothing is known about how the biological processes leading to its formation are initiated and regulated. Accordingly, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-guided cloning strategy was employed to obtain genes encoding pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) as a means to initiate the study of its heartwood formation. (+)-Pinoresinol-(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia was used as a template for primer construction for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplifications, which, when followed by homologous hybridization cloning, resulted in the isolation of two distinct classes of putative pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase cDNA clones from western red cedar. A representative of each class was expressed as a fusion protein with beta-galactosidase and assayed for enzymatic activity. Using both deuterated and radiolabeled (+/-)-pinoresinols as substrates, it was established that each class of cDNA encoded a pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase of different (opposite) enantiospecificity. Significantly, the protein from one class converted (+)-pinoresinol into (-)-secoisolariciresinol, whereas the other utilized the opposite (-)-enantiomer to give the corresponding (+)-form. This differential substrate specificity raises important questions about the role of each of these individual reductases in heartwood formation, such as whether they are expressed in different cells/tissues or at different stages during heartwood development.

  15. Structural and biochemical properties of cloned and expressed human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Russell, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme steroid 5α-reductase is responsible for the conversion of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone. In man, this steroid acts on a variety of androgen-responsive target tissues to mediate such diverse endocrine processes as male sexual differentiation in the fetus and prostatic growth in men. Here we describe the isolation, structure, and expression of a cDNA encoding the human steroid 5α-reductase. A rat cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human prostate cDNA library. A 2.1-kilobase cDNA was identified and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the human steroid 5α-reductase was a hydrophobic protein of 259 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 29,462. A comparison of the human and rat protein sequences revealed a 60% identity. Transfection of expression vectors containing the human and rat cDNAs into simian COS cells resulted in the synthesis of high levels of steroid 5α-reductase enzyme activity. Both enzymes expressed in COS cells showed similar substrate specificities for naturally occurring steroid hormones. However, synthetic 4-azasteroids demonstrated marked differences in their abilities to inhibit the human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

  16. INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF FLAVONOIDS ON THE LENS ALDOSE REDUCTASE OF HEALTHY AND DIABETIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Goodarzi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase is a critical enzyme in the polyol pathway that plays an important role in diabetes mellitus. Inhibition of the activity of this enzyme can prevent cataract in diabetic patients’lenses. In this study the inhibitory effect of two flavonoids, quercetin and naringin, in the activity of aldose reductase in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and healthy rats were investigated. Thirty male rats were divided in six groups. The first, second and third group were healthy rats that received water,quercetin and naringin, respectively. The fourth, fifth and sixth groups were streptozocin-induced diabetic rats that received water, quercetin and naringin, respectively. These rats were fed orally in a definite dose from each substance for 12 days. After this period rats were scarified and their lenses were separated and homogenized. The activity of aldose reductase was measured in each homogenized sample separately. The effect of feeding of these substances in blood sugar was also determined. Aldose reductase activity was reduced 73 and 69 percent in diabetic rats fed by quercetin and naringin, respectively, and the difference compared to control group was significant. In healthy rats this reduction was 63 and 59 percent, respectively, and the difference was significant compared to those who did not receive flavonoids. It was concluded that these substances were effective in reduction of aldose reductase activity in vivo and consequently could delay the progress of cataract.

  17. A Single Mutation Increases the Activity and Stability of Pectobacterium carotovorum Nitrile Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Li, Min; Xu, Jian-He; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2018-03-02

    Nitrile reductases are considered to be promising and environmentally benign nitrile-reducing biocatalysts to replace traditional metal catalysts. Unfortunately, the catalytic efficiencies of the nitrile reductases reported so far are very low. To date, all attempts to increase the catalytic activity of nitrile reductases by protein engineering have failed. In this work, we successfully increased the specific activity of a nitrile reductase from Pectobacterium carotovorum from 354 to 526 U g prot -1 by engineering the substrate binding pocket; moreover, the thermostability was also improved (≈2-fold), showing half-lives of 140 and 32 h at 30 and 40 °C, respectively. In the bioreduction of 2-amino-5-cyanopyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one (preQ 0 ) to 2-amino-5-aminomethylpyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one (preQ 1 ), the variant was advantageous over the wild-type enzyme with a higher reaction rate and complete conversion of the substrate within a shorter period. Homology modeling and docking analysis revealed some possible origins of the increased activity and stability. These results establish a solid basis for future engineering of nitrile reductases to increase the catalytic efficiency further, which is a prerequisite for applying these novel biocatalysts in synthetic chemistry. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Comparative modelling and molecular docking of nitrate reductase from Bacillus weihenstephanensis (DS45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seenivasagan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reductase catalyses the oxidation of NAD(PH and the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. NR serves as a central point for the integration of metabolic pathways by governing the flux of reduced nitrogen through several regulatory mechanisms in plants, algae and fungi. Bacteria express nitrate reductases that convert nitrate to nitrite, but mammals lack these specific enzymes. The microbial nitrate reductase reduces toxic compounds to nontoxic compounds with the help of NAD(PH. In the present study, our results revealed that Bacillus weihenstephanensis expresses a nitrate reductase enzyme, which was made to generate the 3D structure of the enzyme. Six different modelling servers, namely Phyre2, RaptorX, M4T Server, HHpred, SWISS MODEL and Mod Web, were used for comparative modelling of the structure. The model was validated with standard parameters (PROCHECK and Verify 3D. This study will be useful in the functional characterization of the nitrate reductase enzyme and its docking with nitrate molecules, as well as for use with autodocking.

  19. Overexpression of Nitrate Reductase in Tobacco Delays Drought-Induced Decreases in Nitrate Reductase Activity and mRNA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Valadier, Marie-Hélène; Foyer, Christine H.

    1998-01-01

    Transformed (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter [35S]) tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.) plants constitutively expressing nitrate reductase (NR) and untransformed controls were subjected to drought for 5 d. Drought-induced changes in biomass accumulation and photosynthesis were comparable in both lines of plants. After 4 d of water deprivation, a large increase in the ratio of shoot dry weight to fresh weight was observed, together with a decrease in the rate of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Foliar sucrose increased in both lines during water stress, but hexoses increased only in leaves from untransformed controls. Foliar NO3− decreased rapidly in both lines and was halved within 2 d of the onset of water deprivation. Total foliar amino acids decreased in leaves of both lines following water deprivation. After 4 d of water deprivation no NR activity could be detected in leaves of untransformed plants, whereas about 50% of the original activity remained in the leaves of the 35S-NR transformants. NR mRNA was much more stable than NR activity. NR mRNA abundance increased in the leaves of the 35S-NR plants and remained constant in controls for the first 3 d of drought. On the 4th d, however, NR mRNA suddenly decreased in both lines. Rehydration at d 3 caused rapid recovery (within 24 h) of 35S-NR transcripts, but no recovery was observed in the controls. The phosphorylation state of the protein was unchanged by long-term drought. There was a strong correlation between maximal extractable NR activity and ambient photosynthesis in both lines. We conclude that drought first causes increased NR protein turnover and then accelerates NR mRNA turnover. Constitutive NR expression temporarily delayed drought-induced losses in NR activity. 35S-NR expression may therefore allow more rapid recovery of N assimilation following short-term water deficit. PMID:9576799

  20. ION VATAMANU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l. Povar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion Vatamanu was a chemist, writer and public figure. He was equally passionate about both his chosen fields of activity: chemistry and poetry. Chemistry, with its perfect equilibrium of logic and precision, provided inspiration for lyrical creativity, whereas poetry writing enlivened his imagination and passion for chemistry. He loved his parents. He adored his wife Elena, whom he often gifted a sea of flowers. He loved his daughters Mihaela, Mariana, and Leontina. He loved life, and he loved people.

  1. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Fusao; Okuyama, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    In a negative ion source having magnetic filters, bisecting magnetic fields are formed using electromagnets disposed at the outside of a plasma source. The position of the electromagnets is made adjustable and removable to optimize a negative ion generation efficiency. Further, a plurality of electromagnets are disposed in longitudinal direction of the plasma source, and the intensity of the magnetic fields of the filters in the longitudinal direction is made adjustable to control a beam distribution. Since uniform magnetic fields which bisect the plasma source can be formed by the electromagnets, and magnetomotive force of the electromagnets can be increased easily compared with that of permanent magnets, the magnetomotive force is changed to obtain appropriate filter magnetic fields easily. Then, optimum magnetic fields corresponding to the state of source plasmas can be generated by the control of the power source of the electromagnets, which also increases the negative ion drawing current density, thereby enabling to reduce the drawing area and size of the plasma source. (N.H.)

  2. Ion Beam Extraction by Discrete Ion Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (900) and methods are disclosed for ion beam extraction. In an implementation, the apparatus includes a plasma source (or plasma) (802) and an ion extractor (804). The plasma source is adapted to generate ions and the ion extractor is immersed in the plasma source to extract a fraction...... of the generated ions. The ion extractor is surrounded by a space charge (810) formed at least in part by the extracted ions. The ion extractor includes a biased electrode (806) forming an interface with an insulator (808). The interface is customized to form a strongly curved potential distribution (812......) in the space-charge surrounding the ion extractor. The strongly curved potential distribution focuses the extracted ions towards an opening (814) on a surface of the biased electrode thereby resulting in an ion beam....

  3. Expression profiling of the Arabidopsis ferric chelate reductase (FRO) gene family reveals differential regulation by iron and copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Campbell, Nathan H; Ash, Joshua S; Connolly, Erin L

    2006-05-01

    The Arabidopsis FRO2 gene encodes the iron deficiency-inducible ferric chelate reductase responsible for reduction of iron at the root surface; subsequent transport of iron across the plasma membrane is carried out by a ferrous iron transporter (IRT1). Genome annotation has identified seven additional FRO family members in the Arabidopsis genome. We used real-time RT-PCR to examine the expression of each FRO gene in different tissues and in response to iron and copper limitation. FRO2 and FRO5 are primarily expressed in roots while FRO8 is primarily expressed in shoots. FRO6 and FRO7 show high expression in all the green parts of the plant. FRO3 is expressed at high levels in roots and shoots, and expression of FRO3 is elevated in roots and shoots of iron-deficient plants. Interestingly, when plants are Cu-limited, the expression of FRO6 in shoot tissues is reduced. Expression of FRO3 is induced in roots and shoots by Cu-limitation. While it is known that FRO2 is expressed at high levels in the outer layers of iron-deficient roots, histochemical staining of FRO3-GUS plants revealed that FRO3 is predominantly expressed in the vascular cylinder of roots. Together our results suggest that FRO family members function in metal ion homeostasis in a variety of locations in the plant.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyota, Eduardo [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sousa, Sylvia Morais de [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Menossi, Marcelo [Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Yunes, José Andrés [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Centro Infantil Boldrini, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aparicio, Ricardo, E-mail: aparicio@iqm.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  5. Sexual side effects of 5-α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, Raymond M; Gamret, A Caresse; Darwin, Evan; Gaudi, Sudeep

    2017-11-11

    The 5-α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride are frequently used in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia and benign prostatichyperplasia. These drugs are effective at reducing levels of dihydrotestosterone, the primary androgen responsible for the pathogenesis of both these conditions. However, finasteride and dutasteride have also been shown to produce an increase in the incidence of sexual dysfunction, namely, impotence, decreased libido, and ejaculation disorder. The purpose of this study is to review the existing medical literature with regard to the sexual side effects of 5-α-reductase inhibitor therapy. This review is an extensive look at the sexual effects of 5-α-reductase inhibitors and compares outcomes for finasteride versus dutasteride in addition to comparing sexualside effects for each of the different dosages prescribed of finasteride and dutasteride.

  6. Atorvastatin calcium: an addition to HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, P H; Seeger, J D

    1997-01-01

    Atorvastatin calcium is an HMG-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase inhibitor that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on December 17, 1996. Like other such agents, it inhibits the action of HMG-CoA reductase and thereby decreases endogenous cholesterol synthesis, leading to a decrease in circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In addition to its effect on lipoprotein profile, atorvastatin reduces triglycerides to a greater extent than other HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. These actions occur in a dose-dependent fashion. The adverse effect profile is similar to that of other agents in this class. Indications for atorvastatin include primary hypercholesterolemia as well as other lipid disorders.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da; Menossi, Marcelo; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR

  8. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of transgenic soybean expressing the Arabidopsis ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Marta; Eckert, Helene; Arahana, Venancio; Graef, George; Grusak, Michael A; Clemente, Tom

    2006-10-01

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) production is reduced under iron-limiting calcareous soils throughout the upper Midwest regions of the US. Like other dicotyledonous plants, soybean responds to iron-limiting environments by induction of an active proton pump, a ferric iron reductase and an iron transporter. Here we demonstrate that heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO2, in transgenic soybean significantly enhances Fe(+3) reduction in roots and leaves. Root ferric reductase activity was up to tenfold higher in transgenic plants and was not subjected to post-transcriptional regulation. In leaves, reductase activity was threefold higher in the transgenic plants when compared to control. The enhanced ferric reductase activity led to reduced chlorosis, increased chlorophyll concentration and a lessening in biomass loss in the transgenic events between Fe treatments as compared to control plants grown under hydroponics that mimicked Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soil environments. However, the data indicate that constitutive FRO2 expression under non-iron stress conditions may lead to a decrease in plant productivity as reflected by reduced biomass accumulation in the transgenic events under non-iron stress conditions. When grown at Fe(III)-EDDHA levels greater than 10 microM, iron concentration in the shoots of transgenic plants was significantly higher than control. The same observation was found in the roots in plants grown at iron levels higher than 32 microM Fe(III)-EDDHA. These results suggest that heterologous expression of an iron chelate reductase in soybean can provide a route to alleviate iron deficiency chlorosis.

  9. Characterisation of a desmosterol reductase involved in phytosterol dealkylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora F Ciufo

    Full Text Available Most species of invertebrate animals cannot synthesise sterols de novo and many that feed on plants dealkylate phytosterols (mostly C(29 and C(28 yielding cholesterol (C(27. The final step of this dealkylation pathway involves desmosterol reductase (DHCR24-catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol. We now report the molecular characterisation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, of such a desmosterol reductase involved in production of cholesterol from phytosterol, rather than in de novo synthesis of cholesterol. Phylogenomic analysis of putative desmosterol reductases revealed the occurrence of various clades that allowed for the identification of a strong reductase candidate gene in Bombyx mori (BGIBMGA 005735. Following PCR-based cloning of the cDNA (1.6 kb and its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisae, the recombinant protein catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol in an NADH- and FAD-dependent reaction.Conceptual translation of the cDNA, that encodes a 58.9 kDa protein, and database searching, revealed that the enzyme belongs to an FAD-dependent oxidoreductase family. Western blotting revealed reductase protein expression exclusively in the microsomal subcellular fraction and primarily in the gut. The protein is peripherally associated with microsomal membranes. 2D-native gel and PAGE analysis revealed that the reductase is part of a large complex with molecular weight approximately 250 kDa. The protein occurs in midgut microsomes at a fairly constant level throughout development in the last two instars, but is drastically reduced during the wandering stage in preparation for metamorphosis. Putative Broad Complex transcription factor-binding sites detectable upstream of the DHCR24 gene may play a role in this down-regulation.

  10. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC 50 - and K i -values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin reductases.

  11. BIOLOGICAL ROLE OF ALDO-KETO REDUCTASES IN RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS AND SIGNALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier eRuiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Several aldo-keto reductase (AKR enzymes from subfamilies 1B and 1C show retinaldehyde reductase activity, having low Km and kcat values. Only AKR1B10 and 1B12, with all-trans-retinaldehyde, and AKR1C3, with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, display high catalytic efficiency. Major structural determinants for retinaldehyde isomer specificity are located in the external loops (A and C for AKR1B10, and B for AKR1C3, as assessed by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. Cellular models have shown that AKR1B and 1C enzymes are well suited to work in vivo as retinaldehyde reductases and to regulate retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis at hormone pre-receptor level. An additional physiological role for the retinaldehyde reductase activity of these enzymes, consistent with their tissue localization, is their participation in β-carotene absorption. Retinaldehyde metabolism may be subjected to subcellular compartmentalization, based on enzyme localization. While retinaldehyde oxidation to RA takes place in the cytosol, reduction to retinol could take place in the cytosol by AKRs or in the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum by microsomal retinaldehyde reductases. Upregulation of some AKR1 enzymes in different cancer types may be linked to their induction by oxidative stress and to their participation in different signaling pathways related to cell proliferation. AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, through their retinaldehyde reductase activity, trigger a decrease in the RA biosynthesis flow, resulting in RA deprivation and consequently lower differentiation, with an increased cancer risk in target tissues. Rational design of selective AKR inhibitors could lead to development of novel drugs for cancer treatment as well as reduction of chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

  12. The electron transfer reactions of NADPH: cytochrome P450 reductase with nonphysiological oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cénas, N; Anusevicius, Z; Bironaité, D; Bachmanova, G I; Archakov, A I; Ollinger, K

    1994-12-01

    The steady-state kinetics of oxidation of rat liver NADPH: cytochrome P450 reductase (EC 1.6.2.4) by quinones, aromatic nitrocompounds, ferricyanide, Fe(EDTA)-, and cytochrome c has been studied. The logarithms of bimolecular rate constants of reduction (kcat/Km) of quinones and nitrocompounds increase with the increase in their single-electronreduction potential (E1(7)), reaching a maximum value at E1(7) > -0.15 V. The reactivities of nitroaromatics are about by an order of magnitude lower than the reactivities of quinones. For a series of nitroaromatics including the compounds with previously undetermined E1(7) values, an orthogonality was found between their reactivities toward cytochrome P450 reductase, flavocytochrome b2 (EC 1.1.2.3), and the NADPH: adrenodoxin reductase (EC 1.18.1.2)-adrenodoxin system. This indicates the absence of significant specific interactions during these reactions. The effects of ionic strength on reaction kinetics and the character of inhibition by a product of reaction, NADP+, are in accordance with the reduction of oxidants at the negatively charged site in the surroundings of FMN of P450 reductase. Quinones inactivate oxidized reductase modifying the NADP(H) binding site. The redox cycling of quinones markedly slows the inactivation. The kinetic data presented are consistent with an outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism. The analysis of kinetics of reduction of cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and Fe(EDTA)- using the model of Mauk et al. (A. G. Mauk, R. A. Scott, and H. B. Gray (1980) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102, 4360-4363) gives calculated distances of FMN from the surface of protein globule, 0.33-0.63 nm. The data from nitroreductase reactions of cytochrome P450 reductase, flavocytochrome b2, and adrenodoxin were used for approximate evaluation of previously unknown E1(7) of nitrocompounds.

  13. Proteomic Analysis to Elucidate the Antibacterial Action of Silver Ions Against Bovine Mastitis Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seog Jin; Cho, Yong Il; Kim, Ki Hyun; Cho, Eun Seok

    2016-05-01

    Silver ions act as a powerful, broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent and are known to kill over 650 different kinds of pathogens. We investigated the protein expression pattern and identity after silver ion treatment in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, which are primarily responsible for the majority of bovine mastitis cases using proteomics. Two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that silver ion treatment significantly reduced 5 spot's density in E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. We identified 10 proteins (alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C22 subunit, phosphoglucomutase, fructose-1-phosphate kinase, putative carbamoyl transferase, alpha-galactosidase, carbamate kinase, ornithine transcarbamoylase, fumarate hydratase class II, alcohol dehydrogenase, and conserved hypothetical protein) by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF). These results demonstrated that silver ions have bactericidal effects through energy deprivation, inhibition of DNA replication, and accumulation of oxidants in bovine mastitis pathogens and suggested that silver ions can be applied for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  14. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of intermediate subfamily under SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) superfamily that revealed mechanisms of in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF for tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames ...

  15. Role of a conserved glutamine residue in tuning the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli cytochrome c nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas A; Kemp, Gemma L; Van Wonderen, Jessica H; Doyle, Rose-Marie A S; Cole, Jeffrey A; Tovell, Nick; Cheesman, Myles R; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Hemmings, Andrew M

    2008-03-25

    The pentaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase (NrfA) of Escherichia coli is responsible for nitrite reduction during anaerobic respiration when nitrate is scarce. The NrfA active site consists of a hexacoordinate high-spin heme with a lysine ligand on the proximal side and water/hydroxide or substrate on the distal side. There are four further highly conserved active site residues including a glutamine (Q263) positioned 8 A from the heme iron for which the side chain, unusually, coordinates a conserved, essential calcium ion. Mutation of this glutamine to the more usual calcium ligand, glutamate, results in an increase in the K m for nitrite by around 10-fold, while V max is unaltered. Protein film voltammetry showed that lower potentials were required to detect activity from NrfA Q263E when compared with native enzyme, consistent with the introduction of a negative charge into the vicinity of the active site heme. EPR and MCD spectroscopic studies revealed the high spin state of the active site to be preserved, indicating that a water/hydroxide molecule is still coordinated to the heme in the resting state of the enzyme. Comparison of the X-ray crystal structures of the as-prepared, oxidized native and mutant enzymes showed an increased bond distance between the active site heme Fe(III) iron and the distal ligand in the latter as well as changes to the structure and mobility of the active site water molecule network. These results suggest that an important function of the unusual Q263-calcium ion pair is to increase substrate affinity through its role in supporting a network of hydrogen bonded water molecules stabilizing the active site heme distal ligand.

  16. Structure of diaminohydroxyphosphoribosylaminopyrimidine deaminase/5-amino-6-(5-phosphoribosylamino)uracil reductase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alice; Trumper, Paul; Chrysostomou, Georgios; Hunter, William N

    2013-06-01

    The bifunctional diaminohydroxyphosphoribosylaminopyrimidine deaminase/5-amino-6-(5-phosphoribosylamino)uracil reductase (RibD) represents a potential antibacterial drug target. The structure of recombinant Acinetobacter baumannii RibD is reported in orthorhombic and tetragonal crystal forms at 2.2 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Comparisons with orthologous structures in the Protein Data Bank indicated close similarities. The tetragonal crystal form was obtained in the presence of guanosine monophosphate, which surprisingly was observed to occupy the adenine-binding site of the reductase domain.

  17. Chloroplast Fe(III) chelate reductase activity is essential for seedling viability under iron limiting conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Jeeyon; Cohu, Christopher; Kerkeb, Loubna; Pilon, Marinus; Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthesis, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly all take place in the chloroplast, and all require iron. Reduction of iron via a membrane-bound Fe(III) chelate reductase is required before iron transport across membranes in a variety of systems, but to date there has been no definitive genetic proof that chloroplasts have such a reduction system. Here we report that one of the eight members of the Arabidopsis ferric reductase oxidase (FRO) family, FRO7, localizes to the chloropla...

  18. Why Is Mammalian Thioredoxin Reductase 1 So Dependent upon the Use of Selenium?

    OpenAIRE

    Lothrop, Adam P.; Snider, Gregg W.; Ruggles, Erik L.; Hondal, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) is the best characterized of the class of high-molecular weight (M r) thioredoxin reductases (TRs). TR1 is highly dependent upon the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) for the reduction of thioredoxin (Trx) and a host of small molecule substrates, as mutation of Sec to cysteine (Cys) results in a large decrease in catalytic activity for all substrate types. Previous work in our lab and others has shown that the mitochondrial TR (TR3) is much less depe...

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP + reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP + reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  1. Is decreased libido associated with the use of HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, L; Brouwers, A H P M; Diemont, W L

    2004-09-01

    To describe patients with decreased libido during use of a HMG-CoA-reductase-inhibitor, and to discuss causality and pharmacological hypotheses for this association by analysis of the adverse drug reactions (ADR) database of the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb. Eight patients were identified as having decreased libido during use of statins. In two of these cases testosterone levels were determined and appeared to be decreased. Decreased libido is a probable adverse drug reaction of HMG-CoA-reductase-inhibitors and is reversible. The ADR may be caused by low serum testosterone levels, mainly due to intracellular cholesterol depletion.

  2. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... of patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... or unwilling to undergo surgical resection of the prostate will benefit from such therapy....

  3. Escherichia coli ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase are capable of functioning as ferric reductase and of driving the Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Sato, Junichi; Goto, Kazuyuki; Fujita, Takanori; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Abo, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Nakagawa, Junichi; Abe, Akira; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2010-08-01

    Two free flavin-independent enzymes were purified by detecting the NAD(P)H oxidation in the presence of Fe(III)-EDTA and t-butyl hydroperoxide from E. coli. The enzyme that requires NADH or NADPH as an electron donor was a 28 kDa protein, and N-terminal sequencing revealed it to be oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (NfnB). The second enzyme that requires NADPH as an electron donor was a 30 kDa protein, and N-terminal sequencing revealed it to be ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (Fpr). The chemical stoichiometry of the Fenton activities of both NfnB and Fpr in the presence of Fe(III)-EDTA, NAD(P)H and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Both enzymes showed a one-electron reduction in the reaction forming hydroxyl radical from hydrogen peroxide. Also, the observed Fenton activities of both enzymes in the presence of synthetic chelate iron compounds were higher than their activities in the presence of natural chelate iron compounds. When the Fenton reaction occurs, the ferric iron must be reduced to ferrous iron. The ferric reductase activities of both NfnB and Fpr occurred with synthetic chelate iron compounds. Unlike NfnB, Fpr also showed the ferric reductase activity on an iron storage protein, ferritin, and various natural iron chelate compounds including siderophore. The Fenton and ferric reductase reactions of both NfnB and Fpr occurred in the absence of free flavin. Although the k(cat)/K(m) value of NfnB for Fe(III)-EDTA was not affected by free flavin, the k(cat)/K(m) value of Fpr for Fe(III)-EDTA was 12-times greater in the presence of free FAD than in the absence of free FAD.

  4. Hypothesis onSerenoa repens(Bartram) small extract inhibition of prostatic 5α-reductase through anin silicoapproach on 5β-reductase x-ray structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governa, Paolo; Giachetti, Daniela; Biagi, Marco; Manetti, Fabrizio; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease in men aged over 50 years old, with an incidence increasing to more than 80% over the age of 70, that is increasingly going to attract pharmaceutical interest. Within conventional therapies, such as α -adrenoreceptor antagonists and 5 α -reductase inhibitor, there is a large requirement for treatments with less adverse events on, e.g., blood pressure and sexual function: phytotherapy may be the right way to fill this need. Serenoa repens standardized extract has been widely studied and its ability to reduce lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia is comprehensively described in literature. An innovative investigation on the mechanism of inhibition of 5 α -reductase by Serenoa repens extract active principles is proposed in this work through computational methods, performing molecular docking simulations on the crystal structure of human liver 5 β -reductase. The results confirm that both sterols and fatty acids can play a role in the inhibition of the enzyme, thus, suggesting a competitive mechanism of inhibition. This work proposes a further confirmation for the rational use of herbal products in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia, and suggests computational methods as an innovative, low cost, and non-invasive process for the study of phytocomplex activity toward proteic targets.

  5. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  6. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Antinori, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  7. ION GUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  8. A Comparison of growth on mercuric chloride for three Lemnaceae species reveals differences in growth dynamics that effect their suitability for use in either monitoring or remediating ecosystems contaminated with mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjing; Li, Gaojie; Bishopp, Anthony; Heenatigala, P. P. M.; Hu, Shiqi; Chen, Yan; Wu, Zhigang; Kumar, Sunjeet; Duan, Pengfei; Yao, Lunguang; Hou, Hongwei

    2018-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that can alter the ecological balance when it contaminates aquatic ecosystems. Previously, researchers have used various Lemnaceae species either to monitor and/or remove heavy metals from freshwater systems. As Hg contamination is a pressing issue for aquatic systems worldwide, we assessed its impact on the growth of three commonly species of Lemnaceae - Lemna gibba 6745, Lemna minor 6580 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5543. We exposed plants to different concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and monitored their growth, including relative growth rate, frond number, and fresh weight. These data were coupled with measurements of starch content, levels of photosynthetic pigment and the activities of antioxidant substances. The growth of all three lines showed significant negative correlations with Hg concentrations, and starch content, photosynthetic pigment, soluble protein and antioxidant enzymes levels were all clearly affected. Our results indicate that the L. gibba line used in this study was the most suitable of the three for biomonitoring of water contaminated with Hg. Accumulation of Hg was highest in the S. polyrhiza line with a bioconcentration factor over 1000, making this line the most suitable of the three tested for use in an Hg bioremediation system.

  9. Differential stress-induced regulation of two quinone reductases in the brown rot Basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni Cohen; Melissa R. Suzuki; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2004-01-01

    Quinone reductases (QRDs) have two important functions in the basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum, which causes brown rot of wood. First, a QRD is required to generate biodegradative hydroxyl radicals via redox cycling between two G. trabeum extracellular metabolites, 2,5-dimethoxyhydroquinone (2,5-DMHQ) and 2,5-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (2,5- DMBQ). Second, because 2,...

  10. A Rational Approach to Identify Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chhabria, M. T.; Parmar, K. B.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 3878-3883 ISSN 1381-6128 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase * pharmacophore modeling * molecular docking * binding interactions Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2013

  11. Studies on the kinetic mechanism of nitrate reductase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, F F; Palacián, E; Castillo, F

    1980-09-01

    Based on Lineweaver-Burk plots of the initial velocities, at different concentrations of NADH and nitrate, and product inhibition patterns, an Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi steady state kinetic mechanism is proposed for the spinach nitrate reductase. This mechanism incorporates the concept that the oxidized enzyme is present in two isomeric forms.

  12. Differential antioxidant and quinone reductase inducing activity of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antioxidant and quinone reductase (QR) inducing activities of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng have been reported using various plant materials, solvents, and assays. To directly establish their comparative bioactivity, the effects of extracts obtained from acidified methanol (MeOH), a gas...

  13. Purification and properties of a NADPH-dependent erythrose reductase from the newly isolated Torula corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Hong, Kwang-Won; Kim, Sang-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Torula corallina (KCCM-10171) is a yeast strain that is currently used for the industrial production of erythritol and has the highest erythritol yield ever reported for an erythritol-producing microorganism. Production of erythritol in T. corallina is catalyzed by erythrose reductase, an enzyme that converts erythrose to erythritol using NADPH as a cofactor. In this study, NADPH-dependent erythrose reductase was purified to homogeneity from the newly isolated T. corallina. The relative molecular weight of the erythrose reductase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography was 35.4 and 71.0 kDa, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is dimeric. This enzyme catalyzed both erythrose reduction and erythritol oxidation; both enzyme activities required NADP(H). The pH and temperature optima for erythrose reduction and erythritol oxidation were 6.0, 40 degrees C and 8.0, 45 degrees C, respectively. The sequence of the first 10 amino acids of this enzyme was N-V-K-N-F-Y-Q-P-N-D. The affinity (K(m)( )()= 7.12 mM) of the enzyme for erythrose was comparable to that of other known erythrose reductases, and the specificity for erythrose was very high, resulting in no production of other polyols, which may explain the high erythritol yield observed in this strain.

  14. Low activity of superoxide dismutase and high activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes from centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Jeune, B; Nybo, H

    1998-01-01

    aged between 60 and 79 years. MEASUREMENTS: enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes. Functional capacity among the centenarians was evaluated by Katz' index of activities of daily living, the Physical...

  15. The Activities of NADH-MethB Reductase and Glucose-6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activities of NADH-MetHB reductase and G-6-PD were investigated in malaria patients in Calabar, Nigeria. Seventy malaria patients were selected for this study. Sixty-two age, sex – matched apparently healthy children were used as controls. Ages of subjects ranged from 6 months to 12 years (Mean = 5±1.3 years).

  16. Identification and characterization of an inborn error of metabolism caused by dihydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banka, S.; Blom, H.J.; Walter, J.; Aziz, M.; Urquhart, J.; Clouthier, C.M.; Rice, G.I.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Hilton, E.; Vassallo, G.; Will, A.; Smith, D.E.; Smulders, Y.M.; Wevers, R.A.; Steinfeld, R.; Heales, S.; Crow, Y.J.; Pelletier, J.N.; Jones, S.; Newman, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a critical enzyme in folate metabolism and an important target of antineoplastic, antimicrobial, and antiinflammatory drugs. We describe three individuals from two families with a recessive inborn error of metabolism, characterized by megaloblastic anemia and/or

  17. Evidence for a novel mechanism of time-resolved flavin fluorescence depolarization in glutathione reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den P.A.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    Time-resolved flavin fluorescence anisotropy studies on glutathione reductase (GR) have revealed a remarkable new phenomenon: wild-type GR displays a rapid process of fluorescence depolarization, that is absent in mutant enzymes lacking a nearby tyrosine residue that blocks the NADPH-binding cleft.

  18. Aldose reductase activity and glucose-related opacities in incubated lenses from dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Marianne; Guscetti, Franco; Spiess, Bernhard

    2002-11-01

    To determine responses of canine and feline lenses to incubation in a medium with a high glucose concentration. Lenses from 35 dogs and 26 cats. Glucose concentrations were measured in paired lenses from 25 dogs and 17 cats after incubation for 14 days in high-glucose (30 mmol of glucose/L) or control (6 mmol of glucose/L) medium. Aldose reductase activity was measured spectrophotometrically in the incubated lenses and in freshly frozen lenses from 10 dogs and 9 cats. Two lenses of each group were studied histologically. Canine and feline lenses in high-glucose medium developed glucose-specific opacities of variable localization and extent. Canine lenses developed equatorial vacuoles, but severity of the lesions was not associated with the age of the dog. Lenses from young cats (cats (> 4 years old) did not. Glucose concentrations were similar in all lenses incubated in high-glucose medium; however aldose reductase activity was significantly lower in lenses from older cats, compared with lenses from young cats and from dogs. High aldose reductase activity and glucose-related opacities suggest a central role for this enzyme in the pathogenesis of diabetic cataracts in dogs and cats. Because onset of diabetes mellitus usually occurs in cats > 7 years of age, low activity of aldose reductase in lenses of older cats may explain why diabetic cataracts are rare in this species despite hyperglycemia.

  19. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB Gene Encodes a Diheme Ferric Reductase ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria. PMID:21705608

  20. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB gene encodes a diheme ferric reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K; O'Brian, Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria.

  1. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    of the splice acceptor sites clearly indicated that the corresponding mRNA apparently lacks sequences encoding a membrane N-terminal domain. The reductase gene is a single copy and is located on a chromosome of 1.36 Mb as determined by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. The overall...

  2. The role of quinone reductase (NQO1) and quinone chemistry in quercetin cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gliszczynska-Swiglo, A.; Woude, van der H.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Tyrakowska, B.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of quercetin on viability and proliferation of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and CHO cells overexpressing human quinone reductase (CHO+NQO1) were studied to investigate the involvement of the pro-oxidant quinone chemistry of quercetin. The toxicity of menadione was significantly

  3. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. METHODS: We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR...

  4. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower...

  5. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...

  6. Inherited glutathione reductase deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum malaria--a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallo, Valentina; Schwarzer, Evelin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Schirmer, R. Heiner; van Zwieten, Rob; Roos, Dirk; Arese, Paolo; Becker, Katja

    2009-01-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBCs), the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase (GR) regenerates reduced glutathione, which is essential for antioxidant defense. GR utilizes NADPH produced in the pentose phosphate shunt by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Thus, conditions

  7. Cloning, expression and antigenicity of the L. donovani reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A T; Kemp, K; Theander, T G

    2001-01-01

    . We have cloned the reductase gene from L donovani and have shown that it differs in only one nucleotide from the L. major homologue, resulting in one amino acid change. A cytosine (C) to guanine (G) transposition in the coding sequence leads to a nonconserved substitution of asparagine (N) for lysine...

  8. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Ma?ra Bidart; Groll, Andrea Von; Fissette, Krista; Palomino, Juan Carlos; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA) for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using sodium nitrate (NaNO3) in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3) as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  9. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the one electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. It is a homodimer, each monomer containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1), the former being the electron uptake site while the latter is the nitrite reduction site. Hence, i...

  10. CLONING AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF THE DIHYDROFOLATE-REDUCTASE GENE FROM LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LESZCZYNSKA, K; BOLHUIS, A; LEENHOUTS, K; VENEMA, G; CEGLOWSKI, P

    The Lactococcus lactis gene encoding trimethoprim resistance has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the cloned gene encodes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). (i) It fully complements the fol ''null'' mutation in E. coli. (ii)

  11. Cloning, expression and antigenicity of the L. donovani reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A T; Kemp, K; Theander, T G

    2001-01-01

    (K). Only 2 of 22 plasma samples from patients with visceral leishmaniasis were found to have detectable anti-reductase antibodies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from one of three individuals previously infected with visceral leishmaniasis proliferated in the presence of recombinant...

  12. Pharmaco-economic assessment of the HMG- CoA reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To perform a comparative pharmaco-economic assessment of two HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. Design. A cost-effectiveness analysis was employed using comparative'efficacy data from selected clinical trials. A comprehensive international literature search formed the basis for this selection. Criteria for ...

  13. Identification and functional evaluation of the reductases and dehydrogenases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in vanillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinning; Liang, Zhenzhen; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming; Shen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Vanillin, a type of phenolic released during the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials, is toxic to microorganisms and therefore its presence inhibits the fermentation. The vanillin can be reduced to vanillyl alcohol, which is much less toxic, by the ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reducing capacity of S. cerevisiae and its vanillin resistance are strongly correlated. However, the specific enzymes and their contribution to the vanillin reduction are not extensively studied. In our previous work, an evolved vanillin-resistant strain showed an increased vanillin reduction capacity compared with its parent strain. The transcriptome analysis suggested the reductases and dehydrogenases of this vanillin resistant strain were up-regulated. Using this as a starting point, 11 significantly regulated reductases and dehydrogenases were selected in the present work for further study. The roles of these reductases and dehydrogenases in the vanillin tolerance and detoxification abilities of S. cerevisiae are described. Among the candidate genes, the overexpression of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH6, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD6, glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase gene ZWF1, NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase gene YNL134C, and aldo-keto reductase gene YJR096W increased 177, 25, 6, 15, and 18 % of the strain μmax in the medium containing 1 g L(-1) vanillin. The in vitro detected vanillin reductase activities of strain overexpressing ADH6, YNL134C and YJR096W were notably higher than control. The vanillin specific reduction rate increased by 8 times in ADH6 overexpressed strain but not in YNL134C and YJR096W overexpressed strain. This suggested that the enzymes encoded by YNL134C and YJR096W might prefer other substrate and/or could not show their effects on vanillin on the high background of Adh6p in vivo. Overexpressing ALD6 and ZWF1 mainly increased the [NADPH]/[NADP(+)] and [GSH]/[GSSG] ratios but not the vanillin reductase activities. Their

  14. Reduced bone mass and muscle strength in male 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara H Windahl

    Full Text Available Androgens are important regulators of bone mass but the relative importance of testosterone (T versus dihydrotestosterone (DHT for the activation of the androgen receptor (AR in bone is unknown. 5α-reductase is responsible for the irreversible conversion of T to the more potent AR activator DHT. There are two well established isoenzymes of 5α-reductase (type 1 and type 2, encoded by separate genes (Srd5a1 and Srd5a2. 5α-reductase type 2 is predominantly expressed in male reproductive tissues whereas 5α-reductase type 1 is highly expressed in liver and moderately expressed in several other tissues including bone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5α-reductase type 1 for bone mass using Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Four-month-old male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had reduced trabecular bone mineral density (-36%, p<0.05 and cortical bone mineral content (-15%, p<0.05 but unchanged serum androgen levels compared with wild type (WT mice. The cortical bone dimensions were reduced in the male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice as a result of a reduced cortical periosteal circumference compared with WT mice. T treatment increased the cortical periosteal circumference (p<0.05 in orchidectomized WT mice but not in orchidectomized Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice demonstrated a reduced forelimb muscle grip strength compared with WT mice (p<0.05. Female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had slightly increased cortical bone mass associated with elevated circulating levels of androgens. In conclusion, 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated male mice have reduced bone mass and forelimb muscle grip strength and we propose that these effects are due to lack of 5α-reductase type 1 expression in bone and muscle. In contrast, the increased cortical bone mass in female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice, is an indirect effect mediated by elevated circulating androgen levels.

  15. The Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata Does Not Depend on Surface Ferric Reductases for Iron Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Gerwien

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron acquisition is a crucial virulence determinant for many bacteria and fungi, including the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata. While the diverse strategies used by C. albicans for obtaining iron from the host are well-described, much less is known about the acquisition of this micronutrient from host sources by C. glabrata – a distant relative of C. albicans with closer evolutionary ties to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which nonetheless causes severe clinical symptoms in humans. Here we show that C. glabrata is much more restricted than C. albicans in using host iron sources, lacking, for example, the ability to grow on transferrin and hemin/hemoglobin. Instead, C. glabrata is able to use ferritin and non-protein-bound iron (FeCl3 as iron sources in a pH-dependent manner. As in other fungal pathogens, iron-dependent growth requires the reductive high affinity (HA iron uptake system. Typically highly conserved, this uptake mechanism normally relies on initial ferric reduction by cell-surface ferric reductases. The C. glabrata genome contains only three such putative ferric reductases, which were found to be dispensable for iron-dependent growth. In addition and in contrast to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, we also detected no surface ferric reductase activity in C. glabrata. Instead, extracellular ferric reduction was found in this and the two other fungal species, which was largely dependent on an excreted low-molecular weight, non-protein ferric reductant. We therefore propose an iron acquisition strategy of C. glabrata which differs from other pathogenic fungi, such as C. albicans, in that it depends on a limited set of host iron sources and that it lacks the need for surface ferric reductases. Extracellular ferric reduction by a secreted molecule possibly compensates for the loss of surface ferric reductase activity in the HA iron uptake system.

  16. Inhibition of steroid 5 alpha-reductase by specific aliphatic unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Liao, S

    1992-01-01

    Human or rat microsomal 5 alpha-reductase activity, as measured by enzymic conversion of testosterone into 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone or by binding of a competitive inhibitor, [3H]17 beta-NN-diethulcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([3H]4-MA) to the reductase, is inhibited by low concentrations (less than 10 microM) of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative inhibitory potencies of unsaturated fatty acids are, in decreasing order: gamma-linolenic acid greater than cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid = cis-6,9,12,15-octatetraenoic acid = arachidonic acid = alpha-linolenic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than palmitoleic acid greater than oleic acid greater than myristoleic acid. Other unsaturated fatty acids such as undecylenic acid, erucic acid and nervonic acid, are inactive. The methyl esters and alcohol analogues of these compounds, glycerols, phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, retinoids and carotenes were inactive even at 0.2 mM. The results of the binding assay and the enzymic assay correlated well except for elaidic acid and linolelaidic acid, the trans isomers of oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively, which were much less active than their cis isomers in the binding assay but were as potent in the enzymic assay. gamma-Linolenic acid had no effect on the activities of two other rat liver microsomal enzymes: NADH:menadione reductase and glucuronosyl transferase. gamma-Linolenic acid, the most potent inhibitor tested, decreased the Vmax. and increased Km values of substrates, NADPH and testosterone, and promoted dissociation of [3H]4-MA from the microsomal reductase. gamma-Linolenic acid, but not the corresponding saturated fatty acid (stearic acid), inhibited the 5 alpha-reductase activity, but not the 17 beta-dehydrogenase activity, of human prostate cancer cells in culture. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids may play an important role in regulating androgen action in target cells. PMID:1637346

  17. Characterization of FRO1, a Pea Ferric-Chelate Reductase Involved in Root Iron Acquisition1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M.; Blevins, Dale G.; Eide, David J.

    2002-01-01

    To acquire iron, many plant species reduce soil Fe(III) to Fe(II) by Fe(III)-chelate reductases embedded in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells. The reduced product is then taken up by Fe(II) transporter proteins. These activities are induced under Fe deficiency. We describe here the FRO1 gene from pea (Pisum sativum), which encodes an Fe(III)-chelate reductase. Consistent with this proposed role, FRO1 shows similarity to other oxidoreductase proteins, and expression of FRO1 in yeast conferred increased Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Furthermore, FRO1 mRNA levels in plants correlated with Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Sites of FRO1 expression in roots, leaves, and nodules were determined. FRO1 mRNA was detected throughout the root, but was most abundant in the outer epidermal cells. Expression was detected in mesophyll cells in leaves. In root nodules, mRNA was detected in the infection zone and nitrogen-fixing region. These results indicate that FRO1 acts in root Fe uptake and they suggest a role in Fe distribution throughout the plant. Characterization of FRO1 has also provided new insights into the regulation of Fe uptake. FRO1 expression and reductase activity was detected only in Fe-deficient roots of Sparkle, whereas both were constitutive in brz and dgl, two mutants with incorrectly regulated Fe accumulation. In contrast, FRO1 expression was responsive to Fe status in shoots of all three plant lines. These results indicate differential regulation of FRO1 in roots and shoots, and improper FRO1 regulation in response to a shoot-derived signal of iron status in the roots of the brz and dgl mutants. PMID:12011340

  18. Characterization of FRO1, a pea ferric-chelate reductase involved in root iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M; Blevins, Dale G; Eide, David J

    2002-05-01

    To acquire iron, many plant species reduce soil Fe(III) to Fe(II) by Fe(III)-chelate reductases embedded in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells. The reduced product is then taken up by Fe(II) transporter proteins. These activities are induced under Fe deficiency. We describe here the FRO1 gene from pea (Pisum sativum), which encodes an Fe(III)-chelate reductase. Consistent with this proposed role, FRO1 shows similarity to other oxidoreductase proteins, and expression of FRO1 in yeast conferred increased Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Furthermore, FRO1 mRNA levels in plants correlated with Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity. Sites of FRO1 expression in roots, leaves, and nodules were determined. FRO1 mRNA was detected throughout the root, but was most abundant in the outer epidermal cells. Expression was detected in mesophyll cells in leaves. In root nodules, mRNA was detected in the infection zone and nitrogen-fixing region. These results indicate that FRO1 acts in root Fe uptake and they suggest a role in Fe distribution throughout the plant. Characterization of FRO1 has also provided new insights into the regulation of Fe uptake. FRO1 expression and reductase activity was detected only in Fe-deficient roots of Sparkle, whereas both were constitutive in brz and dgl, two mutants with incorrectly regulated Fe accumulation. In contrast, FRO1 expression was responsive to Fe status in shoots of all three plant lines. These results indicate differential regulation of FRO1 in roots and shoots, and improper FRO1 regulation in response to a shoot-derived signal of iron status in the roots of the brz and dgl mutants.

  19. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-(2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy)androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy(/sup 3/H)anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Inhibitors of sterol synthesis. Effects of fluorine substitution at carbon atom 25 of cholesterol on its spectral and chromatographic properties and on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in CHO-K1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W K; Swaminathan, S; Pinkerton, F D; Gerst, N; Schroepfer, G J

    1994-05-01

    25-Fluorocholesterol (III) was prepared by treatment of 25-hydroxycholesterol (IV) with hydrogen fluoride-pyridine. Compounds III, IV, and cholesterol (I) were fully characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, and stereochemical assignments were established for the C-22 and C-23 protons. The side-chain proton assignments, which apply to most other sterols with a saturated eight-carbon side chain, were based on conformational analysis and comparisons with NMR data for 25,26,26,26,27,27,27-heptafluorocholesterol (II). The chromatographic behavior of I, II, and III were compared on thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography. Major fragment ions in electron-impact mass spectra of III were analogous to ions of either cholesterol or desmosterol, and a similar analogy was observed for the trimethylsilyl ethers. The 25-hydroxysterol IV and the 25-fluorosterol III differed markedly in their effects on the levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in CHO-K1 cells. Whereas 25-hydroxycholesterol caused a approximately 66% lowering of reductase activity in cells at 0.1 microM, the 25-fluorosterol III had no effect at this concentration.

  2. Inhibition of aldose reductase activity by Cannabis sativa chemotypes extracts with high content of cannabidiol or cannabigerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Antonella; Giofrè, Salvatore V; Galati, Enza M; Monforte, Maria T; Cicero, Nicola; D'Angelo, Valeria; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Circosta, Clara

    2018-02-07

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) is a key enzyme involved in diabetic complications and the search for new aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) is currently very important. The synthetic ARIs are often associated with deleterious side effects and medicinal and edible plants, containing compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity, could be useful for prevention and therapy of diabetic complications. Non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids exert multiple pharmacological effects with therapeutic potential in many diseases such as inflammation, cancer, diabetes. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effects of extracts and their fractions from two Cannabis sativa L. chemotypes with high content of cannabidiol (CBD)/cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) and cannabigerol (CBG)/cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), respectively, on human recombinant and pig kidney aldose reductase activity in vitro. A molecular docking study was performed to evaluate the interaction of these cannabinoids with the active site of ALR2 compared to known ARIs. The extracts showed significant dose-dependent aldose reductase inhibitory activity (>70%) and higher than fractions. The inhibitory activity of the fractions was greater for acidic cannabinoid-rich fractions. Comparative molecular docking results have shown a higher stability of the ALR2-cannabinoid acids complex than the other inhibitors. The extracts of Cannabis with high content of non-psychotropic cannabinoids CBD/CBDA or CBG/CBGA significantly inhibit aldose reductase activity. These results may have some relevance for the possible use of C. sativa chemotypes based preparations as aldose reductase inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. FQR1, a Novel Primary Auxin-Response Gene, Encodes a Flavin Mononucleotide-Binding Quinone Reductase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Marta J.; Dreher, Kate A.; Gehring, Mary A.; Abel, Steffen; Gensler, Arminda L.; Sussex, Ian M.

    2002-01-01

    FQR1 is a novel primary auxin-response gene that codes for a flavin mononucleotide-binding flavodoxin-like quinone reductase. Accumulation of FQR1 mRNA begins within 10 min of indole-3-acetic acid application and reaches a maximum of approximately 10-fold induction 30 min after treatment. This increase in FQR1 mRNA abundance is not diminished by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating that FQR1 is a primary auxin-response gene. Sequence analysis reveals that FQR1 belongs to a family of flavin mononucleotide-binding quinone reductases. Partially purified His-tagged FQR1 isolated from Escherichia coli catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADH and NADPH to several substrates and exhibits in vitro quinone reductase activity. Overexpression of FQR1 in plants leads to increased levels of FQR1 protein and quinone reductase activity, indicating that FQR1 functions as a quinone reductase in vivo. In mammalian systems, glutathione S-transferases and quinone reductases are classified as phase II detoxification enzymes. We hypothesize that the auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferases and quinone reductases found in plants also act as detoxification enzymes, possibly to protect against auxin-induced oxidative stress. PMID:11842161

  4. FQR1, a novel primary auxin-response gene, encodes a flavin mononucleotide-binding quinone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Marta J; Dreher, Kate A; Gehring, Mary A; Abel, Steffen; Gensler, Arminda L; Sussex, Ian M

    2002-02-01

    FQR1 is a novel primary auxin-response gene that codes for a flavin mononucleotide-binding flavodoxin-like quinone reductase. Accumulation of FQR1 mRNA begins within 10 min of indole-3-acetic acid application and reaches a maximum of approximately 10-fold induction 30 min after treatment. This increase in FQR1 mRNA abundance is not diminished by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating that FQR1 is a primary auxin-response gene. Sequence analysis reveals that FQR1 belongs to a family of flavin mononucleotide-binding quinone reductases. Partially purified His-tagged FQR1 isolated from Escherichia coli catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADH and NADPH to several substrates and exhibits in vitro quinone reductase activity. Overexpression of FQR1 in plants leads to increased levels of FQR1 protein and quinone reductase activity, indicating that FQR1 functions as a quinone reductase in vivo. In mammalian systems, glutathione S-transferases and quinone reductases are classified as phase II detoxification enzymes. We hypothesize that the auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferases and quinone reductases found in plants also act as detoxification enzymes, possibly to protect against auxin-induced oxidative stress.

  5. Ion beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    An ion beam analyzer is specified, having an ion source for generating ions of a sample to be analyzed, means for extracting the sample ions, means for focusing the sample ions into a beam, separation means positioned along the ion beam for selectively deflecting species of ions, and means for detecting the selected species of ions. According to the specification, the analyzer further comprises (a) means for disabling at least a portion of the separation means, such that the ion beam from the source remains undeflected; (b) means located along the path of the undeflected ion beam for sensing the sample ions; and (c) enabling means responsive to the sensing means for automatically re-enabling the separation means when the sample ions reach a predetermined intensity level. (author)

  6. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  7. Synthesis and Activity of a New Series of(Z-3-Phenyl-2-benzoylpropenoic Acid Derivatives as Aldose Reductase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jie Wang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available During the course of studies directed towards the discovery of novel aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetic complications, we synthesized a series of new (Z-3-phenyl-2-benzoylpropenoic acid derivatives and tested their in vitro inhibitory activities on rat lens aldose reductase. Of these compounds, (Z-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-2-(4-methylbenzoylpropenoicacid(3k was identified as the most potent inhibitor, with an IC50 of 0.49μM. The theoretical binding mode of 3k was obtained by simulation of its docking into the active site of the human aldose reductase crystal structure.

  8. Subcellular distribution of nitroblue tetrazolium reductase (NBT-R) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, R L

    1975-11-01

    Subcellular distribution study of cytoplasmic organelles was performed on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after homogenization in 0.34 molar sucrose by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the homogenate. The whole homogenate and each fraction was assayed for nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reductase with and without 1 mM potassium cyanide, and the distribution of this enzyme was compared to the distribution of lysozyme, peroxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and acid and alkaline phosphatase. Enzyme recovery was 97 per cent and ranged between 74 and 124 per cent. Latent activity of all enzymes except NBT-reductase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated by observing a four- to sixfold increase in activity after the addition of Triton-X 100. Maximal relative specific activity using either DPNH or without cyanide for NBT-reductase was found in the 100,000 x g differential centrifugation fraction and was concentrated in the less dense top fraction of the sucrose density gradient. The distribution pattern was similar to acid and alkaline phosphatase. In contrast, the maximal concentration of beta-glucuronidase and peroxidase was found in the heavier 7,200 x g granule fraction and in the more dense bottom fractions of the sucrose density gradient. Maximal lysozyme activity was concentrated in the 30,000 x g granule fraction and in the fractions located between the heaviest and lightest fractions of the sucrose density gradient. The lack of latent activity and the similarity of subcellular distribution of NBT-reductase to acid and alkaline phosphatase, two enzymes associated with microsomes and plasmalemal membranes in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), indicates that NBT-reductase is also a nonlysosomal enzyme located in microsomes or in plasmalemal membranes. These findings support the previously described histochemical observations that initial reduction of NBT to formazan occurs on the PMN plasmalemal surface membrane at

  9. Na(+) but not Cl(-) or osmotic stress is involved in NaCl-induced expression of Glutathione reductase in roots of rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chwan-Yang; Chao, Yun-Yang; Yang, Min-Yu; Cho, Shih-Chueh; Huei Kao, Ching

    2009-10-15

    Glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1,6.4.2) is an important reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme. The present study examined the relative importance of Na(+), Cl(-), and the osmotic component in NaCl-induced expression of Oryza sativa glutathione reductase (OsGR) genes in rice roots. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to quantify the mRNA levels for one cytosolic (OsGR2) and two chloroplastic (OsGR1 and OsGR3) isoforms of GR identified in the rice genome. The expression of OsGR2 and OsGR3 but not OsGR1 was increased in rice roots treated with NaCl. Treatment with 150 mM NaCl and 150 mM NaNO(3) affected OsGR2 and OsGR3 induction similarly, which suggests that Na(+) but not Cl(-) is required for the NaCl-induced expression of OsGR2 and OsGR3. We also show that Na(+) but not Cl(-) is required for NaCl-enhanced GR activity and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production in rice roots. In addition to its component of ion toxicity, salt concentration in soil results in an osmotic effect. Here, we show that OsGR2 and OsGR3 expression, GR activity, and H(2)O(2) content were not affected at a concentration of mannitol iso-osmotic with 150 mM NaCl. NaCl-induced OsGR2 and OsGR3 in rice roots could be associated with Na(+) but not an osmotic component.

  10. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Straub, Sandra; Bischof, Kai

    2013-02-01

    The concentration of CO(2) in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO(2) emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO(2) concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO(2) concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO(2) concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO(2) and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO(2). Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO(2), while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO(2). The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO(2) due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO(2) are discussed.

  11. Novel quinazolinone-based 2,4-thiazolidinedione-3-acetic acid derivatives as potent aldose reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Kamel; Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris; Quattrini, Luca; Coviello, Vito; Motta, Concettina La; El-Rashedy, Ahmed A; Soliman, Mahmoud Es

    2017-12-01

    Targeting aldose reductase enzyme with 2,4-thiazolidinedione-3-acetic acid derivatives having a bulky hydrophobic 3-arylquinazolinone residue. All the target compounds were structurally characterized by different spectroscopic methods and microanalysis, their aldose reductase inhibitory activities were evaluated, and binding modes were studied by molecular modeling. All the synthesized compounds proved to inhibit the target enzyme potently, exhibiting IC 50 values in the nanomolar/low nanomolar range. Compound 5i (IC 50  = 2.56 nM), the most active of the whole series, turned out to be almost 70-fold more active than the only marketed aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat. This work represents a promising matrix for developing new potential therapeutic candidates for prevention of diabetic complications through targeting aldose reductase enzyme. [Formula: see text].

  12. Catalases are NAD(PH-dependent tellurite reductases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván L Calderón

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(PH is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(PH protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(PH-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3(2- to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o, in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical.

  13. Structure of constituents isolated from the flower buds of Cananga odorata and their inhibitory effects on aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Fujimoto, Katsuyoshi; Ohta, Tomoe; Ogawa, Keiko; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2014-10-01

    Three new terpenoid derivatives, canangaterpenes IV-VI, were isolated from the flower buds of Cananga odorata, cultivated in Thailand, together with eight known flavonoids. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on aldose reductase were also investigated. Several terpenoid derivatives and flavonoids were shown to inhibit aldose reductase.

  14. ELEVATED LIPID PEROXIDATION AND DNA OXIDATION IN NERVE FROM DIABETIC RATS: EFFECTS OF ALDOSE REDUCTASE INHIBITION, INSULIN AND NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Joice M.; Jolivalt, Corinne G.; Ramos, Khara M.; Gregory, Joshua A.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor, insulin or select neurotrophic factors on the generation of oxidative damage in peripheral nerve. Rats were either treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce insulin-deficient diabetes or fed with a diet containing 40% D-galactose to promote hexose metabolism by aldose reductase. Initial time-course studies showed that lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation were significantly elevated in sciatic nerve after 1 week or 2...

  15. The structure of Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin reductase reveals molecular features of photo-oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bang, Maria Blanner; Rykær, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent homodimeric flavoenzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) provides reducing equivalents to thioredoxin, a key regulator of various cellular redox processes. Crystal structures of photo-inactivated thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis have...... been determined. These structures reveal novel molecular features that provide further insight into the mechanisms behind the sensitivity of this enzyme toward visible light. We propose that a pocket on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring accommodates oxygen that reacts with photo-excited FAD...... thus be a widespread feature among bacterial TrxR with the described characteristics, which affords applications in clinical photo-therapy of drug-resistant bacteria....

  16. Normal bone density in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5a- reductase 2 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Elaine Maria Frade

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an androgen-dependent tissue, but it is not clear whether the androgen action in bone depends on testosterone or on dihydrotestosterone. Patients with 5alpha-reductase 2 deficiency present normal levels of testosterone and low levels of dihydrotestosterone, providing an in vivo human model for the analysis of the effect of testosterone on bone. OBJECTIVE: To analyze bone mineral density in 4 adult patients with male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5alpha-reductase 2 deficiency. RESULTS: Three patients presented normal bone mineral density of the lumbar column (L1-L4 and femur neck, and the other patient presented a slight osteopenia in the lumbar column. CONCLUSION: Patients with dihydrotestosterone deficiency present normal bone mineral density, suggesting that dihydrotestosterone is not the main androgen acting in bone.

  17. MTD–CoMSIA modelling of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL M. DUDA-SEIMAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D quantitative structure–activity relationship for a series of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors based on the pyrrolylethyl-tetrahydropyranone scaffold was examined using the Minimal Topological Difference (MTD method and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA. The studied compounds were of the tetrahydro-4-hydroxy-6-[2-(1H-pyrrol-1-ylethyl]-2H-pyran-2-one type. In clinical practice, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are usually referred to by the generic name statins. The analysis performed using the MTD method showed that voluminous substituents produce a significant biological activity (= 0.677 > 0.5; SEECV = 0.319, while the CoMSIA method added useful information regarding the influence of the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and acceptor properties on biological activity (= 0.60; r2 = 0.98.

  18. Nitroreductase reactions of the NADPH: adrenodoxin reductase and the adrenodoxin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkeviciene, J; Cenas, N; Kulys, J; Usanov, S A; Sukhova, N M; Selezneva, I S; Gryazev, V F

    1990-01-01

    NADPH: adrenodoxin reductase (E.C. 1.18.1.2) and its complex with adrenodoxin catalyze the aerobic oxidation of NADPH by a number of substituted 2-nitrofurans, 5-nitroimidazoles and p-derivatives of nitrobenzene. The nitrocompounds are reduced via an initial single-electron transfer. Under anaerobic conditions nitrofurans are reduced to the corresponding amines. The rate constants of adrenodoxin oxidation by nitrocompounds vary from 4 x 10(5) to 3 x 10(2) M-1 s-1. A linear correlation between the rate constant logarithm and the single-electron reduction potential at pH 7.0 (E7(1)) of nitrocompounds was observed. The relation between the reactivity and the polarographic half-wave potential (E7(1/2)) is distorted. The reactivity of adrenodoxin reductase is two orders of magnitude lower than that of adrenodoxin.

  19. Substrate Specificity, Inhibitor Selectivity and Structure-Function Relationships of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B15: A Novel Human Retinaldehyde Reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Giménez-Dejoz

    Full Text Available Human aldo-keto reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15 is a newly discovered enzyme which shares 92% amino acid sequence identity with AKR1B10. While AKR1B10 is a well characterized enzyme with high retinaldehyde reductase activity, involved in the development of several cancer types, the enzymatic activity and physiological role of AKR1B15 are still poorly known. Here, the purified recombinant enzyme has been subjected to substrate specificity characterization, kinetic analysis and inhibitor screening, combined with structural modeling. AKR1B15 is active towards a variety of carbonyl substrates, including retinoids, with lower kcat and Km values than AKR1B10. In contrast to AKR1B10, which strongly prefers all-trans-retinaldehyde, AKR1B15 exhibits superior catalytic efficiency with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, the best substrate found for this enzyme. With ketone and dicarbonyl substrates, AKR1B15 also shows higher catalytic activity than AKR1B10. Several typical AKR inhibitors do not significantly affect AKR1B15 activity. Amino acid substitutions clustered in loops A and C result in a smaller, more hydrophobic and more rigid active site in AKR1B15 compared with the AKR1B10 pocket, consistent with distinct substrate specificity and narrower inhibitor selectivity for AKR1B15.

  20. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  1. Thermolabile methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: an inherited risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, S S; Wong, P W; Susmano, A; Sora, J; Norusis, M; Ruggie, N

    1991-01-01

    Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency with less than 2% of normal enzyme activity is characterized by neurological abnormalities, atherosclerotic changes, and thromboembolism. We have discovered a "new" variant of MTHFR deficiency which is characterized by the absence of neurological abnormalities, an enzyme activity of about 50% of the normal value, and distinctive thermolability under specific conditions of heat inactivation. In this study, lymphocyte MTHFR specific ...

  2. Identification of new potent inhibitor of aldose reductase from Ocimum basilicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Huma Aslam; Tehseen, Yildiz; Maryam, Kiran; Uroos, Maliha; Siddiqui, Bina S; Hameed, Abdul; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2017-12-01

    Recent efforts to develop cure for chronic diabetic complications have led to the discovery of potent inhibitors against aldose reductase (AKR1B1, EC 1.1.1.21) whose role in diabetes is well-evident. In the present work, two new natural products were isolated from the ariel part of Ocimum basilicum; 7-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3-methyl-8-β-O-d-glucoside-2H-chromen-2-one (1) and E-4-(6'-hydroxyhex-3'-en-1-yl)phenyl propionate (2) and confirmed their structures with different spectroscopic techniques including NMR spectroscopy etc. The isolated compounds (1, 2) were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and aldehyde reductase (AKR1A1). The natural product (1) showed better inhibitory activity for AKR1B1 with IC 50 value of 2.095±0.77µM compare to standard sorbinil (IC 50 =3.14±0.02µM). Moreover, the compound (1) also showed multifolds higher activity (IC 50 =0.783±0.07µM) against AKR1A1 as compared to standard valproic acid (IC 50 =57.4±0.89µM). However, the natural product (2) showed slightly lower activity for AKR1B1 (IC 50 =4.324±1.25µM). Moreover, the molecular docking studies of the potent inhibitors were also performed to identify the putative binding modes within the active site of aldose/aldehyde reductases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Systemic and ocular pharmacokinetics of N-4-benzoylaminophenylsulfonylglycine (BAPSG), a novel aldose reductase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Sunkara, Gangadhar; Ayalasomayajula, Surya P.; Rao, Cheruku S.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; DeRuiter, Jack; Kompella, Uday B.

    2004-01-01

    To better develop N-[4-(benzoylamino)phenylsulfonyl]glycine (BAPSG), a potent and selective aldose reductase inhibitor capable of delaying the progression of ocular diabetic complications, the objective of this study was to assess its pharmacokinetics. The plasma pharmacokinetics of BASPG was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral routes of administration and its distribution to various tissues including those of the eye was studied following intr...

  4. Phenotypic classification of male pseudohermaphroditism due to steroid 5{alpha}-reductase 2 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnecker, G.H.G; Hiort, O.; Kruse, K.; Dibbelt, L. [Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)] [and others

    1996-05-03

    Conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in genital tissue is catalysed by the enzyme 5{alpha}-reductase 2, which is encoded by the SRD5A2 gene. The potent androgen DHT is required for full masculinization of the external genitalia. Mutations of the SRD5A2 gene inhibit enzyme activity, diminish DHT formation, and hence cause masculinization defects of varying degree. The classical syndrome, formerly described as pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias, is characterized by a predominantly female phenotype at birth and significant virilization without gynecomastia at puberty. We investigated nine patients with steroid 5{alpha}-reductase 2 deficiency (SRD). T/DHT-ratios were highly increased in the classical syndrome, but variable in the less severe affected patients. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene had been characterized using PCR-SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing. A small deletion was encountered in two patients, while all other patients had single base mutations which result in amino acid substitutions. We conclude that phenotypes may vary widely in patients with SRD5A2 gene mutations spanning the whole range from completely female to normal male without distinctive clinical signs of the disease. Hence, steroid 5{alpha}-reductase deficiency should be considered not only in sex reversed patients with female or ambiguous phenotypes, but also in those with mild symptoms of undermasculinization as encountered in patients with hypospadias and/or micropenis. A classification based on the severity of the masculinization defect may be used for correlation of phenotypes with enzyme activities and genotypes, and for comparisons of phenotypes between different patients as the basis for clinical decisions to be made in patients with pseudohermaphroditism due to steroid 5{alpha}-reductase 2 deficiency. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity associated with an aromatic biosynthetic enzyme complex in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaines, C G; Lodge, J S; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1981-01-01

    The cytoplasmic fractions obtained from Bacillus subtilis strains W168 and WB2802 catalyzed reductive release of iron from the ferric chelate of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (ferri-DHB), the ferrisiderophore produced by B. subtilis. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity may insert iron into metabolism. This activity required a reductant (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate was preferred), was oxygen sensitive, and was stimulated by flavin mononucleotide plus certain divalent cation...

  6. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better...

  7. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Nocek, Boguslaw; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2017-08-02

    In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2). In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER) that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  8. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Nocek, Boguslaw; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2017-08-02

    In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2). In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER) that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  9. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant Under Water Deficit Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Aliasgharzad, N. Aliasgharzad; Heydaryan, Zahra; Sarikhani, M.R

    2014-01-01

    Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA). In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari) were inoculated with...

  10. Evidence for participation of the methionine sulfoxide reductase repair system in plant seed longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Châtelain, Emilie; Satour, Pascale; Laugier, Edith; Ly Vu, Benoit; Payet, Nicole; Rey, Pascal; Montrichard, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are in a natural oxidative context leading to protein oxidation. Although inevitable for proper progression from maturation to germination, protein oxidation at high levels is detrimental and associated with seed aging. Oxidation of methionine to methionine sulfoxide is a common form of damage observed during aging in all organisms. This damage is reversible through the action of methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSRs), which play key roles in lifespan control in yeast and animal cells. ...

  11. Heterozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase mutation with mild hyperhomocysteinemia associated with deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Anil; al Kindi, Salam; al Belushi, Talal; Bayoumi, Riad; Dennison, David; Murlitharan, S

    2002-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is known to be associated with arterial occlusive vascular disease and venous thrombosis. Here we report a young ethnic Omani patient with recurrent venous thrombosis who was found to be heterozygous for the C677T mutation in the enzyme methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia was also documented in the presence of normal red cell folate and serum B12 levels. No other marker usually associated with hereditary thrombophilia could be demonstrated in the patient, despite extensive investigations on multiple occasions.

  12. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Forlani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2. In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  13. Molecular Characteristics and Serodiagnostic Potential of Dihydrofolate Reductase from Echinococcus granulosus

    OpenAIRE

    Xingju Song; Dandan Hu; Min Yan; Yu Wang; Ning Wang; Xiaobin Gu; Guangyou Yang

    2017-01-01

    The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus causes cystic echinococcosis (CE), a neglected tropical disease that leads to morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock worldwide. Here, we identified and characterized dihydrofolate reductase (Eg-DHFR) from E. granulosus, and evaluated its potential as a diagnostic antigen for sheep CE. Comparison between mammalian (host) DHFR and Eg-DHFR indicates that 45.7% of the 35 active site residues are different. Immunolocalisation analysis showed tha...

  14. Mechanism of biological denitrification inhibition: procyanidins induce an allosteric transition of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase through membrane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Poly, Franck; Piola, Florence; Pancton, Muriel; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Haichar, Feth el Zahar

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that procyanidins from Fallopia spp. inhibit bacterial denitrification, a phenomenon called biological denitrification inhibition (BDI). However, the mechanisms involved in such a process remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of BDI involving procyanidins, using the model strain Pseudomonas brassicacearum NFM 421. The aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration, cell permeability and cell viability of P. brassicacearum were determined as a function of procyanidin concentration. The effect of procyanidins on the bacterial membrane was observed using transmission electronic microscopy. Bacterial growth, denitrification, NO3- and NO2-reductase activity, and the expression of subunits of NO3- (encoded by the gene narG) and NO2-reductase (encoded by the gene nirS) under NO3 or NO2 were measured with and without procyanidins. Procyanidins inhibited the denitrification process without affecting aerobic respiration at low concentrations. Procyanidins also disturbed cell membranes without affecting cell viability. They specifically inhibited NO3- but not NO2-reductase.Pseudomonas brassicacearum responded to procyanidins by over-expression of the membrane-bound NO3-reductase subunit (encoded by the gene narG). Our results suggest that procyanidins can specifically inhibit membrane-bound NO3-reductase inducing enzymatic conformational changes through membrane disturbance and that P. brassicacearum responds by over-expressing membrane-bound NO3-reductase. Our results lead the way to a better understanding of BDI. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Genetic evidence that induction of root Fe(III) chelate reductase activity is necessary for iron uptake under iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y; Guerinot, M L

    1996-11-01

    Reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by Fe(III) chelate reductase is thought to be an obligatory step in iron uptake as well as the primary factor in making iron available for absorption by all plants except grasses. Fe(III) chelate reductase has also been suggested to play a more general role in the regulation of cation absorption. In order to experimentally address the importance of Fe(III) chelate reductase activity in the mineral nutrition of plants, three Arabidopsis thaliana mutans (frd1-1, frd1-2 and frd1-3), that do not show induction of Fe(III) chelate reductase activity under iron-deficient growth conditions, have been isolated and characterized. These mutants are still capable of acidifying the rhizosphere under iron-deficiency and accumulate more Zn and Mn in their shoots relative to wild-type plants regardless of iron status. frd1 mutants do not translocate radiolabeled iron to the shoots when roots are presented with a tightly chelated form of Fe(III). These results: (1) confirm that iron must be reduced before it can be transported, (2) show that Fe(III) reduction can be uncoupled from proton release, the other major iron-deficiency response, and (3) demonstrate that Fe(III) chelate reductase activity per se is not necessarily responsible for accumulation of cations previously observed in pea and tomato mutants with constitutively high levels of Fe(III) chelate reductase activity.

  16. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  17. EPR and redox properties of periplasmic nitrate reductase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Pablo J; Rivas, María G; Brondino, Carlos D; Bursakov, Sergey A; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2006-07-01

    Nitrate reductases are enzymes that catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. We report here electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies in the periplasmic nitrate reductase isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774. This protein, belonging to the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes, comprises a single 80-kDa subunit and contains a Mo bis(molybdopterin guanosine dinucleotide) cofactor and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. EPR-monitored redox titrations, carried out with and without nitrate in the potential range from 200 to -500 mV, and EPR studies of the enzyme, in both catalytic and inhibited conditions, reveal distinct types of Mo(V) EPR-active species, which indicates that the Mo site presents high coordination flexibility. These studies show that nitrate modulates the redox properties of the Mo active site, but not those of the [4Fe-4S] center. The possible structures and the role in catalysis of the distinct Mo(V) species detected by EPR are discussed.

  18. ECTO-NOX (ENOX) proteins of the cell surface lack thioredoxin reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosneaga, Elena; Kim, Chinpal; Shen, Bernard; Watanabe, Takahiro; Morre, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2008-01-01

    This study was to determine if ENOX proteins of the cell surface act as cell surface thioredoxin reductases. To measure formation of thiols a turbimetric insulin assay was used. No turbidity was observed with insulin alone or with insulin plus DTT. However, the combination of insulin +DTT + recombinant his-tagged ENOX2 (tNOX) did result in increased turbidity. An ENOX1 (CNOX) preparation also resulted in turbidity changes. In contrast, we were unable to demonstrate ENOX2-dependent insulin reduction by high density SDS-PAGE. Inclusion of reduced serum albumin as a source of free thiols for the protein disulfide interchange activity catalyzed by ENOX2 failed to result in insulin reduction in the presence of ENOX2. A direct effect of ENOX2 on thioredoxin reduction in the presence of NADPH also was not observed. The DTNB assay for thioredoxin reductase activity also failed to reveal activity. Thus, ENOX proteins appear not to function as thioredoxin reductases at the cell surface nor do they appear to recognize reduced insulin as a substrate for protein disulfide-thiol interchange. The enhanced turbidity of insulin solutions resulting from ENOX presence was traced to ENOX-catalyzed insulin fibrillation either through nucleation enhancement or some other mechanism. Fibrillation was determined using Thioflavin T fluorescence which paralleled the turbimetric results and the formation of multimers (polymerization) observed on SDS-PAGE.

  19. Atomic Structure of Salutaridine Reductase from the Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Kutchan, Toni M.; Smith, Thomas J. (Danforth)

    2011-11-18

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is one of the oldest known medicinal plants. In the biosynthetic pathway for morphine and codeine, salutaridine is reduced to salutaridinol by salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) using NADPH as coenzyme. Here, we report the atomic structure of SalR to a resolution of {approx}1.9 {angstrom} in the presence of NADPH. The core structure is highly homologous to other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The major difference is that the nicotinamide moiety and the substrate-binding pocket are covered by a loop (residues 265-279), on top of which lies a large 'flap'-like domain (residues 105-140). This configuration appears to be a combination of the two common structural themes found in other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Previous modeling studies suggested that substrate inhibition is due to mutually exclusive productive and nonproductive modes of substrate binding in the active site. This model was tested via site-directed mutagenesis, and a number of these mutations abrogated substrate inhibition. However, the atomic structure of SalR shows that these mutated residues are instead distributed over a wide area of the enzyme, and many are not in the active site. To explain how residues distal to the active site might affect catalysis, a model is presented whereby SalR may undergo significant conformational changes during catalytic turnover.

  20. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (Ex Vivo by Morus indica (Mulberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Reddy Palvai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are the bioactive components that contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular and other degenerative diseases. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase would be an effective means of lowering plasma cholesterol in humans. The present study explores the HMG CoA reductase inhibitory effect of extracts from leaves of Morus indica varieties, M5, V1, and S36, compared with the statin, using an ex vivo method. The assay is based on the stoichiometric formation of coenzyme A during the reduction of microsomal HMG CoA to mevalonate. Dechlorophyllised extract of three varieties was studied at 300 µg. The coenzyme A released at the end of assay in control (100.31 nmoles and statins (94.46 nm was higher than the dechlorphyllised extracts of the samples. The coenzyme A released during the reduction of HMG CoA to mevalonate in dechlorophyllised extracts of the samples was as follows: S36 < M5 < V1. The results indicated that the samples were highly effective in inhibiting the enzyme compared to statins (standard drug. The results indicate the role of Morus varieties extracts in modulating the cholesterol metabolism by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase. These results provide scope for designing in vivo animal studies to confirm their effect.

  1. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-06-23

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites ('catalophores'). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C-C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts.

  2. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  3. Inhibitory effects of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott constituents on aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong Mei; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Beom Goo; Hong, Jae Seung; Lim, Soon Sung

    2014-08-27

    The goal of this study was to determine the rat lens aldose reductase-inhibitory effects of 95% ethanol extracts from the leaves of C. esculenta and, its organic solvent soluble fractions, including the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (BuOH) and water (H2O) layers, using dl-glyceraldehyde as a substrate. Ten compounds, namely tryptophan (1), orientin (2), isoorientin (3), vitexin (4), isovitexin (5), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (6), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (7), rosmarinic acid (8), 1-O-feruloyl-d-glucoside (9) and 1-O-caffeoyl-d-glucoside (10) were isolated from the EtOAc and BuOH fractions of C. esculenta. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison with previous reports. All the isolates were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity against rat lens aldose reductase. Among tested compounds, compounds 2 and 3 significantly inhibited rat lens aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 1.65 and 1.92 μM, respectively. Notably, the inhibitory activity of orientin was 3.9 times greater than that of the positive control, quercetin (4.12 μM). However, the isolated compounds showed only moderate ABTS+ [2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] activity. These results suggest that flavonoid derivatives from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott represent potential compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  4. A DFT-based QSAR study on inhibition of human dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Sedat; Sizochenko, Natalia; Orhan, Adnan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Diaminopyrimidine derivatives are frequently used as inhibitors of human dihydrofolate reductase, for example in treatment of patients whose immune system are affected by human immunodeficiency virus. Forty-seven dicyclic and tricyclic potential inhibitors of human dihydrofolate reductase were analyzed using the quantitative structure-activity analysis supported by DFT-based and DRAGON-based descriptors. The developed model yielded an RMSE deviation of 1.1 a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The prediction set was characterized by R 2 =0.60 and RMSE=3.59. Factors responsible for inhibition process were identified and discussed. The resulting model was validated via cross validation and Y-scrambling procedure. From the best model, we found several mass-related descriptors and Sanderson electronegativity-related descriptors that have the best correlations with the investigated inhibitory concentration. These descriptors reflect results from QSAR studies based on characteristics of human dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of adenylylsulfate reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Goenka Agrawal, Aruna; Kaur, Amrit Pal; Goddard, Richard; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The crystallization of adenylylsulfate reductase isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium D. vulgaris Miyazaki F is described. The crystals diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution. Sulfur in its various oxidation states is used for energy conservation in many microorganisms. Adenylylsulfate reductase is a key enzyme in the sulfur-reduction pathway of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The adenylylsulfate reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F has been purified and crystallized at 277 K using the vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. A data set was collected to 1.7 Å resolution from a single crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P3 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125.93, c = 164.24 Å. The crystal contained two molecules per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 4.02 Å 3 Da −1 ; the solvent content was estimated to be 69.4%

  6. Leishmania chagasi: uptake of iron bound to lactoferrin or transferrin requires an iron reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mary E; Lewis, Troy S; Miller, Melissa A; McCormick, Michael L; Britigan, Bradley E

    2002-03-01

    Leishmania chagasi can utilize iron bound to transferrin, lactoferrin, or other chelates. We investigated the mechanism of iron uptake. Promastigotes preferentially took up iron in a reduced rather than an oxidized form, suggesting that extracellular iron must be reduced prior to internalization. Similar to literature reports, a 70-kDa protein in promastigote membrane-containing microsomes bound to [125I]-labeled transferrin. However, [125I]lactoferrin and [125I]albumin also bound a similar 70-kDa protein, suggesting that binding might not be specific. Both total and fractionated promastigotes exhibited an NADPH-dependent iron reductase activity. In contrast to trypanosomes, which take up transferrin through a specific receptor, these data support a model in which a parasite-associated or secreted reductase reduces ferric to ferrous iron, decreasing its affinity for the extracellular chelate and allowing it to be readily internalized by the parasite. This could account for the ability of the parasite to utilize iron from multiple sources in diverse host environments. Index Descriptors and Abbreviations. Index descriptors: Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, iron, iron reductase, lactoferrin, L. chagasi, leishmaniasis, nutrient acquisition, protozoan, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, transferrin; Abbreviations used: DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid; DTT, dithiothreitol; HBSS, Hanks' balanced salt solution; MTT, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide; NEM, N-ethylmaleimide; RNA, ribonucleic acid.

  7. Chloroplast Fe(III) chelate reductase activity is essential for seedling viability under iron limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeeyon; Cohu, Christopher; Kerkeb, Loubna; Pilon, Marinus; Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2008-07-29

    Photosynthesis, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly all take place in the chloroplast, and all require iron. Reduction of iron via a membrane-bound Fe(III) chelate reductase is required before iron transport across membranes in a variety of systems, but to date there has been no definitive genetic proof that chloroplasts have such a reduction system. Here we report that one of the eight members of the Arabidopsis ferric reductase oxidase (FRO) family, FRO7, localizes to the chloroplast. Chloroplasts prepared from fro7 loss-of-function mutants have 75% less Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and contain 33% less iron per microgram of chlorophyll than wild-type chloroplasts. This decreased iron content is presumably responsible for the observed defects in photosynthetic electron transport. When germinated in alkaline soil, fro7 seedlings show severe chlorosis and die without setting seed unless watered with high levels of soluble iron. Overall, our results provide molecular evidence that FRO7 plays a role in chloroplast iron acquisition and is required for efficient photosynthesis in young seedlings and for survival under iron-limiting conditions.

  8. Mutational reconstructed ferric chelate reductase confers enhanced tolerance in rice to iron deficiency in calcareous soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Kim, Suyeon; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Oki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takanori; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Takahashi, Michiko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2007-05-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a worldwide agricultural problem on calcareous soils with low-Fe availability due to high soil pH. Rice plants use a well documented phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II) to take up Fe from the soil and also possess a direct Fe2+ transport system. Rice plants are extremely susceptible to low-Fe supply, however, because of low phytosiderophore secretion and low Fe3+ reduction activity. A yeast Fe3+ chelate-reductase gene refre1/372, selected for better performance at high pH, was fused to the promoter of the Fe-regulated transporter, OsIRT1, and introduced into rice plants. The transgene was expressed in response to a low-Fe nutritional status in roots of transformants. Transgenic rice plants expressing the refre1/372 gene showed higher Fe3+ chelate-reductase activity and a higher Fe-uptake rate than vector controls under Fe-deficient conditions. Consequently, transgenic rice plants exhibited an enhanced tolerance to low-Fe availability and 7.9x the grain yield of nontransformed plants in calcareous soils. This report shows that enhancing the Fe3+ chelate-reductase activity of rice plants that normally have low endogenous levels confers resistance to Fe deficiency.

  9. Crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complex with cancer prodrug CB1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2005-10-14

    CB1954 is a cancer pro-drug that can be activated through reduction by Escherichia coli nitro-reductases and quinone reductases. Human quinone reductase 2 is very efficient in the activation of CB1954, approximately 3000 times more efficient than human QR1 in terms of k(cat)/K(m). We have solved the three-dimensional structure of QR2 in complex with CB1954 to a nominal resolution of 1.5A. The complex structure indicates the essentiality of the two nitro groups: one nitro group forms hydrogen bonds with the side-chain of Asn161 of QR2 to hold the other nitro group in position for the reduction. We further conclude that residue 161, an Asn in QR2 and a His in QR1, is critical in differentiating the substrate specificities of these two enzymes. Mutation of Asn161 to His161 in QR2 resulted in the total loss of the enzymatic activity towards activation of CB1954, whereas the rates of reduction towards menadione are not altered.

  10. Differential regulation of wheat quinone reductases in response to powdery mildew infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenshields, David L; Liu, Guosheng; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Wei, Yangdou

    2005-11-01

    At least two types of quinone reductases are present in plants: (1) the zeta-crystallin-like quinone reductases (QR1, EC 1.6.5.5) that catalyze the univalent reduction of quinones to semiquinone radicals, and (2) the DT-diaphorase-like quinone reductases (QR2, EC 1.6.99.2) that catalyze the divalent reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. QR2s protect cells from oxidative stress by making the quinones available for conjugation, thereby releasing them from the superoxide-generating one electron redox cycling, catalyzed by QR1s. Two genes, putatively encoding a QR1 and a QR2, respectively, were isolated from an expressed sequence tag collection derived from the epidermis of a diploid wheat Triticum monococcum L. 24 h after inoculation with the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis (DC) EO Speer f. sp. tritici Em. Marchal. Northern analysis and tissue-specific RT-PCR showed that TmQR1 was repressed while TmQR2 was induced in the epidermis during powdery mildew infection. Heterologous expression of TmQR2 in Escherichia coli confirmed that the gene encoded a functional, dicumarol-inhibitable QR2 that could use either NADH or NADPH as an electron donor. The localization of dicumarol-inhibitable QR2 activity around powdery mildew infection sites was accomplished using a histochemical technique, based on tetrazolium dye reduction.

  11. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  12. Expression of steroid 5α-reductase isozymes in prostate of adult rats after environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Pilar; Torres, Jesús M; Castro, Beatriz; Olmo, Asunción; del Moral, Raimundo G; Ortega, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    The elevated incidence of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy is a cause of increasing public health concern in the Western world. The normal and pathological growth of the prostate are both dependent on stimulation by dihydrotestosterone, which is synthesized from circulating testosterone by two 5α-reductase (5α-R) isozymes, 5α-reductase type 1 (5α-R1) and 5α-reductase type 2 (5α-R2). Both isozymes have been implicated in prostate disease. We used quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, to quantify mRNA and protein levels of 5α-R isozymes in the ventral prostate of adult rats under environmental stress conditions analogous to those found in some common workplace situations, i.e. artificial light, excessive heat, and the sensation of immobility in a small space. Transcription and expression levels of both 5α-R isozymes were significantly higher in environmentally stressed rats than in unstressed rats. Increased 5α-R isozyme levels may play a role in the development or maintenance of prostate disease. Further research is warranted to explore these effects of environmental stress on human health and their implications for environmental and occupational health policies. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  13. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux.

  14. Research progress on the roles of aldose reductase in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Zhe Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase(ARbelonging to nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate(NADPH-dependent aldehyde-keto reductase superfamily, is the key rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol pathway which plays an important role in the body's high-sugar metabolism. AR is widely present in the kidneys, blood vessels, lens, retina, heart, skeletal muscle and other tissues and organs, converts glucose to sorbitol which easy permeability of cell membranes, cause cell swelling, degeneration, necrosis, and have a close relationship with the development of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy(DRis a multifactorial disease, the exact cause is currently unknown, but polyol pathway has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DR. Clinical risk factors such as blood sugar control, blood pressure and other treatments for DR only play a part effect of remission or invalid, if we can find out DR genes associated with the disease, this will contribute to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms and contribute to the development of new treatments and drugs. The current research progress of AR, AR gene polymorphism, Aldose reductase inhibitors to DR was reviewed in this article.

  15. Pichia stipitis xylose reductase helps detoxifying lignocellulosic hydrolysate by reducing 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röder Anja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (Ps-XR has been used to design Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are able to ferment xylose. One example is the industrial S. cerevisiae xylose-consuming strain TMB3400, which was constructed by expression of P. stipitis xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase and overexpression of endogenous xylulose kinase in the industrial S. cerevisiae strain USM21. Results In this study, we demonstrate that strain TMB3400 not only converts xylose, but also displays higher tolerance to lignocellulosic hydrolysate during anaerobic batch fermentation as well as 3 times higher in vitro HMF and furfural reduction activity than the control strain USM21. Using laboratory strains producing various levels of Ps-XR, we confirm that Ps-XR is able to reduce HMF both in vitro and in vivo. Ps-XR overexpression increases the in vivo HMF conversion rate by approximately 20%, thereby improving yeast tolerance towards HMF. Further purification of Ps-XR shows that HMF is a substrate inhibitor of the enzyme. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that xylose reductase is also able to reduce the furaldehyde compounds that are present in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Possible implications of this newly characterized activity of Ps-XR on lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation are discussed.

  16. Overexpression of NADH-dependent fumarate reductase improves D-xylose fermentation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusjärvi, Laura; Kaunisto, Sanna; Holmström, Sami; Vehkomäki, Maija-Leena; Koivuranta, Kari; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Deviation from optimal levels and ratios of redox cofactors NAD(H) and NADP(H) is common when microbes are metabolically engineered. The resulting redox imbalance often reduces the rate of substrate utilization as well as biomass and product formation. An example is the metabolism of D-xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoding genes from Scheffersomyces stipitis. This pathway requires both NADPH and NAD(+). The effect of overexpressing the glycosomal NADH-dependent fumarate reductase (FRD) of Trypanosoma brucei in D-xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae alone and together with an endogenous, cytosol directed NADH-kinase (POS5Δ17) was studied as one possible solution to overcome this imbalance. Expression of FRD and FRD + POS5Δ17 resulted in 60 and 23 % increase in ethanol yield, respectively, on D-xylose under anaerobic conditions. At the same time, xylitol yield decreased in the FRD strain suggesting an improvement in redox balance. We show that fumarate reductase of T. brucei can provide an important source of NAD(+) in yeast under anaerobic conditions, and can be useful for metabolic engineering strategies where the redox cofactors need to be balanced. The effects of FRD and NADH-kinase on aerobic and anaerobic D-xylose and D-glucose metabolism are discussed.

  17. Negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion sources have been originally developed at the request of tandem electrostatic accelerators, and hundreds of nA to several μA negative ion current has been obtained so far for various elements. Recently, the development of large current hydrogen negative ion sources has been demanded from the standpoint of the heating by neutral particle beam injection in nuclear fusion reactors. On the other hand, the physical properties of negative ions are interesting in the thin film formation using ions. Anyway, it is the present status that the mechanism of negative ion action has not been so fully investigated as positive ions because the history of negative ion sources is short. In this report, the many mechanisms about the generation of negative ions proposed so far are described about negative ion generating mechanism, negative ion source plasma, and negative ion generation on metal surfaces. As a result, negative ion sources are roughly divided into two schemes, plasma extraction and secondary ion extraction, and the former is further classified into the PIG ion source and its variation and Duoplasmatron and its variation; while the latter into reflecting and sputtering types. In the second half of the report, the practical negative ion sources of each scheme are described. If the mechanism of negative ion generation will be investigated more in detail and the development will be continued under the unified know-how as negative ion sources in future, the development of negative ion sources with which large current can be obtained for any element is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Reactions of lipoamide dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase with arsonic acids and arsonous acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, F C

    1985-10-01

    Lipoamide dehydrogenase reacts irreversibly with arsonous acids, RAs(OH)2, and arsonic acids, RAs(O)(OH)2, to form enzyme-inhibitor complexes. The formation of inactive enzyme requires NADH and is kinetically first order in the presence of excess arsonous acid. The second-order rate constant for formation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex was 545 min-1 M-1 for phenylarsonous acid, C6H5As(OH)2, and 5640 min-1 M-1 for methanearsonous acid, CH3As(OH)2. The kinetics of formation of inactive enzyme in the presence of arsonic acids was found to obey a rate law predicted by a two-step mechanism in which a rate-limiting reduction of an arsonic acid to the corresponding arsonous acid by reduced enzyme, E(SH)2, preceded formation of an inactive binary complex of reduced enzyme and arsonous acid: ES2 + NADH + H+ = E(SH)2 + NAD+; E(SH)2 + RAs(O)(OH)2 = ES2 + RAs(OH)2 + H2O; and E(SH)2 + RAs(OH)2 = ES2AsR + 2H2O. GSSG reductase reacts reversibly with C6H5As(OH)2 to form an inactive binary addition compound in the presence of NADPH. The value of the association constant for formation of enzyme inhibitor complex at pH 7.0 was 119 M-1. The initial rate of the GSSG reductase-catalyzed oxidation of NADPH by GSSG was insensitive to MeAs(OH)2. The kinetics of inhibition of GSSG reductase by arsenite and C6H5As(O)(OH)2 were found to obey the rate law described for lipoamide dehydrogenase and arsonic acids. GSSG reductase catalyzed the oxidation of NADPH by p-arsanilic acid. The initial rate of oxidation of NADPH was linearly dependent on enzyme concentration. The turnover number for GSSG reductase with p-arsanilic acid as an oxidant was 0.13 mol NADPH mol FAD-1 min-1.

  19. Characterization of the osmotic response element of the human aldose reductase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruepp, B; Bohren, K M; Gabbay, K H

    1996-08-06

    Aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21) catalyzes the NADPH-mediated conversion of glucose to sorbitol. The hyperglycemia of diabetes increases sorbitol production primarily through substrate availability and is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Increased sorbitol production can also occur at normoglycemic levels via rapid increases in aldose reductase transcription and expression, which have been shown to occur upon exposure of many cell types to hyperosmotic conditions. The induction of aldose reductase transcription and the accumulation of sorbitol, an organic osmolyte, have been shown to be part of the physiological osmoregulatory mechanism whereby renal tubular cells adjust to the intraluminal hyperosmolality during urinary concentration. Previously, to explore the mechanism regulating aldose reductase levels, we partially characterized the human aldose reductase gene promoter present in a 4.2-kb fragment upstream of the transcription initiation start site. A fragment (-192 to +31 bp) was shown to contain several elements that control the basal expression of the enzyme. In this study, we examined the entire 4.2-kb human AR gene promoter fragment by deletion mutagenesis and transfection studies for the presence of osmotic response enhancer elements. An 11-bp nucleotide sequence (TGGAAAATTAC) was located 3.7 kb upstream of the transcription initiation site that mediates hypertonicity-responsive enhancer activity. This osmotic response element (ORE) increased the expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene product 2-fold in transfected HepG2 cells exposed to hypertonic NaCl media as compared with isoosmotic media. A more distal homologous sequence is also described; however, this sequence has no osmotic enhancer activity in transfected cells. Specific ORE mutant constructs, gel shift, and DNA fragment competition studies confirm the nature of the element and identify specific nucleotides essential for enhancer

  20. Sterol-induced Dislocation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase from Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes into the Cytosol through a Subcellular Compartment Resembling Lipid Droplets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Isamu Z.; Liu, Pingsheng; Zehmer, John K.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Jo, Youngah; Anderson, Richard G. W.; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-induced binding to Insigs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) allows for ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. This ubiquitination marks reductase for recognition by the ATPase VCP/p97, which mediates extraction and delivery of reductase from ER membranes to cytosolic 26 S proteasomes for degradation. Here, we report that reductase becomes dislocated from ER membranes into the cytosol of sterol-treated cells. This dislocation exhibits an absolute requirement for the actions of Insigs and VCP/p97. Reductase also appears in a buoyant fraction of sterol-treated cells that co-purifies with lipid droplets, cytosolic organelles traditionally regarded as storage depots for neutral lipids such as triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. Genetic, biochemical, and localization studies suggest a model in which reductase is dislodged into the cytosol from an ER subdomain closely associated with lipid droplets. PMID:20406816

  1. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  2. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  3. Radioactive Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stora, T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic requirements for ion sources designed and operated in radioactive ion beam facilities. The facilities where these sources are operated exploit the isotope separation online (ISOL) technique, in which a target is combined with an ion source to maximize the secondary beam intensity and chemical element selectivity. Three main classes of sources are operated, namely surface-type ion sources, arc discharge-type ion sources, and finally radio-frequency-heated plasma-type ion sources.

  4. Ions and light

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 3: Ions and Light discusses how ions are formed by electron impact, ion-molecule reactions, or electrical discharge. This book discusses the use of light emitted by excited molecules to characterize either the chemistry that formed the excited ion, the structure of the excited ion, or both.Organized into 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the extension of the classical flowing afterglow technique to include infrared and chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection. This text then examines the experiments involving molecules that ar

  5. Single Cathode Ion Thruster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Objective is to design an electrostatic ion thruster that is more efficient, simpler, and lower cost than the current gridded ion thruster. Initial objective is to...

  6. Applications of decelerated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1985-03-01

    Many facilities whose sole purpose had been to accelerate ion beams are now becoming decelerators as well. The development and current status of accel-decel operations is reviewed here. Applications of decelerated ions in atomic physics experiments are discussed

  7. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  8. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  9. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells-1 h-1

  10. Inhibitory effects of Ganoderma applanatum on rat lens aldose reductase and sorbitol accumulation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Lee, Yeon Sil; Shim, Sang Hee; Lee, Sanghyun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kim, Ju Sun; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kang, Sam Sik

    2005-06-01

    Aldose reductase, the key enzyme of the polyol pathway, is known to play important roles in diabetic complications. Therefore, inhibitors of aldose reductase would be potential agents for the prevention of diabetic complications. To evaluate the inhibitory potential of aldose reductase from Ganoderma applanatum (Polyporaceae), methanol (MeOH) and water extracts were tested for their effects on rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR). The effects of both extracts on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats were also investigated. The MeOH extract exhibited a potent rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibition in vitro, and showed a significant inhibition, of not only serum glucose concentrations, but also of sorbitol accumulations in the lens, red blood cells (RBC) and sciatic nerves in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Associated with a reduction in serum glucose concentration in STZ-induced diabetic rats, this extract was found to cause a significant glucose tolerance effect. These results suggested that G. applanatum might possess constituents with antidiabetic and inhibitory effects on diabetic complications. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Cloning, purification and characterization of novel Cu-containing nitrite reductase from the Bacillus firmus GY-49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haofeng; Li, Caiqing; Ramesh, Bandikari; Hu, Nan

    2017-12-18

    Nitrite is generated from the nitrogen cycle and its accumulation is harmful to environment and it can be reduced to nitric oxid by nitrite reductase. A novel gene from Bacillus firmus GY-49 is identified as a nirK gene encoding Cu-containing nitrite reductase by genome sequence. The full-length protein included a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acids and shown 72.73% similarity with other Cu-containing nitrite reductase whose function was verified. The 993-bp fragment encoding the mature peptide of NirK was cloned into pET-28a (+) vector and overexpressed as an active protein of 36.41 kDa in the E.coli system. The purified enzyme was green in the oxidized state and displayed double gentle peaks at 456 and 608 nm. The specific activity of purified enzyme was 98.4 U/mg toward sodium nitrite around pH 6.5 and 35 °C. The K m and K cat of NirK on sodium nitrite were 0.27 mM and 0.36 × 10 3  s -1 , respectively. Finally, homology model analysis of NirK indicated that the enzyme was a homotrimer structure and well conserved in Cu-binding sites for enzymatic functions. This is a first report for nitrite reductase from Bacillus firmus, which augment the acquaintance of nitrite reductase.

  12. Synechocystis DrgA protein functioning as nitroreductase and ferric reductase is capable of catalyzing the Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Iizuka, Mayumi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nakagawa, Junichi; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2007-03-01

    In order to identify an enzyme capable of Fenton reaction in Synechocystis, we purified an enzyme catalyzing one-electron reduction of t-butyl hydroperoxide in the presence of FAD and Fe(III)-EDTA. The enzyme was a 26 kDa protein, and its N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed it to be DrgA protein previously reported as quinone reductase [Matsuo M, Endo T and Asada K (1998) Plant Cell Physiol39, 751-755]. The DrgA protein exhibited potent quinone reductase activity and, furthermore, we newly found that it contained FMN and highly catalyzed nitroreductase, flavin reductase and ferric reductase activities. This is the first demonstration of nitroreductase activity of DrgA protein previously identified by a drgA mutant phenotype. DrgA protein strongly catalyzed the Fenton reaction in the presence of synthetic chelate compounds, but did so poorly in the presence of natural chelate compounds. Its ferric reductase activity was observed with both natural and synthetic chelate compounds with a better efficiency with the latter. In addition to small molecular-weight chemical chelators, an iron transporter protein, transferrin, and an iron storage protein, ferritin, turned out to be substrates of the DrgA protein, suggesting it might play a role in iron metabolism under physiological conditions and possibly catalyze the Fenton reaction under hyper-reductive conditions in this microorganism.

  13. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaran G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunasekaran Baskaran,1 Shamala Salvamani,1 Siti Aqlima Ahmad,1 Noor Azmi Shaharuddin,1 Parveen Devi Pattiram,2 Mohd Yunus Shukor1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, 2Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl, 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and a-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, Basella alba, phytochemical, GC-MS/MS, RP-HPLC, hypercholesterolemia

  14. Effect of tungsten and vanadium on the in vitro assembly of assimilatory nitrate reductase utilizing Neurospora mutant nit-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.Y.; Erickson, R.; Pan, S.S.; Jones, G.; May, F.; Nason, A.

    1974-06-01

    Tungsten or vanadium in a nutrient medium containing nitrate, but not ammonia, as the sole nitrogen source inhibited the formation of assimilatory NADPH-nitrate reductase (but not nitrate-inducible NADPH-cytochrome c reductase) and growth of wild type Neurospora crassa. Inhibition was prevented by high levels of molybdate in the nutrient medium but was not reversed by adding molybdate to subsequently prepared cell-free enzyme preparations. Neither tungsten nor vanadium was inhibitory when added to partially purified wild type Neurospora NADPH-nitrate reductase. Cell-free preparations of uninduced wild type grown in increasing concentrations of tungsten or vanadium showed progressive inhibition of ability to assemble nitrate reductase in vitro (with extracts of nitrate-induced Neurospora mutant nit-1) which was partially or entirely restored by subsequent addition of molybdate to the extracts of the tungsten- or vanadium-grown uninduced wild type. Tungsten or vanadium added to acid-treated bovine milk xanthine oxidase or to extracts of uninduced wild type also inhibited in vitro enzyme assembly, with added molybdate partially preventing inhibition. The tungsten or vanadium analogue of nitrate reductase formed in vivo or by in vitro assembly is considerably more labile than its molybdenum counterpart as indicated by the complete loss of /sup 185/W or /sup 48/V from the enzyme as a result of trichloroacetic acid precipitation or heat treatment.

  15. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-01-01

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas

  16. Identification and characterization of a bacterial hydrosulphide ion channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, Bryan K.; Wang, Da-Neng (NYUSM)

    2012-10-26

    The hydrosulphide ion (HS{sup -}) and its undissociated form, hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), which are believed to have been critical to the origin of life on Earth, remain important in physiology and cellular signalling. As a major metabolite in anaerobic bacterial growth, hydrogen sulphide is a product of both assimilatory and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. These pathways can reduce various oxidized sulphur compounds including sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate. The dissimilatory sulphate reduction pathway uses this molecule as the terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, in which process it produces excess amounts of H{sub 2}S. The reduction of sulphite is a key intermediate step in all sulphate reduction pathways. In Clostridium and Salmonella, an inducible sulphite reductase is directly linked to the regeneration of NAD{sup +}, which has been suggested to have a role in energy production and growth, as well as in the detoxification of sulphite. Above a certain concentration threshold, both H{sub 2}S and HS{sup -} inhibit cell growth by binding the metal centres of enzymes and cytochrome oxidase, necessitating a release mechanism for the export of this toxic metabolite from the cell. Here we report the identification of a hydrosulphide ion channel in the pathogen Clostridium difficile through a combination of genetic, biochemical and functional approaches. The HS{sup -} channel is a member of the formate/nitrite transport family, in which about 50 hydrosulphide ion channels form a third subfamily alongside those for formate (FocA) and for nitrite (NirC). The hydrosulphide ion channel is permeable to formate and nitrite as well as to HS{sup -} ions. Such polyspecificity can be explained by the conserved ion selectivity filter observed in the channel's crystal structure. The channel has a low open probability and is tightly regulated, to avoid decoupling of the membrane proton gradient.

  17. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Cristina; Besson, Stéphane; Brondino, Carlos D; González, Pablo J; Fauque, Guy; Lampreia, Jorge; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2008-11-01

    Membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617 can be solubilized in either of two ways that will ultimately determine the presence or absence of the small (Iota) subunit. The enzyme complex (NarGHI) is composed of three subunits with molecular masses of 130, 65, and 20 kDa. This enzyme contains approximately 14 Fe, 0.8 Mo, and 1.3 molybdopterin guanine dinucleotides per enzyme molecule. Curiously, one heme b and 0.4 heme c per enzyme molecule have been detected. These hemes were potentiometrically characterized by optical spectroscopy at pH 7.6 and two noninteracting species were identified with respective midpoint potentials at Em=+197 mV (heme c) and -4.5 mV (heme b). Variable-temperature (4-120 K) X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies performed on both as-isolated and dithionite-reduced nitrate reductase showed, respectively, an EPR signal characteristic of a [3Fe-4S]+ cluster and overlapping signals associated with at least three types of [4Fe-4S]+ centers. EPR of the as-isolated enzyme shows two distinct pH-dependent Mo(V) signals with hyperfine coupling to a solvent-exchangeable proton. These signals, called "low-pH" and "high-pH," changed to a pH-independent Mo(V) signal upon nitrate or nitrite addition. Nitrate addition to dithionite-reduced samples at pH 6 and 7.6 yields some of the EPR signals described above and a new rhombic signal that has no hyperfine structure. The relationship between the distinct EPR-active Mo(V) species and their plausible structures is discussed on the basis of the structural information available to date for closely related membrane-bound nitrate reductases.

  18. Diacetyl/l-Xylulose Reductase Mediates Chemical Redox Cycling in Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2017-07-17

    Reactive carbonyls such as diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) and 2,3-pentanedione in tobacco and many food and consumer products are known to cause severe respiratory diseases. Many of these chemicals are detoxified by carbonyl reductases in the lung, in particular, dicarbonyl/l-xylulose reductase (DCXR), a multifunctional enzyme important in glucose metabolism. DCXR is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Using recombinant human enzyme, we discovered that DCXR mediates redox cycling of a variety of quinones generating superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and, in the presence of transition metals, hydroxyl radicals. Redox cycling activity preferentially utilized NADH as a cosubstrate and was greatest for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and 1,2-naphthoquinone, followed by 1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione). Using 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as the substrate, quinone redox cycling was found to inhibit DCXR reduction of l-xylulose and diacetyl. Competitive inhibition of enzyme activity by the quinone was observed with respect to diacetyl (K i = 190 μM) and l-xylulose (K i = 940 μM). Abundant DCXR activity was identified in A549 lung epithelial cells when diacetyl was used as a substrate. Quinones inhibited reduction of this dicarbonyl, causing an accumulation of diacetyl in the cells and culture medium and a decrease in acetoin, the reduced product of diacetyl. The identification of DCXR as an enzyme activity mediating chemical redox cycling suggests that it may be important in generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the lung. These activities, together with the inhibition of dicarbonyl/l-xylulose metabolism by redox-active chemicals, as well as consequent deficiencies in pentose metabolism, are likely to contribute to lung injury following exposure to dicarbonyls and quinones.

  19. Molecular cloning, in-silico characterization and functional validation of monodehydroascorbate reductase gene in Eleusine coracana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Bhawana; Salvi, Prafull; Bhatt, Deepesh; Majee, Manoj; Arora, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is a ubiquitous water soluble antioxidant that plays a critical role in plant growth and environmental stress tolerance. It acts as a free radical scavenger as well as a source of reducing power for several cellular processes. Because of its pivotal role in regulating plant growth under optimal as well as sub-optimal conditions, it becomes obligatory for plants to maintain a pool of reduced ascorbic acid. Several cellular processes help in maintaining the reduced ascorbic acid pool, by regulating its synthesis and regeneration processes. Current study demonstrates that monodehydroascorbate reductase is an important enzyme responsible for maintaining the reduced ascorbate pool, by optimizing the recycling of oxidized ascorbate. Cloning and functional characterization of this important stress inducible gene is of great significance for its imperative use in plant stress management. Therefore, we have cloned and functionally validated the role of monodehydroascorbate reductase gene (mdar) from a drought tolerant variety of Eleusine coracana. The cloned Ecmdar gene comprises of 1437bp CDS, encoding a 478 amino acid long polypeptide. The active site analysis showed presence of conserved Tyr348 residue, facilitating the catalytic activity in electron transfer mechanism. qPCR expression profiling of Ecmdar under stress indicated that it is an early responsive gene. The analysis of Ecmdar overexpressing Arabidopsis transgenic lines suggests that monodehydroascorbate reductase acts as a key stress regulator by modulating the activity of antioxidant enzymes to strengthen the ROS scavenging ability and maintains ROS homeostasis. Thus, it is evident that Ecmdar is an important gene for cellular homeostasis and its over-expression could be successfully used to strengthen stress tolerance in crop plants.

  20. Molecular cloning, in-silico characterization and functional validation of monodehydroascorbate reductase gene in Eleusine coracana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana Negi

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid is a ubiquitous water soluble antioxidant that plays a critical role in plant growth and environmental stress tolerance. It acts as a free radical scavenger as well as a source of reducing power for several cellular processes. Because of its pivotal role in regulating plant growth under optimal as well as sub-optimal conditions, it becomes obligatory for plants to maintain a pool of reduced ascorbic acid. Several cellular processes help in maintaining the reduced ascorbic acid pool, by regulating its synthesis and regeneration processes. Current study demonstrates that monodehydroascorbate reductase is an important enzyme responsible for maintaining the reduced ascorbate pool, by optimizing the recycling of oxidized ascorbate. Cloning and functional characterization of this important stress inducible gene is of great significance for its imperative use in plant stress management. Therefore, we have cloned and functionally validated the role of monodehydroascorbate reductase gene (mdar from a drought tolerant variety of Eleusine coracana. The cloned Ecmdar gene comprises of 1437bp CDS, encoding a 478 amino acid long polypeptide. The active site analysis showed presence of conserved Tyr348 residue, facilitating the catalytic activity in electron transfer mechanism. qPCR expression profiling of Ecmdar under stress indicated that it is an early responsive gene. The analysis of Ecmdar overexpressing Arabidopsis transgenic lines suggests that monodehydroascorbate reductase acts as a key stress regulator by modulating the activity of antioxidant enzymes to strengthen the ROS scavenging ability and maintains ROS homeostasis. Thus, it is evident that Ecmdar is an important gene for cellular homeostasis and its over-expression could be successfully used to strengthen stress tolerance in crop plants.

  1. The catalytic cycle of nitrous oxide reductase - The enzyme that catalyzes the last step of denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Cíntia; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel

    2017-12-01

    The reduction of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide requires a catalyst to overcome the large activation energy barrier of this reaction. Its biological decomposition to the inert dinitrogen can be accomplished by denitrifiers through nitrous oxide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the last step of the denitrification, a pathway of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrous oxide reductase is a multicopper enzyme containing a mixed valence CuA center that can accept electrons from small electron shuttle proteins, triggering electron flow to the catalytic sulfide-bridged tetranuclear copper "CuZ center". This enzyme has been isolated with its catalytic center in two forms, CuZ*(4Cu1S) and CuZ(4Cu2S), proven to be spectroscopic and structurally different. In the last decades, it has been a challenge to characterize the properties of this complex enzyme, due to the different oxidation states observed for each of its centers and the heterogeneity of its preparations. The substrate binding site in those two "CuZ center" forms and which is the active form of the enzyme is still a matter of debate. However, in the last years the application of different spectroscopies, together with theoretical calculations have been useful in answering these questions and in identifying intermediate species of the catalytic cycle. An overview of the spectroscopic, kinetics and structural properties of the two forms of the catalytic "CuZ center" is given here, together with the current knowledge on nitrous oxide reduction mechanism by nitrous oxide reductase and its intermediate species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (IdRS); (Purdue); (Colorado); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  3. Identification of a fish short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase associated with bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Joana; Cox, Cymon J; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Although human and mouse genetics have largely contributed to the better understanding of the mechanisms underlying skeletogenesis, much more remains to be uncovered. In this regard alternative and complementary systems have been sought and cell systems capable of in vitro calcification have been developed to study the mechanisms underlying bone formation. In gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), a gene coding for an unknown protein that is strongly up-regulated during extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization of a pre-osteoblast cell line was recently identified as a potentially important player in bone formation. In silico analysis of the deduced protein revealed the presence of domains typical of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases (SDR). Closely related to carbonyl reductase 1, seabream protein belongs to a novel subfamily of SDR proteins with no orthologs in mammals. Analysis of gene expression by qPCR confirmed the strong up-regulation of sdr-like expression during in vitro mineralization but also revealed high expression levels in calcified tissues. A possible role for Sdr-like in osteoblast and bone metabolism was further evidenced through (i) the localization by in situ hybridization of sdr-like transcript in pre-osteoblasts of the operculum and (ii) the regulation of sdr-like gene transcription by Runx2 and retinoic acid receptor, two regulators of osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Expression data also indicated a role for Sdr-like in gastrointestinal tract homeostasis and during gilthead seabream development at gastrulation and metamorphosis. This study reports a new subfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in vertebrates and, for the first time, provides evidence of a role for SDRs in bone metabolism, osteoblast differentiation and/or tissue mineralization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegan, Scott D; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC₅₀ values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands. Copyright © 2011 The Protein Society.

  5. Detoxification of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. uses a reductase with specificity for dihydrolipoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Abhipsa; Krishnan, Chandraraj

    2016-02-01

    Leucobacter sp. belongs to the metal stressed community and possesses higher tolerance to metals including chromium and can detoxify toxic hexavalent chromium by reduction to less toxic trivalent chromium. But, the mechanism of reduction of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. has not been studied. Understanding the enzyme catalyzing reduction of chromium is important to improve the species for application in bioremediation. Hence, a soluble reductase catalyzing the reduction of hexavalent chromium was purified from a Leucobacter sp. and characterized. The pure chromate reductase was obtained from the cell-free extract through hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration column chromatographic methods. It was a monomeric enzyme and showed similar molecular weights in both gel filtration (∼68 KDa) and SDS-PAGE (64 KDa). It reduced Cr(VI) using both NADH and NADPH as the electron donor, but exhibited higher activity with NADH. The optimal activity was found at pH 5.5 and 30 °C. The K(m) and V(max) for Cr(VI) reduction with NADH were 46.57 μM and 0.37 μmol min(-1) (mg protein) (-1), respectively. The activity was inhibited by p-hydroxy mercury benzoate, Ag(2+) and Hg(2+) indicating the role of thiol groups in the catalysis. The spectrophotometric analysis of the purified enzyme showed the absence of bound flavin in the enzyme. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and LC/MS analysis of trypsin digested purified enzyme showed similarity to dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase. The purified enzyme had dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase activity with dihydrolipoamide as the substrate, which suggested that Leucobacter sp. uses reductase with multiple substrate specificity for reduction of Cr(VI) detoxification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Inhibition of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 by unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yashiro, Koji

    2016-11-01

    A human member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, AKR1B10, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase toward various carbonyl compounds including reactive aldehydes, and is normally expressed in intestines. The enzyme is overexpressed in several extraintestinal cancers, and suggested as a potential target for cancer treatment. We found that saturated and cis-unsaturated fatty acids inhibit AKR1B10. Among the saturated fatty acids, myristic acid was the most potent, showing the IC 50 value of 4.2 μM cis-Unsaturated fatty acids inhibited AKR1B10 more potently, and linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids showed the lowest IC 50 values of 1.1 μM. The inhibition by these fatty acids was reversible and kinetically competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the K i values of 0.24-1.1 μM. These fatty acids, except for α-linoleic acid, were much less inhibitory to structurally similar aldose reductase. Site-directed mutagenesis study suggested that the fatty acids interact with several active site residues of AKR1B10, of which Gln114, Val301 and Gln303 are responsible for the inhibitory selectivity. Linoleic and arachidonic acids also effectively inhibited AKR1B10-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in HCT-15 cells. Thus, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids may be used as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of cancers that up-regulate AKR1B10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductases from sunflower. A major factor contributing to the amount of fatty acids in plant oils are the first steps of their synthesis. The intraplastidic fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in plants is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS). The last step in each elongation cycle is carried out by the enoyl-[ACP]-reductase, which reduces the dehydrated product of β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydrase using NADPH or NADH. To determine the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two enoyl-[ACP]-reductase genes have been identified and cloned from developing seeds with 75 % identity: HaENR1 (GenBank HM021137) and HaENR2 (HM021138). The two genes belong to the ENRA and ENRB families in dicotyledons, respectively. The genetic duplication most likely originated after the separation of di- and monocotyledons. RT-qPCR revealed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Highest expression of HaENR1 was in roots, stems and developing cotyledons whereas that of H a ENR2 was in leaves and early stages of seed development. Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single-copy genes. In vivo activity of the ENR enzymes was tested by complementation experiments with the JP1111 fabI(ts) E. coli strain. Both enzymes were functional demonstrating that they interacted with the bacterial FAS components. That different fatty acid profiles resulted infers that the two Helianthus proteins have different structures, substrate specificities and/or reaction rates. The latter possibility was confirmed by in vitro analysis with affinity-purified heterologous-expressed enzymes that reduced the crotonyl-CoA substrate using NADH with different V max.

  8. Evidence that the intra-amoebal Legionella drancourtii acquired a sterol reductase gene from eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fournier Pierre-Edouard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Free-living amoebae serve as a natural reservoir for some bacteria that have evolved into «amoeba-resistant» bacteria. Among these, some are strictly intra-amoebal, such as Candidatus "Protochlamydia amoebophila" (Candidatus "P. amoebophila", whose genomic sequence is available. We sequenced the genome of Legionella drancourtii (L. drancourtii, another recently described intra-amoebal bacterium. By comparing these two genomes with those of their closely related species, we were able to study the genetic characteristics specific to their amoebal lifestyle. Findings We identified a sterol delta-7 reductase-encoding gene common to these two bacteria and absent in their relatives. This gene encodes an enzyme which catalyses the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes, and is probably functional within L. drancourtii since it is transcribed. The phylogenetic analysis of this protein suggests that it was acquired horizontally by a few bacteria from viridiplantae. This gene was also found in the Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus genome, a virus that grows in amoebae and possesses the largest viral genome known to date. Conclusion L. drancourtii acquired a sterol delta-7 reductase-encoding gene of viridiplantae origin. The most parsimonious hypothesis is that this gene was initially acquired by a Chlamydiales ancestor parasite of plants. Subsequently, its descendents transmitted this gene in amoebae to other intra-amoebal microorganisms, including L. drancourtii and Coxiella burnetii. The role of the sterol delta-7 reductase in prokaryotes is as yet unknown but we speculate that it is involved in host cholesterol parasitism.

  9. Identification of HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor Active Compound in Medicinal Forest Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Rahmania

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, hypercholesterolemia is one of the causes. Three medicinal forest plants are potential natural resources to be developed as cholesterol-reducing herbal product, but scientific informations on their mechanism is still limited. The objective of this research is to explore the potency of the leaf of Jati Belanda (Guazuma ulmifolia, Jabon (Antocephalus macrophyllus, and Mindi (Melia azedarach as inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR, a key enzyme in the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Samples were macerated in ethanol 96% and the filtrate was partitioned using n-hexane and chloroform to obtain the ethanolic flavonoid extract. The effect of each extracts on the HMG-CoA reductase activity were analyzed using HMGR assay kit. At concentration of 10 ppm the G.ulmifolia ethanolic extract showed the highest inhibitory activity as well as pravastatin control inhibitor.  The phenolic content of the ethanolic extracts of G.ulmifolia, A.macrophyllus, and M.azedarach were: 11.00, 34.83, and 13.67 mg gallic acid AE/g dried leaves, respectively. The flavonoid content of the ethanolic extracts of G.ulmifolia, A.macrophyllus, and M.azedarach were: 0.22, 0.64, and 0.78 mg QE/g dried leaves, respectively. Interestingly, G.ulmifolia extract the lowest concentration of phenolic and flavonoid content. HPLC analysis showed that all samples contain quercetin at similiar small concentrations (6.7%, 6.6%, and 7.0% for G.ulmifolia, A.macrophyllus, and M.azedarach, respectively. This indicating other active compounds may play some roles in this inhibitory action on HMG-CoA reductase activity. Further identification using LC-MS/MS showed that G.ulmifolia flavonoid extract contained an unidetified coumpound with molecural weight of 380.0723 Da.  

  10. Direct antioxidant properties of bilirubin andbiliverdin. Is there a role for biliverdin reductase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eJansen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling events are involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and represent a major contribution to vascular regulation. Molecular signaling is highly dependent on reactive oxygen species. But depending on the amount of ROS production it might have toxic or protective effects. Despite a large number of negative outcomes in large clinical trials (e.g. HOPE, HOPE-TOO, antioxidant molecules and agents are important players to influence the critical balance between production and elimination of RONS. However, chronic systemic antioxidant therapy lacks clinical efficacy, probably by interfering with important physiological redox signaling pathways. Therefore, it may be a much more promising attempt to induce intrinsic antioxidant pathways in order to increase the antioxidants not systemically but at the place of oxidative stress and complications. Among others, heme oxygenase (HO has been shown to be important for attenuating the overall production of ROS in a broad range of disease states through its ability to degrade heme and to produce carbon monoxide (CO, biliverdin/bilirubin, and the release of free iron with subsequent ferritin induction. With the present review we would like to highlight the important antioxidant role of the heme oxygenase system and especially discuss the contribution of the biliverdin, bilirubin and biliverdin reductase to these beneficial effects. The bilierdin reductase was reported to confer an antioxidant redox amplification cycle by which low, physiological bilirubin concentrations confer potent antioxidant protection via recycling of biliverdin from oxidized bilirubin by the biliverdin reductase, linking this sink for oxidants to the NADPH pool. To date the existence and role of this antioxidant redox cycle is still under debate and we present and discuss the pros and cons as well as our own findings on this topic.

  11. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel xylose reductase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Jiang, Shao-tong; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Xing-jiang; Luo, Shui-zhong; Wu, Xue-feng

    2015-07-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is valuable as a producer of organic acids via lignocellulose catalysis. R. oryzae metabolizes xylose, which is one component of lignocellulose hydrolysate. In this study, a novel NADPH-dependent xylose reductase gene from R. oryzae AS 3.819 (Roxr) was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. Homology alignment suggested that the 320-residue protein contained domains and active sites belonging to the aldo/keto reductase family. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the recombinant xylose reductase has a molecular weight of approximately 37 kDa. The optimal catalytic pH and temperature of the purified recombinant protein were 5.8 and 50 °C, respectively. The recombinant protein was stable from pH 4.4 to 6.5 and at temperatures below 42 °C. The recombinant enzyme has bias for D-xylose and L-arabinose as substrates and NADPH as its coenzyme. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR tests suggested that native Roxr expression is regulated by a carbon catabolite repression mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis at two possible key sites involved in coenzyme binding, Thr(226)  → Glu(226) and Val(274)  → Asn(274), were performed, respectively. The coenzyme specificity constants of the resulted RoXR(T226E) and RoXR(V274N) for NADH increased 18.2-fold and 2.4-fold, which suggested possibility to improve the NADH preference of this enzyme through genetic modification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Mechanistic studies with solubilized rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase: Elucidation of the kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, M.A.; Brandt, M.; Greway, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    A solubilized preparation of steroid 5 alpha-reductase from rat liver has been used in studies focused toward an understanding of the kinetic mechanism associated with enzyme catalysis. From the results of analyses with product and dead-end inhibitors, a preferentially ordered binding of substrates and release of products from the surface of the enzyme is proposed. The observations from these experiments were identical with those using the steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity associated with rat liver microsomes. The primary isotope effects on steady-state kinetic parameters when [4S-2H]NADPH was used also were consistent with an ordered kinetic mechanism. Normal isotope effects were observed for all three kinetic parameters (Vm/Km for both testosterone and NADPH and Vm) at all substrate concentrations used experimentally. Upon extrapolation to infinite concentration of testosterone, the isotope effect on Vm/Km for NADPH approached unity, indicating that the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate is the first substrate binding to and the second product released from the enzyme. The isotope effects on Vm/Km for testosterone at infinite concentration of cofactor and on Vm were 3.8 +/- 0.5 and 3.3 +/- 0.4, respectively. Data from the pH profiles of these three steady-state parameters and the inhibition constants (1/Ki) of competitive inhibitors versus both substrates indicate that the binding of nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate involves coordination of its anionic 2'-phosphate to a protonated enzyme-associated base with an apparent pK near 8.0. From these results, relative limits have been placed on several of the internal rate constants used to describe the ordered mechanism of the rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase

  13. Enhanced ion acoustic fluctuations and ion outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. E. Forme

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations showing enhanced ion acoustic echoes observed by means of incoherent scatter radars have been reported in the literature. The received power is extremely enhanced by up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude above usual values, and it is mostly contained in one of the two ion acoustic lines. This spectral asymmetry and the intensity of the received signal cannot be resolved by the standard analysis procedure and often causes its failure. As a result, and in spite of a very clear spectral signature, the analysis is unable to fit the plasma parameters inside the regions of ion acoustic turbulence. We present European Incoherent Scatter radar (EISCAT observations of large ion outflows associated with the simultaneous occurrence of enhanced ion acoustic echoes. The ion fluxes can reach 1014 m-2 s-1 at 800 km altitude. From the very clear spectral signatures of these echoes, a method is presented to extract estimates of the electron temperature and the ion drift within the turbulent regions. It is shown that the electron gas is strongly heated up to 11 000 K. Also electron temperature gradients of about 0.02 K/m exist. Finally, the estimates of the electron temperature and of the ion drift are used to study the possible implications for the plasma transport inside turbulent regions. It is shown that strong electron temperature gradients cause enhancement of the ambipolar electric field and can account for the observed ion outflows.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere · magnetosphere interactions; plasma waves and instabilities.

  14. Role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Klai, Sarra; Mrad, Meriem; Zaouali, Jamel; Sayeh, Aycha; Nsiri, Brahim; Gritli, Nasreddine; Mrissa, Ridha

    2013-03-01

    The association between the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) remains controversial. This study principally investigated the potential role of the MTHFR A1298C variant and CVT. The genotyping of the A1298C variant of the MTHFR gene was performed in 35 CVT patients and 200 healthy controls. The frequency of A1298C genotype among CVT patients was significantly higher compared with controls (P MTHFR A1298C variant and CVT. Large study populations would be required to understand the contribution of this marker in the risk of CVT.

  15. Influence of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and coadministration of antimetabolites on toxicity after high dose methotrexate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niekerk, P.B. van Kooten; Schmiegelow, K.; Schroeder, H.

    2008-01-01

    .006-0.027), fever (OR = 2.65; P = 0.037) and interruption of maintenance treatment (OR = 3.04; P = 0.032). No convincing associations were found between the MTHFR C677T or A1298C polymorphisms and toxicity. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that toxicity after HDMTX is influenced by coadministrated...... in the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and coadministration of antimetabolites on post-HDMTX toxicity. METHODS: Toxicity was retrospectively analysed after 656 HDMTX courses administered to 88 paediatric ALL patients at a single treatment centre. RESULTS: High-dose methotrexate with high...

  16. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  17. Basal ganglion calcification in hyperphenylalaninemia due to deficiency of dihydropteridine reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Ullrich, K.; Korinthenberg, R.; Peters, P.E.; Muenster Univ.

    1988-01-01

    The disease course and therapy of a nine-and-a-half-year-old boy with hyperphenylalaninemia due to a dihydropteridine reductase deficiency are reported. Clinicially, there is a marked mental retardation and complex basal ganglion symptoms. The cranial computer tomographic investigation shows bilateral, symmetrical, comma-shaped calcifications in the globus pallidus and the putamen of the lentiform nucleus. The cause of these basal ganglion calcifications remains unclear. Lowering of serum and CSF folic acid levels could not be detected, in contrast to cases with the same enzyme defect described previously. (orig.)

  18. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase induces the UPR pathway in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmelund-Præstekær, Louise Cathrine Braun; Hansen, Nadia Jin Storm; Pilon, Marc

    -requiring enzyme-1 (IRE-1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6). Using a transgenic GFP reporter strain of the model organism C. elegans, we have recently identified that inhibition of the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR) with Fluvastatin and knock down of HMG-CoAR using RNA interference (RNAi) both...... including farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) which are necessary for posttranslational prenylation of several small G proteins. C. elegans are cholesterol auxotrophs, which enable us to investigate the isoprenoid branch and its role in UPR induction. We found...

  19. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...... been studied and found to be dominated by pronounced interactions between the c and the d1 hemes. The interactions are expressed both in dramatic changes in the internal electron-transfer rates between these sites and in marked cooperativity in their electron affinity. The results constitute a prime...... example of intraprotein control of the electron-transfer rates by allosteric interactions....

  20. Mutational reconstructed ferric chelate reductase confers enhanced tolerance in rice to iron deficiency in calcareous soil

    OpenAIRE

    Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Kim, Suyeon; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Oki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takanori; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Takahashi, Michiko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2007-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a worldwide agricultural problem on calcareous soils with low-Fe availability due to high soil pH. Rice plants use a well documented phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II) to take up Fe from the soil and also possess a direct Fe2+ transport system. Rice plants are extremely susceptible to low-Fe supply, however, because of low phytosiderophore secretion and low Fe3+ reduction activity. A yeast Fe3+ chelate-reductase gene refre1/372, selected for better performance...

  1. Differential expression of 5-alpha reductase isozymes in the prostate and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of human benign or malignant prostatic diseases is closely associated with androgens, primarily testosterone (T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT. T is converted to DHT by 5-alpha reductase (5-AR isozymes. Differential expression of 5-AR isozymes is observed in both human benign and malignant prostatic tissues. 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARI are commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and were once promoted as chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer (PCa. This review discusses the role of the differential expression of 5-AR in the normal development of the human prostate and in the pathogenesis and progression of BPH and PCa.

  2. 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: a new biomarker of fish exposure to water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallottini, Valentina; Scalici, Massimiliano; Gibertini, Giancarlo; Marino, Maria; Trentalance, Anna

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a new putative biomarker in Salmo trutta exposed to water pollution. Variations in the levels of hepatic 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR), the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, were compared to heat shock protein 70 and hypoxia inducible factor α, biomarkers of pollution exposure and lowered O₂, respectively. The results confirm that HMG-CoAR levels increase in polluted water irrespective of water temperature or O₂ content, indicating that HMG-CoAR could be used as a specific biomarker for water pollution.

  3. Genetic variation of Aflatoxin B(1) aldehyde reductase genes (AFAR) in human tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praml, Christian; Schulz, Wolfgang; Claas, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    AFAR genes play a key role in the detoxification of the carcinogen Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). In the rat, Afar1 induction can prevent AFB(1)-induced liver cancer. It has been proposed that AFAR enzymes can metabolise endogenous diketones and dialdehydes that may be cytotoxic and/or genotoxic. Furth...... many aldo-keto reductases. This polarity change may have an effect on the proposed substrate binding amino acids nearby (Met(47), Tyr(48), Asp(50)). Further population analyses and functional studies of the nine variants detected may show if these variants are disease-related....

  4. Multicharged ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venikov, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    The main principles of action, beam parameters, basic problems and prospects for development of the available multicharged ion sources for various types of accelerators are considered. Descriptions of three types of Penneng sources (a source with coid cathodes, direct-heated source, and a source with a heated cathode), duoplasmatron, SHP source using electron-cyclotron resonance, electron-ray and laser sources are given. The problems productions for solid substance ions, lithium and beryllium ions in Penning sources, are considered as well as the problem of ion charge growth on passage of accelerated ion/or atom beam through a stripping target [ru

  5. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I.

    2013-12-16

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

  6. Purification and characterization of NAD(P)H quinone reductase from the latex of Hevea brasiliensis Müll.-Arg. (Euphorbiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareonthiphakorn, Nopphakaew; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi; Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun

    2002-09-01

    NAD(P)H quinone reductase [NAD(P)H-QR] present in the latex of Hevea brasiliensis Müll.-Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) was purified to homogeniety from the B-serum fraction obtained by freeze-thawing of the bottom fraction of ultracentrifuged fresh latex. The purification protocol involved acetone fractionation, heat treatment, ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. The M(r) determined by SDS-PAGE for the protein subunit was 21 kDa, and the molecular mass of the native enzyme estimated by gel filtration was 83 kDa, indicating that the native enzyme is a homotetramer. The enzyme showed pH stability over a range of 6 to at least 10 (with an optimum at pH 8) and thermal stability up to 80 degrees C. High NAD(P)H-QR activity (70%) was still retained after 10 h of preincubation at 80 degrees C. A comparable substrate specificity for this enzyme was observed among menadione, p-benzoquinone, juglone, and plumbagin, with only duroquinone generating a lower activity. Positive correlations between latex NAD(P)H-QR activity and rubber yield per tapping [fresh latex (r=0.89, PPP<0.01) indicated that enzyme activity could possibly be used as a marker to predict the yield potential of selected clones.

  7. Molecular Diagnosis of 5α-Reductase Type II Deficiency in Brazilian Siblings with 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricilda Palandi de Mello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The steroid 5α-reductase type II enzyme catalyzes the conversion of testosterone (T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT, and its deficiency leads to undervirilization in 46,XY individuals, due to an impairment of this conversion in genital tissues. Molecular analysis in the steroid 5α-reductase type II gene (SRD5A2 was performed in two 46,XY female siblings. SRD5A2 gene sequencing revealed that the patients were homozygous for p.Gln126Arg missense mutation, which results from the CGA > CAA nucleotide substitution. The molecular result confirmed clinical diagnosis of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD for the older sister and directed the investigation to other family members. Studies on SRD5A2 protein structure showed severe changes at NADPH binding region indicating that structural modeling analysis can be useful to evaluate the deleterious role of a mutation as causing 5α-reductase type II enzyme deficiency.

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 1 genea from human fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Xu, M; Cheng, C; Zhou, Z; Huang, Y; Zhao, W; Zeng, L; Xu, J; Fu, X; Ying, K; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2001-01-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) constitute a large protein family of NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreductase. They are defined by distinct, common sequence motifs and show a wide range of substrate specialisms. By large-scale sequencing analysis of a human fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a novel human SDR-type dehydrogenase/reductase gene named Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 1 (DHRS1). The DHRS1 cDNA is 1411 base pair in length, encoding a 314-amino-acid polypeptide which has a SDR motif. Northern blot reveals two bands, of about 0.9 and 1.4 kb in size. These two forms are expressed in many tissues. The DHRS1 gene is localized on chromosome 14q21.3. It has 9 exons and spans 9.2 kb of the genomic DNA.

  9. Identification of oleamide in Guatteria recurvisepala by LC/MS-based Plasmodium falciparum thioredoxin reductase ligand binding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munigunti, Ranjith; Nelson, Nicholas; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Gupta, Mahabir P; Brun, Reto; Calderón, Angela I

    2011-10-01

    Our current research on applications of mass spectrometry to natural product drug discovery against malaria aims to screen plant extracts for new ligands to Plasmodium falciparum thioredoxin reductase (PfTrxR) followed by their identification and structure elucidation. PfTrxR is involved in the antioxidant defense and redox regulation of the parasite and is validated as a promising target for therapeutic intervention against malaria. In the present study, detannified methanol extracts from Guatteria recurvisepala, Licania kallunkiae, and Topobea watsonii were screened for ligands to PfTrxR using ultrafiltration and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based binding experiments. The PfTrxR ligand identified in the extract of Guatteria recurvisepala displayed a relative binding affinity of 3.5-fold when incubated with 1 μM PfTrxR. The ligand corresponding to the protonated molecule m/z 282.2792 [M+ H]+ was eluted at a retention time of 17.95 min in a 20-min gradient of 95% B consisting of (A) 0.1%formic acid in 95% H₂O-5% ACN, and (B) 0.1% formic acid in 95% ACN-5% H₂O in an LC-QTOF-MS.Tandem MS of the protonated molecule m/z 282.2792 [M + H]+, C₁₈H₃₆NO (DBE: 2; error: 1.13 ppm) resulted in two daughter ions m/z 265.2516[M + H-NH₃]+ (DBE: 3; error: 0.35 ppm) and m/z 247.2405 [M + H-NH₃-H₂O] +, (DBE: 4; error:2.26 ppm). The PfTrxR ligand was identified as oleamide and confirmed by comparison of the retention time, molecular formula, accurate mass,and double bond equivalence with the standard oleamide. This is the first report on the identification of oleamide as a PfTrxR ligand from Guatteria recurvisepala R. E. Fr. and the corresponding in vitro activity against P. falciparum strain K1 (IC₅₀ 4.29 μg/mL). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of the iron and manganese reconstituted tyrosyl radical in Bacillus cereus ribonucleotide reductase R2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane B Tomter

    Full Text Available Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g(1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g(1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν(7a = 1500 cm(-1 was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the (18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm(-1 of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g(1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011 J Biol Chem 286: 33053-33060 indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8

  11. Heavy-metal-induced Inhibition of Aspergillus niger nitrate reductase: Applications for Rapid Contaminant Detection in Aqueous Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William Arnold; Aiken, Abigail Marie; Peyton, Brent Michael; Petersen, James N.

    2003-03-01

    Enzyme inhibition assays have the potential to rapidly screen and identify heavy metals in environmental samples. Inhibition of nitrate reductase (NR) was examined as a method for detecting toxic metals. The activity of NR (EC 1.6.6.2) from Aspergillus niger was assayed as a function of metal concentration in the presence of Cd2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+. NR exhibited sensitivity to these metals at concentrations below 10 µM. Various buffers were screened for their ability to protect NR activity from metal inhibition, and 3-(N-morpholino) propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) was selected as the buffering system for the NR assays as it exhibited the least interference with metal inhibition, thus providing increased assay sensitivity. The hypothesis that chelating agents could prevent the inhibition of NR activity by metal ions was also tested. Results indicated that 10 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) could protect NR activity from inhibition by Cr3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ at concentrations below 100 µM, but that the EDTA had no effect on NR inhibition by Cr6+. An amount of 10 mM nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) prevented NR inhibition by Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ at metal concentrations below 100 µM. However, 10 mM NTA was unable to protect the enzyme from inhibition by either Cr3+ or Cr6+. These results indicated that through specific metal chelation, a NR-based method for individually quantifying Cr3+ and Cr6+ species in aqueous solutions could be developed. The ability to restore activity to NR which been previously inhibited by exposure to 100 µM Pb2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Cr3+ was explored to determine whether NR activity could be recovered by EDTA additions for use in consecutive metal inhibition assays. The results showed NR activity could not be regained after exposure to Cr3+ or Cu2+, but did partially recover activity after Cd2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ exposure.

  12. [Comparison of Physico-chemical Aspects between E. coli and Human Dihydrofolate Reductase: an Equilibrium Unfolding Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Chaudhuri, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    A protein, differing in origin, may exhibit variable physicochemical behaviour, difference in sequence homology, fold and function. Thus studying structure-function relationship of proteins from altered sources is meaningful in the sense that it may give rise to comparative aspects of their sequence-structure-function relationship. Dihydrofolate reductase is an enzyme involved in cell cycle regulation. It is a significant enzyme as.a target for developing anticancer drugs. Hence, detailed understanding of structure-function relationships of wide variants of the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase would be important for developing an inhibitor or an antagonist against the enzyme involved in the cellular developmental processes. In this communication, we have reported the comparative structure-function relationship between E. coli and human dihydrofolate reductase. The differences in the unfolding behaviour of these two proteins have been investigated to understand various properties of these two proteins like relative' stability differences and variation in conformational changes under identical denaturing conditions. The equilibrium unfolding mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase proteins using guanidine hydrochloride as a denaturant in the presence of various types of osmolytes has been monitored using loss in enzymatic activity, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and an extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid as probes. It has been observed that osmolytes, such as 1M sucrose, and 30% glycerol, provided enhanced stability to both variants of dihydrofolate reductase. Their level of stabilisation has been observed to be dependent on intrinsic protein stability. It was observed that 100 mM proline does not show any 'significant stabilisation to either of dihydrofolate reductases. In the present study, it has been observed that the human protein is relatively less stable than the E.coli counterpart.

  13. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and β-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from β-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  14. Statins: 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors demonstrate anti-atherosclerotic character due to their antioxidant capacity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Puttananjaiah, M.H.; Dhale, M.A.; Gaonkar, V.; Keni, S.

    -CoA reductase inhibitors is yet to be elucidated. Based on the present findings, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors may suppress the occurrence atherosclerosis by inhibiting the initiation step in the lipid peroxidation pathway. Our results should assist physicians...

  15. Structure of diaminohydroxyphosphoribosylaminopyrimidine deaminase/5-amino-6-(5-phospho­ribosylamino)uracil reductase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alice; Trumper, Paul; Chrysostomou, Georgios; Hunter, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The bifunctional diaminohydroxyphosphoribosylaminopyrimidine deaminase/5-­amino-6-(5-phosphoribosylamino)uracil reductase (RibD) represents a potential antibacterial drug target. The structure of recombinant Acinetobacter baumannii RibD is reported in orthorhombic and tetragonal crystal forms at 2.2 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Comparisons with orthologous structures in the Protein Data Bank indicated close similarities. The tetragonal crystal form was obtained in the presence of guanosine monophosphate, which surprisingly was observed to occupy the adenine-binding site of the reductase domain. PMID:23722836

  16. Association of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism in Korean patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Keun; Chong, So Young; Jang, Moon Ju; Hong, Seung Ho; Kim, Heung Sik; Cho, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Ae; Ahn, Myung Ju; Kim, Chul Soo; Oh, Doyeun

    2006-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase plays a central role in converting folate to methyl donor for DNA methylation. Recently, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) mutations were discovered to be associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as well as colon cancer, lymphoma, esophageal and stomach cancer. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the MTHFR polymorphisms are associated with the risk of childhood ALL in the Korean population. DNA samples taken from 66 patients with ALL and 100 age-matched controls were analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for detection of MTHFR C677T and A1298C mutations. The frequency of the AC genotype for MTHFR A1298C polymorphism was significantly different between the controls and the cases (OR, 2.22; CI, 95% 1.09-4.51, p=0.03). The 1298AC+CC genotype was also significantly different (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.06-4.22; p=0.049). There was, however, no significant difference for MTHFR C677T polymorphism and combined genotype frequencies between the two groups. Although no consistent results on associations between MTHFR A 1298C polymorphism and ALL in the populations studied were obtained, the A1298C polymorphism, at least in Koreans, may be a genetic determinant among childhood ALL patients.

  17. Rapid induction of GFP expression by the nitrate reductase promoter in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewe, Daniela; Río Bártulos, Carolina; Kroth, Peter G.; Gruber, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    An essential prerequisite for a controlled transgene expression is the choice of a suitable promoter. In the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the most commonly used promoters for trans-gene expression are the light dependent lhcf1 promoters (derived from two endogenous genes encoding fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c binding proteins) and the nitrate dependent nr promoter (derived from the endogenous nitrate reductase gene). In this study, we investigated the time dependent expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter under control of the nitrate reductase promoter in independently genetically transformed P. tricornutum cell lines following induction of expression by change of the nitrogen source in the medium via flow cytometry, microscopy and western blotting. In all investigated cell lines, GFP fluorescence started to increase 1 h after change of the medium, the fastest increase rates were observed between 2 and 3 h. Fluorescence continued to increase slightly for up to 7 h even after transfer of the cells to ammonium medium. The subsequent decrease of GFP fluorescence was much slower than the increase, probably due to the stability of GFP. The investigation of several cell lines transformed with nr based constructs revealed that, also in the absence of nitrate, the promoter may show residual activity. Furthermore, we observed a strong variation of gene expression between independent cell lines, emphasising the importance of a thorough characterisation of genetically modified cell lines and their individual expression patterns. PMID:27635322

  18. In vivo function of the murid herpesvirus-4 ribonucleotide reductase small subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milho, Ricardo; Gill, Michael B; May, Janet S; Colaco, Susanna; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-07-01

    The difficulty of eliminating herpesvirus carriage makes host entry a key target for infection control. However, its viral requirements are poorly defined. Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) can potentially provide insights into gammaherpesvirus host entry. Upper respiratory tract infection requires the MuHV-4 thymidine kinase (TK) and ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (RNR-L), suggesting a need for increased nucleotide production. However, both TK and RNR-L are likely to be multifunctional. We therefore tested further the importance of nucleotide production by disrupting the MuHV-4 ribonucleotide reductase small subunit (RNR-S). This caused a similar attenuation to RNR-L disruption: despite reduced intra-host spread, invasive inoculations still established infection, whereas a non-invasive upper respiratory tract inoculation did so only at high dose. Histological analysis showed that RNR-S(-), RNR-L(-) and TK(-) viruses all infected cells in the olfactory neuroepithelium but unlike wild-type virus then failed to spread. Thus captured host nucleotide metabolism enzymes, up to now defined mainly as important for alphaherpesvirus reactivation in neurons, also have a key role in gammaherpesvirus host entry. This seemed to reflect a requirement for lytic replication to occur in a terminally differentiated cell before a viable pool of latent genomes could be established.

  19. Activity profiles of prostaglandin 15- and 9-hydroxydehydrogenase and 13-reductase in the developing rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Asciak, C

    1975-04-25

    Three prostaglandin F2alpha-catabolizing enzyme activities have been demonstrated in kidneys from adult rats. Activity of each of the enzymes varied with animal age. Whereas 15-hydroxydehydrogenase and delta13-reductase appeared important to the early developing kidney (prior to 4 weeks of age), 9-hydroxydehydrogenase appeared to be characteristic of the adult kidney. Prostaglandin 15-hydroxydehydrogenase rose sharply after birth to a maximal value at 19 days (59-fold relative to the adult) decreasing to adult values by Day 40. Prostaglandin delta13-reductase followed a similar pattern rising about 20-fold at Day 19. Prostaglandin 9-hydroxydehydrogenase, on the other hand, was undetectable up to Day 19, rising gradually to adult values by Day 50. Prostaglandin biosynthesis in whole kidney and renal papilla at the peak period of 15-hydroxydehydrogenase activity, i.e. 19, 22, and 24 days, did not vary significally from adult values. The dramatic rise in 15-hydroxydehydrogenase activity, reflecting an important requirement for prostaglandin inactivation during the first 3 weeks after birth, appears to correlate well with the increase during this period in the number of glomeruli, cortical tubules, and redistribution of blood flow to the cortex. These results suggest for the first time an important relationship between prostaglandin catabolizing activites and nephrogenesis.

  20. Reduction of azo dyes by flavin reductase from Citrobacter freundii A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Firdaus Abdul-Wahab

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter freundii A1 isolated from a sewage treatment facility was demonstrated to be able to effectively decolorize azo dyes as pure and mixed culture. This study reports on the investigation on the enzymatic systems involved. An assay performed suggested the possible involvement of flavin reductase (Fre as an azo reductase. A heterologouslyexpressed recombinant Fre from C. freundii A1 was used to investigate its involvement in the azo reduction process. Three model dyes were used, namely Acid Red 27 (AR27, Direct Blue 15 (DB15 and Reactive Black 5 (RB5. AR27 was found to be reduced the fastest by Fre, followed by RB5, and lastly DB15. Redox mediators nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and riboflavin enhance the reduction, suggesting the redox activity of the enzyme. The rate and extent of reduction of the model dyes correlate well with the reduction potentials (Ep. The data presented here strongly suggest that Fre is one of the enzymes responsible for azo reduction in C. freundii A1, acting via an oxidation-reduction reaction.