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Sample records for menopause prospective analysis

  1. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood clots, you have liver disease. In some women, Menopause Hormone Therapy may increase risks of serious side effects including blood clots, heart attacks, strokes, breast cancer, and gall bladder disease. Menopause Hormone Therapy should ...

  2. The timing of natural menopause after uterine fibroid embolization: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropeano, Giovanna; Amoroso, Sonia; di Stasi, Carmine; Vizzielli, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Scambia, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether uterine fibroid embolization before the age of 45 years advances the timing of natural menopause. Prospective cohort study. University tertiary-care center. Forty-three regularly cycling women aged 35-44 years who underwent embolization and 43 age-matched control subjects. Annual assessments of menopausal status using prospectively recorded menstrual diaries and hormonal (serum FSH and E(2)) and ultrasound measures (ovarian volume and antral follicle count). Women were followed for 7 years or until they reached menopause. Age at menopause as computed by subtracting the date of birth from the exact date of the last menstrual period. Over the study period, 9 patients (25%) and 12 control subjects (33%) became menopausal, 19 patients (53%) and 18 control subjects (50%) entered the menopausal transition (irregular cycles), and 8 patients (22%) and 6 control subjects (17%) continued to menstruate regularly. Mean menopausal age in the embolization group (48.94 ± 2.48 years) was not significantly different from that in the control group (49.52 ± 1.25 years). There was no significant difference of menopause occurrence between the groups. Longitudinal changes in hormonal and ultrasound measures were similar for the two groups. This long-term follow-up study found no evidence for fibroid embolization advancing the timing of menopause in women before the age of 45 years. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prospective follow-up of changes in menopausal complaints and hormone status after surgical menopause in a Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaris, Ron; Sidhu, Kiren; Chan, Joe M

    2010-03-01

    Surgical menopause, in comparison with natural menopause, has traditionally been claimed to lead to faster onset of more severe menopausal symptoms. There is little prospective research to support this view. We aimed to evaluate the speed of onset and magnitude of climacteric symptoms after oophorectomy and whether they relate to serum hormone changes. This would aide in counseling women before surgery. The Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) was used in a sample of women before either total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) or hysterectomy with one or both ovaries preserved. After surgery, women filled out GCS questionnaires weekly until the final assessment 5 to 6 weeks after surgery. Follicle-stimulating hormone, leuteinizing hormone, and estradiol levels were determined preoperatively at day 10 and postsurgery at day 37. All study participants had high preoperative GCS scores. Scores were highest in the TAHBSO group, but by 5 to 6 weeks after surgery, ratings had returned to premenopausal levels, showing marked improvement of ratings for anxiety, depression, and somatic complaints. Vasomotor symptoms remained unchanged. Hormone levels dropped within 10 days to postmenopausal levels in women undergoing TAHBSO. Fewer than 25% of women considered themselves symptomatic, and their symptom ratings increased significantly only between 2 and 3 weeks after surgery. This study suggests that vasomotor and other symptoms do not manifest as rapidly and severely in our study population as claimed in the literature and that many women have minimal or no symptoms. Improved symptom rating may be caused by perceived improvement of overall quality of life after surgery. This supports the concept that menopausal complaints depend on a multitude of factors other than hormone levels alone.

  4. Diabetes and onset of natural menopause: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J S; Onland-Moret, N C; Eijkemans, M J C; Tjønneland, A; Roswall, N; Overvad, K; Fagherazzi, G; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Grote, V; Bergmann, M M; Boeing, H; Trichopoulou, A; Tzivoglou, M; Trichopoulos, D; Grioni, S; Mattiello, A; Masala, G; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Weiderpass, E; Redondo, M L; Sánchez, M J; Castaño, J M Huerta; Arriola, L; Ardanaz, E; Duell, E J; Rolandsson, O; Franks, P W; Butt, S; Nilsson, P; Khaw, K T; Wareham, N; Travis, R; Romieu, I; Gunter, M J; Riboli, E; van der Schouw, Y T

    2015-06-01

    Do women who have diabetes before menopause have their menopause at an earlier age compared with women without diabetes? Although there was no overall association between diabetes and age at menopause, our study suggests that early-onset diabetes may accelerate menopause. Today, more women of childbearing age are being diagnosed with diabetes, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on reproductive health. We investigated the impact of diabetes on age at natural menopause (ANM) in 258 898 women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), enrolled between 1992 and 2000. Determinant and outcome information was obtained through questionnaires. Time-dependent Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of diabetes and age at diabetes diagnosis with ANM, stratified by center and adjusted for age, smoking, reproductive and diabetes risk factors and with age from birth to menopause or censoring as the underlying time scale. Overall, no association between diabetes and ANM was found (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-1.01). However, women with diabetes before the age of 20 years had an earlier menopause (10-20 years: HR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.02-2.01, France); German Cancer Aid, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMMF) (Germany); Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity, Stavros Niarchos Foundation and Hellenic Health Foundation (Greece); Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC) and National Research Council (Italy); Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS), Netherlands Cancer Registry (NKR), LK Research Funds, Dutch Prevention Funds, Dutch ZON (Zorg Onderzoek Nederland), World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), Statistics Netherlands (The Netherlands); ERC-2009-AdG 232997 and Nordforsk, Nordic Centre of Excellence programme on Food, Nutrition and Health (Norway); Health Research Fund (FIS), Regional Governments of Andaluc

  5. Menopause-related brain activation patterns during visual sexual arousal in menopausal women: An fMRI pilot study using time-course analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2017-02-20

    The aging process and menopausal transition are important factors in sexual dysfunction of menopausal women. No neuroimaging study has assessed the age- and menopause-related changes on brain activation areas associated with sexual arousal in menopausal women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time course of regional brain activity associated with sexual arousal evoked by visual stimulation in premenopausal and menopausal women, and further to assess the effect of menopause on the brain areas associated with sexual arousal in menopausal women using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty volunteers consisting of 15 premenopausal and 15 menopausal women underwent the fMRI. For the activation condition, volunteers viewed sexually arousing visual stimulation. The brain areas with significantly higher activation in premenopausal women compared with menopausal women included the thalamus, amygdala, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) using analysis of covariance adjusting for age (pchanges in the amygdala while viewing erotic video were positively correlated with estrogen levels in the two groups. Our findings suggest that reduced brain activity of the thalamus, amygdala, and ACC in menopausal women may be associated with menopause-related decrease in sexual arousal. These findings might help elucidate the neural mechanisms associated with sexual dysfunction in menopausal women. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Manufacturing Menopause: An Analysis of the Portrayal of Menopause and Information Content on Pharmaceutical Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Deborah Hile

    2010-01-01

    Consumer-targeted prescription drug advertising serves as an interesting lens through which we can examine the portrayal of menopause in online drug advertisements. The aim of this study was to explore the portrayal of menopause on web sites sponsored by pharmaceutical companies for hormone therapies (HT). To unravel this question, a qualitative…

  7. Diabetes and onset of natural menopause : Results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, J. S.; Onland-Moret, N. C.; Eijkemans, M. J C; Tjønneland, A.; Roswall, N.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Dossus, L.; Lukanova, A.; Grote, V.; Bergmann, M. M.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Tzivoglou, M.; Trichopoulos, D.; Grioni, S.; Mattiello, A.; Masala, G.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. B.; Weiderpass, E.; Redondo, M. L.; Sánchez, M. J.; Castaño, J. M Huerta; Arriola, L.; Ardanaz, E.; Duell, E. J.; Rolandsson, O.; Franks, P. W.; Butt, S.; Nilsson, P.; Khaw, K. T.; Wareham, N.; Travis, R.; Romieu, I.; Gunter, M. J.; Riboli, E.; Van Der Schouw, Y. T.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do women who have diabetes before menopause have their menopause at an earlier age compared with women without diabetes? SUMMARY ANSWER Although there was no overall association between diabetes and age at menopause, our study suggests that early-onset diabetes may accelerate

  8. Hormones, weight change and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K M; Heaney, R P; Recker, R R; Barger-Lux, M J; Lappe, J M

    2001-06-01

    To determine total body weight change occurring in women at mid-life, specifically with respect to occurrence of menopause and use of estrogen. Retrospective analysis of body weight measurements accumulated in two cohorts of healthy women participating in studies of skeletal metabolism. Cohort 1: 191 healthy nuns enrolled in a prospective study of osteoporosis risk, aged 35-45 in 1967; cohort 2: 75 women aged 46 or older and still menstruating, enrolled in 1988 in a study of bone cell dynamics across menopause. Roughly one-third of each group received hormone replacement after menopause. Body weight and height, age, menstrual status and use of estrogen replacement. Cohort 1: 608 measurements at 5 y intervals spanning a period from 17 y before to 22 y after menopause; cohort 2: 1180 measurements at 6-month intervals spanning a period from 5 y prior to 5 y after menopause. In cohort 1 weight rose as a linear function of age (both chronological and menopausal), both before and after cessation of ovarian function, at a rate of approximately 0.43% y(-1). Neither the menopausal transition nor the use of estrogen had an appreciable effect on this rate of gain. In cohort 2 the rate of gain seemed to diminish slightly at menopause. As with cohort 1, hormone replacement (or its absence) had no appreciable effect on weight. The long-term, total body weight trajectory at mid-life is not influenced appreciably by either cessation of ovarian function or by hormone replacement.

  9. Effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and quality of life in women in natural menopause: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Pan, Chieh-Hsin; Shyu, Yuh-Kae; Han, Bor-Cheng; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2015-02-01

    This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on hot flash frequency and severity, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life in women in natural menopause. We systematically searched PubMed/Medline, PsychINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL using keywords such as acupuncture, hot flash, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life. Heterogeneity, moderator analysis, publication bias, and risk of bias associated with the included studies were examined. Of 104 relevant studies, 12 studies with 869 participants met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. We found that acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency (g = -0.35; 95% CI, -0.5 to -0.21) and severity (g = -0.44; 95% CI, -0.65 to -0.23) of hot flashes. Acupuncture significantly decreased the psychological, somatic, and urogenital subscale scores on the Menopause Rating Scale (g = -1.56, g = -1.39, and g = -0.82, respectively; P Menopause-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (g= -0.46; 95% CI, -0.9 to -0.02). Long-term effects (up to 3 mo) on hot flash frequency and severity (g = -0.53 and g = -0.55, respectively) were found. This meta-analysis confirms that acupuncture improves hot flash frequency and severity, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life (in the vasomotor domain) in women experiencing natural menopause.

  10. Lifestyle risk management--a qualitative analysis of women's descriptions of taking hormone therapy following surgically induced menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Marie; Burrell, Beverly; Whitehead, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    This article is a report of a study that examined how women describe their decisions in relation to the use of menopausal hormone therapy following surgical menopause. Women who have had a surgically induced menopause generally experience more intense menopausal symptoms than natural menopause and are regularly prescribed menopausal hormone therapy. Since 2002 the risks associated with this therapy have been widely reported. This study is a qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews between March and May 2009 with 30 participants who had experienced surgical menopause and were, or had in the past, taken menopausal hormone therapy. This was a community sample recruited in Christchurch, New Zealand. A risk management theoretical approach underpinned the analysis. The womens' descriptions of managing the risks associated with menopausal therapy fell into two main themes: Life has to go on and Waiting for someone to tell me. All these women had either made an active decision to continue on treatment because of the impact of menopausal symptoms or took their doctor's advice to continue. A less dominant theme but one that was also evident was Relying on my body to get me through in which the women had decided to discontinue treatment because they regarded it as unnatural. The study provided insights into how women utilize an experiential reasoning process to manage the health and lifestyle risks associated with taking menopausal hormone therapy. Nurses need to be aware of how this process influences women's reasoning processes when working with women following surgical menopause. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer risk : impact of different treatments. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakken, Kjersti; Fournier, Agnes; Lund, Eiliv; Waaseth, Marit; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fabre, Alban; Hemon, Bertrand; Rinaldi, Sabina; Chajes, Veronique; Slimani, Nadia; Allen, Naomi E.; Reeves, Gillian K.; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Rodriguez, Laudina; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano Etxezarreta, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Steffen, Annika; Schulz, Mandy; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Tumino, Rosario; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Berrino, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is characterized by use of different constituents, regimens and routes of administration. We investigated the association between the use of different types of MHT and breast cancer risk in the EPIC cohort study. The analysis is based on data from 133,744

  12. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halski T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Halski,1 Kuba Ptaszkowski,2 Lucyna Słupska,1 Robert Dymarek,3 Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz2 1Department of Physiotherapy, Opole Medical School, Opole, 2Department of Clinical Biomechanics and Physiotherapy in Motor System Disorders, 3Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Objectives: In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C in the supine position.Materials and methods: This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance.Results: In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102. The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3

  13. Does anti-Müllerian hormone predict menopause in the general population? Results of a prospective ongoing cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depmann, M; Eijkemans, M J C; Broer, S L; Scheffer, G J; van Rooij, I A J; Laven, J S E; Broekmans, F J M

    2016-07-01

    Do ovarian reserve tests (ORTs) predict age at natural menopause (ANM) in a cohort of healthy women with a regular menstrual cycle? Of the ORTs researched, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) alone predicts age at menopause. However, its predictive value decreased with increasing age of the woman, prediction intervals were broad and extreme ages at menopause could not be predicted. A fixed interval is hypothesized to exist between ANM and age at loss of natural fertility. Therefore, if it is possible to predict ANM, one could identify women destined for early menopause and thus at higher risk for age-related subfertility. Of ORTs researched in the prediction of ANM, AMH is the most promising one. A long-term, extended follow-up study was conducted, results of the first follow-up round were previously published. Two hundred and sixty-five normo-ovulatory women (21-46 years) were included between 1992 and 2001, 49 women (18.5%) could not be reached in the current follow-up round. Two hundred and sixty-five healthy normo-ovulatory women were included, recruited in an Academic hospital. We measured baseline AMH, follicle-stimulating hormone and the antral follicle count (AFC). At follow-up (2009 and 2013), menopausal status was determined via questionnaires. Cox regression analysis calculated time to menopause (TTM) using age and ORT. A check of (non-) proportionality of the predictive effect of AMH was performed. A Weibull survival model was used in order to predict individual ANM. In total, 155 women were available for analyses. Eighty-one women (37.5%) had become post-menopausal during follow-up. Univariable Cox regression analysis demonstrated age and ORTs to be significantly correlated with TTM. Multivariable Cox regression analysis, adjusting for baseline age and smoking; however, demonstrated AMH alone to be an independent predictor of TTM (Hazard Ratio 0.70, 95% Confidence Interval 0.56-0.86, P-value menopause predictions did not cover the full range of menopausal

  14. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christina T.L.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Arnold, Alice M.; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K.; Musani, Solomon K.; Nalls, Michael A.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G.; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S.; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M.; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Press, Michael F.; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F.; Taylor, Herman A.; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K.; Harris, Tamara B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H.; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W.; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA. PMID:24493794

  15. Inhibin A and B as markers of menopause: a five-year prospective longitudinal study of hormonal changes during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlie, Inger; Mørkrid, Lars; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Moen, Mette H; Holte, Arne

    2005-03-01

    A more direct and precise hormonal marker of the menopause has been required for some time. The aim of this study was to identify the most accurate marker of the menopause, based on analyses of inhibin A and B, FSH, LH and estradiol (E(2)), among 59 healthy women without hormonal treatment during the perimenopause and early postmenopause. Fifty-nine women, aged 46-56 years (mean age 51.2 years), were examined annually for 5 years during the menopausal transition and had venous blood drawn simultaneously for later analyses of the above-mentioned hormones. Inhibin A showed a steady decline from at least 4 years before the final menstrual period (FMP) until 1 year before menopause, whereas inhibin B had a shorter lasting decline from year 3 to year 2 before menopause, concomitant with a rise in FSH and LH. The present study confirmed previous observations that inhibin A had a continuous decline starting before the decline of inhibin B, suggesting that an increasing part of the cycle was anovulatory. The fall in inhibin B and the increase in FSH constitute markers of ovarian aging. One year prior to menopause neither inhibin A nor inhibin B could be detected. The disappearance of these peptide hormones is an important predictor of the approaching menopause.

  16. Quantitative bias analysis for epidemiological associations of perfluoroalkyl substance serum concentrations and early onset of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Christopher D; Song, Gina; Yoon, Miyoung; Verner, Marc-André; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J; Longnecker, Matthew P

    2017-02-01

    An association between increased serum concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and early menopause has been reported (Knox et al., 2011; Taylor et al., 2014). This association may be explained by the fact that women who underwent menopause no longer excrete PFAS through menstruation. Our objective was to assess how much of the epidemiologic association between PFAS and altered timing of menopause might be explained by reverse causality. We extended a published population life-stage physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PFOS and PFOA characterized by realistic distributions of physiological parameters including age at menopause. We then conducted Monte Carlo simulations to replicate the Taylor population (Taylor et al., 2014) and the Knox population (Knox et al., 2011). The analysis of the simulated data overall showed a pattern of results that was comparable to those reported in epidemiological studies. For example, in the simulated Knox population (ages 42-51) the odds ratio (OR) for menopause in the fifth quintile of PFOA compared to those in the first quintile was 1.33 (95% CI 1.26-1.40), whereas the reported OR was 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.8). Using our model structure, a substantial portion of the associations reported can be explained by pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Menopause Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alone. Learn more about your personal journey with menopause. The Menopause Map™ will help you: Understand the stages of ... About It! Start your Journey Your journey through menopause is unique and we understand that. Answer a ...

  18. A prospective study of DT56a (Femarelle®) for the treatment of menopause symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Borrego, R; Mendoza, N; Llaneza, P

    2015-01-01

    DT56a (Femarelle®) is a natural medication that contains a variety of phytoestrogens derived from tofu. Treatment with DT56a affects bones, vascular tissues and the nervous system in a manner similar to that of estrogen but DT56a acts as an estrogen antagonist in breast and uterine tissues. The objective of this study was to analyze the efficacy of DT56a in the reduction of menopause symptoms in Spanish women who participated in the Post Marketing Menopausal Symptoms International Survey (POMMSIS). A total of 631 Spanish menopausal or perimenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms who took DT56a for 4 weeks participated in this study. This study was an observational, questionnaire-based investigation that consisted of a baseline questionnaire, a hot flushes daily diary and a feedback questionnaire. A statistically significant (p < 0.01) reduction in the number and intensity of hot flushes was experienced after 2 and 4 weeks of DT56a treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment with DT56a, 80.7% of the patients reported that their hot flushes were 'better' or 'much better'. The severity of hot flushes was also reduced by 38% in all study participants and by 36% in women who had experienced more than seven hot flushes per day initially, before treatment. Treatment with DT56a resulted in a significant reduction in the number and intensity of hot flushes in postmenopausal women, especially in those with frequent symptoms, and these effects were observed within the first month of treatment.

  19. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Dymarek, Robert; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C) in the supine position. Materials and methods This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. Results In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102). The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3±11.8 µV, position B – 19.9±10.6 µV, and position C – 25.3±10.9 µV (P=0.0104). Conclusion The results showed that in the supine position, the PFM achieved the lowest resting activity and the highest functional activity. Therefore, the supine position can be recommended for the diagnosis and therapy of weakened PFM. PMID:28115836

  20. Consumption of Low-Fat Dairy Products May Delay Natural Menopause123

    OpenAIRE

    Carwile, Jenny L.; Willett, Walter C.; Michels, Karin B.

    2013-01-01

    Later menopause is a risk factor for breast and endometrial cancer, yet few studies have investigated dietary predictors of this potentially modifiable event. In particular, dairy contains hormones and growth factors that could potentially affect menopausal timing. We therefore assessed the association between regular consumption of dairy foods and related nutrients and age at natural menopause. We conducted a prospective analysis with up to 20 y of follow-up in 46,059 participants in the Nur...

  1. Bone mineral density and fractures after surgical menopause : systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I. E.; Teixeira, N.; Abma, E. M.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Mourits, M. J. E.; de Bock, G. H.

    Background Oophorectomy is recommended for women at increased risk for ovarian cancer. When performed at premenopausal age oophorectomy induces acute surgical menopause, with unwanted consequences. Objective To investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture prevalence after surgical menopause.

  2. Clinicopathological Spectrum of Endometrial Changes in Peri-menopausal and Post-menopausal Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: A 2 Years Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Rajshri P; Dravid, N V; Suryawanshi, Kishor H; Gadre, Arundhati S; Bagale, Priya S; Ahire, Neelam

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is the Common presenting complaint in Gynaecology Outpatient Department in all age groups. It is due to the anovulatory cycles which are commonly seen in adolescent and peri-menopausal women. Abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by wide variety of organic or non-organic causes. Histopathological examination of endometrial sample remains the gold standard for diagnosis of endometrial pathology. To study the clinicopathological spectrum of endometrium in abnormal uterine bleeding in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal age groups. The study included prospective analysis of 119 cases of endometrial samples in patients of abnormal uterine bleeding above 40 years of age. The specimens were routinely processed and H&E stained slides were studied. Patients were categorized into peri-menopausal (40-49 years) and post-menopausal (> 50 years) age group. A total of 119 specimens of endometrium were analyzed. Maximum number (73.94%) of cases were from peri-menopausal age group. The most common presenting complaint was menorrhagia (48.86%) followed by post-menopausal bleeding (26.05%). In peri-menopausal age group proliferative endometrium (35.22%) was the predominant histopathological pattern followed by endometrial hyperplasia (23.86%). Atrophic endometrium (25.80%) was the most frequent finding followed by endometrial hyperplasia (19.35%) in post-menopausal age group. Three cases of endometrial carcinoma were reported in post-menopausal age group only. A thorough histopathological work up and clinical correlation is mandatory in cases of abnormal uterine bleeding above the age of 40 years to find out organic lesions. Careful screening can detect early cancer of endometrium which has excellent prognosis and it will help in further management.

  3. Menopausal status and the risk of lung cancer in women: A PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Lingfeng; Wang, Fang; Liang, Sudong; Yang, Junjun; Xu, Xingxiang

    2017-06-01

    Quantification of the association between menopausal status and risk of lung cancer is inconsistent. We carried out a meta-analysis of available studies to examine this issue. Relevant articles were identified by searching PudMed and Embase databases. Reference lists from selected papers were also reviewed. A random-effect model was used to calculate summary odds ratios (OR) and relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Publication bias was estimated using Egger regression asymmetry test. Eight eligible studies, including 5 case-control studies and 3 cohort studies, provided data for meta-analysis. Postmenopausal women had a statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer in all included studies (RR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.12-1.85) and cohort studies (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.05-1.86), but not in case-control studies (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 0.95-2.24). Overall, there was evidence that postmenopause is related to increased lung cancer risk. However, studies have produced slightly heterogeneous results (I = 38.40%). To obtain a better indication of relationship, well-designed large prospective studies are required.

  4. Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ju Chien

    Full Text Available Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer.A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2 was used to analyze the data.We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33, but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009. None of the studies reported severe adverse events.Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.

  5. Added value of anti-Müllerian hormone in prediction of menopause: results from a large prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dólleman, Madeleine; Verschuren, W M Monique; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Broekmans, Frank J M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2015-08-01

    What is the added value of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) on top of patient characteristics for predicting the risk to enter menopause within 10 years? For women who did enter menopause, the risk of entering menopause within 10 years assigned by the model with AMH was on average 3% higher than that assigned by the model without AMH, and in the subgroup of young women with regular cycles, this increase was 14%. Prediction of age at menopause may be useful in predicting the end of female fertility. AMH may be useful for this, but the current evidence is based on small studies or specific subgroups, and does not take into account predictors other than age. This was a retrospective cohort study among 1163 premenopausal women participating in the second follow-up round of the Doetinchem Cohort Study with follow-up assessments of menopausal status and age after 5 and 10 years of follow-up. This study included premenopausal women from the general population with a mean age of 41 (SD 7) years. A Cox proportional hazards' model without AMH was fitted using variables selected based on Akaike's information criterion. Performance of the prediction rule was assessed with C-statistics and compared with a model additionally including AMH and to a model with age only. The added value of AMH was assessed with Net Reclassification Index and change in absolute predicted risk. Performance of these three models was compared in subgroups based on age and reproductive characteristics. The final model included age, BMI, packyears of smoking and menstrual cycle status (regular, irregular, pregnant or taking oral contraceptives). This model had a C-statistic of 0.89 (0.01 SD), compared with 0.88 (0.01 SD) for the model including age only. Addition of AMH increased it to 0.91 (0.03 SD). In a subgroup of 25-43 year olds with regular menstrual cycles, the model with age only had a C-statistic of 0.79 (0.04 SD) and for the models without and with AMH the C-stastic was 0.79 (0.04 SD) and 0.87 (0

  6. Body mass index and age at natural menopause: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xingyong; Jiang, Anran; Yin, Liping; Li, Yingchun; Tao, Fangbiao; Hu, Huaqing

    2015-04-01

    There is no universal consensus on the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and age at natural menopause (ANM). The primary bias was confounding by cigarette smoking because smoking was a strong confounding factor related to lower BMI and earlier menopause. This meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the effect of BMI on ANM. Medline and EMBASE databases were searched for relevant studies up to December 2013. Studies were selected for analysis based on certain inclusion and exclusion criteria. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CI were extracted to assess the association between BMI and early ANM. Nine studies were selected for this meta-analysis. The HR of early ANM was 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.14; P < 0.01) in underweight women compared with women of normal BMI. Compared with women of normal BMI, overweight women (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96; P < 0.001) and obese women (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.79-1.15; P = 0.59) were associated with late ANM. In addition, the HRs of early ANM in overweight and obese women were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.90-0.94; P < 0.001) and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; P < 0.001), respectively, compared with underweight women. A separate meta-analysis indicated that the results (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.81-0.90; P < 0.001) changed markedly in the comparison of obese versus normal-weight women in studies that controlled for smoking. The results of our study indicate that increased BMI modestly associates with later ANM. The relationship between BMI and ANM needs further clarification in well-designed studies, especially studies well-controlled for smoking status.

  7. Early or Premature Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email updates Enter email Submit Early or premature menopause Menopause that happens before age 40 is called ... What is the difference between early and premature menopause? Early or premature menopause happens when ovaries stop ...

  8. Menopause accelerates biological aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Chen, Brian H.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E.; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D. J.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the “epigenetic clock”), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  9. Manifestations of somatic disturbances in early postmenopause in women after physiological and surgical menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninčić Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The most common secondary manifestations of menopause are clinical manifestations of estrogen deficiency. They could be early and late. The aim of this study was to compare manifestations of somatic disturbances in early postmenopause in women after physiological and surgical menopause. Methods. This prospective study included 60 women, age 41-55 years, divided into two groups: physiological (30 of them and surgically induced menopause. For every subject a special evidence list, consisting of the disease history questions, physical and gynecology examination as well as dates about physiological variables (arterial tension, height, weight, and body-mass index and laboratory examination was formed. The values of arterial blood pressure, body height, body mass, body mass index (BMI, and lipid status were determined and gynecological examinations were performed in each patient. Results. The most frequent symptoms in both groups were vasomotor ones. Headache was the more intensive sign in the group after induced menopause. Extra systolic heart excursion was a common symptom in both study groups. Arterial tension, regardless of the type of menopause, was in the physiological range. The frequent organic signs of menopause, more intensive in the group after induced menopause, were genitourinary and skin atrophy. An analysis of the BMI showed that the women in both groups were obese (BMI > 25. The lipids analysis confirmed the predomination of hyperlipoproteinemia type IIa in the group with physiologic menopause and type IIb after induced menopause. Conclusion. The dominant signs of menopausal syndrome were vasomotor and bone-joint symptoms, more frequent in the group after induced menopause. There were no statistically significant differences between the study groups according to the genitourinary atrophy and other signs of aging. Menopausal hormonal changes, regardless of the way of menopause developing, increase the risk for

  10. Menopausal Estrogen Therapy Benefits and Risks Vary by Age, WHI Analysis Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term follow-up data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) provide new information about the potential risks and benefits of hormone therapy to treat symptoms related to menopause, including its effect on breast cancer risk,

  11. Orthotopic genital sparing radical cystectomy in pre-menopausal women with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moursy, Essam ElDin S.; Eldahshoursy, Mohammed Z.; Gamal, Wael M.; Badawy, Abdelbasset A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Invasive cancer bladder is a life-threatening disease that is best treated with radical cystectomy and a suitable urinary diversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncological outcome, voiding and sexual functions after genital sparing radical cystectomy with orthotopic bladder reconstruction in pre-menopausal women with bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: 18 pre-menopausal women who underwent radical cystectomy and orthotopic urinary diversion with preservation of genital organs were included for this study. The patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically to assess their oncological outcome in addition to their voiding and sexual function. Results: Mean age of the patients was 37.8 years, and the median follow-up after surgery was 70 months. One patient was lost to follow-up at 12 months post-operatively. The surgery was completed as planned in all patients, with a mean operative time of 290 min and an average blood loss of 750 mL. 14 patients were able to void satisfactorily, being continent day and night, while four patients needed clean intermittent catheterization. Sexual life remained unchanged in 15 cases, while three patients reported dysparunea. Till the last follow-up, there was no local recurrence while distant metastases were detected in three cases, two of whom died. Conclusions: Genital sparing cystectomy is a valid option for managing carefully selected women with muscle-invasive bladder cancer with good functional and sexual outcomes. PMID:26941498

  12. Large Prospective Study of Ovarian Cancer Screening in High-risk Women: CA125 Cut-point Defined by Menopausal Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skates, Steven J.; Mai, Phuong; Horick, Nora K.; Piedmonte, Marion; Drescher, Charles W.; Isaacs, Claudine; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Buys, Saundra S.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Horowitz, Ira R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Daly, Mary B.; Domchek, Susan; Cohn, David E.; Van Le, Linda; Schorge, John O.; Newland, William; Davidson, Susan A.; Barnes, Mack; Brewster, Wendy; Azodi, Masoud; Nerenstone, Stacy; Kauff, Noah D.; Fabian, Carol J.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Nayfield, Susan G.; Kasten, Carol H.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Greene, Mark H.; Lu, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous screening trials for early detection of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women have used the standard CA125 cut-point of 35 U/mL, the 98th percentile in this population yielding a 2% false positive rate, while the same cut-point in trials of premenopausal women results in substantially higher false positive rates. We investigated demographic and clinical factors predicting CA125 distributions, including 98th percentiles, in a large population of high-risk women participating in two ovarian cancer screening studies with common eligibility criteria and screening protocols. Methods Baseline CA125 values and clinical and demographic data from 3,692 women participating in screening studies conducted by the NCI-sponsored Cancer Genetics Network and Gynecologic Oncology Group were combined for this pre-planned analysis. Due to the large effect of menopausal status on CA125 levels, statistical analyses were conducted separately in pre- and postmenopausal subjects to determine the impact of other baseline factors on predicted CA125 cut-points based on the 98th percentile. Results The primary clinical factor affecting CA125 cut-points was menopausal status, with premenopausal women having a significantly higher cut-point of 50 U/mL while in postmenopausal subjects the standard cut-point of 35 U/mL was recapitulated. In premenopausal women, current oral contraceptive (OC) users had a cut-point of 40 U/mL. Conclusions To achieve a 2% false positive rate in ovarian cancer screening trials and in high-risk women choosing to be screened, the cut-point for initial CA125 testing should be personalized primarily for menopausal status (~ 50 for premenopausal women, 40 for premenopausal on OC, 35 for postmenopausal women). PMID:21893500

  13. Menopause, postmenopausal hormone use and risk of incident gout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Hak (Liesbeth); G.C. Curhan (Gary); F. Grodstein (Francine); H.K. Choi (Hyon)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To prospectively study the relation between menopause, postmenopausal hormone use and risk of gout, since female sex hormones have been postulated to decrease gout risk among women. Methods: In the Nurses' Health Study, the association between menopause, age at menopause,

  14. Myeloperoxidase polymorphism, menopausal status, and breast cancer risk: an update meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qin

    Full Text Available Myeloperoxidase (MPO is a metabolic/oxidative lysosomal enzyme secreted by reactive neutrophils at the sites of inflamed organs and tissues during phagocytosis. MPO has been either directly or indirectly linked to neoplasia, which is a well-established risk factor for many types of cancer. A large number of studies have reported the role of MPO G-463A polymorphism regarding breast-cancer risk. However, the published findings are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine more precise estimations for the relationship. Eligible studies were identified by searching several electronic databases for relevant reports published before June 2012. According to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria, a total of five eligible studies were included in the pooled analyses. When the five eligible studies concerning MPO G-463A polymorphism were pooled into this meta-analysis, there was no evidence found for a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. We also categorized by ethnicity (Caucasian or Asian for subgroup analysis; according to this subgroup analysis, we found no significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. However, in the stratified analysis for the premenopausal group, women carrying the AA genotype were found to have a significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.94, p = 0.027. Under the recessive model, there was a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.34-0.93, p = 0.025. We conclude that MPO-G463A polymorphism might not be a good predictor of breast-cancer risk, though menopausal status modified women's risk of developing breast cancer.

  15. Feeling an Invisible Wall: The Experience of Iranian Women's Marital Relationship After Surgical Menopause: A Qualitative Content Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Om Salimeh Roudi Rasht; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Tirgari, Batool; Nayeri, Nahid Dehaghan; Rayyani, Masoud

    2018-02-16

    Sexual relationships after surgical menopause matter when talking about sex is taboo and marriage is the only justified way to meet sexual needs. In this qualitative research study, 22 surgical menopausal women shared their experiences of sexual/marital relationship after surgery through in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. Qualitative content analysis technique was used for data analysis. An overarching theme entitled "feeling an invisible wall" reflected this experience. It comprised three categories: (1) declined marital intimacy, (2) disarming, and (3) transformation of societal norms into concerns. This study proposed new contextual information about the marital relationship of Iranian women after surgical menopause that was not openly articulated before and which may be applicable for others in such contexts. Women's main concern was the emotional separation because of the sexual consequences of the surgery. Healthcare providers should be aware of women's concerns, which may alter their marital relationship. They must provide individualized care, education, and support for couples to make thoughtful decisions about rebuilding their sexual relationship. Results may also have implications for psychiatrists, sex/marital therapists, and probably clergy who have the authority to openly address this important issue to the public.

  16. Aromatherapy for managing menopausal symptoms: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiae; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2018-02-01

    Aromatherapy is often used as a complementary therapy for women's health. This systematic review aims to evaluate the therapeutic effects of aromatherapy as a management for menopausal symptoms. Eleven electronic databases will be searched from inception to February 2018. Randomized controlled trials that evaluated any type of aromatherapy against any type of control in individuals with menopausal symptoms will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and risk of bias and to extract data. This study will provide a high quality synthesis of current evidence of aromatherapy for menopausal symptoms measured with Menopause Rating Scale, the Kupperman Index, the Greene Climacteric Scale, or other validated questionnaires. The conclusion of our systematic review will provide evidence to judge whether aromatherapy is an effective intervention for patient with menopausal women. Ethical approval will not be required, given that this protocol is for a systematic review. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The review will also be disseminated electronically and in print. PROSPERO CRD42017079191.

  17. Premature Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal abnormalities are reported in. 10‑20% of cases involving X sex chromosomes.[3]. Genetic causes of premature menopause: • Examples of Chromosomal abnormalities. ‑ Turner's syndrome. ‑ Pure gonadal dysgenesis. ‑ Familial. ‑ Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 13. Metabolic. • 17 alpha‑hydroxylase deficiency.

  18. Chemotherapy-Related Amenorrhea and Menopause in Young Chinese Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis on Incidence, Risk Factors and Serum Hormone Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Giok S.; Mo, Frankie K. F.; Pang, Elizabeth; Suen, Joyce J. S.; Tang, Nelson L. S.; Lee, Kun M.; Yip, Claudia H. W.; Tam, Wing H.; Ng, Rita; Koh, Jane; Yip, Christopher C. H.; Kong, Grace W. S.; Yeo, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this prospective cross-sectional study on young premenopausal breast cancer patients, the objectives were to: determine the incidences of chemotherapy-related amenorrhea (CRA) and menopause (CRM); identify associated factors; and assess plasma levels of estradiol (E2) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) among patients who developed menopause. Methods Eligibility criteria include Chinese stage I-III breast cancer patients, premenopausal, age ≤45 at breast cancer diagnosis, having received adjuvant chemotherapy, within 3–10 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Detailed menstrual history prior to and after adjuvant treatment was taken at study entry. Patients’ background demographics, tumor characteristics and anti-cancer treatments were collected. The rates of CRA and CRM were determined. Analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with CRM. For postmenopausal patients, levels of E2 and FSH were analyzed. Results 286 patients were recruited; the median time from breast cancer diagnosis to study entry was 5.0 years. 255 patients (91.1%) developed CRA. Of these, 66.7% regained menstruation. At the time of study entry, 137 (48.9%) had developed CRM, amongst whom 84 were age ≤45. On multivariate analysis, age was the only associated factor. Among patients with CRM, the median FSH was 41.0 IU/L; this was significantly lower in those who were taking tamoxifen compared to those who were not (20.1 vs. 59.7 IU/L, p<0.0001). The E2 level was <40 pmol/L; there was no difference between those who were still on tamoxifen or not. Conclusion After adjuvant chemotherapy, the majority of young Chinese breast cancer patients developed CRA; ~50% developed CRM, with 61% at age ≤45. Age at diagnosis is the only factor associated with CRM. FSH level may be affected by tamoxifen intake. PMID:26485568

  19. Free androgen index as a determinant of arterial stiffness in menopause: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Georgiopoulos, Georgios A; Athanasouli, Fani; Armeni, Elena; Rizos, Demetrios; Augoulea, Areti; Chatzidou, Sofia; Koutli, Evangelia; Makris, Nikolaos; Kanakakis, Ioannis; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon

    2017-06-01

    Associations of endogenous androgens in menopause with blood pressure (BP) and indices of arterial stiffness are reported, but directional relationships are not clear. Structural equation modeling is a contemporary statistical method, which allows assessment of such relationships and improves pathway understanding. We recruited 411 consecutive apparently healthy postmenopausal women who underwent noninvasive vascular evaluation. This included pulse wave analysis (aortic pressures and arterial wave reflections [augmentation index]), measurement of aortic stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV), stiffness index (SI), and flow-mediated dilatation. A cumulative marker combining PWV and SI (combined local and aortic arterial stiffness [CAS]) was also assessed. Free androgen index (FAI) was calculated from circulating total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin. FAI was an independent determinant of systolic BP (SBP) (P = 0.032), SI (P = 0.042), and PWV (P = 0.027). Under structural equation modeling analysis, FAI was a direct predictor for PWV (beta = 0.149, P = 0.014), SI (beta = 0.154, P = 0.022), and CAS (beta = 0.193, P = 0.02), whereas SBP was a parallel mediator of androgen's vascular effects on PWV (beta = 0.280, P determinant of augmentation index. In healthy postmenopausal women, FAI was directly associated with PWV, SI, and CAS. FAI also directly correlated with SBP, which in turn concurrently increased PWV and CAS. The directional correlations found herein, imply that endogenous androgens may be causally associated with indices of arterial stiffness both directly and indirectly. This hypothesis should be confirmed in further studies with causal design.

  20. Analysis of lipid status, body mass index and waist-hip ratio in post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Mešalić

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Menopause is the absence of menses in the period longer that one year. It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profi le. The aim of this study wasto analyze the infl uence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and also the influence of body mass index (BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR on lipid profi le in post-menopausal women.Methods: Sixty post-menopausal women of average age of 52.82 years were compared to a group of 34 pre-menopausal women average age of 47.92 years.Results: Post-menopausal women had higher, but non signifi cant (p>0.05 concentrations of total cholesterol, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, low density lipoproteins (LDL and triglycerides than pre-menopausal women. The concentration of high density lipoproteins (HDL was significantly lower in post-menopausal women than pre-menopausal (pbut without signifi cance (p>0.05. There was no difference between body mass index (BMI and waste-hip ratio (WHR, but the WHR has shown as a signifi cant predictor of the LDL and cholesterol concentrations inpost-menopausal women.Conclusion: We can conclude that menopause leads to changes in lipid profi le by lowering of HDL and increasing the levels of apolipoprotein B, that increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. The WHR is thesignifi cant predictor of cardiovascular risk in post-menopausal women.

  1. The effects of yoga and self-esteem on menopausal symptoms and quality of life in breast cancer survivors-A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Anna K; Rabsilber, Sybille; Lauche, Romy; Kümmel, Sherko; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost; Cramer, Holger

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has found that yoga can enhance quality of life and ease menopausal symptoms of breast cancer survivors. The study examined whether self-esteem mediated the effects of yoga on quality of life, fatigue and menopausal symptoms, utilizing validated outcome measures. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga with those of usual care in 40 breast cancer survivors who suffered from menopausal symptoms. All participants completed all 3 assessments (week 0, week 12, and week 24) and provided full data. Outcomes were measured using self-rating instruments. Mediation analyses were performed using SPSS. Self-esteem mediated the effect of yoga on total menopausal symptoms (B=-2.11, 95% BCI [-5.40 to -0.37]), psychological menopausal symptoms (B=-0.94, 95% BCI [-2.30 to -0.01]), and urogenital menopausal symptoms (B=-0.66, 95% BCI [-1.65 to -0.15]), quality of life (B=8.04, 95% BCI [3.15-17.03]), social well-being (B=1.80, 95% BCI [0.54-4.21]), emotional well-being (B=1.62, 95% BCI [0.70-3.34]), functional well-being (B=1.84, 95% BCI [0.59-4.13]), and fatigue (B=4.34, 95% BCI [1.28-9.55]). Self-esteem had no effect on somatovegetative menopausal symptoms (B=-0.50, 95% BCI n.s.) or on physical well-being (B=0.79, 95% BCI n.s.). Findings support the assumption that self-esteem plays a vital role in the beneficial effect of yoga and that yoga can have long-term benefits for women diagnosed with breast cancer and undergoing menopausal transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Endometrial response to IVF hormonal manipulation: Comparative analysis of menopausal, down regulated and natural cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayer Nalini

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine luminal epithelial cell response to different hormonal strategies was examined to determine commonality when an endometrium attains a receptive, stimulated, morphological profile that may lead to successful implantation. Methods Endometrial biopsies from 3 cohorts of patients were compared. The tissue samples taken from these patients were categorized into 8 different groups according to their baseline and the hormone regime used. Results Pre-treatment natural cycle tissue was variable in appearance. Downregulation with a GnRH analogue tissue appeared menopausal in character. HRT after downregulation resulted in tissue uniformity. HRT in menopause resulted in a 'lush' epithelial surface. HST in the natural cycle improved the morphology with significant difference in secretion between the two regimes examined. Conclusions Down regulation plus HRT standardized surface appearance but tissue response is significantly different from the natural cycle, natural cycle plus HRT or menopause plus HRT. HRT in menopause reinstates tissue to a state similar to a natural cycle but significantly different from a natural cycle plus HST. HST with a natural cycle is similar to tissue from the natural cycle but significant differences reflect the influence of the particular hormones present (at any point within the cycle.

  3. Endometrial response to IVF hormonal manipulation: Comparative analysis of menopausal, down regulated and natural cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan M; Terry, Vera; Hosie, Margot J; Gayer, Nalini; Murphy, Christopher R

    2004-01-01

    Background Uterine luminal epithelial cell response to different hormonal strategies was examined to determine commonality when an endometrium attains a receptive, stimulated, morphological profile that may lead to successful implantation. Methods Endometrial biopsies from 3 cohorts of patients were compared. The tissue samples taken from these patients were categorized into 8 different groups according to their baseline and the hormone regime used. Results Pre-treatment natural cycle tissue was variable in appearance. Downregulation with a GnRH analogue tissue appeared menopausal in character. HRT after downregulation resulted in tissue uniformity. HRT in menopause resulted in a 'lush' epithelial surface. HST in the natural cycle improved the morphology with significant difference in secretion between the two regimes examined. Conclusions Down regulation plus HRT standardized surface appearance but tissue response is significantly different from the natural cycle, natural cycle plus HRT or menopause plus HRT. HRT in menopause reinstates tissue to a state similar to a natural cycle but significantly different from a natural cycle plus HST. HST with a natural cycle is similar to tissue from the natural cycle but significant differences reflect the influence of the particular hormones present (at any point) within the cycle. PMID:15117407

  4. Menopause and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links ...

  5. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premature menopause; Ovarian insufficiency - cancer ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  6. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  7. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video Series-2016 Video Series-2017 Commercial Supporters Advertise in Menopause NAMS Corporate Liaison Council Outreach Opportunities ... menopause source Menopause Guidebook Sexual Health Module MenoPro Mobile App Hormone Therapy MenoNote NAMS Video Series Homepage ...

  8. Managing menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert; Abramson, Beth L; Blake, Jennifer; Desindes, Sophie; Dodin, Sylvie; Johnston, Shawna; Rowe, Timothy; Sodhi, Namrita; Wilks, Penny; Wolfman, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    To provide updated guidelines for health care providers on the management of menopause in asymptomatic healthy women as well as in women presenting with vasomotor or urogenital symptoms and on considerations related to cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, urogynaecology, and sexuality. Lifestyle interventions, prescription medications, and complementary and alternative therapies are presented according to their efficacy in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Counselling and therapeutic strategies for sexuality concerns in the peri- and postmenopausal years are reviewed. Approaches to the identification and evaluation of women at high risk of osteoporosis, along with options for prevention and treatment, are presented in the companion osteoporosis guideline. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library in August and September 2012 with the use of appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., hormone therapy, menopause, cardiovascular diseases, and sexual function) and key words (e.g., hormone therapy, perimenopause, heart disease, and sexuality). Results were restricted to clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Results were limited to publication dates of 2009 onwards and to material in English or French. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline until January 5, 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, and clinical practice guideline collections.

  9. Misoprostol prior to hysteroscopy in premenopausal and post-menopausal women. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzos, N P; Zavos, A; Valachis, A; Dragamestianos, C; Blockeel, C; Stoop, D; Papanikolaou, E G; Tournaye, H; Devroey, P; Messinis, I E

    2012-07-01

    Although several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have examined the effect of misoprostol prior to hysteroscopy for cervical dilatation, no solid conclusion has been reached. We therefore set out to perform a meta-analysis of RCTs. We searched MEDLINE, the ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane Library to identify RCTs comparing misoprostol versus placebo or control prior to hysteroscopy. No restrictions on language or time were applied. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for all dichotomous outcomes, whereas mean differences (MDs) and 95% CIs were calculated for continuous outcomes using the Mantel-Haenszel or DerSimonian-Laird model according to the heterogeneity. Of the initial 141 potentially relevant articles that were retrieved, 21 RCTs involving 1786 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Subgroup analyses were performed according to menopausal status and according to whether diagnostic or operative hysteroscopy was performed. Premenopausal women treated with misoprostol had a significantly lower risk for further cervical dilatation in the diagnostic setting [RR (95% CI): 0.56 (0.34-0.92)] and a significantly lower risk for cervical laceration in the operative setting [RR (95% CI): 0.22 (0.09-0.54)], compared with placebo. In contrast, post-menopausal patients did not experience any clear benefit from misoprostol compared with placebo regarding the need for further cervical dilatation [RR (95% CI): 0.99 (0.76-1.30)] and the cervical laceration rate [RR (95% CI): 1.15 (0.40-3.29)]. In addition, the mean cervical width prior to hysteroscopy was significantly higher in premenopausal women treated with misoprostol compared with placebo [MD (95% CI): 2.47 mm (1.81-3.13)] but did not differ among post-menopausal patients [MD (95% CI): 0.39 mm (-0.42 to 1.21)]. Misoprostol prior to hysteroscopy appears to facilitate an easier and uncomplicated procedure only in premenopausal women.

  10. Analysis of lipid status, body mass index and waist-hip ratio in post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Mešalić

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Menopause is the absence of menses in the period longer that one year. It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profi le. The aim of this study wasto analyze the infl uence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and also the influence of body mass index (BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR on lipid profi le in post-menopausal women.Methods: Sixty post-menopausal women of average age of 52.82 years were compared to a group of 34 pre-menopausal women average age of 47.92 years.Results: Post-menopausal women had higher, but non signifi cant (p>0.05 concentrations of total cholesterol, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, low density lipoproteins (LDL and triglycerides than pre-menopausal women. The concentration of high density lipoproteins (HDL was significantly lower in post-menopausal women than pre-menopausal (p<0.05. The concentration of apolipoprotein B was also signifi cantly higher in post-menopausal women (p<0.05, but the concentrations of apolipoprotein and lipoprotein (a were lowerbut without signifi cance (p>0.05. There was no difference between body mass index (BMI and waste-hip ratio (WHR, but the WHR has shown as a signifi cant predictor of the LDL and cholesterol concentrations inpost-menopausal women.Conclusion: We can conclude that menopause leads to changes in lipid profi le by lowering of HDL and increasing the levels of apolipoprotein B, that increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. The WHR is thesignifi cant predictor of cardiovascular risk in post-menopausal women.

  11. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6663) • Hormone Health Network information about menopause —— www.hormone.org/Menopause —— www.hormone.org/MenopauseMap • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of ... in Spanish at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  12. Effect of Estradiol valerate plus dienogest on body composition of healthy women in the menopausal transition: a prospective one-year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Anna Maria; Lello, Stefano; Di Carlo, Costantino; Orrù, Marisa; Malune, Maria Elena; Neri, Manuela; Pilloni, Monica; Zedda, Pierina; D'Alterio, Maurizio Nicola; Motzo, Costantino; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In the menopausal transition (MT), combined oral contraceptive (COC) should be chosen accordingly to its neutrality on liver metabolism and to its ability to counter the increase of fat mass (FM) that occurs in this reproductive period of life. This prospective multi-centric observational study was conducted on 36 women in their MT at the Universities of Cagliari, Modena and Naples. The body weight (BW), the Body Mass Index (BMI), the waist to hip ratio (WHR), the measurement of body composition (BC) with the Multi-frequency Bioelectrical Impedance (MF-BIA) were performed before, at the 6th and at the 12th month of the study in which a group of women (control group; N.18) did not assume COC, whereas the other 18 women assumed the four-phasic COC containing estradiol valerate (EV) associated with dienogest (EV/DNG group). In comparison to controls in the EV/DNG group, a significant decrease (p < 0.05) of BW (58.8 ± 7.6 to 57.3 ± 7.0), BMI (24.1 ± 2.7 to 23.5 ± 2.8), WHR (0.82 ± 0.052 to 0.79 ± 0.048) and FM (17.7 ± 5.4 to 16.4 ± 5.6) was observed. In controls, FM significantly increased (17.0 ± 11 to 17.7 ± 2.7; p < 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that the anti-androgenic and progestinic activities of DNG associated with a weak estrogenic activity of EV, is a contraceptive method capable of counteracting the negative changes of BC occurring in the MT.

  13. Association between Soy Isoflavone Intake and Breast Cancer Risk for Pre- and Post-Menopausal Women: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Wei, Shiqing; Li, Ye; Guo, Tong; Yin, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Conclusions drawn from meta-analyses on the association between soy isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk for pre- and post-menopausal women are not fully consistent. These meta-analyses did not explore the influence of different study designs on the pooled results on the basis of distinguishing between pre- and post-menopausal women. Methodology and Principal Findings We performed a meta-analysis of 35 studies which reported results of association between soy isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk for pre- and/or post-menopausal women, calculated pooled odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals of pre- and post-menopausal women respectively, and further explored soy isoflavone-breast cancer association on the basis of considering different study regions and designs. Summary results suggested that soy isoflavone intake has a protective effect against breast cancer for both pre- and post-menopausal women. However, they are influenced by study design and region. Pooled ORs of studies carried out in Asian countries suggested that soy isoflavone’s protective effect exist in both pre- and post-menopausal women (OR = 0.59, 95%CI: 0.48–0.69 for premenopausal women; OR = 0.59, 95%CI: 0.44–0.74 for postmenopausal women). However, there are some differences between the results pooled from different study designs for women in Asian countries (test for consistency, P = 0.04). Pooled OR of studies on postmenopausal women in Western countries suggested that soy isoflavone intake has a marginally significant protective effect (OR = 0.92; 95%CI: 0.83∼1.00), but further analyses stratifying by study design found no statistically significant association. Conclusions We meta-analyzed more and newer research results, and separated women according to menopausal status to explore soy isoflavone-breast cancer association. We founded that soy isoflavone intake could lower the risk of breast cancer for both pre- and post-menopausal women in

  14. Coffee Intake Decreases Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis on Prospective Cohort Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lafranconi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A dose-response meta-analysis was conducted in order to summarize the evidence from prospective cohort studies regarding the association between coffee intake and breast cancer risk. Methods: A systematic search was performed in electronic databases up to March 2017 to identify relevant studies; risk estimates were retrieved from the studies and linear and non-linear dose-response analysis modelled by restricted cubic splines was conducted. A stratified and subgroup analysis by menopausal and estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR status, smoking status and body mass index (BMI were performed in order to detect potential confounders. Results: A total of 21 prospective studies were selected either for dose-response, the highest versus lowest category of consumption or subgroup analysis. The dose-response analysis of 13 prospective studies showed no significant association between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk in the non-linear model. However, an inverse relationship has been found when the analysis was restricted to post-menopausal women. Consumption of four cups of coffee per day was associated with a 10% reduction in postmenopausal cancer risk (relative risk, RR 0.90; 95% confidence interval, CI 0.82 to 0.99. Subgroup analyses showed consistent results for all potential confounding factors examined. Conclusions: Findings from this meta-analysis may support the hypothesis that coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

  15. Age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Hautaniemi, Susan I

    2003-04-01

    Comparisons of age at menopause are made difficult by the different methodologies applied across populations. This study extended an opportunity to apply different methodologies to the same data to draw some preliminary conclusions about age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico. Among 755 women aged 28 to 70 interviewed in the capital city of Puebla, Mexico, 447 (59.6%) were naturally or surgically postmenopausal. Mean recalled age at natural menopause in Puebla (46.7 years) appears to be similar to mean recalled age at menopause in Mexico City (46.5 years), suggesting that age at menopause is similar in urban Mexican populations. However, median age at menopause computed by probit analysis was later in the city of Puebla (49.6 years) compared to the median age computed by the same method in the capital city of León, Guanajuato, Mexico (48.2 years). Median age at menopause computed by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis suggests that age at menopause in Puebla (50.0 years) is older still, and close to that of the United States (51.1 years). The differences in median ages at menopause in Puebla are solely due to methodological choices and highlight the difficulty inherent in making inferences across studies of age at menopause between biological and/or cultural groups. Factors associated with age at menopause offer another avenue for comparing and understanding variation in this basic biological process. In Puebla, smoking, low levels of education, and nulliparity are associated with an earlier age at menopause.

  16. Exploration of changes in disability after menopause in a longitudinal multiple sclerosis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Riley; Healy, Brian C; Musallam, Alexander; Glanz, Bonnie I; De Jager, Philip L; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-06-01

    Onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is typically in early adulthood. The impact, if any, of menopause on the MS course is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether menopause is associated with changes in MS severity in a longitudinal clinical cohort. Responses from an ongoing reproductive questionnaire deployed in all active female CLIMB observational study participants with a diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or MS were analyzed when the response rate was 60%. Reproductive data were linked with clinical severity measures that were prospectively collected every six months, including our primary measure, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Over one-half of the respondents (368 of 724 women) were postmenopausal. Median age at natural menopause was 51.5 years. In our primary analysis of 124 women who were followed longitudinally (mean duration 10.4 years) through their menopausal transition (natural or surgical), menopause represented an inflection point in their EDSS changes (difference of 0.076 units; 95% CI 0.010-0.14; p = 0.024). These findings were not explained by vitamin D levels, nor changes in treatment or smoking status over this period. There was no effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) exposure, but HRT use was low. We observed a possible worsening of MS disability after menopause. Larger cohorts are required to assess any HRT effects. © The Author(s), 2015.

  17. Association of alcohol consumption with the onset of natural menopause : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taneri, Petek Eylul; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Bramer, Wichor M.; Daan, Nadine M P; Franco, Oscar H.; Muka, Taulant

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early onset of menopause is associated with long-term health risks, including cardiovascular disease and premature death. Although alcohol intake has been suggested to affect the age at which natural menopause occurs, results from observational studies are not consistent. Objective and

  18. Sexual Health and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MenoNotes MenoPro Mobile App MenoPause Blog Sexual Health & Menopause Online Changes at Midlife How to Navigate This Online Resource ... on the left. We start by reviewing midlife changes related to menopause and aging. We then discuss common sexual problems ...

  19. Exercise through Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  20. Testing evolutionary theories of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Daryl P; Sear, Rebecca; Mace, Ruth; Kirkwood, Thomas B L

    2007-12-07

    Why do women cease fertility rather abruptly through menopause at an age well before generalized senescence renders child rearing biologically impossible? The two main evolutionary hypotheses are that menopause serves either (i) to protect mothers from rising age-specific maternal mortality risks, thereby protecting their highly dependent younger children from death if the mother dies or (ii) to provide post-reproductive grandmothers who enhance their inclusive fitness by helping to care and provide for their daughters' children. Recent theoretical work indicates that both factors together are necessary if menopause is to provide an evolutionary advantage. However, these ideas need to be tested using detailed data from actual human life histories lived under reasonably 'natural' conditions; for obvious reasons, such data are extremely scarce. We here describe a study based on a remarkably complete dataset from The Gambia. The data provided quantitative estimates for key parameters for the theoretical model, which were then used to assess the actual effects on fitness. Empirically based numerical analysis of this nature is essential if the enigma of menopause is to be explained satisfactorily in evolutionary terms. Our results point to the distinctive (and perhaps unique) role of menopause in human evolution and provide important support for the hypothesized evolutionary significance of grandmothers.

  1. Distress During the Menopause Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianna Nosek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, nearly 400 million women worldwide were of menopause age (45-54. Although many women transition through menopause with ease, some experience distress and a subsequent decrease in quality of life. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of distress in women during the menopause transition. A narrative analysis methodology was used maintaining participants’ complete narratives when possible. In-person interviews of 15 midlife women were digitally audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Women shared narratives of distress related to menstrual changes, emotional instability, vaginal dryness, and decreased libido affected by their relationships with self, partners, work, and family. Some experiences were presented against a backdrop of the past and influenced by concerns for the future. Detailed stories illuminated the effect that distressful symptoms had on quality of life and captured how intricately woven symptoms were with the women’s interpersonal and social lives.

  2. Obesity and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Polotsky, Alex J

    2015-05-01

    Over the recent decades, the prevalence of obesity in the United States has increased to epidemic proportions to more than 35% of adults, along with an increased risk of a number of health conditions, including hypertension, adverse lipid concentrations, and type 2 diabetes. The relationships between menopausal transition, weight gain, and obesity are reported but incompletely understood. The association between menopause and these measures has been the subject of many studies, along with examining their effect on reproductive hormones and menopausal symptoms. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is published in the literature on this subject and examine it through: (1) the possible impact of obesity on the timing of menopause; (2) the effect of obesity on menopausal symptoms and reproductive hormones around the time of menopause; and (3) the effect of menopause on obesity, weight gain, and body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships: an international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hsin-Fang; Pandeya, Nirmala; Dobson, Annette J; Kuh, Diana; Brunner, Eric J; Crawford, Sybil L; Avis, Nancy E; Gold, Ellen B; Mitchell, Ellen S; Woods, Nancy F; Bromberger, Joyce T; Thurston, Rebecca C; Joffe, Hadine; Yoshizawa, Toyoko; Anderson, Debra; Mishra, Gita D

    2018-02-12

    Many women experience both vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS) and depressed mood at midlife, but little is known regarding the prospective bi-directional relationships between VMS and depressed mood and the role of sleep difficulties in both directions. A pooled analysis was conducted using data from 21 312 women (median: 50 years, interquartile range 49-51) in eight studies from the InterLACE consortium. The degree of VMS, sleep difficulties, and depressed mood was self-reported and categorised as never, rarely, sometimes, and often (if reporting frequency) or never, mild, moderate, and severe (if reporting severity). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the bi-directional associations adjusted for within-study correlation. At baseline, the prevalence of VMS (40%, range 13-62%) and depressed mood (26%, 8-41%) varied substantially across studies, and a strong dose-dependent association between VMS and likelihood of depressed mood was found. Over 3 years of follow-up, women with often/severe VMS at baseline were more likely to have subsequent depressed mood compared with those without VMS (odds ratios (OR) 1.56, 1.27-1.92). Women with often/severe depressed mood at baseline were also more likely to have subsequent VMS than those without depressed mood (OR 1.89, 1.47-2.44). With further adjustment for the degree of sleep difficulties at baseline, the OR of having a subsequent depressed mood associated with often/severe VMS was attenuated and no longer significant (OR 1.13, 0.90-1.40). Conversely, often/severe depressed mood remained significantly associated with subsequent VMS (OR 1.80, 1.38-2.34). Difficulty in sleeping largely explained the relationship between VMS and subsequent depressed mood, but it had little impact on the relationship between depressed mood and subsequent VMS.

  4. Consumption of low-fat dairy products may delay natural menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carwile, Jenny L; Willett, Walter C; Michels, Karin B

    2013-10-01

    Later menopause is a risk factor for breast and endometrial cancer, yet few studies have investigated dietary predictors of this potentially modifiable event. In particular, dairy contains hormones and growth factors that could potentially affect menopausal timing. We therefore assessed the association between regular consumption of dairy foods and related nutrients and age at natural menopause. We conducted a prospective analysis with up to 20 y of follow-up in 46,059 participants in the Nurses' Health Study who were premenopausal in 1980. We observed 30,816 events of natural menopause over 401,754 person-years. In the total population, the estimated mean age at natural menopause was 51.5 y for women who consumed no low-fat dairy and 51.5, 51.6, 51.7, and 51.8 y for women who consumed 0.1-1.0, 1.1-2.0, 2.1-3.0, and >3 servings of low-fat dairy daily, respectively. Premenopausal women 3 servings of low-fat dairy per day were 14% less likely (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.96; P-trend menopause in the next month relative to those consuming 0.1-1 servings/d. Similar results were obtained for skim milk (for >6 servings/wk vs. 0-1 servings/mo: HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.97; P-trend menopause among women ≥51 y of age. These findings support the growing body of literature on the hormonally active nature of milk and dairy foods.

  5. Consumption of Low-Fat Dairy Products May Delay Natural Menopause123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carwile, Jenny L.; Willett, Walter C.; Michels, Karin B.

    2013-01-01

    Later menopause is a risk factor for breast and endometrial cancer, yet few studies have investigated dietary predictors of this potentially modifiable event. In particular, dairy contains hormones and growth factors that could potentially affect menopausal timing. We therefore assessed the association between regular consumption of dairy foods and related nutrients and age at natural menopause. We conducted a prospective analysis with up to 20 y of follow-up in 46,059 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who were premenopausal in 1980. We observed 30,816 events of natural menopause over 401,754 person-years. In the total population, the estimated mean age at natural menopause was 51.5 y for women who consumed no low-fat dairy and 51.5, 51.6, 51.7, and 51.8 y for women who consumed 0.1–1.0, 1.1–2.0, 2.1–3.0, and >3 servings of low-fat dairy daily, respectively. Premenopausal women 3 servings of low-fat dairy per day were 14% less likely (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.96; P-trend menopause in the next month relative to those consuming 0.1–1 servings/d. Similar results were obtained for skim milk (for >6 servings/wk vs. 0–1 servings/mo: HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.97; P-trend menopause among women ≥51 y of age. These findings support the growing body of literature on the hormonally active nature of milk and dairy foods. PMID:23946341

  6. The Menopause Time of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet examines menopause and the changes associated with it. Menopause is briefly described, surgical menopause is explained, and the relationship between menopause and the reproductive cycle is discussed. Signs of menopause are described, including hot flashes and vaginal and urinary tract changes. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is explained…

  7. Prospective analysis. Nuclear deterrence in 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, B.

    2006-12-01

    This study is a prospective analysis of the long-term future of nuclear weapons, and particularly the future of French nuclear deterrence after 2015. The selected time period is 2025-2030. The principal objective is to reflect on what the nuclear world might look like during the first part of the 21 st century, beyond the modernization decisions already planned or envisaged, and to draw conclusions for the future of the French deterrent. (author)

  8. The influence of unilateral oophorectomy on the age of menopause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, M; Simonsen, M K; Kjer, J J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the age of menopause after premenopausal unilateral oophorectomy (UO) and to establish whether UO at a young age leads to menopause at a younger age than if UO occurs at an older age. METHODS: A cohort of 28 731 women, of whom 17 781 (62%) were menopausal, was investigated....... Information on menopause was obtained from self-reported questionnaires. Surgical data were obtained from the National Patient Register to avoid recollection bias. Age of menopause after UO/not UO was determined using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox regression was used to identify factors of importance for early...... menopause. RESULTS: UO was performed in 1148 women. Women with UO after the age of 45 years, premenopausal hysterectomy, bilateral oophorectomy and cancer were excluded, leaving 236 in the analysis. Menopause occurred 1.8 years earlier after UO compared to women with two intact ovaries (mean 49.5 vs. 51...

  9. [Lifestyles and quality of life of post menopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alegría, Fanny; De Lorenzi, Dino Roberto Soares

    2011-05-01

    During menopause the quality of life of women can be seriously deteriorated and influenced by lifestyles. To assess the prevalence of menopausal symptoms and their relationship with lifestyles and quality of life. The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), a survey that measures menopausal symptoms and has questions related to lifestyles, was applied to 1023 women aged 54 ± 6 years (range 45 to 64 years), consulting in primary health care clinics. A multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between menopausal symptoms and lifestyle. Fifty six percent of women did not have a paid work, 64% were nonsmokers and 90% did not perform any physical exercise. The most frequent menopausal symptoms referred were muscle and joint ailments (85%) followed by mental and physical exhaustion (80%). Sedentary women, smokers or those who did not to have time for leisure activities showed worst quality of life scores. Postmenopausal women with unhealthy lifestyles had the lower quality of life scores and more menopausal symptoms.

  10. Application of Behavioral Analysis Phase of PRECEDE Model on Women’s Psychological Well-being in the Menopausal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Moshki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims Positive psychology introduce mental health as a positive psychological functioning and represent it as wellbeing psychology and having positive characteristics such as self-esteem, positive social relationships, and life satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychological wellbeing of postmenopausal women based on the behavioral analysis phase of PRECEDE model. Materials and Methods This study is a cross-sectional survey and carried out through random sampling in the case of 110 postmenopausal women at Ferdows city, Iran in 2014. The psychological wellbeing variable was studied by Ryff test, including 84 questions and six components containing autonomy, purposeful in life, dominance on environment, personal development, positive relationships with others, and self-acceptance. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS v.20 using descriptive statistics and analytic statistics through correlation and ANOVA. Results The mean age of participants and the average number of their children were 51.62 ± 4.26 and 3.42 ± 1.38, respectively. 61.80 percent of participants had primary education. Pearson correlation test indicated a positive and significant relationship between psychological wellbeing and predisposing factors (knowledge, attitude toward menopause, environmentalbehavioral factors, enabling factors and reinforcing factors (P < 0.01. Conclusion The results indicated that increasing awareness, creating positive attitude and promoting healthy behaviors are the effective steps to improve the psychological wellbeing in postmenopausal women. * Corresponding Author: Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Public Health. Email: Fpf357@gmail.com

  11. "Is it menopause or bipolar?": a qualitative study of the experience of menopause for women with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perich, Tania; Ussher, Jane; Parton, Chloe

    2017-11-16

    Menopause can be a time of change for women and may be marked by disturbances in mood. For women living with a mental illness, such as bipolar disorder, little is known about how they experience mood changes during menopause. This study aimed to explore how women with bipolar disorder constructed mood changes during menopause and how this impacted on treatment decisions. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with fifteen women who reported they had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Data was analysed using thematic analysis guided by a social constructionist framework. Themes identified included 'Constructions of mood change: menopause or bipolar disorder?',' Life events, bipolar disorder and menopause coming together'; 'Treatment choices for mood change during menopause'. The accounts suggested that women related to the experience of mood changes during menopause through the lens of their existing framework of bipolar disorder, with implications for understanding of self and treatment choices.

  12. Menopause in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Kavitha; Hou, Susan

    2018-03-09

    Most women with dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 (CKD stage 5D) are in the postmenopausal age group. Early menopause is reported for all CKD stages (stages 3-5D). The traditional definition of menopause is not applicable in CKD stage 5(D) because menses can resume with hormone replacement therapy or kidney transplantation. Treatment of vasomotor symptoms continues to be the primary indication for hormone replacement therapy, with no dosing studies done specifically for CKD or kidney transplantation populations. Similarly, the risk for cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in menopause is well described in healthy women, but the role that menopause plays in accelerating the risk further in CKD/kidney transplantation is yet to be explored. Lack of data and specific guidance on management make the long-term effects of menopause one of the most under-recognized and neglected patient problems in clinical nephrology. The efficacy and side effects of widely available therapeutic options in healthy women for menopause-related clinical manifestations, be it hormone replacement therapy for vasomotor symptoms or antiresorptive agents for osteoporosis, are to be tested in kidney transplantation and CKD populations. Longitudinal clinical trials are in need to define menopause in CKD and determine the role that CKD plays in menopause transition and menopause on CKD manifestations. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Herbal Treatment in Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Gun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The digest has been prepared to review available clinical evidence on herbs used in treatment of menopause symptoms. Effectiveness of Humulus lupulus, Vitex agnus-castus, Dioskorea vilosa, Linum usitatissimum, Pinus pinaster, cruciferous vegetables, Cimicifuga racemosa L., Angelica sinensis, Oenothera biennis L., Hypericum perforatum L., Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, Glycine soja, Trifolium pratense and Piper methysticum herbs were assessed for treatment of menopausal symptoms in the studies. Herbs used as alternative supplementary treatment for menopause symptoms have been found to have a limited effect. Thus more studies are warranted to assess effectiveness of herbal treatments for menopausal symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 520-530

  14. Dermatosis associated with menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya A Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is defined as permanent irreversible cessation of menses brought by decline in ovarian follicular activity. Hormonal alteration results in various physical, psychological, and sexual changes in menopausal women. Associated dermatological problems can be classified as physiological changes, age-related changes, changes due to estrogen deficiency and due to hormone replacement therapy. Dermatosis seen due to estrogen deficiency includes Atrophic Vulvovaginitis, Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus, Dyaesthetic Vulvodynia, Hirsutism, Alopecia, Menopausal Flushing, Keratoderma Climactericum, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis. Dermatologists and gynecologists need to be familiar with the problems of menopausal women, as with increase in life expectancy, women passing through this phase is rising.

  15. The Menopausal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Janice L

    2017-06-01

    A clear understanding of the physiology of the menopausal transition, clinical symptoms, and physical changes is essential for individualized patient management, maximizing benefits and minimizing risks for the present and the future. Menopause, defined by amenorrhea for 12 consecutive months, is determined retrospectively and represents a permanent end to menses. Many physical changes occur during the menopausal transition and beyond. Knowledge of symptoms and findings experienced by women undergoing the menopausal transition allow individualized care- improving quality of life and enhancing wellbeing for years to come. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Skin disorders during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gleison V; Trigo, Ana Cm; Paim de Oliveira, Mária de Fátima

    2016-02-01

    Menopause is the cessation of menstrual periods due to the loss of ovarian function. Among the various phases of a woman's life, menopause has the greatest impact on health and has been one of the most neglected areas of research. Hormonal changes caused by menopause can lead to problems in the skin and its annexes, and despite the high frequency of dermatologic signs and symptoms, studies on this topic are limited. In this article, we review the skin disorders that result from the hormonal changes of menopause and other common dermatoses observed during this period and assess possible therapeutic approaches.

  17. Metabolic disorders in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance - IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus - T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  18. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  19. Hydrothermal Ni Prospectivity Analysis of Tasmania, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Alvarez, I.; Porwal, A.; McCuaig, T. C.; Maier, W.

    2009-04-01

    Tasmania contains the largest hydrothermal Ni deposit in Australia: Avebury (118,000 Ni metal tonnes). This Devonian deposit was discovered in 1998 in the Dundas geological region, and consists of a system of hydrothermal Ni ore bodies. They are hosted by an intensely altered and serpentinized Cambrian ultramafic suite in close proximity to major structural features. The mineralization is considered to be the result of hydrothermal scavenging and remobilization of the original nickel content of mafic/ultramafic rocks in the area, and subsequent re-deposition in favourable structural traps. This is based on the low sulphur, low Cu and Platinum element content of the mineralization. The mineralization is spatially (at the edge) and temporally related to a large granitic intrusion, the Heemskirk Granite, which is considered to be the source of the hydrothermal fluids as well as the necessary thermal gradients for the circulation of the fluids. Tasmania is largely covered by the Jurassic Ferrar continental flood basalt province in the East and constrains a number of early Cambrian ultramafic-mafic complexes in the West. The Ferrar large igneous province (LIP) extends over to Antarctica and is temporally and genetically related to the Karoo igneous province in southern Africa that comprises tholeiitic lava flows, sills, and dyke swarms. The Ferrar and Karoo igneous provinces were associated with the same thermal anomaly that was responsible for the break up of eastern Gondwana at ca 180 Ma. Despite of timeframe differences between the Avebury Ni deposits and the Ferrar LIP emplacement, similar geological settings to the Avebury could be duplicated along the Ferrar LIP. The presence of mafic/ultramafic rocks in favourable lithological packages and/or structural traps along the margins of the province indicate that this LIP could represent a possible exploration target for Ni hydrothermal deposits. Based on this background, a prospectivity analysis for hydrothermal Ni

  20. The effects of perceived stress and attitudes toward menopause and aging on symptoms of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Marcianna; Kennedy, Holly Powell; Beyene, Yewoubdar; Taylor, Diana; Gilliss, Catherine; Lee, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study of midlife women, the aim of this investigation was to describe the intensity of menopausal symptoms in relation to the level of perceived stress in a woman's life and her attitudes toward menopause and aging. Data were collected on 347 women between 40 and 50 years of age in Northern California who began the study while premenopausal. Women self-identified as African American, European American, or Mexican/Central American. Data collected over three time points in the first 12 months were used for this analysis. An investigator-developed tool for the perception of specific types of stress was used. Attitudes toward menopause and aging were measured using the Attitudes Toward Menopause and Attitude Toward Aging scales. Attitudes toward aging and menopause, perceived stress, and income were related to intensity of symptoms. There was no ethnic group difference in perceived stress or attitude toward menopause. However, European and African Americans had a more positive attitude toward aging than Mexican/Central Americans. A lower income, higher perceived stress, a more negative attitude toward aging, and a more positive attitude toward menopause influenced menopausal symptom experience. Copyright 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Defining menopause status: creation of a new definition to identify the early changes of the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Clarisa R; Sammel, Mary D; Freeman, Ellen W; Lin, Hui; Langan, Elizabeth; Kapoor, Shiv; Nelson, Deborah B

    2005-03-01

    Several menopausal staging definitions are currently being used in ongoing studies designed to identify changes occurring during menopause. The objective of this study was to determine which definition captures the earliest hormonal changes in the menopausal transition. In this prospective cohort study, women aged 35 to 47 years were followed for 5 years. Women were classified as premenopausal, early transition, late transition, and postmenopausal by 2 different menopausal staging systems defined by bleeding patterns. Definitions from the Study of Women Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop (STRAW) were compared. A new menopausal staging system (PENN-5) was also developed with five groups rather than four to distinguish among women with more subtle changes in cycle length. For each staging system, a linear regression model was created comparing mean hormone values (inhibin B, FSH, LH, E2) and menopausal stages at each assessment. Race, body mass index, cycle day, smoking, and follow-up time were included in the model. Statistically significant differences in mean inhibin B and FSH levels, but not estradiol levels, were detected between the earliest menopausal stages of each definition. Significant differences in LH values were detected among the earliest stages of the SWAN and STRAW definitions, but not the PENN-5 definition. Subtle changes in menstrual cycle length reflect significant changes in inhibin B and FSH levels during the menopausal transition. Therefore, it appears that subtle changes in bleeding pattern may be helpful in identifying the earliest hormonal changes during menopausal transition.

  2. Menopause and postmenopausal hormone therapy and risk of hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curhan, Sharon G; Eliassen, A Heather; Eavey, Roland D; Wang, Molin; Lin, Brian M; Curhan, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Menopause may be a risk factor for hearing loss, and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been proposed to slow hearing decline; however, there are no large prospective studies. We prospectively examined the independent relations between menopause and postmenopausal HT and risk of self-reported hearing loss. Prospective cohort study among 80,972 women in the Nurses' Health Study II, baseline age 27 to 44 years, followed from 1991 to 2013. Baseline and updated information was obtained from detailed validated biennial questionnaires. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to examine independent associations between menopausal status and postmenopausal HT and risk of hearing loss. After 1,410,928 person-years of follow-up, 18,558 cases of hearing loss were reported. There was no significant overall association between menopausal status, natural or surgical, and risk of hearing loss. Older age at natural menopause was associated with higher risk. The multivariable-adjusted relative risk of hearing loss among women who underwent natural menopause at age 50+ years compared with those aged less than 50 years was 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03, 1.17). Among postmenopausal women, oral HT (estrogen therapy or estrogen plus progestogen therapy) was associated with higher risk of hearing loss, and longer duration of use was associated with higher risk (P trend menopause and longer duration of postmenopausal HT are associated with higher risk of hearing loss.

  3. Menopause and Methodological Doubt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Menopause and methodological doubt begins by making a tongue-in-cheek comparison between Descartes' methodological doubt and the self-doubt that can arise around menopause. A hermeneutic approach is taken in which Cartesian dualism and its implications for the way women are viewed in society are examined, both through the experiences of women…

  4. Length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect the risk of early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Bennett, Claire E.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range associated with the risk of early menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER The length of repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect risk of early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is a strong, well-established relationship between length of premutation FMR1 alleles and age at menopause, suggesting that this relationship could continue into the normal range. Within the normal range, there is conflicting evidence; differences in ovarian reserve have been identified with FMR1 repeat allele length, but a recent population-based study did not find any association with age at menopause as a quantitative trait. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION We analysed cross-sectional baseline survey data collected at recruitment from 2004 to 2010 from a population-based, prospective epidemiological cohort study of >110 000 women to investigate whether repeat allele length was associated with early menopause. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD We included 4333 women from the Breakthrough Generations Study (BGS), of whom 2118 were early menopause cases (menopause under 46 years) and 2215 were controls. We analysed the relationship between length of FMR1 alleles and early menopause using logistic regression with allele length as continuous and categorical variables. We also conducted analyses with the outcome age at menopause as a quantitative trait as well as appropriate sensitivity and exploratory analyses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was no association of the shorter or longer FMR1 allele or their combined genotype with the clinically relevant end point of early menopause in our main analysis. Likewise, there were no associations with age at menopause as a quantitative trait in our secondary analysis. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Women with homozygous alleles in the normal range may have undetected FMR1 premutation alleles, although there was no evidence to suggest this. We

  5. Menopause and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rina; Assalman, Iyas; Bottlender, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    We have come a long way from our understanding of the menopause as it was described in the 11th century by Trotula of Salerno, a female gynaecologist who said 'there are older women who give forth blood matter especially as menopause approaches them'. Yet very little is known about the impact menopause has on the mental health of women especially severe and enduring illnesses like schizophrenia. A lot of research has shown that estrogen acts as a protective factor due to its antidopaminergic properties, thus providing an explanation for the increase in risk of a new psychotic disorder during the menopause. This has further led to the hypothesis of hormone replacement therapy providing benefits in the management of these disorders in menopausal women. This review article highlights the importance of a clear understanding of this phase of life in patients suffering from or who present with a risk of developing schizophrenia.

  6. SELUK BELUK MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannywati Ghani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Menopause, especially the symptoms and complications, is always an interesting topic to be discussed. It is actually a normal part of woman's life entering ages of 50. The symptoms of menopause are highly individual to each woman. Some may experience multiple physical and psychological symptoms that may continue to social impacts. Misinterpretation as other disease symptoms could happen and lead to incorrect treatment. Many studies have been done to learn more about the menopause physiological process, symptoms, complication, and treatment. So many preventive and treatment options are offered, including hormone therapy and practicing healthy life style. By understanding the menopause, it is expected that symptoms could be controlled and complications could be avoided.   Key words : Woman, Menstrual Period, Menopause, Healthy

  7. Androgens and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, L P

    2009-12-01

    The cessation of ovarian sex steroidigenesis, either as result as surgical extirpation, certain medical therapies or the gradual cessation of ovarian function, leads to menopause with all its associated physiological, physical and lifestyle changes. The changing hormonal milieu of menopause is most commonly associated with declining levels of estrogens. However, ovarian senescence also results in declining levels of androgens. Indeed, it is the loss of physiological levels of estrogens and androgens that result in the varied signs and symptoms of menopause including vasomotor symptoms, bone mineral density loss, reduced interest in sex, alterations in mood and energy and hair loss, among others. This paper will provide a review of the role of androgens in the menopause and assess the potential of androgen therapies in the management of the menopause.

  8. Hand osteoarthritis, menopause and menopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest musculoskeletal conditions, primarily affecting women over the age of 50, typically around the age of the menopause. Symptomatic disease can give rise to substantial pain, impairment of hand function and quality of life, leading to significant socioeconomic cost. There is currently no disease-modifying therapy, representing a huge unmet clinical need. The evidence for a relationship between hand OA and the menopause is summarised. Whether there is evidence for an effect of menopausal hormonal therapy on the incidence, prevalence or severity of symptomatic hand OA is critically reviewed, and gaps in our knowledge identified. Lastly, the potential mechanisms by which estrogen, or newer agents such as SERMs, might act to interfere with disease pathogenesis are overviewed. The need for specifically designed, controlled trials of agents in cohorts with symptomatic hand OA, refractory to standard symptomatic management is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Life course exposure to smoke and early menopause and menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Hebatullah; Kline, Jennie; Jacobson, Judith; Tehranifar, Parisa; Protacio, Angeline; Flom, Julie D; Cirillo, Piera; Cohn, Barbara A; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-10-01

    Early age at menopause is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, osteoporosis, and all-cause mortality. Cigarette smoke exposure in adulthood is an established risk factor for earlier age at natural menopause and may be related to age at the menopausal transition. Using data from two US birth cohorts, we examined the association between smoke exposure at various stages of the life course (prenatal exposure, childhood exposure to parental smoking, and adult smoke exposure) and menopause status in 1,001 women aged 39 to 49 years at follow-up. We used logistic regression analysis (adjusting for age at follow-up) to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) relating smoke exposure to natural menopause and the menopausal transition. The magnitudes of the associations for natural menopause were similar but not statistically significant after adjustment for confounders among (i) women with prenatal smoke exposure who did not smoke on adult follow-up (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.8-9.4) and (ii) current adult smokers who were not exposed prenatally (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 0.9-9.0). Women who had been exposed to prenatal smoke and were current smokers had three times the risk of experiencing earlier natural menopause (adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1-10.3) compared with women without smoke exposure in either period. Only current smoking of long duration (>26 y) was associated with the timing of the menopausal transition. Our data suggest that exposure to smoke both prenatally and around the time of menopause accelerates ovarian aging.

  10. Efficacy of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Alone, FSH + Luteinizing Hormone, Human Menopausal Gonadotropin or FSH + Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on Assisted Reproductive Technology Outcomes in the "Personalized" Medicine Era: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Daniele; Casarini, Livio; Alviggi, Carlo; Simoni, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) act on the same receptor, activating different signal transduction pathways. The role of LH or hCG addition to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) as well as menopausal gonadotropins (human menopausal gonadotropin; hMG) in controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is debated. To compare FSH + LH, or FSH + hCG or hMG vs. FSH alone on COS outcomes. A meta-analysis according to PRISMA statement and Cochrane Collaboration was performed, including prospective, controlled clinical trials published until July 2016, enrolling women treated with FSH alone or combined with other gonadotropins. Trials enrolling women with polycystic ovarian syndrome were excluded (PROSPERO registration no. CRD42016048404). Considering 70 studies, the administration of FSH alone resulted in higher number of oocytes retrieved than FSH + LH or hMG. The MII oocytes number did not change when FSH alone was compared to FSH + LH, FSH + hCG, or hMG. Embryo number and implantation rate were higher when hMG was used instead of FSH alone. Pregnancy rate was significantly higher in FSH + LH-treated group vs. others. Only 12 studies reported live birth rate, not providing protocol-dependent differences. Patients' stratification by GnRH agonist/antagonist identified patient subgroups benefiting from specific drug combinations. In COS, FSH alone results in higher oocyte number. HMG improves the collection of mature oocytes, embryos, and increases implantation rate. On the other hand, LH addition leads to higher pregnancy rate. This study supports the concept of a different clinical action of gonadotropins in COS, reflecting previous in vitro data.

  11. The change in motivating factors influencing commencement, adherence and retention to a supervised resistance training programme in previously sedentary post-menopausal women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Janet Erica; Christie, Candice Jo-Anne

    2015-03-12

    Understanding motivators for exercise participation in post-menopausal women may impact retention to exercise programmes and inform intervention trial designs. The purpose of this investigation was to assess self-reported motivational factors influencing adherence and retention to a 24-week progressive resistance training programme. Post-menopausal females (n = 34) were passively recruited to undertake a 24-week progressive resistance training protocol, in small-group sessions, on three non-consecutive days of the week. Attendance was recorded by the researcher. Qualitative reports were sourced from the sample for four phases of the study: pre-study (prior to week 1), recruitment (week 1), during study (weeks 2 - 24), and post-intervention (beyond week 24). Responses were categorised according to ten descriptors: specific health index improvement, education, flexibility of time, social contact, conscience (loyalty to the researcher), wellness, weight management, organisation parameters (pertaining to the study programme) and enjoyment of the exercises. Of the initial sample, 76.5% (n = 26) met the specified ≥80% attendance criterion. The primary findings were that motivation to volunteer for the study was driven by a perceived need for a structured exercise programme (50% of respondents). A commitment to the researcher was the primary motivator for continued adherence to the study for 50% of participants. Social contact with other participants was cited by 60% of the sample as the primary reason for adherence for the full duration of 24 weeks. A desire to maintain the "wellness" derived from the programme was cited by 60% as a reason for continuing an exercise routine post-study. This study identified that routine and supervision initially attract women to exercise programmes, while social cohesion of the group setting contributes to retention over time. Understanding the changing nature of motivating factors may contribute to better overall adherence

  12. HDL and the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoudary, Samar R

    2017-08-01

    To summarize recent provocative findings on conventional and novel metrics of HDL including HDL-C, HDL subclasses and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity as related to menopause. Pattern of menopause-related changes in HDL-C are not consistent, suggesting a complex relationship between HDL and menopause. Growing body of literature indicates that higher levels of HDL-C may not be consistently cardio-protective in midlife women, suggesting a potential change in other metrics of HDL that could not be captured by the static metric HDL-C. It is also possible that higher HDL-C at certain conditions could be a marker of HDL metabolism dysfunctionality. Significant alterations in other metrics of HDL have been reported after menopause and found to be related to estradiol. The impact of changes in novel metrics of HDL over the menopausal transition on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk later in life is not clear in women. Much of our understanding of how the menopausal transition may impact HDL metrics comes from cross-sectional studies. Future longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate other metrics of HDL shown to better reflect the cardio-protective capacities of HDL, so that the complex association of menopause, HDL and CVD risk could be characterized.

  13. Urinary incontinence: the role of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutnovsky, Gerda; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman; Mann, Kristy Pamela; Dietz, Hans P

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of menopause and hormone therapy on the symptoms and signs of stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. Records of women who attended a tertiary urogynecological unit were reviewed retrospectively. A standardized interview included evaluations of symptoms, menopause age (ie, time since last menstrual period or onset of menopausal symptoms), current or previous hormone use, and visual analogue scales for bother. Multichannel urodynamics, including urethral pressure profilometry and determination of abdominal leak point pressure, was performed. Of 382 women seen during the inclusion period, 62% were postmenopausal. Current systemic or local hormone use was reported by 7% and 6%, respectively. Two hundred eighty-eight women (76%) reported symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 5.7, and 273 women (72%) reported symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 6.4. On univariate analysis, symptoms and bother of urge incontinence were significantly related to menopause age, whereas this relationship was not found for stress incontinence. After calendar age was controlled for, length of menopause showed no significant relationship with any symptom or sign of urinary incontinence. Hormone deficiency after menopause is unlikely to play a major role in urinary incontinence.

  14. Managing menopause at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or supplements. Eat high calcium foods, such as cheese, leafy green vegetables, low-fat milk and other ... unable to manage your symptoms of menopause with home care only. Also call if you have any ...

  15. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Bioidentical Hormones January 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Howard ... take HT for symptom relief. What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  16. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  17. MENOPAUSE AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Anichkov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A role of menopause as a cardiovascular risk factor is reviewed. Menopause influence on the cardiovascular system may be mediated by body fat re-allocation, metabolic, hemodynamic and pro-inflammatory changes. Besides, estrogen deprivation has a direct effect on the arterial wall. Lifestyle modification, lipid-lowering and antihypertensive treatment should be considered for cardiovascular risk reduction in postmenopausal women.

  18. Voice impairment and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Berit; van Trotsenburg, Michael; Hanke, Gunda; Bigenzahn, Wolfgang; Huber, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Menopause rating scales still do not regard voice impairment as a genuine climacteric symptom, although voice changes are frequently reported. The purpose of this study was both to register and differentiate voice alterations and disorders in menopausal women. A total of 107 women between 37 and 71 years of age who were rated as postmenopausal according to their hormonal status answered a questionnaire on voice changes and vocal discomfort. Of this group, 49 women mentioned voices changes, and 35 of those women associated these changes with subjective discomfort, whereas 58 women mentioned neither voice changes nor discomfort. Sixteen of the women who mentioned voice changes and eight who did not participated in a comprehensive investigation, which included completion of the Klimax questionnaire, a head and neck examination, videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation of voice sound, voice range profile measurements, and voice dysfunction index determination. Voice changes during menopause might be a common problem seen in clinical practice. Therefore, an additional systematic registration of voice impairment in future menopause rating scales should be considered if further studies confirm our findings of a high prevalence of voice complaints associated with menopause. Severe menopausal voice impairments, even without other climacteric symptoms, should be regarded as an indication for phoniatric examination.

  19. Treating schizophrenia during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Amnon; Brzezinski-Sinai, Noa A; Seeman, Mary V

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this review is to examine three questions: What are the risks and benefits of treating women with schizophrenia with hormone therapy (HT) at menopause? Should the antipsychotic regimen be changed at menopause? Do early- and late-onset women with schizophrenia respond differently to HT at menopause? MEDLINE databases for the years 1990 to 2016 were searched using the following interactive terms: schizophrenia, gender, menopause, estrogen, and hormones. The selected articles (62 out of 800 abstracts) were chosen on the basis of their applicability to the objectives of this targeted narrative review. HT during the perimenopause in women with schizophrenia ameliorates psychotic and cognitive symptoms, and may also help affective symptoms. Vasomotor, genitourinary, and sleep symptoms are also reduced. Depending on the woman's age and personal risk factors and antipsychotic side effects, the risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease may be increased. Antipsychotic types and doses may need to be adjusted at menopause, as may be the mode of administration. Both HT and changes in antipsychotic management should be considered for women with schizophrenia at menopause. The question about differences in response between early- and late-onset women cannot yet be answered.

  20. [Urinary incontinence and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Ringa, V; Lesavre, M; Fernandez, H

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the relationship between menopause and urinary incontinence (UI). Our work is based on a review of the literature on the epidemiology of UI in women and the effects of hormone therapy on symptoms of urinary leakage. A search of the Medline database between January 2000 and April 2012 was performed by crossing the keywords "urinary incontinence, stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge incontinence, over active bladder, menopause, estrogen therapy". Twenty-nine articles over the 482 articles were initialy selected. The UI was a common symptom during menopause, with a prevalence of 15 to 30% and an annual incidence of 5 to 10%. The association between UI and menopause was controversial. Indeed, although underpinned by pathophysiological mechanisms such as the sensitivity of tissues of the urogenital sinus to estrogen, the epidemiological data available were contradictory and should be interpreted, if possible, depending on the type of UI. Thus, it remained difficult to distinguish the effect of menopause of the aging. The effects of estrogen on IU differed depending on the route of administration and of the type of UI. Randomized trials showed that oral administration of estrogen after menopause increased the occurrence of UI or SUI. However a vaginal administration of estrogen improved urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and overactive bladder. The data of this review were consistent with the French and European guidelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Transparent meta-analysis of prospective memory and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Uttl

    Full Text Available Prospective memory (ProM refers to our ability to become aware of a previously formed plan at the right time and place. After two decades of research on prospective memory and aging, narrative reviews and summaries have arrived at widely different conclusions. One view is that prospective memory shows large age declines, larger than age declines on retrospective memory (RetM. Another view is that prospective memory is an exception to age declines and remains invariant across the adult lifespan. The present meta-analysis of over twenty years of research settles this controversy. It shows that prospective memory declines with aging and that the magnitude of age decline varies by prospective memory subdomain (vigilance, prospective memory proper, habitual prospective memory as well as test setting (laboratory, natural. Moreover, this meta-analysis demonstrates that previous claims of no age declines in prospective memory are artifacts of methodological and conceptual issues afflicting prior research including widespread ceiling effects, low statistical power, age confounds, and failure to distinguish between various subdomains of prospective memory (e.g., vigilance and prospective memory proper.

  2. Chinese midlife women's perceptions and attitudes about menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y L; Voda, A M; Mansfield, P K

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to discover and describe the meaning of and attitudes toward menopause in midlife Chinese women in Taiwan. How these women learned about menopause was also explored. Questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 208 Chinese women aged 35 to 55 living in Taiwan; 168 responded. Qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. Percentage and chi-square were used to examine the quantitative data. The findings revealed that 154 (91.7%) women perceived menopause as a natural phenomenon. No statistically significant differences in attitude toward menopause were found between women grouped by different menopausal levels, by use or not use of hormones, or by religious preference. Some women described menopause as, "no longer young, getting old." Others described menopause as, "wisdom and maturation," "a symbol of achievement," and "a time to start enjoying life." Sixty-eight (40.5%) of the sample indicated they obtained menopausal information from friends and printed materials such as books, newspapers, and magazines. Study findings indicate that Chinese women in Taiwan perceive menopause in a positive and holistic way. Culturally sensitized Western practitioners can utilize this study's findings to more appropriately individualize care for Chinese midlife women.

  3. The menopausal age and associated factors in Gorgan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Ali Akbar; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asayesh, Hamid; Rezapour, Aziz; Noroozi, Mehdi; Mansourian, Morteza; Soleimani, Mohammad Ali; Ansari, Hossain

    2013-05-01

    Considering the physical, emotional and psychological complications of early or delayed menopause on women's life, it is necessary to determine associated factors of menopause age. This study designed to determine menopausal age and associated factors in women of Gorgan, i.e. the capital of Golestan province in the north-east of Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 804 menopausal women in Gorgan were selected via two-stage sampling method in 2009. The study included only women who had undergone natural menopause and had their last menstrual bleeding at least one year before. Data were gathered through structured questionnaire that included individual characteristics, socioeconomic characteristics, menstrual and fertility characteristics and climacteric complaints. Socioeconomic status was defined using principal component analysis. Data were analyzed with T-student's and ANOVA tests using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA) for Windows. The mean menopause age was 47.6±4.45 years with the median age of 48 years. The mean menopause age in women with first pregnancy before 30 years (47.58±4.47years), without pregnancy (46.26±4.90years) and without delivery (46.30±4.47 years) was significantly lower than others (p0.05). Socioeconomic status was not associated significantly with menopause age (p>0.05). This study illustrated that menstrual and fertility factors have influence on menopausal age while socioeconomic factors were not effective.

  4. Association of collagen type I alpha1 (COLIA1) Sp1 polymorphism with osteoporotic fracture in Caucasian post-menopausal women: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ji, G-R

    2012-01-06

    This study was designed to summarize quantitatively the evidence for a relationship between collagen type I alpha1 (COLIA1) Sp1 polymorphism and osteoporotic fracture risk in Caucasian post-menopausal women. This meta-analysis included 16 studies, which analysed 2294 patients with fractures and 10 285 controls. The combined results showed that there was a significant difference in genotype distribution (SS odds ratio [OR] 0.72; Ss OR 1.18; ss OR 1.97) between patients with fractures and controls. When stratifying by the fracture site, it was found that: (i) patients with vertebral fractures had a significantly higher frequency of the Ss genotype and a lower frequency of the SS genotype than controls; and (ii) patients with non-vertebral fractures had a significantly higher frequency of the ss genotype and a lower frequency of the SS genotype than controls. This meta-analysis suggests that the COLIA1 Sp1 polymorphism may be associated with osteoporotic fracture in Caucasian post-menopausal women.

  5. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and breast cancer risk according to menopause and hormone receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Ferrari, Pietro; González, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary flavonoids and lignans and breast cancer (BC) risk is inconclusive, with the possible exception of isoflavones in Asian countries. Therefore, we investigated prospectively dietary total and subclasses of flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk according...

  6. Menopause perception and care of menopausal women in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause is one area that has been shrouded in myths and taboos especially as related to the behaviour of women. The study therefore examined the perception of menopause and the adjustment practices adopted by menopausal women in Nigeria. The study involved both Quantitative and Qualitative method.

  7. Age of Menopause and Fracture Risk in Post-Menopausal Women Randomized to Calcium + Vitamin D, Hormone Therapy, or the combination: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shannon D.; Lehman, Amy; Nathan, Nisha K.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We previously reported that in the absence of hormone therapy (HT) or calcium/vitamin D (Ca/D) supplementation, earlier menopause age was associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk in healthy post-menopausal women. Treatment with HT and Ca/D are protective against fractures after menopause. In this analysis, we asked if age of menopause onset alters fracture risk in healthy post-menopausal women receiving HT, Ca/Vit D, or the combination. METHODS Hazard ratios (HR) for any fracture among 21,711 healthy post-menopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Clinical Trial (WHI-CT), who were treated with HT, Ca/Vit D, or HT + Ca/D, and who reported age of non-surgical menopause of menopause menopause 40-49 or ≥50, regardless of treatment intervention [HR (95% CI): menopause menopause menopause age (menopause ages. The effect of menopause age on fracture risk was not altered by any of the treatment interventions (HT, Ca/D, HT+Ca/D), suggesting that early age of menopause is an independent contributor to postmenopausal fracture risk. PMID:27801706

  8. Toward a Biology of Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Madeleine

    1980-01-01

    Discusses research dealing with the study of menopause. Underscores the problems with the case study method. Discusses two population-based studies and the problems of age adjustment and measurement in menopause research. Highlights alternate research strategies. (MK)

  9. Verbal memory and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Pauline M

    2015-11-01

    Midlife women frequently report memory problems during the menopausal transition. Recent studies validate those complaints by showing significant correlations between memory complaints and performance on validated memory tasks. Longitudinal studies demonstrate modest declines in verbal memory during the menopausal transition and a likely rebound during the postmenopausal stage. Clinical studies that examine changes in memory following hormonal withdrawal and add-back hormone therapy (HT) demonstrate that estradiol plays a critical role in memory. Although memory changes are frequently attributed to menopausal symptoms, studies show that the memory problems occur during the transition even after controlling for menopausal symptoms. It is well established that self-reported vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are unrelated to objective memory performance. However, emerging evidence suggests that objectively measured VMS significantly correlate with memory performance, brain activity during rest, and white matter hyperintensities. This evidence raises important questions about whether VMS and VMS treatments might affect memory during the menopausal transition. Unfortunately, there are no clinical trials to inform our understanding of how HT affects both memory and objectively measured VMS in women in whom HT is indicated for treatment of moderate to severe VMS. In clinical practice, it is helpful to normalize memory complaints, to note that evidence suggests that memory problems are temporary, and to counsel women with significant VMS that memory might improve with treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Risk of chronic liver disease in post-menopausal women due to body mass index, alcohol and their interaction: a prospective nested cohort study within the United Kingdom Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Trembling

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the risk of chronic liver disease (CLD due to alcohol consumption and body mass index (BMI and the effects of their interaction in a prospective cohort study of women recruited to the UKCTOCS trial. Methods 95,126 post-menopausal women without documented CLD were stratified into 12 groups defined by combinations of BMI (normal, overweight, obese and alcohol consumption (none, <1–15, 16–20 and ≥21 units/week, and followed for an average of 5.1 years. Hazard ratios (HR were calculated for incident liver-related events (LRE. Results First LREs were reported in 325 (0.34% participants. Compared to women with normal BMI, HR = 1.44 (95% CI; 1.10–1.87 in the overweight group and HR = 2.25 (95% CI; 1.70–2.97 in the obese group, adjusted for alcohol and potential confounders. Compared to those abstinent from alcohol, HR = 0.70 (95% CI; 0.55–0.88 for <1–15 units/week, 0.93 (95% CI; 0.50–1.73 for 16–20 units/week and 1.82 (95% CI; 0.97–3.39 for ≥21 units/week adjusted for BMI and potential confounders. Compared to women with normal BMI drinking no alcohol, HR for LRE in obese women consuming ≥21 units/week was 2.86 (95% CI; 0.67–12.42, 1.58 (95% CI; 0.96–2.61 for obese women drinking <1–15 units/week and 1.93 (95% CI; 0.66–5.62 in those with normal BMI consuming ≥21 units/week after adjustment for potential confounders. We found no significant interaction between BMI and alcohol. Conclusion High BMI and alcohol consumption and abstinence are risk factors for CLD in post-menopausal women. However, BMI and alcohol do not demonstrate significant interaction in this group. Trial registration UKCTOCS is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN22488978 . Registered 06/04/2000.

  11. Menopause and the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mutneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications.

  12. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies.

  13. Exploring Australian Aboriginal women's experiences of menopause: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgenson, Janelle R; Jones, Emma K; Haynes, Emma; Green, Charmaine; Thompson, Sandra C

    2014-03-20

    Despite extensive literature demonstrating differing experiences in menopause around the world, documentation of the experience of menopause in Australian Aboriginal women is scarce, and thus their menopausal experience is relatively unknown. This study aimed to understand Australian Aboriginal women's understanding and experience of menopause and its impact on their lives. The study was an exploratory qualitative study. Twenty-five Aboriginal women were recruited from a regional centre in the Mid-West region of Western Australia using opportunistic and snowballing sampling. Interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken from February 2011 to February 2012 using open-ended questioning with a yarning technique. Thematic analysis was undertaken of the transcribed interviews. A number of themes were revealed. These related to the language used, meanings and attitudes to menopause, symptoms experienced, the role of men, a lack of understanding, coping mechanisms and the attribution of menopausal changes to something else. The term "change of life" was more widely recognised and signified the process of ageing, and an associated gain of respect in the local community. A fear of menopausal symptoms or uncertainty about their origin was also common. Overall, many women reported insufficient understanding and a lack of available information to assist them and their family to understand the transition. There are similarities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal experiences of menopause, including similar symptom profiles. The current language used within mainstream health settings may not be appropriate to this population if it fails to recognise the importance of language and reflect the attributed meaning of menopause. The fear of symptoms and uncertainty of their relationship to menopause demonstrated a need for more information which has not adequately been supplied to Australian Aboriginal women through current services. While this study is with a select

  14. Plasma Metabolic Profiles in Women are Menopause Dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofu Ke

    Full Text Available Menopause is an endocrinological transition that greatly affects health and disease susceptibility in middle-aged and elderly women. To gain new insights into the metabolic process of menopause, plasma metabolic profiles in 115 pre- and post-menopausal women were systematically analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. Metabolic signatures revealed considerable differences between pre- and post-menopausal women, and clear separations were observed between the groups in partial least-squares discriminant analysis score plots. In total, 28 metabolites were identified as potential metabolite markers for menopause, including up-regulated acylcarnitines, fatty acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylethanolamines, and down-regulated pregnanediol-3-glucuronide, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydrolipoic acid. These differences highlight that significant alterations occur in fatty acid β-oxidation, phospholipid metabolism, hormone metabolism and amino acid metabolism in post-menopausal women. In conclusion, our plasma metabolomics study provides novel understanding of the metabolic profiles related to menopause, and will be useful for investigating menopause-related diseases and assessing metabolomic confounding factors.

  15. Liver disease in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Carla W

    2015-07-07

    There are numerous physiologic and biochemical changes in menopause that can affect the function of the liver and mediate the development of liver disease. Menopause represents a state of growing estrogen deficiency, and this loss of estrogen in the setting of physiologic aging increases the likelihood of mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, declining immune responses to injury, and disarray in the balance between antioxidant formation and oxidative stress. The sum effect of these changes can contribute to increased susceptibility to development of significant liver pathology, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as accelerated progression of fibrosis in liver diseases, as has been particularly demonstrated in hepatitis C virus liver disease. Recognition of the unique nature of these mediating factors should raise suspicion for liver disease in perimenopausal and menopausal women and offer an opportunity for implementation of aggressive treatment measures so as to avoid progression of liver disease to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure.

  16. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  17. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen affected all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appears to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit: risk profile and safety of hormone therapy. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients’ risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely impacts the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit: risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  18. Management of Menopausal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunitz, Andrew M; Manson, JoAnn E

    2015-10-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women's Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen increased all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appear to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit-risk profile and safety of HT. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65 years; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients' risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely affects the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low-dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit-risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms.

  19. Do stages of menopause affect the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Özge Çeliker; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Tosun, Gökhan; Ergenoğlu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgur; Malkoç, Mehtap; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine whether there is a difference in pelvic floor muscle strength attributable to pelvic floor muscle training conducted during different stages of menopause. One hundred twenty-two women with stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were included in this prospective controlled study. The participants included in this study were separated into three groups according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop staging system as follows: group 1 (n = 41): stages -3 and -2; group 2 (n = 32): stages +1 and -1; and group 3 (n = 30): stage +2. All three groups were provided an individual home exercise program throughout the 12-week study. Pelvic floor muscle strength before and after the 12-week treatment was measured in all participants (using the PERFECT [power, endurance, number of repetitions, and number of fast (1-s) contractions; every contraction is timed] scheme, perineometry, transabdominal ultrasound, Brink scale, pad test, and stop test). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences in pre-exercise training pelvic floor muscle strength parameters among the three groups. After 12 weeks, there were statistically significant increases in PERFECT scheme, Brink scale, perineometry, and ultrasound values. In contrast, there were significant decreases in stop test and 1-hour pad test values observed in the three groups (P = 0.001, dependent t test). In comparison with the other groups, group 1 demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the following postexercise training parameters: power, repetition, speed, Brink vertical displacement, and stop test. The lowest increase was observed in group 2 (P menopause with pelvic floor muscle training, but the rates of increase vary according to the menopausal stage of the participants. Women in the late menopausal transition and early menopause are least responsive to pelvic floor muscle strength training

  20. Endocrinology of the Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    In women, age-related changes in ovarian function begin in the mid-30s with decreased fertility and compensatory hormonal changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis that maintain follicle development and estrogen secretion in the face of a waning pool of ovarian follicles. The menopause transition is characterized by marked variability in follicle development, ovulation, bleeding patterns, and symptoms of hyper- and hypoestrogenism. The menopause, which is clinically defined by the last menstrual period, is followed by the consistent absence of ovarian secretion of estradiol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between menopause status, attitude toward menopause, and quality of life in Chinese midlife women in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixuan; Ho, Suzanne C; Sham, Aprille

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the relationship between menopause status and attitude toward menopause, and also its relationship with quality of life (QoL) of Chinese midlife women in Hong Kong. Hong Kong Chinese women aged 40 to 59 years were recruited through computer-generated random telephone dialing. Information was obtained through telephone interviews based on a structured questionnaire. Women were classified into 3 groups: premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal. Menopause Belief Scale and Utian Quality of Life Scale (QoL) were used to measure respondents' attitude toward menopause and their QoL. Information on social, health, and lifestyle factors was also collected. The mean age of the participants was 49.4 ± 5.2 years. Respondents generally had a positive attitude toward menopause. Compared with premenopausal women, postmenopausal women were noted to have significantly higher attitude score toward menopause. No significant differences in QoL score were noted among women of the 3 menopause statuses. Stepwise regression analysis showed that women with more positive attitude toward menopause tended to have higher QoL score. Furthermore, better self-reported health status, doing physical activities, higher education level, being married, and non-smoking status were associated with better QoL. Postmenopausal women tended to have more positive attitude toward menopause. Although menopause status did not seem to be associated with QoL, attitude toward menopause, self-reported health status, as well as social and lifestyle factors were associated with QoL in Chinese midlife women.

  2. A prospective toxicology analysis in alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Felby, Søren

    1997-01-01

    A prospective and comprehensive investigation was done on 73 medico–legal autopsies in alcoholics. The results of the toxicology analyses are described. Alcohol intoxication was the cause of death in 8%, combined alcohol/drug intoxication in 15% and drugs alone in 19%. Alcoholic ketoacidosis...

  3. A prospective toxicology analysis in alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Felby, Søren

    1997-01-01

    A prospective and comprehensive investigation was done on 73 medico–legal autopsies in alcoholics. The results of the toxicology analyses are described. Alcohol intoxication was the cause of death in 8%, combined alcohol/drug intoxication in 15% and drugs alone in 19%. Alcoholic ketoacidosis...... than the exception in deaths in alcoholics....

  4. Age at menopause and incident heart failure: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Watson, Karol E; Goff, David C; Bluemke, David A; Srikanthan, Preethi; Horwich, Tamara; Bertoni, Alain G

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the associations of early menopause (menopause occurring before age 45 years) and age at menopause with incident heart failure (HF) in postmenopausal women. We also explored the associations of early menopause and age at menopause with left ventricular (LV) measures of structure and function in postmenopausal women. We included 2,947 postmenopausal women, aged 45 to 84 years without known cardiovascular disease (2000-2002), from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of early menopause and age at menopause with incident HF. In 2,123 postmenopausal women in whom cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was obtained at baseline, we explored the associations of early menopause and age at menopause with LV measures using multivariable linear regression. Across a median follow-up of 8.5 years, we observed 71 HF events. There were no significant interactions with ethnicity for incident HF (Pinteraction > 0.05). In adjusted analysis, early menopause was associated with an increased risk of incident HF (hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.01-2.73), whereas every 1-year increase in age at menopause was associated with a decreased risk of incident HF (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99). We observed significant interactions between early menopause and ethnicity for LV mass-to-volume ratio (LVMVR; Pinteraction = 0.02). In Chinese-American women, early menopause was associated with a higher LVMVR (+0.11; P = 0.0002), whereas every 1-year increase in age at menopause was associated with a lower LVMVR (-0.004; P = 0.04) at baseline. Older age at menopause is independently associated with a decreased risk of incident HF. Concentric LV remodeling, indicated by a higher LVMVR, is present in Chinese-American women who experienced early menopause at baseline.

  5. Sleep disturbance in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameratunga, D; Goldin, J; Hickey, M

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance during menopause is a common and important complaint faced by many women. There are many factors that may play a role in this problem, including vasomotor symptoms and changing hormone levels, circadian rhythm abnormalities, exacerbation of primary insomnia, mood disorders, coexistent medical conditions as well as lifestyle factors. Sleep can be measured both objectively and subjectively; however, correlation between the two measures is not high. Most of the menopause-related sleep disturbances have been reported as qualitative in nature; however, there have also been studies showing changes in objective measures. This discrepancy has implications with regard to evaluation of research in sleep and menopause, as well as application in the clinical setting. Investigations of inadequate sleep and sleep problems during the menopausal period and obtaining a thorough understanding of the factors contributing to these problems are essential in formulating treatment strategies. Such strategies can vary from hormonal treatment and medications to lifestyle and behavioural modification. © 2012 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. Thyroid and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Ghianda, S; Tonacchera, M; Vitti, P

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common in the general population especially in women. All thyroid diseases are in fact more common in women than in men and may interfere with the reproductive system. Thyroid function and the gonadal axes are related throughout the woman's fertile period. The relationship between the two glands is mutual. In particular, thyroid hormones affect the reproductive function both directly and indirectly through several actions. Studies on the relationship between menopause and thyroid function are few and do not allow to clarify whether menopause has an effect on the thyroid regardless of aging. With aging, the main changes regarding thyroid physiology and function are: a reduction of thyroid iodine uptake, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine synthesis and catabolism of free thyroxine while reverse triiodothyronine increases; the level of thyroid stimulating hormone remains normal with sometimes a tendency to higher limits. These changes are present in both sexes without distinction between males and females. The complexity of the relationships can be summarized in three aspects: thyroid status does not influence significantly the climacteric syndrome; menopause may modify the clinical expression of some thyroid diseases, particularly the autoimmune ones; thyroid function is not directly involved in the pathogenesis of the complications of menopause. However, coronary atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be aggravated in the presence of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. The effects of postmenopausal estrogen replacement on thyroxine requirements in women with hypothyroidism should be considered.

  7. Oral Manifestations of Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    manifested in the oral cavity.[9] The teeth and gums are more affected by the hormonal changes occurring before menopause, which decrease the body's ability to fight minor infections or maintain a healthy balance of useful and harmful bacteria within the oral environment.[10] The dentist needs to be aware of oral ...

  8. Vascular dysfunction across the stages of the menopausal transition is associated with menopausal symptoms and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Kerry L; Ozemek, Cemal; Kohrt, Wendy M; Blatchford, Patrick J; Moreau, Kerrie L

    2018-04-09

    The menopausal transition is associated with somatic symptoms and increased rates of depression, which can impair quality of life (QOL) and increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This period is also associated with accelerated vascular aging (arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction), an antecedent to CVD. This secondary analysis sought to explore associations between depression, menopausal symptoms and QOL, and vascular aging across menopause stages. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance), endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD]), menopausal symptoms (Menopausal Symptom List [MSL]), depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]), and QOL (Utian QOL Scale [UQOL]) were measured in 138 women (19-70 years) classified as premenopausal (n = 41, 34 ± 8 years; mean ± SD), early (n = 25, 49 ± 3 years), or late perimenopausal (n = 26, 50 ± 4 years), or early (n = 22, 55 ± 4 years) or late postmenopausal (n = 24, 61 ± 5 years). Differences across menopause stages were determined using one-way analysis of variance; associations between vascular measures and MSL, CES-D, and UQOL were tested using Pearson's correlation analyses. Menopausal symptoms, depression, and QOL worsened across menopause stages, particularly in late perimenopausal women. Vasosomatic symptom frequency, and general somatic symptom frequency and severity were inversely correlated with carotid artery compliance and FMD (r = -0.27 to -0.18, all P stages of menopause was associated with greater frequency and severity of menopausal symptoms, and lower QOL, but not depression. Mechanisms underlying these associations (eg, inflammation, oxidative stress) should be explored.

  9. Age at menopause and menopause-related symptoms in human immunodeficiency virus-infected Thai women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyanurak, Pongrak; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Wilawan, Kittisak; Lueanyod, Aksorn; Thongpaeng, Parawee; Chatvong, Duangjai; Sophonphan, Jiratchaya; Saeloo, Siriporn; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith

    2012-07-01

    There are limited data for age at menopause (AM) and menopause-related symptoms in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Asian women. We investigated AM and menopause-related symptoms in HIV-infected Thai women. HIV-infected Thai women 40 years or older who did not receive any hormone therapy in the 8-week period preceding the study were enrolled. Participants completed the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life survey for their symptoms in the past 30 days. Menopause was defined as having the last menstrual period more than 1 year ago. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with menopause. Two hundred sixty-eight HIV-infected women were enrolled; their median age was 44.6 (41.8-48.7) years, and the ratio of their Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clinical classifications (A:B:C) was 53%:34%:13%; 95% were using highly active antiretroviral therapy. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) CD4 count was 575 (437-758) cells/μL, and 93% had HIV-RNA of less than 1.7log10 copies/mL. Among the 55 women who had reached menopause, the mean (SD) AM was 47.3 (5.1) years. The mean (SD) AM in our study was earlier than the previous report of 49.5 (3.6) years in non-HIV-infected Thai women (difference, -2.2 y; 95% CI, -3.2 to -1.2, P menopause were Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clinical classification B or C (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-3.03, P = 0.04), and no sexual act in the past month (hazard ratio, 4.9; 95% CI, 1.5-16.0, P = 0.01). No associations of later age of menarche, parity, marital status, educational level, income, body mass index, CD4 count, and HIV-RNA with menopause were found. AM in HIV-infected Thai women was 47.3 years, which is significantly earlier than the findings of a previous AM report on non-HIV-infected women. Postmenopausal HIV-infected women had more vasomotor and sexual symptoms. More studies are needed to investigate the cause and appropriate interventions for

  10. Analysis of Amygdalar-Cortical Network Covariance During Pre- versus Post-menopausal Estrogen Levels: Potential Relevance to Resting State Networks, Mood, and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottowitz, William E.; Derro, David; Dougherty, Darin D.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Fischman, Alan J.; Hall, Janet E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives 1.) Expand the scope of neuroendocrine applications of functional neuroimaging techniques. 2.) Compare the covariance of amygdalar activity with that of the rest of the brain during pre- and post-menopausal levels of estrogen (E2). Based on the distribution of cortical E2 receptors and the neocortical regions where E2 has been shown to preferentially accumulate, we predict that E2 infusion will increase covariance of amygdalar activity with that of the temporal and frontal cortices. Design This basic physiology study employed a within-subject design. All participants were post-menopausal women (n =7). Analysis of covariance between whole brain and amygdalar regional cerebral glucose consumption (CMRglc) was conducted in a voxel-wise manner by means of the basic regression option in SPM2 and was applied to FDG-PET scans acquired at baseline and after a 24 hour graded E2 infusion. Setting an academic medical center; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Results E2 levels (mean ± sem) were significantly greater at 24 hours (257.9 pg/mL ± 29.7) than at 0 hours (28.1 pg/mL ± 3.4). Right amygdalar CMRglc showed a significant covariance with activity of three different regions of the temporal cortex during E2 infusion, but none at baseline. In addition, right amygdalar CMRglc covaried with that of the right medial and superior frontal gyri only during E2 infusion. Conclusions In addition to suggesting changes in amygdalar-cortical network connectivity as a result of short-term E2 exposure, these analyses provide evidence that basic neuroendocrine research may benefit from further use of FDG-PET and other functional neuroimaging modalities for network level analyses. PMID:18766152

  11. Hubungan Jumlah Paritas dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Hadya Gorga; Putri Sri Lasmini; Arni Amir

    2016-01-01

    AbstrakMenopause merupakan waktu penghentian menstruasi secara permanen yang terjadi setelah hilangnya aktivitas ovarium. Saat ini jumlah wanita usia menopause meningkat seiring dengan peningkatan usia harapan hidup. Studi tentang menopause sangat penting, terutama terkait akibat yang akan terjadi pasca menopause seperti penyakit kardiovaskuler dan osteoporosis. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan usia menopause alami dan menganalisis hubungannya terhadap jumlah paritas pada wanita di Kel...

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; Hickey, Martha; Giles, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    This article aims to review currently available evidence for women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and menopause and to propose clinical management algorithms. Key studies addressing HIV and menopause have been reviewed, specifically age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women, frequency of menopausal symptoms, comorbidities associated with HIV and aging (including cardiovascular disease and bone disease), treatment of menopausal symptoms, and prevention of comorbidities in HIV-infected women. Studies suggest an earlier onset of menopause in HIV-infected women, with increased frequency of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease risk may be increased in this population, with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and chronic inflammation associated with HIV, contributing to increased risk. Chronic inflammation and cART have been independently implicated in bone disease. No published data have assessed the safety and efficacy of hormone therapy in relation to symptoms of menopause, cardiovascular risk, and bone disease among HIV-infected women. Few studies on menopause have been conducted in HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women. Many questions regarding age of menopause onset, frequency of menopausal symptoms and associated complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular disease, and efficacy of treatment among HIV-infected women remain. The incidence and severity of some of these factors may be increased in the setting of HIV and cART.

  13. Bee pollen and honey for the alleviation of hot flushes and other menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    MÜNSTEDT, KARSTEN; VOSS, BENJAMIN; KULLMER, UWE; SCHNEIDER, URSULA; HÜBNER, JUTTA

    2015-01-01

    Hot flushes, night sweats, pain during sexual intercourse, hair loss, forgetfulness, depression and sleeping disturbances are common problems among breast cancer patients undergoing antihormonal treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bee pollen can alleviate menopausal symptoms in patients receiving tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors/inactivators. We compared a pollen-honey mixture with pure honey (placebo) in a prospective, randomized crossover trial in breast cancer patients receiving antihormonal treatment. The menopausal complaints were assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS). A total of 46 patients were recruited; 68.3% (28/41) of the patients reported an improvement in their symptoms while taking honey, compared with 70.9% (22/31) who reported an improvement with pollen (the difference was non-significant). The results were confirmed by significant improvements in the postmenopausal complaints in the two groups in a pre-post analysis in the MRS and its 3 subscales. This study provided evidence that honey and bee pollen may improve the menopausal symptoms of breast cancer patients on antihormonal treatment. Of note, honey, which was intended to be used as a placebo, produced similar effects as pollen and they both exceeded the extent of a placebo effect in this setting (~25%). PMID:26171198

  14. Menopause: Prevention and Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mª Rivas Hidalgo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that climacteric constitutes a physiological state in woman’s life, which covers a large stage of her life cycle, it is important that nursery professionals will develop an Action Plan, whose main objective will be health. Covering, then, this stage from a multidisciplinary and holistic field is going to contribute to both: the adoption of healthy life habits and the repercussions that symptoms and physiological processes associated with menopause have on women. Another objective for nurses there must be to provide all our knowledge in a detailed and focused on the individual needs that may come up way. That way, we lay the foundations for facing climacteric with the minimum deterioration of the quality of life and well being.This article is an analysis of the etiology of every one of the most prevalent menopause problems, the predisposing factors to suffer them or to make them get worse, and the habits that are going to prevent larger spill-over effects of those problems. Furthermore, a revision about how nutrition, exercise, toxic substances consumption, etc. have repercussions on musculoskeletal problems, vascular symptoms, urogenital problems, psychological alterations, and gynaecological and breast cancer is made.

  15. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  17. Hormonal changes during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Palacios, Santiago

    2009-06-20

    Ovarian senescence occurs gradually during the fourth and fifth decades of life, leading to menopause at an average age of about 51 years. This senescence results in a changing hormonal milieu, with decreases in the levels of estrogens and androgens. Similar changes may be induced by surgical menopause (bilateral oophorectomy) or ovarian failure resulting from cancer treatment. The declining levels of estrogens and androgens affect many tissues of the body and can produce a variety of signs and symptoms, including vasomotor symptoms, decreased bone density, changes in mood and energy, loss of pubic hair and changes in the genital tissues, and effects on sexual function. Accurate measurement of testosterone levels in postmenopausal women requires methods that are validated in the lower ranges of testosterone level observed in this population.

  18. Cellulite in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Leszko, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly af...

  19. Gaps in Menopause Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Yum, Sun Kyoung; Kim, Tak

    2014-01-01

    The average middle aged woman goes through a volatile period of endocrine fluctuations as she passes through menopause and the stages that precede and follow it. Ovarian hormones are steroid hormones. They readily cross the cell and nuclear membranes and influence transcription of numerous genes. Such influences are tissue specific and state specific. In short, changes in ovarian hormones mean that a women will experience changes in her entire body systems. When an individual woman's constitu...

  20. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with...

  1. Menopause 101: A Primer for the Perimenopausal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abstracts Media Award Recipients Media Policy Media Requests Menopause 101: A primer for the perimenopausal The information ... about 2 years earlier. Common Body Changes at Menopause Each woman’s experience of menopause is different. Many ...

  2. Diabetes and Menopause: A Twin Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes and menopause: A twin challenge Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body. Here's what to ... to stay in control. By Mayo Clinic Staff Menopause — and the years leading up to it — may ...

  3. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  5. Vaginal microbiota in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinus Tarina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human vagina together with its resident, microbiota, comprise a dynamic ecosystem. Normal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus species, and pathogen microbiota such as Gardnerella species and Bacteroides species can occur due to decrease in Lactobacillus domination. Lactobacillus plays an essential role in keeping normal vaginal microbiota in balance. Vaginal microbiota adapts to pH change and hormonal value. Changes in the vaginal microbiota over a woman’s lifespan will influence the colonization of pathogenic microbes. They include changes in child, puberty, reproductive state, menopause, and postmenopause. Estrogen levels change will affect the colonization of pathogenic microbium, leading to genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Vulvovaginal atrophy is often found in postmenopausal women, and dominated by L. iners, Anaerococcus sp, Peptoniphilus sp, Prevotella sp, and Streptococcus sp. The normal vaginal microbiota’s imbalance in menopause will cause diseases such as bacterial vaginosis, and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis due to hormonal therapies. Changes in the vaginal microbiota due to bacterial vaginosis are characterized by decrease in H2O2-producing Lactobacillus. They are also caused by the increase in numbers and concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and other anaerob species such as Peptostreptococci, Prevotella spp, and Mobiluncus spp.

  6. [Phytoestrogens and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torella, M; La Rezza, F; Labriola, D; Ammaturo, F P; Ambrosio, D; Zarcone, R; Trotta, C; Schettino, M T; De Franciscis, P

    2013-12-01

    Menopause is the interruption of menstrual and reproductive capacity, therefore, that occurs naturally in all women between 48 and 55 years, due to a lower production of gonadal steroids. The period becomes progressively irregular and lack of ovulation and menstrual flow decrease, and finally disappears. The time between the first symptoms and the cessation of the menstrual cycle is called menopause. With the onset of menopause the woman undergoes a series of changes related to estrogen deficiency, which occur in all tissues of the body. In this period one can distinguish an early stage, characterized by hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats and insomnia, and a late phase in which we highlight more symptoms related to the interruption of hormonal such as osteoporosis, obesity, at urogenital and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. In Italy, only 5.2% of women aged 45-64 years used hormone replacement therapy, and only 20-30% follow a therapy for more than two years, both for psychological reasons, and for fear of side effects. Not surprisingly, therefore, phytoestrogens are given a high importance, as they are considered a natural alternative tank to to their plant origin. Interest in phytoestrogens was born from the observation that postmenopausal women who live in the East have a lower incidence of symptoms, cardiovascular disease, cancer and osteoporosis hormone use, compared to Western women.

  7. Age at menopause and measuring symptoms at midlife in a community in Babol, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavar, Mouloud Agajani; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine age at menopause and the prevalence of menopausal symptoms among women in a community in Babol, Iran, and then identify the factors associated with these symptoms and age. A retrospective, descriptive, epidemiological study was conducted on the characteristics of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. A total of 1,397 individuals aged 45 to 63 years were selected using a standard cluster sampling technique. The questionnaire used included menopausal symptoms, menopause status, causes of menopause, use of hormones, reproductive history, and sociodemographic factors. A standard questionnaire named Symptom ScoreCard was used to assess the frequency and severity of menopausal symptoms. The data were analyzed by χ2 analysis, t test, analysis of variance, and adjusted odds ratios with their 95% CIs. Recalled mean ± SD age at natural menopause was 47.7 ± 4.9 years. No significant difference by age at menopause was observed in sociodemographic data, smoking status, reproductive history, and oral contraceptive use. The most prevalent symptoms were irritability (72.1%), joint pain (70.6%), and depression (59.7%) during the previous 2 weeks. An increase in the percentage of occurrence and severity of some symptoms with transition to menopause was observed. The total score for menopausal symptoms was 13.0 ± 7.7. High economic situation (odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.37-2.58) was a factor significantly associated with a total menopausal score of higher than 15. This study shows a high prevalence of menopausal symptoms and an earlier mean age at menopause (47.7 y) for women in a community in Babol, Iran. It would be beneficial to establish a menopausal clinic in primary healthcare centers for the clinical staff to monitor postmenopausal women.

  8. Menopause-specific quality of life satisfaction in community-dwelling menopausal women in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Shou-Qing; Wei, Yang; Gao, Hong-Lian; Wu, Zheng-Lai

    2007-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the satisfaction with quality of life of menopausal women living in an urban community of Beijing, People's Republic of China, using the Chinese version of the menopause-specific quality of life questionnaire (MENQOL). Menopause-related complaints were assessed for 353 women aged 40-60 years during their menopausal transition (MT) or postmenopause (PM) using MENQOL. The Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. The mean age of the subjects was 51.20 +/- 4.62 years. The most frequent symptom was 'experiencing poor memory' (84.1%) and the least frequent was 'dissatisfaction with personal life' (26.9%). Mean scores of vasomotor and sexual symptoms in PM women were higher than in MT women (2.60 +/- 1.74 and 3.39 +/- 2.35 vs. 1.96 +/- 1.46 and 2.10 +/- 1.48, respectively; p = 0.0001). The prevalence of menopause-related symptoms varied between self-assessed health status groups (chi(2) = 29.12, p = 0.0001). In conclusion, MENQOL is a good self-administered tool in the assessment of climacteric complaints, with convenient application. The most frequent climacteric symptom of Chinese women living in an urban community was 'experiencing poor memory'. PM women seemed to suffer from more symptoms, especially in vasomotor and sexual domains, than did MT women. Symptom reports might be associated with self-assessed health status.

  9. Association between smoking and respiratory function before and after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad R; Najman, Jake M; O'Callaghan, Michael J; Williams, Gail M; Paydar, Anita; Clavarino, Alexandra

    2011-02-01

    There is a lack of evidence about whether menopausal status influences the effect of smoking on lung function. This study examined the association between smoking and menopausal status and lung function independent of each other. Data were from a cohort of women attending the 21-year follow-up of the Mater University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy. The study was based on 2020 women who provided data on respiratory function, smoking, and menopausal status. A Spirobank G spirometer system was used to measure forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV(1)), and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75)). Smoking and menopausal status were assessed by self-report. Respiratory function was associated with cigarette smoking, menopausal status, and hormone replacement therapy. Regardless of smoking status, postmenopausal women had poorer lung function when compared with premenopausal women. In multivariate analysis, cigarette smoking was associated with lower FVC, FEV(1), and FEF(25-75), with the magnitude of effect being stronger for women who were postmenopausal. The data suggest that the impact of smoking intensifies after menopause. It seems plausible that effective quit-smoking programs, particularly after menopause, may lead to better lung function and reduced morbidity and mortality in women.

  10. HISTOPATHOLOGY OF MARGINAL SUPERFICIAL PERIODONTIUM AT MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Georgescu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Premises: Sexual hormones may affect the general health condition of women, as early as puberty, continuing during pregnancy and also after menopause. Variations of the hormonal levels may cause different – either local or general – pathological modifications. Sexual hormones may also affect periodontal status, favourizing gingival inflammations and reducing periodontal resistance to the action of the bacterial plaque. Scope: Establishment of the correlations between the debut or the manifestation of menopause and the modifications produced in the superficial periodontium. Materials and method: Clinical and paraclinical investigations were performed on female patients with ages between 45 and 66 years, involving macroscopic, microscopic and radiological recording of the aspect of the superificial periodontium (gingiva. Results: Analysis of the histological sections evidenced atrophic and involutive modifications in the marginal superficial periodontium of female patients at menopause. Conclusions: Sexual hormones intervene in the histological equilibrium of the marginal superficial periodontium, influencing the periodontal health status, which explains the correlation between the subjective symptomatology specific to menopause and the histopatological aspect at epithelial level.

  11. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Pirie, K.

    2012-01-01

    by age at menopause were stronger for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (p effects of menarche and menopause on breast cancer risk might not be acting merely by lengthening women's total number of reproductive......Background Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected...... women. Methods Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone therapy, were included in the analyses. We calculated adjusted relative risks (RRs) associated with menarche...

  12. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: Individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamajima, N; Hirose, K; Tajima, K; Rohan, T; Friedenreich, CM; Calle, EE; Gapstur, SM; Patel, AV; Coates, RJ; Liff, JM; Talamini, R; Chantarakul, N; Koetsawang, S; Rachawat, D; Marcou, Y

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected women. METHODS: Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone thera...

  13. of menopause and sexual satisfaction in menopausal women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    menopause and the prevalence rates of depression fall post- menopause.“ Genazzani', Spinetti, Gallo, et ... previous history of poor physical and psychosocial health at age 36 also reported more symptoms at 47 ..... Hammer M, Berg G and Hindgren R: Does physical exercise influence the frequency ofpostmenopausal hot ...

  14. Analysis of the Relationship between Estradiol and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Concentrations and Polymorphisms of Apolipoprotein E and LeptinGenes in Women Post-Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rył, Aleksandra; Jasiewicz, Andrzej; Grzywacz, Anna; Adler, Grażyna; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Rotter, Iwona; Sipak-Szmigiel, Olimpia; Rumianowski, Bogdan; Karakiewicz, Beata; Jurczak, Anna; Parczewski, Miłosz; Urbańska, Anna; Grabowska, Marta; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2016-05-28

    Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation due to loss of ovarian follicular activity. A review of the available literature indicates that correlations between the changes that take place in a woman's body after menopause and different genetic variants are still being sought. The study was conducted in 252 women who had completed physiological menopause. The women were divided into groups according to the time elapsed since menopause. The total concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone were determined by means of electrochemiluminescence. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) and lepitn (LEP) genotypes were determined by real-time PCR and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, respectively. We observed that people with the APOE3/E3 genotype entered menopause insignificantly later compared to other genotypes. Additionally, in the group of patients with the APOE3/E3 genotypes, differences in the E2 concentration were significantly related to the time since their last menstruation. There is no association found in the literature between these polymorphisms of the LEP gene and hormones. To date, attempts to formulate a model describing the association between E2 and FSH concentration with the polymorphisms of various genes of menopause in women have not been successful. This relationship is difficult to study because of the number of nongenetic factors. Environmental factors can explain variation in postmenopausal changes in hormone levels.

  15. Analysis of the Relationship between Estradiol and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Concentrations and Polymorphisms of Apolipoprotein E and LeptinGenes in Women Post-Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rył

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation due to loss of ovarian follicular activity. A review of the available literature indicates that correlations between the changes that take place in a woman’s body after menopause and different genetic variants are still being sought. Methods: The study was conducted in 252 women who had completed physiological menopause. The women were divided into groups according to the time elapsed since menopause. The total concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone were determined by means of electrochemiluminescence. The apolipoprotein E (APOE and lepitn (LEP genotypes were determined by real-time PCR and polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism, respectively. Results: We observed that people with the APOE3/E3 genotype entered menopause insignificantly later compared to other genotypes. Additionally, in the group of patients with the APOE3/E3 genotypes, differences in the E2 concentration were significantly related to the time since their last menstruation. There is no association found in the literature between these polymorphisms of the LEP gene and hormones. Conclusions: To date, attempts to formulate a model describing the association between E2 and FSH concentration with the polymorphisms of various genes of menopause in women have not been successful. This relationship is difficult to study because of the number of nongenetic factors. Environmental factors can explain variation in postmenopausal changes in hormone levels.

  16. Menopause affects pain depending on pain type and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggiola, Maria Cristina; Nanni, Michela; Bachiocco, Valeria; Vodo, Stellina; Aloisi, Anna M

    2012-05-01

    Women are more affected than men by many chronic pain conditions, suggesting the effect of sex-related mechanisms in their occurrence. The role of gonadal hormones has been studied but with contrasting results depending on the pain syndrome, reproductive status, and hormone considered. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pain changes related to the menopausal transition period. In this observational study, postmenopausal women were asked to evaluate the presence of pain in their life during the premenopausal and postmenopausal periods and its modification with menopause. One hundred one women were enrolled and completed questionnaires on their sociodemographic status, pain characteristics, and evolution. The most common pain syndromes were headache (38%), osteoarticular pain (31%), and cervical/lumbar pain (21%). Pain was present before menopause in 66 women, ceased with menopause in 17, and started after menopause in 18. Data were used for cluster analysis, which allowed the division of participants into four groups. In the first, all women experienced headaches that disappeared or improved with menopause. The second group included osteoarticular pain; the pain improved in half of these women and remained stable in the other half. The third group had cervical/lumbar pain, which disappeared or improved with menopause in all. The fourth group presented different kinds of moderate pain, which worsened in all. The present study provides preliminary data suggesting that menopause can affect pain depending on the painful condition experienced by the woman. This underlines the different interactions of menopause-related events with body structures involved in pain.

  17. The efficacy and safety of vertebral fracture prevention therapies in post-menopausal osteoporosis treatment: Which therapies work best? a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Sui, L; Gai, P; Li, G; Qi, X; Jiang, X

    2017-07-01

    Osteoporosis has become an increasing concern for older people as it may potentially lead to osteoporotic fractures. This study is designed to assess the efficacy and safety of ten therapies for post-menopausal women using network meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic search in several databases, including PubMed and Embase. A random-effects model was employed and results were assessed by the odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Furthermore, with respect to each outcome, each intervention was ranked according to the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) value. With respect to preventing new vertebral fractures (NVF), all ten drugs outperformed placebo, and etidronate proved to be the most effective treatment (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.39). In addition, zoledronic acid and parathyroid hormone ranked higher compared with the other drugs. With respect to preventing clinical vertebral fractures (CVF), zoledronic acid proved to be the most effective drug (OR = 0.25, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.92), with denosumab as a desirable second option (OR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.96), when both were compared with placebo. As for adverse events (AE) and severe adverse events (SAE), no significant difference was observed. According to SUCRA, etidronate ranked first in preventing CVF; parathyroid hormone and zoledronic acid ranked highly in preventing NVF and CVF. Raloxifene was safe with a high rank in preventing AEs and SAEs though performed unsatisfactorily in efficacy. This study suggests that, taking efficacy and safety into account, parathyroid hormone and zoledronic acid had the highest probability of satisfactory performance in preventing osteoporotic fractures. Cite this article: G. Wang, L. Sui, P. Gai, G. Li, X. Qi, X. Jiang. The efficacy and safety of vertebral fracture prevention therapies in post-menopausal osteoporosis treatment: Which therapies work best? a network meta-analysis. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:452-463. DOI: 10

  18. Correlative analysis of plasma and urine neopterin levels in the pre- and post-menopausal women with periodontitis, following nonsurgical periodontal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Periodontitis is an inflammatory condition which is distinguished by the devastation of the supported tooth structures. In such inflammatory conditions, some biomarkers such as neopterin will be secreted and elevated in the body fluids, which can be used as a diagnostic marker for the present and future disease activity. Aims: Assessment of the neopterin as a biomarker in inflammatory conditions such as menopause and periodontitis. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional interventional study. Materials and Methods: Sixty female individuals with a mean age of 40–60 years with chronic periodontitis were included in this study. All were categorized into two groups of thirty each, depending on their menstrual history: Group I – thirty premenopausal women and Group II – thirty postmenopausal women. Urine and plasma were collected from both groups to estimate neopterin levels. ELISA kit was used to assess the neopterin levels at baseline and after 3 months of nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSPT. Statistical Analysis Used: IBM SPSS version 21 software. Results: A significant depreciation in the mean values of all the parameters from baseline to 3 months (P < 0.001, in the intragroup analysis, was observed. Plasma (0.006 and urine (0.004 reduction was seen. Conclusions: In both the groups, in 3 months after NSPT, decreased neopterin levels were found, suggesting that the NSPT is the definitive therapy. Further, suggesting that, neopterin levels in the plasma and urine can be used as an index to identify the periodontal inflammation and destruction.

  19. Carotid artery distensibility and hormone therapy and menopause: the Los Angeles Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufelt, Chrisandra; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Johnson, B Delia; Mehta, Puja; Bittner, Vera; Braunstein, Glenn; Berga, Sarah; Stanczyk, Frank; Dwyer, Kathleen; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-02-01

    Observational studies have suggested that arterial distensibility decreases during menopause; however, its relationship with hormone therapy use remains controversial. We prospectively studied distensibility and hormone therapy use at different menopause stages. One hundred sixty-one women (aged between 42 and 61 y) without cardiovascular disease underwent carotid artery measurements by ultrasound to calculate distensibility index at baseline and 3 years later. Menopause stage was classified at each visit as premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal. Across 3 years of prospective observation, women were classified as remaining premenopausal, remaining postmenopausal, or transitioning (defined as change from premenopausal to perimenopausal, from premenopausal to postmenopausal, from perimenopausal to perimenopausal, or from perimenopausal to postmenopausal). Distensibility declined across time at all menopause stages (P menopausal transition is associated with reduced vascular compliance. Hormone therapy is associated with better arterial distensibility only during the menopausal transition. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether hormone therapy use beyond the menopausal transition is related to distensibility.

  20. Prospective analysis. Nuclear deterrence in 2030; Essai de prospective. La dissuasion nucleaire en 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertrais, B

    2006-12-15

    This study is a prospective analysis of the long-term future of nuclear weapons, and particularly the future of French nuclear deterrence after 2015. The selected time period is 2025-2030. The principal objective is to reflect on what the nuclear world might look like during the first part of the 21 st century, beyond the modernization decisions already planned or envisaged, and to draw conclusions for the future of the French deterrent. (author)

  1. Menopause, a Self Care Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maria Cristina; And Others

    Written for women from the three main cultural groups in New Mexico (Native American, Hispanic, and Anglo), this pamphlet discusses the causes and symptoms, some remedies for the symptoms of menopause, and presents ideas for organizing support groups to help middle-aged women and their families deal with menopausal problems. Explanations of the…

  2. Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargarten, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

  3. Menopause: Salient Issues for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Marilyn M.; Lynch, Ann Q.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding menopause, with the idea that counselors are in an ideal position to help change attitudes toward viewing menopause as a time of positive change rather than a time of psychological distress. Reviews historical, sociological, psychological, and attitudinal factors that account for negative responses associated with…

  4. Menopause: A Life Cycle Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarts, Barbara Kess; Baldwin, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    Family therapists need to address the issue of menopause proactively to be of benefit to couples and families during this transitional period in the family life cycle. Physical, psychological, and psychosocial factors affecting the menopausal woman and her family, and ways to address these issues in counseling are discussed. (Author/EMK)

  5. MENOPAUSE AND NATURAL HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Vrabič Dežman

    2008-12-01

    The studies could not decisively confirm the effectiveness of various phytoestrogens inamelioration of climacteric symptoms. Most studies have proven the effectiveness of thenatural medication made of Cimicifuga racemosa and its safe short-term use. Gynecologists should be familiar with the basics of phytotherapy and the results of clinical studiesin this field in order to confidently advise women to use the natural medications in caseswhere despite the climacteric symptoms they cannot or will not use HRT, consequentlygreatly reducing the quality of their lives. In cases where climacteric symptoms are mild tomoderate, some menopausal societies around the globe suggest trying natural medicationfirst, and only later implementing HRT

  6. Long-term effect of hormone therapy on bone in early menopause: vertebral fractures after 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Branco, C; Davila, J; Perelló, M F; Peguero, A; Ros, C; Martínez-Serrano, M J; Balasch, J

    2014-08-01

    The role of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) on vertebral fracture prevention after treatment discontinuation is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of vertebral fracture in a group of women who received HT in early menopause compared with another group who did not receive such treatment after 20 years of follow-up. In 1990, we included 177 patients aged 43-57 years old (mean 49.1 ± 3.9 years) in a prospective study to evaluate the effect of different HT regimens on bone metabolism and mineral density. After 20-21 years, a total of 49 patients from the initial study were retrieved. These patients were divided into two groups: the first group included women who had taken HT, and those who constituted the control groups and had not taken HT formed the second group. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed and vertebral fracture was assessed by radiology using the Genant semiquantitative scale. Of the 49 patients enrolled, 32 (65.3%) received HT for an average of 5.5 (± 2.96) years while the 17 (34.7%) remaining belonged to the control group without treatment. A higher rate of vertebral fracture was observed in the group receiving HT (p = 0.03). Depending on the degree of fracture (Genant semiquantitative method), subsequent analysis by subgroups corroborated the higher rate in the group receiving HT in all cases (p menopause, body mass index, type of menopause and drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis) in the final result. In spite of the fact that this study does not have a large enough sample, our data suggest that HT used in the early years of menopause does not present a long-term protective effect on vertebral fracture after discontinuing treatment.

  7. Vitamin D and calcium intake and risk of early menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue-Smithe, Alexandra C; Whitcomb, Brian W; Szegda, Kathleen L; Boutot, Maegan E; Manson, JoAnn E; Hankinson, Susan E; Rosner, Bernard A; Troy, Lisa M; Michels, Karin B; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R

    2017-06-01

    Background: Early menopause, defined as the cessation of ovarian function before the age of 45 y, affects ∼10% of women and is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and other conditions. Few modifiable risk factors for early menopause have been identified, but emerging data suggest that high vitamin D intake may reduce risk. Objective: We evaluated how intakes of vitamin D and calcium are associated with the incidence of early menopause in the prospective Nurses' Health Study II (NHS2). Design: Intakes of vitamin D and calcium from foods and supplements were measured every 4 y with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire. Cases of incident early menopause were identified from all participants who were premenopausal at baseline in 1991; over 1.13 million person-years, 2041 women reported having natural menopause before the age of 45 y. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate relations between intakes of vitamin D and calcium and incident early menopause while accounting for potential confounding factors. Results: After adjustment for age, smoking, and other factors, women with the highest intake of dietary vitamin D (quintile median: 528 IU/d) had a significant 17% lower risk of early menopause than women with the lowest intake [quintile median: 148 IU/d; HR: 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.95); P -trend = 0.03]. Dietary calcium intake in the highest quintile (median: 1246 mg/d) compared with the lowest (median: 556 mg/d) was associated with a borderline significantly lower risk of early menopause (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.00; P -trend = 0.03). Associations were stronger for vitamin D and calcium from dairy sources than from nondairy dietary sources, whereas high supplement use was not associated with lower risk. Conclusions: Findings suggest that high intakes of dietary vitamin D and calcium may be modestly associated with a lower risk of early menopause. Further studies evaluating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, other

  8. Self-reported menopausal symptoms, coronary artery calcification, and carotid intima-media thickness in recently menopausal women screened for the Kronos early estrogen prevention study (KEEPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Erin Foran; He, Yunxiao; Black, Dennis M; Brinton, Eliot A; Budoff, Mathew J; Cedars, Marcelle I; Hodis, Howard N; Lobo, Rogerio A; Manson, Joann E; Merriam, George R; Miller, Virginia M; Naftolin, Fredrick; Pal, Lubna; Santoro, Nanette; Zhang, Heping; Harman, S Mitchell; Taylor, Hugh S

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether self-reported menopausal symptoms are associated with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Cross-sectional analysis. Multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Recently menopausal women (n = 868) screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). None. Baseline menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, night sweats, palpitations, mood swings, depression, insomnia, irritability), serum E2 levels, and measures of atherosclerosis were assessed. Atherosclerosis was quantified using coronary artery calcium (CAC) Agatston scores (n = 771) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Logistic regression model of menopausal symptoms and E2 was used to predict CAC. Linear regression model of menopausal symptoms and E2 was used to predict CIMT. Correlation between length of time in menopause with menopausal symptoms, E2, CAC, and CIMT were assessed. In early menopausal women screened for KEEPS, neither E2 nor climacteric symptoms predicted the extent of subclinical atherosclerosis. Palpitations and depression approached significance as predictors of CAC. Other symptoms of insomnia, irritability, dyspareunia, hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats, and vaginal dryness were not associated with CAC. Women with significantly elevated CAC scores were excluded from further participation in KEEPS; in women meeting inclusion criteria, neither baseline menopausal symptoms nor E2 predicted CIMT. Years since menopause onset correlated with CIMT, dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, and E2. Self-reported symptoms in recently menopausal women are not strong predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis. Continued follow-up of this population will be performed to determine whether baseline or persistent symptoms in the early menopause are associated with progression of cardiovascular disease. NCT00154180. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Computational analysis for hepatic safety signals of constituents present in botanical extracts widely used by women in the United States for treatment of menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Jan; Dou, Jinhui; Cross, Kevin P; Valerio, Luis G

    2011-02-01

    Black cohosh, red clover, hops, and chasteberry are botanicals commonly used to alleviate menopausal symptoms in the US, and are examined in this study as part of a FDA Office of Women's Health research collaboration to expand knowledge on the safety of these botanical products. Computational approaches using classic (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ((Q)SAR), probabilistic reasoning, machine learning methods, and human expert rule-based systems were employed to deliver human hepatobiliary adverse effect predictions. The objective is to profile and analyze constituents that are alerting for the human hepatobiliary adverse effects. Computational analysis of positively predicted constituents showed that common structural features contributing to the hepatobiliary adverse effect predictions contain phenolic, flavone, isoflavone, glucoside conjugated flavone and isoflavone, and 4-hydroxyacetophenone structures. Specifically, protocatechuic acid from black cohosh, benzofuran and 4-vinylphenol from chasteberry, and xanthohumol I from hops were botanical constituents predicted positive for liver toxicity endpoints and were also confirmed with literature findings. However, comparison between the estimated human exposure to these botanical constituents and the LOAEL and NOAEL in published animal liver toxicology studies for these constituents demonstrated varying margins of safety. This study will serve as regulatory decision support information for regulators at the FDA to help with the process of prioritizing chemicals for testing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Exploring Black-White Differences in the Relationship Between Inflammation and Timing of Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Graves, Katelyn Y

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the biosocial context of menopausal timing offers insight into social and health inequalities. Prior research on inflammatory chronic conditions suggests that inflammation may predict how early women experience menopause. We explore the ability of black race to moderate the overall relationship between chronic inflammation and timing of menopause. We use data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project on inflammation, age of last menstruation, and race as well as relevant social and medical covariates. We conduct event history modeling to predict age at menopause by inflammatory biomarker levels. Using interaction analysis, we investigate whether being black may shape the overall relationship between inflammation status and menopause timing. Our analyses find no significant statistical interactions between black race and inflammation in predicting menopausal onset. However, we do identify independent correlational relationships between inflammation and black race (r = 0.136) and between menopausal timing and black race (r = -0.129) as well as inflammation (r = -0.138) that emerge as significant in corresponding regression models. We conclude that race probably does not moderate associations between inflammation and menopause. Yet, we also note that the original parameter estimate for black race's impact on menopausal onset (HR = 1.29, p menopause relationship and recommend future research using mediation modeling.

  11. [Menopause-related symptoms in middle-aged women residing in the Zaragoza Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Roncero, Gonzalo Ramón; Martínez-Dearth, Rebeca; López-Baena, María Teresa; Ornat-Clemente, Lía

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess menopausal symptoms and related sociodemographic conditions in middle-aged women from the Spanish province of Zaragoza. This was a cross-sectional study in which 241 women (40-59 years old) from the Zaragoza province completed the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) and a sociodemographic questionnaire containing personal and partner data to assess symptoms associated with the menopause. The most prevalent symptoms were musculoskeletal, followed by hot flushes and perspiration. Somatic, psychological and urogenital symptoms were more severe in post-menopausal women. Somatic and urogenital symptoms worsen with age, body mass index, age at menopause, and partner age. Multiple linear regression analysis (MA) for somatic symptoms was related with the menopausal status, psychiatric treatment, problems with sexual relationships, and history of gender violence. The MA for psychological symptoms was associated with menopausal status, psychiatric treatment and a history of gender violence. The MA for urogenital symptoms was associated with menopausal status, problems with sexual relationships, urinary incontinence and partner alcohol abuse. A history of gender violence was reported by 11.6% of the women. In this sample of middle-aged women, menopausal symptoms were related to menopausal status, and other factors associated with their partner factors, including gender violence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Tindakan Bedah Mulut Pada Pasien Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Andriani

    2008-01-01

    Menopause diartikan sebagai suatu proses dimana wanita tidak mengalami menstruasi lagi. Usia rata - rata seorang wanita mengalami menopause adalah 51 tahun. Pada masa menjelang menopause, ovarium mulai mengalami penuaan sehingga produksi hormon estrogen menurun dan terjadi gangguan keseimbangan hormon. Kekurangan hormon estrogen ini menyebabkan keluhan keluhan yang dikenal sebagai sindroma defisiensi estrogen. Wanita menopause sering disertai dengan penyakit – penyakit sistemik seperti o...

  13. Hubungan Penggunaan Kontrasepsi Pil dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Fitriyani Fitriyani; Ratna Djuwita

    2013-01-01

    Menopause merupakan menstruasi yang berhenti secara permanen yang disebabkan kehilangan fungsi folikel sel-sel telur. Wanita yang memasuki menopause mengalami penurunan hormon estrogen yang mengganggu aktivitas sehari-hari, bahkan menurunkan kualitas hidup. Penggunaan kontrasepsi pil berhubungan dengan penundaan usia dan keluhan menopause. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui hubungan antara penggunaan kontrasepsi pil terhadap usia menopause. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain potong lintang. P...

  14. Cellulite in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leszko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  15. Cellulite in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszko, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  16. Comparison of multi- and single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for assessment of body composition in post-menopausal women: effects of body mass index and accelerometer-determined physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gába, A; Kapuš, O; Cuberek, R; Botek, M

    2015-08-01

    Bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) is commonly used in research to assess body composition. However, studies that validate the accuracy of BIA exclusively in post-menopausal women are lacking. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the agreement of multi-frequency (MF)-BIA and single-frequency (SF)-BIA with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the estimation of fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) among post-menopausal women with variation in body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (PA). FM and FFM were estimated by BIA and DXA in 146 post-menopausal women with a mean (SD) age of 62.8 (5.2) years. PA was determined by an accelerometer. The mean (SD) difference between MF-BIA and DXA was -1.8 (1.8) kg (P = 0.08) and 1.3 (1.8) kg (P = 0.01) for FM and FFM, respectively. SF-BIA provided a significantly lower estimate of FM [-2.0 (2.2) kg; P = 0.04] and a higher estimate of FFM [1.8 (2.4) kg; P obese and insufficiently active subjects. In other BMI and PA groups, both BIA devices showed a similar deviation from DXA. BIA tends to underestimate FM and overestimate FFM relative to DXA. MF-BIA appears to be a more appropriate method for the assessment of body composition than SF-BIA in post-menopausal woman with BMI >30 kg/m(2) and in those who are insufficiently active. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  17. Menopause Is Associated with Accelerated Lung Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebner, Kai; Matulonga, Bobette; Johannessen, Ane; Suske, Sandra; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Demoly, Pascal; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Franklin, Karl A; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gullón Blanco, José Antonio; Heinrich, Joachim; Holm, Mathias; Jarvis, Debbie; Jõgi, Rain; Lindberg, Eva; Moratalla Rovira, Jesús Martínez; Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea; Pin, Isabelle; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Puggini, Luca; Raherison, Chantal; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sunyer, Jordi; Svanes, Cecilie; Hustad, Steinar; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Gómez Real, Francisco

    2017-04-15

    Menopause is associated with changes in sex hormones, which affect immunity, inflammation, and osteoporosis and may impair lung function. Lung function decline has not previously been investigated in relation to menopause. To study whether lung function decline, assessed by FVC and FEV 1 , is accelerated in women who undergo menopause. The population-based longitudinal European Community Respiratory Health Survey provided serum samples, spirometry, and questionnaire data about respiratory and reproductive health from three study waves (n = 1,438). We measured follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and added information on menstrual patterns to determine menopausal status using latent class analysis. Associations with lung function decline were investigated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for age, height, weight, pack-years, current smoking, age at completed full-time education, spirometer, and including study center as random effect. Menopausal status was associated with accelerated lung function decline. The adjusted mean FVC decline was increased by -10.2 ml/yr (95% confidence interval [CI], -13.1 to -7.2) in transitional women and -12.5 ml/yr (95% CI, -16.2 to -8.9) in post-menopausal women, compared with women menstruating regularly. The adjusted mean FEV 1 decline increased by -3.8 ml/yr (95% CI, -6.3 to -2.9) in transitional women and -5.2 ml/yr (95% CI, -8.3 to -2.0) in post-menopausal women. Lung function declined more rapidly among transitional and post-menopausal women, in particular for FVC, beyond the expected age change. Clinicians should be aware that respiratory health often deteriorates during reproductive aging.

  18. Menopause, hormone treatment and urinary incontinence at midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Guillaume; Ringa, Virginie; Fauconnier, Arnaud; Fritel, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Whether there is any association between urinary incontinence and menopause is the subject of debate, partly due to the fact it is difficult to tell the difference between the effects of menopause and those of ageing. For some time it was hoped that hormonal treatment for menopause would be beneficial for urinary incontinence because there are hormonal receptors in the urinary tract. The goal of this survey of current knowledge on the subject is to explore thoroughly the relationship between menopause and urinary incontinence. Our study is based on a review of the literature dealing with the epidemiology of urinary incontinence in women aged between 45 and 60, and the effects of hormonal treatment with respect to the symptoms of involuntary loss of urine. Analysis of the epidemiological data drawn from large cohorts shows that on the one hand, the menopause has little if any impact on the risk of urinary incontinence, and on the other hand that the effects of oestrogen medication on urinary incontinence vary according to how it is administered and the type of incontinence. The effect of oral hormone treatments for menopause is rather negative with respect to stress incontinence. Vaginal treatment appears to be beneficial for overactive bladder symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Premature menopause or early menopause and risk of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Miller, Virginia M.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The general consensus has been that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS). We reviewed new observational studies that challenge this simple conclusion. Methods This was a review of observational studies of the association of premature or early menopause with stroke or IS published in English from 2006 through 2010. Results Three cohort studies showed an increased risk of all stroke in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy compared with women who conserved their ovaries before age 50 years. The increased risk of stroke was reduced by hormonal therapy (HT) in one of the studies, suggesting that estrogen deprivation is involved in the association. Four additional observational studies showed an association of all stroke or IS with the early onset of menopause or with a shorter lifespan of ovarian activity. In three of the seven studies, the association was restricted to IS. Age at menopause was more important than type of menopause (natural vs induced). Conclusions The findings from seven recent observational studies challenge the consensus that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for IS and can be reconciled by a unifying timing hypothesis. We hypothesize that estrogen is protective for IS before age 50 years and may become a risk factor for IS after age 50 years or, possibly, after age 60 years. These findings are relevant to women who experienced premature or early menopause, or to women considering prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of natural menopause. PMID:21993082

  20. Prospective Analysis of Nursing Management from the Students Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alejandro Camejo Giménez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This scientific article was intended to study management in nursing from a prospective analysis, interpret the meanings and meanings that social actors grant to the future of nursing management and unveil the importance of nursing management from prospectivity. The paradigm was interpretative under a qualitative approach, where the phenomenological method based on hermeneutics was applied. We selected 05 students from the first semester of nursing and 05 from the eighth for a total of 10 social actors. As a technique for obtaining the information I used as resources the in-depth interview, notes, photographs and recordings. The following categories emerged from the findings: Service management: training, administration and functions; Prospectivity: profile and futuristic scenario. The emerging categories triangulated and I can say that every bachelor who enters the career must know the functions of nursing. The contribution of the theoretician Michel Godet, among others, was considered. Finally, as a main finding, it was known that most nursing students do not know the future of the career and UCLA in the Deanery under study does not apply prospective management to determine cognitive and mental indicators in future Nursing graduates.

  1. The menopause and urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to study the possible role of the menopause in adult female urinary incontinence (UI) etiology, using a cross-sectional population study comprising a random sample of adult females and self-reported data based on postal questionnaires. The study group comprised 915 women who...... prevalence in 1987 of episodes of stress and urge urinary incontinence; prevalence of menopause and exposure to childbirth, gynecologic surgery, cystitis and obesity as indicated by body mass index more than 29; prevalence relative risks, as indicated by odds ratio of UI conditional on menopause and other...... the year of final menstruation. The findings suggest perimenopausal processes rather than the menopause in general to be responsible for an increased risk of developing UI. The elevation of UI prevalence in the perimenopause may reflect the adjustment of the female continence mechanism to function...

  2. Prevention of diseases after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, R A; Davis, S R; De Villiers, T J; Gompel, A; Henderson, V W; Hodis, H N; Lumsden, M A; Mack, W J; Shapiro, S; Baber, R J

    2014-10-01

    Women may expect to spend more than a third of their lives after menopause. Beginning in the sixth decade, many chronic diseases will begin to emerge, which will affect both the quality and quantity of a woman's life. Thus, the onset of menopause heralds an opportunity for prevention strategies to improve the quality of life and enhance longevity. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, cognitive decline, dementia and depression, and cancer are the major diseases of concern. Prevention strategies at menopause have to begin with screening and careful assessment for risk factors, which should also include molecular and genetic diagnostics, as these become available. Identification of certain risks will then allow directed therapy. Evidence-based prevention for the diseases noted above include lifestyle management, cessation of smoking, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, a healthy diet and moderate exercise, as well as mentally stimulating activities. Although the most recent publications from the follow-up studies of the Women's Health Initiative do not recommend menopause hormonal therapy as a prevention strategy, these conclusions may not be fully valid for midlife women, on the basis of the existing data. For healthy women aged 50-59 years, estrogen therapy decreases coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality; this interpretation is entirely consistent with results from other randomized, controlled trials and observational studies. Thus. as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic disease after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered as part of the armamentarium.

  3. Understanding weight gain at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S R; Castelo-Branco, C; Chedraui, P; Lumsden, M A; Nappi, R E; Shah, D; Villaseca, P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the literature regarding the impact of the menopause transition on body weight and body composition. We conducted a search of the literature using Medline (Ovid, 1946-present) and PubMed (1966-2012) for English-language studies that included the following search terms: 'menopause', 'midlife', 'hormone therapy' or 'estrogen' combined with 'obesity', 'body weight' or 'body composition'. Whereas weight gain per se cannot be attributed to the menopause transition, the change in the hormonal milieu at menopause is associated with an increase in total body fat and an increase in abdominal fat. Weight excess at midlife is not only associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, but also impacts adversely on health-related quality of life and sexual function. Animal and human studies indicate that this tendency towards central abdominal fat accumulation is ameliorated by estrogen therapy. Studies mostly indicate a reduction in overall fat mass with estrogen and estrogen-progestin therapy, improved insulin sensitivity and a lower rate of development of type 2 diabetes. The hormonal changes across the perimenopause substantially contribute to increased abdominal obesity which leads to additional physical and psychological morbidity. There is strong evidence that estrogen therapy may partly prevent this menopause-related change in body composition and the associated metabolic sequelae. However, further studies are required to identify the women most likely to gain metabolic benefit from menopausal hormone therapy in order to develop evidence-based clinical recommendations.

  4. Ecology drives intragenomic conflict over menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, Francisco; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Gardner, Andy

    2014-02-01

    Menopause is the transition from reproductive to non-reproductive life well before natural death. Rather than involving a smooth, rapid change, it is normally preceded by a long period of erratic hormonal fluctuation that is accompanied by a plethora of unpleasant symptoms. Here, we (1) suggest that this turbulent period owes to conflict, between a woman's maternally inherited (MI) and paternally inherited (PI) genes, over the trade-off between reproduction and communal care; (2) perform a theoretical analysis to show that this conflict is resolved either through silencing or fluctuating expression of one of the genes; (3) highlight which of the symptoms preceding menopause may result from antagonistic co-evolution of MI and PI genes; (4) argue that ecological differences between ancestral human populations may explain the variability in menopause among different ethnic groups; (5) discuss how these insights may be used to inform family planning and cancer risk assessment based on a woman's ancestral background. © 2013 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  5. Menopause and Metabolic Syndrome in Tunisian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Ben Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of menopausal status on the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS in Tunisian women. Methods. We analyzed a total of 2680 women aged between 35 and 70 years. Blood pressure, anthropometric indices, fasting glucose, and lipid profile were measured. The MetS was assessed by the modified NCEP-ATPIII definition. Results. The mean values of waist circumference, blood pressure, plasma lipids, and fasting glucose were significantly higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women, a difference that was no longer present when adjusting for age. Except for hypertriglyceridaemia, the frequency of central obesity, hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, and high total cholesterol was significantly higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. After adjusting for age, the significance persisted only for hyperglycemia. The overall prevalence of MetS was 35.9%, higher in postmenopausal (45.7% versus 25.6% than in premenopausal women. A binary logistic regression analysis showed that menopause was independently associated with MetS (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.10–1.82 after adjusting for age, residence area, marital status, family history of cardiovascular disease, education level, and occupation. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that the MetS is highly prevalent in this group of women. Menopause can be a predictor of MetS independent of age in Tunisian women.

  6. Menopause and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Büki, Bela; Cohn, Edward S.; Janky, Kristen L.; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to examine the age and gender distribution and the effect of menopause in a large cohort of participants diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Methods We analyzed 1,377 BPPV patients and surveyed 935 women from this group, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH) over the last decade. Results A detailed age- and gender- distribution analysis of BPPV onset showed that aging had a profound impact on BPPV occurrence in both genders, and that peri-menopausal women were especially susceptible to BPPV (3.2:1 female to male). The latter is a novel finding and was confirmed by a direct survey of female BPPV patients (168 participated). In addition, there was a pronounced female preponderance (6.8:1) for BPPV in the teenage group despite the low prevalence in this age group. Conclusions The data suggest that hormonal fluctuations (especially during menopause) may increase the tendency to develop BPPV. PMID:24496089

  7. Carotid Artery Distensibility and Hormone Therapy and Menopause: The Los Angeles Atherosclerosis Study (LAAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufelt, Chrisandra; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Johnson, B. Delia; Mehta, Puja; Bittner, Vera; Braunstein, Glenn; Berga, Sarah; Stanczyk, Frank; Dwyer, Kathleen; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Observational studies suggest that arterial distensibility decreases during menopause; however, the relation to hormone therapy use is controversial. We prospectively studied distensibility and hormone therapy use during different menopause stages. Methods 161 women between 42–61 years of age without cardiovascular disease had carotid artery measurements by ultrasound to calculate the distensibility index at baseline and 3 years later. Menopause stage was classified at each visit as premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal. Over 3 years of prospective observation, women were classified as remaining premenopausal, remaining postmenopausal, or transitioning, defined as change from premenopausal-to-perimenopausal, premenopausal-to-postmenopausal, perimenopausal-to-perimenopausal, or perimenopausal-to-postmenopausal. Results Distensibility declined over time in all menopause stages (pmenopause transition is associated with reduced vascular compliance. Hormone therapy is associated with better arterial distensibility only during menopause transition. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine if hormone therapy use beyond menopause transition is related to distensibility. PMID:26308234

  8. Sleep During Menopausal Transition: A 6-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampio, Laura; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Kurki, Samu; Huupponen, Eero; Engblom, Janne; Heinonen, Olli J; Polo, Olli; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    Menopausal transition is associated with increased dissatisfaction with sleep, but the effects on sleep architecture are conflicting. This prospective 6-year follow-up study was designed to evaluate the changes in sleep stages and sleep continuity that occur in women during menopausal transition. Sixty women (mean age 46.0 years, SD 0.9) participated. All women were premenopausal at baseline, and at the 6-year follow-up, women were in different stages of menopausal transition. Polysomnography was used to study sleep architecture at baseline and follow-up. The effects of aging and menopause (assessed as change in serum follicle-stimulating hormone [S-FSH]) on sleep architecture were evaluated using linear regression models. After controlling for body mass index, vasomotor, and depressive symptoms, aging of 6 years resulted in shorter total sleep time (B -37.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -71.5 to (-3.3)), lower sleep efficiency (B -6.5, 95%CI -12.7 to (-0.2)), as well as in increased transitions from slow-wave sleep (SWS) to wakefulness (B 1.0, 95%CI 0.1 to 1.9), wake after sleep onset (B 37.7, 95%CI 12.5 to 63.0), awakenings per hour (B 1.8, 95%CI 0.8 to 2.8), and arousal index (B 2.3, 95%CI 0.1 to 4.4). Higher S-FSH concentration in menopausal transition was associated with increased SWS (B 0.09, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.16) after controlling for confounding factors. A significant deterioration in sleep continuity occurs when women age from 46 to 52 years, but change from premenopausal to menopausal state restores some SWS. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Surgical menopause and nonvertebral fracture risk among older US women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesco, Kimberly K; Marshall, Lynn M; Nelson, Heidi D; Humphrey, Linda; Rizzo, Joanne; Pedula, Kathryn L; Cauley, Jane A; Ensrud, Kristine E; Hochberg, Marc C; Antoniucci, Diana; Hillier, Teresa A

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older postmenopausal women with a history of bilateral oophorectomy before natural menopause (surgical menopause) have a higher risk of nonvertebral postmenopausal fracture than women with natural menopause. We used 21 years of prospectively collected incident fracture data from the ongoing Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, a cohort study of community-dwelling women without previous bilateral hip fracture who were 65 years or older at enrollment, to determine the risk of hip, wrist, and any nonvertebral fracture. χ(2) and t tests were used to compare the two groups on important characteristics. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models stratified by baseline oral estrogen use status were used to estimate the risk of fracture. Baseline characteristics differed significantly among the 6,616 women within the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures who underwent either surgical (1,157) or natural (5,459) menopause, including mean age at menopause (44.3 ± 7.4 vs 48.9 ± 4.9 y, P menopause, even among women who had never used oral estrogen (hip fracture: hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.21; wrist fracture: HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.78-1.57; any nonvertebral fracture: HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.93-1.32). These data provide some reassurance that the long-term risk of nonvertebral fracture is not substantially increased for postmenopausal women who experienced premenopausal bilateral oophorectomy, compared with postmenopausal women with intact ovaries, even in the absence of postmenopausal estrogen therapy.

  10. Technical analysis of prospective photovoltaic systems in Utah.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2012-02-01

    This report explores the technical feasibility of prospective utility-scale photovoltaic system (PV) deployments in Utah. Sandia National Laboratories worked with Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), a division of PacifiCorp operating in Utah, to evaluate prospective 2-megawatt (MW) PV plants in different locations with respect to energy production and possible impact on the RMP system and customers. The study focused on 2-MW{sub AC} nameplate PV systems of different PV technologies and different tracking configurations. Technical feasibility was evaluated at three different potential locations in the RMP distribution system. An advanced distribution simulation tool was used to conduct detailed time-series analysis on each feeder and provide results on the impacts on voltage, demand, voltage regulation equipment operations, and flicker. Annual energy performance was estimated.

  11. A study of the menopause, smoking, and contraception in women with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtarowicz, A; Norman, C; Calcraft, B; Morris, J S; Rhodes, J; Mayberry, J

    1989-07-01

    One hundred and ninety-six women with Crohn's disease from south-east Wales were asked to provide details of their menstrual cycles, age at menopause, history of surgery, smoking habits and use of oral contraceptives. One hundred and forty-six provided the information (response rate 77 per cent). Eighty-four were still menstruating, three were pregnant, 10 had undergone hysterectomy, one had a pharmacologically-induced menopause and 48 had had a physiological menopause. Of these 48 women, 33 were diagnosed as having Crohn's disease before the menopause. Twenty-five of these were smokers. The mean age at menopause was similar in smokers and non-smokers and in those diagnosed before and after the menopause. The mean age at menopause was between 46 and 47. A logistic analysis using the 'status quo' method showed that 50 per cent of women with Crohn's disease had the menopause at 47.6 years compared with 49.6 years in a group of healthy women from the same area. The two groups had similar smoking habits and it would seem that a premature menopause is associated with Crohn's disease.

  12. Association of menopause age and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Watson, Karol E; Goff, David C; Bluemke, David A; Srikanthan, Preethi; Horwich, Tamara; Bertoni, Alain G

    2015-05-01

    Menopause age can affect the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of early menopause (menopause occurring before age 45 y) and menopause age with N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a potential risk marker of CVD and heart failure. Our cross-sectional study included 2,275 postmenopausal women, aged 45 to 85 years and without clinical CVD (2000-2002), from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants were classified as having or not having early menopause. NT-proBNP was log-transformed. Multivariable linear regression was used for analysis. Five hundred sixty-one women had early menopause. The median (25th-75th percentiles) NT-proBNP value was 79.0 (41.1-151.6) pg/mL for all participants, 83.4 (41.4-164.9) pg/mL for women with early menopause, and 78.0 (40.8-148.3) pg/mL for women without early menopause. The mean (SD) age was 65 (10.1) and 65 (8.9) years for women with and without early menopause, respectively. No significant interactions between menopause age and ethnicity were observed. In multivariable analysis, early menopause was associated with a 10.7% increase in NT-proBNP levels, whereas each 1-year increase in menopause age was associated with a 0.7% decrease in NT-proBNP levels. Early menopause is associated with greater NT-proBNP levels, whereas each 1-year increase in menopause age is associated with lower NT-proBNP levels, in postmenopausal women.

  13. Comparative study of gabapentin and isoflavone in menopausal vasomotor symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Savita Rani Singhal; Wansalan Kuru Shullai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was planned to compare the effects of gabapentin and isoflavones in menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Materials and Methods: This prospective comparative study was conducted on 100 patients with complaints of hot flashes, divided into two groups of 50 each. Group I received 900 mg of gabapentin and Group II received 60 mg of isoflavones daily for 3 months. The patients were interviewed to calculate hot flash, global and depression scores and were rescored after 2, 4, 8, and...

  14. Informing women on menopause and hormone therapy: Know The Menopause a multidisciplinary project involving local healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Serena; Satolli, Roberto; Colombo, Cinzia; Senatore, Sabrina; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Da Cas, Roberto; Spila Alegiani, Stefania; Mosconi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Hormone therapy (HT) in the menopause is still a tricky question among healthcare providers, women and mass media. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy was a Consensus Conference (CC) organized in 2008: the project Know the Menopause has been launched to shift out the results to women and healthcare providers and to assess the impact of the cc's statement. And Findings: The project, aimed at women aged 45-60 years, was developed in four Italian Regions: Lombardy, Tuscany, Lazio, Sicily, each with one Local Health Unit (LHU) as "intervention" and one as "control". Activities performed were: survey on the press; training courses for health professionals; educational materials for target populations; survey aimed at women, general practitioners (GPs), and gynaecologists; data analysis on HT drugs' prescription. Local activities were: training courses; public meetings; dissemination on mass media. About 3,700 health professionals were contacted and 1,800 participated in the project. About 146,500 printed leaflets on menopause were distributed to facilitate the dialogue among women and health care professionals. Training courses and educational cascade-process activities: participation ranged 25- 72% of GPs, 17-71% of gynaecologists, 14-78% of pharmacists, 34-85% of midwives. 1,281 women interviewed. More than 90% believed menopause was a normal phase in life. More than half did not receive information about menopause and therapies. HT prescription analysis: prevalence fell from 6% to 4% in five years. No differences in time trends before-after the intervention. Major limitations are: organizational difficulties met by LHU, too short time for some local activities. A huge amount of information was spread through health professionals and women. The issue of menopause was also used to discuss women's wellbeing. This project offered an opportunity to launch a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach to menopause looking not only at pharmacological aspects, but

  15. Genetic variants of age at menopause are not related to timing of ovarian failure in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Michael V; Charo, Lindsey M; Natarajan, Loki; Haunschild, Carolyn; Chung, Karine; Mao, Jun J; DeMichele, Angela M; Su, H Irene

    2017-06-01

    To determine if interindividual genetic variation in single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to age at natural menopause is associated with risk of ovarian failure in breast cancer survivors. A prospective cohort of 169 premenopausal breast cancer survivors recruited at diagnosis with stages 0 to III disease were followed longitudinally for menstrual pattern via self-reported daily menstrual diaries. Participants were genotyped for 13 SNPs previously found to be associated with age at natural menopause: EXO1, TLK1, HELQ, UIMC1, PRIM1, POLG, TMEM224, BRSK1, and MCM8. A risk variable summed the total number of risk alleles in each participant. The association between individual genotypes, and also the risk variable, and time to ovarian failure (>12 months of amenorrhea) was tested using time-to-event methods. Median age at enrollment was 40.5 years (range 20.6-46.1). The majority of participants were white (69%) and underwent chemotherapy (76%). Thirty-eight participants (22%) experienced ovarian failure. None of the candidate SNPs or the summary risk variable was significantly associated with time to ovarian failure. Sensitivity analysis restricted to whites or only to participants receiving chemotherapy yielded similar findings. Older age, chemotherapy exposure, and lower body mass index were related to shorter time to ovarian failure. Thirteen previously identified genetic variants associated with time to natural menopause were not related to timing of ovarian failure in breast cancer survivors.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and other cardiovascular risk factors are no more common during menopause: longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriguer, Federico; Morcillo, Sonsoles; Hernando, Virginia; Valdés, Sergio; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Olveira, Gabriel; Fuentes, Eduardo García; González, Inmaculada; Tapia, Maria José; Esteva, Isabel; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to undertake a prospective study of the changes in certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease occurring during menopause. A longitudinal cohort study of 475 women was followed up for 6 years (Pizarra Study). The final menstrual period was defined after at least 6 months of amenorrhea. The women were classified into three groups: group 1, no menopause at either the first or second study; group 2, no menopause at the first study but menopause at the second study (6 y later); and group 3, menopause at the first study (and also at the second). The following are the main outcome measures used: age; body mass index; waist circumference; waist-to-hip ratio; skinfold thickness; arm circumference; intake of macronutrients (quantitative questionnaire); systolic and diastolic blood pressures; cholesterol, triglycerides; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; uric acid; homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance; and the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and impaired fasting glucose. None of the cardiovascular risk factors studied changed during the passage from premenopause to postmenopause, independently of age or physical activity. Menopause is a biological condition of the human species, for which has recently received attempts at medicalization that were not always justified. If menopause is not accompanied by any other cardiovascular risk factor independently of age, the stigma of menopause being considered a risk factor should cease. Although the results have the strength of a prospective study, the sample size forced us to consider these findings as preliminary.

  17. Osteoporosis in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aliya; Fortier, Michel

    2014-09-01

    To provide guidelines for the health care provider on the prevention, diagnosis, and clinical management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Strategies for identifying and evaluating high-risk individuals, the use of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers in assessing diagnosis and response to management, and recommendations regarding nutrition, physical activity, and the selection of pharmacologic therapy to prevent and manage osteoporosis. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library on August 30 and September 18, 2012, respectively. The strategy included the use of appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., oteoporosis, bone density, menopause) and key words (e.g., bone health, bone loss, BMD). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, practice guidelines, randomized and controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English or French. The search was limited to the publication years 2009 and following, and updates were incorporated into the guideline to March 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.

  18. Fractal dimension analysis in digital periapical radiographs: A diagnostic indicator of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathivanan Kavitha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the alveolar bone density by fractal dimension (FD analysis in radiovisiograph of postmenopausal women of mandibular posterior region and to correlate FD values with t-scores of quantitative ultrasound of the calcaneus bone. Materials and Methods: This study, approved by the institutional review board, included 40 participants, aged 45–60 years divided into two groups. Twenty postmenopausal women with osteoporosis comprised group 1, and 20 postmenopausal women without osteoporosis comprised group 2 based on bone mineral density assessment of ultrasound of the calcaneus bone. Digital dental radiograph of mandibular first molar were obtained and used for assessing alveolar bone density by FD analysis and were correlated with t-scores of ultrasound of calcaneus bone. Results: The mean FD values were evaluated using SPSS 14 version software, and were found to be 1.738 and 1.867 for group 1 and group 2, respectively, which was statistically significant (P 0.05. Conclusion: FD analysis using direct digital periapical radiographs is a novel method, which can be used for early diagnosis of osteoporosis in the alveolar bone.

  19. Comparison of the effects of surgical and natural menopause on carotid intima media thickness, osteoporosis, and homocysteine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkaya, Enis; Cakir, Evrim; Okuyan, Erhan; Cakir, Caner; Ustün, Gülnihal; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2011-01-01

    Menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular risk factors. We designed this study to compare common carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) and homocysteine level between women who had natural menopause and those who had surgical menopause and to correlate IMT, bone mineral density (BMD), and homocysteine level with time since menopause. Ninety healthy postmenopausal women aged 50 to 78 years who were not on hormone therapy (45 women who did not have a prior hysterectomy or oophorectomy and 45 women who had undergone hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy) were included in the study. B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid artery, BMD, and serum homocysteine level analysis were completed to evaluate the relationship between type of menopause, time since menopause, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Mean ± SD carotid artery IMT measurements were 0.72 ± 0.002 mm among women experiencing natural menopause and 0.88 ± 0.003 mm among women having bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.002). After adjusting for time since menopause and age, the mean IMT also differed between the two groups: 0.76 ± 0.003 mm in the natural menopause group and 0.84 ± 0.003 mm in the bilateral oophorectomy group (P = 0.038). The age-adjusted carotid IMT was significantly positively associated with years since menopause (P = 0.001). Mean homocysteine measurements were 10.3 ± 5 μmol/L among women experiencing natural menopause and 9.1 ± 4 μmol/L among women who had bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.216). Age-adjusted femur total, trochanter, and shaft BMDs were significantly lower in the surgical menopause group (P = 0.041, P = 0.034, and P = 0.046, respectively). Oophorectomy before natural menopause increases IMT but not homocysteine levels independent of age and time since menopause and is associated with lower BMD values after adjustment for age.

  20. Menopausal women's positive experience of growing older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged.......This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged....

  1. What Are the Symptoms of Menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the symptoms of menopause? Perimenopause begins with a change in a woman's ... longer than a week. A common symptom of menopause is the appearance of hot flashes (sometimes called ...

  2. Menopause: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Aging) Also in Spanish Living With Healthy Lifestyle: Women's Health (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Also ... Spanish Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) ... (North American Menopause Society) What You ...

  3. Menopause, hormone therapy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuenkel, C A

    2017-02-01

    Over the past three decades, the prevalence of diabetes has increased four-fold. Coupled with the global obesity epidemic and aging of the world's population, a perfect metabolic storm is brewing. The influence of menopause and exogenous estrogen and progestogens must be included in this equation. In this review, criteria for diagnosing diabetes and recommendations for screening are described. The reported effects of menopause on diabetes risk in healthy women are reviewed as well as the relationship between established diabetes and the timing of menopause. The effects of menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) on glucose control in women with diabetes and the effect of MHT on diabetes risk in menopausal women without diabetes are described. Evidence-based strategies to prevent diabetes in midlife women are highlighted. The augmenting effect of diabetes on chronic health concerns of aging women, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cancer, along with current recommendations for screening and prevention are presented. Given the current demographics of today's world, the content of this review may apply to as many as one-third of the average practitioner's postmenopausal patient population.

  4. Ramelteon for the treatment of insomnia in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Roseanne DeFronzo; Menza, Matthew; Bienfait, Karina L; Allen, Lesley A; Marin, Humberto; Gara, Michael A

    2009-03-01

    Sleep disturbances have been reported to be one of the most troubling manifestations of menopause. While hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has historically been considered a first-line treatment for menopausal insomnia, many women are now seeking alternative treatments due to concerns about the risks and side-effects of HRT. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor agonist, for the treatment of menopausal insomnia. A total of 20 healthy peri- and postmenopausal women with insomnia participated in this six-week, prospective, open-label trial of ramelteon (8 mg) at an academic medical centre. Participants completed sleep-wake diaries on a daily basis for six weeks. Self-report measures of sleep impairment, daytime functioning, quality of life and mood were also completed on a bi-weekly basis. Significant improvements in latency to sleep onset, total sleep time and sleep efficiency were observed in diary data while gains in sleep quality, sleep impairment, daytime functioning, quality of life and mood were found in self-report measures. There was no evidence of tolerance or rebound over the course of the trial. Overall, results suggest that ramelteon is an effective non-hormonal approach for the treatment of insomnia in menopause. Randomized-controlled trials are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of this intervention.

  5. Menopausal status and the risk of lung cancer in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Lingfeng; Wang, Fang; Liang, Sudong; Yang, Junjun; Xu, Xingxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Quantification of the association between menopausal status and risk of lung cancer is inconsistent. We carried out a meta-analysis of available studies to examine this issue. Methods: Relevant articles were identified by searching PudMed and Embase databases. Reference lists from selected papers were also reviewed. A random-effect model was used to calculate summary odds ratios (OR) and relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Publication bias was estimated using Egger regression asymmetry test. Results: Eight eligible studies, including 5 case–control studies and 3 cohort studies, provided data for meta-analysis. Postmenopausal women had a statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer in all included studies (RR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.12–1.85) and cohort studies (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.05–1.86), but not in case–control studies (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 0.95–2.24). Conclusions: Overall, there was evidence that postmenopause is related to increased lung cancer risk. However, studies have produced slightly heterogeneous results (I2 = 38.40%). To obtain a better indication of relationship, well-designed large prospective studies are required. PMID:28658099

  6. The menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nuttall, Dilyse

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy can ease the symptoms of the menopause. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is developing guidelines on the diagnosis and management of menopause, which are due for release in October 2015. This welcome development acknowledges the impact that menopause-related symptoms can have on an individual. NICE (2013) identify menopause as the ending of menstruation resulting from a failure in ovarian follicular activity. Changes in hormone levels can...

  7. Positive aspects of menopause: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, L

    2001-01-01

    As a part of a larger study, "Menopause described from the woman's perspective", it has been the aim to explore whether women have any positive experiences in relation to menopause, and if so, the nature of these experiences.......As a part of a larger study, "Menopause described from the woman's perspective", it has been the aim to explore whether women have any positive experiences in relation to menopause, and if so, the nature of these experiences....

  8. Voiding characteristics and related hormonal changes in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jong Kyu; Kim, Jae Heon; Choi, Hoon; Chang, In Ho; Park, Bo Ra; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Lee, Eun Sil; Choi, Gyu Yeon; Lee, Jeong Jae; Lee, Im Soon

    2014-11-01

    To characterize voiding symptoms during the peri- and post-menopausal periods and to investigate related hormonal changes. We enrolled a total of 55 patients between February 10, 2013, and August 15, 2013, to participate in this cross-sectional study. To characterize patients' voiding symptoms, we administered voiding questionnaires, including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), and Sandvik Severity Index. Measured hormones included E2, FSH, TSH, prolactin, progesterone, and testosterone. In the univariate analysis, there were significant intergroup differences for all of the hormones except progesterone. Among the voiding symptoms, straining (IPSS question 1), frequency (IPSS question 2), and SUI were significantly different between the two groups (p=0.039. 0.010, and 0.017, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, frequency (IPSS question 2) and SUI were significantly different between the two groups (p=0.020 and 0.011, respectively). Among the hormones, only testosterone was marginally different between the two groups (p=0.059). During the transition to menopause, voiding symptoms, such as frequency, can potentially worsen in the peri-menopausal period, and SUI is more prevalent in the post-menopausal period. Additionally, testosterone may have a role in voiding changes that occur during the menopausal transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Terapi Hormonal Pasca Menopause: Peran Preparat Testosteron

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Muhammad Fidel Ganis

    2016-01-01

    Menopause adalah hal yang normal, fase alami yang terjadi pad a wanita. Selama masa transisi dari tahun reproduktif .ke masa menopause dan sesudahnya, wanita mengalami banyak perubahan fisiko Walaupun banyak wanita menopause asimptomatik dan berhubungan dengan gangguan kecil hidup normal dan kesejahteraan, banyak wan ita mengalami gejala terkadang berat sehingga mempengaruhi kualitas kehidupan mereka .. Salah satunya adalah perubahan siklus menstruasi, hot flashes, gangguan ...

  10. RISK FACTOR ASSESSMENT AND CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF BREAST DISEASES IN A TERTIARY CENTER- A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Jina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast is modified sebaceous gland. It is an organ of female beauty and pride. From puberty to death, the breast is subjected to constant physical and physiological alterations that are related to menses, pregnancy and menopause. The breast problem could be as simple as breast abscess to as ominous as cancer. Both benign and malignant diseases occur in men and women of all ages but benign lesion tend to occur more commonly at younger age than cancer. Benign breast diseases (BBD are common with estimate of over half of the female population at some times in life seeking medical advice for breast problem. This prospective study was done on patients attending OPD for breast complaints in 1 year period, to do the risk factors assessment & clinical analysis of patients presented with breast complaints. MATERIALS AND METHODS Total 200 patients who have attended OPD with breast related complaints and given consent for study, were studied in a period of 1 year duration from at Nehru Hospital, B.R.D Medical College, Gorakhpur. RESULTS Benign breast diseases are more common in the population than malignant one, Fibroadenoma, Breast abscesses and Fibrocystic disease and ANDI are the most common cause of mass seen in middle ages. Malignant lesion of the breast is major concern and the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in our region as seen in study. Incidence is high in western industrialized countries and relatively low in developing countries in Asia and other parts of the world, predisposing factors for BBD are age, sex, race, inverted nipple, retracted nipple, cracked nipple, improper feeding due to lack of knowledge about breast-feeding and endogenous hormonal factors. CONCLUSION BBD is the most frequent type of lesion found in the present study in surgery OPD in BRD medical college, Gorakhpur. Among BBD, fibroadenoma was the commonest, followed by breast abscess, ANDI and gynecomastia. In this study, breast abscess was second most

  11. Exploring Australian Aboriginal Women’s experiences of menopause: a descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite extensive literature demonstrating differing experiences in menopause around the world, documentation of the experience of menopause in Australian Aboriginal women is scarce, and thus their menopausal experience is relatively unknown. This study aimed to understand Australian Aboriginal women’s understanding and experience of menopause and its impact on their lives. Methods The study was an exploratory qualitative study. Twenty-five Aboriginal women were recruited from a regional centre in the Mid-West region of Western Australia using opportunistic and snowballing sampling. Interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken from February 2011 to February 2012 using open-ended questioning with a yarning technique. Thematic analysis was undertaken of the transcribed interviews. Results A number of themes were revealed. These related to the language used, meanings and attitudes to menopause, symptoms experienced, the role of men, a lack of understanding, coping mechanisms and the attribution of menopausal changes to something else. The term “change of life” was more widely recognised and signified the process of ageing, and an associated gain of respect in the local community. A fear of menopausal symptoms or uncertainty about their origin was also common. Overall, many women reported insufficient understanding and a lack of available information to assist them and their family to understand the transition. Conclusion There are similarities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal experiences of menopause, including similar symptom profiles. The current language used within mainstream health settings may not be appropriate to this population if it fails to recognise the importance of language and reflect the attributed meaning of menopause. The fear of symptoms and uncertainty of their relationship to menopause demonstrated a need for more information which has not adequately been supplied to Australian Aboriginal women through current

  12. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  14. [Menopause: social and practical representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelcastre-Villafuerte, B; Garrido-Latorre, F; de León-Reyes, V

    2001-01-01

    To characterize the meanings attributed to menopause, as a first approximation to the representational world of this event. A qualitative study was conducted between September and October 1998, in twenty women aged 45-65 years, residents of Cuernavaca and Emiliano Zapata, municipalities of Morelos state, Mexico. Twenty in-depth interviews were conducted using a guide, to collect data on sociodemographic variables, diagnosis, feelings and emotions, changes in life style, and physiological changes. Findings show that menopause is represented as the end of fertility and the beginning of old age. Characterization of menopause is related to womanhood, body, and sexuality representations. This paper analyzes women's practices related to life experiences such as medical visits. Implications of these findings are discussed using the social construction of meanings framework.

  15. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Partner relationships in menopausal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpak, Rafał; Folwarczny, Wiesław; Drozdzol, Agnieszka; Szuścik, Adam; Skrzypulec, Agnieszka; Skrzypulec, Violetta

    2010-02-01

    Evaluation of partner relationships in menopausal period. A questionnaire study was performed in a group of 67 women (age: 45-55 years) and their partners. The inclusion criteria were: presence of climacteric symptoms, stable partnership, consent to research. 40 women and their spouses were included into the final study group. The investigative tool was based on 3 scales: Marriage Bond Scale (SWM); Scale of Attractiveness (SKAT); GREEN Scale evaluating intensification of menopausal symptoms and a set of additional questions concerning socio-demographical data, marital sexuality and substitute hormonal therapy. Mean age of respondents was 52 years. Most of the women demonstrated an amenorrhea (90%). Climacteric symptoms such as: hot flush, stress, depressive moods (87.5% each), musculoarticular pain (80%) occurred in various degree. 97.5% of women did not use a substitute hormonal treatment. The mean result of SWM for women and their partners scored 237 which is 79% of the total value. A correlation between exacerbation of menopausal signs and SWM score was not found. The co-attractiveness ratio counted on the basis of SKAT scale scored 30 points on average, which constitutes 74% of the maximum. Approximately 58% of the men accepted symptoms related to menopause in their partners; they tolerated changes appearing in the climacteric period, however; 100% of men did not talk about menopausal problems with their partners and did not support them in this difficult time. Men find their partners attractive in the perimenopausal period, accepting their partners and problems related to menopause. Most of the male respondents understand changes occurring in their partners, however, they do not help them to deal with them.

  17. Osteoporosis and years since menopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Saburo; Hirota, Yoshio; Hotokebuchi, Takao; Takasugi, Shin-ichiro; Sugioka, Yoichi; Hayabuchi, Hitomi

    1999-01-01

    In Fukuoka Prefecture, in south-western Japan, a regional screening program for osteoporosis was conducted from 1994 to 1995. The screening level in the bone mineral density (BMD) at the distal non-dominant radius was equal to or less than two standard deviations below age-specific mean (≤ -2.0 SD). In 1177 examinees with natural menopause (mean age: 61.4, range: 42-88), 56 of those who were screened were subsequently radiologically confirmed by orthopedic specialists to have osteoporosis (case group). They were then compared with 802 normal BMD (≥ -1.0 SD) women (reference group) with their lifestyle and reproductive characteristics. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a logistic regression model. A significant increase in the ORs for osteoporosis based on the number of years since menopause was observed for 7-13 years since menopause (OR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.0-5.4) compared with <7 years, however, no increasing trend in risk was evident in 14+ years since menopause (OR=1.4; 95% CI: 0.4-5.1). Thus, the elevated risk continued up to around 10 years since menopause. These findings are consistent with previous studies that reported an alternation in the calcium metabolism and bone loss related to the length of time after menopause. Both the childhood and current milk consumption were also associated with a decreased risk: ORs were 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2-0.9) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.3-1.0), respectively

  18. [Hypertension in women after menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Michel

    2006-06-01

    Menopause coincides with an increase in the incidence of hypertension in women. A direct role of estrogen deprivation in this increased blood pressure remains a topic of debate. Menopause probably accelerates the arterial changes related to aging. Hormone replacement therapy does not influence blood pressure significantly and is not contraindicated in hypertensive women. The effect of hormone replacement treatment on cardiovascular risk was recently the object of controversy. It does not increase risk except in cases of late treatment in older women who already have atherosclerosis. Hypertension management in women is otherwise similar to management in men.

  19. Adrenal androgens and the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasley, Bill L; Crawford, Sybil; McConnell, Daniel S

    2011-09-01

    The concept that adrenal androgen production gradually declines with age has changed after analysis of longitudinal data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). It is now recognized that 4 adrenal androgens rise during the menopausal transition in most women. Ethnic and individual differences in sex steroids are more apparent in circulating adrenal steroids than in either estradiol or cyclic ovarian steroid hormone profiles, particularly during the early and late perimenopause. Thus, adrenal steroid production may play a larger role in the occurrence of symptoms and the potential for healthier aging than previously recognized.

  20. Prospective analysis of delayed colorectal post-polypectomy bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Seo, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Min-Gu; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Choi, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hungdai; Kim, Hyung Ook; Jung, Kyung Uk; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Park, Dong Il

    2018-01-17

    Although post-polypectomy bleeding is the most frequent complication after colonoscopic polypectomy, only few studies have investigated the incidence of bleeding prospectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of delayed post-polypectomy bleeding and its associated risk factors prospectively. Patients who underwent colonoscopic polypectomy at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were prospectively enrolled in this study. Trained nurses contacted patients via telephone 7 and 30 days after polypectomy and completed a standardized questionnaire regarding the development of bleeding. Delayed post-polypectomy bleeding was categorized as minor or major and early or late bleeding. Major delayed bleeding was defined as a > 2-g/dL drop in the hemoglobin level, requiring hospitalization for control of bleeding or blood transfusion; late delayed bleeding was defined as bleeding occurring later than 24 h after polypectomy. A total of 8175 colonoscopic polypectomies were performed in 3887 patients. Overall, 133 (3.4%) patients developed delayed post-polypectomy bleeding. Among them, 90 (2.3%) and 43 (1.1%) patients developed minor and major delayed bleeding, respectively, and 39 (1.0%) patients developed late delayed bleeding. In the polyp-based multivariate analysis, young age ( 10 mm (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.38-4.36) were significant risk factors for major delayed bleeding, while young age (< 50 years; OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.35-5.12) and immediate bleeding (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.49-7.30) were significant risk factors for late delayed bleeding. Young age, aspirin use, polyp size, and immediate bleeding were found to be independent risk factors for delayed post-polypectomy bleeding.

  1. RISK OF LONG TERM HOT FLASHES AFTER NATURAL MENOPAUSE: EVIDENCE FROM THE PENN OVARIAN AGING COHORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.; Sanders, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and evaluate associations of hormone levels, behavioral and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes following menopause. Methods Annual assessments of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause during 16 years of follow-up. Results The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first two years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly following menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after FMP. The mean duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after FMP was 4.6 (SD2.9) years (4.9, SD3.1 years for any hot flashes). One-third of women at 10 or more years following menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African American women (obese and non-obese) and obese white women had significantly greater risk of hot flashes compared to non-obese white women (interaction P=0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing FSH levels before FMP (Pmenopause; more than one- third of women observed for 10 or more years following menopause had moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years following menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risk/benefit when selecting hormone or non-hormonal therapy for menopausal symptoms. PMID:24473530

  2. Life course effects on age at menopause among Bangladeshi sedentees and migrants to the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lorna; Sievert, Lynnette; Begum, Khurshida; Sharmeen, Taniya; Puleo, Elaine; Chowdhury, Osul; Muttukrishna, Shanthi; Bentley, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    To assess how different variables experienced across the life course, but particularly during early life, might affect age at menopause among 174 Bangladeshi migrants to London by comparing them to 157 nonmigrant sedentees and 154 women of European descent in London. Participants were aged 35-59 years, with no exogenous hormone use in the past three months, not pregnant or lactating, with no history of hysterectomy or oophorectomy. Face-to-face interviews and anthropometric measures were carried out. In addition to mean recalled age at natural menopause, median age was computed by probit analysis. Ages at menopause were examined by bivariate and Cox regression analyses in relation to demographic, reproductive, and lifestyle variables, and in relation to potential exposure to cyclones in early childhood. Ages at menopause were significantly earlier among Bangladeshi sedentees and immigrants compared to Londoners of European origin. Ages at menopause were earlier among sedentees compared to immigrants. Urban birthplace, more infectious diseases during childhood, and lower levels of education increased the risk of an earlier menopause. Changes in environmental conditions during adulthood appeared to modify age at menopause among Bangladeshi immigrants in London compared to women living in Bangladesh; however, Bangladeshi immigrants still experienced an earlier age at menopause compared with their London neighbors of European descent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analysis And Prospects Of Private Pension Funds In Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Pudovkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article under the title "Analysis and prospects of private pension funds in Russia" deals with the pension system of the Russian Federation and the problems that the private pension funds will be facing with the introduction of the new pension reform. In addition, the article also deeply studies the private pension funds market in Russia. The study presented in the article also aims to thoroughly analyze the key drivers of the recent boom of the private pension funds sector. In addition, the study also reflects on the prospects of development of private pension funds and the major growth factors for the future taking into considerations the latest pension reform. It is exactly the pension capital that constitutes the major role to the growth of the the private pension funds market. In addition, taking into account the latest developments in the pension legislature, which imply no pension capital available to the private pension funds for the period 2014-2015 years, it is easy to foresee that the only growth factor left is pension reserves. Overall it obviously means that private pension funds should develop private pension schemes. Moreover, private pension insurance may become the major driver of the whole pension industry in the near future.

  4. Age of menopause and fracture risk in postmenopausal women randomized to calcium + vitamin D, hormone therapy, or the combination: results from the Women's Health Initiative Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shannon D; Lehman, Amy; Nathan, Nisha K; Thomson, Cynthia A; Howard, Barbara V

    2017-04-01

    We previously reported that in the absence of hormone therapy (HT) or calcium/vitamin D (Ca/D) supplementation, earlier menopause age was associated with decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk in healthy postmenopausal women. Treatment with HT and Ca/D is protective against fractures after menopause. In this analysis, we asked if the age of menopause onset alters fracture risk in healthy postmenopausal women receiving HT, Ca/D, or a combination. Hazard ratios (HRs) for any fracture among 21,711 healthy postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Clinical Trial, who were treated with HT, Ca/D, or HT + Ca/D, and who reported age of nonsurgical menopause of menopause menopause 40 to 49 or ≥50 years, regardless of treatment intervention (HR [95% CI]: menopause menopause menopause age (menopause ages. The effect of menopause age on fracture risk was not altered by any of the treatment interventions (HT, Ca/D, HT + Ca/D), suggesting that early age of menopause is an independent contributor to postmenopausal fracture risk.

  5. Type and Timing of Menopause and Later Life Mortality Among Women in the Iowa Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rachel; Wallace, Robert B.; Guralnik, Jack M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The relationship between menopausal characteristics and later life mortality is unclear. We tested the hypotheses that women with surgical menopause would have increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with women with natural menopause, and that women with earlier ages at natural or surgical menopause would have greater all-cause and cardiovascular mortality than women with later ages at menopause. Methods Women who participated in the Iowa cohort of the Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (n=1684) reported menopausal characteristics and potential confounding variables at baseline and were followed up for up to 24 years. Participants were aged 65 years or older at baseline and lived in rural areas. We used survival analysis to examine the relationships between menopausal characteristics and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Results A total of 1477 women (87.7% of respondents) died during the study interval. Women with an age at natural menopause ≥55 years had increased all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality compared with women who had natural menopause at younger ages. Type of menopause and age at surgical menopause were not related to mortality. These patterns persisted after adjustment for potential confounding variables. Conclusions Among an older group of women from a rural area of the United States, later age at natural menopause was related to increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Monitoring the cardiovascular health of this group of older women may contribute to improved survival times. PMID:21970557

  6. Menopause prediction and potential implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daan, Nadine M P; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-11-01

    Reproductive ageing in women is characterized by a decline in both the quantity and quality of oocytes. Menopause is reached upon exhaustion of the resting primordial follicle pool, occurring on average at 51 years of age (range 40-60 years). The mean global age at natural menopause (ANM) appears robust, suggesting a distinct genetic control. Accordingly, a strong correlation in ANM is observed between mothers and daughters. Few specific genetic determinants of ANM have been identified. Substantial efforts have been made to predict ANM by using anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels. AMH serum concentrations at reproductive age predict ANM, but precision is currently limited. Early ANM is associated with early preceding fertility loss, whereas late menopause is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality later in life. Menopause affects various women's health aspects, including bone density, breast, the cardiovascular system, mood/cognitive function and sexual well-being. If the current trend of increasing human life expectancy persists, women will soon spend half their life postmenopause. Unfortunately, increased longevity does not coincide with an equal increase in years spend in good health. Future research should focus on determinants of long term health effects of ANM, and efforts to improve women's postmenopausal health and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pelvic inflammatory diseases in perimenopause and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabunac Petar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the gynecological profession Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID has a significant role due to its frequency, many complications and high costs of treatment Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate frequency and complications caused by these diseases, and used methods of treatment. Methods: The research was conducted in Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology 'Narodni Front', Belgrade, and included all consecutive patients diagnosed with PID during the period from year 2007 to 2010. The diagnosis of PID was set on the basis of: gynecological examination, test analysis (leucocytes, sedimentation, platelets, CRP, CA125, and ultrasound examination. A clinical criterion is divided into minimal and additional. The study included 112 patients. There were 33.93% of women in perimenopause/menopause (experimental group, while the control group consisted of 66.07% female subjects. Results: The frequency of surgically treated patients in experimental and control group was: 44.74% : 39.19% (χ2 test; p > 0.05. Women in experimental group used Intrauterine Device (IUD more than other patients 57.89% : 13.15% (χ2 test; p = 0.0001. A link was established between the use of intrauterine devicela in (χ2 test; p = 0.0516, patients’ irregular control of IUD (χ2 test; p = 0.0114 and surgical treatments of women in experimental group. The conservative treatment usually applies dual antibiotic therapy. Costs of surgically treated patients are around 1300 and conservatively treated around 210 €. Conclusion: Women in perimenopause and menopause are not exposed to higher risks of contracting PID. Women in perimenopause and menopause which use intrauterine device and don’t have regular controls, have higher risk of surgical treatments in case of pelvic inflammatory disease. Costs of treatment are 6-7 times in lower with conservatively treated patients compared to operatively treated ones.

  8. Menopause hormonal therapy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; González-Pérez, Marisol; Durand-Carbajal, Marta; Lara-Reyes, Pilar; Jiménez-Santana, Luisa; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Cravioto, María-del-Carmen

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of menopause hormonal therapy on disease activity in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We conducted a double-blind, randomized clinical trial involving 106 women with SLE who were in the menopausal transition or in early or late postmenopause. Patients received a continuous-sequential estrogen-progestogen regimen (n = 52) or placebo (n = 54). Disease activity was assessed at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 months, according to the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). The primary outcome measure was global disease activity, estimated by measuring the area under the SLEDAI curve. Secondary outcome measures included maximum SLEDAI score, change in SLEDAI score, incidence of lupus flares, median time to flare, medication use, and adverse events. Results were studied using intent-to-treat analysis. At baseline, demographic and disease characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean +/- SD SLEDAI scores were 3.5 +/- 3.3 and 3.1 +/- 3.4 in the menopause hormonal therapy and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.57). Disease activity remained mild and stable in both groups throughout the trial. There were no significant differences between the groups in global or maximum disease activity, incidence or probability of flares, or medication use. Median time to flare was 3 months in both groups. Thromboses occurred in 3 patients who received menopause hormonal therapy and in 1 patient who received placebo. One patient in each group died during the trial due to sepsis. Menopause hormonal therapy did not alter disease activity during 2 years of treatment. However, an apparently increased risk of thrombosis seems to be a real threat in women with SLE who receive menopausal hormone therapy.

  9. Common diseases as determinants of menopausal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Mikael; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A

    2016-12-01

    Can the diagnosis of common diseases before menopause influence age at natural menopause (ANM) onset? Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and depression were observed to delay menopause. It has been observed that women who undergo early menopause experience a higher burden of health problems related to metabolic syndromes, heart disease and depression, but whether ANM can be influenced by common adult diseases has not been studied extensively. All women attending mammography screening or clinical mammography at four hospitals in Sweden were invited to participate in the Karolinska Mammography Project for Risk Prediction of Breast Cancer (KARMA) study. Between January 2011 and March 2013, 70 877 women were recruited. Information from the baseline questionnaire filled out upon enrollment was used in this cross-sectional analysis on predictors of ANM onset. We limited our analyses to 61 936 women with complete data on ANM and covariates and a follow-up time (from birth to menopause or censoring) of at least 35 years. Premenopausal diagnoses of depression, anorexia, bulimia, PCOS, ovarian cyst, heart failure, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke, preeclampsia, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia were examined as time-dependent variables in multivariable Cox regression analyses, adjusting for reproductive factors (age at menarche, menstrual cycle regularity in adult life, number of children and premenopausal oral contraceptive use) and risk factors of common diseases (education, physical activity at 18 years and information at the time of questionnaire including BMI, ever smoking and alcohol consumption). Women with PCOS and depression were independently associated with later menopause (hazard ratio (95% CI): 0.44 (0.28-0.71) and 0.95 (0.91-1.00), respectively), compared to women with no such histories. The associations remained significant in a subset of women who had never received gynecological surgery or hormone treatment (n = 32313, 0.21 (0

  10. Effects of early age at natural menopause on coronary heart disease and stroke in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijun; Song, Lulu; Liu, Bingqing; Li, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Lina; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2017-08-15

    Menopause is identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease because of the change of estrogen. The objective of the study was to explore the associations between early age at natural menopause (menopause at an age≤45years) and the presence of CHD and stroke. The study subjects were from the first follow-up survey of the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study. A total of 16,515 postmenopausal women were included for the analysis. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between age at natural menopause (≤45, 45-52, >52years) and the presence of CHD and stroke adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, reproductive history and metabolic factors. In the fully adjusted model, for each 1-year delay in menopausal age, the prevalence of CHD and stroke was reduced by 3% (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.98) and 5% (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), respectively. Women with early menopause (≤45years) had a higher prevalence of CHD (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Similarly, women with early menopause (≤45years) was associated with higher prevalence of stroke (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.25-2.30) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Early age at natural menopause is significantly associated with the presence of CHD and stroke among Chinese women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Cross-cultural study: experience, understanding of menopause, and related therapies in Australian and Laotian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayakhot, Padaphet; Vincent, Amanda; Teede, Helena

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare symptom experiences, beliefs, attitudes, and understanding of menopause and menopausal therapies in Australian and Laotian women. This was a cross-cultural, questionnaire-based study involving 108 women (56 Australian women and 52 Laotian women aged 40-65 y) attending outpatient clinics in Australia and Laos. Descriptive statistics and univariate analysis were conducted using Student's t test or Mann-Whitney U test, where appropriate. Psychological symptoms, depression, vasomotor symptoms, and sexual dysfunction were significantly higher in Australian women compared with Laotian women (P menopause as aging (57%), whereas most Laotian women reported not knowing what menopause meant to them (81%). Australian women's fears about menopause included weight gain (43%), aging (41%), and breast cancer (38%), whereas Laotian women reported not knowing about potential menopausal problems (85%). Exercise (55%), education and awareness (46%), and improving lifestyle (41%) were reported by Australian women as being effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms, with only 21% reporting not knowing what was effective compared with 83% of Laotian women. Many women reported not knowing the risks/benefits of hormonal therapies (50% of Australian women and 87% of Laotian women) and herbal therapies (79% of Australian women and 92% of Laotian women). General practitioners were the most common source of menopause information for both Australians (73%) and Laotians (67%). Sociocultural factors influence women's perception of menopause. Psychological symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and vasomotor symptoms are more commonly reported by Australian women than by Laotian women. Women have a limited understanding of the risks/benefits of menopausal therapies, and culturally appropriate education is needed.

  12. Differences in age at death according to smoking and age at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Andrea; Wolk, Alicja; Orsini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Younger age at menopause is associated with overall mortality, and cigarette smoking is the only lifestyle factor influencing this association. However, the combined effects of age at menopause and smoking have never been quantified in terms of survival time. Our aim was to evaluate, in a large cohort of Swedish women, differences in age at death according to age at menopause and smoking status. Age at menopause and smoking were assessed, using a self-administered questionnaire, in a population-based cohort of 25,474 women aged 48 to 83 years. Laplace regression was used to calculate differences in median age at death (50th percentile difference [PD]) according to smoking and age at menopause. Across 16 years of follow-up, 5,942 participants died. The difference in median age at death between women with menopause at 40 years and women with menopause at 60 years was 1.3 years (50th PD, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2). Compared with current smokers, former smokers and never smokers had older median age at death-2.5 years (50th PD, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.9-3.1) and 3.6 years (50th PD, 3.6; 95% CI, 3.1-4.1), respectively. When analysis was restricted to current smokers, the difference in age at death between women with menopause at 40 years and women with menopause at 60 years increased to 2.6 years (50th PD, 2.6; 95% CI, 0.8-4.5). No association among never smokers was observed. Younger age at menopause is linearly associated with shorter survival. This association tends to be stronger among current smokers.

  13. Staying Healthy After Menopause | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Staying Healthy After Menopause Past Issues / ... menopause/menopause-basics/index.html Staying healthy after menopause may mean making some changes in the way you live. Don't smoke. ...

  14. Effects of flaxseed and Hypericum perforatum on hot flash, vaginal atrophy and estrogen-dependent cancers in menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfarpour, Masumeh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Khadivzadeh, Talat; khorsand, Imaneh; Afiat, Maliheh; Esmaeilizadeh, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed at evaluation of the efficacy of Hypericum perforatum and flaxseed on hot flash, vaginal atrophy and estrogen-dependent cancers in menopausal women Materials and Methods: We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (RCT) to explore trials that assessed the effectiveness of H. perforatum and flaxseed on hot flash, vaginal atrophy and estrogen-dependent cancers. In this regard, the following terms were used “menopause AND H. perforatum OR flaxseed OR Linum usitatissimum. Only randomized controlled trials were included in the study. Results: Nine RCTs were included in this systematic review. Based on the literature, flaxseed showed beneficial effect on hot flash frequency and intensity, which was not statistically significant. According to two trials, flaxseed showed estrogenic effects; however, no conclusion regarding cancer promoting or protecting effects can be made. The evidence of the efficacy of the flaxseed on alleviating vaginal atrophy was also limited due to inconsistent findings in this regard. One trial declared that Vitex agnus-castus and H. perforatum showed comparable decrease in the frequency of hot flashes. Conclusion: The results of our systematic review suggest beneficial effect on vasomotor symptom with both of flaxseed and H. perforatum. Consistent conclusion regarding estrogen-dependent cancers and maturation value is limited due to small number of trials related to flaxseed. Further trials are still needed to confirm the results of our systematic review. PMID:27462550

  15. Efficacy and safety of Cimicifuga foetida extract on menopausal syndrome in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ting-ping; Sun, Ai-jun; Xue, Wei; Wang, Ya-ping; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Lang, Jing-He

    2013-01-01

    It is now recognized that Cimicifuga foetida extract is effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms. But the durations reported were usually short. This paper compares the clinical effects of different regimens of three-month course on climacteric symptoms in Chinese women, so as to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Cimicifuga foetida extract. This was a prospective, randomized trial. Ninety-six early menopausal women were recruited and randomly assigned into 3 groups to take different kinds of medicine for 3 months; participants were given Cimicifuga foetida extract daily in group A (n = 32), given estradiol valerate and progesterone capsule cycle sequentially in group B (n = 32), and given estradiol valerate and medroxyprogesterone acetate cycle sequentially in group C (n = 32). The questionnaires of Kupperman menopause index, Menopause-Specific Quality of Life, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were finished before and after the treatment. The status of vaginal bleeding and breast tenderness was recorded every day. Eighty-nine participants (89/96, 92.7%) completed the treatment. Kupperman menopause index decreased after taking the medicine for 3 months in each group (with all P Cimicifuga foetida extract is effective and safe in the treatment of menopausal syndrome. It is worth extending its use in the treatment of climacteric complaints, especially among those having contradiction for hormone replacement therapy.

  16. Hubungan Jumlah Paritas dengan Usia Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadya Gorga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakMenopause merupakan waktu penghentian menstruasi secara permanen yang terjadi setelah hilangnya aktivitas ovarium. Saat ini jumlah wanita usia menopause meningkat seiring dengan peningkatan usia harapan hidup. Studi tentang menopause sangat penting, terutama terkait akibat yang akan terjadi pasca menopause seperti penyakit kardiovaskuler dan osteoporosis. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan usia menopause alami dan menganalisis hubungannya terhadap jumlah paritas pada wanita di Kelurahan Bandar Buat Padang. Penelitian  ini merupakan  studi analitik cross-sectional terhadap wanita usia 45-60 tahun yang berada di Kelurahan Bandar Buat Padang. Pengumpulan data dilakukan melalui  wawancara dengan  menggunakan kuesioner  di rumah atau di tempat kerja mereka. Hasil penelitian menunjukan 69 wanita yang diteliti didapatkan rata-rata jumlah paritas adalah 3,663 dengan jumlah paritas 1 dan terbanyak memiliki 10 orang anak. Rata-rata usia menopause responden dalam penelitian ini adalah usia 50,65 tahun dengan usia termuda 46 tahun dan tertua 58 tahun. Terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara jumlah paritas dan usia menopause di Kelurahan Bandar Buat  dengan hasil p< 0,01.Kata kunci: menopause, jumlah paritas, penyakit kardiovaskuler, osteoporosis AbstractMenopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation period that occurs after the loss of ovarian activity. Currently, the number of women of menopausal age increases as the increase in life expectancy. The study of menopause is very important, especially related to the consequences that will occur after the menopause such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to determine the age of natural menopause and analyze its relationship on the amount of parity in the Village Bandar Buat Padang. This study was a cross-sectional analytic study to women aged 45-60 years  in the Village of Bandar Buat Padang. Data collected through interviews using a

  17. Menopause transition: Annual changes in serum hormonal patterns over the menstrual cycle in women during a nine-year period prior to menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Britt-Marie; Collins, Aila; Csemiczky, Giorgy; Burger, Henry G; Baksheev, Lyrissa; Robertson, David M

    2004-06-01

    To examine the hormonal characteristics of menstrual cycles in healthy women approaching menopause, serum hormone profiles were investigated annually in this longitudinal study of 13 healthy women between 4 and 9 yr before menopause and the year of the menopause. Serum FSH, LH, estradiol, progesterone, total inhibin, inhibins A and B, and prolactin were determined in blood samples collected annually three times weekly for 4 wk beginning with the onset of menses. Menstrual bleeding diaries covering this 4- to 9-yr period were also collected allowing the prospective identification of the final menstrual period. A change in serum hormone patterns was observed in cycles approaching menopause, exemplified by an increasing number of cycles of prolonged length with a prolonged follicular phase resulting in a failure to detect a luteal phase rise in serum progesterone within the 4-wk collection period. These prolonged cycles (designated B cycles based on a previous work) were analyzed separately and compared with the remaining ovulatory (D) cycles. No B cycles were identified in any women earlier than 27 cycles from menopause. The proportion of B cycles increased as menopause approached, reaching 62% in the last 10 cycles. The proportion of D cycles decreased accordingly. The B cycles during the initial 4-wk collection period were characterized by elevated FSH, LH, FSH/inhibin A and FSH/inhibin B ratios, and longer duration, although cycle length/subject was not significantly different presumably due to the small number of B cycles. The D cycles showed no changes in hormonal profiles over the 4- to 9-yr time period. These data indicate that there is a time-related change in the character of menstrual cycles as menopause approaches, with an increasing proportion of cycles observed with prolonged follicular phases that may either be delayed ovulatory cycles or anovulatory cycles. The increase in the proportion of B cycles with elevated early follicular phase FSH levels and

  18. Associations of physical activity and diet with the onset of menopause in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Chisato; Wada, Keiko; Nakamura, Kozue; Tamai, Yuya; Tsuji, Michiko; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Prospective studies on physical activity and diet and the onset of natural menopause are scarce. The aim of this study was to examine the association of physical activity and dietary factors potentially related to endogenous estrogen levels such as fats, dietary fiber, soy isoflavones, and alcohol with the onset of menopause in a cohort of premenopausal women. Study participants were 3,115 premenopausal Japanese women aged 35 to 56 years derived from the participants in the Takayama Study. Physical activity was assessed by a validated questionnaire at baseline, and the metabolic equivalent score was calculated. The dietary intakes were estimated by a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline and adjusted for total energy. Menopause status was defined as the absence of menstruation for 12 months or more. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the hazard ratio of the occurrence of menopause after controlling for age, parity, body mass index, smoking status, years of education, and lifelong irregular menstrual cycle. During the 10-year follow-up, 1,790 women experienced natural menopause. A high physical activity level and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat were moderately but significantly associated with the earlier onset of menopause; the hazard ratios for the highest versus lowest quartile were 1.17 (95% CI, 1.02-1.34) for physical activity and 1.15 (95% CI, 1.01-1.31) for polyunsaturated fat intake. Total fat, other types of fat, dietary fiber, soy isoflavones, and alcohol were not associated with the onset of menopause. These data suggest that high levels of physical activity and polyunsaturated fat intake are associated with earlier onset of menopause.

  19. Menopause: developing a rational treatment plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Danielle; Naftolin, Frederick; Naftoilin, Frederick; Taylor, Hugh S

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, growing importance has been afforded to assisting women in coping with the menopausal transition. Menopause is a normal stage of development and a woman's attitude toward this transition embodies biological, psychological and social influences. An enlarging body of conflicting data concerning menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) demands reassessment of established paradigms of disease prevention and menopausal health. Currently, a woman's decision to participate in or abstain from menopausal HT is personal. It involves not only consideration of risk stratification of potential harm and benefit, but also involves her expectations and attitudes toward perceived physical and emotional changes associated with this change. Through the use of extensive patient history, quality-of-life questionnaires and powerful biological profiling, we may be able to develop a rational approach to menopausal HT that safely guides our patients through this transition.

  20. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  1. HUBUNGAN TINGKAT STATUS GIZI WANITA MENOPAUSE DENGAN PERUBAHAN FISIK PADA MASA MENOPAUSE KOTA SEMARANG

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Elliana; Anita Murniwati

    2017-01-01

    Latar belakang : Menopause terjadi akibat dari penurunan produksi hormon estrogen yang dihasilkan oleh kelenjar endokirin dimana pada usia sekitar 45-55 tahun ditandai dengan keluhan haid yang mulai tidak teratur. Berdasarkan studi pendahuluan terhadap 10 wanita yang berumur 45-55 tahun di Kelurahan Bendanduwur Kecamatan Gajahmungkur kota Semarang, didapatkan bahwa 7 dari 10 wanita menopause (70%) berstatus gizi baik dan 2 orang wanita menopause (20%) telah mengalami perubahan fisik menopause...

  2. Risk of long-term hot flashes after natural menopause: evidence from the Penn Ovarian Aging Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Sammel, Mary D; Sanders, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and to evaluate the associations of hormone levels, behavioral variables, and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes after menopause. We performed annual assessment of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause within 16 years of follow-up. The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first 2 years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly after menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after the FMP. The mean (SD) duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after the FMP was 4.6 (2.9) years (for any hot flashes, 4.9 [3.1] y). One third of women at 10 years or more after menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African-American women (obese and nonobese) and obese white women had significantly greater risks of hot flashes compared with nonobese white women (interaction, P = 0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing follicle-stimulating hormone levels before the FMP (P menopause; more than one third of women observed for 10 years or more after menopause have moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years after menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risks/benefits when selecting hormone or nonhormone therapy for menopausal symptoms.

  3. Understanding and Managing Menopause | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Understanding and Managing Menopause Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Menopause, or the "change of life," is different for each woman. For ...

  4. Menopause Treatments | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Menopause Treatments Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents ... you should use hormones to help relieve some menopause symptoms. It's hard to know what to do, ...

  5. Menopause Symptoms | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Menopause Symptoms Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Women may have different signs or symptoms at menopause. That's because estrogen is used by many parts ...

  6. Menopause Weight Gain: Stop the Middle Age Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but excess pounds aren't inevitable. To minimize menopause weight gain, step up your activity level and ... In fact, many women gain weight around the menopause transition. Menopause weight gain isn't inevitable, however. ...

  7. An overview of menopause associated Vaso Motor Symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Vasomotor Symptoms are the most common and distressing menopausal complaint, for which women seek advice from their physician. OBJECTIVE: To review menopausal associated vasomotor symptoms and options available in its management. METHODS: Pertinent literature on menopause associated ...

  8. Risk factors for postmenopausal osteoporosis: anthropometric measurements, age, age at menopause and the time elapsed after menopause onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Nurten; Akpolat, Veysi; Kale, Ahmet; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Kuyumcuoglu, Umur; Celik, Yusuf

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, how much the anthropometric measurements and age affect the femur and vertebra T-scores by using correlation and regression analysis in postmenopausal women. Data of 540 healthy postmenopausal women were included in this analysis. Bone mineral density was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The data of the patients related to height, weight, age, age at menopause were obtained from records, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated (BMI = W (kg)/H(m(2))). Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS 15.0 for Windows (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Mean age and standard deviation of 540 postmenopausal women was 59.3 +/- 8.4 years. The correlation coefficients among femur, vertebra T-scores, weight, the time elapsed after the menopause onset, age, BMI and height were found as follows, from higher to lower values with 0.465, 0.453, 0.411, 0.382, 0.232, respectively, and were statistically significant (p osteoporosis from higher to lower influence as follows: weight, menopause age, age, BMI and height. Weight and menopause age of the patients were the major determinants for osteoporosis.

  9. Analysis geothermal prospect of Mt. Endut using geochemistry methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobirin, R.; Permadi, A. N.; Akbar, A. M.; Wildan, D.; Supriyanto

    2017-07-01

    Mt. Endut geothermal area is located in Lebak district, Banten province, about 40 km to the south of the town of Rangkasbitung. There are four manifestations of hot springs i.e: Handeuleum hot springs, Cikawah 1, Cikawah 2, and Gajrug. Based on geochemical analysis using Na-K-Mg triangular diagrams, Cl-Li-B, and Cl-SO4-HCO3, it is known that Cikawah 1 hot springs is chloride type and the other springs are bicarbonate type. Reservoir temperature range is from 162°C to 180°C are predicted by SiO2 and NaK geothermometers. In general all hot springs are out flows, but there is an hypothesis that Cikawah 1 is the up flow. Because it is in partial equilibrium and chloride type. Mount Endut has a hydrothermal system with a fluid reservoir in the form of hot water or water dominated system. The geothermal prospect area of Mount Endut is located around the Cikawah manifestation to the western part of the Endut mountain. Further research is required by conducting geophysical surveys around the Mount Endut.

  10. Portraits of menopause in the mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, L; Stevens, J

    1998-01-01

    This examination of menopause as presented by the popular print media was conducted in the context of furthering our understanding of the development of attitudes toward menopause. All articles indexed under "menopause" in the Reader's Guide in the years 1981, 1982, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1994 were located and examined. The data revealed that, although there has been an increase in the frequency of articles on menopause in the last 15 years, the media's portrayal of menopause is problematic in several respects: (a) in spite of the increased attention, the information available on menopause through the popular media is minimal and insufficient; (b) there was little variability in terms of perspective, discipline, or focus; almost all were focused on menopause as a negative experience or disease and in need of medical treatment; (c) there was considerable contradiction and inconsistency among the articles with respect to descriptions of menopause and intervention advice for menopausal women; (d) aging, stress, life-style factors, race and ethnicity, exercise and diet were, with few exceptions, ignored or trivialized.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF IRON STATUS AMONG SUDANESE MENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Siham Khalifa Abd Allah; Mohamed Abedelrahman Syid; Areeg Alsail Mohmmed; Raian Bakhet Yassein; Nosiba Abdelmajid Alballah; Nada Omer Alseedig

    2017-01-01

    Menopause is very important turning phase in the life of a female and is associated with hormonal changes. These hormones affect the overall personality however menopause is also associated with varied menopausal symptoms. Menopause women are a high risk group for iron level disturbance in your bodies. This was descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to determine the serum iron level in menopause women. Following informed consent, fifty subjects in menopause period, and sex matched fifty heal...

  12. Tooth Loss and Perceived Masticatory Ability in Post-Menopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunga Riadiani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-menopausal women experience physiological hormonal changes that reduce bone density which leads to tooth loss and presumably affect masticatory function. Objective: This study aims to determine association between tooth loss and masticatory ability in post-menopausal women. Methods: Cross sectional study of 95 post-menopausal women at Posbindu Lansia Pergeri Depok, West Java was performed. Subjects answered questionnaires and intra oral examination was performed. Chi square analysis was conducted to relate age, menopausal period, education level, tooth loss and denture use with masticatory ability. Results: 47% subjects lost >10 teeth, 27% subjects lost 6-10 teeth and 26% subjects lost <6 teeth. Seventy-six percent of subjects did not wear dentures. Menopausal period, tooth loss, and age had significant correlation with masticatory ability (p<0.05. Conclusions: This study concludes that masticatory ability in post-menopausal women is significantly affected by length of menopausal period, tooth loss and age (p<0.05.

  13. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause hot flushing: A crossover randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Rafat; Nikjou, Roya; Rostamnegad, Masoumeh; Norouzi, Hosein

    2016-09-01

    Flushing is generally considered to be the primary symptom of menopause and is typically the most common complaint in menopausal women. Although flushing poses no danger to a woman's health, it decreases the quality of life. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause flushing. This double-blinded crossover clinical trial included 100 menopausal women 45-55 years of age who were referred to various health centers in Ardabil, Iran in 2013-2014. Samples were blocked randomly and divided into two intervention (lavender) and control (diluted milk) groups. Lavender aroma was smelled for 20 minutes twice a day, over a 12-week period. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, and flushing numbers were duly recorded. Data analysis was performed by SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using the Chi-square and t test. The results of our investigation showed that both groups had no significant difference according to demographic characteristics (p > 0.05). Additionally, the flushing number significantly decreased in the intervention group than in the control group (p aromatherapy reduced menopause flushing. Given the impact of stress on flushing and the undesirable effects of menopause symptoms on the quality of life, it would appear that this simple, noninvasive, safe, and effective method can be used by menopausal women with noticeable benefits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  14. Differential genetic basis for pre-menopausal and post-menopausal salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L M Herrera

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension affects 75% of post-menopausal women in the United States causing greater cardiovascular complications compared with age-matched men and pre-menopausal women. Hormone replacement and current anti-hypertensive therapies do not correct this post-menopausal increased risk suggesting a distinct pathogenic framework. We investigated the hypothesis that distinct genetic determinants might underlie susceptibility to salt sensitive hypertension in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal states. To determine whether distinct genetic loci contribute to post-menopausal salt-sensitive hypertension, we performed a genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting blood pressure (BP in 16-month old post-menopausal F2 (Dahl S×R-intercross female rats characterized for blood pressure by radiotelemetry. Given identical environments and high salt challenge, post-menopausal BP levels were significantly higher than observed in pre-menopausal (post-menopausal versus pre-menopausal SBP, P<0.0001 and ovariectomized (post-menopausal versus ovariectomized SBP, P<0.001 F2-intercross female rats. We detected four significant to highly significant BP-QTLs (BP-pm1 on chromosome 13, LOD 3.78; BP-pm2 on chromosome 11, LOD 2.76; BP-pm3 on chromosome 2, LOD 2.61; BP-pm4 on chromosome 4, LOD 2.50 and two suggestive BP-QTLs (BP-pm5 on chromosome 15, LOD 2.37; BP-f1 on chromosome 5, LOD 1.65, four of which (BP-pm2, BP-pm3, BP-pm4, BP-pm5 were unique to this post-menopausal cohort. These data demonstrate distinct polygenic susceptibility underlying post-menopausal salt-sensitive hypertension providing a pathway towards the identification of mechanism-based therapy for post-menopausal hypertension and ensuing target-organ complications.

  15. Mother's menopausal age is associated with her daughter's early follicular phase urinary follicle-stimulating hormone level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Anne Z; Baird, Donna D; Kesner, James S

    2008-01-01

    Early follicular phase follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a marker of ovarian reserve, has been used to predict time to menopause. A mother's age at menopause is related to her daughter's age at menopause, possibly because of genetic factors. In this study we sought to determine the relationship between maternal age at menopause and early follicular phase FSH of premenopausal daughters. The Uterine Fibroid Study enrolled women randomly selected from a prepaid health plan, collected questionnaire data, and obtained early follicular phase urine samples for a subset of participants. For this secondary analysis, premenopausal women between the ages of 35 and 46 years, who provided a urine sample on cycle day 2, 3, 4, or 5 and their mother's age at natural menopause (n = 182) were selected from the original cohort. Initially bivariate analysis and subsequently regression modeling were performed to assess the independent relationship between maternal age at menopause and urinary creatinine-corrected FSH. Unadjusted analyses and those adjusting for age (mean +/- SD, 40.5 +/- 3.2 y), smoking status (16% current smokers), and body mass index (26.8 +/- 6.9 kg/m) showed a significant association between maternal age at menopause and daughter's urinary FSH level (P menopause had higher urinary FSH levels. The significantly increased FSH values among women whose mothers experienced early menopause is consistent with previously reported associations between mother's and daughter's age of menopause. FSH, a marker of ovarian reserve, is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Future epidemiologic studies on FSH should include collection of information on maternal age at menopause.

  16. Reducing inappropriate testing in the diagnosis of the menopause and peri-menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jac; Currie, Heather; Foster, Adele; Anderson, Julia

    2016-09-01

    The menopause should be diagnosed based on age, menstrual history and clinical symptoms, and as such, follicle stimulating hormone testing may be considered inappropriate when diagnosing the menopause or peri-menopause in women aged 45 and over. As part of a demand optimisation programme, the number of follicle stimulating hormone tests requested to diagnose the menopause in this age group was quantified and educational interventions were implemented to reduce inappropriate testing. The number of follicle stimulating hormone tests requested to diagnose the menopause in women aged 45 and over was successfully and sustainably reduced. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Estrogen and progestogen use in postmenopausal women: 2010 position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    To update for both clinicians and the lay public the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in July 2008 regarding its recommendations for menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women, with consideration for the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio at various times through menopause and beyond. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health was enlisted to review the July 2008 NAMS position statement, evaluate new evidence through an evidence-based analysis, and reach consensus on recommendations. The Panel' s recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees as an official NAMS position statement. Also participating in the review process were other interested organizations who then endorsed the document. Current evidence supports a consensus regarding the role of HT in postmenopausal women, when potential therapeutic benefits and risks around the time of menopause are considered. This paper lists all these areas along with explanatory comments. Areas that vary from the 2008 position statement are noted. A suggested reading list of key references published since the last statement is also provided. Recent data support the initiation of HT around the time of menopause to treat menopause-related symptoms; to treat or reduce the risk of certain disorders, such as osteoporosis or fractures in select postmenopausal women; or both. The benefit-risk ratio for menopausal HT is favorable for women who initiate HT close to menopause but decreases in older women and with time since menopause in previously untreated women.

  18. The perceptions of African women regarding natural menopause in Mamelodi, Tshwane district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria N. Makuwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of South African aging population are women, who spend late adulthood experiencing natural menopause. Despite the government spending billions of rand on different services for ageing women, menopausal challenges to African women still receive little attention. Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore and describe the perceptions of African women regarding natural menopause, in order to propose recommendations for health and social support systems for women in Mamelodi, Tshwane district. Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used to conduct the study. The population of the study consisted of menopausal women, between the ages 45 and 60 years or more, visiting the clinics for collection of chronic medication and othe rhealth assessment. Individual face-to-face interviews were conducted, using a semi-structured interview guide to collect data. Tesch’s method of qualitative data analysis was used in the study. Results: The main theme that emerged from the study was ‘attitude toward menopause’, which was supported by cultural beliefs and experience. The African menopausal women expressed the importance of health support systems that will meet their needs within their context. Conclusion: Women’s health programs and educational health information at facilities should include menopausal education to promote and improve health of all African menopausal women during their adulthood. There is a need to establish a women’s health support group network within communities to share menopausal experiences with peers. The training and education curriculum of healthcare providers should include detailed menopause in order to provide comprehensive, congruent care.

  19. Age at menopause, reproductive history and venous thromboembolism risk among postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Marianne; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Cochrane, Barbara; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate VTE risk in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy and time since menopause, as well as any interaction with randomized HT assignment among postmenopausal women. Methods Using pooled data from the Women’s Health Initiative HT clinical trials including 27,035 postmenopausal women ages 50 to 79 years with no history of VTE, we assessed the risk of VTE in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy and time since menopause by Cox proportional hazard models. Linear trends, quadratic relationships and interactions of reproductive life characteristics with HT on VTE risk were systematically tested. Results During the follow-up, 426 women reported a first VTE, including 294 nonprocedure-related events. No apparent interaction of reproductive life characteristics with HT assignment on VTE risk was detected and there was any significant association of VTE with age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, oophorectomy or time since menopause. However, analyses restricted to nonprocedure-related VTE showed a U-shaped relationship between age at menopause and thrombotic risk that persisted after multivariable analysis (pmenopause, those with early menopause (agemenopause (age>55 years) had a significant increased VTE risk (HR=1.8;95%CI:1.2–2.7 and HR=1.5;95%CI:1.0–2.4, respectively). Conclusion Reproductive life characteristics have little association with VTE and do not seem to influence the effect of HT on thrombotic risk among postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, early and late onset of menopause might be newly identified risk factors for nonprocedure-related VTE. PMID:23760439

  20. Prevalence and predictors of severe menopause symptoms among HIV-positive and -negative Nigerian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaba, Patricia A; Meloni, Seema T; Sule, Halima M; Ocheke, Amaka N; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Idoko, John A; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2017-11-01

    We compared the prevalence of menopause symptoms between women living with HIV to their HIV-negative peers and determined predictors of severe menopause symptoms in Jos, Nigeria. This descriptive cross-sectional study included 714 women aged 40-80 years. We compared prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms using the menopause rating scale (MRS). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of severe symptoms. Six-hundred and seven (85.0%) were HIV-positive, with a mean duration of infection of 5.6 ± 2.7 years. The mean age of the cohort was 46 ± 5 years. The most prevalent menopause symptoms were hot flushes (67.2%), joint and muscle discomfort (66.2%), physical/mental exhaustion (65.3%), heart discomfort (60.4%), and anxiety (56.4%). The median MRS score was higher for HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative women (p = 0.01). Factors associated with severe menopause symptoms included HIV-positive status (aOR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.20-7.54) and history of cigarette smoking (aOR: 4.18, 95% CI: 1.31-13.26). Being married (aOR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32-0.77), premenopausal (aOR: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.39-0.94), and self-reporting good quality of life (aOR: 0.62. 95% CI: 0.39-0.98) were protective against severe menopause symptoms. We found HIV infection, cigarette smoking, quality of life, and stage of the menopause transition to be associated with severe menopause symptoms. As HIV-positive populations are aging, additional attention should be given to the reproductive health of these women.

  1. The perceptions of African women regarding natural menopause in Mamelodi, Tshwane district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria N. Makuwa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of South African aging population are women, who spend late adulthood experiencing natural menopause. Despite the government spending billions of rand on different services for ageing women, menopausal challenges to African women still receive little attention.Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore and describe the perceptions of African women regarding natural menopause, in order to propose recommendations for health and social support systems for women in Mamelodi, Tshwane district.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used to conduct the study. The population of the study consisted of menopausal women, between the ages 45 and 60 years or more, visiting the clinics for collection of chronic medication and othe rhealth assessment. Individual face-to-face interviews were conducted, using a semi-structured interview guide to collect data. Tesch’s method of qualitative data analysis was used in the study.Results: The main theme that emerged from the study was ‘attitude toward menopause’, which was supported by cultural beliefs and experience. The African menopausal women expressed the importance of health support systems that will meet their needs within their context.Conclusion: Women’s health programs and educational health information at facilities should include menopausal education to promote and improve health of all African menopausal women during their adulthood. There is a need to establish a women’s health support group network within communities to share menopausal experiences with peers. The training and education curriculum of healthcare providers should include detailed menopause in order to provide comprehensive, congruent care.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Proteins with Stimulating Activity on Ovarian Estradiol Biosynthesis from Four Different Dioscorea Species in vitro Using Both Phenotypic and Target-based Approaches: Implication for Treating Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J; Wong, R N S; Zhang, L; Wong, R Y L; Ng, T B; Lee, K F; Zhang, Y B; Lao, L X; Liu, J Y; Sze, S C W

    2016-09-01

    Rhizomes of Dioscorea species are traditionally used for relieving menopausal syndromes in Chinese medicine. The estrogen-stimulating bioactive principles have been demonstrated in our previous study. In this study, the estrogen-stimulating effects of proteins isolated from four Dioscorea species [D. alata L. (DA), D. zingiberensis C.H. Wright (DH), D. collettii var. hypoglauca (Palib.) S.J. Pei & C.T. Ting (DH), and D. oppositifolia L. (DO)] have been investigated and compared. Microscopic authentication of four Dioscorea species was performed by using paraffin and powder sections of the rhizomes. The potential bioactive proteins of four Dioscorea species have been rapidly isolated by using a DOI-antibody affinity column chromatography on immobilized antibodies against on estradiol-stimulating protein from DO (DOI), and their bioactivity has been rapidly confirmed and compared by phenotypic (i.e., estradiol-stimulating effect) and target-based (i.e., STAR, aromatase, estrogen receptors) screening approaches. The estrogen-stimulating activity of bioactive proteins from DO is the highest. In addition, bioactive proteins from DO upregulated the estradiol-metabolizing enzymes (aromatase and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein). Meanwhile, bioactive proteins from DA, DH and DO upregulated estrogen receptor β (ERβ). All bioactive proteins did not change the expression of estrogen receptor β (ERα). The estrogen-stimulating bioactive proteins isolated from DO increased biosynthesis of estradiol and upregulated the protein expression of aromatase, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and ERβ. The results scientifically support the traditional use of DO in Chinese medicine for relieving menopausal syndrome. Besides, proteins from DA and DZ could also upregulate the translational levels of ERβ, and potentially reducing the risk of ovarian cancer, which also support the clinical use of them for treating female aging disorder. Graphical Abstract Comparative

  3. Factors associated with menstrual cycle irregularity and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jinju; Park, Susan; Kwon, Jin-Won

    2018-02-06

    A regular menstrual cycle is an important indicator of a healthy reproductive system. Previous studies reported obesity, stress, and smoking as the factors that are associated with irregular menstruation and early menopause. However, the integrative effects of these modifiable risk factors have not been fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the modifiable risk factors of menstrual cycle irregularity and premature menopause, as well as their individual and combined effects among adult women in Korea. This study selected adult women aged 19 years and above who had been included in the 2007-2014 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We used a separate dataset to analyze the risk factors of menstrual cycle irregularity and menopause (pre- and postmenopausal women: n = 4788 and n = 10,697, respectively). Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the effects of smoking, drinking, obesity, and perceived level of stress on the menstrual cycle and menopause. Both logit and linear models were used in the analyses of the association between smoking and menopausal age. Equivalized household income, marital status, and educational level were considered as covariates. The modifiable risk factor scores were also calculated to integrate the effect of smoking, drinking, and obesity in the analysis. Results showed that smoking status, pack-year, obesity, and perceived level of stress were significantly associated with irregular menstruation among premenopausal women. Especially, women demonstrating > 3 modifiable risk factor scores had 1.7 times higher risk of having irregular menstruation than those who had a 0 score. Meanwhile, early initiation of smoking (≤19 years) and high pack-year (≥5) were also significantly associated with premature menopause among postmenopausal women. This study demonstrated that modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, and stress, were significantly associated

  4. Lipid changes during the menopause transition in relation to age and weight: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Carol A; Crawford, Sybil L; Pasternak, Richard C; Sowers, Maryfran; Sternfeld, Barbara; Matthews, Karen A

    2009-06-01

    Few studies have prospectively examined lipid changes across the menopause transition or in relation to menopausal changes in endogenous hormones. The relative independent contributions of menopause and age to lipid changes are unclear. Lipid changes were examined in relation to changes in menopausal status and in levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone in 2,659 women followed in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (1995-2004). Baseline age was 42-52 years, and all were initially pre- or perimenopausal. Women were followed annually for up to 7 years (average, 3.9 years). Lipid changes occurred primarily during the later phases of menopause, with menopause-related changes similar in magnitude to changes attributable to aging. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein(a) peaked during late peri- and early postmenopause, while changes in the early stages of menopause were minimal. The relative odds of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (> or =130 mg/dL) for early postmenopausal, compared with premenopausal, women were 2.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.5, 2.9). High density lipoprotein cholesterol also peaked in late peri- and early postmenopause. Results for estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone confirmed the results based on status defined by bleeding patterns. Increases in lipids were smallest in women who were heaviest at baseline.

  5. Thoracic irrigation prevents retained hemothorax: A prospective propensity scored analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Nathan W; Carver, Thomas W; Milia, David; Paul, Jasmeet S

    2017-12-01

    Thoracic trauma resulting in hemothorax (HTx) is typically managed with thoracostomy tube (TT) placement; however, up to 20% of patients develop retained HTx which may necessitate further intervention for definitive management. Although optimal management of retained HTx has been extensively researched, little is known about prevention of this complication. We hypothesized that thoracic irrigation at the time of TT placement would significantly decrease the rate of retained HTx necessitating secondary intervention. A prospective, comparative study of patients with traumatic HTx who underwent bedside TT placement was conducted. The control group consisted of patients who underwent standard TT placement, whereas the irrigation group underwent standard TT placement with immediate irrigation using 1 L of warmed sterile 0.9% saline. Patients who underwent emergency thoracotomy, those with TTs removed within 24 hours, or those who died within 30 days of discharge were excluded. The primary end point was secondary intervention defined by additional TT placement or operative management for retained HTx. A propensity-matched analysis was performed with scores estimated using a logistic regression model based on age, sex, mechanism of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scale chest score, and TT size. In over a 30-month period, a total of 296 patients underwent TT placement for the management of traumatic HTx. Patients were predominantly male (79.6%) at a median age of 40 years and were evenly split between blunt (48.8%) and penetrating (51.2%) mechanisms. Sixty (20%) patients underwent thoracic irrigation at time of initial TT placement. The secondary intervention rate was significantly lower within the study group (5.6% vs. 21.8%; OR, 0.16; p irrigation and control cohort. Thoracic irrigation at the time of initial TT placement for traumatic HTx significantly reduced the need for secondary intervention for retained HTx. Therapeutic Study, Level III.

  6. Invisalign--patient profiling. Analysis of a prospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Beate; Wiemer, Kerstin B; Miethke, Rainer-Reginald

    2003-09-01

    The aim of the present prospective study was to produce a profile of those patients who are interested in treatment with the Invisalign system. Personal data and clinical findings of 89 patients attending the Invisalign consulting hours offered by the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Charité Medical School were recorded. Personal data included gender, age, profession, motivation for treatment, accepted treatment duration, and initial source of information; clinical findings included anomalies of tooth position and jaw relationship as well as oral hygiene. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a characteristic profile: Mainly women between 20 and 29 years of age were interested in Invisalign treatment, chiefly for esthetic reasons, accepting a treatment time of 1.5 to 2.5 years. The majority of patients rejected treatment with visible appliances. 41% had been initially informed of this new treatment system by their dentist or an orthodontist, and the same percentage through different media. The standard of oral hygiene was only moderate or low in 54% of all subjects. Frontal crowding was diagnosed in 87%, and a Class II malocclusion in 49%. The demand for orthodontic treatment mainly among women is substantial, but many of these potential patients baulk at the esthetic impairment induced by a fixed labial appliance or the speech disturbances induced by a lingual appliance. In order to increase the acceptance of new treatment methods, the high demands placed by those concerned on esthetic and phonetic aspects should therefore be respected. With respect to oral hygiene, many patients are still in urgent need of professional instruction.

  7. Hubungan Penggunaan Kontrasepsi Hormonal dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Kudadiri, Liza

    2016-01-01

    Kontrasepsi hormonal merupakan suatu metode untuk mencegah kehamilan dengan cara pemberian hormon steroid. Menopause merupakan suatu fase dalam kehidupan wanita dimana masa kesuburan sudah berakhir yang ditandai dengan berhentinya siklus haid sekurang-kurangnya selama 1 tahun. Penggunaan kontrasepsi hormonal dapat menyebabkan pergeseran usia menopause menjadi lebih tua. Desain penelitian yang digunakan adalah deskriptif korelasi yang bertujuan mengidentifikasi hubungan pengg...

  8. Menopause in patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    Menopause represents a time of significant clinical and hormonal change. Given the incompletely understood interrelationship between gonadal hormones and the immune system, it is possible that menopause may affect, or be affected by, the presence of autoimmune disease. Menopause has significant effects on a number of organ systems including the cardiovascular, skeletal, central nervous and genitourinary systems. Premature ovarian failure is related to autoimmune factors in a proportion of cases, but is not generally associated with systemic autoimmune disorders unless secondary to treatment with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. Gonadal hormones have been suggested to relate to both onset and activity in certain autoimmune diseases. For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, disease activity is lower, and damage accrual higher, in the postmenopausal years, but the mechanisms responsible may relate to age, duration of disease, menopause changes, long-term effects of therapy, or some combination of these factors. Early menopause is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, and post-menopausal status in RA is associated with greater damage and disability. Systemic sclerosis and giant cell arteritis may also be adversely affected by onset of menopause. Importantly, autoimmune disease and menopause may have an additive effect on risk for common comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychosocial Adjustment Needs of Menopausal Women | Dimkpa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychosocial adjustment needs of menopausal women. The population of the study consisted of 623 menopausal women who were out-patients in Federal Medical Centre and a private hospital in Yenagoa Local Government Area, Bayelsa State of. Nigeria. The sample ...

  10. Age at menopause, reproductive history, and venous thromboembolism risk among postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Therapy clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Marianne; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Stefanick, Marcia L; Cochrane, Barbara; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Manson, Joann E

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to investigate venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy, and time since menopause, as well as any interaction with randomized hormone therapy (HT) assignment, among postmenopausal women. Using pooled data from the Women's Health Initiative HT clinical trials including 27,035 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years who had no history of VTE, we assessed the risk of VTE in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy, and time since menopause by Cox proportional hazards models. Linear trends, quadratic relationships, and interactions of reproductive life characteristics with HT on VTE risk were systematically tested. During follow-up, 426 women reported a first VTE, including 294 non-procedure-related events. No apparent interaction of reproductive life characteristics with HT assignment on VTE risk was detected, and there was not a significant association between VTE and age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, oophorectomy, or time since menopause. However, analyses restricted to non-procedure-related VTE showed a U-shaped relationship between age at menopause and thrombotic risk that persisted after multivariable analysis (P menopause, those who had early menopause (age menopause (age >55 y) had a significantly increased VTE risk (hazard ratio [95% CI]: 1.8 [1.2-2.7] and 1.5 [1.0-2.4], respectively). Reproductive life characteristics have little association with VTE and do not seem to influence the effect of HT on thrombotic risk among postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, early and late onset of menopause might be newly identified risk factors for non-procedure-related VTE.

  11. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  12. The urogenital system and the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Agius, J; Brincat, M P

    2015-01-01

    The major cause of urogenital atrophy in menopausal women is estrogen loss. The symptoms are usually progressive in nature and deteriorate with time from the menopausal transition. The most prevalent urogenital symptoms are vaginal dryness, vaginal irritation and itching. The genitourinary syndrome of menopause includes vulvovaginal atrophy and the postmenopausal modifications of the lower urinary tract. Dyspareunia and vaginal bleeding from fragile atrophic skin are common problems. Other urogenital complaints include frequency, nocturia, urgency, stress urinary incontinence and urinary tract infections. Atrophic changes of the vulva, vagina and lower urinary tract can have a large impact on the quality of life of the menopausal woman. However, hormonal and non-hormonal treatments can provide patients with the solution to regain the previous level of function. Therefore, clinicians should sensitively question and examine menopausal women, in order to correctly identify the pattern of changes in urogenital atrophy and manage them appropriately.

  13. Surgical menopause versus natural menopause and cardio-metabolic disturbances: A 12-year population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, M; Ramezani Tehrani, F; Bahri Khomami, M; Noroozzadeh, M; Azizi, F

    2015-07-01

    Menopausal status exposes women to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study was performed to compare the effect of menopausal types, including surgical and natural, on metabolic syndrome and other metabolic disorders 3 years before and after menopause. Of 437 postmenopausal women, who participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, 13 women with surgical menopause and 39 age-matched controls with natural menopause were selected. During the follow-up period, changes in metabolic and biochemical profiles were compared between surgical and natural menopause women. Odds of incidence of metabolic syndrome in surgical menopause women, compared to natural menopause women, was 9.7 (95 % CI 1.8-51.8). Metabolic disturbances after menopause are highly influenced by type of menopause and are more prevalent in those undergoing surgical menopause.

  14. Efficacy of Erbium:YAG laser treatment compared to topical estriol treatment for symptoms of genitourinary syndrome of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Adrian; Brandi, Hugo; Gomez, Valentin; Luque, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this prospective comparative cohort study was to establish the effectiveness and safety of Erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) laser treatment for genitourinary syndrome of menopause and to compare it with an established topical estriol treatment. Fifty patients with genitourinary syndrome of menopause were divided into two groups. The estriol group received a treatment of 0.5 mg estriol ovules for 8 weeks and the laser group was first treated for 2 weeks with 0.5 mg estriol ovules 3 times per week to hydrate the mucosa and then received three sessions with 2,940 nm Er:YAG laser in non-ablative mode. Biopsies were taken before and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Maturation index, maturation value and pH where recorded up to 12-months post-treatment, while the VAS analysis of symptoms was recorded up to 18 months post-treatment. Statistically significant (P changes in the tropism of the vaginal mucosa and also angiogenesis, congestion, and restructuring of the lamina propria in the laser group. Side effects were minimal and of transient nature in both groups, affecting 4% of patients in the laser group and 12% of patients in the estriol group. Our results show that Er:YAG laser treatment successfully relieves symptoms of genitourinary syndrome of menopause and that the results are more pronounced and longer lasting compared to topical estriol treatment. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:160-168, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Video Games and Youth Violence: A Prospective Analysis in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The potential influence of violent video games on youth violence remains an issue of concern for psychologists, policymakers and the general public. Although several prospective studies of video game violence effects have been conducted, none have employed well validated measures of youth violence, nor considered video game violence effects in…

  16. Prospective analysis of the medicine possession ratio of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conducted a prospective cohort study analysing AD medicine claims (N=35 175) for 14 135 patients, obtained from a nationally representative pharmaceutical benefit management company, over a 6-year study period (1 January 2006 - 31 December 2011). The medicine possession ratio (MPR) was used as a proxy to ...

  17. Menopausal Status, Depression, and Life-Satisfaction among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the study revealed that (I) currently menopausal women experienced a significantly higher level of depression and a lower level of life satisfaction than non-menopausal and post menopausal women. (ii) women who experienced late menopause were more depressed and less satisfied with life than women who ...

  18. The impact of serum FSH and estradiol on postmenopausal osteoporosis related to time since menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoldemir, Tevfik; Erenus, Mithat; Durmusoglu, Fatih

    2012-11-01

    To determine the impact on osteopenia/osteoporosis of serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol levels and time since menopause in a group of Turkish postmenopausal women. Four hundred and thirty-three healthy postmenopausal women seen at the Marmara University Menopause Outpatient Clinic were enrolled for this prospective cohort study. The women were allocated to one of three groups according to the bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebrae and total hip, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Serum FSH, estradiol levels, age and time since menopause were compared between the groups. The mean serum FSH, LH, estradiol and testosterone levels for women with normal, osteopenic and osteoporotic BMD at lumbar vertrebra L1-L4 and total hip were comparable. Time since menopause had a stronger predictive value for low BMD (osteopenia or osteoporosis) in the lumbar and hip areas than did serum FSH or estradiol levels. Our study showed that neither FSH nor E2 has a strong impact on postmenopausal BMD. However it appears that time since menopause has a weak non-significant association with postmenopausal osteopenia and osteoporosis.

  19. Menopausal status and the risk of lung cancer in women

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Lingfeng; Wang, Fang; Liang, Sudong; Yang, Junjun; Xu, Xingxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Quantification of the association between menopausal status and risk of lung cancer is inconsistent. We carried out a meta-analysis of available studies to examine this issue. Methods: Relevant articles were identified by searching PudMed and Embase databases. Reference lists from selected papers were also reviewed. A random-effect model was used to calculate summary odds ratios (OR) and relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Publication bias was estimated ...

  20. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa, Patrizia; Ornello, Raffaele; Degan, Diana; Tiseo, Cindy; Stewart, Janet; Pistoia, Francesca; Carolei, Antonio; Sacco, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. PMID:26316824

  1. Distinguishing benign from malignant pelvic mass utilizing an algorithm with HE4, menopausal status, and ultrasound findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Karen KL; Chen, Chi-An; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ochiai, Kazunori; Aw, Tar-Choon; Sabaratnam, Subathra; Hebbar, Sudarshan; Sickan, Jaganathan; Schodin, Beth A; Charakorn, Chuenkamon; Sumpaico, Walfrido W

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a risk prediction score for distinguishing benign ovarian mass from malignant tumors using CA-125, human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), ultrasound findings, and menopausal status. The risk prediction score was compared to the risk of malignancy index and risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA). Methods This was a prospective, multicenter (n=6) study with patients from six Asian countries. Patients had a pelvic mass upon imaging and were scheduled to undergo surgery. Serum CA-125 and HE4 were measured on preoperative samples, and ultrasound findings were recorded. Regression analysis was performed and a risk prediction model was developed based on the significant factors. A bootstrap technique was applied to assess the validity of the HE4 model. Results A total of 414 women with a pelvic mass were enrolled in the study, of which 328 had documented ultrasound findings. The risk prediction model that contained HE4, menopausal status, and ultrasound findings exhibited the best performance compared to models with CA-125 alone, or a combination of CA-125 and HE4. This model classified 77.2% of women with ovarian cancer as medium or high risk, and 86% of women with benign disease as very-low, low, or medium-low risk. This model exhibited better sensitivity than ROMA, but ROMA exhibited better specificity. Both models performed better than CA-125 alone. Conclusion Combining ultrasound with HE4 can improve the sensitivity for detecting ovarian cancer compared to other algorithms. PMID:25310857

  2. The Association between Serum Uric Acid Level and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome according to Menopausal Status in Korean Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jong Kil; Hong, Gil Pyo; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Seung Chul; Kim, Chang Woon; Lee, Kyu Sup

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome according to menopausal status in Korean women. A total of 2,241 women who visited to the health promotion center at Pusan National University Hospital from 2010 to 2014 were included in this cross-sectional study. Self-report questionnaires and interviews with healthcare providers were used to assess disease history, medication history, menstrual history and body size measuring. Anthropometric measurements and laboratory results were compared as presence of metabolic syndrome and menopausal status by student-t test. Logistic regression analysis was performed between presence of metabolic syndrome and presumable predictive factors, such as age, menopause and serum uric acid. The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome were 7.45% (63/846) in pre-menopausal group and 23.87% (333/1395) in menopausal group. Serum uric acid level was higher in menopausal women than premenopausal women (4.6 ± 1.1 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9. P = 0.000). And, its concentration was also higher in metabolic syndrome than normal women regarding of menopausal statue (premenopause 4.7 ± 1.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.001, menopause 4.9 ± 1.3 vs. 4.5 ± 1.0, P = 0.000). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed serum uric acid and age have relationship with metabolic syndrome (OR: 1.453, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.074-1.111, P = 0.000; OR: 1.092, 95% CI: 1.305-1.619, P = 0.000). We could find out some potential of uric acid as predictive factor for metabolic syndrome in premenopausal and menopausal group. Further investigation is required to clarify the relationship between serum uric acid, menopause and metabolic syndrome.

  3. Video games and youth violence: a prospective analysis in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Christopher J

    2011-04-01

    The potential influence of violent video games on youth violence remains an issue of concern for psychologists, policymakers and the general public. Although several prospective studies of video game violence effects have been conducted, none have employed well validated measures of youth violence, nor considered video game violence effects in context with other influences on youth violence such as family environment, peer delinquency, and depressive symptoms. The current study builds upon previous research in a sample of 302 (52.3% female) mostly Hispanic youth. Results indicated that current levels of depressive symptoms were a strong predictor of serious aggression and violence across most outcome measures. Depressive symptoms also interacted with antisocial traits so that antisocial individuals with depressive symptoms were most inclined toward youth violence. Neither video game violence exposure, nor television violence exposure, were prospective predictors of serious acts of youth aggression or violence. These results are put into the context of criminological data on serious acts of violence among youth.

  4. A tree-based method of analysis for prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Holford, T; Bracken, M B

    1996-01-15

    Prospective studies often involve rare events as study outcomes, and a primary concern is to identify risk factors and risk groups associated with the outcomes. We discuss practical solutions to risk factor analyses in prospective studies and address strategies to determine tree structures, to estimate relative risks, and to manage missing data in connection with some important epidemiologic problems. Some of the basic ideas for our strategies follow from work of Breiman, Friedman, Olshen, and Stone, although we propose extensions to their methods to resolve some practical problems that arise in implementation of these methods in epidemiologic studies. To illustrate these ideas, we analyse low birthweight associated risk factors with use of a data set from the Yale Pregnancy Outcome Study.

  5. Cumulative prospect theory and mean variance analysis. A rigorous comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Hens, Thorsten; Mayer, Janos

    2012-01-01

    We compare asset allocations derived for cumulative prospect theory(CPT) based on two different methods: Maximizing CPT along the mean–variance efficient frontier and maximizing it without that restriction. We find that with normally distributed returns the difference is negligible. However, using standard asset allocation data of pension funds the difference is considerable. Moreover, with derivatives like call options the restriction to the mean-variance efficient frontier results in a siza...

  6. Hormonal changes in the menopause transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Henry G; Dudley, Emma C; Robertson, David M; Dennerstein, Lorraine

    2002-01-01

    The menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from the loss of ovarian follicular activity. It is heralded by the menopausal transition, a period when the endocrine, biological, and clinical features of approaching menopause begin. A common initial marker is the onset of menstrual irregularity. The biology underlying the transition to menopause includes central neuroendocrine changes as well as changes within the ovary, the most striking of which is a profound decline in follicle numbers. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is an established indirect marker of follicular activity. In studies of groups of women, its concentration, particularly in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, begins to increase some years before there are any clinical indications of approaching menopause. The rise in FSH is the result of declining levels of inhibin B (INH-B), a dimeric protein that reflects the fall in ovarian follicle numbers, with or without any change in the ability of the lining granulosa cells to secrete INH-B. Estradiol levels remain relatively unchanged or tend to rise with age until the onset of the transition and are usually well preserved until the late perimenopause, presumably in response to the elevated FSH levels. During the transition, hormone levels frequently vary markedly - hence, measures of FSH and estradiol are unreliable guides to menopausal status. Concentrations of testosterone have been reported to fall by about 50% during reproductive life, between the ages of 20 and 40. They change little during the transition and, after menopause, may even rise. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEAS, its sulphate, on the other hand, decline with age, without any specific influence of the menopause. Symptoms of the menopause can be interpreted as resulting primarily from the profound fall in estradiol, occurring over a 3- to 4-year period around final menses, a fall that presumably contributes importantly to the beginning, in the

  7. Effect of persistent menopausal symptoms on the wellbeing of Japanese breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sena; Masutani, Eiko; Arao, Harue

    2016-09-01

    While more women with breast cancer survive because of advances in cancer treatment including hormonal therapy, they are at a risk of menopausal symptoms, which can threaten their psychological wellbeing. We examined the effect of menopausal symptoms on women's psychological wellbeing during three different phases of breast cancer: short-term (0-1 years since diagnosis), medium-term (2-5 years), and long-term (more than 5 years). In this cross-sectional study, 425 survivors treated with hormonal therapy were recruited from a convenience sample in Japan and completed an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis revealed that menopausal symptoms significantly contributed to psychological wellbeing in all phases. In long-term survivors, menopausal symptoms were significantly milder; however, the negative effect was prolonged. One in three to four survivors was suspected to have poor psychological wellbeing, irrespective of time. Although the effect of menopausal symptoms on psychological wellbeing has been described in short-term survivors, little is known about the long-term effect. This study examines the effect of menopausal symptoms on psychological wellbeing, thereby providing useful information regarding long-term quality of life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Cholesterol Efflux Capacity and Subclasses of HDL Particles in Healthy Women Transitioning Through Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoudary, Samar R; Hutchins, Patrick M; Matthews, Karen A; Brooks, Maria M; Orchard, Trevor J; Ronsein, Graziella E; Heinecke, Jay W

    2016-09-01

    Growing evidence challenges the concept that high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) is cardioprotective after menopause. HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) and cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) might be better predictors of cardiovascular risk. Quantify alterations in HDL-P and CEC during menopause, correlating those changes with alterations in estradiol (E2) and FSH. Longitudinal study of HDL metrics before and after menopause as indexed by the final menstrual period (FMP). Forty-six women, mean baseline age 47.1 years, 33% black, 67% white. HDL-P concentration (HDL-PIMA) by calibrated ion mobility analysis (IMA); macrophage CEC with cAMP-stimulated macrophages; ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-specific CEC with BHK cells expressing human ABCA1. After a median of 2.1 years since FMP, both HDL-C (P = .03) and HDL-PIMA (P = .01) increased, with a selective increase in large HDL-PIMA (P = .01), whereas sizes of medium and small HDL-PIMA were decreased (P changes were independent of race, body mass index, and time difference. Macrophage CEC and ABCA1-specific CEC increased after FMP (both P menopause (P = .04 and .009, respectively). Large HDL-PIMA and CEC increased significantly in the early phase of the menopausal transition. Whether patterns of these alterations differ in late postmenopause is unknown. Further exploration is needed to assess that and to determine whether the reported changes in HDL metrics associate with increased cardiovascular risk after menopause.

  9. Menopausal symptoms: do life events predict severity of symptoms in peri- and post-menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Filipa; Leal, Isabel; Maroco, João; Ramos, Catarina

    2012-08-01

    Hormonal changes during menopausal transition are linked to physical and psychological symptoms' emergence. This study aims to explore if life events predict menopausal symptoms. This cross-sectional research encompasses a community sample of 992 women who answered to socio-demographic, health, menopause-related and lifestyle questionnaires; menopausal symptoms and life events were assessed with validated instruments. Structural equation modeling was used to build a causal model. Menopausal status predicted only three symptoms: skin/facial hair changes (β=.136; p=.020), sexual (β=.157; p=.004) and, marginally, vasomotor symptoms (β=.094; p=.054). Life events predicted depressive mood (β=-.391; p=.002), anxiety (β=-.271; p=.003), perceived cognitive impairment (β=-.295; p=.003), body shape changes (β=-.136; p=.031), aches/pain (β=-.212; p=.007), skin/facial hair changes (β=-.171; p=.021), numbness (β=-.169; p=.015), perceived loss of control (β=-.234; p=.008), mouth, nails and hair changes (β=-.290; p=.004), vasomotor (β=-.113; p=.044) and sexual symptoms (β=-.208; p=.009). Although women in peri- and post-menopausal manifested higher symptoms' severity than their pre-menopausal counterparts, only three of the menopausal symptoms assessed were predicted by menopausal status. Since the vast majority of menopausal symptoms' severity was significantly influenced by the way women perceived their recent life events, it is concluded that the symptomatology exacerbation, in peri- and post-menopausal women, might be due to life conditions and events, rather than hormonal changes (nonetheless, the inverse influence should be investigated in future studies). Therefore, these should be accounted for in menopause-related clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  11. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... an Endocrinologist Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  12. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Amenorrhea About NICHD Research Information Find a Study More ... What are common symptoms? » Related A-Z Topics Amenorrhea Menstruation and Menstrual Problems Women's Health NICHD News ...

  13. Factors affecting age of onset of menopause and determination of quality of life in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Ceylan, Burcu; ?zerdo?an, Nebahat

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is a process in the climacteric period, characterized by a reduction in ovarian activity, a fall in the fertility rate, and a range of symptoms including irregular menstruation intervals. Most women enter menopause in their 40s, but this can vary from one individual to another. Although there are many factors affecting the age of menopause onset, there is no general agreement on them. Studies have shown many factors to affect the age of menopause, such as the mother?s age at menopau...

  14. Sleep in post-menopausal women: differences between early and late post-menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, Helena; Bittencourt, Lia Rita Azeredo; Soares, José Maria; Tufik, Sergio; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in sleep between women of early and late post-menopause. Thirty post-menopausal women who came to the climacteric service of their own volition were selected. Fourteen were in early post-menopause (less than 5 years after menopause), and sixteen were in late post-menopause (more than 5 years since menopause). None of the women were suffering from any other clinical diseases. Participants had no previous history of hormone therapy or hypnotic drug use. These patients were not previously selected with regard to any sleep complaints. All participants answered a sleep questionnaire and underwent a polysomnography recording. Subjective complaints included body pain, bruxism, anxiety, depression, lack of concentration, and sleepiness (measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale). These complaints were more frequent in the late post-menopause group. In contrast, complaints of memory impairment were more frequent in the early post-menopause group (psleep were higher in the late post-menopausal group.

  15. MAS approach to political prospection and alliance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli N. PROTO

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The generalization of the Lotka-Volterra model (GLVM, to the N agents case is used in this contribution. The model is applied to model party alliances before election processes, as well as to prospect the final horizons of different candidates in Argentinian future elections which will take place on October 2011. The parameters of the model are setting using public polls. Romanian polls are used to validate the ansatzabout the meaning of the parameters considering the available data, as this election results are known.

  16. Reflux esophagitis revisited: Prospective analysis of radiologic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective radiologic-endoscopic study of the esophagogastric region in 266 patients, including 206 normals and 60 with esophagitis, is reported. The endoscopic classification grading severity of esophagitis was grade 1-normal; grades 2. 3. and 4-mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis, respectively. Radiology detected 22% of patient with mild esophagitis, 83% with moderate esophagitis, and 95% with severe esophagitis. Although hiatal hernia was present in 40% of normals and 89% with esophagitis, absence of radiographic hiatal hernia excluded esophagitis with 95% accuracy. The implications of this study regarding the role of radiology in evaluating patient with suspected reflux esophagitis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Hormonal management of migraine at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Sances, Grazia; Detaddei, Silvia; Ornati, Alessandra; Chiovato, Luca; Polatti, Franco

    2009-06-01

    In this review, we underline the importance of linking migraine to reproductive stages for optimal management of such a common disease across the lifespan of women. Menopause has a variable effect on migraine depending on individual vulnerability to neuroendocrine changes induced by estrogen fluctuations and on the length of menopausal transition. Indeed, an association between estrogen 'milieu' and attacks of migraine is strongly supported by several lines of evidence. During the perimenopause, it is likely to observe a worsening of migraine, and a tailored hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) to minimize estrogen/progesterone imbalance may be effective. In the natural menopause, women experience a more favourable course of migraine in comparison with those who have surgical menopause. When severe climacteric symptoms are present, postmenopausal women may be treated with continuous HRT. Even tibolone may be useful when analgesic overuse is documented. However, the transdermal route of oestradiol administration in the lowest effective dose should be preferred to avoid potential vascular risk.

  18. The emergence of the menopause in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, A

    2003-06-01

    A total of 130 million Indian women are expected to live beyond the menopause into old age by 2015. The menopause is emerging as an issue owing to rapid globalization, urbanization, awareness and increased longevity in urban middle-aged Indian women, who are evolving as a homogeneous group. Improved economic conditions and education may cause the attitude of rural working women to be more positive towards the menopause. However, most remain oblivious of the short- and long-term implications of the morbid conditions associated with middle and old age, simply because of lack of awareness, and the unavailability or ever-increasing cost of the medical and social support systems. Evidence-based medicine is accessible to still only a few Indian women. Most menopausal women go untreated or use unproven alternative therapies.

  19. Analysis of North Korea's Nuclear Tests under Prospect Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Myung; Ryu, Jae Soo; Lee, Kwang Seok; Lee, Dong Hoon; Jun, Eunju; Kim, Mi Jin

    2013-01-01

    North Korea has chosen nuclear weapons as the means to protect its sovereignty. Despite international society's endeavors and sanctions to encourage North Korea to abandon its nuclear ambition, North Korea has repeatedly conducted nuclear testing. In this paper, the reason for North Korea's addiction to a nuclear arsenal is addressed within the framework of cognitive psychology. The prospect theory addresses an epistemological approach usually overlooked in rational choice theories. It provides useful implications why North Korea, being under a crisis situation has thrown out a stable choice but taken on a risky one such as nuclear testing. Under the viewpoint of prospect theory, nuclear tests by North Korea can be understood as follows: The first nuclear test in 2006 is seen as a trial to escape from loss areas such as financial sanctions and regime threats; the second test in 2009 was interpreted as a consequence of the strategy to recover losses by making a direct confrontation against the United States; and the third test in 2013 was understood as an attempt to strengthen internal solidarity after Kim Jong-eun inherited the dynasty, as well as to enhance bargaining power against the United States. Thus, it can be summarized that Pyongyang repeated its nuclear tests to escape from a negative domain and to settle into a positive one. In addition, in the future, North Korea may not be willing to readily give up its nuclear capabilities to ensure the survival of its own regime

  20. THE ANALYSIS OF THE DIABETIC FOOT OSTEOMYELITIS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Mithun N; Pattanashetty; Reshmina; Sharath Babu; Harikrishna; Sreedhar Reddy; Ramakrishna J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : India is considered as the diabetic capital of the world. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis is considered as one of the severe complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis tends to complicate around one third of diabetic foot infections. In v iew of this we conducted a prospective study on the bacteriological analysis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis at a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective study was perform...

  1. Dental considerations in pregnancy and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Chaveli López, Begonya; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The present study offers a literature review of the main oral complications observed in women during pregnancy and menopause, and describes the different dental management protocols used during these periods and during lactation, according to the scientific literature. To this effect, a PubMed-Medline search was made, using the following key word combinations: “pregnant and dentistry”, “lactation and dentistry”, “postmenopausal and dentistry”, “menopausal and dentistry” and “oral ...

  2. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  3. Epilepsy and menopause: potential implications for pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2014-09-01

    Being a woman with epilepsy is not the same as being a man with the disease. There is a complex multidirectional interaction between sex hormones, seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with gender-specific implications. Estrogen can be a potent proconvulsant, whereas progesterone is an anticonvulsant in experimental models. It is well established that women with epilepsy can have changes in seizure propensity related to their menstrual cycle (catamenial epilepsy). There is good evidence that the gonadotropin-releasing hormone cell population in the hypothalamus can be affected by seizures originating in the limbic system, possibly leading to anovulatory menses, possibly contributing to lower fertility, and earlier menopause among women with epilepsy. Data on the effects of menopause on epilepsy are scarce. In general, menopause appears to have limited effects on seizure control, with the possible exception of women with catamenial epilepsy who may experience an increase in seizure frequency during perimenopause and a decrease after menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has the potential to increase seizure frequency and thus cannot be recommended for women with epilepsy. Of particular relevance for menopause is the adverse effect on bone mineral density caused by enzyme inducers and other AEDs. In general, there is a remarkable shortage of studies on the impact of menopause on epilepsy and on its implications for epilepsy treatment.

  4. Insomnia in women approaching menopause: Beyond perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Fiona C; Willoughby, Adrian R; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Colrain, Ian M; de Zambotti, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    The menopausal transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40-60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43-57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopausal transition. Sleep quality was assessed with two weeks of sleep diaries and one laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording. In multiple regression models controlling for menopausal transition stage, menstrual cycle phase, depression symptoms, and presence of objective hot flashes, a diagnosis of insomnia predicted PSG-measured total sleep time (p insomnia had, on average, 43.5 min less PSG-measured sleep time (p insomnia reported more WASO (p = 0.002), more night-to-night variability in WASO (p insomnia in the approach to menopause have a measurable sleep deficit, with almost 50% of the sample having less than 6h of sleep. Compromised sleep that develops in the context of the menopausal transition should be addressed, taking into account unique aspects of menopause like hot flashes, to avoid the known negative health consequences associated with insufficient sleep and insomnia in midlife women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Periodontal aspects in menopausal women undergoing hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Marcos, Joaquín Francisco; García-Valle, Silvia; García-Iglesias, Angel Agustín

    2005-01-01

    Currently, an important number of women use HRT to control their hormonal problems during menopause. A large percentage of these have problems at periodontal level. The present study aims at examining the effects that menopause, due to a decline in the synthesis of hormones, mainly of estrogens, can cause on the oral dental health of such women; in particular on the characteristics of the gingiva and periodontium, checking whether characteristics such as gingival recession, pain, tooth mobility and periodontal pocket formation might permit physicians to evaluate the degree of bone loss in menopausal woman. Menopausal women aged 40 to 58 years of age undergoing hormone replacement therapy that had gingival periodontal disturbances. The total population of the study comprised 210 patients, divided into two groups. One group received HRT administered in patches and the other group did not receive this therapy. Gynecologic and odonto-stomatologic protocols were established for data collection. In order to assess the efficacy of the treatment a descriptive statistical study for sociodemographic variables, analysis of variance, McNemar's test and the Stuart-Maxwell test were performed. The mean age of the patients studied was 49.6 years. HRT acts as a protective factor in dental pain and improves tooth mobility and depth of the probing of periodontal pockets. With respect to the variable gingival recession, no significant results were found either for the group not receiving HRT or for the group being treated with patches. The response to the HR therapy in periodontal disease is probably due to the existence of estrogen receptors localized in the gingiva and in the periodontal ligament.

  6. Assessing osteoporosis risk factors in Spanish menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, José Antonio; Palacios, Santiago; García, Felipe Chavida; Pérez, Maite

    2011-10-01

    (1) To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis risk factors in Spanish menopausal women; (2) to detect medical and lifestyle risk factor differences between perimenopausal and postmenopausal women; (3) and to identify the main factors responsible for osteoporosis. Cross-sectional descriptive study encompassing women aged 45-65 across Spain. The study population sample was collected through random sampling and a total of 10,514 women were included. Socio-demographic, medical history, and lifestyle data were assessed. The prevalence of osteoporosis risk factors was 67.6%. The most common risk factors were physical inactivity (53.6%), use of medication related to osteoporosis risk (45.9%), and low calcium intake (30.1%). There were statistically significant differences between peri- and postmenopausal women in terms of smoking status, alcohol intake, personal history, poor dairy product intake, and medication use that could increase risk. Logistic regression analysis showed that osteoporosis was significantly associated with age, family history, age at onset of menopause, Kupperman Index, prolonged immobilization, weight loss, and other diseases that increase the probability of developing osteoporosis. A high prevalence of women taking osteoporosis risk-related medication was observed in our study. There was correlation between the menopausal symptoms' degree of severity and the risk of suffering from osteoporosis.

  7. Relationship between major dietary patterns and sarcopenia among menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Reza; Aliakbar, Sima; Abdollahi, Afsoun; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Maghbooli, Zhila; Mirzaei, Khadijeh

    2017-12-01

    Dietary habits have been associated with the prevalence of the sarcopenia and limited data are available in this field for menopausal women. This study focused on the relationship between dietary patterns and prevalence of the sarcopenia in menopausal women. This cross-sectional study was done in 250 menopausal women 45 years old or older. Dietary data were collected using a food-frequency questionnaire and physical activity was assessed by International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Height, weight, skeletal muscle mass, hand grip, and gait speed were measured and sarcopenia was defined based on European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) guidelines. Using factor analysis, two major dietary patterns were found: a Western pattern (high in commercial beverage, sugar and dessert, snacks, solid fat, potato, high fat dairy, legume, organ meat, fast food, and sweets) and a Mediterranean pattern (high in olive, low-fat dairy, vegetable, fish, nut, and vegetable oil). After adjusting for confounding variables, for the highest vs the lowest tertiles, the Odds Ratio (OR) for sarcopenia was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-2.37] in the Western pattern and 0.40 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.17-0.89] in the Mediterranean pattern. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean dietary pattern has a favorable role in the prevention of sarcopenia.

  8. Renewable energy sources cost benefit analysis and prospects for Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariemma, A.; Montanino, G.

    1992-01-01

    In light of Italy's over-dependency on imported oil, and due to this nation's commitment to the pursuit of the strict environmental protection policies of the European Communities, ENEL (the Italian National Electricity Board) has become actively involved in research efforts aimed at the commercialization of renewable energy sources - photovoltaic, wind, biomass, and mini-hydraulic. Through the use of energy production cost estimates based on current and near- future levels of technological advancement, this paper assesses prospects for the different sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each source in its use as a suitable complementary energy supply satisfying specific sets of constraints regarding siting, weather, capital and operating costs, maintenance, etc., are pointed out. In comparing the various alternatives, the paper also considers environmental benefits and commercialization feasibility in terms of time and outlay

  9. Costochondritis. A prospective analysis in an emergency department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disla, E; Rhim, H R; Reddy, A; Karten, I; Taranta, A

    1994-11-14

    Costochondritis (CC) is a common, but poorly understood condition among patients with chest wall pain. We have prospectively analyzed distinctive features of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and CC. Patients with a chief complaint of chest pain, not due to trauma, fever, or malignancy, were prospectively evaluated for the presence of CC and compared with another chest pain group without CC. Of 122 consecutive patients studied, 36 had CC (30%) and in 17 the pain induced reproduced the original one (15%). Women made up 69% of the patients with CC (vs 31% of control subjects) and Hispanics 47% (vs 24% of control subjects). Only three patients (8%) with CC met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia, while none of the control subjects did. Widespread pain was more common in the CC group (42% vs 5%). The mean sedimentation rate in the CC group was 44 +/- 31 mm/h vs 41 +/- 31 mm/h in the control group. The acute myocardial infarction rate was 6% in the CC group vs 28% in the control group. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis were diagnosed in three and two patients, respectively, of 32 patients with CC cases. One year later, 11 (55%) of 21 patients with CC were still suffering from chest pain, but only one third still had definite CC. Costochondritis is common among patients with chest pain in an emergency department setting, with a higher frequency among women and Hispanics. It is associated with fibromyalgia in only a minority of cases. Patients with CC appear to have a lower frequency of acute myocardial infarction. Spontaneous resolution is seen in most cases at 1 year.

  10. Childhood cognitive ability and age at menopause: evidence from two cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, Diana; Butterworth, Suzanne; Kok, Helen; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Wadsworth, Michael E J; Leon, David A

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether poorer cognitive ability in childhood is associated with an earlier menopause. Two cohorts were included: a nationally representative British birth cohort study of 1,350 women born in March 1946 and followed up to age 54 years, and an Aberdeen cohort study of 3,465 women born in Aberdeen from 1950 to 1956 and followed up to age 44 to 50 years. Both cohorts had prospective information on childhood cognitive ability at age 7 or 8 years. In both cohorts, women with lower cognitive scores in childhood reached menopause earlier than women with higher scores. With follow-up of menopause to 49 years, the hazard ratio (HR) for one standard deviation of the cognitive score was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.72-0.90) in the Aberdeen cohort and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.73-0.97) in the older 1946 birth cohort. The effect was still evident in the 1946 birth cohort with follow-up of menopause to 53 years (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95). These ratios were weakly attenuated by adjustment for potential confounding effects of lifetime socioeconomic circumstances, parity, and smoking. The association between early cognitive ability and timing of menopause only partially reflects common risk factors, although residual confounding remains a possibility. Alternatively, early environmental or genetic programming may explain this association, perhaps through setting lifelong patterns of hormone release or causing transient hormonal changes at sensitive periods of development. These findings have implications for the interpretation of studies investigating an association between age at menopause and adult cognitive function.

  11. Type of Menopause, Age at Menopause, and Risk of Developing Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianyi; Lin, Brian M; Redline, Susan; Curhan, Gary C; Hu, Frank B; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2018-01-22

    Despite established sex differences and longstanding hypotheses of sex hormones in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) etiology, no studies have evaluated type of menopause and age at menopause, which affect postmenopausal hormonal milieu, in relation to OSA risk in women. We followed 50,473 postmenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) between 2002-2012 and 53,827 postmenopausal women from the NHSII between 1995-2013, with 1,712 and 2,560 incident OSA diagnoses, respectively. Compared with natural menopause, the pooled HR for OSA was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.17, 1.38) for surgical menopause by hysterectomy/oophorectomy. The association remained the same after further accounting for age at menopause (HR=1.26; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.38). The risk associated with surgical menopause was higher in non-obese women as well as women who never used hormone therapy (P-interactionmenopause was associated with higher OSA risk prior to adjustment for type of menopause (HR comparing menopause was independently associated with higher OSA risk in postmenopausal women. Our results provide additional evidence for a role of sex hormones, particularly abrupt hormonal changes, in modulating OSA risk. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Factors affecting age of onset of menopause and determination of quality of life in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Burcu; Özerdoğan, Nebahat

    2015-03-01

    Menopause is a process in the climacteric period, characterized by a reduction in ovarian activity, a fall in the fertility rate, and a range of symptoms including irregular menstruation intervals. Most women enter menopause in their 40s, but this can vary from one individual to another. Although there are many factors affecting the age of menopause onset, there is no general agreement on them. Studies have shown many factors to affect the age of menopause, such as the mother's age at menopause, the age at menarche, gestational age, use of oral contraceptives, irregular menstrual cycle, number of pregnancies, body mass index, use of tobacco and alcohol, physical activity, unilateral oophorectomy, serum lead levels, consumption of polyunsaturated fat, socioeconomic status and educational level. During this period, hormonal and biochemical changes give rise to various symptoms in the woman's body. In menopause period, physical, psychological, social and sexual changes have a negative effect on quality of life in women. Recently, different measures have been used to assess women's quality of life in this period of change. The purpose of this review was to examine the factors affecting the onset age of menopause and the measures of quality of life related to menopause.

  13. Current smoking at menopause rather than duration determines the onset of natural menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselt, Kristel M.; Kok, Helen S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; te Velde, Egbert R.; Pearson, Peter L.; Peeters, Petra H. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Smoking has frequently been associated with early menopause. However, studies of this association have been inconclusive with regard to duration and intensity of smoking. A major problem in analyzing the effect of smoking duration on menopausal age is that both exposure and outcome are

  14. Prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms and associated factors across menopause status in Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Gyeyoon; Ahn, Younjhin; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Lim, Joong-Yeon; Kang, Danbee; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Jiin; Choi, Yuni; Cho, Juhee; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms experienced by Korean women aged 44 to 56 years and their associated factors. A cross-sectional study was performed on 2,201 women aged 44 to 56 years in health checkup centers between November 2012 and March 2013. The 29-item Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire was used to assess vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, and sexual symptoms related to menopause. The guidelines for the classification of reproductive aging stages proposed at the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop were used. Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with severity of menopause symptoms. Among participants, 42.6% were premenopausal, 36.7% were perimenopausal, and 20.7% were postmenopausal. Although physical symptoms were the most severe menopause symptoms experienced by premenopausal and perimenopausal women, postmenopausal women reported sexual symptoms as the most bothersome. The mean scores for each domain increased from the premenopausal period through the postmenopausal period (P for trend menopause symptoms (P menopause than inactive women. Postmenopausal women experience the most severe symptoms. Obesity and physical activity are the main modifiable factors associated with symptom severity. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of physical activity promotion and weight control interventions on preventing menopause symptoms in Korean women.

  15. Age of menopause and determinants of menopause age: A PAN India survey by IMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Ahuja

    2016-01-01

    Results: Average age of menopause of an Indian woman is 46.2 years much less than their Western counter parts (51 years. A definite rural and urban division was also seen. There was a correlation between the age of menopause and social and economic status, married status, and parity status.

  16. A prospective video-based analysis of injury situations in elite male football: football incident analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Arni; Tenga, Albin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald

    2004-09-01

    The mechanisms for football injuries are largely unknown. To describe the characteristics of injury situations in elite male football using a video-based method called football incident analysis. Prospective cohort study. During the 1999 season, videotapes from 52 matches in the Icelandic elite football league were reviewed. Incidents (N = 95) were recorded when the match was interrupted by the referee because of a suspected injury. Team physical therapists recorded injuries prospectively (N = 28 time-loss injuries). Duels caused 84 of the incidents, mostly tackling duels (n = 54). The exposed player's attention appeared to be focused away from the opponent in 93% of the cases. The 3 main mechanisms observed were (1) breakdown attacks, tackling from the side or the front, attention focused on the ball (24%); (2) defensive tackling duels, attention focused on the ball or low ball control (20%); and (3) heading duels, attention focused on the ball in the air (13%). Most incidents and injuries occurred during breakdown attacks and when a player was involved in tackling duels. Player attention appeared to be focused mainly on the ball, not on the opponent challenging him to gain ball possession.

  17. [CONNECTIVE TISSUE METABOLIC FEATURES IN CLIMACTERIC SYNDROME'S PATIENTS WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF MENOPAUSE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshchenko, O; Vasylieva, I; Gryshchuk, K

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was investigation of the connective tissue metabolic features among women with menopausal syndrome (MS) and MS, in which the arthropathic syndrome is leading and comparative analysis of the connective tissue indicators exchange during menopause caused in a surgical and natural way. We examined 70 women in total, menopause duration they accounted for 1,95±1,1 years, it came both as natural, and as a result of a surgery. The main group included 40 women with MS with leading arthropathic syndrome. The patients' modified menopausal index was calculated (MMI), the functional condition of the joints was assessed on a scale-questionnaire with the calculation of the clinical-functional index of WOMAC; the quantitative content and qualitative composition of glycosaminoglycans in the serum, the urinary excretion of hydroxyproline and uronic acids were determined. To determine the degree of deviation from the control (standard) indicators was used non-parametric Mann-Whitney criterion and factor analysis (main components method). It was revealed that all patients have an increased content of glycosaminoglycans and glycoprotein in the blood, which corresponds to the general age-related rearrangement of connective tissue metabolism, but the patients of the main group have more expressed indictors, which corresponds to more severe dystrophic changes and the severity of clinical symptoms. Redistribution of the fractional composition of glycosaminoglycans towards the increase of chondroitin-6 sulfate in patients of the main group indicates the presence of pre-emptive destruction of cartilage. The arthropathic syndrome availability also confirms the significant reduction CI-6s / CI-4s ratio and an increased content of chondroitin sulfates. Patients with a natural type of menopause showed more pronounced changes in connective tissue metabolites, in contrast to patients with surgical menopause еhat indicates a longer and more invasive pathologic course of

  18. Relationship between some indicators of reproductive history, body fatness and the menopausal transition in Hungarian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsakai, Annamaria; Mascie-Taylor, Nicholas; Bodzsar, Eva B

    2015-10-22

    This paper analyzed the relationship between some indicators of reproductive history and body fatness in relation to the timing of the menopause transition in Hungarian women using survival analysis after controlling for birth cohort. Data on menstruation and reproductive history were collected during the personal interviews in a sample of 1932 women (aged 35+ years). Menarcheal age, the length of menstrual cycles and menstrual bleedings, regularity of menstrual cycles, number of gestations, lactation, the ever use of contraceptives, menopausal status and age at menopause were used as indicators of reproductive history. The body fat fraction was estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Body fatness was also estimated by dividing women into obese and non-obese categories (considering body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio). Survival analyses were used to analyze the relationship between the indicators of reproductive history and body fatness during the menopausal transition. Only the menarcheal age among the investigated reproductive life characteristics showed secular changes in the studied decades in Hungary; the mean age at menarche decreased by approximately 2.5 months per decade from the 1920s until the 1970s. Ever use of hormonal contraceptives, a relatively long cycle length in the perimenopausal transition and higher parity were all related with lower risk of early menopause. Later menarcheal age, normal length of menstrual cycle or bleeding in the climacterium, irregular bleeding pattern and postmenopausal status were associated with a higher amount of body fatness, while never use of contraceptives, regular menstruation, postmenopausal status and relatively early menopause were associated with a higher risk of abdominal obesity. This report confirms that age of menarche is not significantly predictive of age at menopause but prior use of oral contraceptives, longer mean cycle length and smaller number of gestations all are. In addition, age of

  19. Pengaruh Konsep Diri Wanita terhadap Penyesuaian Diri pada Masa Menopause di Kota Binjai

    OpenAIRE

    Sibero, Jitasari Tarigan

    2017-01-01

    Menopause is the cessation of menstruation. At menopause there is a change of physical and psychological. The number of grievances felt women during menopause can cause high stress. Menopausal women will experience emotional instability if they are difficult to adjust to changes that occur during menopause. The totality of self adjustment ability of menopausal women on menopause and social environment influenced by the the self concept. When individuals are experiencing menopause have a posit...

  20. A treelet transform analysis to relate nutrient patterns to the risk of hormonal receptor-defined breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Nada; Moskal, Aurelie; Slimani, Nadia; Viallon, Vivian; Chajes, Veronique; Freisling, Heinz; Monni, Stefano; Knueppel, Sven; Förster, Jana; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Amiano, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Molina-Montes, Esther; Salmerón, Diego; Quirós, José Ramón; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Fournier, Agnès; Baglietto, Laura; Fortner, Renee Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Orfanos, Philippos; De Magistris, Maria Santucci; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas; Bakker, Marije F; Peeters, Petra Hm; Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Winkvist, Anna; Johansson, Ingegerd; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Key, Tim; Travis, Ruth; Schmidt, Julie A; Merritt, Melissa A; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Ferrari, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    Pattern analysis has emerged as a tool to depict the role of multiple nutrients/foods in relation to health outcomes. The present study aimed at extracting nutrient patterns with respect to breast cancer (BC) aetiology. Nutrient patterns were derived with treelet transform (TT) and related to BC risk. TT was applied to twenty-three log-transformed nutrient densities from dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals computed using Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between quintiles of nutrient pattern scores and risk of overall BC, and by hormonal receptor and menopausal status. Principal component analysis was applied for comparison. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Women (n 334 850) from the EPIC study. The first TT component (TC1) highlighted a pattern rich in nutrients found in animal foods loading on cholesterol, protein, retinol, vitamins B12 and D, while the second TT component (TC2) reflected a diet rich in β-carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins C and B6, fibre, Fe, Ca, K, Mg, P and folate. While TC1 was not associated with BC risk, TC2 was inversely associated with BC risk overall (HRQ5 v. Q1=0·89, 95 % CI 0·83, 0·95, P trend<0·01) and showed a significantly lower risk in oestrogen receptor-positive (HRQ5 v. Q1=0·89, 95 % CI 0·81, 0·98, P trend=0·02) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours (HRQ5 v. Q1=0·87, 95 % CI 0·77, 0·98, P trend<0·01). TT produces readily interpretable sparse components explaining similar amounts of variation as principal component analysis. Our results suggest that participants with a nutrient pattern high in micronutrients found in vegetables, fruits and cereals had a lower risk of BC.

  1. Prospective Safety Analysis and the Complex Aviation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Fatal accident rates in commercial passenger aviation are at historic lows yet have plateaued and are not showing evidence of further safety advances. Modern aircraft accidents reflect both historic causal factors and new unexpected "Black Swan" events. The ever-increasing complexity of the aviation system, along with its associated technology and organizational relationships, provides fertile ground for fresh problems. It is important to take a proactive approach to aviation safety by working to identify novel causation mechanisms for future aviation accidents before they happen. Progress has been made in using of historic data to identify the telltale signals preceding aviation accidents and incidents, using the large repositories of discrete and continuous data on aircraft and air traffic control performance and information reported by front-line personnel. Nevertheless, the aviation community is increasingly embracing predictive approaches to aviation safety. The "prospective workshop" early assessment tool described in this paper represents an approach toward this prospective mindset-one that attempts to identify the future vectors of aviation and asks the question: "What haven't we considered in our current safety assessments?" New causation mechanisms threatening aviation safety will arise in the future because new (or revised) systems and procedures will have to be used under future contextual conditions that have not been properly anticipated. Many simulation models exist for demonstrating the safety cases of new operational concepts and technologies. However the results from such models can only be as valid as the accuracy and completeness of assumptions made about the future context in which the new operational concepts and/or technologies will be immersed. Of course that future has not happened yet. What is needed is a reasonably high-confidence description of the future operational context, capturing critical contextual characteristics that modulate

  2. South African Menopause Society revised consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidozzi, Franco; Alperstein, A; Bagratee, J S; Dalmeyer, P; Davey, M; de Villiers, T J; Hirschowitz, S; Kopenhager, T; Moodley, S P; Roos, P; Shaw, A; Shimange, O; Smith, T; Thomas, C; Titus, J; van der Spuy, Z; van Waart, J

    2014-06-19

    The South African Menopause Society (SAMS) consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy (HT) 2014 is a revision of the SAMS Council consensus statement on menopausal HT published in the SAMJ in May 2007. Information presented in the previous statement has been re-evaluated and new evidence has been incorporated. While the recommendations pertaining to HT remain similar to those in the previous statement, the 2014 revision includes a wider range of clinical benefits for HT, the inclusion of non-hormonal alternatives such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors for the management of vasomotor symptoms, and an appraisal of bioidentical hormones and complementary medicines used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. New preparations that are likely to be more commonly used in the future are also mentioned. The revised statement emphasises that commencing HT during the 'therapeutic window of opportunity' maximises the benefit-to-risk profile of therapy in symptomatic menopausal women.

  3. Discourses on menopause--Part II: How do women talk about menopause?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte; Gannik, Dorte Effersøe

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe which of the different available discourses women relate to as revealed in the way they talk about menopause. We use a discourse analytic approach, which implies that meaning is ascribed to things according to how we talk about them. Twenty-four menopausal...... women from Denmark were interviewed. They were selected to cover a broad spectrum of Danish women with different menopausal experiences and social background factors. Seven previously identified discourses could be found in the interviews, though to varying degrees from woman to woman. Nearly all women...... the menopause was talked about almost became kaleidoscopic when images speedily changed from the decrepit osteoporotic woman or a woman with lack of vitality and sex-appeal to a healthy and strong woman with control over her body and self. Since many women contact doctors in relation to menopause, and since...

  4. Placental methylome analysis from a prospective autism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Diane I; Schmidt, Rebecca J; Crary-Dooley, Florence K; Walker, Cheryl K; Ozonoff, Sally; Tancredi, Daniel J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; LaSalle, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorders that are behaviorally diagnosed in early childhood. Most ASD cases likely arise from a complex mixture of genetic and environmental factors, an interface where the epigenetic marks of DNA methylation may be useful as risk biomarkers. The placenta is a potentially useful surrogate tissue characterized by a methylation pattern of partially methylated domains (PMDs) and highly methylated domains (HMDs) reflective of methylation patterns observed in the early embryo. In this study, we investigated human term placentas from the MARBLES (Markers of Autism Risk in Babies: Learning Early Signs) prospective study by whole genome bisulfite sequencing. We also examined the utility of PMD/HMDs in detecting methylation differences consistent with ASD diagnosis at age three. We found that while human placental methylomes have highly reproducible PMD and HMD locations, there is a greater variation between individuals in methylation levels over PMDs than HMDs due to both sampling and individual variability. In a comparison of methylation differences in placental samples from 24 ASD and 23 typically developing (TD) children, a HMD containing a putative fetal brain enhancer near DLL1 was found to reach genome-wide significance and was validated for significantly higher methylation in ASD by pyrosequencing. These results suggest that the placenta could be an informative surrogate tissue for predictive ASD biomarkers in high-risk families.

  5. Prospects of Organic Farming in Bhutan: A SWOT Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Tashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the prospects of organic agriculture (OA in Bhutan from the experts’ perspective, particularly the SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat aspect. Thirty-five Bhutanese experts were interviewed. The strengths of OA were (i good alignment of the principles of OA with Bhutan’s development philosophy, (ii strong policy and political support, (iii pristine environment, (iv OA practices similar to traditional farming, and (v compatibility of OA with the local farming knowledge. The major weaknesses were (i a lack of awareness of the benefits of OA, (ii lack of incentives, (iii shortage of farm labor, (iv small and irregular supply of organic product, (v lack of clarity in policy, (vi limited plant protection materials, and (vii a lack of coordination between agencies. Opportunities were (i a huge regional and global organic market, (ii promoting healthy lifestyle, (iii sustainable use of resources, (iv lowering dependence on food and input imports, (v development of local organic manure suppliers, (vi creating seed sovereignty, (vii conserving local crops, (viii building soil fertility, (ix introducing premium price for organic products, and (x addressing unemployment. Threats included (i increasing incidences of pests and diseases, (ii decline in sources of organic manure, and (iii limited sources of organic manures and fertilizers.

  6. Antimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2012-01-31

    Antimicrobial therapies in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) need to be appropriate in both their antimicrobial cover and duration. We performed a prospective observational study of admissions to our semi-closed ICU over a three-month period and recorded the indications for antimicrobial therapy, agents used, duration of use, changes in therapy and reasons for changes in therapy. A change in therapy was defined as the initiation or discontinuation of an antimicrobial agent. There were 51 patients admitted during the three-month study period and all received antimicrobial therapy. There were 135 changes in antimicrobial therapy. 89 (66%) were made by the ICU team and 32 (24%) were made by the primary team. Changes were made due to a deterioration or lack of clinical response in 41 (30%) cases, due to the completion of prescribed course in 36 (27%) cases, and in response to a sensitivity result in 25 (19%) cases. Prophylactic antibiotic courses (n=24) were of a duration greater than 24 hours in 15 (63%) instances. In conclusion, the majority of changes in antimicrobial therapy were not culture-based and the duration of surgical prophylaxis was in excess of current recommended guidelines.

  7. Prospective Analysis of Risk for Hypothyroidism after Hemithyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgilijus Beisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate risk factors and to develop a simple scoring system to grade the risk of postoperative hypothyroidism (PH. Methods. In a controlled prospective study, 109 patients, who underwent hemithyroidectomy for a benign thyroid disease, were followed up for 12 months. The relation between clinical data and PH was analyzed for significance. A risk scoring system based on significant risk factors and clinical implications was developed. Results. The significant risk factors of PH were higher TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone level and lower ratio of the remaining thyroid weight to the patient’s weight (derived weight index. Based on the log of risk factor, preoperative TSH level greater than 1.4 mU/L was assigned 2 points; 1 point was for 0.8–1.4 mU/L. The derived weight index lower than 0.8 g/kg was assigned 1 point. A risk scoring system was calculated by summing the scores. The incidences of PH were 7.3%, 30.4%, and 69.2% according to the risk scores of 0-1, 2, and 3. Conclusion. Risk factors for PH are higher preoperative TSH level and lower derived weight index. Our developed risk scoring system is a valid and reliable tool to identify patients who are at risk for PH before surgery.

  8. Age of menopause and determinants of menopause age: A PAN India survey by IMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    Age of menopause is a very important biomarker of not only the loss of fertility but also an increased risk for various mid-life diseases and problems. Many of these diseases can be prevented by timely intervention of lifestyle modification, menopausal hormone therapy, or other supplementations such as calcium, Vitamin D, and micronutrients. In India age of menopause is less than our counterparts in the Western world. This means that the fertility potential of Indian women starts compromising early, so we need to start with the preventive measures much early. Earlier studies in India have been done on a limited population, and small sample size and not all the determinants of menopause age were considered. Survey was conducted in 21 chapters of Indian Menopause Society and all regions South, West, East and North were covered. There were 23 Medical practitioners who participated. Consent was taken and inclusion and exclusion criteria was set. Set questions were asked The questionnaire comprised of identification of the participants' religion, education, and various socioeconomic parameters. They were also inquired about their marital and parity status, abortion, or contraceptive use. The menopausal women were asked their menopause age and whether it was natural or surgical. The perimenopausal women were asked to enlist the date of their last period. All women with <1 year to menopause were classified as perimenopausal. The height, weight, and waist circumference were noted for all the women, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The women were also inquired about their food habits and social habits including alcohol consumption or smoking. Hence, this study was planned as a PAN India study. Average age of menopause of an Indian woman is 46.2 years much less than their Western counter parts (51 years). A definite rural and urban division was also seen. There was a correlation between the age of menopause and social and economic status, married status, and parity

  9. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrizia Ripa,1 Raffaele Ornello,1 Diana Degan,1 Cindy Tiseo,1 Janet Stewart,2 Francesca Pistoia,1 Antonio Carolei,1 Simona Sacco1 1Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, Institute of Neurology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 2Psychology Division, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland, UK Abstract: Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. Keywords: headache, female, menstrual cycle, sex hormones

  10. Surgical versus natural menopause: cognitive issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Victor W; Sherwin, Barbara B

    2007-01-01

    Women who undergo both natural and surgical menopause experience the loss of cyclic ovarian production of estrogen, but hormonal and demographic differences distinguish these two groups of women. Our objective was to review published evidence on whether the premature cessation of endogenous estrogen production in women who underwent a surgical menopause has deleterious consequences for cognitive aging and to determine whether consequences differ for women if they undergo natural menopause. Studies of estrogen-containing hormone therapy are relevant to this issue. We reviewed evidence-based research, including the systematic identification of randomized clinical trials of hormone therapy with cognitive outcomes that included an objective measure of episodic memory. As inferred from very small, short-term, randomized, controlled trials of high-dose estrogen treatment, surgical menopause may be accompanied by cognitive impairment that primarily affects verbal episodic memory. Observational evidence suggests that the natural menopausal transition is not accompanied by substantial changes in cognitive abilities. For initiation of hormone therapy during perimenopause or early postmenopause when the ovaries are intact, limited clinical trial data provide no consistent evidence of short-term benefit or harm. There is stronger clinical trial evidence that initiation of hormone therapy in late postmenopause does not benefit episodic memory or other cognitive skills. Further research is needed on the long-term cognitive consequences of surgical menopause and long-term cognitive consequences of hormone therapy initiated near the time of surgical or natural menopause. A potential short-term cognitive benefit might be weighed when a premenopausal woman considers initiation of estrogen therapy at the time of, or soon after, hysterectomy and oophorectomy for benign conditions, although data are still quite limited and estrogen is not approved for this indication. Older

  11. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS, which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  12. Hormone-related factors and post-menopausal onset depression: results from KNHANES (2010-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sun Jae; Shin, Aesun; Kang, Daehee

    2015-04-01

    Although hypotheses have been proposed regarding the biological mechanisms of hormonal fluctuations in mood disorders, few epidemiological studies have addressed this issue. The aim of this study was to examine the association between hormone-related life events and postmenopausal depression. Of 13,918 women who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) V, a total of 4869 post-menopausal women who had completed information on depression onset age and additional reproductive factors were included in the analysis. A multivariate logistic regression was applied to calculate the odds ratios between reproductive factors and post-menopausal onset depression. A total of 276 women (5.7%) were diagnosed with depression after menopause. Longer reproductive years were associated with a reduced risk of depression (for more than 35 reproductive years: OR=0.41, 95% CI: 0.27-0.62, P-trenddepression (OR=0.35, 95% CI: 0.22-0.55) compared to the women with a menopausal age younger than 46 years. Greater numbers of pregnancies and exogenous hormone use were also associated with increased risk of depression. All data were collected from interviews using questionnaires. There may be some inaccuracies in recall of lifetime reproductive events, but women generally recalled their hormonal events correctly. Early menopause and the use of exogenous hormones were associated with the risk of post-menopausal depression. Clinicians should closely monitor and consider further screening for depressed women who undergo early menopause or those with exogenous hormone use. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-directed Learning and Its Impact on Menopausal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdkhasti, Mansoureh; Keshavarz, Maryam; Mahmoodi, Zohreh; Hosseini, Agha Fatemeh

    2014-05-01

    One of the main criteria to verify the effectiveness of a health training program is to measure quality of life in menopausal women. Hence the aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of self-directed learning (SDL) on MENQOl. The present single blind field study was conducted in Saadatmandi Health Center of Robat Karim (Iran, Southwest of Tehran Province) from August to December 2010. One handred and ten menopausal women were selected using convenience sampling method and then divided into two experimental (Self-directed Learning) and control groups of 55 each. Four manuals were developed to guide the women in the experimental group containing practical ways to treat menopausal symptoms. They were distributed among the participants for four weeks on a specific day. Menopausal Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL) was used to determine and compare quality of life scores of these women (before and three months after intervention sessions). The control group did not receive any intervention. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS/16 software using Kolmogorov-Sminov, ANOVA, independent paired t test and Chi-square test. There were significant statistical differences between two groups regarding the age of subjects; age of menopause; economic, educational and employment status; number of dead and living children; BMI and vasomotor, physical, sexual and psycho-social postmenopausal symptoms. The implementation of Self-directed Learning (SDL) model leads to a significant statistical difference in scores of vasomotor symptoms (16.32 ± 5.92 to 13.26 ± 5.31), psychosocial symptoms (34.8 ± 11 to 27.18 ± 10.83), physical symptoms (75.02 ± 18.07 to 61.42 ± 15.49), sexual symptoms (15.36 ± 6.10 to 12.00 ± 4.97) and the overall score for quality of life (141.5 ± 41.09 to 113.86 ± 36.6) (P self-directed learning provides a useful strategy that should be included in health intervention and national surveillance programs in order to improve health and

  14. Estrogen and progestogen use in postmenopausal women: July 2008 position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utian, Wulf H; Archer, David F; Bachmann, Gloria A; Gallagher, Christopher; Grodstein, Francine n; Heiman, Julia R; Henderson, Victor W; Hodis, Howard N; Karas, Richard H; Lobo, Rogerio A; Manson, JoAnn E; Reid, Robert L; Schmidt, Peter J; Stuenkel, Cynthia A

    2008-01-01

    : To update for both clinicians and the lay public the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in March 2007 regarding its recommendations for menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women, with consideration for the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio at various times through menopause and beyond. : An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health was enlisted to review the March 2007 NAMS position statement, evaluate new evidence through an evidence-based analysis, and reach consensus on recommendations. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees as an official NAMS position statement. The document was provided to other interested organizations to seek their endorsement. : Current evidence supports a consensus regarding the role of HT in postmenopausal women, when potential therapeutic benefits and risks around the time of menopause are considered. This paper lists all these areas along with explanatory comments. Conclusions that vary from the 2007 position statement are highlighted. Addenda include a discussion of risk concepts, a new component not included in the 2007 paper, and a recommended list of areas for future HT research. A suggested reading list of key references is also provided. : Recent data support the initiation of HT around the time of menopause to treat menopause-related symptoms; to treat or reduce the risk of certain disorders, such as osteoporosis or fractures in select postmenopausal women; or both. The benefit-risk ratio for menopausal HT is favorable close to menopause but decreases with aging and with time since menopause in previously untreated women.

  15. Prevalence of hormone therapy, factors associated with its use, and knowledge about menopause: a population-based household survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacello, Poliana; Baccaro, Luiz F; Pedro, Adriana O; Costa-Paiva, Lucia

    2018-01-29

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of hormone therapy (HT), the factors associated with its use, and the importance of knowledge about menopause and HT. A cross-sectional population-based study with 749 Brazilian women aged 45 to 60 years living in the Campinas Metropolitan Region was carried out between September 2012 and June 2013. The dependent variable was current or previous HT use. The independent variables were sociodemographic data, health-related problems, and knowledge about menopause assessed using a score that was obtained with a questionnaire on various aspects of menopause. The mean age of the women was 52.5 (±4.4) years. With regard to the menopause status, 16% were premenopausal, 16% were perimenopausal, and 68% were postmenopausal. Among all the women included, 19.5% reported current or previous HT use. In multiple regression analysis, being postmenopausal (prevalence ratio [PR] 2.76; 95% CI, 1.74-4.38), receiving information about menopause from physicians and health service workers (PR 2.73; 95% CI, 1.91-3.89), having bilateral oophorectomy (PR 2.18; 95% CI, 1.49-3.17), experiencing work interruption due to hot flashes (PR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.03-2.01), and having extensive knowledge about menopause (PR 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05-1.19) were associated with a higher prevalence of HT use. The prevalence of HT use was 19.5%. Menopause status, information source, surgical menopause, work interruption due to hot flashes, and knowledge about menopause were associated with HT use. Education promoted by healthcare systems can increase HT use in women who have indications for treatment.

  16. Estrogen and progestogen use in postmenopausal women: July 2008 position statement of The North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To update for both clinicians and the lay public the evidence-based position statement published by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in March 2007 regarding its recommendations for menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for postmenopausal women, with consideration for the therapeutic benefit-risk ratio at various times through menopause and beyond. Design An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women’s health was enlisted to review the March 2007 NAMS position statement, evaluate new evidence through an evidence-based analysis, and reach consensus on recommendations. The Panel’s recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees as an official NAMS position statement. The document was provided to other interested organizations to seek their endorsement. Results Current evidence supports a consensus regarding the role of HT in postmenopausal women, when potential therapeutic benefits and risks around the time of menopause are considered. This paper lists all these areas along with explanatory comments. Conclusions that vary from the 2007 position statement are highlighted. Addenda include a discussion of risk concepts, a new component not included in the 2007 paper, and a recommended list of areas for future HT research. A suggested reading list of key references is also provided. Conclusions Recent data support the initiation of HT around the time of menopause to treat menopause-related symptoms; to treat or reduce the risk of certain disorders, such as osteoporosis or fractures in select postmenopausal women; or both. The benefit-risk ratio for menopausal HT is favorable close to menopause but decreases with aging and with time since menopause in previously untreated women. PMID:18580541

  17. Physical activity, menopause, and quality of life: the role of affect and self-worth across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity has been shown to enhance quality of life (QOL); however, few investigations of these effects exist in women undergoing the menopausal transition. The present study examined the long-term effects of physical activity on menopause-related QOL and tested the mediating effects of physical self-worth and positive affect in this relationship. Middle-aged women previously enrolled in a 4-month randomized controlled trial involving walking and yoga, and a control group completed a follow-up mail-in survey 2 years after the end of the trial. The survey included a battery of psychological and physical activity measures, including measures of menopausal symptoms and menopause-related QOL. Longitudinal linear panel analysis was conducted within a covariance modeling framework to test whether physical self-worth and positive affect mediated the physical activity-QOL relationship over time. At the end of the trial, physical activity and menopausal symptoms were related to physical self-worth and positive affect, and in turn, greater levels of physical self-worth and positive affect were associated with higher levels of menopause-related QOL. Analyses indicated that increases in physical activity and decreases in menopausal symptoms over the 2-year period were related to increases in physical self-worth (betas = 0.23 and -0.52, physical activity and menopausal symptoms, respectively) and, for symptoms, also to decreased positive affect (beta = -0.47), and both physical self-worth (beta = 0.34) and affect (beta = 0.43) directly influenced enhancements in QOL (R = 0.775). The findings support the position that the effects of physical activity on QOL are mediated, in part, by intermediate psychological outcomes and that physical activity can have long-term benefits for women undergoing the menopausal transition.

  18. Sexual function among married menopausal women in Amol (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Omidvar

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Findings revealed high percentage of sexual desire disorder and sexual arousal disorder in menopausal women. Therefore, we should have emphasis on counseling and education about sexual activities during the menopause period.

  19. Correlation between hormonal and lipid status in women in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesalić, Lejla; Tupković, Emir; Kendić, Sulejman; Balić, Devleta

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and, the influence of estradiol, progesterone, FSH, LH on lipid profile in menopausal women as well. The menopausal women had higher but non-significant (p>0,05) concentrations of total cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, and triglycerides than women with regular menstruation. The concentration of HDL was significantly lower in menopausal women than in women with regular menstruation (pmenopausal women (p0,05). Estrogen concentration has significant negative correlation with VLDL and triglycerides (pmenopausal women. Progesterone concentration has shown no correlation with concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins in menopause. We can conclude that menopause leads to changes in lipid profile by reducing HDL, and elevating apolipoprotein B levels, thus increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease. These changes were caused by reduction of estrogen concentrations in menopause.

  20. Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These medications can be given during or after menopause. Hormone Therapy to Prevent Chronic Conditions Many women take ... a recommendation. Click Here to Learn More About Menopause and Hormone Therapy Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Information for the Public ( ...

  1. CORRELATION BETWEEN HORMONAL AND LIPID STATUS IN WOMEN IN MENOPAUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mešalić, Lejla; Tupković, Emir; Kendić, Sulejman; Balić, Devleta

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and, the influence of estradiol, progesterone, FSH, LH on lipid profile in menopausal women as well. The menopausal women had higher but non-significant (p>0,05) concentrations of total cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, and triglycerides than women with regular menstruation. The concentration of HDL was significantly lower in menopausal women than in women with regular menstruation (pmenopausal women (p0,05). Estrogen concentration has significant negative correlation with VLDL and triglycerides (pmenopausal women. Progesterone concentration has shown no correlation with concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins in menopause. We can conclude that menopause leads to changes in lipid profile by reducing HDL, and elevating apolipoprotein B levels, thus increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease. These changes were caused by reduction of estrogen concentrations in menopause. PMID:18498273

  2. Menopause and High Blood Pressure: What's the Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's the connection? Is there a connection between menopause and high blood pressure? Answers from Shannon K. ... Tommaso, M.D. Blood pressure generally increases after menopause. Some doctors think this increase suggests that hormonal ...

  3. The ultrasound research's results of the peri menopausal women's genitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodkhoeva, M.F.; Djonova, B.Yu.; Barieva, L.S.; Djonbekova, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    The results of ultrasound research of the peri menopausal women's genitals revealed that the sizes of the ovaries of women with the climacteric syndrome are smaller that the size of ovaries of the women with the physiologic menopause

  4. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible effects on menopausal symptoms than have other botanicals. The evidence base on efficacy for black cohosh ... treatment of menopausal hot flashes. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2016;164(3):1-24. Borud E, White ...

  5. Menopause: highlighting the effects of resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, R D; Prestes, J; Pereira, G B; Shiguemoto, G E; Perez, S E A

    2010-11-01

    The increase in lifespan and in the proportion of elderly women has increased the focus on menopause induced physiological alterations. These modifications are associated with the elevated risk of several pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, among others. Because of estrogen levels decline, many tissue and organs (muscular, bone, adipose tissue and liver) are affected. Additionally, body composition suffers important modifications. In this sense, there is a growing body of concern in understanding the physiological mechanisms involved and establishing strategies to prevent and reverse the effects of menopause. The hormone reposition therapy, diet and physical exercise have been recommended. Among the diverse exercise modalities, resistance training is not commonly used as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of menopause. Thus, the aim of this review was to analyze the physiological alterations on several organs and systems induced by menopause and ovariectomy (experimental model to reproduce menopause), as well as, to study the effects of resistance training in preventing and reverting these modifications. In conclusion, resistance training promotes beneficial effects on several organs and systems, mainly, on muscular, bone and adipose tissue, allowing for a better quality of life in this population.

  6. Approach to the patient with menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kathryn Ann; Manson, Joann E

    2008-12-01

    Many women experience menopausal symptoms during the menopausal transition and postmenopausal years. Hot flashes, the most common symptom, typically resolve after several years, but for 15-20% of women, they interfere with quality of life. For these women, estrogen therapy, the most effective treatment for hot flashes, should be considered. The decision to use hormone therapy involves balancing the potential benefits of hormone therapy against its potential risks. Accumulating data suggest that initiation of estrogen many years after menopause is associated with excess coronary risk, whereas initiation soon after menopause is not. Therefore, most now agree that short-term estrogen therapy, using the lowest effective estrogen dose, is a reasonable option for recently menopausal women with moderate to severe symptoms who are in good cardiovascular health. Short-term therapy is considered to be not more than 4-5 yr because symptoms diminish after several years, whereas the risk of breast cancer increases with longer duration of hormone therapy. A minority of women may need long-term therapy for severe, persistent vasomotor symptoms after stopping hormone therapy. However, these women should first undergo trials of nonhormonal options such as gabapentin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, returning to estrogen only if these alternatives are ineffective or cause significant side effects. Low-dose vaginal estrogens are highly effective for genitourinary atrophy symptoms, with minimal systemic absorption and endometrial effects.

  7. Cigarettes, genetic background, and menopausal timing: the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes is associated with increased risk of natural menopause in European-American smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Samantha F.; Sammel, Mary D.; Greer, Christine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Boorman, David W.; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate associations between variations in genes involved in the metabolism of environmental chemicals and steroid hormones and risk of menopause in smokers. Methods Survival analysis was performed on 410 eligible participants from the Penn Ovarian Aging study (ongoing for 14 years), a cohort study of late-reproductive-age women. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at the following loci were studied: COMT Val158Met, CYP1B1*4 Asn452Ser, CYP1B1*3 Leu432Val, and CYP3A4*1B. Results Significant interactions between smoking and single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in European-American carriers of CYP3A4*1B and CYP1B1*3, supporting a greater risk of menopause entry compared with those not carrying these alleles. Among CYP1B1*3 carriers, smokers had a greater risk of menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% CI, 1.4–3.67; median time to menopause, 10.42 and 11.07 y, respectively). No association between smoking and menopause was identified in CYP1B1 wild types. Among CYP3A4*1B carriers, smokers were at greater risk for menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted HR, 15.1; 95% CI, 3.31–69.2; median time to menopause, 11.36 and 13.91 y, respectively). Risk of menopause entry in CYP3A4 wild types who smoked was far lower (adjusted HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.03–2.44). Heavily smoking CYP1B1*3 carriers (adjusted HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.54–5.84; median time to menopause, 10.41 y) and heavily smoking CYP3A4*1B carriers (adjusted HR, 17.79; 95% CI, 3.21–98.65; median time to menopause, 5.09 y) had the greatest risk of menopause entry. Conclusions Our finding that the risk of menopause entry in European-American smokers varies depending on genetic background represents a novel gene-environment interaction in reproductive aging. PMID:24448104

  8. Cigarettes, genetic background, and menopausal timing: the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes is associated with increased risk of natural menopause in European-American smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Samantha F; Sammel, Mary D; Greer, Christine; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Boorman, David W; Freeman, Ellen W

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate associations between variations in genes involved in the metabolism of environmental chemicals and steroid hormones and risk of menopause in smokers. Survival analysis was performed on 410 eligible participants from the Penn Ovarian Aging study (ongoing for 14 years), a cohort study of late-reproductive-age women. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at the following loci were studied: COMT Val158Met, CYP1B1*4 Asn452Ser, CYP1B1*3 Leu432Val, and CYP3A4*1B. Significant interactions between smoking and single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in European-American carriers of CYP3A4*1B and CYP1B1*3, supporting a greater risk of menopause entry compared with those not carrying these alleles. Among CYP1B1*3 carriers, smokers had a greater risk of menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% CI, 1.4-3.67; median time to menopause, 10.42 and 11.07 y, respectively). No association between smoking and menopause was identified in CYP1B1 wild types. Among CYP3A4*1B carriers, smokers were at greater risk for menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted HR, 15.1; 95% CI, 3.31-69.2; median time to menopause, 11.36 and 13.91 y, respectively). Risk of menopause entry in CYP3A4 wild types who smoked was far lower (adjusted HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.03-2.44). Heavily smoking CYP1B1*3 carriers (adjusted HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.54-5.84; median time to menopause, 10.41 y) and heavily smoking CYP3A4*1B carriers (adjusted HR, 17.79; 95% CI, 3.21-98.65; median time to menopause, 5.09 y) had the greatest risk of menopause entry. Our finding that the risk of menopause entry in European-American smokers varies depending on genetic background represents a novel gene-environment interaction in reproductive aging.

  9. Analysis Of Japans Economy Based On 2014 From Macroeconomics Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Mohammad Rafiqul Islam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Japan is the worlds third largest economy. But currently economic situations of Japan are not stable. It is not increasing as expected. Since 2013 it was world second largest economy but Japan loosed its placed to China in 2014 due to slow growth of important economic indicators. By using the basic Keynesian model we will provide a detailed analysis of the short and long run impacts of the changes for Japans real GDP rate of unemployment and inflation rate. We demonstrated a detailed use of the 45-degree diagram or the AD-IA model and other economic analysis of the macroeconomic principles that underlie the model and concepts. Finally we will recommend the government with a change in fiscal policy what based on the analysis by considering what might be achieved with a fiscal policy response and the extent to which any impact on the stock of public debt might be a consideration

  10. Empowerment and Coping Strategies in Menopause Women: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdkhasti, Mansoureh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Abdi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Context: Menopause is described as a period of psychological difficulties that changes the lifestyle of women in multiple ways. Menopausal women require more information about their physical and psychosocial needs. Empowerment during the menopause can contribute to improving the perception of this stage and the importance of self-care. It is essential to increase women?s awareness and adaptation to menopause, using empowerment programs. The aim of this study was to review the empowerment and ...

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN HORMONAL AND LIPID STATUS IN WOMEN IN MENOPAUSE

    OpenAIRE

    Mešalić, Lejla; Tupković, Emir; Kendić, Sulejman; Balić, Devleta

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and, the influence of estradiol, progesterone, FSH, LH on lipid profile in menopausal women as well. The menopausal women had higher but non-significant (p>0,05) concentrations of total cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, and triglycerides than women with regular menstruation. The concentration...

  12. Attitudes of Women to Menopause: Implications for Counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause, a normal midlife transition for women remains poorly understood. This study examined the attitudes of women to menopause. A total of 300 married female teachers made up the sample for the study. Data was collected using the modified Attitude Towards Menopause (ATM) checklist. The responses of the ...

  13. [Hypertension in women (contraception and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, M

    2000-11-01

    There are three circumstances where hypertension develops specifically in women: oral contraception, pregnancy, and menopause. Oral contraception usually shifts the blood pressure moderately upwards, but hypertension appears in less than 5% of women. Still it may (rarely) be very severe. Hypertension is poorly related to the dosage of the estrogenic compound, but rather to the nature and dosage of the progestive part. This hypertension does not significantly increase the cardiovascular risk of these women. The role of menopause itself in the trigging of hypertension remains uncertain. It seems however that confounding factors such as age, body weight, sodium balance and so on explain the increased incidence of hypertension after menopause. The latter is also associated with an increase of cardiovascular risk, which requires adequate treatment. Hormone replacement therapy is not contra-indicated, even in hypertensive patients.

  14. Treatment of the genitourinary syndrome of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, S; Mejía, A; Neyro, J L

    2015-01-01

    The vagina, vulva, vestibule, labia majora/minora, and bladder trigone have a high concentration of estrogen receptors; therefore, they are a sensitive biological indicator of serum levels of these hormones in women. The estrogen loss in postmenopausal women produces a dysfunction called genitourinary syndrome of menopause. The principal therapeutic goal in the genitourinary syndrome of menopause is to relieve symptoms. Treatment options, as well as local and systemic hormonal treatment are changes in lifestyle and non-hormonal treatments mainly based on the use of moisturizers and lubricants. New treatments that have recently appeared are ospemifeme, the first selective hormone receptor modulator for dyspareunia and vulvovaginal atrophy treatment, and the use of vaginal laser. This review has been written with the intention of giving recommendations on the prevention and treatment of genitourinary syndrome of menopause.

  15. The evolutionary origin and significance of Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollycove, Ricki; Naftolin, Frederick; Simon, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary human females have long life expectancy (81y US), especially relative to age at menopause (51y US). Menopause is a consequence of reproductive aging and follicular depletion (ovarian failure), yielding very low circulating estrogen* serum concentrations and biologically disadvantageous metabolic alterations. Stated in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy, the ongoing hypoestrogenic endocrine environment, beneficial during lactation, results in acceleration of several age-related health conditions following menopause (i.e. late postmenopausal osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline). In contrast, the complex hypoestrogenic hormonal milieu present during postpartum lactation provides biologic advantages to both mother and newborn. The lactational hormonal milieu causes symptoms similar to those of the late perimenopause and early postmenopause, prompting theories for their biologic selective advantage. The precepts of evolutionary medicine encourage a reassessment of hormone therapy. Based on data presented, the authors propose additional opportunities for disease prevention and morbidity reduction in postmenopausal women. PMID:21252729

  16. The evolutionary origin and significance of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollycove, Ricki; Naftolin, Frederick; Simon, James A

    2011-03-01

    Contemporary women have long life expectancy (81 y, United States), especially relative to the age at menopause (51 y, United States). Menopause is a consequence of reproductive aging and follicular depletion (ovarian failure), yielding very low circulating estrogen serum concentrations and biologically disadvantageous metabolic alterations. Stated in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy, the ongoing hypoestrogenic endocrine environment, beneficial during lactation, results in acceleration of several age-related illnesses after menopause (ie, late postmenopausal osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive decline). Specifically, the similar hypoestrogenic hormonal milieu present during postpartum lactation provides biologic advantages (fitness) to both mother and newborn. These precepts of evolutionary medicine encourage a reassessment of hormone therapy, and on the basis of data presented the authors propose additional opportunities for disease prevention and morbidity reduction in postmenopausal women.

  17. Model-based human reliability analysis: prospects and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh, A.; Chang, Y.H.

    2004-01-01

    Major limitations of the conventional methods for human reliability analysis (HRA), particularly those developed for operator response analysis in probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) of nuclear power plants, are summarized as a motivation for the need and a basis for developing requirements for the next generation HRA methods. It is argued that a model-based approach that provides explicit cognitive causal links between operator behaviors and directly or indirectly measurable causal factors should be at the core of the advanced methods. An example of such causal model is briefly reviewed, where due to the model complexity and input requirements can only be currently implemented in a dynamic PSA environment. The computer simulation code developed for this purpose is also described briefly, together with current limitations in the models, data, and the computer implementation

  18. Immigration transition and sleep-related symptoms experienced during menopausal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ko, Young; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik

    2018-01-01

    The transition due to immigration from one country to another country (referred to as immigration transition henceforth) is inherently stressful, placing an additional dimension of stress to midlife women in the menopausal transition. However, few studies have examined the association of immigration to sleep-related symptoms experienced by midlife women in the menopausal transition. The purpose of this study was to explore the associations of immigration to sleep-related symptoms among four major racial/ethnic groups of 1,054 midlife women in the U.S. This was a secondary analysis of data from two national surveys that were collected from 2005 to 2013. The instruments included questions on background characteristics, health and menopausal status, immigration transition and the Sleep Index for Midlife Women. The data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, correlation analyses, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses. Immigrants reported fewer total numbers of and lower total severity scores of sleep-related symptoms than non-immigrants (p < .01). Yet, when background characteristics and health and menopausal status were controlled, self-reported racial/ethnic identity was the only significant factor associated with sleep-related symptoms (Δ R2=0.02, p<0.01). Health care providers need to consider self-reported racial/ethnic identity as a factor significantly related to sleep-related symptoms during the menopausal transition. PMID:26881786

  19. The Effect of Husbands' Education Regarding Menopausal Health on Marital Satisfaction of Their Wives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshany, Nooshin; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Mihanpour, Hamideh; Bahri, Narjes; Jadgal, Khair Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    Marital satisfaction has an important effect on people's mental health. Due to the increasing average age and life expectancy of Iranian women, obtaining knowledge about sexual aspects of post-menopause women for partners can improve their health and quality of life. This study aimed to determine the effect of education for the husbands regarding menopause on marital satisfaction of their wives. This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 100 women aged 45 to 55 years old and their husbands in Yazd in 2014. Subjects were randomly assigned to intervention group (50 couples) and control group (50 couples). The data gathering tools included two questionnaires, the first one contained questions about demographic information of women and men, and the other one was used to assess knowledge and practice in men about menopause and Enrich marital satisfaction. The second questionnaire was applied twice; before intervention and two months after that. In the intervention group an educational program in the form of three 60-minute sessions were conducted using speech, but the control group received no training. Analysis was performed through the statistical SPSS software, paired t -test, t -test and chi-square. In the intervention group, two months after the educational program the knowledge of menopausal health and women's marital satisfaction scores increased significantly ( P marital satisfaction in the period of menopausal transition. Therefore, designing and implementing educational programs for husbands is recommended.

  20. [Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors related to insomnia and menopause: Pró-Saúde Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaina, Jaqueline Rodrigues; Lopes, Claudia S; Rotenberg, Lúcia; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the association between insomnia and menopausal status and the influence of socioeconomic and psychosocial variables on this association in a cross-sectional analysis of 2,190 university employees (the Pró-Saúde Study). A self-administered questionnaire was used, covering menopausal status, complaints of insomnia, common mental disorders, stressful life events, social support, and socioeconomic variables. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression with a polytomous outcome. After adjusting for potential socio-demographic confounders, women who had entered menopause more than 60 months previously were more likely to report complaints with sleep (OR 1.53-1.86) as compared to women in menopause for less than 60 months. After adjusting for psychosocial variables, in the first group the ORs decreased to 1.53 (95%CI: 0.92-2.52) for difficulty initiating sleep, 1.81 (95%CI: 1.09-2.98) for difficulty maintaining sleep, and 1.71 (95%CI: 1.08-2.73) for general complaints of insomnia. Psychosocial factors can mediate the manifestation of insomnia among menopausal women.

  1. Beer Polyphenols and Menopause: Effects and Mechanisms—A Review of Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Ramírez, Berner Andrée; M. Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa; Estruch, Ramon; Sasot, Gemma; Doménech, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Beer is one of the most frequently consumed fermented beverages in the world, and it has been part of the human diet for thousands of years. Scientific evidence obtained from the development of new techniques of food analysis over the last two decades suggests that polyphenol intake derived from moderate beer consumption may play a positive role in different health outcomes including osteoporosis and cardiovascular risk and the relief of vasomotor symptoms, which are commonly experienced during menopause and are an important reason why women seek medical care during this period; here, we review the current knowledge regarding moderate beer consumption and its possible effects on menopausal symptoms. The effect of polyphenol intake on vasomotor symptoms in menopause may be driven by the direct interaction of the phenolic compounds present in beer, such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and isoxanthohumol, with intracellular estrogen receptors that leads to the modulation of gene expression, increase in sex hormone plasma concentrations, and thus modulation of physiological hormone imbalance in menopausal women. Since traditional hormone replacement therapies increase health risks, alternative, safer treatment options are needed to alleviate menopausal symptoms in women. The present work aims to review the current data on this subject. PMID:28904736

  2. Relationship between uric acid and metabolic syndrome according to menopausal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Park, Hyun Tae; Cho, Geum Joon; Yi, Kyung Wook; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Shin, Jung-Ho; Kim, Tak; Kim, Young Tae; Hur, Jun Young; Kim, Sun Haeng

    2011-06-01

    Uric acid, the levels of which have been shown to increase after menopause, has been associated with metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has also been determined to increase after menopause. Therefore, we surmised that menopausal status-specific analyses for the characterisation of the relationship between uric acid and the metabolic syndrome were warranted. We included 1644 patients: 1018 premenopausal women and 626 postmenopausal women, all of whom participated in annual health examinations at Anam Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from January 2008 through December 2008. On the multivariate logistic regression analysis, uric acid was identified as an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Uric acid levels had different relationships with blood pressure based on menopausal status, however, no such relationships with fasting glucose or age were found. Increased uric acid levels were associated with increased risk for metabolic syndrome in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. In studies regarding uric acid and metabolic syndrome in women, the effects of menopausal status should be considered.

  3. Total bone calcium in normal women: effect of age and menopause status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.C.; Goldgar, D.; Moy, A.

    1987-01-01

    Bone density in different regions of the skeleton was measured in 392 normal women aged 20-80 years by dual photon absorpiometry. In premenopausal women, aged 25-50 years, multiple regression analysis of regional bone density on age, height, and weight showed a small significant decrease in total bone density (less than 0.01) but no significant change in other regions of the skeleton. In postmenopausal women there were highly significant decreases in all regions of the skeleton (p less than 0.001), and bone density in these areas decreased as a logarithmic function of years since menopause. Based on multiple regression analyses, the decrease in spine density and total bone calcium was 2.5-3.0 times greater in the 25 years after menopause than the 25 years before menopause. The largest change, however, occurred in the first five years after menopause. During this time the estimated annual change in spine density and total bone calcium was about 10 times greater than that in the premenopausal period. These results demonstrate the important effect of the menopause in determining bone mass in later life

  4. Beer Polyphenols and Menopause: Effects and Mechanisms—A Review of Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berner Andrée Sandoval-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Beer is one of the most frequently consumed fermented beverages in the world, and it has been part of the human diet for thousands of years. Scientific evidence obtained from the development of new techniques of food analysis over the last two decades suggests that polyphenol intake derived from moderate beer consumption may play a positive role in different health outcomes including osteoporosis and cardiovascular risk and the relief of vasomotor symptoms, which are commonly experienced during menopause and are an important reason why women seek medical care during this period; here, we review the current knowledge regarding moderate beer consumption and its possible effects on menopausal symptoms. The effect of polyphenol intake on vasomotor symptoms in menopause may be driven by the direct interaction of the phenolic compounds present in beer, such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and isoxanthohumol, with intracellular estrogen receptors that leads to the modulation of gene expression, increase in sex hormone plasma concentrations, and thus modulation of physiological hormone imbalance in menopausal women. Since traditional hormone replacement therapies increase health risks, alternative, safer treatment options are needed to alleviate menopausal symptoms in women. The present work aims to review the current data on this subject.

  5. Relationship of serum and saliva calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase with dry mouth feeling in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare serum and saliva calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase of menopausal women with/without dry mouth (DM) feeling. The composition of saliva in menopause women with/without DM feeling is different. Some of these differences are in hormones that are related to bone turnover. A case-control study was carried out on 60 selected menopausal women aged 45-79 years with or without DM feeling (30 as case, 30 as control), conducted at the Clinic of Oral Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The phosphorus concentration was measured by photometrical measurement of the blue colour formed after the addition of ammonium molybdate and stannous chloride; calcium was measured by Arsenazo reaction; and alkaline phosphatase by the pNPP-AMP method. Statistical analysis of Student's t-test was used. The mean serum phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase, stimulated and unstimulated saliva calcium and alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly higher in the menopausal women suffering from DM. There were no significant differences between groups regarding saliva phosphorus and serum calcium concentration. Calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase appear associated with DM feeling in menopause. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer by menopausal and estrogen receptor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Holford, Theodore R; Zhang, Yawei; Boyle, Peter; Mayne, Susan T; Dai, Min; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2013-02-01

    Evaluate the hypothesis that relation of breast cancer associated with dietary fiber intakes varies by type of fiber, menopausal, and the tumor's hormone receptor status. A case-control study of female breast cancer was conducted in Connecticut. A total of 557 incident breast cancer cases and 536 age frequency-matched controls were included in the analysis. Information on dietary intakes was collected through in-person interviews with a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and was converted into nutrient intakes. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. Among pre-menopausal women, higher intake of soluble fiber (highest versus lowest quartile of intake) was associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR = 0.38, 95% CI, 0.15-0.97, P (trend) = 0.08). When further restricted to pre-menopausal women with ER(-) tumors, the adjusted OR for the highest quartile of intake was 0.15 (95% CI, 0.03-0.69, P (trend) = 0.02) for soluble fiber intake. Among post-menopausal women, no reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for either soluble or insoluble fiber intakes or among ER(+) or ER(-) tumor groups. The results from this study show that dietary soluble fiber intake is associated with a significantly reduced risk of ER(-) breast cancer among pre-menopausal women. Additional studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm these results.

  7. Analysis and Market Prospects of a Traditional Calabrian Product

    OpenAIRE

    Gulisano, Giovanni; Platania, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The strategies for exploiting typical production represents a theme of great interest, above all in the measure in which exploitation brought about via adequate marketing strategies allows these products to shed their anonymity. This paper constitutes a contribution in this direction, since it analyses the potential of a traditional product ('Nduja) using multivariate analysis techniques on a sample of consumers, identified by a specific market research survey. This made it possible to define...

  8. A New Method of Measuring Online Media Advertising Effectiveness: Prospective Meta-Analysis in Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Liberali (Gui); G.L. Urban (Glen); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); C. Tucker (Catherine); Y. Bart (Yakov); S. Stremersch (Stefan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe authors introduce a new method, prospective meta-analysis in marketing (PMM), to estimate consumer response to online advertising on a large and adaptive scale. They illustrate their approach in a field study in the U.S., China and the Netherlands, covering equivalent ad content on

  9. Chinese herbal medicine for menopausal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoshu; Liew, Yuklan; Liu, Zhao Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) usage is expected to increase as women suffering from menopausal symptoms are seeking alternative therapy due to concerns from the adverse effects (AEs) associated with hormone therapy (HT). Scientific evidence for their effectiveness and safety is needed. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CHM in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Search methods We searched the Gynaecology and Fertility Group’s Specialised Register of controlled trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO (from inception to March 2015). Others included Current Control Trials, Citation Indexes, conference abstracts in the ISI Web of Knowledge, LILACS database, PubMed, OpenSIGLE database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure database (CNKI, 1999 to 2015). Other resources included reference lists of articles as well as direct contact with authors. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of CHM with placebo, HT, pharmaceutical drugs, acupuncture, or another CHM formula in women over 18 years of age, and suffering from menopausal symptoms. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed 864 studies for eligibility. Data extractions were performed by them with disagreements resolved through group discussion and clarification of data or direct contact with the study authors. Data analyses were performed in accordance with Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Main results We included 22 RCTs (2902 women). Participants were from different ethnic backgrounds with the majority of Chinese origin. When CHM was compared with placebo (eight RCTs), there was little or no evidence of a difference between the groups for the following pooled outcomes: hot flushes per day (MD 0.00, 95% CI −0.88 to 0.89; 2 trials, 199 women; moderate quality evidence); hot flushes per day assessed by an overall hot

  10. Energy Technology Analysis Prospects for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Energy security, economic prosperity and environmental protection are prominent challenges for all countries. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier and fuel cells as motive devices in transportation and energy distribution systems are possible solutions. This book provides the reader with an authoritative and objective analysis of policy responses and hurdles and business opportunities. Information regarding the latest RD&D, policy initiatives and private sector plans are assessed from the perspective of the rapidly changing global energy system in the next half century. This book prov

  11. Fertility (male and female) and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathryn J; Partridge, Ann H

    2012-10-20

    The impact of oncologic treatments on fertility and menopausal symptoms is often significant for patients with cancer. Surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy can all damage the reproductive organs or the hypothalamic pituitary axis that controls them, impairing fertility and causing hormonally mediated symptoms such as hot flashes. Understanding these risks and strategies to mitigate them may substantially improve cancer survivorship care. For both female and male patients who desire a future biologic child, there are a variety of fertility preservation techniques that should be considered. For cancer survivors who experience menopausal symptoms, lifestyle changes may be beneficial, and hormonal and nonhormonal pharmacologic agents are well proven to reduce symptom burden.

  12. Reproductive Hormones and the Menopause Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nanette; Randolph, John F

    2011-01-01

    The hormonal correlates of reproductive aging and the menopause transition reflect an initial loss of the follicle cohort, while a responsive ovary remains, and an eventual complete loss of follicle response, with persistent hypergonadotropic amenorrhea. The physiology of the process is described, along with key findings of relevant studies, with an emphasis on SWAN, the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. A clinical framework is provided to help clinicians forecast the major milestones of the menopausal transition and to predict potential symptoms or disease. PMID:21961713

  13. Assessment of Prospective Physician Characteristics by SWOT Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thira, Woratanarat; Patarawan, Woratanarat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Thailand is one of the developing countries encountering medical workforce shortage. From the national registry in 2006, there were 33 166 physicians: 41.5% worked in the government sector, 21.6% worked in the private sector, and the remaining worked in non-medical fields. There is no current data to confirm the effectiveness of the national policy to increase physician production. We demonstrate our findings from the strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat (SWOT) analysis in medical students and the potential impact on national workforce planning. Methods: We introduced SWOT analysis to 568 medical students during the 2008–2010 academic years, with the objective of becoming “a good physician in the future”. Results: Pertinent issues were grouped into 4 categories: not wanting to be a doctor, having inadequate medical professional skills, not wanting to work in rural or community areas, and planning to pursue training in specialties with high salary/low workload/low risk for lawsuit. The percentages of medical students who described themselves as “do not want to be a doctor” and “do not want to work in rural or community areas” increased from 7.07% and 25.00% in 2008 to 12.56% and 29.65% in 2010, respectively. Conclusion: Further intervention should be considered in order to change the medical students attitudes on the profession and their impact on Thai health system. PMID:22977376

  14. Assessment of Prospective Physician Characteristics by SWOT Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thira, Woratanarat; Patarawan, Woratanarat

    2012-01-01

    Thailand is one of the developing countries encountering medical workforce shortage. From the national registry in 2006, there were 33 166 physicians: 41.5% worked in the government sector, 21.6% worked in the private sector, and the remaining worked in non-medical fields. There is no current data to confirm the effectiveness of the national policy to increase physician production. We demonstrate our findings from the strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat (SWOT) analysis in medical students and the potential impact on national workforce planning. We introduced SWOT analysis to 568 medical students during the 2008-2010 academic years, with the objective of becoming "a good physician in the future". Pertinent issues were grouped into 4 categories: not wanting to be a doctor, having inadequate medical professional skills, not wanting to work in rural or community areas, and planning to pursue training in specialties with high salary/low workload/low risk for lawsuit. The percentages of medical students who described themselves as "do not want to be a doctor" and "do not want to work in rural or community areas" increased from 7.07% and 25.00% in 2008 to 12.56% and 29.65% in 2010, respectively. Further intervention should be considered in order to change the medical students attitudes on the profession and their impact on Thai health system.

  15. Menopause versus aging: The predictor of obesity and metabolic aberrations among menopausal women of Karnataka, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Dasgupta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Menopausal transition brings about anomalies in total body composition characterized by an increased body fat mass and central adiposity. This creates a compatible atmosphere for abnormal metabolism and aggravated cardio metabolic risk factors. Thus, menopausal status and associated obesity is the major predictor of metabolic aberrations over age in menopausal women.

  16. Age at menarche and natural menopause and number of reproductive years in association with mortality: results from a median follow-up of 11.2 years among 31,955 naturally menopausal Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wu

    Full Text Available Studies conducted in Western countries suggest that early age at menarche and early age at menopause are both associated with increased total mortality, but limited data are available for Asian populations. We examined associations of age at menarche and natural menopause and duration of the reproductive span with mortality in a population-based cohort study of Chinese women.We evaluated the effects of age at menarche, age at natural menopause, and number of reproductive years on total and cause-specific mortality among 31,955 naturally menopausal Chinese women who participated in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study.A total of 3,158 deaths occurred during a median follow-up of 11.2 years. Results from Cox proportional hazards models showed that younger age at menopause (<46.64 years was associated with higher risk of total mortality (Ptrend= 0.02. Younger age at menarche (<14 years was associated with higher risk of mortality from stroke (Ptrend= 0.03 and diabetes (Ptrend = 0.02 but lower risk of mortality from respiratory system cancer (Ptrend = 0.01. Women with a shorter reproductive span had lower risk of mortality from gynecological cancers (Ptrend = 0.03.Our study found that menstrual characteristics are important predictors of mortality, suggesting an important role of sex hormones in biological aging.

  17. The Relationship Between Menopausal Symptoms, Menopausal Age and Body Mass Index With Depression in Menopausal Women of Ahvaz in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziagham

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Depression is the commonest psychiatric disorder in women. Menopausal symptoms include hot flashes, sleep disturbance, irritability, and vaginal dryness, which can give rise to depression in postmenopausal women. Objectives This study aimed to determine the factors affecting and associated with depression in postmenopausal women. Patients and Methods In this descriptive analytical research, 250 postmenopausal women who referred to health centers in Ahvaz were selected through an easy sampling method and studied. The beck depression inventory, the menopause rating scale (MRS Questionnaire, and demographic information sheets were used to collect data. The collected data were analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficients, Spearman, chi-square, and one-way ANOVA. Results The mean depression score was 12.17 ± 8. The total MRS mean in this study is 13.04 ± 8.01. The somatic dimension had the highest score, the mean of which was 5.48 ± 3.28. We found a significant relationship between depression score and MRS scores in all three dimensions (P 0.05. However, the level of education was significantly associated with depression (P < 0.001. Conclusions Increase in menopausal symptoms is associated with a higher severity of depression. Diagnosis and treatment of menopausal symptoms is therefore recommended to reduce depression.

  18. Ten-year absolute risk of osteoporotic fractures according to BMD T score at menopause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Vestergaard, Peter; Rud, Bo

    2006-01-01

    was 10.9% as opposed to an expected risk of 5.7%. Relative risk gradients were similar to those of the recent meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy women, examined in the first year or two after menopause, 10-year fracture risk was higher at each level of BMD T score than expected from the model...... by Kanis et al. Inclusion of HRT users in the cohorts used may have led to higher BMD values and lower absolute fracture risk in the Kanis model. These longitudinal data can be used directly in estimating absolute fracture risk in untreated north European women from BMD at menopause....

  19. Pattern of clustering of menopausal problems: A study with a Bengali Hindu ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Doyel; Pal, Baidyanath; Ray, Subha

    2016-01-01

    We attempted to find out how menopausal problems cluster with each other. The study was conducted among a group of women belonging to a Bengali-speaking Hindu ethnic group of West Bengal, a state located in Eastern India. We recruited 1,400 participants for the study. Information on sociodemographic aspects and menopausal problems were collected from these participants with the help of a pretested questionnaire. Results of cluster analysis showed that vasomotor, vaginal, and urinary problems cluster together, separately from physical and psychosomatic problems.

  20. Tales of the second spring: menopause in Turkey through the narratives of menopausal women and gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Maral

    2009-10-01

    Medicalization of menopause is a relatively recent phenomenon, originating from and shaped in the Northern American and Western European cultural context. This article, which is based on data from ethnographic research done in Istanbul between June 2006 and March 2007, explores how menopause is perceived and constructed in Turkey. Since the 1920s, Western science and technology has been accepted as the "guide" for the Turkish modernization project. Starting with the 1980s, neoliberalism and globalization brought structural changes, new notions, and practices in the health care sector as well as furthering and changing the modernization ideals. In this article I illustrate the interactions between modernization, globalization, femininity, and health by juxtaposing narratives of menopause as told by women and physicians. I argue that the ideals of modernity, especially the concept of "consciousness" (bilinç), provide a discursive basis for the adoption of the global medical discourse around menopause in the Turkish context.

  1. The relationships of multiple factors to menopausal symptoms in different racial/ethnic groups of midlife women: the structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chang, Sun Ju; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik

    2018-04-09

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships of multiple factors to menopausal symptoms in different racial/ethnic groups of midlife women. This secondary analysis was conducted with the data from 980 midlife women that were collected from 2005 to 2013 using the Midlife Women's Symptom Index. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. The model had the highest fit indices for Non-Hispanic (NH) White midlife women, and prominent racial/ethnic differences were observed in the relationships of multiple factors to menopausal symptoms. In all racial/ethnic groups (except in Hispanic women), perceived health status was significantly associated positively with menopausal symptoms (β = -0.149 for NH African American; β = -0.207 for NH Asians; β = -0.162 for NH Whites). Body mass index was significantly positively associated with menopausal symptoms only in NH Asians (β = 0.118) and Hispanics (β = 0.210). The racial/ethnic differences in the relationships of multiple factors to menopausal symptoms could have resulted from the different cultural contexts in which women undergo during their menopausal transitions. Further cultural studies on the associations of racial/ethnic-specific factors with menopausal symptoms would help in understanding possible causes for racial/ethnic differences in the factors significantly associated with menopausal symptoms.

  2. Hubungan Indeks Massa Tubuh, Paritas dan Lama Menopause dengan Densitas Mineral Tulang pada Wanita Pasca Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Fitria, Rahmi

    2016-01-01

    The process of osteoporosis in women after menopause affected by such body mass index ( bmi ), parity and menopausal old.That was increasing every year, it because estogen not, resulting from the follicle but there is another source of estrogen that are produced by cells of adipose.Activity generated by network is smaller than for estrogen that is generated by a follicles and adalagi other factors reduce employment osteoblast.The process of osteoporosis be known by measuring its Bone Mineral ...

  3. Menopause and big data: Word Adjacency Graph modeling of menopause-related ChaCha data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Janet S; Groves, Doyle; Chen, Chen X; Otte, Julie L; Miller, Wendy R

    2017-07-01

    To detect and visualize salient queries about menopause using Big Data from ChaCha. We used Word Adjacency Graph (WAG) modeling to detect clusters and visualize the range of menopause-related topics and their mutual proximity. The subset of relevant queries was fully modeled. We split each query into token words (ie, meaningful words and phrases) and removed stopwords (ie, not meaningful functional words). The remaining words were considered in sequence to build summary tables of words and two and three-word phrases. Phrases occurring at least 10 times were used to build a network graph model that was iteratively refined by observing and removing clusters of unrelated content. We identified two menopause-related subsets of queries by searching for questions containing menopause and menopause-related terms (eg, climacteric, hot flashes, night sweats, hormone replacement). The first contained 263,363 queries from individuals aged 13 and older and the second contained 5,892 queries from women aged 40 to 62 years. In the first set, we identified 12 topic clusters: 6 relevant to menopause and 6 less relevant. In the second set, we identified 15 topic clusters: 11 relevant to menopause and 4 less relevant. Queries about hormones were pervasive within both WAG models. Many of the queries reflected low literacy levels and/or feelings of embarrassment. We modeled menopause-related queries posed by ChaCha users between 2009 and 2012. ChaCha data may be used on its own or in combination with other Big Data sources to identify patient-driven educational needs and create patient-centered interventions.

  4. Effectiveness of human menopausal gonadotropin versus recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted reproductive cycles: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wely, Madelon; Westergaard, Lars G.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; van der Veen, Fulco

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of hMG and recombinant FSH after down-regulation for ovulation stimulation in assisted reproductive cycles. Design: Meta-analysis. Setting: Infertility centers providing assisted reproductive techniques. Patient(s): Two thousand thirty women undergoing IVF or

  5. Women, the menopause, hormone replacement therapy and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease considerations are associated with the menopause. Despite a misconception that women have a minimal risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), it is the major cause of female deaths. This review highlights issues of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and CHD in women. A woman under age 60, who suffers a myocardial infarction (MI), has a 2-year post-MI mortality of 28.9%; it is 19.6% in men. CHD and MI in women are subtle. In addition, female mortality from CHD increases after the menopause. The increased inflammatory risk factor status of women plays a role in development of atherosclerosis, before and after the menopause. Until after the menopause, women overall have a lower CHD mortality rate. Menopause is associated with unique symptoms, especially vasomotor ones; preexisting cardiovascular disease further exacerbates problems associated with the menopause. Use of HRT after the menopause is a major issue. Early menopause at age 39 years or younger and late menopause at age 56 years or older increase cardiovascular risk. HRT should not be prescribed for cardiovascular risk prevention, but when less than 10 years from menopause at a normal age, women can be reassured that cardiovascular risk from HRT is very low. Prescription of HRT should never be made only for cardiovascular risk reduction. However, when symptom-related and other indications are present, HRT is appropriate and well tolerated in the early years after menopause with onset at a normal age.

  6. Management of menopause in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, A J

    2015-10-01

    Increasing breast cancer incidence and decreasing mortality have highlighted the importance of survivorship issues related to breast cancer. A consideration of the issues related to menopause is therefore of great importance to both women and clinicians. Menopause/menopausal symptoms, with significant negative effects on quality of life and potential long-term health impacts, may in women with breast cancer be associated with: (1) natural menopause occurring concurrently with a breast cancer diagnosis; (2) recurrence of menopausal symptoms following cessation of hormone replacement therapy; (3) treatment-induced menopause (chemotherapy, ovarian ablation/suppression) and adjuvant endocrine therapy. A variety of non-hormonal pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been investigated as therapeutic options for menopausal symptoms with mixed results, and ongoing research is required. This review presents a summary of the causes, common problematic symptoms of menopause (vasomotor, genitourinary and sexual dysfunction), and longer-term consequences (cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis) related to menopause. It proposes an evidenced-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of menopause/menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer.

  7. The impact of menopause on work ability in women with severe menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geukes, Marije; van Aalst, Mariëlle P; Robroek, Suzan J W; Laven, Joop S E; Oosterhof, Henk

    2016-08-01

    To measure the impact of menopause on work ability in women with severe menopausal symptoms. This cross-sectional study compared the work ability of a sample of otherwise healthy employed Dutch women (n=205) with that of a sample of first-time attendees of a menopause clinic (n=60); both groups were aged 44-60 years. Self-reported questionnaire data assessing work ability (Work Ability Index; WAI) and menopausal symptoms (Greene Climacteric Scale; GCS) were used. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine whether women with severe menopausal symptoms were more likely to have low work ability (defined as a score group, after adjustment for individual and lifestyle factors. Symptomatic women had significantly higher total GCS scores (mean 26.7 vs 14.2, t=10.8, Pvs 40.0, U=2380, Pgroup. They were 8.4 times more likely to report low work ability than their healthy counterparts: 76.7% versus 30.2% (OR 8.4, 95% CI 4.1-17.2). Over three-quarters of symptomatic menopausal women report serious problems in dealing with the physical and mental demands of their work (recorded here as low work ability); hence these women might be at risk of prolonged sickness absence from work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An approach to prospective consequential life cycle assessment and net energy analysis of distributed electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher; Gilbert, Paul; Raugei, Marco; Mander, Sarah; Leccisi, Enrica

    2017-01-01

    Increasing distributed renewable electricity generation is one of a number of technology pathways available to policy makers to meet environmental and other sustainability goals. Determining the efficacy of such a pathway for a national electricity system implies evaluating whole system change in future scenarios. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and net energy analysis (NEA) are two methodologies suitable for prospective and consequential analysis of energy performance and associated impacts. This paper discusses the benefits and limitations of prospective and consequential LCA and NEA analysis of distributed generation. It concludes that a combined LCA and NEA approach is a valuable tool for decision makers if a number of recommendations are addressed. Static and dynamic temporal allocation are both needed for a fair comparison of distributed renewables with thermal power stations to account for their different impact profiles over time. The trade-offs between comprehensiveness and uncertainty in consequential analysis should be acknowledged, with system boundary expansion and system simulation models limited to those clearly justified by the research goal. The results of this approach are explorative, rather than for accounting purposes; this interpretive remit, and the assumptions in scenarios and system models on which results are contingent, must be clear to end users. - Highlights: • A common LCA and NEA framework for prospective, consequential analysis is discussed. • Approach to combined LCA and NEA of distributed generation scenarios is proposed. • Static and dynamic temporal allocation needed to assess distributed generation uptake.

  9. Fruits, vegetables and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, D; Chan, D S M; Vieira, A R; Rosenblatt, D A Navarro; Vieira, R; Greenwood, D C; Norat, T

    2012-07-01

    Evidence for an association between fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer risk is inconclusive. To clarify the association, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence from prospective studies. We searched PubMed for prospective studies of fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer risk until April 30, 2011. We included fifteen prospective studies that reported relative risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer associated with fruit and vegetable intake. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks. The summary relative risk (RR) for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.89 (95 % CI: 0.80-0.99, I (2) = 0 %) for fruits and vegetables combined, 0.92 (95 % CI: 0.86-0.98, I (2) = 9 %) for fruits, and 0.99 (95 % CI: 0.92-1.06, I (2) = 20 %) for vegetables. In dose-response analyses, the summary RR per 200 g/day was 0.96 (95 % CI: 0.93-1.00, I (2) = 2 %) for fruits and vegetables combined, 0.94 (95 % CI: 0.89-1.00, I (2) = 39 %) for fruits, and 1.00 (95 % CI: 0.95-1.06, I (2) = 17 %) for vegetables. In this meta-analysis of prospective studies, high intake of fruits, and fruits and vegetables combined, but not vegetables, is associated with a weak reduction in risk of breast cancer.

  10. Emerging hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, Andrea R; Komm, Barry S; Pickar, James H

    2015-03-01

    The majority of women experience bothersome symptoms postmenopause (e.g., hot flushes, vaginal symptoms). Estrogen receptor agonists remain the most effective options for ameliorating menopausal symptoms. However, use of hormonal therapies has declined in the wake of issues raised by the Women's Health Initiative trials. As a result, there is a need for new safe and effective alternatives to estrogen-progestogen hormone therapy. We review the efficacy and safety profile of hormonal menopausal therapies that are in Phase III clinical trials or recently approved. Investigational treatments discussed include two new vaginal estrogen products (TX-004HR, WC-3011); the first combination of estradiol and progesterone, and a novel combination of dehydroepiandrosterone and acolbifene. We also review a new selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), ospemifene, recently approved for treatment of dyspareunia related to menopause, and conjugated estrogens plus bazedoxifene, an estrogens/SERM combination, recently approved for moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis. New and emerging hormonal treatments for managing menopausal symptoms may have improved safety and efficacy profiles compared with traditional estrogen-progestogen therapy; however, long-term safety data will be needed.

  11. Psychosocial Adjustment Needs of Menopausal Women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    activity in the body system. Hence ... challenges such as anxiety, poor self-image, low self esteem, panic, ..... Husbands should encourage their wives during menopause and take them to social functions regularly so as to build up their self confidence. 5. There is need for Christian and Muslim leaders to introduce training.

  12. Knowledge and Perception of Menopause and Climacteric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Menopause alters the physiological, biochemical and psychological environment of a woman. Thus the knowledge and perception of its symptomatology is invaluable to enable appropriate adjustment to this natural phenomenon. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and ...

  13. Mate choice and the origin of menopause.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Morton

    Full Text Available Human menopause is an unsolved evolutionary puzzle, and relationships among the factors that produced it remain understood poorly. Classic theory, involving a one-sex (female model of human demography, suggests that genes imparting deleterious effects on post-reproductive survival will accumulate. Thus, a 'death barrier' should emerge beyond the maximum age for female reproduction. Under this scenario, few women would experience menopause (decreased fertility with continued survival because few would survive much longer than they reproduced. However, no death barrier is observed in human populations. Subsequent theoretical research has shown that two-sex models, including male fertility at older ages, avoid the death barrier. Here we use a stochastic, two-sex computational model implemented by computer simulation to show how male mating preference for younger females could lead to the accumulation of mutations deleterious to female fertility and thus produce a menopausal period. Our model requires neither the initial assumption of a decline in older female fertility nor the effects of inclusive fitness through which older, non-reproducing women assist in the reproductive efforts of younger women. Our model helps to explain why such effects, observed in many societies, may be insufficient factors in elucidating the origin of menopause.

  14. Alterations in the human brain in menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishunina, T.A.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    In a series of studies we showed that menopause in women causes alterations not only in the neuronal expression of estrogen receptors (ER) alpha and beta, but also in local estrogen production in several brain areas and in the rate of neuronal metabolism. Although such changes are clearly brain

  15. Menopause and depression: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivian-Taylor, Josephine; Hickey, Martha

    2014-10-01

    Depression is common and may have significant implications for the individual, their families and work and for the health care system. The menopause transition (MT) may be an 'at risk' time for the development of depression. This review aims to explore the relationship between depression and MT and the complex interaction between the biological, psychological and social factors that inform it. The literature on depressive disorders and MT is reviewed. Longitudinal studies have demonstrated an association between the menopause transition (MT) and an increase in depressive symptoms. A trend towards higher rates of depressive disorders during the MT, has also been shown, although not always reaching statistical significance. Risk factors for the development of depressive symptoms and depression in the MT include the presence of vasomotor symptoms (VMS), a personal history of depression (particularly depression that is related to pregnancy or hormonal changes through the menstrual cycle), surgical menopause, adverse life events, and negative attitudes to menopause and ageing. A treatment approach to depression during the MT exploits the biological as well as the psychosocial factors that are likely to be contributing in an individual. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Abrogation by human menopausal gonadotropin on testicular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer cells including testicular cancer. Human Menopausal Gonadotropin (HMG) is a natural hormone necessary for human reproduction. This hormone is a leading modality of treatment for infertility as it contains equal amount of ...

  17. Knowledge and Perception of Menopause and Climacteric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Abstract. Background: Menopause alters the physiological, biochemical and psychological environment of a woman. Thus the knowledge and perception of its symptomatology is invaluable to enable appropriate adjustment to this natural phenomenon. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge ...

  18. Menarche menopause breast cancer risk individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer; Bausch-Goldbohm, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected

  19. Perimenstrual chocolate craving. What happens after menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Julia M; Rozin, Paul

    2009-10-01

    About half of American women crave chocolate, and approximately half of the cravers crave it specifically around the onset of menstruation. This study examines whether the primary cause of this "perimenstrual" craving is a direct effect of hormonal changes around the perimenstrum, or rather if the craving is a general response in some individuals to stress or other notable events. Insofar as there is a direct hormonal effect, one would predict a substantial decrease of 38% in total chocolate craving in women post-menopause, corresponding to the proportion of women pre-menopause who report craving chocolate exclusively perimenstrually. Based on a survey of pre- and post-menopausal alumnae of the same University, we report a significant but small decrease in prevalence of chocolate cravings post-menopause. The decrease is only 13.4% and thereby much smaller than a 38% drop predicted by a purely hormonal explanation, suggesting that female reproductive hormones are not the principal cause of perimenstrual chocolate craving.

  20. Assessment of Menopausal Symptoms During Perimenopause and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause is a significant stage marking the end of a woman's reproductive life. Although this process is physiological, it is plagued by wide range of discomforting features which affects their quality of life. These symptoms includes years of hot flashes associated with episodes of sweating; sleep disturbances; joint pains; ...

  1. Managing Depression during the Menopausal Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Quinn M.

    2010-01-01

    The menopausal transition is associated with both first onset of depression and recurrent depression. Risk factors include vasomotor symptoms, a history of premenstrual dysphoria, postpartum depression, major depression, and sleep disturbances. Hormone replacement therapy, complementary and alternative medicine approaches, and counseling…

  2. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  3. Depressive disorders and the menopause transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaneza, Plácido; García-Portilla, María P; Llaneza-Suárez, David; Armott, Begoña; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2012-02-01

    Depressive disorders and symptoms are common among middle-aged women. The effects of hormones on depression remain unclear. This review aims to clarify the nature of depressive disorders during the menopause transition as well as their links with climacteric syndrome, sexuality, cardiovascular risk and cognitive function. The recent literature on depressive disorders and menopause is reviewed. Women are more vulnerable than men to depressive disorders. Endocrine influences have been postulated but differences in, for example, coping style and response to stress may also contribute to the gender difference in the prevalence of depressive disorders. Gender differences in socialization may lead to higher rates of depression in women. There are data top suggest that menopause and depression are associated, although there is not a common clear causative factor. Women with climacteric symptoms (hot flushes, night sweats, vaginal dryness and dyspareunia) are more likely to report anxiety and/or depressive symptoms. Bothersome vasomotor symptoms could be associated with sleep disturbances, which in turn can increase reports of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Biopsychosocial and partner factors have a significant influence on middle-aged women's sexuality and depressive disorders, and most antidepressants can have a negative effect on sexual response. Lastly, studies have consistently shown that women with high levels of depressive symptoms are at greater cardiovascular risk and have poorer cognitive function than non-depressed women. At present, a direct relationship between psychiatric symptoms and hormonal changes such as estrogen decrease has not been clearly found. Stress, educational level, ethnicity, socioeconomic factors and partner status may influence the prevalence and clinical course of both menopause symptoms and depressive disorders. Since in many cases depression is a lifelong condition, and is associated with severe comorbid conditions, further studies are

  4. Radiation-induced premature menopause: a misconception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Berit L.; Giudice, Linda; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To disprove the common view that women who have undergone irradiation to fields excluding the pelvis are at risk for radiation-induced premature menopause, we reviewed menstrual function and fertility among women treated with subtotal lymphoid irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease. Methods and Materials: Treatment and follow-up records of all women less than age 50 at the time of diagnosis of Stage I or II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's Disease, treated with subtotal lymphoid irradiation alone and enrolled in radiotherapy trials from 1967 to 1985, were reviewed. In addition, patients were surveyed regarding their menstrual status and fertility history. Results: Thirty-six women, aged 10 to 40 years, with normal menstrual function at the time of Hodgkin's diagnosis, were identified. Mean follow-up was 14 years, with a range of 1.25-22.75 years. The average radiation dose to mantle and paraaortic fields was 40-44 Gy; the calculated scatter radiation dose to the pelvis at the ovaries was 3.2 Gy. There were 38 pregnancies in 18 women; all offspring are normal. One of 36 women (2.7%) experienced premature menopause. The reported rate of premature menopause in women who have not undergone irradiation is 1-3%; not significantly different than the rate in our study. There is a syndrome whereby antibodies to several endocrine organs occur (including the ovary), which is associated with premature ovarian failure. This syndrome may be associated with prior radiation to the thyroid, such as that given by mantle-irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease. We report such a case. Conclusion: There is little risk of premature menopause in women treated with radiation fields that exclude the pelvis. Women with presumed radiation-induced premature menopause warrant an evaluation to exclude other causes of ovarian failure, such as autoimmune disorders

  5. Hormone replacement therapy after menopause and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Neuhausen, Susan L; Senter, Leigha; Demsky, Rochelle; Foulkes, William D; Eng, Charis; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Singer, Christian F; Sun, Ping; Lubinski, Jan; Narod, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Many BRCA1 mutation carriers undergo elective surgical oophorectomy (often before menopause) to manage their elevated risk of developing ovarian cancer. It is important to clarify whether or not the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to mitigate the symptoms associated with surgical or natural menopause is safe in women with an inherited BRCA1 mutation and no personal history of breast or ovarian cancer. We conducted a case-control analysis of 432 matched pairs of women with a BRCA1 mutation. Detailed information on HRT use after menopause (duration, type, age at first/last use, formulation) was obtained from a research questionnaire administered at the time of study enrollment. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) associated with HRT use. The mean duration of HRT use after menopause was 4.3 years among the cases and 4.4 years among the controls (P = 0.83). The adjusted OR for breast cancer comparing all women who ever used HRT to those who never used HRT was 0.80 (95 % CI 0.55-1.16; P = 0.24). Findings did not differ by type of menopause (natural vs. surgical), by recency of use, by duration of use, and by formulation type. These findings suggest that a short course of HRT should not be contra-indicated for BRCA1 mutation carriers who have undergone menopause and who have no personal history of cancer.

  6. The effect of ethanol extract of ylang-ylang flower (Cananga odorata on vascular and kidney histology in menopausal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliastuti Juliastuti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the histopathological changes in the aorta and kidneys of mice age of menopause by the ethanol extract of ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata flowers. Thirty female age of menopause mice was divided into three groups (n = 10 each group, consisting of a group of mice the age of menopause without any treatment, mice age of menopause treated with different dosages of ylang-ylang flower extract (0.1 mg/day and 0.2 mg/day. Histopathological analysis was performed with hematoxylin-eosin staining. The number of endothelial cells and the thickness of the intima in the group treated with high dose of the extract were significantly higher than the lowest dose of the extract or the control group (p < 0.05. The diameter of the Bowman's capsule and the renal glomerulus was significantly higher in the group treated with ylang-ylang flower extract compared with the control group (p < 0.05. Concluded that at the doses administered, ylang flower extract triggers the repair of endothelial cells, but increase the thickness of the intima and hyperplasia of the kidney in mice age of menopause. Thus, ylang flower extract and renal vascular remodeling triggered by the age of menopause.

  7. [Retrospectively experiencing the menopause in Germany and in Papua New Guinea: a comparative report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalcek, I; Rotte, D; Painn, K; Schmidt-Müller, A; Diedrich, K

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experience of menopause in postmenopausal women from Germany and in postmenopausal women from Papua New Guinea. Experience of menopause were assessed by formation of symptom groups (e. g. hot flushes, cardiac or sleeping trouble, depression, touchiness, drop in performance, vaginal dryness, painful joints or muscles), following the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS). Apart from the translated English version a questionaire in Pidgin English was offered. Questions about positive and negative experience of menopause and the acceptance of hormonal replacement therapy were included. Statistical analysis was performed both descriptively and for the group analyses the Chi-squared-test and the Mann Whitney's U test. 40 postmenopausal German women and 41 postmenopausal women from Papua New Guinea were asked about their experience of menopause. The German women were 58.7 years old (range from 52 to 62) and had two children on average (range from 0 to 4). 87.7 % had experience of symptoms. In Papua New Guinea mean age was 55.2 years (range from 48 to 70), parity six (range from 2 to 12). 76.9 % had experience of symptoms. There were significant intercultural differences between the experience of depressive mood, general drop of performance, sexual experience and the vaginal dryness and we found no significant intercultural differences between the experiences of hot flushes, cardiac trouble, sleeping trouble, nervousness and urological symptoms. 50 % of the German women take hormonal replacement therapy and nobody of Papua New Guinea. The experience of menopause as seen in the developed countries does not exist in the developing countries. The perception about illness and well-being are formed by culturally produced patterns.

  8. Menopause status and attitudes in a Turkish midlife female population: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayranci, Unal; Orsal, Ozgul; Orsal, Ozlem; Arslan, Gul; Emeksiz, Dursun Figen

    2010-01-11

    It is a well accepted status that socio-cultural characteristics may affect the onset of menopause and its characteristics. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence rates of menopausal symptoms and these symptoms related factors, and to assess the women's attitudes towards some climacteric issues. This survey was conducted between Jan., 1st 2008 and March, 31st 2008 to research the menopause status of the female population in a city of western Turkey. The study group consisted of 1551 women selected with a multistage area sampling method: a random sample of individuals aged 40-65 years. The questionnaire included questions pertaining to women's sociodemographic characteristics, women's menopausal status, some statements about the climacteric, use of hormones at menopause or before menopause, and some climacteric myths. The data was analyzed by Chi-square (x2) analysis and percent (%) ratios with a significant value of P connections between age groups and nearly all the items, with the exception of the items "the end of life" and "the end of fecundity". Among the women, hot flushes were the most common complaint occurring in 96.5% of women: being severe in 32.9%, moderate in 43.1% and mild in 20.4%. This was followed by low backache or muscle pain 95.0% (25.9% severe, 46.0% moderate and mild 23.1%), headache 91.7% (21.9% severe, 34.9% moderate and 34.9% mild) and feeling tired 91.0% (15.3% severe, 38.6% moderate and 37.1% mild). Most of the women in this study had mixed ideas of opinions concerning the climacteric, and the majority was also suffering from climacteric complaints. This data could assist healthcare providers in the provision of culturally competent health care to midlife Turkish women.

  9. Texture analysis of clinical radiographs using radon transform on a local scale for differentiation between post-menopausal women with and without hip fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Holger F.; Körner, Markus; Baumert, Bernhard; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian

    2011-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic condition characterized by demineralization and destruction of bone tissue. Fractures associated with the disease are becoming an increasingly relevant issue for public health institutions. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus research and, over the years, has been approched by various methods. Still, bone mineral density (BMD) obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) remains the clinical gold-standard for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. However, DXA is restricted to specialized diagnostic centers and there exists considerable overlap in BMD results between populations of individuals with and without fractures. Clinically far more available than DXA is conventional x-ray imaging depicting trabecular bone structure in great detail. In this paper, we demonstrate that bone structure depicted by clinical radiographs can be analysed quantitatively by parameters obtained from the Radon Transform (RT). RT is a global analysis-tool for detection of predefined, parameterized patterns, e.g. straight lines or struts, representing suitable approximations of trabecular bone texture. The proposed algorithm differentiates between patients with and without fractures of the hip by application of various texture-metrics based on the Radon-Transform to standard x-ray images of the proximal femur. We consider three different regions-of-interest in the proximal femur (femoral head, neck, and inter-trochanteric area), and conduct an analysis with respect to correct classification of the fracture status. Performance of the novel approach is compared to DXA. We draw the conclusion that performance of RT is comparable to DXA and may become a useful supplement to densitometry for the prediction of fracture risk.

  10. Satiety quotient linked to food intake and changes in anthropometry during menopause: a MONET Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, J; Prud'homme, D; Strychar, I; Rabasa-Lhoret, R; Brochu, M; Lavoie, J-M; Doucet, E

    2014-08-01

    It is unknown whether the satiety quotient (SQ) differs across the menopausal transition, and whether changes in SQ are related to changes in anthropometric/body composition variables. The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in SQ and its association with energy intake and changes in anthropometric/body composition variables across the menopausal transition. At baseline, 102 premenopausal women (aged 49.9 ± 1.9 years, body mass index 23.3 ± 2.2 kg/m(2)) took part in a 5-year observational, longitudinal study. Body composition (DXA), appetite (visual analog scales), energy and macronutrient intakes (ad libitum lunch and 7-day food diary) were assessed annually. The SQ (mm/100 kcal) was calculated at 60 and 180 min post-breakfast consumption. Overall, the SQ increased at years 3 and 4 (p = 0.01-0.0001), despite no significant differences between menopausal status groups. Lower fullness, prospective food consumption and mean SQ values predicted overall increases in lunch energy and macronutrient intakes (p = 0.04-0.01), whereas only prospective food consumption and fullness SQ predicted energy intake and carbohydrate intake, respectively, when assessed with food diaries (p = 0.01). Delta SQs were negatively correlated with changes in waist circumference (p = 0.03-0.02), whereas delta SQs were positively (p = 0.04) and negatively (p = 0.02) associated with delta fat mass between years 1 and 5, and years 4 and 5, respectively. These results suggest that variations in SQ across the menopausal transition are related to energy and macronutrient intakes and coincide with changes in body composition and waist circumference.

  11. Longitudinal analysis of associations between women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners/use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbo; Adams, Jon; Hickman, Louise; Sibbritt, David W

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine associations between consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners/use of self-prescribed CAM and menopause-related symptoms. Data were obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Generalized estimating equations were used to conduct longitudinal data analyses, which were restricted to women born in 1946-1951 who were surveyed in 2007 (survey 5; n = 10,638) and 2010 (survey 6; n = 10,011). Women with menopause-related symptoms were more likely to use self-prescribed CAM but were not more likely to consult a CAM practitioner. Overall, CAM use was lower among women who had undergone hysterectomy or women who had undergone oophorectomy, compared with naturally postmenopausal women, and decreased with increasing age of postmenopausal women. Weak associations between CAM use and hot flashes were observed. Women experiencing hot flashes were more likely to consult a massage therapist (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20) and/or use self-prescribed herbal medicines (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23) than women not experiencing hot flashes. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of self-prescribed CAM among naturally or surgically postmenopausal women are associated with menopause-related symptoms. Our study findings should prompt healthcare providers, in particular family medicine practitioners, to be cognizant of clinical evidence for CAM typically used for the management of common menopause-related symptoms in their aim to provide safe, effective, and coordinated care for women.

  12. Dietary fiber and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, D; Chan, D S M; Greenwood, D C; Vieira, A R; Rosenblatt, D A Navarro; Vieira, R; Norat, T

    2012-06-01

    Evidence from case-control studies suggest that dietary fiber may be inversely related to breast cancer risk, but it is unclear if this is supported by prospective data. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence from prospective studies. PubMed was searched for prospective studies of fiber intake and breast cancer risk until 31st August 2011. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs). Sixteen prospective studies were included. The summary RR for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98, I(2) = 0%] for dietary fiber, 0.95 (95% CI 0.86-1.06, I(2) = 4%) for fruit fiber, 0.99 (95% CI 0.92-1.07, I(2) = 1%) for vegetable fiber, 0.96 (95% CI 0.90-1.02, I(2) = 5%) for cereal fiber, 0.91 (95% CI 0.84-0.99, I(2) = 7%) for soluble fiber and 0.95 (95% CI 0.89-1.02, I(2) = 0%) for insoluble fiber. The summary RR per 10 g/day of dietary fiber was 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98, I(2) = 0%, P(heterogeneity) = 0.82). In stratified analyses, the inverse association was only observed among studies with a large range (≥13 g/day) or high level of intake (≥25 g/day). In this meta-analysis of prospective studies, there was an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk.

  13. Chocolate consumption and risk of myocardial infarction: a prospective study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Åkesson, Agneta; Gigante, Bruna; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-07-01

    To examine whether chocolate consumption is associated with a reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease, we used data from a prospective study of Swedish adults and we performed a meta-analysis of available prospective data. The Swedish prospective study included 67 640 women and men from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort who had completed a food-frequency questionnaire and were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Myocardial infarction (MI) cases were ascertained through linkage with the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched from inception until 4 February 2016 to identify prospective studies on chocolate consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease. The results from eligible studies were combined using a random-effects model. During follow-up (1998-2010), 4417 MI cases were ascertained in the Swedish study. Chocolate consumption was inversely associated with MI risk. Compared with non-consumers, the multivariable relative risk for those who consumed ≥3-4 servings/week of chocolate was 0.87 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.98; p for trend =0.04). Five prospective studies on chocolate consumption and ischaemic heart disease were identified. Together with the Swedish study, the meta-analysis included six studies with a total of 6851 ischaemic heart disease cases. The overall relative risk for the highest versus lowest category of chocolate consumption was 0.90 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.97), with little heterogeneity among studies (I(2)=24.3%). Chocolate consumption is associated with lower risk of MI and ischaemic heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. The effect of weight change on changes in breast density measures over menopause in a breast cancer screening cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Johanna Olga Pauline; Bakker, Marije Fokje; Veldhuis, Wouter Bernard; Peeters, Petra Huberdina Maria; van Gils, Carla Henrica

    2015-05-30

    High weight and high percentage mammographic breast density are both breast cancer risk factors but are negatively correlated. Therefore, we wanted to obtain more insight into this apparent paradox. We investigated in a longitudinal study how weight change over menopause is related to changes in mammographic breast features. Five hundred ninety-one participants of the EPIC-NL cohort were divided into three groups according to their prospectively measured weight change over menopause: (1) weight loss (more than -3.0 %), (2) stable weight (between -3.0 % and +3.0 %), and (3) weight gain (more than 3.0 %). SPSS GLM univariate analysis was used to determine both the mean breast measure changes in, and the trend over, the weight change groups. Over a median period of 5 years, the mean changes in percent density in these groups were -5.0 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) -8.0; -2.1), -6.8 % (95 % CI -9.0; -4.5), and -10.2 % (95 % CI -12.5; -7.9), respectively (P-trend = 0.001). The mean changes in dense area were -16.7 cm(2) (95 % CI -20.1; -13.4), -16.4 cm(2) (95 % CI -18.9; -13.9), and -18.1 cm(2) (95 % CI -20.6; -15.5), respectively (P-trend = 0.437). Finally, the mean changes in nondense area were -6.1 cm(2) (95 % CI -11.9; -0.4), -0.6 cm(2) (95 % CI -4.9; 3.8), and 5.3 cm(2) (95 % CI 0.9; 9.8), respectively (P-trend menopause is associated with a decrease in both percent density and dense area. Owing to an increase in the nondense tissue, the decrease in percent density is largest in women who gain weight. The decrease in dense area is not related to weight change. So the fact that both high percent density and high weight or weight gain are associated with high postmenopausal breast cancer risk can probably not be explained by an increase (or slower decrease) of dense area in women gaining weight compared with women losing weight or maintaining a stable weight. These results suggest that weight and dense area are presumably two independent postmenopausal breast

  15. A Meta-Analysis and Critical Review of Prospective Memory in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, Julia; Williams, David M.; Abbot-Smith, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is the ability to remember to carry out a planned intention at an appropriate moment in the future. Research on PM in ASD has produced mixed results. We aimed to establish the extent to which two types of PM (event-based/time-based) are impaired in ASD. In part 1, a meta-analysis of all existing studies indicates a large…

  16. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga spp.) for menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Moore, Vivienne

    2012-09-12

    Menopause can be a distressing and disruptive time for many women, with many experiencing hot flushes, night sweats, vaginal atrophy and dryness. Postmenopausal women are also at increased risk of osteoporosis. Interventions that decrease the severity and frequency of these menopausal symptoms are likely to improve a woman's well-being and quality of life. Hormone therapy has been shown to be effective in controlling the symptoms of menopause; however, many potentially serious adverse effects have been associated with this treatment. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that black cohosh may be a biologically plausible alternative treatment for menopause; even so, findings from studies investigating the clinical effectiveness of black cohosh have, to date, been inconsistent. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa or Actaea racemosa) for treating menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Relevant studies were identified through AARP Ageline, AMED, AMI, BioMed Central gateway, CAM on PubMed, CINAHL, CENTRAL, EMBASE, Health Source Nursing/Academic edition, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, MEDLINE, Natural medicines comprehensive database, PsycINFO, TRIP database, clinical trial registers and the reference lists of included trials; up to March 2012. Content experts and manufacturers of black cohosh extracts were also contacted. All randomised controlled trials comparing orally administered monopreparations of black cohosh to placebo or active medication in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Two review authors independently selected trials, extracted data and completed the 'Risk of bias' assessment. Study authors were contacted for missing information. Sixteen randomised controlled trials, recruiting a total of 2027 perimenopausal or postmenopausal women, were identified. All studies used oral monopreparations of black cohosh at a median daily dose of 40 mg, for a mean duration of

  17. Knowledge and attitude of older women towards menopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazhar, S.B.; Gul-e-Erum

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the knowledge and attitude towards menopause among postmenopausal women seeking gynecological treatment. Results: The mean age of respondents was 54.4 years. Fifty-two (74.3%) women knew about menopause, 39 (55.7%) were aware of symptomatology while only 7(10%) knew sequelae of menopause. Fifty-three (75.5%) women were satisfied with cessation of menstruation and only 17 (24.3%) desired to continue menstruation. Twenty-four (34.3%) respondents were unhappy with their menopausal status. Thirty-two (45.7%) women were content with their present sexual relations, 18 (25.7%) were dissatisfied and 20 (28.6%) had no sexual activity. Fifty-two (74.3%) women felt a need for health education on menopause in educational institutions. Thirty-three (47.1%) considered treatment of menopause necessary. Four (5.7%) were aware of any treatment of menopause and 55 (78.6%) desired to learn more about menopause. Conclusion: Women have different views about menopause, few see it as a medical condition requiring treatment, whereas majority consider it is a natural transition. There was breath of knowledge regarding significance of menopause. (author)

  18. Correlation Between Hormonal and Lipid Status in Women in Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Mešalić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and, the influence of estradiol, progesterone, FSH, LH on lipid profile in menopausal women as well. The menopausal women had higher but non-significant (p>0,05 concentrations of total cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, and triglycerides than women with regular menstruation. The concentration of HDL was significantly lower in menopausal women than in women with regular menstruation (p<0,05. Also, the concentration of apolipoprotein B was significantly higher in menopausal women (p<0,05, but the concentrations of apolipoprotein and lipoprotein (a were lower but without significance (p>0,05. Estrogen concentration has significant negative correlation with VLDL and triglycerides (p<0,05 and significant positive correlation with HDL (p<0,05 in menopausal women. Progesterone concentration has shown no correlation with concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins in menopause. We can conclude that menopause leads to changes in lipid profile by reducing HDL, and elevating apolipoprotein B levels, thus increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease. These changes were caused by reduction of estrogen concentrations in menopause.

  19. Menopause and illness course in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perich, Tania; Ussher, Jane; Meade, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    Menopause may be a time of increased mood symptoms for some women. This systematic review aimed to examine the severity of symptoms and prevalence of mood changes in women with bipolar disorder during peri-menopause and post-menopause. A systematic review was undertaken in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The two primary outcomes assessed were relapse rates and symptom severity during menopause. Databases searched were MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 1980 until December 2016. Nine studies, including a total of 273 participants diagnosed with bipolar disorder and who reported menopause, were included in the narrative synthesis. Menopause was reported to be associated with increased symptoms overall, and with depression in particular (range of 46%-91%). The collection of self-reported retrospective data was the most commonly used method to record menopause status. The impact of menopause on illness course for women with bipolar disorder is largely under-explored. Preliminary evidence suggests that it may be associated with increased bipolar symptoms. Further work is needed to explore how menopause may interact with bipolar disorder over time and the nature of these symptom changes, and if and how menopause may differ from other reproductive stages. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Large Updated Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feiyue Xie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential role of coffee consumption in the development of various types of cancer has been extensively investigated in epidemiologic studies. How coffee consumption may modulate risk of gastric cancer, however, remains a subject open for investigation. To better quantify this relation, we quantitatively summarized evidence from prospective studies. Eligible studies were identified on PubMed and Embase databases. The summary risk estimates were obtained using the random-effects model. Subgroup, sensitivity and dose-response analyses were conducted. The present meta-analysis included 12 prospective cohort studies. A pooled analysis of these studies suggested that coffee consumption (highest vs. lowest consumption was not associated with risk of gastric cancer (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.93–1.36. In the subgroup analysis, significant increased risk was detected in the U.S. studies (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06–1.74 and in the studies with <10 years of follow-up (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.00–1.54, and the greatest increase in risk was observed in those studies without adjustment for smoking (RR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.13–1.93. There was some evidence of publication bias (P for Egger’s test = 0.03. Cumulative evidence from prospective studies suggests that coffee consumption is not associated with risk of gastric cancer. The observed positive results may be confounded by smoking and need further investigation.

  1. Evaluation of Dietary Intake of Various Vitamins in Menopausal Women with Hot Flashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Tokmak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Menopausal hot flashes affect the majority of women. Hormone replacement therapy to reduce the severity of hot flashes is the most effective method. Today, however, due to a number of side effects of hormone therapy more women are seeking alternative treatments such as vitamin pills and herbal products. Previously, various vitamins, minerals and trace elements were studied for this purpose. In this study, our aim was to determine the level of dietary intake of various vitamins in women with hot flashes and to compare them with women who had no complaints. Material and Method: One hundred and seven consecutive women who attended the menopause clinic of our hospital for routine follow up were included in this study. All of the participants were asked about the occurrence of specific menopausal symptoms and completed 92-itm antioxidant nutrient questionnaire developed by Satia. The main parameters recorded for each woman were; age, obstetrical characteristics, body mass index, smoking status, educational level, type of menopause (surgical or natural, duration of menopause, menopausal symptoms, and number and duration of hot flashes. According to the computerized analysis of questionnaire, dietary intake of water-soluble vitamins; B complex and vitamin C, and fat-soluble vitamins; vitamin, A D, E, K were calculated. Results: Patients were divided into two groups with regard to presence of hot flashes, those with hot flashes constituted the study groups (n:75, and others without hot flashes constituted the control group (n:32. The mean age of patients was statistically significantly lower in the study group (p<0,001. The mean duration of menopause was also lower in this group (p<0,001. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of obstetrical characteristics, body mass index, smoking status, educational level, type of menopause (p>0,05. Night sweats and sleep disorders were more common in women with hot flashes

  2. Validity and reliability of menopause attitude assessment scale: a study in women aged 40-64 in Eskisehir-Mahmudiye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugce Koyuncu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to studies, related to symptoms of menopause, women's attitudes about menopause is an effective variable on the frequency and severity of menopausal symptoms. The most common method to assess attitudes about menopause is the attitude scale. The main purpose of the study is to expose reliability and validity of and ldquo;menopause attitudes assessment scale and rdquo; developed for assessing attitudes of menopause on middle age women. Methods: This is a methodological study conducted 8-15 November 2013 on middle age women living in the district center of Mahmudiye. In the first of the two stage s of the study, items pool was generated and items were assessed by experts for content validity. In the second stages, exploratory factor analysis was performed for construct validity and Cronbach alpha (Cra was calculated for reliability analysis. Result: According to the factor analysis, items, whose factor loadings were less than 0.40, were removed from the scale. The remaining 13 items were classified into four factors. Four factors explain 61.82% of variance. Factors were named as positive emotional, negative emotional, family relationships, behavioral. For this scale, which is consists of 13 items, Cra is 0.744. Factors' Cra are between 0.682 to 0.828. Conclusion: According to the results of validity and reliability study, Menopause Attitude Assessment Scale, which is consists of 13 items and four subscales, was found to be suitable to measure middle-aged women's attitudes about menopau se. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(6.000: 448-452

  3. The effects of menopausal health training for spouses on women's quality of life during menopause transitional period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Narjes; Yoshany, Nooshin; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Noghabi, Ali Delshad; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-02-01

    Spouses' support during menopausal transition has an important role for improving the quality of life in postmenopausal women. Since the first step in providing support is having adequate knowledge, this study aimed to investigate the effects of an educational program on menopause health for spouses on women's quality of life during the menopausal transition. This clinical trial was conducted in Yazd, Iran. A hundred healthy women aged 45 to 60 years were recruited by random sampling. The spouses in the intervention group (n = 50) attended three training sessions about the management and health of menopausal transition. The spouses in the control group (n = 50) did not receive any intervention. Knowledge and performance about menopausal health were assessed in all spouses before and 3 months after intervention. All women were assessed by the Menopause Rating Scale, and the Menopause Quality of Life questionnaire before and 3 months after educational intervention. Analyses were carried out using SPSS 16 software. The level of significance was set at P less than 0.05. The knowledge and performance of spouses in the intervention group were significantly higher 3 months after intervention (P menopausal health for spouses improves the quality of life in women during menopausal transition. We suggest integrating such educational programs in menopausal management programs.

  4. Age at menopause: imputing age at menopause for women with a hysterectomy with application to risk of postmenopausal breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Colditz, Graham A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Age at menopause, a major marker in the reproductive life, may bias results for evaluation of breast cancer risk after menopause. Methods We follow 38,948 premenopausal women in 1980 and identify 2,586 who reported hysterectomy without bilateral oophorectomy, and 31,626 who reported natural menopause during 22 years of follow-up. We evaluate risk factors for natural menopause, impute age at natural menopause for women reporting hysterectomy without bilateral oophorectomy and estimate the hazard of reaching natural menopause in the next 2 years. We apply this imputed age at menopause to both increase sample size and to evaluate the relation between postmenopausal exposures and risk of breast cancer. Results Age, cigarette smoking, age at menarche, pregnancy history, body mass index, history of benign breast disease, and history of breast cancer were each significantly related to age at natural menopause; duration of oral contraceptive use and family history of breast cancer were not. The imputation increased sample size substantially and although some risk factors after menopause were weaker in the expanded model (height, and alcohol use), use of hormone therapy is less biased. Conclusions Imputing age at menopause increases sample size, broadens generalizability making it applicable to women with hysterectomy, and reduces bias. PMID:21441037

  5. Risk of recurrent cardiac events after onset of menopause in women with congenital long-QT syndrome types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buber, Jonathan; Mathew, Jehu; Moss, Arthur J; Hall, W Jackson; Barsheshet, Alon; McNitt, Scott; Robinson, Jennifer L; Zareba, Wojciech; Ackerman, Michael J; Kaufman, Elizabeth S; Luria, David; Eldar, Michael; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Vincent, Michael; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2011-06-21

    Women with congenital long-QT syndrome experience an increased risk for cardiac events after the onset of adolescence that is more pronounced among carriers of the LQT2 genotype. We hypothesized that the hormonal changes associated with menopause may affect clinical risk in this population. We used a repeated-events analysis to evaluate the risk for recurrent syncope during the menopause transition and postmenopausal periods (5 years before and after the age at onset of menopause, respectively) among 282 LQT1 (n=151) and LQT2 (n=131) women enrolled in the Long-QT Syndrome Registry. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk for recurrent syncope (n=150) among LQT2 women was significantly increased during both menopause transition (hazard ratio, 3.38; P=0.005) and the postmenopausal period (hazard ratio, 8.10; Pmenopause was associated with a reduction in the risk for recurrent syncope (hazard ratio, 0.19; P=0.05; P=0.02 for genotype-by-menopause interaction). Only 22 women (8%) experienced aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death during follow-up. The frequency of aborted cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death showed a similar genotype-specific association with the onset of menopause. The onset of menopause is associated with a significant increase in the risk of cardiac events (dominated by recurrent episodes of syncope) in LQT2 women, suggesting that careful follow-up and continued long-term therapy are warranted in this population.

  6. Age at natural menopause in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a follow-up study of US black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Se; Rosenberg, Lynn; Wise, Lauren A; Boggs, Deborah A; LaValley, Michael; Palmer, Julie R

    2013-07-01

    Early age at natural menopause has been associated with increased all-cause mortality in several studies, although the literature is not consistent. This relation has not been examined among African American women. Data were from the Black Women's Health Study, a follow-up study of African-American women enrolled in 1995. Among 11,212 women who were naturally menopausal at entry to the study or during follow-up through 2008, we assessed the relation of age at natural menopause to all-cause and cause-specific mortality. At baseline and biennially, participants reported on reproductive and medical history, including gynecologic surgeries and exogenous hormone use. Mortality data were obtained from the National Death Index. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for categories of age at menopause. Of 692 deaths identified during 91,829 person years of follow-up, 261 were due to cancer, 199 to cardiovascular diseases and 232 to other causes. Natural menopause before age 40 was associated with increased all-cause mortality (MRR=1.34, 95% CI 0.96-1.84, relative to menopause at 50-54 years; P-trend=0.04) and with the subcategories of death considered - cancer, cardiovascular disease, and all other causes. The associations were present among never and ever users of postmenopausal female hormones and among never and ever smokers. In this large prospective cohort of African-American women, natural menopause before age 40 was associated with a higher rate of all-cause and cause-specific mortality. These findings provide support for the theory that natural menopause before age 40 may be a marker of accelerated somatic aging. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Blood pressure and kidney cancer risk: meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Khemayanto; Du, Xuan; Zou, Sheng-Yi; Shi, Bi-Min

    2017-07-01

    Globally, kidney cancer is the twelfth most common cancer, accounting for 337 860 cases recorded in 2012. By 2020, this number has been estimated to reach 412 929 or increase by 22%. Over the past few decades, a number of prospective studies have investigated the association between blood pressure (BP) and risk of kidney cancer, using either recorded BP levels or reported hypertension as the principal exposure variable. However, the relation of BP to kidney cancer remains incompletely understood, and the data on sex-specific differences in risk estimates have been inconsistent. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for studies assessing the association between BP and kidney cancer through July 2016. The summary relative risk with 95% confidence intervals was calculated using a random-effects model. A total of 18 prospective studies with 8097 kidney cancer cases from 3 628 479 participants were included in our meta-analysis. History of hypertension was associated with 67% increased risk of kidney cancer. Significant heterogeneity and evidence of publication bias were observed. However, the results remain unchanged after introducing the trim and fill method to correct the publication bias. Accordingly, each 10-mmHg increase in SBP and DBP was associated with 10 and 22% increased risk of kidney cancer. Collectively, the present meta-analysis of 18 prospective studies provides further support for a positive association between hypertension and kidney cancer risk.

  8. Which diet for prevention of type 2 diabetes? A meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Chiodini, Paolo; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Giugliano, Dario

    2014-09-01

    No specific diet is recommended to prevent type 2 diabetes. We did a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to assess the association between different diets and prevention of type 2 diabetes. We did a comprehensive search of multiple electronic databases (Medline, Scopus, EMBASE, and ISI web of knowledge) until August 2013 using predefined criteria. We included prospective cohort studies that evaluated the role of different diets in type 2 diabetes prevention. Studies were selected by 2 independent reviewers. We did random-effects meta-analyses to determine the relative risk (RR) of incident diabetes associated with healthful dietary patterns. A total of 21,372 cases of incident diabetes, from 18 prospective studies, with 20 cohorts, in 4 world regions were identified. In the random-effect meta-analysis of the 20 cohorts, RR was 0.80 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.74-0.86, P diabetes did not appreciably change considering the geography (USA, Europe, and Asia), the duration of follow-up (≤10 and >10 years), and type of diets (Mediterranean and DASH, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, diets). There was a difference between at risk and general population (P = 0.0487), but the evidence was limited to two studies only. The results of our study demonstrate that several healthy diets are equally and consistently associated with a 20 % reduced risk of future type 2 diabetes.

  9. Menopause, Reproductive Life, Hormone Replacement Therapy, and Bone Phenotype at Age 60-64 Years: A British Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, D; Muthuri, S; Cooper, R; Moore, A; Mackinnon, K; Cooper, C; Adams, J E; Hardy, R; Ward, K A

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies of menopausal age and length of reproductive life on bone are limited by retrospective reproductive histories, being cross-sectional, or lacking gold standard bone technologies or information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or surgical treatment. The objective of the study was to investigate age at menopause, length of reproductive life, and HRT use in relation to volumetric and areal bone mineral density (vBMD, aBMD), bone size, and strength in women aged 60-64 years. This was a birth cohort study that followed up for 64 years with prospective measures of age at menarche and menopause and monthly HRT histories. The study was conducted in England, Scotland, and Wales. Participants included 848 women with a known type of menopause and bone measures at 60-64 years. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography measurements of the distal radius total and trabecular vBMD were measured. Diaphyseal radius total and medullary cross-sectional area, cortical vBMD, and polar strength strain index (SSI); dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements of aBMD at the lumbar spine and total hip were also measured. A 10-year increase in age at natural (but not surgical) menopause was associated with 8.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3%-15.1%, P = .02) greater trabecular vBMD and a 6.0% (95% CI 0.51%-11.5%, P = .03) greater total vBMD; findings were similar for length of reproductive life. A 10-year difference in HRT use was associated with a 6.0% (95% CI 2.6%-9.3%, P menopause and longer reproductive life persisted into early old age. HRT use was associated with greater radius cortical vBMD and polar SSI and aBMD.

  10. Preliminary study of Songa-Wayaua geothermal prospect area using volcanostratigraphy and remote sensing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokawaty, Ribka; Nugroho, Indra; Satriana, Joshua; Hafidz, Muhamad; Suryantini

    2017-12-01

    Songa-Wayaua geothermal prospect area is located on Bacan Island, Northern Molluca Province. Geothermal systems in this area associated with three Quartenary volcanoes, such as Mt. Pele-pele, Mt. Lansa, and Mt. Bibinoi. Based on literature study, five surface manifestations such as hot springs and alteration occurred within this area. The active manifestations indicate that Songa-Wayaua area has potential geothermal resource. This study objective is to evaluate Songa-Wayaua geothermal system on preliminary study stage by using volcanostratigraphy and remote sensing analysis to delineate the boundary of geothermal system area. The result of this study showed that Songa-Wayaua prospect area has four heat sources potential (e.g. Pele-pele Hummock, Lansa Hummock, Songa Hummock, and Bibinoi Hummock), controlled by geological structure presented by Pele-pele Normal Fault, and had three places as the recharge and discharge area which are very fulfilling as a geothermal system.

  11. Aesthetic analysis in rhinoplasty: surgeon vs. patient perspectives: a prospective, blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipchandler, Taha Z; Sultan, Babar; Ishii, Lisa; Boahene, Kofi D; Capone, Randolph B; Kontis, Theda C; Papel, Ira D; Byrne, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    To determine how patients seeking cosmetic rhinoplasty analyze themselves compared to their surgeon's analysis. Simply stated, "Does your surgeon view your nose the same as you?" Prospective, blinded study. All primary rhinoplasty consultations completed a nasal analysis questionnaire. The patients' facial plastic surgeons completed an identical questionnaire. The results were compared and analyzed. Data underwent statistical analysis and subsequent factor analysis was performed. 132 patients participated in the study. Questions were grouped together based on factors: overall appearance, skin quality, tip dimensions, straightness, nostril show, and width. The only factor with reasonable surgeon/patient correlation was factor 1, overall appearance, with correlation 0.6473, p<0.001. Surgeons and patients are in agreement with the overall appearance of the nose, but differ in their analysis regarding the details. This information can be used to guide future discussions during consultations and most importantly help to better gauge and manage patient expectations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct renin inhibitors – new approaches in the treatment of patients with arterial hypertension associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, menopause and kidneys’ disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Syvolap, V. V.; Gerasko, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this review composed on the data of multicentred randomized investigations the advantages of direct renin inhibitors for patients with arterial hypertension are discussed. The prospects of using direct renin inhibitors in the cases of arterial hypertension associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, menopause and kidneys’ disorders are studied.

  13. Preventing osteoporosis in menopause : a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Winfred

    2011-01-01

    In both developed and developing countries osteoporosis is a growing health problem that is well recognized. This contributes greatly to the high costs of health care and mortality. Osteoporosis is a disease that is associated with fractures. This is a cause for worry solely because the results are lowered quality of life, people are no longer mobile, occurrences of disability and deaths. This bachelor thesis focuses on providing patient education on prevention of osteoporosis in menopaus...

  14. [Menopausal hormonal therapy and cancer risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Fournier, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-progestagen menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) is recognized as carcinogenic to humans. The article presents the associations between MHT and breast, ovary and endometrial cancer risks, in particular according to treatment modalities. If MHT must be prescribed, it is recommended to use the lowest dose for the shortest possible duration. Discussing with the patient the benefits but also the risks and making regular gynecological follow-up are strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Sleep and menopause: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Joan L; Woods, Nancy F

    2015-08-01

    Our overall aim-through a narrative review-is to critically profile key extant evidence of menopause-related sleep, mostly from studies published in the last decade. We searched the database PubMed using selected Medical Subject Headings for sleep and menopause (n = 588 articles). Using similar headings, we also searched the Cochrane Library (n = 1), Embase (n = 449), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (n = 163), Web of Science (n = 506), and PsycINFO (n = 58). Articles deemed most related to the purpose were reviewed. Results were articulated with interpretive comments according to evidence of sleep quality (self-reported) and sleep patterns (polysomnography and actigraphy) impact as related to reproductive aging and in the context of vasomotor symptoms (VMS; self-reported), vasomotor activity (VMA) events (recorded skin conductance), depressed mood, and ovarian hormones. Predominantly, the menopausal transition conveys poor sleep beyond anticipated age effects. Perceptions of sleep are not necessarily translatable from detectable physical sleep changes and are probably affected by an emotional overlay on symptoms reporting. Sleep quality and pattern changes are mostly manifest in wakefulness indicators, but sleep pattern changes are not striking. Likely contributing are VMS of sufficient frequency/severity and bothersomeness, probably with a sweating component. VMA events influence physical sleep fragmentation but not necessarily extensive sleep loss or sleep architecture changes. Lack of robust connections between perceived and recorded sleep (and VMA) could be influenced by inadequate detection. There is a need for studies of women in well-defined menopausal transition stages who have no sleep problems, accounting for sleep-related disorders, mood, and other symptoms, with attention to VMS dimensions, distribution of VMS during night and day, and advanced measurement of symptoms and physiologic manifestations.

  16. Menopause and autonomic control of heart

    OpenAIRE

    Arunima Chaudhuri; Nirmala G Borade

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is associated with decreased heart rate variability, which is due to reduced parasympathetic or increased sympathetic outflow to the heart. Acute myocardial infarction may be accompanied by decreased heart rate variability. The causes of autonomic dysfunction in postmenopausal women may be multi-factorial i.e., dyslipidemia, increased body fat percentage, aging and loss of female sex hormones. The cardiac vagotonic and sympatholytic effects of estrogen can explain, at least in part,...

  17. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model

    OpenAIRE

    Acer, Semra; Pekel, Gökhan; Küçükatay, Vural; Karabulut, Aysun; Yağcı, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin; Akyer, Şahika Pınar; Şahin, Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Methods: Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1). From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2), 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Gro...

  18. Factors affecting sexual function in menopause: A review article

    OpenAIRE

    Soheila Nazarpour; Masoumeh Simbar; Fahimeh Ramezani Tehrani

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to systematically review the articles on factors affecting sexual function during menopause. Searching articles indexed in Pubmed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, EMBASE, Scopus, and Scientific Information Database databases, a total number of 42 studies published between 2003 and 2013 were selected. Age, estrogen deficiency, type of menopause, chronic medical problems, partner's sex problems, severity of menopause symptoms, dystocia history, and health status were the physical fa...

  19. Menopause and cardiovascular disease: the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano, G M C; Vitale, C; Marazzi, G; Volterrani, M

    2007-02-01

    Menopause is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) because estrogen withdrawal has a detrimental effect on cardiovascular function and metabolism. The menopause compounds many traditional CVD risk factors, including changes in body fat distribution from a gynoid to an android pattern, reduced glucose tolerance, abnormal plasma lipids, increased blood pressure, increased sympathetic tone, endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation. Many CVD risk factors have different impacts in men and women. In postmenopausal women, treatment of arterial hypertension and glucose intolerance should be priorities. Observational studies and randomized clinical trials suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) started soon after the menopause may confer cardiovascular benefit. In contrast to other synthetic progestogens used in continuous combined HRTs, the unique progestogen drospirenone has antialdosterone properties. Drospirenone can therefore counteract the water- and sodium-retaining effects of the estrogen component of HRT via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which may otherwise result in weight gain and raised blood pressure. As a continuous combined HRT with 17beta-estradiol, drospirenone has been shown to significantly reduce blood pressure in postmenopausal women with elevated blood pressure, but not in normotensive women. Therefore, in addition to relieving climacteric symptoms, drospirenone/17beta-estradiol may offer further benefits in postmenopausal women, such as improved CVD risk profile.

  20. Hormone changes associated with the menopausal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H. Irene; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Menopausal Transition (MT) is the time in each woman’s reproductive life that precedes the final menstrual period (FMP). MT is associated with changes in bleeding pattern and hormone profiles. In recent years, research efforts have characterized changes in reproductive hormones over MT in order to elucidate the process of late reproductive aging and potentially identify predictors of time to menopause. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), inhibin B and estradiol represent the four primary hormone measures of these investigations. Current data show an increase in FSH and decreases in AMH, inhibin B and estradiol over MT (Table 1). AMH appears to be the first marker to change, followed by FSH and inhibin B. Estradiol declines in late MT. To date, there are no validated hormone cutpoints that predict the length of MT or FMP. There are very preliminary data on AMH as a predictor of menopause. Until further evidence identifies clinically useful hormone levels for predicting MT or FMP, diagnosis of MT and FMP should be based on clinical signs and symptoms only. PMID:19942836

  1. Sleep disturbance associated factors in menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Haghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep is necessary in life and approximately 1/3 of human life is devoted to sleep. One of the most common problems in menopausal women is sleep disturbance. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of sleep disorders and its related factors in 50 – 60 years old women Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on 200 eligible women who referred to selected health centers of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. Demographic form, ten-point slide to review sexual satisfaction and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index Questioner (PSQI were used for data collection. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, t-test, and Pearson correlation tests.Results: The mean age of women was 53.6±3.6 year, menopause age 47.8±4, number of children 4.76±2 and partner age was 57.99±6.6. 34.5% of women were satisfied from their sexual relationship and their score was 8-10. Rate of sleep disturbances in this group was about 70%. The results showed that between four variables: economical status, occupation, partner occupation and educational status were significantly associated with sleep disturbance (P=0.002. There was not significant difference between other demographic information and sleep disturbance.Conclusion: The results show high prevalence of sleep disturbance symptoms among menopausal women. According to the relationship between some personal characters and sleep disturbance, health care providers need to consider these variables.

  2. Hormonal changes and biomarkers in late reproductive age, menopausal transition and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, G E; Burger, H G

    2009-02-01

    This chapter describes current definitions of the climacteric, perimenopause, menopausal transition and menopause, and discusses the 2001 Stages of Reproductive Aging (STRAW) criteria in relation to more recently proposed categorization criteria for reproductive aging. Data from endocrine studies on women throughout the menopausal transition are discussed from earliest to most recent. The earlier studies focused on the changes in levels of steroid hormones and gonadotrophins, and established that follicle-stimulating hormone undergoes the first detectable change while menstrual cycles remain regular. Erratic and less predictable changes in steroid hormones follow, especially with the onset of irregular cycles. Later serum hormone studies on the inhibins and anti-Mullerian hormone established that diminishing ovarian follicle number contributes to the endocrine changes with advancing reproductive age. A classification system of cycle types incorporating all available endocrine data and their associated menstrual cycle patterns is proposed, and the application of biological markers as diagnostic tools for reproductive staging is discussed.

  3. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brończyk-Puzoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and sexual activity of these women. Reduction of body weight in obese menopausal women should play a vital role in treatment of this group of patients. Therefore, adequate management seems to be essential, and it should involve dietary, pharmacological and/or surgical treatment, depending on the patient’s needs. Following a rational weight loss plan provided by a dietician under medical supervision may contribute to improvement of the health condition and quality of life. It is recommended to observe the guidelines on dietary management described in this article by adjusting a diet plan individually. The following work constitutes a review of articles from 2004-2014 which are available in the PubMed medical knowledge base and the Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska. For this purpose, the following controlled vocabulary has been used: menopausal woman, menopausal diet, menopausal weight gain, menopausal weight loss, dietary management in menopause.

  4. Hormone replacement therapy in menopause and in premature ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, S; Orlandini, C; Biliotti, G; Scolaro, V; De Felice, G; Regini, C; Petraglia, F

    2013-12-01

    Menopause is defined by world health organization (WHO) as the permanent cessation of menstruating resulting from a loss of ovarian follicular activity, after one year of amenorrhea. It signifies the last menstrual cycle and the end of women's fertile and reproductive life. The average age for a women to undergo menopause is 51 years; unlike menarche, whose average age has decreased over the past decades, the age of menopause has remained unchanged. We can distinguish: 1) premenopause, the time interval leading up to menopause; 2) climacteric, the time interval between the reproductive e non-reproductive life; 3) premature menopause, that occurs in 1% of women. Menopause can also be induced iatrogenically as a result of surgery, medical therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Beyond the life the number of oocytes falls until there are no more suitable follicles for reproduction and the menopause ensues. At the same time, the ability of the ovary to produce hormones falls, leading to an increasing pulsatile release of FSH in order to stimulate the ovary to produce oestrogens. Menopause is characterized by different symptoms such as hot flushes, night sweats, dispareunia, prolapse, vulval itching due to vaginal atrophy and dryness, urinary incontinence, dysuria, and also the psychological aspects don't should be underestimated because of many women suffer of depression, mood instability, insomnia, fatigue and decreased libido. Long term symptoms include osteoporosis, cardiovascular and neuro-degenerative diseases. The main aim of different treatments was symptoms relief. Pharmacological agents and psychological support represent the goal for menopause treatment.

  5. A review of effective herbal medicines in controlling menopausal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargozar, Rahele; Azizi, Hoda; Salari, Roshanak

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute menopausal syndrome especially hot flashes, is one of the most common gynecological problems during menopause. Due to the side effects of hormone therapy, herbal and complementary medicines are always of immense interest to people in the treatment and management of the symptoms and complications of menopause. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms and effects of medicinal plants employed in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Methods This review article was carried out by examining clinical trial studies between the period of 1994 and 2016. The keywords, which include menopause, climacteric, hot flushes, flashes, herb and phytoestrogens were used to search for herbal medicines used in clinical trials for the treatment of menopausal symptoms using databases such as PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Google scholar, SID and Magiran. Results The results of the study showed that the medicinal plants, which include Sage herb (Salvia officinalis), Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), Valerina officinalis, Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), Black cumin (Nigella sativa), Vitex (Vitex agnus-castus), Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), Evening primrose (Oenothera biennis), Ginkgo biloba, Alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Hypericum perforatum, Panax ginseng, Pimpinella anisum, Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Passiflora incarnata, Red clover (Trifolium pratense), and Glycine soja were effective in the treatment of acute menopausal syndrome with different mechanisms. Conclusion Medicinal plants can play an imperative role in the treatment of acute menopausal syndrome; however, further studies are required to buttress their efficacy in the treatment of acute menopausal syndrome. PMID:29403626

  6. Men's perceptions and attitudes toward their wives experiencing menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caçapava Rodolpho, Juliana Reale; Cid Quirino, Bruna; Komura Hoga, Luiza Akiko; Lima Ferreira Santa Rosa, Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore men's perceptions, experiences, and attitudes toward wives experiencing natural menopause. We interviewed 20 men using the oral history method. Descriptive categories of experiences, such as misconceptions about menopause overcome through coexistence and recognition of women's perspectives; recognition of women's needs and efforts to provide support; coping with changes in marital relations and need to start a new time in couple's life; and existence of several needs as husbands of women experiencing menopause were explored. A better understanding by men about the changes experienced by menopausal women fosters the development of a better emotional support for their wives, which improves the quality of marital relations.

  7. Empowerment and coping strategies in menopause women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdkhasti, Mansoureh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Abdi, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    Menopause is described as a period of psychological difficulties that changes the lifestyle of women in multiple ways. Menopausal women require more information about their physical and psychosocial needs. Empowerment during the menopause can contribute to improving the perception of this stage and the importance of self-care. It is essential to increase women's awareness and adaptation to menopause, using empowerment programs. The aim of this study was to review the empowerment and coping strategies in menopause women. In this review, PubMed, EMBASE, ISI, and Iranian databases were scanned for relevant literature. A comprehensive search was performed, using the combinations of the keywords "empowerment, menopause, coping with" to review relevant literature and higher education journals. Most interventions for menopause women have focused on educational intervention, physical activity/exercise, healthy diet, stress management, healthy behaviors, preventing certain diseases and osteoporosis. Health education intervention strategy is one of the alternative strategies for improving women's attitudes and coping with menopause symptoms, identified as severalof the subcategories of health promotion programs. Empowerment of menopausal women will guarantee their health during the last third of their life. It will also help them benefit from their final years of reproductive life. The results of the present study can pave the way for future research about women's health promotion and empowerment.

  8. Parity and age at menopause in a Danish sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeune, B

    1986-01-01

    A random sample of 151 Danish women who had undergone natural menopause reported the age at which this occurred and answered a questionnaire. A significant association was found between parity and age at menopause after correction for the effects of age at the first and last births, weight, smoking...... and occupation. However, there is no evidence that the age at menopause has fallen in recent decades, even though the average parity in developed populations has dropped dramatically over this period. It is therefore possible that potential fertility is a confounding variable in the relationship between parity...... and age at menopause....

  9. Psychiatric disorders and menopause symptoms in Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Lidiane; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Garcez, Anderson da Silva; Mendes, Karina Giane; Theodoro, Heloísa; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the association between minor psychiatric disorders and menopause symptoms and their associated factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 615 women aged 40 to 65 years treated in a public menopause and gynecological outpatient clinic in the South Region of Brazil. Minor psychiatric disorders were assessed using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) and menopause symptoms using the Menopause Rating Scale. Score for menopause symptoms was categorized into three levels of symptoms: mild, moderate, and severe. Multivariate analyses used ordinal logistic regression. The prevalence of mild, moderate, and severe menopause symptoms was 34.1% (95% CI 30.3-37.9), 29.6% (95% CI 25.8-33.1), and 36.3% (95% CI 32.4-40.0), respectively. The overall prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders was 66.6% (95% CI 62.8-70.3). After adjustment, the odds ratio (OR) of the occurrence of menopause symptoms were approximately eight times higher in women relating minor psychiatric disorders compared with those without such disorders (OR = 7.76; 95% CI 5.27-11.44). The following factors were also associated with the menopause symptoms: women older than 50 years, living with a partner, lower educational level, smokers, larger number of pregnancies, obese, and those using psychotropic and/or postmenopause medication. The minor psychiatric disorders exhibited strong association with the presence of menopause symptoms independently of sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive factors, and of use of psychotropic medication.

  10. PEER GROUP SUPPORT DECREASE DEPRESSION LEVEL IN MENOPAUSE WOMAN

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    Ah. Yusuf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Menopause woman has higher depression level than pre and postmenopause woman. Many woman who are getting menopause will feel lonely and don’t have any friends to talk, if this situation continue it can cause menopausal depression. Peer group support is one of group therapy which gives opportunity to menopause woman to get mutual support and help them to face the problem. This aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of peer group support in the menopause woman depression level. Method: A quasy experimental pre-post test design was used in this study. There were 16 menopause women taken from Cepokomulyo Kepanjen. The independent variable was peer group support and the dependent variable was the depression level. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with the significance level α<0.05. Result: Result showed that there was an effect of peer group support in the menopause woman depression level with significance level p=0.011 (treatment group and p=0.23 (controlled group and the result of Mann Whitney U Test showed that p=0.02. Discussion: It can be concluded that peer group support can reduce the menopause woman depression level. It can be suggested to the institutional to practice peer group support to help menopause woman reduce their depression level.

  11. Discourses on menopause--Part I: Menopause described in texts addressed to Danish women 1996-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte; Gannik, Dorte Effersøe

    2008-01-01

    To understand Danish women's very different ways of interpreting menopausal experiences and the way they construct meaning relating to menopause, it is necessary to include the context in which meaning is constructed as well as the background of cultural attitudes to menopause existing...... in the Danish society. Using documentary material, the aim of this article was to describe different discourses on menopause in Denmark that present themselves to menopausal women, and to discuss how these discourses may affect women's identity and constitute their scope of action. One hundred and thirty......-two pieces of text under the heading or subject of 'menopause' or 'becoming a middle-aged woman', published from 1996 to 2004, were included. All material was addressed to Danish women, and consisted of booklets and informational material, articles from newspapers and magazines and popular science books...

  12. Breast cancer risk in relation to the interval between menopause and starting hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beral, Valerie; Reeves, Gillian; Bull, Diana; Green, Jane

    2011-02-16

    Although breast cancer risk is greater in users of estrogen-progestin than estrogen-only formulations of menopausal hormonal therapy, reports on their effects have been somewhat inconsistent. We investigated whether the timing of these therapies affected breast cancer incidence. A total of 1,129,025 postmenopausal UK women provided prospective information on hormonal therapy use and other factors relevant for breast cancer risk. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted relative risks (RRs) of breast cancer in hormonal therapy users vs never users and calculated standardized incidence rates. All statistical tests were two-sided. During 4.05 million woman-years of follow-up, 15,759 incident breast cancers occurred, with 7107 in current users of hormonal therapy. Breast cancer incidence was increased in current users of hormonal therapy, returning to that of never users a few years after use had ceased. The relative risks for breast cancer in current users were greater if hormonal therapy was begun before or soon after menopause than after a longer gap (P(heterogeneity) menopause (RR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89 to 1.24), but risk was statistically significantly increased if use began before or less than 5 years after menopause (RR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.35 to 1.51). A similar pattern was observed among current users of estrogen-progestin formulations (RR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.38 to 1.70, and RR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.95 to 2.14, respectively). At 50-59 years of age, annual standardized incidence rates for breast cancer were 0.30% (95% CI = 0.29% to 0.31%) among never users of hormone therapy and 0.43% (95% CI = 0.42% to 0.45%) and 0.61% (95% CI = 0.59% to 0.64%), respectively, among current users of estrogen-only and estrogen-progestin formulations who began use less than 5 years after menopause. There was substantial heterogeneity in breast cancer risk among current users of hormonal therapy. Risks were greater among users of estrogen-progestin than estrogen

  13. Hormones, herbal preparations and nutriceuticals for a better life after the menopause: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comhaire, F H; Depypere, H T

    2015-06-01

    In developed countries, women spend more than one-third of their life in the menopause and at least half of them experience vasomotor symptoms that impair their normal function and well-being. Long-term estrogen replacement therapy (HRT) with estrogen can suppress typical menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis. When estrogen-only HRT is started within 10 years after the menopause, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is reduced, mortality is lower, and the risk of breast cancer is not significantly increased. Postmenopausal genital and urinary problems with recurrent infections, incontinence, and dyspareunia can effectively be treated by vaginal application of estriol, which seems to be safe for women treated for breast cancer. HRT after the age of 60 years is associated with a lower number needed to treat than number needed to harm, implying that there would be one unfavorable side-effect for up to ten women experiencing a positive effect. However, further studies are needed regarding the risk-benefit ratio of HRT in women over 70 years. It is concluded that transdermal substitution therapy with estradiol may increase the number of quality-adjusted life years of postmenopausal women. The combination with nutriceutical food supplementation may add to this benefit, but complementary prospective trials are still needed.

  14. Do Estrogens improve bone mass in osteoporotic women over ten years of menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Szejnfeld

    Full Text Available A retrospective analysis of 24 patients with established osteoporosis and with ten or more years of menopause treated with conjugated estrogen, progesterone and calcium followed for one year has been performed. Treated women received 0.625 mg/day of conjugated estrogen from day 1 to 25, 5 mg/day of medroxiprogesterone from day 13 to 25, of each cycle, plus calcium (500 - 1000 mg/day, during one year (12 cycles. As control group was used 18 age-matched that received only calcium (500 a 1000 mg/day. All patients had at least two dual-photon spine and proximal femur (neck, Ward's triangle and trocanter densities measurements performed 12 months apart. Estrogen treatment was associated with increased bone mineral density at spine and trocanter. Control group did not present any statistically change after one year in any site studied. We concluded that women with ten or more years of menopause and established osteoporosis treated with replacement hormonal therapy and calcium results in improvement of bone mineral density. These data support that women with ten or more years of menopause respond to estrogen replacement therapy with absolute increments in bone density similar to those seen in younger women, in the early menopause.

  15. Influence of the menopause in the sexual standard: opinion of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosália Teixeira de Araújo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we objectify: to inquire the physiological modifications of the menopause that influence the sexual standard of the woman; to know if the frequency of the sexual activity changed the menopause after and to investigate the factors aggravations or extenuating circumstances in the sexual life during this phase. One is about a study of quanti-qualitative nature, had as scene the Center of Health Almerinda Lomanto, having as informing 16 women. The data had been collected using the form. The data had been submitted to the Technique of Analysis of Content of Bardin, of where categories and subcategorias had emerged: Changes observed in the sexual relationship after the menopause (Reduction of the libido, Incompreensão of the friend, did not have alteration, positive Change; Reasons that had favored the changes (physiological Alterations in the sexual act, menorragia Chronic headache nauseas fogacho/, Lack or psychological reduction of the pleasure, Alterations. We conclude that during the climatério and after the menopause, can occur physiological modifications that influence the standard of the sexual act, fits professional we while of health, to search to promote attitudes and behaviors that aim at the disruption of myths and taboos and the promotion of the sexual health.

  16. Towards ICF implementation in menopause healthcare: a systematic review of ICF application in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangger, Martina; Poethig, Dagmar; Meissner, Florian; von Wolff, Michael; Stute, Petra

    2017-12-28

    To present a systematic literature review on the application and degree of implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) across different health conditions and regions in Switzerland in order to develop an ICF classification of the climacteric syndrome in the medium term. A systematic literature search was conducted through Embase and Medline covering the period between 2011 and August 2016. Inclusion criteria were the term ICF in title or abstract and Switzerland as the workplace of the first author. Identified publications were analysed as descriptive statistics. A total of 83 articles were included in the analysis. Forty-seven different first authors from 24 different institutions were identified. The majority of publications were from Swiss Paraplegic Research (68.7%) and focused on neurology (31.3%). Forty-six cohort studies were identified. In most of them, the ICF was used to set up a general language for comparing patients' information (82.9%). Only one paper from the medical specialty gynaecology was identified; this was on breast cancer. No paper on the menopause was found. In Switzerland, the ICF is actively used in various areas of healthcare, especially in the field of neurology and rehabilitation. There is a need for ICF core sets in other medical fields, such as menopause healthcare, in order to accomplish the goal of the European Menopause and Andropause Society, which is a healthcare model for healthy menopause and aging.

  17. Assessment of sleep quality and correlates in a large cohort of Colombian women around menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, Alvaro; Marrugo-Flórez, Martha; Romero-Pérez, Ivette; Fernández-Alonso, Ana M; Chedraui, Peter; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between self-reported sleep quality, menopausal symptom intensity, and correlates (including ethnicity) among middle-aged women. The present cross-sectional study involved 1,078 Colombian women aged 40 to 59 years who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), and a general questionnaire exploring sociodemographic data. The median [interquartile range] age of the whole sample was 49.0 [9.0] years. Among the participants, 45.4% were postmenopausal, 57.2% had increased body mass index values, 13.9% were black, 20.7% had hypertension, 74.1% had a stable partner, and 3.8% used hormone therapy. The prevalence of poor sleep quality was 57.1% (PSQI global score ≥5). Significant correlations between PSQI global scores and MRS total and subscale scores were found. Multiple linear regression analysis found that higher PSQI scores (poorer quality of sleep) correlated with higher MRS psychological and somatic subscale scores (more severe symptoms), smoking habit, and hypertension. Menopause status and black ethnicity were excluded from the final regression model. Despite study limitations, poor sleep quality is highly prevalent in this large middle-aged Colombian female sample and is related to menopausal symptom severity, tobacco use, and presence of hypertension.

  18. The Analysis of the Chosen Internal Condition and Prospects of Romania’s Energy Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutka Michał

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the age of high pace of technological, economic and social development, stable and uninterrupted energy supply is one of the key components determining the economic sovereignty of the state, its position in international relations, and the quality of human life. Every economy around the world is heavily dependent on its energy sector. Consequently, ensuring energy security is currently one of the most important determinant of every country’s national security and the purpose of its security policy. In this article we focus on Romania’s energy security internal condition and prospects. Our main goal is to present actual state and prospects of Romanian energy sector. In order to achieve that goal, we decided to use various methods, such as descriptive analysis, document analysis and comparative analysis. The article has two parts. The first part consists of a description of energy sources and infrastructure used by Romanian economy. The second part is an analysis of possible chances and threats for both energy sector and energy security level.

  19. [Phytoestrogens in the treatment of menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remport, Júlia; Blázovics, Anna

    2017-08-01

    In previous centuries many women did not even live until their menopause years due to poor economic conditions, deficiencies of medicine, epidemics and wars. Nowadays in the developed countries, people live until they are 75-80 years old, and with the expansion of average age, the number of people affected by menopause and the years spent in that state increase. Nowadays women spend one third of their lives in the menopausal stage. The only effective way to treat unpleasant symptoms for centuries was with the use of herbs, and the knowledge about them spread through oral tradition. In the 20th century, this therapeutic form was pushed into the background by the development of synthetic drug production and the introduction of hormone replacement therapy. Thanks to the influence of media in the 20th century, women began to have the social need for preserving their beauty and youth for as long as they could. Hormone replacement therapy enjoyed great popularity because women were temporarily relieved of their life quality-impairing menopausal symptoms, but years later it turned out that hormone replacement therapy could pose serious risks. A distinct advantage of herbal therapy is the more advantageous side-effect-profile opposite the used synthetics in hormone replacement therapy. Women are therefore happy to turn to valuable and well-tried natural therapies, which have been used for thousands of years. There is growing interest in herbal remedies. Studying the effects of phytoestrogens has now become an active area for research. However, the results of studies in animals and humans are controversial, some sources suggest that phytoestrogens are effective and safe, other authors claim that they are ineffective in menopause or they have particularly dangerous properties, and cannot be recommended to everyone. It is important to address this issue for the sake of health, mental health and safety of women, and so it is necessary to assess the benefits and the risks

  20. Menopause as risk factor for oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Zacarías-Flores, Mariano; Arronte-Rosales, Alicia; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of menopause (hypoestrogenism) as a risk factor for oxidative stress. We carried out a cross-sectional study with 187 perimenopausal women from Mexico City, including 94 premenopausal (mean ± SD age, 44.9 ± 4.0 y; estrogen, 95.8 ± 65.7 pg/mL; follicle-stimulating hormone, 13.6 ± 16.9 mIU/mL) and 93 postmenopausal (mean ± SD age, 52.5 ± 3.3 y; estrogen, 12.8 ± 6.8 pg/mL; follicle-stimulating hormone, 51.4 ± 26.9 mIU/mL) women. We measured lipoperoxides using a thiobarbituric acid-reacting substance assay, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and the total antioxidant status with the Randox kit. An alternative cutoff value for lipoperoxide level of 0.320 μmol/L or higher was defined on the basis of the 90th percentile of young healthy participants. All women answered the Menopause Rating Scale, the Athens Insomnia Scale, and a structured questionnaire about pro-oxidant factors, that is, smoking, consumption of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, and physical activity. Finally, we measured weight and height and calculated body mass index. The lipoperoxide levels were significantly higher in the postmenopausal group than in the premenopausal group (0.357 ± 0.05 vs 0.331 ± 0.05 μmol/L, P = 0.001). Using logistic regression to control pro-oxidant variables, we found that menopause was the main risk factor for oxidative stress (odds ratio, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.35-5.11; P menopause rating score, insomnia score, and lipoperoxides, and this relationship was most evident in the postmenopausal group (menopause scale, r = 0.327 [P = 0.001]; insomnia scale, r = 0.209 [P < 0.05]). Our findings suggest that the depletion of estrogen in postmenopause could cause oxidative stress in addition to the known symptoms.

  1. Vaginal rings for menopausal symptom relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballagh, Susan A

    2004-01-01

    The vagina is an alternative delivery site of sex steroids for menopausal women. New ring technology provides continuous and consistent delivery of steroids for up to 3 months. Rings rest on the pelvic floor muscles in a nearly horizontal position and are usually imperceptible. Steroid is delivered directly into the systemic circulation which may result in less alteration of coagulation/fibrinolysis pathways as seen with transdermal hormone therapy. Fewer adverse effects are noted when progesterone is applied vaginally, possibly due to lower serum levels of metabolites such as alloprenanolone. Women often switch to a ring for the longer dosing interval but also appreciate the reduced messiness. Over 5700 healthy US women who evaluated an unmedicated ring as a drug delivery platform found it very acceptable independent of age or prior use of barrier contraceptives. Marketed rings in the US include: (i) a ring for systemic and vaginal menopausal therapy that provides average serum estradiol levels of 40.6 pg/mL for the 0.05 mg and 76 pg/mL for the 0.1 mg dose; (ii) a ring for urogenital menopausal symptoms only that minimally elevates serum estradiol, usually within the menopausal range, treating atrophic vaginitis and urethritis; and (iii) a ring labelled for contraception that provides ethinyl estradiol 15 microg and etonogestrel 120 microg appropriate for nonsmoking perimenopausal women. A ring for combination hormone therapy and another releasing progesterone for contraception in lactating women have been reported in the literature, but are not yet available commercially. These may offer future options for hormone therapy. Women with a uterus receiving estrogen, even in low doses, should be given progestogen to prevent endometrial hyperplasia or carcinoma. Even women who have had an endometrial ablation are likely to have some endometrial tissue remaining since long-term amenorrhoea is uncommon. Since no marketed combination ring product is available, other forms

  2. Migraine in the post-menopausal period is associated with higher levels of mood disorders, disability, and more menopausal symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Carturan, Paula; Scorcine, Claudio; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess the prevalence of headache in post-menopausal women. Methods Women attending gynecology outpatient services in the coastal region of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil were invited to participate in this study. Only those with non-surgical menopause and no hormone replacement therapy were included. Prevalence and characterization of headaches were assessed, as well as the burden of migraine, traits of anxiety and depression, and menopausal symptomatology. Results...

  3. Comparison of myocardial function between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women: evaluation by gated myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K. H.; Choa, Won Sick; Yoon, Min Ki

    2005-01-01

    In addition to inhibiting coronary atherosclerosis, estrogen is expected to have protective effects on cardiac myocytes. We investigated the difference in myocardial functional parameters evaluated by gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal healthy women. This study included 22 healthy post-menopausal women (mean age: 53.0 yr) and 20 pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43.0 yr) who performed Tc-99m tetrofosmin gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress. Measured hemodynamic parameters, EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, cardiac output and cardiac index were compared between the two groups. For comparison, similar-aged two male groups with matched numbers were also studied. There was no significant difference in hemodynamic parameters. EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, or cardiac output between the post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women. However, post-menopausal women have a smaller cardiac index (mean: 1.95 L/min/m2 vs 2.20 L/min/m2; p=0.045) and adenosine-induced HR increase (mean : 80.5/min vs 89.7/min ; p=0.03), compared to the pre-menopausal women. On the contrary, the two male groups of the same age range and numbers with the women groups showed no significant difference in any myocardial parameters. These results suggest that menopause may be correlated with reduced increase in cardiac index and HR increase after adenosine-stress

  4. Comparison of myocardial function between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women: evaluation by gated myocardial SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, K. H.; Choa, Won Sick; Yoon, Min Ki [Gachon Medical School, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In addition to inhibiting coronary atherosclerosis, estrogen is expected to have protective effects on cardiac myocytes. We investigated the difference in myocardial functional parameters evaluated by gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress between post-menopausal and pre-menopausal healthy women. This study included 22 healthy post-menopausal women (mean age: 53.0 yr) and 20 pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43.0 yr) who performed Tc-99m tetrofosmin gated myocardial SPECT after adenosine-stress. Measured hemodynamic parameters, EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, cardiac output and cardiac index were compared between the two groups. For comparison, similar-aged two male groups with matched numbers were also studied. There was no significant difference in hemodynamic parameters. EDV, ESV, stroke volume, EF, or cardiac output between the post-menopausal and pre-menopausal women. However, post-menopausal women have a smaller cardiac index (mean: 1.95 L/min/m2 vs 2.20 L/min/m2; p=0.045) and adenosine-induced HR increase (mean : 80.5/min vs 89.7/min ; p=0.03), compared to the pre-menopausal women. On the contrary, the two male groups of the same age range and numbers with the women groups showed no significant difference in any myocardial parameters. These results suggest that menopause may be correlated with reduced increase in cardiac index and HR increase after adenosine-stress.

  5. The effect of adverse intrauterine conditions, early childhood growth and famine exposure on age at menopause: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrzadeh, S; Verschuuren, M; Schoonmade, L J; Lambalk, C B; Painter, R C

    2018-04-01

    When the follicle reserve, which is developed solely during the fetal period, is depleted, women enter menopause. Intrauterine and childhood adverse conditions might affect the ovarian capacity by influencing follicle production in the first trimester, limiting the initial follicle pool or mediate an accelerated follicular loss thereafter. To investigate if adverse early life influences result in younger age at menopause, the following online databases were systematically searched: PubMed, EMBASE, CINHAL (EBSCO) and Cochrane library (Wiley) up to 1 January 2017. Eligibility, data extraction and quality assessment was independently performed by two researchers. A total of 5278 studies were identified, 11 studies were deemed eligible and included. Nine were cohort studies, 1 case-control study and 1 twin study. Due to the diversity of reported data and risk estimates we were unable to pool data or perform meta-analysis on pooled data. Prenatal and childhood exposure to famine was significantly associated to an earlier age at menopause in three studies. Mean differences in age at menopause varied from 4 months up to 1.7 years between famine exposed and unexposed women. Three studies described a significant association between a low weight at ages 1 or 2 and a younger age at menopause. A younger age at menopause was associated with a higher weight at birth in only one study and with a high ponderal index, a measure for fatness at birth in another study. None of the nine studies reporting on low birth weight and age at natural menopause find a significant association.

  6. Symptomatic menopausal transition and subsequent bipolar disorder among midlife women with major depression: a nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chi; Yang, Albert C; Su, Tung-Ping; Bai, Ya-Mei; Li, Cheng-Ta; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that menopausal transition played an important role in the clinical course of major depression and bipolar disorder. However, the role of symptomatic menopausal transition in diagnostic conversion from major depression to bipolar disorder was still unknown. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 50,273 midlife women aged between 40 and 60 years in 2002∼2008 with major depression were enrolled in our study and divided into two subgroups based on the presence (n = 21,120) or absence (n = 29,153) of symptomatic menopausal transition. Subjects who had subsequent bipolar disorder during the follow-up were identified. Midlife women with major depression and symptomatic menopausal transition had a higher incidence of the diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder (7.3 vs. 6.6%, p = 0.003) than those with major depression alone. Cox regression analysis after adjusting for demographic data and psychiatric comorbidities further showed that symptomatic menopausal transition was associated with an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07∼1.23) among midlife women with major depression. Sensitivity test after excluding the 1-year and 3-year observation exhibited the consistent findings (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09∼1.28; HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.08∼1.34). Midlife women with the dual diagnoses of major depression and symptomatic menopausal transition had an increased risk of the diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder compared to those with major depression alone. Further studies may be required to investigate the underlying mechanisms among menopausal transition and the diagnostic conversion from major depression to bipolar disorder.

  7. Serum Lipids and Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Ni

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies exploring causal associations between serum lipids and breast cancer risk have reported contradictory results. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to evaluate these associations.Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE through April 2015. We included prospective cohort studies that reported relative risk (RR estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the associations of specific lipid components (i.e., total cholesterol [TC], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], and triglycerides [TG] with breast cancer risk. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled RRs.Fifteen prospective cohort studies involving 1,189,635 participants and 23,369 breast cancer cases were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of breast cancer for the highest versus lowest categories were 0.96 (95% CI: 0.86-1.07 for TC, 0.92 (95% CI: 0.73-1.16 for HDL-C, 0.90 (95% CI: 0.77-1.06 for LDL-C, and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.86-1.00 for TG. Notably, for HDL-C, a significant reduction of breast cancer risk was observed among postmenopausal women (RR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.64-0.93 but not among premenopausal women. Similar trends of the associations were observed in the dose-response analysis.Our findings suggest that serum levels of TG but not TC and LDL-C may be inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Serum HDL-C may also protect against breast carcinogenesis among postmenopausal women.

  8. A Prospective Analysis of Dynamic Loss of Breast Projection in Tissue Expander-Implant Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M Mioton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBreast projection is a critical element of breast reconstruction aesthetics, but little has been published regarding breast projection as the firm expander is changed to a softer implant. Quantitative data representing this loss in projection may enhance patient education and improve our management of patient expectations.MethodsFemale patients who were undergoing immediate tissue-expander breast reconstruction with the senior author were enrolled in this prospective study. Three-dimensional camera software was used for all patient photographs and data analysis. Projection was calculated as the distance between the chest wall and the point of maximal projection of the breast form. Values were calculated for final tissue expander expansion and at varying intervals 3, 6, and 12 months after implant placement.ResultsFourteen breasts from 12 patients were included in the final analysis. Twelve of the 14 breasts had a loss of projection at three months following the implant placement or beyond. The percentage of projection lost in these 12 breasts ranged from 6.30% to 43.4%, with an average loss of projection of 21.05%.ConclusionsThis study is the first prospective quantitative analysis of temporal changes in breast projection after expander-implant reconstruction. By prospectively capturing projection data with three-dimensional photographic software, we reveal a loss of projection in this population by three months post-implant exchange. These findings will not only aid in managing patient expectations, but our methodology provides a foundation for future objective studies of the breast form.

  9. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, pcontraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  10. Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith (Vapor) for Planetary Resource Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Malespin, C. A.; Ten Kate, I. L.; Mcadam, A.; Getty, S. A.; Mumm, E.; Franz, H. B.; Southard, A. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the chemical composition of planetary bodies and their atmospheres is key to understanding the formation of the Solar System and the evolution of the planets and their moons. In situ volatile measurements enable a ground-truth assessment of the distribution and abundance of resources such as water-ice and oxygen, important for a sustained human presence on the Moon and beyond. The Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith (VAPoR) instrument is a compact pyrolysis mass spectrometer designed to detect volatiles released from solid samples that are heated to elevated temperatures and is one technique that should be considered for resource prospecting on the Moon, Mars, and asteroids.

  11. Electrocardiographic PR prolongation and atrial fibrillation risk: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Lu, Xiangfeng; Huang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Shu; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiographic PR interval prolongation is considered a benign condition, but recent studies have challenged the notion by demonstrating that prolonged PR interval is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to evaluate the evidence supporting an association of prolonged PR interval with AF incidence. We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE database (from inception to May 2014) supplemented by manual searches of references of relevant retrieved articles. Prospective cohort studies were included with hazard ratio (HR) of prolonged PR interval for incident AF. The search strategy yielded 6 cohort studies meeting eligibility criteria. A total of 328,932 participants were included, with 14,191 participants suffering from AF during follow-up. Pooled HRs of prolonged PR interval for incident AF was 1.30 (95% CI: 1.13 to 1.49) using random-effect model (I(2) = 30%). There was a significant difference of combined HRs between studies with and without adjustment for taking of AV nodal blocking agents in subgroup analysis. Sensitivity analysis supported the robustness of the results. Prolonged PR interval is not a totally benign condition but an independent risk factor for AF incidence. The mechanisms underlying the association of prolonged PR interval with AF incidence need further research. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Preclosure safety analysis for a prospective Yucca Mountain conceptual design repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C.W. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

    1989-12-01

    A preliminary probabilistic risk assessment was performed for the prospective Yucca Mountain conceptual design repository. A new methodology to quantify radioactive source terms was developed and applied in the analysis. The study identified 42 event trees comprising 278 accident scenarios. The maximum offsite dose evaluated in this study is about 1000 mrem. For the majority of the accident scenarios, either the offsite dose is less than 100 mrem or the probability of occurrence is less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9}/yr. Only 11 accident scenarios with a dose larger than 100 mrem and an associated probability greater than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9}/yr were identified. A more detailed follow-on analysis for seismic events of various severity was also performed, and similar results were obtained. Therefore, based on the results of this analysis, no significant risk to the general public was identified during the preclosure period for the conceptual repository design. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Early menopause and severity of rheumatoid arthritis in women older than 45 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikwer, Mitra; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Bergström, Ulf; Jacobsson, Lennart T H; Turesson, Carl

    2012-08-17

    We aimed to investigate whether recognized hormonal predictors of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) also influence the severity of RA. One hundred thirty-four incident RA cases identified by four different local and national registers, who had participated in a community-based health survey between 1991 and 1996, were included. By a retrospective structured review of the medical records, information on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), erosions on radiographs, rheumatoid factor (RF) status, and disability measured by using the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) were collected. The variables were added to the SPSS TwoStep Cluster Analysis to reveal natural groupings of RA severity. Known hormonal predictors analyzed were breastfeeding history, history of oral contraceptive (OC) use, and menopausal age. The mean age at RA diagnosis was 63.4 years; 72% were RF positive, and 28% had received biological treatment. Three clusters were identified, one with severe RA, one with mild/moderate RF-positive RA, and one with mild/moderate RF-negative RA. A significant difference (P = 0.005) was found in the distribution of clusters between patients with a history of early menopause compared with those with menopause after 45 years, with a higher proportion with mild/moderate RF-negative RA in the early-menopause subset. No major difference in severity of the disease was noted depending on OC use or history of breastfeeding. Early menopause was associated with a milder form of RA. Hormonal changes may influence pathways that are distinct from those leading to severe, progressive disease.

  14. Coffee Decreases the Risk of Endometrial Cancer: A Dose–Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lafranconi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of the association between coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer. Methods: Eligible studies were identified by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases. The dose–response relationship as well as the risk of endometrial cancer for the highest versus the lowest categories of coffee consumption were assessed. Subgroup analyses considering the menopausal and receptor statuses, the smoking status, and the BMI (Body Mass Index were performed in order to identify potential confounders. Results: We identified a total of 12 studies eligible for meta-analysis. A dose–response meta-analysis showed a decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Moreover, a subgroup analysis indicated that coffee consumption is significantly associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal cancer. Increasing coffee consumption by four cups per day was associated with a 20% reduction in endometrial cancer risk (relative risk (RR 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.72 to 0.89 and with a 24% reduction in postmenopausal cancer risk (RR 0.76; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.83. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that increased coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of endometrial cancer, and this association is observed also for postmenopausal cancer.

  15. Coffee consumption and risk of stroke: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Orsini, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    Coffee consumption has been inconsistently associated with risk of stroke. The authors conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to quantitatively assess the association between coffee consumption and stroke risk. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase from January 1966 through May 2011 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. Prospective studies in which investigators reported relative risks of stroke for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from individual studies were pooled using a random-effects model. Eleven prospective studies, with 10,003 cases of stroke and 479,689 participants, met the inclusion criteria. There was some evidence of a nonlinear association between coffee consumption and risk of stroke (P for nonlinearity = 0.005). Compared with no coffee consumption, the relative risks of stroke were 0.86 (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.78, 0.94) for 2 cups of coffee per day, 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.92) for 3-4 cups/day, 0.87 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.97) for 6 cups/day, and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.79, 1.08) for 8 cups/day. There was marginal between-study heterogeneity among study-specific trends (I₂ = 12% and I₂ = 20% for the first and second spline transformations, respectively). Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that moderate coffee consumption may be weakly inversely associated with risk of stroke.

  16. The association of depression status with menopause symptoms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The majority of Chinese rural midlife women do not experience depression. The relationship between depression, VMS and sleep disturbances tends to change with menopausal status in Chinese rural midlife women. Keywords: depression, poor sleep, vasomotor symptoms, menopause, rural women ...

  17. Factor V Leiden mutation accelerates the onset of natural menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselt, Kristel M.; Kok, Helen S.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Roest, Mark; Pearson, Peter L.; te Velde, Egbert R.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Smoking is consistently associated with a younger age for menopause. Although this may be because of the direct toxic effects of tobacco smoke on follicles, we hypothesize that there may also be a relationship between smoking and a vascular origin of early menopausal onset. Several

  18. Inhibin A and B as markers of menopause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overlie, Inger; Mørkrid, Lars; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2005-01-01

    A more direct and precise hormonal marker of the menopause has been required for some time. The aim of this study was to identify the most accurate marker of the menopause, based on analyses of inhibin A and B, FSH, LH and estradiol (E(2)), among 59 healthy women without hormonal treatment during...

  19. Heart disease risk determines menopausal age rather than the reverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Helen S.; van Asselt, Kristel M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Wilson, Peter W. F.; Pearson, Peter L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a harmful cardiovascular risk profile accelerates menopause. BACKGROUND Women with an early menopause are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Although increased cardiovascular risk has been proposed as consequence of

  20. Perception and experience of menopause among primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: As life expectancy increases,most women spent a larger part of their lives in the post-menopausal state,with part of this during the peak of their career for working class women. Perception, attitude and experience of the menopause and its transitional period may differ from one female population to the other.

  1. Assessing menopausal status in women aged 40 - 49 using depot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Determining symptoms of menopause in older users of hormonal injectable contraceptives may be challenging, owing to method-induced amenorrhoea, suppression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and vasomotor symptoms. Objective. To investigate menopausal symptoms in women aged 40 - 49 using ...

  2. The Use Of Alternative Methods In Reducing Menopausal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Millions of women experience menopause every year, therefore the aim of this study is to determine the rates of application of alternative methods applied by women in order to reduce their complaints caused by menopause and alternative application methods. Materials and Methods: This study was carried ...

  3. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  4. A pastoral evaluation of menopause in the African context | Baloyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause, with its physical and emotional changes, appears to be an inevitable road for women to travel. The moment of choice for women at menopause involves not only whether they will embrace the new self or try to cling to identities from earlier life but also how the society in which they live views women after ...

  5. "Adopting self-sacrifice": how Iranian women cope with the sexual problems during the menopausal transition? An exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Narjes; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Azimi Hashemi, Mozhgan

    2017-09-01

    In the menopausal transition sexual problems are an important issue and one of the most frequently presented health concerns of women attending menopause clinics. This study aimed to explore the ways of managing sexual dysfunctions during the menopausal transition among Iranian women. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in Iran, from May 2013 to April 2015. Twenty-one women in three stages of menopausal transition, aged 42-55 years old, were purposively selected from urban health centers in Mashhad and Gonabad, Iran. Semi-structured in depth interviews were conducted for data collection until data saturation was achieved. All interviews were recorded electronically and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis was used for data analysis using Granehiem and Lundman (2004) recommended method. MAXQDA 2007 software was used for organizing data and managing the process of analysis. Data analysis demonstrated one overarching theme entitled "Adopting self-sacrifice" consisting of three categories and seven sub-categories. Major categories included: (1) Confronting decline of libido with two subcategories of women's libido decline and inability to fulfill husbands' sexual needs, (2) Seeking strategies for coping with two subcategories of looking for experiences of peer menopausal women and choosing how to interact with the husband and (3) Achieving problem solving strategies with three sub-categories of obedience in sexual relationships (Tamkin), employing affection based on religious advice, and giving up own right to reach mutual understanding. The major finding of this study was "Adopting self-sacrifice" in the process of managing sexual dysfunctions during the menopausal transition. The reason for choosing this passive approach by the majority of women has deep roots in their cultural and traditional beliefs.

  6. Consumption of garlic and risk of colorectal cancer: an updated meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Yi; Hu, Yi-Wang; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Meng-Wen; Li, Dan; Zheng, Shu

    2014-11-07

    To conduct an updated meta-analysis of prospective studies addressing the association between garlic consumption and colorectal cancer. Eligible cohort studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (PubMed) and screening the references of related articles published up to October 2013. Meta-analyses were conducted for colorectal cancer in relation to consumption of raw and cooked (RC) garlic and garlic supplements, separately. The summary relative risks (RR) with 95%CI were calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects model depending on the heterogeneity among studies. A total of 5 prospective cohort studies were identified. In contrast to the previous meta-analysis, no significant associations were found between consumption of RC garlic (RR: 1.06; 95%CI: 0.95-1.19) or garlic supplements (RR: 1.12; 95%CI: 0.96-1.31) and risk of colorectal cancer. A non-significant protective effect of garlic supplement intake against colorectal cancer was observed in females (RR: 0.84; 95%CI: 0.64-1.11), but the opposite was the case in males (RR: 1.24; 95%CI: 0.96-1.59). Consumption of RC garlic or garlic supplements is not significantly associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk.

  7. Chocolate Consumption and Risk of Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fei; Yao, Shuyuan; Wan, Jing; Gan, Xuedong

    2017-04-20

    Epidemiological studies have shown inconsistent findings on the association between chocolate consumption and risk of heart failure (HF). We, therefore, performed a meta-analysis of prospective studies to determine the role of chocolate intake in the prevention of HF. We searched databases of PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus through December 2016 and scrutinized the reference lists of relevant literatures to identify eligible studies. Study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were aggregated using random effect models. The dose-response relationship between chocolate consumption and incident HF was also assessed. This meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42017054230. Five prospective studies with 106,109 participants were finally included. Compared to no consumption of chocolate, the pooled HRs (95% CIs) of HF were 0.86 (0.82-0.91) for low-to-moderate consumption (chocolate consumption and risk of HF ( p for nonlinearity = 0.005). Compared with non-consumption, the HRs (95% CIs) of HF across chocolate consumption levels were 0.92 (0.88-0.97), 0.86 (0.78-0.94), 0.93 (0.85-1.03), and 1.07 (0.92-1.23) for 1, 3, 7, and 10 servings/week, respectively. In conclusion, chocolate consumption in moderation may be associated with a decreased risk of HF.

  8. Comparative study of gabapentin and isoflavone in menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Savita Rani; Shullai, Wansalan Kuru

    2016-01-01

    This study was planned to compare the effects of gabapentin and isoflavones in menopausal vasomotor symptoms. This prospective comparative study was conducted on 100 patients with complaints of hot flashes, divided into two groups of 50 each. Group I received 900 mg of gabapentin and Group II received 60 mg of isoflavones daily for 3 months. The patients were interviewed to calculate hot flash, global and depression scores and were rescored after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a change in the hot flash score from baseline. The secondary outcome was an improvement in sleep, depression, and lipid profile. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and Student's t -test. Both groups showed significant improvement in hot flash score at the end of 12 weeks (82% Group I, 74% Group II; P = 0.076). Statistically significant difference was seen at 12 weeks in sleep quality in favor of gabapentin ( P = 0.011) and in depression in favor of isoflavones (0.026). Isoflavone had significant improvement in cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides profiles after 12 weeks ( P sleep disturbance.

  9. Abnormal CA-125 levels in menopausal women without ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Keith Y; Elia, Jennifer; Kim, Robert; Carney, Michael; Ahn, Hyeong Jun

    2014-10-01

    To determine if an abnormal CA-125 level in a menopausal female without ovarian cancer is associated with an increase in mortality. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled (PLCO) Trial is a large multicenter prospective trial conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Over 78,000 healthy women aged 55-74 were randomized to a screening arm versus a usual medical care arm to evaluate the efficacy of screening in reducing mortality due to ovarian cancer. Women in the screening arm underwent annual screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound and CA-125 levels. There were 38,818 patients without ovarian cancer that had at least one CA-125 level drawn; 1201 (3.09%) had at least one abnormal level. The current study compares mortality in patients that had one or more abnormal CA-125 levels without ovarian cancer versus those with all normal levels. Patients with one or more abnormal CA-125 levels, without ovarian cancer, had a significantly higher mortality than patients with all normal CA-125 levels in the PLCO screening trial (pCA-125 and without ovarian cancer are exposed to an increased risk of premature mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Stovall, Dale W; Kightlinger, Rebecca S

    2009-07-01

    Vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy are both common menopausal symptoms. Hormone therapy is currently the only FDA-approved treatment for hot flashes. Current recommendations are to use the lowest dose of hormone therapy for the shortest period that will allow treatment goals to be met. Although the reanalysis of the WHI in 2007 by Roussow et al. provided evidence of coronary heart safety for users of hormone therapy under the age of 60 years and within 10 years of the onset of menopause, not all women desire or are candidates for hormone therapy. In this review we present an evidence-based discussion considering the effectiveness of hormonal and nonhormonal therapies for the relief of vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy. Concern exists regarding systemic absorption of vaginal estrogen and possible adverse effects on the breast and uterus. Selective estrogen receptor modulators and estrogen agonists offer benefits through targeted estrogen agonist/antagonistic effects and are being evaluated with and without estrogen for symptomatic menopausal women. Centrally acting nonhormonal therapies that are effective for the relief of vasomotor symptoms include various antidepressants, gabapentin and clonidine. A limited number of clinical trials have been conducted with nonprescription remedies, including paced respiration, yoga, acupuncture, exercise, homeopathy and magnet therapy, and some, but not all of these, have been found to be more effective than placebo. Dietary herbal supplements, such as soy and black cohosh, have demonstrated mixed and inconclusive results in placebo-controlled trials. Potential therapies for vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy require randomized, placebo-controlled trials of sufficient duration to establish efficacy and safety. Agents under investigation for vasomotor symptoms relief include neuroactive agents, such as gabapentin and desvenlafaxine; an estrogen receptor-beta-targeted herbal therapy, MF-101; and the selective estrogen

  11. The efficacy of acupuncture on menopausal symptoms (ACOM study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Around 75% of menopausal women experience hot flushes (HF) and 10-20% of all postmenopausal women find this very distressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms in general and HF in particular. METHODS: An un...... acupuncturists will be medical doctors educated in acupuncture. The primary outcome is change in HF from baseline to week 6 measured by the HF scale from the MenoScores Questionnaire (MSQ). Secondary outcomes are change in other menopausal symptoms, in particular day and night sweats and menopausal......: In the ACOM study, we explore the potential benefits of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe meno-pausal symptoms. The cross-over design offers the possi-bility of examining the legacy effect of acupuncture. FUNDING: The Idella Foundation, the University of Copenhagen and the Research Foundation of General...

  12. Menopause and autonomic control of heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunima Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with decreased heart rate variability, which is due to reduced parasympathetic or increased sympathetic outflow to the heart. Acute myocardial infarction may be accompanied by decreased heart rate variability. The causes of autonomic dysfunction in postmenopausal women may be multi-factorial i.e., dyslipidemia, increased body fat percentage, aging and loss of female sex hormones. The cardiac vagotonic and sympatholytic effects of estrogen can explain, at least in part, why premenopausal women compared with postmenopausal women have a lower coronary heart disease incidence and mortality rate.

  13. Attention problems and pathological gaming: resolving the 'chicken and egg' in a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Christopher J; Ceranoglu, T Atilla

    2014-03-01

    Pathological gaming (PG) behaviors are behaviors which interfere with other life responsibilities. Continued debate exists regarding whether symptoms of PG behaviors are a unique phenomenon or arise from other mental health problems, including attention problems. Development of attention problems and occurrence of pathological gaming in 144 adolescents were followed during a 1-year prospective analysis. Teens and their parents reported on pathological gaming behaviors, attention problems, and current grade point average, as well as several social variables. Results were analyzed using regression and path analysis. Attention problems tended to precede pathological gaming behaviors, but the inverse was not true. Attention problems but not pathological gaming predicted lower GPA 1 year later. Current results suggest that pathological gaming arises from attention problems, but not the inverse. These results suggest that pathological gaming behaviors are symptomatic of underlying attention related mental health issues, rather than a unique phenomenon.

  14. Menopausal status dependence of the timing of breast cancer recurrence after surgical removal of the primary tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demicheli, Romano; Bonadonna, Gianni; Hrushesky, William JM; Retsky, Michael W; Valagussa, Pinuccia

    2004-01-01

    Information on the metastasis process in breast cancer patients undergoing primary tumour removal may be extracted from an analysis of the timing of clinical recurrence. The hazard rate for local-regional and/or distant recurrence as the first event during the first 4 years after surgery was studied in 1173 patients undergoing mastectomy alone as primary treatment for operable breast cancer. Subset analyses were performed according to tumour size, axillary nodal status and menopausal status. A sharp two-peaked hazard function was observed for node-positive pre-menopausal patients, whereas results from node-positive post-menopausal women always displayed a single broad peak. The first narrow peak among pre-menopausal women showed a very steep rise to a maximum about 8–10 months after mastectomy. The second peak was considerably broader, reaching its maximum at 28–30 months. Post-menopausal patients displayed a wide, nearly symmetrical peak with maximum risk at about 18–20 months. Peaks displayed increasing height with increasing axillary lymph node involvement. No multi-peaked pattern was evident for either pre-menopausal or post-menopausal node-negative patients; however, this finding should be considered cautiously because of the limited number of events. Tumour size influenced recurrence risk but not its timing. Findings resulting from the different subsets of patients were remarkably coherent and each observed peak maintained the same position on the time axis in all analysed subsets. The risk of early recurrence for node positive patients is dependent on menopausal status. The amount of axillary nodal involvement and the tumour size modulate the risk value at any given time. For pre-menopausal node-positive patients, the abrupt increase of the first narrow peak of the recurrence risk suggests a triggering event that synchronises early risk. We suggest that this event is the surgical removal of the primary tumour. The later, broader, more symmetrical risk

  15. Longitudinal pattern of depressive symptoms around natural menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Sammel, Mary D; Boorman, David W; Zhang, Rongmei

    2014-01-01

    An increased risk of depressive symptoms has been associated with the transition to menopause, but the risk of depressive symptoms in the early postmenopausal years has not been well characterized. To identify within-woman changes in depressive symptoms during a 14-year period around menopause, determine associations of a history of depression with the pattern of depressive symptoms, and evaluate the rate of change in reproductive hormones as predictors of depressive symptoms following menopause. A randomly identified, population-based sample in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, of 203 late-reproductive-age women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause. Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The prevalence of high scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale decreased from 10 years before to 8 years after the final menstrual period (FMP), with a decrease of approximately 15% of baseline per year (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.81-0.89; P menopause compared with women with no depression history. Among women who first experienced depressive symptoms approaching menopause, the risk of depressive symptoms declined after the FMP, with a significantly lower risk the second year after menopause. The risk of depressive symptoms after menopause decreased by 35% for each unit (SD) increase before the FMP in the log rate of change of follicle-stimulating hormone (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.46-0.91; P = .01). The FMP was pivotal in the overall pattern of decreasing depressive symptoms in midlife women, with higher risk before and lower risk after the FMP. A history of depression strongly increased the risk both before and after menopause. Women who had no history of depression before the menopause transition had a low risk of depressive symptoms 2 or more years after the FMP.

  16. The modern approach to the correction of menopausal disorders in women with physiological menopause and after ovariectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Henyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of menopause attracts attention for many decades of not only gynecologists, but urologists, cardiologists, psychiatrists and other doctors. This is related to systemic complications of estrogen deficiency. The objective of our work is to establish clinical and hormonal changes in women of menopausal age with physiological menopause and after ovariectomy and also assess the effectiveness of the offered treatment. During the examination and treatment the women were divided as follows: I – main group – 48 women with physiological menopause: Ia (n=27 – within three months received a complex of non-hormonal treatment, Ib (n=21 – hormone replacement therapy (HRT; II group – 34 women after total ovariectomy: IIa (16 with therapeutic purpose received a complex of non-hormonal treatment for three months, IIb (18 – HRT. The offered complex of non-hormonal treatment included Cimicifuga, Menopace, Noophen. This treatment was used in women with early menopause who have contraindications to HRT or refused to take hormones. The degree of severity of menopausal syndrome was judged according to the menopausal index of Kuperman. In the study of hormonal status the determination of a set of hormones by immunochemical method was performed. During study we obtained results that indicate the inverse dynamics of menopausal disorders in both study groups. For the prevention and treatment of individual selection of treatment of climax manifestations it is appropriate the dynamic definition of hormonal mirrors of the patients.

  17. Anticipating the use of future things: towards a framework for prospective use analysis in innovation design projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Julien; Buisine, Stéphanie; Aoussat, Améziane

    2013-11-01

    Anticipation of future product use is a persistent issue in User-Centered Design. In this paper, we argue that one obstacle to early integration of use analysis in innovation design is overreliance on retrospective use analysis, i.e. that which is based on clear references to existing products or activities. In contrast, innovation design projects are full of uncertainty, leading to a need for prospective analysis. After having described some limitations of prospective use analysis, we contend that creativity tools may be used to assist the anticipation of future product use, by allowing designers to approach the variability of situations of future use in a structured manner rather than by "muddling through". We illustrate the expected benefits of this approach with two case studies, and describe some prospects for future research and practice in ergonomics. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Prospect Theory and the Risks Involved in Decision-Making: Content Analysis in ProQuest Articles

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    Sady Darcy da Silva-Junior

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the objective is to perform content analysis on articles of a reliable database, dealing with the prospect theory and the risks involved in the decision making process, evaluating some criteria for the theoretical and methodological approaches that allow a joint analysis and comparative. Therefore, a search in ProQuest database was performed which resulted in 15 articles that were submitted to content analysis process, based on the evaluation of nine factors identified by researchers. Among the results highlight the critical attitude to the prospect theory, in contrast to the assertion of his representative capacity of real situations and application in various situations.

  19. Migraine in the post-menopausal period is associated with higher levels of mood disorders, disability, and more menopausal symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carturan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess the prevalence of headache in post-menopausal women. Methods Women attending gynecology outpatient services in the coastal region of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil were invited to participate in this study. Only those with non-surgical menopause and no hormone replacement therapy were included. Prevalence and characterization of headaches were assessed, as well as the burden of migraine, traits of anxiety and depression, and menopausal symptomatology. Results One hundred and three women were included in the study. Migraine affected 14.7% of them. Some previous type of headache was reported by 86.2% of the women, most of whom improved during menopause but still presented with headache attacks. There was a correlation between higher migraine disability and depressive traits. Conclusions Many women believe that their headaches, particularly migraine, will end after menopause. This is, unfortunately, not the case for many of them.

  20. Site-specific analysis of geothermal development-data files of prospective sites. Vol. III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, F.; Cohen, A.; Pfundstein, R.; Pond, S.

    1978-02-01

    Development scenarios for 37 hydrothermal and geopressured prospects in the United States were analyzed. This third of three volumes presents site-specific data and sample development schedules for the first plant on line at each of the 37 prospects.