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Sample records for menopausal gonadotropin ovarian

  1. The effect of human chorionic gonadotrophin contained in human menopausal gonadotropin on the clinical outcomes during progestin-primed ovarian stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuxian; Ye, Jing; Fu, Yonglun; Ai, Ai; Cai, Renfei; Wang, Yun; Hong, Qingging; Hui, Tian; Lyu, Qifeng; Chen, Qiuju; Kuang, Yanping

    2017-10-20

    Progestin-primed ovarian stimulation (PPOS) protocol has recently been demonstrated to be an novel regimen for preventing premature LH surges during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) in combination with frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET). Our prospective controlled study was to explore the effect of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) contained in human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) on the clinical outcomes in normalovulatory women undergoing COH with PPOS. A total of 180 patients were allocated into three groups according to the gonadotropin (Gn) used: group A (human menopausal gonadotropin, hMG-A), group B (hMG-B) or group C (follicle stimulating hormone, FSH). The primary outcome measured was the number of oocytes retrieved. The number of oocytes retrieved in group A B C was 10.72±5.78 11.33±5.19and13.38±8.97, respectively, with no statistic significance (p>0.05). Other embryological indicators were also similar (p>0.05). The concentration of serum and urinary β-hCG on the trigger day in group A and B were not associated with embryo results (p>0.05). There was no significant differences in the clinical pregnancy rate (41.67% vs. 51.56% vs. 39.51%, p>0.05) and implantation rate (31.58%vs. 34.75%vs.25.33%) after FET among the three groups. Thus the clinical characteristics were not affected by the hCG contained in hMG in normalovulatory women treated with PPOS.

  2. The effects of low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin combined with human menopausal gonadotropin protocol on women with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism undergoing ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shutian; Kuang, Yanping

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) combined with human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) protocol on cycle characteristics and outcomes of infertile women with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) undergoing ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF). A retrospective cohort study. Tertiary-care academic medical centre. Forty-six infertile patients with HH and seventy-one infertile patients with tubal factor (TF) infertility undergoing IVF. In the study group, all 46 HH patients were given low-dose hCG (50-300IU/d) in combination with HMG daily from cycle day 3. Meanwhile, a control group consisting of 71 patients with tubal factor infertility was set up, where the infertile women were given triptorelin 3.75 mg on cycle day 3 for desensitization and started stimulation with HMG only 5 weeks later. Transvaginal ultrasound and serum sex steroids were used for monitoring the development of follicles. Ovulation was triggered by hCG 5000IU when dominant follicles matured. Viable embryos were transferred on the third day after ovum pickup or cryopreserved for later transfer. The primary outcome measure was the clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes included hCG day P4, ratio of E2/follicle count, number of oocytes retrieved, number of viable embryos, implantation rate, ongoing pregnancy rate and cumulative pregnancy rate. With lower basal FSH, LH and E2, HH patients showed longer HMG stimulation duration (13 (10-22) d vs 12 (8-18) d, P 10 mm) and E2/follicle count (>14 mm) were distinctively higher in the HH group (1056 ± 281 vs 830 ± 245, P < .001; 1545 ± 570 vs 1312 ± 594pmol/L, P = .037; respectively). The clinical pregnancy rate, implantation rate, ongoing pregnancy rate and cumulative pregnancy rate per woman were comparable between the two groups. Comparison among the subgroups with different hCG dosage showed that HMG duration shortened with the increase of daily hCG dose (14.84 ± 2.88 vs 13

  3. Sulfonation and sialylation of gonadotropins in women during the menstrual cycle, after menopause, and with polycystic ovarian syndrome and in men.

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    Wide, Leif; Naessén, Tord; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Eriksson, Karin

    2007-11-01

    More basic isoforms of LH and FSH appear in blood at midcycle and more acidic after menopause. The LH isoforms are more basic in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). These charge alterations may reflect differences in the number of two negatively charged residues on the gonadotropins: sialic acid and sulfonated N-acetylgalactosamine, residues that modulate the half-life of the gonadotropins in blood. The objective of the study was to determine the contributions of sialic acid and sulfonated N-acetylgalactosamine and sialic acid on LH and FSH to the observed alterations in charge. Serum samples were obtained from 59 young women with regular cycles, nine postmenopausal women, 12 women with PCOS, and 40 young men. The number of sulfonated N-acetylgalactosamine and sialic acid residues per LH and FSH molecule in serum and the distributions of molecules with 0-1-2-3-4 sulfonated residues were determined by electrophoretic analyses before and after removal of sialic acid. Considerably decreased sulfonation of LH was found at midcycle and in women with PCOS concomitant with slightly increased sialylation. The sulfonation of LH increased in the luteal phase, and the sialylation was highest after menopause for both hormones. The frequencies of sulfonated LH and FSH isoforms were directly related (P sulfonated residues on serum gonadotropins are suggested to reflect alterations in the isoform composition of the hormones secreted by the pituitary, resulting in modulations of their biological properties, such as half-life in blood.

  4. Abrogation by human menopausal gonadotropin on testicular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer cells including testicular cancer. Human Menopausal Gonadotropin (HMG) is a natural hormone necessary for human reproduction. This hormone is a leading modality of treatment for infertility as it contains equal amount of ...

  5. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alice W; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Doherty, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. METHODS: Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway...

  6. Differences in gene expression of granulosa cells from women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with either recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone or highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, Marie Louise; Borup, Rehannah; Lee, Young Bae

    2009-01-01

    groups of granulosa cells. Expression level of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor gene and genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol and steroids were expressed at lower levels in the hMG-treated cells; inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-3-kinase-A and S100-calcium....... Granulosa cells were collected from follicular fluid after oocyte retrieval, and mRNA were isolated for gene expression analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): General gene expression profile. RESULT(S): Ninety-six probe sets (85 genes) showed statistically significant differences in expression level in the two......-binding-protein-P (anti-apoptosis protein) were expressed at higher levels in hMG than in recombinant FSH. CONCLUSION(S): The different hormone compositions of the two drugs used for COH had a statistically significant impact on the gene expression profile of preovulatory granulosa cells. Some of these genes may...

  7. A comparison of outcomes from in vitro fertilization cycles stimulated with either recombinant luteinizing hormone (LH) or human chorionic gonadotropin acting as an LH analogue delivered as human menopausal gonadotropins, in subjects with good or poor ovarian reserve: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Michael H; Agdi, Mohammed; Shehata, Fady; Son, Weonyoung; Tan, Seang Lin

    2014-01-01

    To compare rates of pregnancy and IVF parameters in subjects who were stimulated with FSH plus recombinant human luteinizing hormone or menopausal gonadotropins. To determine whether responses to type of LH differ in poor or good responders. Retrospective analysis at a university-based fertility center. Subjects were women with good and poor ovarian reserve, who underwent in vitro fertilization during a 2 year period, as part of a long agonist (N=122), or microdose flair (N=79) protocol. Measurements included FSH and LH dose, number of oocytes collected, number of embryos obtained, and pregnancy and clinical pregnancy rates. Patients treated with r-hLH (n=105) had higher numbers of eggs retrieved and of embryos while using less FSH than their hMG-treated (n=96) counterparts. Pregnancy and clinical pregnancy rates were significantly higher with r-hLH than with hMG protocols (p=0.008 and 0.009, respectively). If patients had a baseline serum FSH level ≥10IU/L, clinical pregnancy rates were higher when r-hLH was used. When the antral follicle count was below 6 no significant differences in stimulation parameters or outcomes were detected between the groups. r-hLH may be beneficial when compared to hMG and used for in-vitro fertilization, except in subjects with baseline follicle counts less than 6. Further data should be obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Peritoneal Adhesion and Angiogenesis in Ovarian Carcinoma Are Inversely Regulated by Hyaluronan: The Role of Gonadotropins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Chagit Tzuman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death among gynecologic cancers. Although transformation of the outer ovarian epithelium was linked with ovulation, the disease is significantly more prevalent and severe in postmenopausal women. We postulated that menopause could augment ovarian cancer progression through the effects of gonadotropins on multifocal seeding to the mesothelial layer lining the peritoneum. This seeding is mediated by integrins as well as by CD44 interaction with hyaluronan (HA. Here, we report the effect of gonadotropins on HA synthesis and degradation and on peritoneal adhesion. A significant concentration- and time-dependent induction in expression levels of HA synthases (HASs and hyaluronidases (Hyals was observed in vitro on stimulation of human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells by gonadotropins. Hormonal regulation of HA-mediated adhesion was manifested in vivo as well, by fluorescence microscopy of stained MLS multicellular tumor spheroids. The number of spheroids adhered to the mesothelium of ovariectomized CD-1 nude mice 9.5 hours after intraperitoneal insertion was significantly higher than in nonovariectomized mice. Inhibition of HA synthesis by 6-diazo-5-oxo-1-norleucine (DON both in spheroids and ovariectomized mice significantly reduced the number of adhered spheroids. Thus, the change in the hormonal environment during menopause assists in HA-dependent adherence of ovarian cancer spheroids onto the peritoneum. However, HA is antiangiogenic and it can significantly suppress tumor progression. Accordingly, angiogenesis of the adhered spheroids was significantly elevated in DON-treated tumors. These results can explain the selective pressure that can lead to simultaneously increased tumor expression of both HASs and Hyals.

  9. Transitional versus surgical menopause in a rodent model: etiology of ovarian hormone loss impacts memory and the acetylcholine system.

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    Acosta, Jazmin I; Mayer, Loretta; Talboom, Joshua S; Tsang, Candy Wing S; Smith, Constance J; Enders, Craig K; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2009-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that type of ovarian hormone loss at menopause influences cognition. Until recently ovariectomy (OVX) has been the primary rodent model to examine effects of ovarian hormone loss on cognition. This model limits evaluations to abrupt and complete ovarian hormone loss, modeling less than 13% of women who receive surgical menopause. The majority of women do not have their ovaries surgically removed and undergo transitional hormone loss via ovarian follicular depletion. 4-Vinylcyclohexene-diepoxide (VCD) produces gradual ovarian follicular depletion in the rodent, with hormone profiles more similar to naturally menopausal women vs. OVX. We directly compared VCD and OVX models to examine whether type of hormone loss (transitional vs. surgical) impacted cognition as assessed on a maze battery as well as the cholinergic system tested via scopolamine mnemonic challenge and brain acetylcholinesterase activity. Middle-aged rats received either sham surgery, OVX surgery, VCD, or VCD then OVX to assess effects of removal of residual ovarian output after transitional menopause and follicular depletion. VCD-induced transitional menopause impaired learning of a spatial recent memory task; surgical removal of residual ovarian hormones by OVX abolished this negative effect of transitional menopause. Furthermore, transitional menopause before OVX was better for memory than an abrupt loss of hormones via OVX only. Surgical ovarian hormone loss, regardless of menopause history, increased hippocampal acetylcholinesterase activity. Circulating gonadotropin and androstenedione levels were related to cognitive competence. Collectively, findings suggest that in the rat, initiation of transitional menopause before surgical ovary removal can benefit mnemonic function and could obviate some negative cognitive consequences of surgical menopause alone.

  10. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, A.W.; Tyrer, J.P.; Doherty, J.A.; Stram, D.A.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Plisiecka-Halasa, J.; Spiewankiewicz, B.; Myers, E.J.; Study, G.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Fasching, P.A.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Hein, A.; Vergote, I.; Nieuwenhuysen, E. Van; Lambrechts, D.; Wicklund, K.G.; Eilber, U.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Chang-Claude, J.; Rudolph, A.; Sucheston-Campbell, L.; Odunsi, K.; Moysich, K.B.; Shvetsov, Y.B.; Thompson, P.J.; Goodman, M.T.; Wilkens, L.R.; Dork, T.; Hillemanns, P.; Durst, M.; Runnebaum, I.B.; Bogdanova, N.; Pelttari, L.M.; Nevanlinna, H.; Leminen, A.; Edwards, R.P.; Kelley, J.L.; Harter, P.; Schwaab, I.; Heitz, F.; Bois, A. du; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Walsh, C.; Karlan, B.Y.; Hogdall, E.; Kjaer, S.K.; Jensen, A.; Vierkant, R.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Goode, E.L.; Fridley, B.L.; Southey, M.C.; Giles, G.G.; Bruinsma, F.; Wu, X.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Lu, K.; Liang, D.; Bisogna, M.; Levine, D.A.; Weber, R.P.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Iversen, E.S.; Berchuck, A.; Terry, K.L.; Cramer, D.W; Tworoger, S.S.; Poole, E.M.; Olson, S.H.; Orlow, I.; Bandera, E.V.; Bjorge, L.; Tangen, I.L.; Salvesen, H.B.; Krakstad, C.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Altena, A.M. van; Bean, Y.; Pejovic, T.; Kellar, M.; Le, N.D.; Cook, L.S.; Kelemen, L.E.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Lubinski, J.; Gronwald, J.; Cybulski, C.; Jakubowska, A.; Wentzensen, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Lissowska, J.; Yang, H.; Nedergaard, L.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of

  11. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  12. Genetics of ovarian ageing : genetic association studies on natural menopause and primary ovarian insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhuis, M.

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is the endpoint of a process referred to as ovarian ageing. The mean age at menopause is approximately 51 years, but varies widely between 40 to 60 years of age. Approximately 1% of all women experience menopause before the age of 40, which is a condition known as primary ovarian

  13. Evaluation of Endometrial Angiogenesis in Mice Uterus Before Implantation in Natural Cycles Followed by Use of Human Menopausal Gonadotropin - Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Drugs and Epigallocatechin Gallate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Angiogenesis plays a major role in endometrial receptivity and thickening of the endometrium immediately before implantation. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the antiangiogenic properties of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG from green tea in angiogenesis of endometrium. Materials and Methods: In this study, forty adult female NMARI mice randomly divided into four groups. Control group received vehicle; human menopausal gonadotropin/human chorionic gonadotropin (HMG/HCG group received 7.5 IU HMG intraperitoneal (IP and 48 h later 7.5 IU HCG was injected (IP for ovarian stimulation; HMG/HCG + EGCG group received HMG and HCG in the same manner as the previous group and also received 5 mg/kg EGCG at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after injection of HMG; and the group EGCG received 5 mg/kg EGCG. A male mouse was kept with two female animals in the same cage for mating. Mice were dissected 96 h after administration of HMG (immediately before implantation and tissue processing was carried out for the uterine specimens. CD31-positive cells were counted by use of histological and immunohistochemical methods. Results: Angiogenesis in EGCG-treated group was less than that of control and gonadotropin group (P < 0.05. The number of endothelial cells was counted by CD31 marker under a light microscope and showed significant differences between all groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: EGCG significantly inhibited the angiogenesis in endometrium (in natural cycles through antiangiogenic effects.

  14. Evaluation of Endometrial Angiogenesis in Mice Uterus Before Implantation in Natural Cycles Followed by Use of Human Menopausal Gonadotropin - Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Drugs and Epigallocatechin Gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Bahman; Malekzadeh, Mehrnoush

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a major role in endometrial receptivity and thickening of the endometrium immediately before implantation. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the antiangiogenic properties of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea in angiogenesis of endometrium. In this study, forty adult female NMARI mice randomly divided into four groups. Control group received vehicle; human menopausal gonadotropin/human chorionic gonadotropin (HMG/HCG) group received 7.5 IU HMG intraperitoneal (IP) and 48 h later 7.5 IU HCG was injected (IP) for ovarian stimulation; HMG/HCG + EGCG group received HMG and HCG in the same manner as the previous group and also received 5 mg/kg EGCG at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after injection of HMG; and the group EGCG received 5 mg/kg EGCG. A male mouse was kept with two female animals in the same cage for mating. Mice were dissected 96 h after administration of HMG (immediately before implantation) and tissue processing was carried out for the uterine specimens. CD31-positive cells were counted by use of histological and immunohistochemical methods. Angiogenesis in EGCG-treated group was less than that of control and gonadotropin group ( P < 0.05). The number of endothelial cells was counted by CD31 marker under a light microscope and showed significant differences between all groups ( P < 0.05). EGCG significantly inhibited the angiogenesis in endometrium (in natural cycles) through antiangiogenic effects.

  15. Ovarian adrenal interactions during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasley, B L; Crawford, S L; McConnell, D S

    2013-12-01

    Observations over the past decade using longitudinal data reveal a gender-specific shift in adrenal steroid production. This shift is represented by an increase in the circulating concentrations of delta 5 steroids in 85% of all women and is initiated only after the menopausal transition has begun. While the associated rise in the major adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), is modest, the parallel rises in dehydroepiandrosteone (DHEA) and androstenediol (Adiol) are much more robust. These increases in circulating steroid concentrations are qualitatively similar on average between ethnicities but quantitatively different between individual women. Both circulating testosterone (T) and androstenedione (Adione) also rise concomitantly but modestly by comparison. This phenomenon presents a new and provocative aspect to the endocrine foundations of the menopausal transition and may provide important clues to understanding the fundamentals of mid-aged women's healthy aging, particularly an explanation for the wide diversity in phenotypes observed during the MT as well as their different responses to hormone replacement therapies. Experimental studies using the nonhuman primate animal model show an acute adrenal response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) challenge as well as the presence of luteinizing hormone receptors (LHR) in their adrenal cortices. These experimental results support the concept that LHRs are recruited to the adrenal cortices of mid-aged women that subsequently function to respond to increasing circulating LH to shunt pregnenolone metabolites towards the delta 5 pathway. Future investigations are required to determine the relationship of these changes in adrenal function to symptoms and health outcomes of mid-aged women.

  16. Comparative study of gonadotropin levels and clinical presentation in surgical and natural menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Naik Raviraj R, Chandel Rittu S, Abichandani Leela G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Menopause means complete stoppage of menses for last one year due to failure of follicular activities of the ovaries. This can be determined by the various hormones secreted by ovary such as LH and FSH. As these hormones are responsible for normal maintenance of basic ovarian function in reproductive life; there occurs considerable alteration in their levels in menopause. Aims and Objectives :- 1] To study and compare ovarian function by d...

  17. Efficacy of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Alone, FSH + Luteinizing Hormone, Human Menopausal Gonadotropin or FSH + Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on Assisted Reproductive Technology Outcomes in the "Personalized" Medicine Era: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Daniele; Casarini, Livio; Alviggi, Carlo; Simoni, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) act on the same receptor, activating different signal transduction pathways. The role of LH or hCG addition to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) as well as menopausal gonadotropins (human menopausal gonadotropin; hMG) in controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is debated. To compare FSH + LH, or FSH + hCG or hMG vs. FSH alone on COS outcomes. A meta-analysis according to PRISMA statement and Cochrane Collaboration was performed, including prospective, controlled clinical trials published until July 2016, enrolling women treated with FSH alone or combined with other gonadotropins. Trials enrolling women with polycystic ovarian syndrome were excluded (PROSPERO registration no. CRD42016048404). Considering 70 studies, the administration of FSH alone resulted in higher number of oocytes retrieved than FSH + LH or hMG. The MII oocytes number did not change when FSH alone was compared to FSH + LH, FSH + hCG, or hMG. Embryo number and implantation rate were higher when hMG was used instead of FSH alone. Pregnancy rate was significantly higher in FSH + LH-treated group vs. others. Only 12 studies reported live birth rate, not providing protocol-dependent differences. Patients' stratification by GnRH agonist/antagonist identified patient subgroups benefiting from specific drug combinations. In COS, FSH alone results in higher oocyte number. HMG improves the collection of mature oocytes, embryos, and increases implantation rate. On the other hand, LH addition leads to higher pregnancy rate. This study supports the concept of a different clinical action of gonadotropins in COS, reflecting previous in vitro data.

  18. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms

  19. Neonatal outcomes and congenital malformations in children born after human menopausal gonadotropin and medroxyprogesterone acetate treatment cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Mao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yun; Chen, Qiuju; Lu, Xuefeng; Hong, Qingqing; Kuang, Yanping

    2017-12-01

    To investigate neonatal outcomes and congenital malformations in children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and vitrified embryo transfer cycles using human menopausal gonadotrophin and medroxyprogesterone acetate (hMG + MPA) treatment. We performed a retrospective cohort study including 4596 live born babies. During January 2014-June 2016, children born after either hMG + MPA treatment, gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist short protocol, or mild ovarian stimulation were included. The main outcome measures were neonatal outcomes and congenital malformations. Neonatal outcomes both for singletons and twins such as mean birth weight and length, gestational age, the frequency of preterm birth were comparable between groups. Rate of stillbirth and perinatal death were also similar. No significant differences were found in the overall incidence of congenital malformations between the three groups. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that hMG + MPA regimen did not significantly increase the risk of congenital malformations compared with short protocol and mild ovarian stimulation, with adjusted odds ratio of 1.22 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-2.44] and 1.38 (CI 0.65-2.93), respectively, after adjusting for confounding factors. Our data suggested that compared with conventional ovarian stimulations, hMG + MPA treatment neither compromised neonatal outcomes of IVF newborns, nor did increase the prevalence of congenital malformations.

  20. White spotting variant (Wv) mouse as an experimental model for ovarian aging and menopausal biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth R.; Yeasky, Toni; Wei, Jain Qin; Miki, Roberto A.; Cai, Kathy Q.; Smedberg, Jennifer L.; Yang, Wan-Lin; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2011-01-01

    follicular endowment in newborn mice and premature depletion of follicles in young mice, though the mutant females have a normal lifespan after cessation of ovarian function. The Wv female mice exhibit consistent physiological changes that resemble common features of postmenopausal women. These alterations include follicle depletion, morphological aging of the ovary, altered serum levels of cholesterol, gonadotropins, and steroid hormones, decreased bone density, and reduced cardiac function. These changes were not observed in male mice, either age-matched male Wv/Wv or WT mice, and are unlikely caused by global loss of c-kit function. The Wv mouse may be a genetic, intact-ovary model that mimics closely the phenotypes of human menopause to be used for further studies to understand mechanisms of menopausal biology. PMID:22228319

  1. Hormone replacement therapy in menopause and in premature ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, S; Orlandini, C; Biliotti, G; Scolaro, V; De Felice, G; Regini, C; Petraglia, F

    2013-12-01

    Menopause is defined by world health organization (WHO) as the permanent cessation of menstruating resulting from a loss of ovarian follicular activity, after one year of amenorrhea. It signifies the last menstrual cycle and the end of women's fertile and reproductive life. The average age for a women to undergo menopause is 51 years; unlike menarche, whose average age has decreased over the past decades, the age of menopause has remained unchanged. We can distinguish: 1) premenopause, the time interval leading up to menopause; 2) climacteric, the time interval between the reproductive e non-reproductive life; 3) premature menopause, that occurs in 1% of women. Menopause can also be induced iatrogenically as a result of surgery, medical therapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Beyond the life the number of oocytes falls until there are no more suitable follicles for reproduction and the menopause ensues. At the same time, the ability of the ovary to produce hormones falls, leading to an increasing pulsatile release of FSH in order to stimulate the ovary to produce oestrogens. Menopause is characterized by different symptoms such as hot flushes, night sweats, dispareunia, prolapse, vulval itching due to vaginal atrophy and dryness, urinary incontinence, dysuria, and also the psychological aspects don't should be underestimated because of many women suffer of depression, mood instability, insomnia, fatigue and decreased libido. Long term symptoms include osteoporosis, cardiovascular and neuro-degenerative diseases. The main aim of different treatments was symptoms relief. Pharmacological agents and psychological support represent the goal for menopause treatment.

  2. Development of A Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; questions of the cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology.A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1-5% (it is not a null mutation. Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer.Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention.

  3. Gonadotropins and female sex steroid hormones in cyst fluid and serum from patients with ovarian tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, C.M.G.; Boss, E.A.; Boonstra, H.; Tienoven, D. van; Sweep, C.G.J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the concentrations of LH, FSH, 17beta-estradiol and progesterone in ovarian cyst fluid and serum from patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors and to assess the correlation of the gonadotropin and female sex steroid hormone concentrations

  4. Abnormal CA-125 levels in menopausal women without ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Keith Y; Elia, Jennifer; Kim, Robert; Carney, Michael; Ahn, Hyeong Jun

    2014-10-01

    To determine if an abnormal CA-125 level in a menopausal female without ovarian cancer is associated with an increase in mortality. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled (PLCO) Trial is a large multicenter prospective trial conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Over 78,000 healthy women aged 55-74 were randomized to a screening arm versus a usual medical care arm to evaluate the efficacy of screening in reducing mortality due to ovarian cancer. Women in the screening arm underwent annual screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound and CA-125 levels. There were 38,818 patients without ovarian cancer that had at least one CA-125 level drawn; 1201 (3.09%) had at least one abnormal level. The current study compares mortality in patients that had one or more abnormal CA-125 levels without ovarian cancer versus those with all normal levels. Patients with one or more abnormal CA-125 levels, without ovarian cancer, had a significantly higher mortality than patients with all normal CA-125 levels in the PLCO screening trial (pCA-125 and without ovarian cancer are exposed to an increased risk of premature mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V; Gaitskell, K; Hermon, C

    2015-01-01

    . Adjusted Poisson regressions yielded relative risks (RRs) versus never-use. FINDINGS: During prospective follow-up, 12 110 postmenopausal women, 55% (6601) of whom had used hormone therapy, developed ovarian cancer. Among women last recorded as current users, risk was increased even with

  6. Effect of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue triptorelin on the occurrence of chemotherapy-induced early menopause in premenopausal women with breast cancer: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Boni, Luca; Michelotti, Andrea; Gamucci, Teresa; Olmeo, Nina; Gori, Stefania; Giordano, Monica; Garrone, Ornella; Pronzato, Paolo; Bighin, Claudia; Levaggi, Alessia; Giraudi, Sara; Cresti, Nicola; Magnolfi, Emanuela; Scotto, Tiziana; Vecchio, Carlo; Venturini, Marco

    2011-07-20

    Premenopausal patients with breast cancer are at high risk of premature ovarian failure induced by systemic treatments, but no standard strategies for preventing this adverse effect are yet available. To determine the effect of the temporary ovarian suppression obtained by administering the gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue triptorelin during chemotherapy on the incidence of early menopause in young patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The PROMISE-GIM6 (Prevention of Menopause Induced by Chemotherapy: A Study in Early Breast Cancer Patients-Gruppo Italiano Mammella 6) study, a parallel, randomized, open-label, phase 3 superiority trial, was conducted at 16 sites in Italy and enrolled 281 patients between October 2003 and January 2008. The patients were premenopausal women with stage I through III breast cancer who were candidates for adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Assuming a 60% rate of early menopause in the group treated with chemotherapy alone, it was estimated that 280 patients had to be enrolled to detect a 20% absolute reduction in early menopause in the group treated with chemotherapy plus triptorelin. The intention-to-treat analysis was performed by including all randomized patients and using imputed values for missing data. Before beginning chemotherapy, patients were randomly allocated to receive chemotherapy alone or combined with triptorelin. Triptorelin was administered intramuscularly at a dose of 3.75 mg at least 1 week before the start of chemotherapy and then every 4 weeks for the duration of chemotherapy. Incidence of early menopause (defined as no resumption of menstrual activity and postmenopausal levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol 1 year after the last cycle of chemotherapy). The clinical and tumor characteristics of the 133 patients randomized to chemotherapy alone and the 148 patients randomized to chemotherapy plus triptorelin were similar. Twelve months after the last

  7. Novel use of the ovarian follicular pool to postpone menopause and delay osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Kristensen, Stine Gry

    2015-01-01

    Life expectancy has increased by more than 30 years during the last century and continues to increase. Many women already live decades in menopause deprived of naturally produced oestradiol and progesterone, leading to an increasing incidence of menopause-related disorders such as osteoporosis......, cardiovascular diseases and lack of general well-being. Exogenous oestradiol has traditionally been used to alleviate menopause-related effects. This commentary discusses a radical new method to postpone menopause. Part of the enormous surplus of ovarian follicles can now be cryostored in youth for use after...... menopause. Excision of ovarian tissue will advance menopause marginally and will not reduce natural fertility. Grafted tissue restores ovarian function with circulating concentrations of sex steroids for years in post-menopausal cancer survivors. Future developments may further utilize the enormous store...

  8. Novel use of the ovarian follicular pool to postpone menopause and delay osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Kristensen, Stine Gry

    2015-08-01

    Life expectancy has increased by more than 30 years during the last century and continues to increase. Many women already live decades in menopause deprived of naturally produced oestradiol and progesterone, leading to an increasing incidence of menopause-related disorders such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases and lack of general well-being. Exogenous oestradiol has traditionally been used to alleviate menopause-related effects. This commentary discusses a radical new method to postpone menopause. Part of the enormous surplus of ovarian follicles can now be cryostored in youth for use after menopause. Excision of ovarian tissue will advance menopause marginally and will not reduce natural fertility. Grafted tissue restores ovarian function with circulating concentrations of sex steroids for years in post-menopausal cancer survivors. Future developments may further utilize the enormous store of ovarian follicles. Currently, the main goal of ovarian cryopreservation is fertility preservation, but grafting of ovarian tissue may also serve endocrine functions as a physiological solution to prevent the massive medical legacy of osteoporosis and menopause-related conditions in the ageing population. This intriguing solution is now technically available; the question is whether this method qualifies for postponing menopause, perhaps initially for those patients who already have cryostored tissue? Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low dosing of gonadotropins in in vitro fertilization cycles for women with poor ovarian reserve: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, Mohamed Abdel-Fattah; van Wely, Madelon; Mochtar, Monique; Fouda, Usama Mohamed; Eldaly, Ashraf; El Abidin, Eman Zein; Elhalwagy, Ahmed; Mageed Abdallah, Ahmed Abdel; Zaki, Sherif Sameh; Abdel Ghafar, Mohamed Sayed; Mohesen, Mohamed Nagi; van der Veen, Fulco

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of low doses of gonadotropins and gonadotropins combined with oral compounds compared with high doses of gonadotropins in ovarian stimulation regimens in terms of ongoing pregnancy per fresh IVF attempt in women with poor ovarian reserve undergoing

  10. Human chorionic gonadotropin and its relation to grade, stage and patient survival in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhard, Miriam; Tsvilina, Alexandra; Schumacher, Lan; Kupka, Markus; Ditsch, Nina; Mayr, Doris; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2012-01-01

    An influence of gonadotropins (hCG) on the development of ovarian cancer has been discussed. Therefore, we quantified serum hCG levels in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors and the hCG expression in ovarian cancer tissue in order to analyze its relation to grade, stage, gonadotropin receptor (LH-R, FSH-R) expression and survival in ovarian cancer patients. Patients diagnosed and treated for ovarian tumors from 1990 to 2002 were included. Patient characteristics, histology including histological subtype, tumor stage, grading and follow-up data were available. Serum hCG concentration measurement was performed with ELISA technology, hCG tissue expression determined by immunohistochemistry. HCG-positive sera were found in 26.7% of patients with benign and 67% of patients with malignant ovarian tumors. In addition, significantly higher hCG serum concentrations were observed in patients with malignant compared to benign ovarian tumors (p = 0.000). Ovarian cancer tissue was positive for hCG expression in 68%. We identified significant differences in hCG tissue expression related to tumor grade (p = 0.022) but no differences with regard to the histological subtype. In addition, mucinous ovarian carcinomas showed a significantly increased hCG expression at FIGO stage III compared to stage I (p = 0.018). We also found a positive correlation of hCG expression to LH-R expression, but not to FSH-R expression. There was no significant correlation between tissue hCG expression and overall ovarian cancer patient survival, but subgroup analysis revealed an increased 5-year survival in LH-R positive/FSH-R negative and hCG positive tumors (hCG positive 75.0% vs. hCG negative 50.5%). Serum human gonadotropin levels differ in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors. HCG is often expressed in ovarian cancer tissue with a certain variable relation to grade and stage. HCG expression correlates with LH-R expression in ovarian cancer tissue, which has previously

  11. Human chorionic gonadotropin and its relation to grade, stage and patient survival in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background An influence of gonadotropins (hCG) on the development of ovarian cancer has been discussed. Therefore, we quantified serum hCG levels in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors and the hCG expression in ovarian cancer tissue in order to analyze its relation to grade, stage, gonadotropin receptor (LH-R, FSH-R) expression and survival in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Patients diagnosed and treated for ovarian tumors from 1990 to 2002 were included. Patient characteristics, histology including histological subtype, tumor stage, grading and follow-up data were available. Serum hCG concentration measurement was performed with ELISA technology, hCG tissue expression determined by immunohistochemistry. Results HCG-positive sera were found in 26.7% of patients with benign and 67% of patients with malignant ovarian tumors. In addition, significantly higher hCG serum concentrations were observed in patients with malignant compared to benign ovarian tumors (p = 0.000). Ovarian cancer tissue was positive for hCG expression in 68%. We identified significant differences in hCG tissue expression related to tumor grade (p = 0.022) but no differences with regard to the histological subtype. In addition, mucinous ovarian carcinomas showed a significantly increased hCG expression at FIGO stage III compared to stage I (p = 0.018). We also found a positive correlation of hCG expression to LH-R expression, but not to FSH-R expression. There was no significant correlation between tissue hCG expression and overall ovarian cancer patient survival, but subgroup analysis revealed an increased 5-year survival in LH-R positive/FSH-R negative and hCG positive tumors (hCG positive 75.0% vs. hCG negative 50.5%). Conclusions Serum human gonadotropin levels differ in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors. HCG is often expressed in ovarian cancer tissue with a certain variable relation to grade and stage. HCG expression correlates with LH-R expression in ovarian

  12. Down-regulation of serum gonadotropins is as effective as estrogen replacement at improving menopause-associated cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Kathryn J; Mudd, Joseph C; Richardson, Sandy L; Chang, Jaewon; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A; Casadesus, Gemma

    2010-02-01

    Declining levels of estrogen in women result in increases in gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH) through loss of feedback inhibition. LH, like estrogen, is modulated by hormone replacement therapy. However, the role of post-menopausal gonadotropin increases on cognition has not been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate that the down-regulation of ovariectomy-driven LH elevations using the gonadotropin releasing hormone super-analogue, leuprolide acetate, improves cognitive function in the Morris water maze and Y-maze tests in the absence of E2. Furthermore, our data suggest that these effects are independent of the modulation of estrogen receptors alpha and beta, or activation of CYP19 and StAR, associated with the production of endogenous E2. Importantly, pathways associated with improved cognition such as CaMKII and GluR1-Ser831 are up-regulated by leuprolide treatment but not by chronic long-term E2 replacement suggesting independent cognition-modulating properties. Our findings suggest that down-regulation of gonadotropins is as effective as E2 in modulating cognition but likely acts through different molecular mechanisms. These findings provide a potential novel protective strategy to treat menopause/age-related cognitive decline and/or prevent the development of AD.

  13. Gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, K.; Kitayama, S.; Nakano, R.

    1987-05-01

    Gonadotropin binding sites were localized by autoradiography after incubation of human ovarian sections with /sup 125/I-labeled gonadotropins. The binding sites for /sup 125/I-labeled human follicle-stimulating hormone (/sup 125/I-hFSH) were identified in the granulosa cells and in the newly formed corpora lutea. The /sup 125/I-labeled human luteinizing hormone (/sup 125/I-hLH) binding to the thecal cells increased during follicular maturation, and a dramatic increase was preferentially observed in the granulosa cells of the large preovulatory follicle. In the corpora lutea, the binding of /sup 125/I-hLH increased from the early luteal phase and decreased toward the late luteal phase. The changes in 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the corpora lutea corresponded to the /sup 125/I-hLH binding. Thus, the changes in gonadotropin binding sites in the follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle may help in some important way to regulate human ovarian function.

  14. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  15. Transitional Versus Surgical Menopause in a Rodent Model: Etiology of Ovarian Hormone Loss Impacts Memory and the Acetylcholine System

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Jazmin I.; Mayer, Loretta; Talboom, Joshua S.; Tsang, Candy Wing S.; Smith, Constance J.; Enders, Craig K.; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical research suggests that type of ovarian hormone loss at menopause influences cognition. Until recently ovariectomy (OVX) has been the primary rodent model to examine effects of ovarian hormone loss on cognition. This model limits evaluations to abrupt and complete ovarian hormone loss, modeling less than 13% of women who receive surgical menopause. The majority of women do not have their ovaries surgically removed and undergo transitional hormone loss via ovarian follicular depletion....

  16. Human chorionic gonadotropin β subunit affects the expression of apoptosis-regulating factors in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerba, Anna; Śliwa, Aleksandra; Kubiczak, Marta; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Jankowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Expression of human chorionic gonadotropin, especially its free β subunit (hCGβ) were shown to play an important role in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. It is postulated that hCGβ is one of the factors determining cancer cell survival. To test this hypothesis, we applied two models: an in vitro model of ovarian cancer using OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cell lines transfected with the CGB5 gene and an in vivo model of ovarian cancer tissues. The material was tested against changes in expression level of genes encoding factors involved in apoptosis: BCL2, BAX and BIRC5. Overexpression of hCGβ was found to cause a decrease in expression of the analyzed genes in the transfected cells compared with the control cells. In ovarian cancer tissues, high expression of CGB was related to significantly lower BCL2 but higher BAX and BIRC5 transcript levels. Moreover, a low BCL2/BAX ratio, characteristic of advanced stages of ovarian cancer, was revealed. Since tumors were discriminated by a significantly lower LHCGR level than the level noted in healthy fallopian tubes and ovaries, it may be stated that the effect of hCGβ on changes in the expression of apoptosis-regulating agents observed in ovarian cancer is LHCGR-independent. The results of the study suggest that the biological effects evoked by hCGβ are related to apoptosis suppression.

  17. A splicing variant of TERT identified by GWAS interacts with menopausal estrogen therapy in risk of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alice W; Bomkamp, Ashley; Bandera, Elisa V

    2016-01-01

    Menopausal estrogen-alone therapy (ET) is a well-established risk factor for serous and endometrioid ovarian cancer. Genetics also plays a role in ovarian cancer, which is partly attributable to 18 confirmed ovarian cancer susceptibility loci identified by genome-wide association studies. The int......Menopausal estrogen-alone therapy (ET) is a well-established risk factor for serous and endometrioid ovarian cancer. Genetics also plays a role in ovarian cancer, which is partly attributable to 18 confirmed ovarian cancer susceptibility loci identified by genome-wide association studies...

  18. Dynamics of the ovarian reserve and impact of genetic and epidemiological factors on age of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Emanuele; Simonsick, Eleanor; Forabosco, Antonino; Garcia-Ortiz, Jose Elias; Schlessinger, David

    2015-05-01

    The narrow standard age range of menopause, ∼50 yr, belies the complex balance of forces that govern the underlying formation and progressive loss of ovarian follicles (the "ovarian reserve" whose size determines the age of menopause). We show here the first quantitative graph of follicle numbers, distinguished from oocyte counts, across the reproductive lifespan, and review the current state of information about genetic and epidemiological risk factors in relation to possible preservation of reproductive capacity. In addition to structural X-chromosome changes, several genes involved in the process of follicle formation and/or maintenance are implicated in Mendelian inherited primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), with menopause before age 40. Furthermore, variants in a largely distinct cohort of reported genes-notably involved in pathways relevant to atresia, including DNA repair and cell death-have shown smaller but additive effects on the variation in timing of menopause in the normal range, early menopause (age menopause, equivalent to the summed effect of the top 17 genetic variants. The identified genetic and epidemiological factors underline the importance of early detection of reproductive problems to enhance possible interventions. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  19. Ovarian stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin and equine chorionic gonadotropin affects prostacyclin and its receptor expression in the porcine oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małysz-Cymborska, I; Andronowska, A

    2015-10-01

    Prostaglandins are well-known mediators of crucial events in the female reproductive tract, eg, early embryo development and implantation. Prostacyclin (PGI2) is the most synthesized prostaglandin in the human oviduct during the postovulatory period, indicating its important role in supporting and regulating the oviductal environment. The present study was undertaken to determine the influence of insemination and ovarian stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)/equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) on PGI2 synthesis in the porcine oviduct on day 3 post coitus. Mature gilts (n = 25) were assigned into 2 experiments. In experiment I, gilts were divided into cyclic (control; n = 5) and inseminated (control; n = 5) groups. In experiment II, there were 3 groups of animals: inseminated (n = 5), induced ovulation/inseminated (750 IU eCG, 500 IU hCG; n = 5), and superovulated/inseminated (1,500 IU eCG, 1,000 IU hCG; n = 5) gilts. Parts of oviducts (isthmus and ampulla) were collected 3 days after phosphate-buffered saline treatment (cyclic gilts of experiment I) or insemination (all other groups). Expression of messenger RNA for PGI2 synthase (PGIS) and its receptor (IP) was measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT PCR) and protein levels using Western blots. Concentrations of the PGI2 metabolite 6-keto PGF1α were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay and localization of PGIS and IP in the oviductal tissues using immunohistochemical staining. Insemination by itself increased PGIS protein levels in the oviductal isthmus (P < 0.05) and IP protein expression in the ampulla (P < 0.05). The concentration of 6-keto PGF1α increased significantly in the oviductal ampulla after insemination (P < 0.05). Induction of ovulation decreased IP protein levels in the oviductal ampulla (P < 0.05), whereas superovulation reduced IP levels in both parts of the oviduct (P < 0.01). Synthesis of 6-keto PGF1α was reduced by induction of ovulation

  20. Neonatal exposure to xenoestrogens impairs the ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Oscar E; Varayoud, Jorgelina; Rodríguez, Horacio A; Santamaría, Clarisa G; Bosquiazzo, Verónica L; Osti, Mario; Belmonte, Norberto M; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2015-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and diethylstilbestrol (DES) are xenoestrogens, which have been associated with altered effects on reproduction. We hypothesized that neonatal xenoestrogen exposure affects the ovarian functionality in lambs. Thus, we evaluated the ovarian response to exogenous ovine FSH (oFSH) administered from postnatal day 30 (PND30) to PND32 in female lambs previously exposed to low doses of DES or BPA (BPA50: 50 μg/kg per day, BPA0.5: 0.5 μg/kg per day) from PND1 to PND14. We determined: i) follicular growth, ii) circulating levels of 17β-estradiol (E2), iii) steroid receptors (estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta, and androgen receptor (AR)) and atresia, and iv) mRNA expression levels of the ovarian bone morphogenetic protein (BMPs) system (BMP6, BMP15, BMPR1B, and GDF9) and FSH receptor (FSHR). Lambs neonatally exposed to DES or BPA showed an impaired ovarian response to oFSH with a lower number of follicles ≥2 mm in diameter together with a lower number of atretic follicles and no increase in E2 serum levels in response to oFSH treatment. In addition, AR induction by oFSH was disrupted in granulosa and theca cells of lambs exposed to DES or BPA. An increase in GDF9 mRNA expression levels was observed in oFSH-primed lambs previously treated with DES or BPA50. In contrast, a decrease in BMPR1B was observed in BPA0.5-postnatally exposed lambs. The modifications in AR, GDF9, and BMPR1B may be associated with the altered ovarian function due to neonatal xenoestrogen exposure in response to an exogenous gonadotropin stimulus. These alterations may be the pathophysiological basis of subfertility syndrome in adulthood. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  1. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol--the protocol of choice for the polycystic ovary syndrome patient undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Homburg, Roy; Alsbjerg, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients are prone to develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a condition which can be minimized or completely eliminated by the use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger. In this commentary paper, we maintain that the gonadotropin...

  2. Large twisted ovarian fibroma in menopausal women: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovarian fibroma is the most common benign solid tumors of the ovary, commonly misdiagnosed as uterine fibromaor as malignant ovarian tumors. It occurs generally in older perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Occasionally large fibromas may undergo torsion causing acute abdominal pain. Doppler ...

  3. Cryopreservation and transplantation of ovarian tissue exclusively to postpone menopause: technically possible but endocrinologically doubtful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wolff, Michael; Stute, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Transplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissue has been shown to induce pregnancies and puberty successfully. Therefore, using cryopreserved ovarian tissue to postpone menopause (tissue hormone therapy [THT]) seems to be an interesting option to avoid conventional menopause hormone therapy (MHT). Pregnancy induction and replacing MHT by THT, however, are completely different topics as different requirements need to be met. First, MHT requires long-lasting and continuous hormone production. It still needs to be proven if the transplanted tissue is active for at least 5 years with a continuous follicle growth to avoid phases with low oestrogen production, which would otherwise cause menopausal symptoms and could reduce the postulated benefit for women's health. Second, the advantage of a physiological hormone production over a non-physiological MHT is still hypothetical. Third, women who have undergone hysterectomies who do not need progesterone for endometrial protection would only require oestrogens, imposing more health benefits (cardiovascular system, mammary gland) than oestrogen and progesterone production or replacement. Therefore, transplanting ovarian tissue exclusively to postpone menopause is endocrinologically doubtful and should only be carried out within clinical trials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Ovarian reaction and estrus manifestation in delayed puberty gilts after treatment with equine chorionic gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stančić, Ivan B; Bošnjak, Darko V; Radović, Ivan B; Stančić, Blagoje L; Harvey, Roger B; Anderson, Robin C

    2012-08-22

    Prolonged pre-insemination anestrus (i.e. delayed puberty) is a major contributing factor for culling up to 30% of the replacement gilts at large breeding farm units in Vojvodina. It is imperative to determine if these gilts are acyclic (prepubertal) or cyclic, but just fail to exhibit behavioural estrus. Recent investigations demonstrate that treatment with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) can increase the diestrous phase duration in sexually mature gilts. Based on these finding, the aim of the present studies was to determine the reproductive status of delayed puberty gilts following injection with eCG. Two experiments were conducted on a swine breeding farm in Vojvodina. In Exp. 1, 20 prepubertal (acyclic) gilts, and 120 sexually mature (cyclic) gilts were injected with a single injection of 400  IU eCG + 200 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or with 1000  IU eCG (cyclic gilts), at d5, d11 or d17 after spontaneous estrus detection, to determine their ovarian reaction and induced estrus manifestation. In Exp. 2, sixty delayed puberty gilts (estrus not detected until 8 month of age, av. 258 days) were culled from breeding herd and slaughtered to determine their reproductive status based on ovarian anatomical features. The second group of gilts (n = 60) was treated with a single 1000  IU eCG injection to determine their reproductive status, based on the interval between eCG injection to estrus detection and duration. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance and Duncan's test in the software package Statistics 10th. Ovulations were induced in 90% of acyclic (sexually immature) and, on average, 93.3% of cyclic (sexually mature) gilts after the eCG injection. On average, 4 days after the eCG injection, estrus was detected in 85% of the treated acyclic (sexually immature) gilts and in 95% (19/20) of the cyclic (sexually mature) gilts, treated with eCG on day 17 after spontaneous estrus detection. The

  5. Ovarian reaction and estrus manifestation in delayed puberty gilts after treatment with equine chorionic gonadotropin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Ivan B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged pre-insemination anestrus (i.e. delayed puberty is a major contributing factor for culling up to 30% of the replacement gilts at large breeding farm units in Vojvodina. It is imperative to determine if these gilts are acyclic (prepubertal or cyclic, but just fail to exhibit behavioural estrus. Recent investigations demonstrate that treatment with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG can increase the diestrous phase duration in sexually mature gilts. Based on these finding, the aim of the present studies was to determine the reproductive status of delayed puberty gilts following injection with eCG. Methods Two experiments were conducted on a swine breeding farm in Vojvodina. In Exp. 1, 20 prepubertal (acyclic gilts, and 120 sexually mature (cyclic gilts were injected with a single injection of 400 IU eCG + 200 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG or with 1000 IU eCG (cyclic gilts, at d5, d11 or d17 after spontaneous estrus detection, to determine their ovarian reaction and induced estrus manifestation. In Exp. 2, sixty delayed puberty gilts (estrus not detected until 8 month of age, av. 258 days were culled from breeding herd and slaughtered to determine their reproductive status based on ovarian anatomical features. The second group of gilts (n = 60 was treated with a single 1000 IU eCG injection to determine their reproductive status, based on the interval between eCG injection to estrus detection and duration. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance and Duncan’s test in the software package Statistics 10th. Results Ovulations were induced in 90% of acyclic (sexually immature and, on average, 93.3% of cyclic (sexually mature gilts after the eCG injection. On average, 4 days after the eCG injection, estrus was detected in 85% of the treated acyclic (sexually immature gilts and in 95% (19/20 of the cyclic (sexually mature gilts, treated with eCG on day 17

  6. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood clots, you have liver disease. In some women, Menopause Hormone Therapy may increase risks of serious side effects including blood clots, heart attacks, strokes, breast cancer, and gall bladder disease. Menopause Hormone Therapy should ...

  7. Ovarian response to pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and porcine pituitary extract in gilts actively immunized against gonadotropin releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbenshade, K L

    1987-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of exogenous gonadotropins on follicular development in gilts actively immunized against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Four gilts, which had become acyclic after immunization against GnRH, and four control gilts were given 1,000 IU pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG), while four additional control gilts were given saline. Control animals were prepuberal crossbred gilts averaging 100 kg body weight. Control gilts given saline had ovaries containing antral follicles (4 to 6 mm in diameter). Control gilts given PMSG exhibited estrus and their ovaries contained corpora hemorrhagica and corpora lutea. PMSG failed to stimulate follicular growth in gilts immunized against GnRH, and ovaries contained regressed corpora albicantia and small antral follicles (less than 1 mm in diameter). Concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol-17 beta (E2) were non-detectable in gilts immunized against GnRH and given PMSG. In the second experiment, five gilts actively immunized against GnRH were given increasing doses of PMSG every third day until unilateral ovariectomy on d 50. PMSG failed to stimulate follicular growth, and concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), E2 and LH were not detectable. Six weeks later, gilts were given a booster immunization and then were given 112 micrograms LH and 15 micrograms FSH intravenously every 6 h for 9 d. The remaining ovary was removed on d 10. Although LH and FSH concentrations were elevated, administration of gonadotropins did not stimulate follicular growth or increase E2 concentrations. These results indicate that neither PMSG or exogenous LH and FSH can induce E2 synthesis or sustain follicular development in gilts actively immunized against GnRH.

  8. Recovery of ovarian function after postradiation menopause. Do FSH levels have a definitive prognostic value?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letur-Konirsch, H.; Guis, F.

    1996-01-01

    Menopause, conventionally defined as the permanent cessation as a result of loss of ovarian follicular activity, is biologically expressed by the collapse of plasma levels and increased plasma levels of the gonadotrophins FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) and LH (luteinizing hormone). At present, estimation of the ovarian follicle reserve is based on endocrine capacity tests of the ovaries, with increased FSH representing the first sign of exocrine ovarian failure. We report the case of one of our amenorrhoeic patients after chemotherapy, total body radiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute immuno-blastic leukaemia. This patient was included in an in vitro fertilization with oocyte donation (IVF-OD) programme for iatrogenic premature ovarian failure with increased FSH levels. Instead of high levels of gonadotrophins, this young woman recovered spontaneous follicular developments, benefited from standard IVF with her own oocytes and brought a twin pregnancy to term. This observation shows that a high FSH level is not a definitive prediction of ovarian exocrine capacity. In young women of child-bearing age such as these wanting a child and showing signs of endogenous estrogen impregnation, evaluation of the existence and quality of follicular development is an important factor. (author)

  9. Cognitive Changes Across the Menopause Transition: A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Impact of Age and Ovarian Status on Spatial Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebele, Stephanie V.; Mennenga, Sarah E.; Hiroi, Ryoko; Quihuis, Alicia M.; Hewitt, Lauren T.; Poisson, Mallori L.; George, Christina; Mayer, Loretta P.; Dyer, Cheryl A.; Aiken, Leona S.; Demers, Laurence M.; Carson, Catherine; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive changes that occur during mid-life and beyond are linked to both aging and the menopause transition. Studies in women suggest that the age at menopause onset can impact cognitive status later in life; yet, little is known about memory changes that occur during the transitional period to the post-menopausal state. The 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) model simulates transitional menopause in rodents by depleting the immature ovarian follicle reserve and allowing animals to retain their follicle-deplete ovarian tissue, resulting in a profile similar to the majority of perimenopausal women. Here, Vehicle or VCD treatment was administered to ovary-intact adult and middle-aged Fischer-344 rats to assess the trajectory of cognitive change across time with normal aging and aging with transitional menopause via VCD-induced follicular depletion, as well as to evaluate whether age at the onset of follicular depletion plays a role in cognitive outcomes. Animals experiencing the onset of menopause at a younger age exhibited impaired spatial memory early in the transition to a follicle-deplete state. Additionally, at the mid- and post- follicular depletion time points, VCD-induced follicular depletion amplified an age effect on memory. Overall, these findings suggest that the age at the onset of menopause is a critical parameter to consider when evaluating learning and memory across the transition to reproductive senescence. From a translational perspective, this study illustrates how age at menopause onset might impact cognition in menopausal women, and provides insight into time points to explore for the window of opportunity for hormone therapy during the menopause transition period. Hormone therapy during this critical juncture might be especially efficacious at attenuating age- and menopause- related cognitive decline, producing healthy brain aging profiles in women who retain their ovaries throughout their lifespan. PMID:27793768

  10. Cognitive changes across the menopause transition: A longitudinal evaluation of the impact of age and ovarian status on spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebele, Stephanie V; Mennenga, Sarah E; Hiroi, Ryoko; Quihuis, Alicia M; Hewitt, Lauren T; Poisson, Mallori L; George, Christina; Mayer, Loretta P; Dyer, Cheryl A; Aiken, Leona S; Demers, Laurence M; Carson, Catherine; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive changes that occur during mid-life and beyond are linked to both aging and the menopause transition. Studies in women suggest that the age at menopause onset can impact cognitive status later in life; yet, little is known about memory changes that occur during the transitional period to the postmenopausal state. The 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) model simulates transitional menopause in rodents by depleting the immature ovarian follicle reserve and allowing animals to retain their follicle-deplete ovarian tissue, resulting in a profile similar to the majority of perimenopausal women. Here, Vehicle or VCD treatment was administered to ovary-intact adult and middle-aged Fischer-344 rats to assess the trajectory of cognitive change across time with normal aging and aging with transitional menopause via VCD-induced follicular depletion, as well as to evaluate whether age at the onset of follicular depletion plays a role in cognitive outcomes. Animals experiencing the onset of menopause at a younger age exhibited impaired spatial memory early in the transition to a follicle-deplete state. Additionally, at the mid- and post- follicular depletion time points, VCD-induced follicular depletion amplified an age effect on memory. Overall, these findings suggest that age at the onset of menopause is a critical parameter to consider when evaluating learning and memory across the transition to reproductive senescence. From a translational perspective, this study illustrates how age at menopause onset might impact cognition in menopausal women, and provides insight into time points to explore for the window of opportunity for hormone therapy during the menopause transition period. Hormone therapy during this critical juncture might be especially efficacious at attenuating age- and menopause- related cognitive decline, producing healthy brain aging profiles in women who retain their ovaries throughout their lifespan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Genetic variants of age at menopause are not related to timing of ovarian failure in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Michael V; Charo, Lindsey M; Natarajan, Loki; Haunschild, Carolyn; Chung, Karine; Mao, Jun J; DeMichele, Angela M; Su, H Irene

    2017-06-01

    To determine if interindividual genetic variation in single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to age at natural menopause is associated with risk of ovarian failure in breast cancer survivors. A prospective cohort of 169 premenopausal breast cancer survivors recruited at diagnosis with stages 0 to III disease were followed longitudinally for menstrual pattern via self-reported daily menstrual diaries. Participants were genotyped for 13 SNPs previously found to be associated with age at natural menopause: EXO1, TLK1, HELQ, UIMC1, PRIM1, POLG, TMEM224, BRSK1, and MCM8. A risk variable summed the total number of risk alleles in each participant. The association between individual genotypes, and also the risk variable, and time to ovarian failure (>12 months of amenorrhea) was tested using time-to-event methods. Median age at enrollment was 40.5 years (range 20.6-46.1). The majority of participants were white (69%) and underwent chemotherapy (76%). Thirty-eight participants (22%) experienced ovarian failure. None of the candidate SNPs or the summary risk variable was significantly associated with time to ovarian failure. Sensitivity analysis restricted to whites or only to participants receiving chemotherapy yielded similar findings. Older age, chemotherapy exposure, and lower body mass index were related to shorter time to ovarian failure. Thirteen previously identified genetic variants associated with time to natural menopause were not related to timing of ovarian failure in breast cancer survivors.

  12. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premature menopause; Ovarian insufficiency - cancer ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  13. Symptomatic ovarian steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified in a post-menopausal woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Sood

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified (NOS is a rare subtype of sex cord stromal tumor of the ovary and contributes less than 0.1% of all ovarian neoplasms. The majority of tumors occur in pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43 years, in which 56-77% of patients present with virilization due to excess testosterone. An 80-year-old woman with worsening alopecia and excessive growth of coarse hair on abdomen and genital area was found to have elevated serum testosterone level (462 ng/mL. Radiologic studies were consistent with bilateral adrenal adenomas. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling ruled out the adrenal gland as origin of hormone secretion. A diagnostic and therapeutic bilateral salpingooophorectomy confirmed steroid cell tumor NOS of the left ovary. Post-operatively, the patient had complete resolution of her symptoms and normalization of testosterone level. Our case emphasizes the importance of a clinical suspicion for an occult testosterone secreting ovarian tumor in a symptomatic patient without obvious ovarian mass on imaging.

  14. Rate and Time of Ovarian Function Restoration in Menopausal Breast Cancer Patients Who Received Letrozole Following Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapour Omidvari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study aimed to investigate the rate and time of ovarian function restoration in breast cancer patients between 40 and 60 years of age who were in menopause (biochemically documented and received letrozole after chemotherapy. We intended to further clarify the management strategy for breast cancer patients with different menopausal status. Methods: We prospectively measured the effects of replacing tamoxifen with letrozole on ovarian function recovery in 90 women from two age groups (40-50 and 51-60 years. All had breast cancer and were treated by chemotherapy. Patients had laboratory documentation of menopause (FSH >40 mIU/ml and estradiol <20 pg/mL. Patients did not have menstruation for at least one year. Study patients received letrozole. At three month intervals, we checked their FSH and estradiol levels. Results:At three months after beginning letrozole, 12 patients in the younger age group had laboratory ovarian function restoration, among which three had vaginal bleeding. In the older group, 8 patients had increased estradiol levels; however, there was no evidence of vaginal bleeding in this group. At 6, 9 and 12 months, no ovarian function restoration was seen in the older group. However in younger patients, 4 had laboratory evidence of ovarian function restoration at 6 months, 2 at 9 months and 1 patient showed laboratory ovarian function restoration at 12 months of follow-up. Totally, there was a significant difference in the occurrence of ovarian function restoration between the two groups (P=0.03. Conclusion: A remarkable portion of women with chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea may develop ovarian function restoration. Therefore, endocrine therapy using aromatase inhibitors in patients with chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea should be followed by a regular hormonal study.

  15. Triggering ovulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist versus human chorionic gonadotropin in polycystic ovarian syndrome. A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Hassaan Farag

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare GnRH agonist to hCG for triggering ovulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome treated with clomiphene citrate. Study design: Prospective randomized study. Materials & methods: Eighty five infertile women with PCOS participated in a randomized allocation concealed prospective trial and had induction of ovulation with clomiphene citrate. GnRH agonist 0.2 mg subcutaneously (group 1 or hCG 10,000 IU intramuscularly (group 2 was given to trigger ovulation. Primary outcome was mid-luteal serum progesterone, while secondary outcomes were ovulation rates and clinical pregnancy rates along 3 cycles. Results: No difference was found between group 1 and group 2 regarding mean serum progesterone and clinical pregnancy rates in each cycle. Cumulative pregnancy rates were similar (17.14% versus 20% respectively; P = 0.332. Ovulation rates were 80% versus 68.6% (P = 0.413; 94.3% versus 90.9% (P = 0.669; 97.1% versus 93.7% (P = 0.603 in the two groups respectively. However, a significant rise in number of patients with mid-luteal serum progesterone >10 ng/mL was noted in the 3rd cycle between both groups, (P < 0.0001 for group 1 while P = 0.007 for group 2. Conclusion: Triggering ovulation with GnRH-a after treatment with clomiphene citrate in PCOS, in view of its known protective effect against OHSS, may be an effective physiological alternative to conventional hCG without compromising luteal function and pregnancy rates after repeated cycles of treatment.

  16. Management of sexuality, intimacy, and menopause symptoms in patients with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Margaret; Black, Jonathan; Altwerger, Gary; Menderes, Gulden; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Ratner, Elena

    2017-10-01

    Issues of sexuality, intimacy, and early menopause significantly impact the quality of life of patients following the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. These are undertreated problems. Successful treatment requires the provider's awareness of the problem, ability to identify it, and willingness to treat it. Unfortunately many providers do not address these issues in the pretreatment or perioperative period. Furthermore, patients do not often alert their providers to their symptoms. While systemic hormone therapy may improve many of the issues, they are not appropriate for all patients given their action on estrogen receptors. However, other nonhormonal treatments exist including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antiepileptics, natural remedies, and pelvic floor physical therapy. In addition psychological care and the involvement of the partner can be helpful in managing the sexual health concerns of these patients. At the time of diagnosis or at initial consultation, women should be informed of the potential physiologic, hormonal, and psychosocial effects of ovarian cancer on sexuality and that there is a multimodal approach to dealing with symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of human chorionic gonadotropin combined with clomiphene on Serum E2, FSH, LH and PRL levels in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonggang, Huang; Xiaosheng, Lu; Zhaoxia, Huang; Yilu, Chen; Jiqiang, Lv; Huina, Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Effects of human chorionic gonadotropin combined with clomiphene on serum E 2 , FSH, LH and PRL levels in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome were analyzed. 90 patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome treated from January 2015 to March 2016 were randomly and evenly divided into control group and observation group. Patients in the control group were only treated with clomiphene. On the basis of the treatment in control group, human chorionic gonadotropin was added in the treatment of observation group. The changes of E 2 , FSH, LH, PRL levels were compared between two groups before and after the treatment. Clinical curative effects of patients in the two groups was evaluated. Adverse reactions during treatment in two groups were observed and recorded. The incidence of adverse reactions was calculated. Serum E 2 , FSH, LH and PRL levels in the two groups decreased significantly after treatment compared with that before treatment. The difference is statistical significant ( P   0.05). Combined use of human chorionic gonadotropin can significantly reduce serum E 2 , FSH, LH and PRL levels, improve clinical curative effects and reduce the incidence of adverse reactions. Human chorionic gonadotropin has high application value on the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.

  18. Comparison between pulsatile GnRH therapy and gonadotropins for ovulation induction in women with both functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and polycystic ovarian morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Agathe; Dewailly, Didier; Plouvier, Pauline; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Robin, Geoffroy

    2016-12-01

    Ovulation induction in patients having both functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) and polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) has been less studied in the literature. As results remain contradictory, no recommendations have yet been established. To compare pulsatile GnRH therapy versus gonadotropins for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients and to determine if one treatment strikes as superior to the other. A 12-year retrospective study, comparing 55 "FHA-PCOM" patients, treated either with GnRH therapy (38 patients, 93 cycles) or with gonadotropins (17 patients, 53 cycles). Both groups were similar, defined by low serum LH and E2 levels, low BMI, excessive follicle number per ovary and/or high serum AMH level. Ovulation rates were significantly lower with gonadotropins (56.6% versus 78.6%, p = 0.005), with more cancellation and ovarian hyper-responses (14% versus 34% per initiated cycle, p < 0.005). Pregnancy rates were significantly higher with GnRH therapy, whether per initiated cycle (26.9% versus 7.6%, p = 0.005) or per patient (65.8% versus 23.5%, p = 0.007). In our study, GnRH therapy was more successful and safer than gonadotropins, for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients. If results were confirmed by prospective studies, it could become a first-line treatment for this population, just as it is for FHA women without PCOM.

  19. Ultrastructural Changes of Corpus Luteum after Ovarian Stimulation at Implantation Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beigi Boroujeni, M.; Beigi Boroujeni, N.; Salehnia, M.; Marandi, E.; Biegi Boroujeni, M.

    2012-01-01

    To achieve multiple oocytes for in vitro fertilization, ovulation induction is induced by gonadotropins; however, it has several effects on oocytes and embryo quality and endometrium receptivity. The aim of this study was to assess ultrastructural changes of corpus luteum after ovarian induction using human menopausal gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin during luteal phase at implantation period. Methods: Female NMRI mice (6-8 weeks) were divided into control and stimulated groups. In the control group, the mice were rendered pseudo pregnant and in the ovarian induction group, the mice were rendered pseudo pregnant after the ovarian induction. The samples were obtained from the ovary in each group at the same time during luteal phase at implantation period. Ultrastructural changes were assessed using electron microscopy study. Results: Our results displayed some identifiable changes in ultrastructure of corpus luteum in ovarian induction group. These changes included enhancement of the apoptosis and intercellular space, whereas the angio genesis was decreased. The findings indicated a decline in organelle density in the cytoplasm of ovarian induction, such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and polyribosome. Furthermore, chromatin condensation of nuclei was observed in some cells. Conclusion: The ovarian induction using human menopausal gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin resulted in some ultrastructural changes on the corpus luteum at implantation period, which could affect on the pregnancy rate.

  20. Can we predict age at natural menopause using ovarian reserve tests or mother's age at menopause? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depmann, Martine; Broer, Simone L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Tehrani, Fahimeh R; Eijkemans, Marinus J; Mol, Ben W; Broekmans, Frank J

    2016-02-01

    This review aimed to appraise data on prediction of age at natural menopause (ANM) based on antimüllerian hormone (AMH), antral follicle count (AFC), and mother's ANM to evaluate clinical usefulness and to identify directions for further research. We conducted three systematic reviews of the literature to identify studies of menopause prediction based on AMH, AFC, or mother's ANM, corrected for baseline age. Six studies selected in the search for AMH all consistently demonstrated AMH as being capable of predicting ANM (hazard ratio, 5.6-9.2). The sole study reporting on mother's ANM indicated that AMH was capable of predicting ANM (hazard ratio, 9.1-9.3). Two studies provided analyses of AFC and yielded conflicting results, making this marker less strong. AMH is currently the most promising marker for ANM prediction. The predictive capacity of mother's ANM demonstrated in a single study makes this marker a promising contributor to AMH for menopause prediction. Models, however, do not predict the extremes of menopause age very well and have wide prediction interval. These markers clearly need improvement before they can be used for individual prediction of menopause in the clinical setting. Moreover, potential limitations for such use include variations in AMH assays used and a lack of correction for factors or diseases affecting AMH levels or ANM. Future studies should include women of a broad age range (irrespective of cycle regularity) and should base predictions on repeated AMH measurements. Furthermore, currently unknown candidate predictors need to be identified.

  1. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Treatment in Postmenopausal Women with Hyperandrogenism of Ovarian Origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, Esther S.; van Beek, Andre P.; Verburg, Frederik A. J.; Roos, Annemieke; Land, Jolande A.

    Context: The most frequent cause of virilization in postmenopausal women is excessive androgen production of ovarian origin. Bilateral oophorectomy is usually performed, even in cases of benign tumors or hyperthecosis. This is the first report of a case series of long-term GnRH-agonist treatment of

  2. Ovarian imaging by the binding of radioiodinated chorionic gonadotropin: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.Y.; Lee, S.L.; Loken, M.K.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of specific, high-affinity receptors for human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in human and rat ovaries. In the present study, highly purified HCG was labeled with iodine-131 and used for the imaging of luteinized rat ovaries. Excellent images were obtained. The accumulation of radioactivity in the ovaries was completely inhibited by previous administration of excess unlabeled HCG. Time-course studies show that radioiodinated HCG was rapidly accumulated within 1 hr and largely cleared from the ovary at 24 hr. These results show the potential for imaging of endocrine target tissues by hormone-receptor binding, and the possibility of quantitation of hormone receptors in tissues under pathological conditions

  3. Cardiovascular Autonomic Responses in the VCD Rat Model of Menopause: Effects of Short- and Long-Term Ovarian Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Domitila A; Bazilio, Darlan; Lorenzon, Flaviano; Sehnem, Sibele; Pacheco, Lucas; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Lima, Fernanda B

    2017-01-01

    After menopause, hypertension elevates the risk of cardiac diseases, one of the major causes of women's morbidity. The gradual depletion of ovarian follicles in rats, induced by 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), is a model for studying the physiology of menopause. 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide treatment leads to early ovarian failure (OF) and a hormonal profile comparable to menopause in humans. We have hypothesized that OF can compromise the balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic tones of the cardiovascular system, shifting toward dominance of the former. We aimed to study the autonomic modulation of heart and blood vessels and the cardiovascular reflexes in rats presenting short-term (80 days) or long-term (180 days) OF induced by VCD. Twenty-eight-day-old Wistar rats were submitted to VCD treatment (160 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or vehicle (control) for 15 consecutive days and experiments were conducted at 80 or 180 days after the onset of treatment. Long-term OF led to an increase in the sympathetic activity to blood vessels and an impairment in the baroreflex control of the heart, evoked by physiological changes in arterial pressure. Despite that, long-term OF did not cause hypertension during the 180 days of exposure. Short-term OF did not cause any deleterious effect on the cardiovascular parameters analyzed. These data indicate that long-term OF does not disrupt the maintenance of arterial pressure homeostasis in rats but worsens the autonomic cardiovascular control. In turn, this can lead to cardiovascular complications, especially when associated with the aging process seen during human menopause.

  4. Clinical and hormonal effects of chronic gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment in polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingold, K; De Ziegler, D; Cedars, M; Meldrum, D R; Lu, J K; Judd, H L; Chang, R J

    1987-10-01

    Previously, we reported that short term administration of a highly potent GnRH agonist (GnRHa) for 1 month to patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) resulted in complete suppression of ovarian steroidogenesis without measurable effects on adrenal steroid production. This new study was designed to evaluate the effects of long term GnRHa administration in PCO patients with respect to their hormone secretion patterns and clinical responses. Eight PCO patients and 10 ovulatory women with endometriosis were treated daily with sc injections of [D-His6-(imBzl]),Pro9-NEt]GnRH (GnRHa; 100 micrograms) for 6 months. Their results were compared to hormone values in 8 women who had undergone bilateral oophorectomies. In response to GnRHa, PCO and ovulatory women had rises of serum LH at 1 month, after which it gradually declined to baseline. In both groups FSH secretion was suppressed throughout treatment. Serum estradiol, estrone, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone levels markedly decreased to values found in oophorectomized women by 1 month and remained low thereafter. In contrast, serum pregnenolone and 17-hydroxypregnenolone were partially suppressed, and dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and cortisol levels did not change. Clinically, hyperplastic endometrial histology in three PCO patients reverted to an inactive pattern, and proliferative endometrium in two other PCO patients became inactive in one and did not change in the other. Regression of proliferative endometrial histology occurred in all ovulatory women. Vaginal bleeding occurred in all women studied during the first month of GnRHa administration, after which all but one PCO patient became amenorrheic. Hot flashes were noted by all ovulatory women and by four of eight PCO patients. All PCO patients noted subjective reduction of skin oiliness, and five had decreased hair growth. We conclude that in premenopausal women: 1) chronic Gn

  5. Gene variants associated with age at menopause are also associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, gonadotrophins and ovarian volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R; Bjonnes, A C; Georgopoulos, N A; Koika, V; Panidis, D; Welt, C K

    2015-07-01

    Is there a relationship between the genetic risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and genetic variants that influence timing of menopause? The genetic risk score, which sums the contribution of variants at all menopause loci, was associated with PCOS. Ovarian parameters and anti-Mullerian hormone levels suggest that women with PCOS should have a later age at menopause. The study was a case-control examination of genetic variants associated with age at menopause in a discovery cohort of women with PCOS (n = 485) and controls (n = 407) from Boston recruited from 2003 to 2012. Replication was performed in women from Greece (cases, n = 884 and controls, n = 311). PCOS was defined by the National Institutes of Health criteria in Boston and Greece (n = 783), with additional subjects fulfilling the Rotterdam criteria (hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovary morphology and regular menses) in Greece (n = 101). Controls in Boston and Greece had regular menstrual cycles and no hyperandrogenism. Allele frequencies for variants previously associated with age at menopause were examined in PCOS cases and controls, along with the relationship to quantitative traits. The variant rs11668344-G was associated with decreased risk of PCOS (odds ratio: 0.77 [0.59-0.93]; P = 0.004). There was a strong relationship between the late menopause allele rs12294104-T and increased LH levels (β ± SE; 0.26 ± 0.06; P = 5.2 × 10(-5)) and the LH:FSH ratio (0.28 ± 0.06; P = 2.7 × 10(-6)). The minor allele at rs10852344-T was associated with smaller ovarian volume (-0.16 ± 0.05; P = 0.0012). A genetic risk score calculated from 16 independent variants associated with age at menopause was also associated with PCOS (P menopause are also associated with risk for PCOS. Further, our data suggest that the relationship between age at menopause and PCOS may be explained, at least in part, by effects on LH levels and follicle number. The data point to opposing influences of the genetic variants on both

  6. Enhancement of a robust arcuate GABAergic input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in a model of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Aleisha M; Prescott, Mel; Marshall, Christopher J; Yip, Siew Hoong; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2015-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), the leading cause of female infertility, is associated with an increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency, implicating abnormal steroid hormone feedback to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. This study investigated whether modifications in the synaptically connected neuronal network of GnRH neurons could account for this pathology. The PCOS phenotype was induced in mice following prenatal androgen (PNA) exposure. Serial blood sampling confirmed that PNA elicits increased LH pulse frequency and impaired progesterone negative feedback in adult females, mimicking the neuroendocrine abnormalities of the clinical syndrome. Imaging of GnRH neurons revealed greater dendritic spine density that correlated with increased putative GABAergic but not glutamatergic inputs in PNA mice. Mapping of steroid hormone receptor expression revealed that PNA mice had 59% fewer progesterone receptor-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARN). To address whether increased GABA innervation to GnRH neurons originates in the ARN, a viral-mediated Cre-lox approach was taken to trace the projections of ARN GABA neurons in vivo. Remarkably, projections from ARN GABAergic neurons heavily contacted and even bundled with GnRH neuron dendrites, and the density of fibers apposing GnRH neurons was even greater in PNA mice (56%). Additionally, this ARN GABA population showed significantly less colocalization with progesterone receptor in PNA animals compared with controls. Together, these data describe a robust GABAergic circuit originating in the ARN that is enhanced in a model of PCOS and may underpin the neuroendocrine pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  7. RISK OF LONG TERM HOT FLASHES AFTER NATURAL MENOPAUSE: EVIDENCE FROM THE PENN OVARIAN AGING COHORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.; Sanders, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and evaluate associations of hormone levels, behavioral and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes following menopause. Methods Annual assessments of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause during 16 years of follow-up. Results The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first two years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly following menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after FMP. The mean duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after FMP was 4.6 (SD2.9) years (4.9, SD3.1 years for any hot flashes). One-third of women at 10 or more years following menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African American women (obese and non-obese) and obese white women had significantly greater risk of hot flashes compared to non-obese white women (interaction P=0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing FSH levels before FMP (Pmenopause; more than one- third of women observed for 10 or more years following menopause had moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years following menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risk/benefit when selecting hormone or non-hormonal therapy for menopausal symptoms. PMID:24473530

  8. Characterization of neural estrogen signaling and neurotrophic changes in the accelerated ovarian failure mouse model of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Gorecka, Jolanta; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Soeda, Fumio; Milner, Teresa A; Waters, Elizabeth M

    2014-09-01

    Accelerated ovarian failure (AOF) can be induced in young mice with low doses of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), modeling the hormone changes observed across menopause. We assessed markers of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, anxiety-like behavior, and spatial learning longitudinally at 4 time points across the AOF model: premenopause, early perimenopause, late perimenopause, and postmenopause (POST). As others have shown, VCD administration decreased ovarian follicle counts and increased acyclicity as the model progressed to POST but with no impact on organ or body weights. The morphology of Iba1 immunoreactive microglia did not differ between vehicle- and VCD-administered mice. Hippocampal postsynaptic density 95 levels were minimally altered across the AOF model but decreased at POST in CA3b 24 hours after exogenous estradiol benzoate (EB). In contrast, hippocampal phosphorylated AKT levels transiently decreased in premenopause but increased at POST after 24 hours of EB in select subregions. Electron microscopy revealed fewer estrogen receptor α containing dendritic spines and terminals in CA1 stratum radiatum at POST. mRNA levels of most brain-derived neurotrophic factor exons (except V and VI) were lower in POST compared with ovariectomized mice. Exon V was sensitive to 24 hours of EB administration in POST-VCD. Anxiety-like behavior was unaffected at any menopause phase. Spatial learning was unaffected in all groups, but POST-VCD mice performed below chance. Our results suggest that the AOF model is suitable for longitudinal studies of neurobiological changes across the menopause transition in mice. Our findings also point to complex interactions between estrogen receptors and pathways involved in synaptic plasticity.

  9. Dexamethasone as a Supplement for Exogenous Gonadotropin to Improve Ovarian Response of Women over 35 Years Undergoing IVF/ICSI Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ashrafi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With aging, the ovarian reserve is decreased and that is a major contributor to poor ovarian response to exogenous gonadotropins. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the role of Dexamethasone on ovarian response in infertile patients aged over 35 years undergoing IVF/ICSI cycles.Materials and Methods: In this triple blind placbo-control clinical trial study, a total of 72 infertile women over age 35, undergoing IVF/ICSI cycles, referred to Royan Institute from May 2000 to May 2002 were selected. Dexamethasone co-treatment (1mg/d was started on the 21st of their preceding menstrual cycle and it was continued until oocyte aspiration. The main outcome measures were number of retrieved oocytes, number of fertilized and transferred embryos, number of used HMG, serum E2 level on HCG injection day, and pregnancy rate.Results: There was no significant statistical difference in age, duration of infertility, Body mass index, hormonal tests, number of retrieved oocytes and transferred embryos. However, the number of used HMG was significantly lower in Dexamethasone group compared to placebo group (30.6±13.39 versus 41.64 ± 18.34 (p<0.05.Conclusion: The addition of dexamethasone 1mg/d to standard long protocol decreased the number of HMG used in patients over 35 years who hold known risk of low ovarian response.

  10. [Fertility preservation, contraception and menopause hormone therapy in women treated for rare ovarian tumors: Guidelines from the French national network dedicated to rare gynaecological cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset-Jablonski, Christine; Selle, Fréderic; Adda-Herzog, Elodie; Planchamp, François; Selleret, Lise; Pomel, Christophe; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Daraï, Emile; Pautier, Patricia; Trémollières, Florence; Guyon, Frederic; Rouzier, Roman; Laurence, Valérie; Chopin, Nicolas; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Bentivegna, Enrica; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Lhomme, Catherine; Floquet, Anne; Treilleux, Isabelle; Lecuru, Fabrice; Gouy, Sébastien; Kalbacher, Elsa; Genestie, Catherine; de la Motte Rouge, Thibault; Ferron, Gwenael; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Namer, Moise; Joly, Florence; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Grynberg, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Morice, Philippe; Gompel, Anne; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2018-03-01

    Rare ovarian tumors include complex borderline ovarian tumors, sex-cord tumors, germ cell tumors, and rare epithelial tumors. Indications and modalities of fertility preservation, infertility management and contraindications for hormonal contraception or menopause hormone therapy are frequent issues in clinical practice. A panel of experts from the French national network dedicated to rare gynaecological cancers, and of experts in reproductive medicine and gynaecology have worked on guidelines about fertility preservation, contraception and menopause hormone therapy in women treated for ovarian rare tumors. A panel of 39 experts from different specialties contributed to the preparation of the guidelines, following the DELPHI method (formal consensus method). Statements were drafted after a systematic literature review, and then rated through two successive rounds. Thirty-five recommendations were selected, and concerned indications for fertility preservation, contraindications for ovarian stimulation (in the context of fertility preservation or for infertility management), contraceptive options (especially hormonal ones), and menopause hormone therapy for each tumor type. Overall, prudence has been recommended in the case of potentially hormone-sensitive tumors such as sex cord tumors, serous and endometrioid low-grade adenocarcinomas, as well as for high-risk serous borderline ovarian tumors. In the context of a scarce literature, a formal consensus method allowed the elaboration of guidelines, which will help clinicians in the management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effects of Administrated Sildenafil Citrate on Uterine Luminal Epithelium Height Associated with Ovarian Angiogenesis: An Experimental Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Golkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian angiogenesis (OA remains in lifetime and normal ovarian function depends to this continual remodeling of a complex vascular system. Endometrial thickness (ET is one of the strongest predictors of successful implantation and pregnancy. Appropriate OA effects on ET by facilitating of ovarian hormone delivery. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult female mice and twenty adult male mice were purchased. The female mice were divided into three groups: (1 control group without any intervention (n = 10, (2 gonadotropin group: receiving human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG and human chorionic gonadotropin (n = 10, and (3 gonadotropin and sildenafil citrate (SC group: receiving HMG and SC administration (n = 10. After mating, animals were deeply anesthetized, and the ovary and uterus was rapidly removed for histology and immunohistochemistry process. Results: Four days after ovarian induction, all three layers of the uterus with specified thickness can be clearly seen. The heights of endometrial epithelial cells in gonadotropin group were not significantly different than those in control group. In gonadotropin and SC group, heights of the cells were significantly (P 0.05 each. Our results of immunohistochemistry survey for ovarian CD31 demonstrated that administrated SC increased OA but not significantly (P > 0.05 each. Conclusion: It may finally conclude that administration of SC does not cause notable alterations in OA and ET; although for realistic decision about the SC effects on aforementioned parameters, more molecular investigations and longer drug consumption period are necessary.

  12. An Integrated Quantitative Methodology to Longitudinally Characterize Complex Dynamic Processes Associated with Ovarian Aging and the Menopausal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyong Zheng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An integrative methodology is developed to characterize the complex patterns of change in highly variable dynamic biological processes. The method permits estimatation of the population mean profile, multiple change points and length of time-windows defined by any two change points of interest using a semi-/non-parametric stochastic mixed effect model and a Bayesian Modeling Average (BMA approach to account for model uncertainty. It also allows estimation of the mean rate of change of sub-processes by fitting piecewise linear mixed effect models. The methodology is applied to characterize the stages of female ovarian aging and the menopausal transition defined by hormone measures of estradiol (E2 and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH from two large-scale epidemiological studies with community-based longitudinal designs and ethnic diversity.

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger increases the number of oocytes and embryos available for cryopreservation in cancer patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nigel; Kelly, Amelia G; Stone, Logan D; Witzke, Justine D; Lekovich, Jovana P; Elias, Rony T; Schattman, Glenn L; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2017-09-01

    To compare the oocyte and embryo yield associated with GnRH-agonist triggers vs. hCG triggers in cancer patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) for fertilization preservation. Retrospective cohort study. Academic center. Cancer patients undergoing COS with letrozole and gonadotropins or gonadotropin-only protocols for oocyte or embryo cryopreservation. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or hCG trigger. Number of metaphase II (MII) oocytes or two-pronuclei (2PN) embryos available for cryopreservation were primary outcomes. Separate multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the effect of trigger type on the primary outcomes, after controlling for confounders of interest. A total of 341 patients were included, 99 (29.0%) in the GnRH-agonist group and 242 (71%) in the hCG group. There was no difference in the baseline demographics of patients receiving GnRH-agonist or hCG triggers. Within the letrozole and gonadotropins group (n = 269), the number (mean ± SD, 11.8 ± 5.8 vs. 9.9 ± 6.0) and percentage of MII oocytes (89.6% vs. 73.0%) available for cryopreservation was higher with GnRH-agonist triggers compared with hCG triggers. Similar results were noted with GnRH-agonist triggers in the gonadotropin-only group (n = 72) (i.e., a higher number [13.3 ± 7.9 vs. 9.3 ± 6.0] and percentage of MII oocytes [85.7% vs. 72.8%] available for cryopreservation). Multivariate linear regression demonstrated approximately three more MII oocytes and 2PN embryos available for cryopreservation in the GnRH-agonist trigger group, irrespective of cancer and COS protocol type. Utilization of a GnRH-agonist trigger increases the number of MII oocytes and 2PN embryos available for cryopreservation in cancer patients undergoing COS for fertility preservation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New trends in combined use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists with gonadotropins or pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone in ovulation induction and assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, K; Danforth, D R; Williams, R F; Hodgen, G D

    1992-10-01

    The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists as adjunctive therapy with gonadotropins for ovulation induction in in vitro fertilization and other assisted reproductive technologies has become common clinical practice. With the recent advent of potent gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists free from the marked histamine-release effects that stymied earlier compounds, an attractive alternative method may be available. We have established the feasibility of combining gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-induced inhibition of endogenous gonadotropins with exogenous gonadotropin therapy for ovulation induction in a nonhuman primate model. Here, the principal benefits to be gained from using the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist rather than the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist are the immediate inhibition of pituitary gonadotropin secretion without the "flare effect," which brings greater safety and convenience for patients and the medical team and saves time and money. We have also recently demonstrated the feasibility of combining gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy for the controlled restoration of gonadotropin secretion and gonadal steroidogenesis culminating in apparently normal (singleton) ovulatory cycles. This is feasible only with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists because, unlike gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, they achieve control of the pituitary-ovarian axis without down regulation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor system. This capacity to override gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-induced suppression of pituitary-ovarian function may allow new treatment modalities to be employed for women who suffer from chronic hyperandrogenemia with polycystic ovarian disease.

  15. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triggering and "freeze-all": in-depth analysis of genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Ribeiro, Samuel; Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Stouffs, Katrien; De Vos, Michel; Seneca, Sara; Tournaye, Herman; Blockeel, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We report on the results of the whole-genome analysis performed in a patient who developed severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triggering in a "freeze-all" protocol. A 30-year-old patient with polycystic ovary syndrome who developed severe early-onset OHSS with clinical ascites, and slight renal and hepatic dysfunction was admitted for monitoring and treatment with cabergoline and intravenous albumin. Exome sequencing to assess for any known genetic predisposition for OHSS was performed. No known genetic variants associated with OHSS predisposition were found. Case reports of severe OHSS following a "freeze-all" strategy are starting to arise, showing that OHSS has not been completely eliminated with this approach. Further studies should be conducted to confirm if such cases may be due to genetic predisposition or not.

  16. Withholding gonadotropins until human chorionic gonadotropin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Rony; Kligman, Isaac; Davis, Owen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2010-11-01

    Withholding gonadotropins in women who exhibit high estradiol responses before follicles reach full maturation is called "coasting." Coasting, or suspending gonadotropin administration, can be an effective strategy for decreasing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) while reducing cancelation rates. In in vitro fertilization cycles, mechanistically it is believed that withholding gonadotropins starves smaller follicles, induces apoptosis, and decreases the potential for these follicles to elaborate vascular endothelial growth factor, a known mediator of OHSS. It is generally accepted that coasting should be initiated when the estradiol (E₂) level is >3000 pg/mL in the setting of immature follicles. The human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger should be administered when the E₂ level subsequently drops to a "safe" level. Cycle cancellation should be considered if, after 3 to 4 days of coasting, the E₂ level remains excessively elevated. Oocyte retrieval may also be cancelled if the E₂ level on the day after hCG trigger drops precipitously. In gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa)-based protocols, one can consider withholding GnRHa administration if the E₂ level continues to increase after a few days of coasting. Current data seem to show that the coasting period is short and/or is less likely to be required in GnRH-antagonist protocols as compared with GnRHa-based protocols. Large randomized control trials are still needed to establish the relative efficacy of coasting versus embryo cryopreservation in the context of OHSS prevention. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  17. Association Between Menopausal Estrogen-Only Therapy and Ovarian Carcinoma Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice W; Ness, Roberta B; Roman, Lynda D; Terry, Kathryn L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Doherty, Jennifer A; Menon, Usha; Cramer, Daniel W; Gayther, Simon A; Risch, Harvey; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Eilber, Ursula; Moysich, Kirsten B; Berchuck, Andrew; Rossing, Mary Anne; Jensen, Allan; Wicklund, Kristine G; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L; Hogdall, Estrid; Rudolph, Anja; Thompson, Pamela J; Wilkens, Lynne R; Kjaer, Susanne K; Carney, Michael E; Stram, Daniel O; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-05-01

    To describe the association between postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy use and risk of ovarian carcinoma, specifically with regard to disease histotype and duration and timing of use. We conducted a pooled analysis of 906 women with ovarian carcinoma and 1,220 women in a control group; all 2,126 women included reported having had a hysterectomy. Ten population-based case-control studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, an international consortium whose goal is to combine data from many studies with similar methods so reliable assessments of risk factors can be determined, were included. Self-reported questionnaire data from each study were harmonized and conditional logistic regression was used to examine estrogen-only therapy's histotype-specific and duration and recency of use associations. Forty-three and a half percent of the women in the control group reported previous use of estrogen-only therapy. Compared with them, current or recent estrogen-only therapy use was associated with an increased risk for the serous (51.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.09) and endometrioid (48.6%, OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.17-3.41) histotypes. In addition, statistically significant trends in risk according to duration of use were seen among current or recent postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy users for both ovarian carcinoma histotypes (Ptrendovarian carcinoma (36.8%, OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.26-2.38) and endometrioid ovarian carcinoma (34.9%, OR 4.03, 95% CI 1.91-8.49). We found evidence of an increased risk of serous and endometrioid ovarian carcinoma associated with postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy use, particularly of long duration. These findings emphasize that risk may be associated with extended estrogen-only therapy use.

  18. Pelvic pain, free fluid in pelvis, and human chorionic gonadotropin serum elevation: recurrence of malignant ovarian germ-cell tumor or early pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyński, B; Rogala, E; Nowicka, A; Nurzyńska-Flak, J; Kotarski, J

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of metastatic germ-cell tumor of the ovary does not exclude the possibility of pregnancy in the future. Serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) serves as pregnancy test, and has also been proven to be a useful marker for ovarian germ-cell tumors. This paper is a case report of a 19-year-old patient who was admitted to a district hospital in emergency due to pelvic pain, amenorrhoea, and free fluid in the pelvis. Laboratory tests demonstrated slight increase in beta-hCG serum concentration and transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) showed no evidence of gestational sac in the uterus. At the age of 14, the patient was diagnosed with malignant germ-cell tumor of the left ovary in FIGO Stage IV and was treated with four courses of chemotherapy according to TGM-95 protocol with etoposide, ifosfamide, and cisplatin, followed by conservative surgery and adjuvant two courses of cytostatics. The initial diagnosis was recurrence of ovarian malignancy and the patient was referred to an oncology center. Wait-and-see approach and repeated ultrasound examination confirmed a normal intrauterine pregnancy which concluded with the delivery of a healthy newborn through cesarean section.

  19. Association Between Menopausal Estrogen-Only Therapy and Ovarian Carcinoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alice W; Ness, Roberta B; Roman, Lynda D

    2016-01-01

    in a control group; all 2,126 women included reported having had a hysterectomy. Ten population-based case-control studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, an international consortium whose goal is to combine data from many studies with similar methods so reliable assessments of risk...... in the control group reported previous use of estrogen-only therapy. Compared with them, current or recent estrogen-only therapy use was associated with an increased risk for the serous (51.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.09) and endometrioid (48.6%, OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.......17-3.41) histotypes. In addition, statistically significant trends in risk according to duration of use were seen among current or recent postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy users for both ovarian carcinoma histotypes (Ptrendcontrol group, current...

  20. Comparing the effect of aqueous extract of green tea and catechin on gonadotropins, β-estradiol, Progesterone, testosterone and ovarian follicle in polycystic ovarian syndrome rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Damoon Sadoughi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Compared with green tea, catechin has a more favorable effect on improving hormonal parameters, especially FSH hormone and increasing the number of ovarian follicles in rats with polycystic ovary syndrome.

  1. Standardization of androstenedione and estrone radioimmunoassay and profile of sex steroids, gonadotropins and prolactin - in patients with chronic anovulation due to inappropriate feedback (polycystic ovarian syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilanova, Maria do Socorro Veras

    1992-01-01

    Full text. In order to evaluate the profile of the sex steroids gonadotropin and prolactin in polycystic ovarian syndrome (POS), 24 patients with POS were studied and compared with 20 normal women during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Radioimmunoassay techniques for androstenedione (A) and estrone (E 1 ) were standardized for the purpose of the study. Androstenedione and estrone were extracted from plasma with ethyl ether. The assays were maintained in equilibrium and the labelled hormone-antibody complex was then separated from the free hormone using dextran charcoal. The sensitivity of the method was 6.8 pg/tube for A and 3.7 pg/tube for E 1 . Nonspecific binding ws 3.4 for A and 3.3 for E 1 . The interessay error at the D50 level was 15.6 for A and 8.6 for E 1 . Patients with POS had significantly higher basal levels of LH, A, T E 1 and PRL and similar FSH and DHEA-S levels when compared with normal women. The LH/FSH ratio was significantly elevated and the A/T ratio was significantly decreased. The A/E 1 and T/E 2 ratios were elevated and the E 1 /E 2 was decreased, although the differences were not statistically significant. A positive correlation between A and E 1 was observed in patients with POS. In view of the above data, it was concluded that: the quality control parameters of the radioimmunoassay for A and E 1 standardized in the present study are considered satisfactory, and the assay could be used for diagnosis and research; the patients with POS have a different sex steroid and gonadotropin profile when compared normal women during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle

  2. Androgens and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, L P

    2009-12-01

    The cessation of ovarian sex steroidigenesis, either as result as surgical extirpation, certain medical therapies or the gradual cessation of ovarian function, leads to menopause with all its associated physiological, physical and lifestyle changes. The changing hormonal milieu of menopause is most commonly associated with declining levels of estrogens. However, ovarian senescence also results in declining levels of androgens. Indeed, it is the loss of physiological levels of estrogens and androgens that result in the varied signs and symptoms of menopause including vasomotor symptoms, bone mineral density loss, reduced interest in sex, alterations in mood and energy and hair loss, among others. This paper will provide a review of the role of androgens in the menopause and assess the potential of androgen therapies in the management of the menopause.

  3. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  4. Large Prospective Study of Ovarian Cancer Screening in High-risk Women: CA125 Cut-point Defined by Menopausal Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skates, Steven J.; Mai, Phuong; Horick, Nora K.; Piedmonte, Marion; Drescher, Charles W.; Isaacs, Claudine; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Buys, Saundra S.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Horowitz, Ira R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Daly, Mary B.; Domchek, Susan; Cohn, David E.; Van Le, Linda; Schorge, John O.; Newland, William; Davidson, Susan A.; Barnes, Mack; Brewster, Wendy; Azodi, Masoud; Nerenstone, Stacy; Kauff, Noah D.; Fabian, Carol J.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Nayfield, Susan G.; Kasten, Carol H.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Greene, Mark H.; Lu, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous screening trials for early detection of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women have used the standard CA125 cut-point of 35 U/mL, the 98th percentile in this population yielding a 2% false positive rate, while the same cut-point in trials of premenopausal women results in substantially higher false positive rates. We investigated demographic and clinical factors predicting CA125 distributions, including 98th percentiles, in a large population of high-risk women participating in two ovarian cancer screening studies with common eligibility criteria and screening protocols. Methods Baseline CA125 values and clinical and demographic data from 3,692 women participating in screening studies conducted by the NCI-sponsored Cancer Genetics Network and Gynecologic Oncology Group were combined for this pre-planned analysis. Due to the large effect of menopausal status on CA125 levels, statistical analyses were conducted separately in pre- and postmenopausal subjects to determine the impact of other baseline factors on predicted CA125 cut-points based on the 98th percentile. Results The primary clinical factor affecting CA125 cut-points was menopausal status, with premenopausal women having a significantly higher cut-point of 50 U/mL while in postmenopausal subjects the standard cut-point of 35 U/mL was recapitulated. In premenopausal women, current oral contraceptive (OC) users had a cut-point of 40 U/mL. Conclusions To achieve a 2% false positive rate in ovarian cancer screening trials and in high-risk women choosing to be screened, the cut-point for initial CA125 testing should be personalized primarily for menopausal status (~ 50 for premenopausal women, 40 for premenopausal on OC, 35 for postmenopausal women). PMID:21893500

  5. Circulating gonadotropins and ovarian adiponectin system are modulated by acupuncture independently of sex steroid or β-adrenergic action in a female hyperandrogenic rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Benrick, Anna; Alvi, Asif; Johansson, Julia; Sun, Miao; Labrie, Fernand; Ohlsson, Claes; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2015-09-05

    Acupuncture with combined manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation, or electroacupuncture (EA), reduces endocrine and reproductive dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), likely by modulating sympathetic nerve activity or sex steroid synthesis. To test this hypothesis, we induced PCOS in rats by prepubertal implantation of continuous-release letrozole pellets (200 µg/day) or vehicle. Six weeks later, rats were treated for 5-6 weeks with low-frequency EA 5 days/week, subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (2.0 µg) every fourth day, or a β-adrenergic blocker (propranolol hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg) 5 days/week. Letrozole controls were handled without needle insertion or injected with sesame oil every fourth day. Estrous cyclicity, ovarian morphology, sex steroids, gonadotropins, insulin-like growth factor I, bone mineral density, and gene and protein expression in ovarian tissue were measured. Low-frequency EA induced estrous-cycle changes, decreased high levels of circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and the LH/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio, decreased high ovarian gene expression of adiponectin receptor 2, and increased expression of adiponectin receptor 2 protein and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. EA also increased cortical bone mineral density. Propranolol decreased ovarian expression of Foxo3, Srd5a1, and Hif1a. Estradiol decreased circulating LH, induced estrous cycle changes, and decreased ovarian expression of Adipor1, Foxo3, and Pik3r1. Further, total bone mineral density was higher in the letrozole-estradiol group. Thus, EA modulates the circulating gonadotropin levels independently of sex steroids or β-adrenergic action and affects the expression of ovarian adiponectin system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk of long-term hot flashes after natural menopause: evidence from the Penn Ovarian Aging Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Sammel, Mary D; Sanders, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and to evaluate the associations of hormone levels, behavioral variables, and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes after menopause. We performed annual assessment of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause within 16 years of follow-up. The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first 2 years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly after menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after the FMP. The mean (SD) duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after the FMP was 4.6 (2.9) years (for any hot flashes, 4.9 [3.1] y). One third of women at 10 years or more after menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African-American women (obese and nonobese) and obese white women had significantly greater risks of hot flashes compared with nonobese white women (interaction, P = 0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing follicle-stimulating hormone levels before the FMP (P menopause; more than one third of women observed for 10 years or more after menopause have moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years after menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risks/benefits when selecting hormone or nonhormone therapy for menopausal symptoms.

  7. Human chorionic gonadotropin suppresses human breast cancer cell growth directly via p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and indirectly via ovarian steroid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuri, Takashi; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-03-01

    The tumor-suppressive effects of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) against human breast cancer cells were examined. In cell viability assays, hCG inhibited the growth of three human breast cancer cell lines (estrogen receptor (ER)-positive KPL-1 and MCF-7, and ER-negative MKL-F cells), and the growth inhibition activity of hCG was most pronounced against KPL-1 cells (luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR)-positive and luminal-A subtype). In hCG-treated KPL-1 cells, immunoblotting analysis revealed the expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 peaking at 12 h following treatment, followed by cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3 at 24 h and 48 h, respectively. KPL-1-transplanted athymic mice were divided into 3 groups: a sham-treated group that received an inoculation of KPL-1 cells at 6 weeks of age followed by daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline; an in vitro hCG-treated KPL-1 group that received an inoculation of KPL-1 cells pre-treated with 100 IU/ml hCG in vitro for 48 h at 6 weeks of age, followed by daily i.p. injection of saline; and an in vivo hCG-treated group that received an KPL-1 cell inoculation at 6 weeks of age, followed by daily i.p. injection of 100 IU hCG. The daily injections of saline or hCG continued until the end of the experiment when mice reached 11 weeks of age. KPL-1 tumor growth was retarded in in vitro and in vivo hCG-treated mice compared to sham-treated controls, and the final tumor volume and tumor weight tended to be suppressed in the in vitro hCG-treated group and were significantly suppressed in the in vivo hCG-treated group. In vivo 100-IU hCG injections for 5 weeks elevated serum estradiol levels (35.7 vs. 23.5 pg/ml); thus, the mechanisms of hCG action may be directly coordinated via the p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and indirectly through ovarian steroid secretion that elevates estrogen levels. It is thus concluded that hCG may be an attractive agent for treating human breast

  8. Endocrinology of the Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    In women, age-related changes in ovarian function begin in the mid-30s with decreased fertility and compensatory hormonal changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis that maintain follicle development and estrogen secretion in the face of a waning pool of ovarian follicles. The menopause transition is characterized by marked variability in follicle development, ovulation, bleeding patterns, and symptoms of hyper- and hypoestrogenism. The menopause, which is clinically defined by the last menstrual period, is followed by the consistent absence of ovarian secretion of estradiol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermatosis associated with menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya A Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is defined as permanent irreversible cessation of menses brought by decline in ovarian follicular activity. Hormonal alteration results in various physical, psychological, and sexual changes in menopausal women. Associated dermatological problems can be classified as physiological changes, age-related changes, changes due to estrogen deficiency and due to hormone replacement therapy. Dermatosis seen due to estrogen deficiency includes Atrophic Vulvovaginitis, Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus, Dyaesthetic Vulvodynia, Hirsutism, Alopecia, Menopausal Flushing, Keratoderma Climactericum, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis. Dermatologists and gynecologists need to be familiar with the problems of menopausal women, as with increase in life expectancy, women passing through this phase is rising.

  10. Skin disorders during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gleison V; Trigo, Ana Cm; Paim de Oliveira, Mária de Fátima

    2016-02-01

    Menopause is the cessation of menstrual periods due to the loss of ovarian function. Among the various phases of a woman's life, menopause has the greatest impact on health and has been one of the most neglected areas of research. Hormonal changes caused by menopause can lead to problems in the skin and its annexes, and despite the high frequency of dermatologic signs and symptoms, studies on this topic are limited. In this article, we review the skin disorders that result from the hormonal changes of menopause and other common dermatoses observed during this period and assess possible therapeutic approaches.

  11. Ovarian and Adrenal Androgens and Their Link to High Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels: A Prospective Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM. Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P≤0.001. Free testosterone (T and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S were found to be higher in the cases (2.78 ± 1.24 pg/mL and 231.50 ± 127.20 μ/dL when compared to the control group (1.50 ± 0.75 pg/mL and 133.59 ± 60.69 μ/dL (P=0.0001 and 0.001, respectively. There was a strong correlation between hCG and free T/total T/DHEA-S concentrations (r=0.78; P≤0.001, r=0.74;  P≤0.001, and r=0.71;  P≤0.001, respectively. In the cases group 48 hours after HM evacuation, hCG levels were found to be significantly lower when compared to initial levels (P=0.001 and free T and DHEA-S declined significantly (P=0.0002 and 0.009. Conclusion. Before uterus evacuation, hCG, free T, and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher when compared with controls finding a strong correlation between hCG and free T/DHEA-S levels. Forty-eight hours after HM treatment hCG levels declined and the difference was lost. A novel finding of our study is that in cases, besides free T, DHEA-S was also found to be significantly higher and both the ovaries and adrenal glands appear to be the sites of this androgen overproduction.

  12. A Proof-of-Concept Clinical Trial of A Single Luteal Use of Long-Acting Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Antagonist Degarelix in Controlled Ovarian Stimulation for In Vitro Fertilization: Long Antagonist Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos G. Papanikolaou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionA drawback of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocols in in vitro fertilization (IVF is that they have limited flexibility in cycle programming. This proof of concept study explored the efficacy of a single-dose, long-acting GnRH antagonist IVF protocol. Trial registration number is NCT03240159, retrospectively registered on March 08, 2017.Materials and methodsThe efficacy of a single-dose long-acting antagonist, degarelix, was explored initially in healthy donors and subsequently in infertile patients. In the first part, five healthy oocyte donors underwent ovarian stimulation with this new protocol: in the late luteal phase, at day 24, a bolus injection of degarelix was administered subcutaneously to control the LH surge in the follicular phase. Ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins was initiated subsequently from day 7 to day 10. End points were first to inhibit the LH surge later in the follicular phase and, second, to retrieve mature oocytes for IVF. In the second part, five infertile women received the same bolus injection of degarelix administered during the luteal phase at day 24. Different gonadotropin starting days (day 2 through day 8 were tested in order to observe possible differences in ovarian stimulation. In these infertile patients, fresh embryo transfers were performed to assess the pregnancy efficacy of this protocol on pregnancy outcomes and to address any possible negative effects on endometrium receptivity.ResultsIn the first part of the study, all donors were effectively downregulated with a single luteal dose of 0.5 ml of degarelix for up to 22 days until the final oocyte maturation triggering day. Mature oocytes were retrieved after 36 h from all patients and all produced 2–7 blastocysts. In the second part, all five infertile patients achieved sufficient LH downregulation and completed ovarian stimulation without any LH surge. All patients (except one with freeze all strategy had

  13. Cellulite in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Leszko, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly af...

  14. Gaps in Menopause Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Yum, Sun Kyoung; Kim, Tak

    2014-01-01

    The average middle aged woman goes through a volatile period of endocrine fluctuations as she passes through menopause and the stages that precede and follow it. Ovarian hormones are steroid hormones. They readily cross the cell and nuclear membranes and influence transcription of numerous genes. Such influences are tissue specific and state specific. In short, changes in ovarian hormones mean that a women will experience changes in her entire body systems. When an individual woman's constitu...

  15. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol.......To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  16. The menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nuttall, Dilyse

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy can ease the symptoms of the menopause. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is developing guidelines on the diagnosis and management of menopause, which are due for release in October 2015. This welcome development acknowledges the impact that menopause-related symptoms can have on an individual. NICE (2013) identify menopause as the ending of menstruation resulting from a failure in ovarian follicular activity. Changes in hormone levels can...

  17. Preoperative serum tetranectin, CA125 and menopausal status used as single markers in screening and in a risk assessment index (RAI) in discriminating between benign and malignant ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begum, F D; Høgdall, E; Kjaer, S K

    2009-01-01

    risk for OC for quick referral to highly specialized centers in gynecologic oncology. These aims were addressed in the present study by evaluating serum tetranectin (TN) and serum CA125 on a large number of pre- and postmenopausal women with ovarian tumors and controls. METHODS: The potential ability...... of the markers to discriminate between the four groups (208 benign ovarian tumor, 153 borderline ovarian tumor (BOT), 445 OC and 1333 age matched controls) in OC screening was examined. We also constructed a risk assessment index (RAI) for discrimination between tumor groups based on these variables...... and menopausal status. RESULTS: Highly significant differences in both TN and CA125 levels were found between all the four groups as well as between the different FIGO stages of OC patients. A very high probability of having OC or a benign tumor, respectively, was predicted by the RAI. CONCLUSIONS: In the case-control...

  18. A service evaluation of women attending the menopause/premature ovarian failure clinic of a tertiary referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, B; Holloway, D; Grace, J; Robinson, J; Rymer, J

    2012-05-01

    This service evaluation aimed to characterise the referrals to the premature ovarian failure clinic, including the type of referral and patient needs, in order to plan for future service provision. The majority of women seen in the clinic experienced idiopathic premature ovarian failure, were aged 30-39 and were nulliparous at the time of diagnosis. Our service requires to be tailored to their needs. For many women, this includes a fertility consultation in the clinic and this part of the service is well used. Our data support the long-term follow-up of women both on treatment and those who initially decline treatment. Most women who initially decline treatment accept it after a few clinic visits. This may be due to consistent advice on the benefits of oestrogen treatment or due to yearly bone scans showing a change in bone density. There was a high non-attendance rate in this group: 21% of appointments were not attended.

  19. Menopause Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alone. Learn more about your personal journey with menopause. The Menopause Map™ will help you: Understand the stages of ... About It! Start your Journey Your journey through menopause is unique and we understand that. Answer a ...

  20. Premature ovarian failure and ovarian autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Schoemaker (Joop); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); A. Hoek (Annemieke)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPremature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as a syndrome characterized by menopause before the age of 40 yr. The patients suffer from anovulation and hypoestrogenism. Approximately 1% of women will experience menopause before the age of 40 yr. POF is a

  1. Effectiveness of human menopausal gonadotropin versus recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted reproductive cycles: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wely, Madelon; Westergaard, Lars G.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; van der Veen, Fulco

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of hMG and recombinant FSH after down-regulation for ovulation stimulation in assisted reproductive cycles. Design: Meta-analysis. Setting: Infertility centers providing assisted reproductive techniques. Patient(s): Two thousand thirty women undergoing IVF or

  2. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  3. Hormones, weight change and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K M; Heaney, R P; Recker, R R; Barger-Lux, M J; Lappe, J M

    2001-06-01

    To determine total body weight change occurring in women at mid-life, specifically with respect to occurrence of menopause and use of estrogen. Retrospective analysis of body weight measurements accumulated in two cohorts of healthy women participating in studies of skeletal metabolism. Cohort 1: 191 healthy nuns enrolled in a prospective study of osteoporosis risk, aged 35-45 in 1967; cohort 2: 75 women aged 46 or older and still menstruating, enrolled in 1988 in a study of bone cell dynamics across menopause. Roughly one-third of each group received hormone replacement after menopause. Body weight and height, age, menstrual status and use of estrogen replacement. Cohort 1: 608 measurements at 5 y intervals spanning a period from 17 y before to 22 y after menopause; cohort 2: 1180 measurements at 6-month intervals spanning a period from 5 y prior to 5 y after menopause. In cohort 1 weight rose as a linear function of age (both chronological and menopausal), both before and after cessation of ovarian function, at a rate of approximately 0.43% y(-1). Neither the menopausal transition nor the use of estrogen had an appreciable effect on this rate of gain. In cohort 2 the rate of gain seemed to diminish slightly at menopause. As with cohort 1, hormone replacement (or its absence) had no appreciable effect on weight. The long-term, total body weight trajectory at mid-life is not influenced appreciably by either cessation of ovarian function or by hormone replacement.

  4. Environment, human reproduction, menopause, and andropause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, A

    1993-07-01

    As the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator is an integrator of hormonal, metabolic, and neural signals, it is not surprising that the function of the hypothalamogonadal axis is subject to the influence of a large array of environmental factors. Before puberty, the central nervous system (CNS) restrains the GnRH pulse generator. Undernutrition, low socioeconomic status, stress, and emotional deprivation, all delay puberty. During reproductive life, among peripheral factors that effect the reproductive system, stress plays an important role. Stress, via the release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), eventually triggered by interleukin 1, inhibits GnRH release, resulting in hypogonadism. Effects of CRF are probably mediated by the opioid system. Food restriction and underweight (anorexia nervosa), obesity, smoking, and alcohol all have negative effects on the GnRH pulse generator and gonadal function. Age and diet are important determinants of fertility in both men and women. The age-associated decrease in fertility in women has as a major determinant chromosomal abnormalities of the oocyte, with uterine factors playing a subsidiary role. Age at menopause, determined by ovarian oocyte depletion, is influenced by occupation, age at menarche, parity, age at last pregnancy, altitude, smoking, and use of oral contraceptives. Smoking, however, appears to be the major determinant. Premature menopause is most frequently attributable to mosaicism for Turner Syndrome, mumps ovaritis, and, above all, total hysterectomy, which has a prevalence of about 12-15% in women 50 years old. Premature ovarian failure with presence of immature follicles is most frequently caused by autoimmune diseases or is the consequence of irradiation or chemotherapy with alkylating cytostatics. Plasma estrogens have a physiological role in the prevention of osteoporosis. Obese women have osteoporosis less frequently than women who are not overweight. Early menopause

  5. Benefits and risks of ovarian function and reproduction for cancer development and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Adolf E

    2011-12-01

    Ovarian function and menstrual cycle disturbances, pregnancy, and reproductive medicine procedures can either increase gynecological cancer risk or prevent cancer development. For ovarian cancer development, there are two hypotheses, which are connected with ovulation and gonadotropin secretion. Most of the ovarian cancers seem to be derived from displaced ovarian surfice epithelial cells. One year of ovulatory cycles increases the ovarian cancer risk by 6%. Ovulation between 22 and 29 years of age causes the highest risk increase per year. In contrast, progesterone or progestins appear to create protection. Lifestyle can affect or modify ovarian cancer risk. Breast cancer risk is very much related to age of menarche and menopause, pregnancy, and breast feeding. All of which are related to ovarian function and progestogenic impact that translates either into breast cancer risk increase or decrease. This is modified by body mass index, physical activity, and lifestyle in general. The risk of endometrial cancer is most closely related to endogenous progesterone during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy or by exogenous progestogens as in oral contraceptives. These effects are progestogen dose and time dependent. Endometrial cancer risk can also be increased by estrogen-producing tumors or long-term estrogen treatment.

  6. A nationwide study on reproductive function, ovarian reserve, and risk of premature menopause in female survivors of childhood cancer: design and methodological challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Annelies

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in childhood cancer treatment over the past decades have significantly improved survival, resulting in a rapidly growing group of survivors. However, both chemo- and radiotherapy may adversely affect reproductive function. This paper describes the design and encountered methodological challenges of a nationwide study in the Netherlands investigating the effects of treatment on reproductive function, ovarian reserve, premature menopause and pregnancy outcomes in female childhood cancer survivors (CCS, the DCOG LATER-VEVO study. Methods The study is a retrospective cohort study consisting of two parts: a questionnaire assessing medical, menstrual, and obstetric history, and a clinical assessment evaluating ovarian and uterine function by hormonal analyses and transvaginal ultrasound measurements. The eligible study population consists of adult female 5-year survivors of childhood cancer treated in the Netherlands, whereas the control group consists of age-matched sisters of the participating CCS. To date, study invitations have been sent to 1611 CCS and 429 sister controls, of which 1215 (75% and 333 (78% have responded so far. Of these responders, the majority consented to participate in both parts of the study (53% vs. 65% for CCS and sister controls respectively. Several challenges were encountered involving the study population: dealing with bias due to the differences in characteristics of several types of (non- participants and finding an adequately sized and well-matched control group. Moreover, the challenges related to the data collection process included: differences in response rates between web-based and paper-based questionnaires, validity of self-reported outcomes, interpretation of clinical measurements of women using hormonal contraceptives, and inter- and intra-observer variation of the ultrasound measurements. Discussion The DCOG LATER-VEVO study will provide valuable information about the

  7. A nationwide study on reproductive function, ovarian reserve, and risk of premature menopause in female survivors of childhood cancer: design and methodological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Advances in childhood cancer treatment over the past decades have significantly improved survival, resulting in a rapidly growing group of survivors. However, both chemo- and radiotherapy may adversely affect reproductive function. This paper describes the design and encountered methodological challenges of a nationwide study in the Netherlands investigating the effects of treatment on reproductive function, ovarian reserve, premature menopause and pregnancy outcomes in female childhood cancer survivors (CCS), the DCOG LATER-VEVO study. Methods The study is a retrospective cohort study consisting of two parts: a questionnaire assessing medical, menstrual, and obstetric history, and a clinical assessment evaluating ovarian and uterine function by hormonal analyses and transvaginal ultrasound measurements. The eligible study population consists of adult female 5-year survivors of childhood cancer treated in the Netherlands, whereas the control group consists of age-matched sisters of the participating CCS. To date, study invitations have been sent to 1611 CCS and 429 sister controls, of which 1215 (75%) and 333 (78%) have responded so far. Of these responders, the majority consented to participate in both parts of the study (53% vs. 65% for CCS and sister controls respectively). Several challenges were encountered involving the study population: dealing with bias due to the differences in characteristics of several types of (non-) participants and finding an adequately sized and well-matched control group. Moreover, the challenges related to the data collection process included: differences in response rates between web-based and paper-based questionnaires, validity of self-reported outcomes, interpretation of clinical measurements of women using hormonal contraceptives, and inter- and intra-observer variation of the ultrasound measurements. Discussion The DCOG LATER-VEVO study will provide valuable information about the reproductive potential of

  8. Hormonal changes during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Palacios, Santiago

    2009-06-20

    Ovarian senescence occurs gradually during the fourth and fifth decades of life, leading to menopause at an average age of about 51 years. This senescence results in a changing hormonal milieu, with decreases in the levels of estrogens and androgens. Similar changes may be induced by surgical menopause (bilateral oophorectomy) or ovarian failure resulting from cancer treatment. The declining levels of estrogens and androgens affect many tissues of the body and can produce a variety of signs and symptoms, including vasomotor symptoms, decreased bone density, changes in mood and energy, loss of pubic hair and changes in the genital tissues, and effects on sexual function. Accurate measurement of testosterone levels in postmenopausal women requires methods that are validated in the lower ranges of testosterone level observed in this population.

  9. GnRH agonist trigger with intensive luteal phase support vs. human chorionic gonadotropin trigger in high responders: an observational study reporting pregnancy outcomes and incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, Georgios; Vlismas, Antonios; Carby, Anna; Lavery, Stuart; Trew, Geoffrey

    2016-09-01

    A retrospective, cohort study of high-risk patients undergoing IVF treatment was performed to assess if there is a difference in clinical pregnancy rate, live birth rate and the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, when a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger with intensive luteal support is compared to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with standard luteal support. The control group consisted of 382 high-risk patients having a GnRH antagonist protocol with 194 receiving an hCG trigger. All patients had ≥18 follicles ≥11mm or serum oestradiol >18,000pmol/l on the day of trigger. Patients had a single or double embryo transfer at cleavage or blastocyst stage. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences between the groups. An intention-to-treat analysis of all cycles was performed. No statistically significant differences were observed in terms of positive pregnancy test, clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate. Only one patient (0.3%) was hospitalized with severe OHSS in the GnRHa group, compared to 26 patients (13%) in the hCG group. In conclusion, GnRHa trigger is associated with similar pregnancy rates with hCG trigger and a significant reduction in hospitalization for severe OHSS after an intention to treat analysis was performed.

  10. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture...... gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional...

  11. Steroid Cell Ovarian Neoplasm, Not Otherwise Specified: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Steroid cell ovarian tumors, not otherwise specified, represent a unique cause of female virilization. Most commonly encountered in premenopausal women, these tumors can exist throughout a women’s lifetime, from before puberty until after menopause. Case. Steroid cell, not otherwise specified, was diagnosed in a 70-year-old female significant for hirsutism. The patient demonstrated elevated total testosterone levels with normal gonadotropins, DHEA, and DHEA-S levels. CT imaging revealed a right ovarian mass and subsequent laparoscopic right oophorectomy yielded clinical improvement promptly. Conclusion. Virilization in females can occur based on ovarian or adrenal pathology. In terms of ovarian-based female virilization, many tumors exist that may induce women to demonstrate masculine features, such as pure Sertoli, pure Leydig, Sertoli-Leydig combinations, and gynandroblastomas. Each of these tumor types possesses a unique histologic pattern that allows for pathologic identification after removal. A rare source of ovarian-based female virilization is steroid cell neoplasms, not otherwise specified, that do not demonstrate these specific histologic characteristics and thus represent a diagnosis of exclusion after other causes of ovarian-based female virilization have been ruled out.

  12. Use of letrozole and clomiphene citrate combined with gonadotropins in clomiphene-resistant infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi W

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wenyan Xi,1 Shankun Liu,2 Hui Mao,1 Yongkang Yang,1 Xiang Xue,1 Xiaoning Lu1 1The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an City, Shaanxi, 2Taian City Central Hospital, Shandong, Taian, People’s Republic of China Background: Gonadotropin has been used to stimulate ovulation in clomiphene-resistant infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, but it is associated with overstimulated cycles with the development of many follicles. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of letrozole and clomiphene citrate combined with human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG in CC-resistant infertile women with PCOS.Methods: Ninety-four women received the letrozole + HMG, 90 women received CC + HMG, and 71 women received HMG only. All women received one treatment regimen in one treatment cycle. All patients were given HMG 75 IU on alternate days daily starting on day 3 or day 7 until the day of administration of human chorionic gonadotropin.Results: The rate of monofollicular development was 80.2% in the letrozole + HMG group, 65.3% in the CC + HMG group, and 54.7% in the HMG-only group (P<0.05 for letrozole + HMG vs the other two groups. The number of developing follicles (≥14 mm follicles and the cycle cancellation rate due to ovarian hyperresponse were the lowest in the letrozole + HMG group, but the difference was not significant. The ovulation and pregnancy rate were similar among the three protocols. The HMG dose needed and the mean duration of treatment were significantly lower in the letrozole + HMG and CC + HMG groups compared with the HMG-only group.Conclusion: Letrozole in combination with HMG is an effective protocol for reducing the risks of hyperstimulation for ovarian induction in CC-resistant women with PCOS. This combination may be more appropriate in patients who are particularly sensitive to gonadotropin. Keywords: letrozole, clomiphene citrate, human menopausal gonadotropin

  13. Minimal Stimulation Using Gonadotropin Combined with Clomiphene Citrate or Letrozole for Intrauterine Insemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Chon, Seung Joo; Park, Joo Hyun; Seo, Seok Kyo; Cho, SiHyun; Kim, Seok Hyun; Lee, Byung Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of minimal stimulation using discretely administered gonadotropin combined with clomiphene citrate (CC) or letrozole (LTZ) for intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles. Materials and Methods Total 257 IUI cycles from 158 infertile couples were assessed. A CC dose of 100 mg/day (n=126 cycles) or a LTZ dose of 5 mg/day (n=131 cycles) was administered on days 3-5 of the menstrual cycle for 5 days. Each group received human menopausal gonadotropin at a dose of 150 IU by two or three alternative day: CC combined with alternate-day regimen for 2 or 3 days (CC+300, n=37; CC+450, n=89) and LTZ combined with alternate-day regimen for 2 or 3 days (LTZ+300, n=36; LTZ+450, n=95). Results The clinical pregnancy rate was comparable between the CC and LTZ groups (18.3% vs. 13.0%, p=0.243). The clinical pregnancy rate also showed no significant difference among the 4 groups (21.6% vs. 16.9% vs. 11.1% vs. 12.6%, p=0.507). The multiple pregnancy rate was significantly higher in LTZ compared to CC group (37.5% vs. 8.7%, p=0.028) and in the LTZ+450 compared to CC+450 group (50% vs. 13.3%, p=0.038). Overall, there were 15 cases of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), with the prevalence being significantly lower in the LTZ compared to CC group (1.5% vs. 10.3%, p=0.003). OHSS was more prevalent in the CC+450 compared to the LTZ+450 group (12.4% vs. 1.1%, p=0.002). Conclusion Our findings suggest that minimal stimulation using two alternate-day gonadotropin with LTZ decreases the development of OHSS and multiple pregnancies, while maintaining comparable pregnancy rates in IUI cycles. PMID:25684000

  14. Bone mineral density and fractures after surgical menopause : systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I. E.; Teixeira, N.; Abma, E. M.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Mourits, M. J. E.; de Bock, G. H.

    Background Oophorectomy is recommended for women at increased risk for ovarian cancer. When performed at premenopausal age oophorectomy induces acute surgical menopause, with unwanted consequences. Objective To investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture prevalence after surgical menopause.

  15. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  16. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  17. PROGESTERONE/ESTRADIOL RATIO IN THE LATE FOLLICULAR PHASE OF LONG GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE AGONIST CYCLES DID NOT DIFFER BETWEEN CONCEIVED AND NOT-CONCEIVED WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Safdarian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a challenging debate on the effect of premature luteinization on the clinical outcome of ‘controlled ovarian hyperstimulation' (COH using long ‘gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist' (GnRHa cycles. Premature luteinization is defined as late follicular progesterone/estradiol ratio more than 1 on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG administration. We carried out a retrospective case-control study on 75 conceived cases versus 75 not-conceived control women, receiving long GnRHa cycles in their first cycle of treatment. Premature luteinization developed in 15% of the case group vs. 22% of the control group. Neither the late follicular progesterone/estradiol (P/E2 ratio was significantly different between the two groups, nor the day 3 follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, serum estradiol level on the HCG day, total amount of human menopausal gonadotropins ampoules, number of follicles, retrieved oocytes and transferred embryos. Endometrial thickness was significantly more in the pregnant women than in the non-pregnant group. Premature luteinization seems not to adversely affect the clinical outcome of COH.

  18. Prevalence and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine/non-pharmacological interventions use for menopausal symptoms within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentry-Maharaj, A; Karpinskyj, C; Glazer, C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The negative publicity about menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has led to increased use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and non-pharmacological interventions (NPI) for menopausal symptom relief. We report on the prevalence and predictors of CAM/NPI among UK postmenopau......OBJECTIVES: The negative publicity about menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has led to increased use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and non-pharmacological interventions (NPI) for menopausal symptom relief. We report on the prevalence and predictors of CAM/NPI among UK...... for herbal therapies (43.8%; 9725/22 206), vitamins (42.6%; 9458/22 206), lifestyle approaches (32.1%; 7137/22 206) and phytoestrogens (21.6%; 4802/22 206). Older women reported less ever-use of herbal therapies, vitamins and phytoestrogens. Lifestyle approaches, aromatherapy...

  19. Review of epidemiological evidence for reproductive and hormonal factors in relation to the risk of epithelial ovarian malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riman, Tomas; Nilsson, Staffan; Persson, Ingemar R

    2004-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of mortality related to gynecologic malignancies in Sweden but there is no current screening program. Based upon epidemiological research there is evidence that certain reproductive factors are associated with ovarian cancer risk. Most studies generally indicate that each childbirth incurs a 15-20% risk reduction. Women who have used oral contraceptives for 5 years or longer experience about half the risk of ovarian cancer compared with never users. Breastfeeding seems to be protective while age at menarche and at menopause are less consistent risk predictors. Tubal ligation and hysterectomy seem to reduce ovarian cancer risk by up to 80%. Although some studies found endometriosis, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) to be positively related to ovarian cancer, the role of these factors is not yet established. Most recent studies observed an approximately 50% ovarian cancer risk increase among ever users of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) compared with never users, and the risk increased further with long-term use. There is less information concerning separate estrogen and progestin effects of HRT and ovarian cancer risk. Although the cause of ovarian cancer remains obscure, hypotheses relating to "incessant" ovulation, excessive gonadotropin secretion, retrograde carcinogen transportation, apoptosis and estrogen/progestin imbalance have been invoked as etiological explanations. All these hypotheses find various epidemiological support. The aim of this review is to summarize the epidemiological findings on reproductive factors and ovarian cancer risk. These findings are considered in the context of etiologic hypotheses and some new research areas are suggested.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Proteins with Stimulating Activity on Ovarian Estradiol Biosynthesis from Four Different Dioscorea Species in vitro Using Both Phenotypic and Target-based Approaches: Implication for Treating Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J; Wong, R N S; Zhang, L; Wong, R Y L; Ng, T B; Lee, K F; Zhang, Y B; Lao, L X; Liu, J Y; Sze, S C W

    2016-09-01

    Rhizomes of Dioscorea species are traditionally used for relieving menopausal syndromes in Chinese medicine. The estrogen-stimulating bioactive principles have been demonstrated in our previous study. In this study, the estrogen-stimulating effects of proteins isolated from four Dioscorea species [D. alata L. (DA), D. zingiberensis C.H. Wright (DH), D. collettii var. hypoglauca (Palib.) S.J. Pei & C.T. Ting (DH), and D. oppositifolia L. (DO)] have been investigated and compared. Microscopic authentication of four Dioscorea species was performed by using paraffin and powder sections of the rhizomes. The potential bioactive proteins of four Dioscorea species have been rapidly isolated by using a DOI-antibody affinity column chromatography on immobilized antibodies against on estradiol-stimulating protein from DO (DOI), and their bioactivity has been rapidly confirmed and compared by phenotypic (i.e., estradiol-stimulating effect) and target-based (i.e., STAR, aromatase, estrogen receptors) screening approaches. The estrogen-stimulating activity of bioactive proteins from DO is the highest. In addition, bioactive proteins from DO upregulated the estradiol-metabolizing enzymes (aromatase and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein). Meanwhile, bioactive proteins from DA, DH and DO upregulated estrogen receptor β (ERβ). All bioactive proteins did not change the expression of estrogen receptor β (ERα). The estrogen-stimulating bioactive proteins isolated from DO increased biosynthesis of estradiol and upregulated the protein expression of aromatase, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and ERβ. The results scientifically support the traditional use of DO in Chinese medicine for relieving menopausal syndrome. Besides, proteins from DA and DZ could also upregulate the translational levels of ERβ, and potentially reducing the risk of ovarian cancer, which also support the clinical use of them for treating female aging disorder. Graphical Abstract Comparative

  1. Factors affecting age of onset of menopause and determination of quality of life in menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Ceylan, Burcu; ?zerdo?an, Nebahat

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is a process in the climacteric period, characterized by a reduction in ovarian activity, a fall in the fertility rate, and a range of symptoms including irregular menstruation intervals. Most women enter menopause in their 40s, but this can vary from one individual to another. Although there are many factors affecting the age of menopause onset, there is no general agreement on them. Studies have shown many factors to affect the age of menopause, such as the mother?s age at menopau...

  2. Ovarian characteristics and timed artificial insemination pregnancy risk after presynchronization with gonadotropin-releasing hormone 7 days before PGF2α in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J S

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to determine the benefit of including GnRH and PGF2α (PG) as a part of a presynchronization option before enrolling cows in a timed artificial insemination (AI) program. Holstein cows in one herd were assigned weekly at calving from January 2012 to August 2014 to a completely randomized design consisting of two presynchronization treatments. Cows in the Presynch-11 (n = 290) control were administered two PGF2α injections (Presynch PG-1 and Presynch PG-2) 14 days apart starting at 39 ± 4 days postpartum (study Days 0 and 14). Cows receiving the experimental presynchronization treatment (Gsynch-11, n = 287) were treated with GnRH (pre-GnRH) on study Day 7 and PG (pre-PG) on study Day 14. On study Day 25, all cows were enrolled in the Ovsynch-56 timed AI program: GnRH-1 on study Day 25, PG on study Day 32, GnRH-2 on study Day 34, 56 hours after PG, and timed AI on study Day 35, 16 hours after GnRH-2. In a subsample of 255 cows, ovarian structures were monitored for size and ovulation, and blood samples were collected on study Days 7, 14, 25, 32, 34, and 41 to measure progesterone. Concentrations of progesterone were greater (P 96%), ovulation to GnRH-2 (>90%), and synchronization risk (>88%) did not differ between treatments, but incidence of multiple ovulation after GnRH-2 was larger (P = 0.036) in Presynch-11 than Gsynch-11 cows (28.4% vs. 15.9%), respectively. Pregnancy per AI at 32 days (36.4% vs. 35.1%) and 60 days (30.0% vs. 29.0%) after AI did not differ between Gsynch-11 and Presynch-11 cows, respectively, but was suppressed during summer months in both treatments to less than 70% of the pregnancy per AI of nonsummer months. Because more than 90% of the cows were ovular as treatments were applied, the GnRH treatment of Gsynch-11 could not be assessed for its benefit in anovular cows. The Gsynch-11 presynchronization treatment performed comparably with the standard Presynch-11 program and provides a viable presynchronization option for use

  3. Repeat dose of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger in polycystic ovarian syndrome undergoing In Vitro fertilization cycles provides a better cycle outcome - a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Deepika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Is a single dose of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa trigger to induce final oocyte maturation in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles with GnRH antagonist protocol sufficient to provide optimal oocyte maturity? Design: This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, proof-of-concept study. Setting: This study was carried out at a tertiary care center. Material and Methods: A total of 125 patients diagnosed with PCOS defined as per the ESHRE/ASRM Rotterdam criteria (2003 undergoing IVF in antagonist protocol were randomized into two groups. Group A: single dose of GnRHa 0.2 mg, 35 h prior to oocyte retrieval, and Group B: 0.2 mg GnRHa 35 h prior to oocyte retrieval + repeat dose of 0.1 mg 12 h following the 1st dose. 12 h post-trigger, luteinizing hormone (LH, progesterone (P4, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH values were estimated. Statistical Analysis: Continuous variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and categorical variables as proportions where applicable. Independent sample t-test was used for continuous variables which were normally distributed and Mann–Whitney U-test for data not normally distributed. Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables where appropriate. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs was calculated. In addition, receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the post-trigger LH, P4, and FSH values at 12 h as predictors of oocyte maturity. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome: maturity rate of the oocytes. Secondary outcomes: oocyte yield, fertilization rate, availability of good quality embryos on day 3, blastocyst conversion, OHSS rates, post-trigger serum LH (IU/L, FSH (IU/L, and P4 (ng/mL levels implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate. Results: A higher number of mature (metaphase II oocytes were obtained in Group B compared to Group A (OR of 0.47; CI: 0.38–0

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels reflect endogenous LH production and response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) challenge in the older female macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Francisco M.; Chen, Jiangang; Gee, Nancy A.; Lohstroh, Pete; Lasley, Bill L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis We propose that the adrenal gland of an older higher primate female animal model will respond to a human chorionic gonadotropic (hCG) hormone challenge by secreting additional dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Such a response in surgically and chemically-castrated animals will provide proof-of-concept and a validated animal model for future studies to explore the rise of DHEAS during the menopausal transition of women. Methods Twenty four 18–26 y/o female cynomolgus monkeys were screened for ovarian function then either ovariectomized (n=4) or treated with a gonadotropic releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) (n=20) to block ovarian steroid production. Following a recovery period from surgery or down-regulation, a single dose challenge (1,000 IU; IM) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was then administered in order to determine if LH/CG could accelerate circulating DHEAS production. Serum DHEAS, bioactive LH and urinary metabolites of ovarian sex steroids were monitored before, during and following these treatments. Results Circulating LH bioactivity and immunoreactive DHEAS concentrations were suppressed in all animals 14 days post administration of GnRHa. Urinary metabolites of estradiol and progesterone remained low following surgery or the flare reaction to GnRHa. Circulating DHEAS levels were increased following hCG administration and the increase in individual animals was proportional to the pre-treatment DHEAS baseline. Circulating DHEAS concentrations were positively correlated to endogenous LH bioactive concentrations prior to, and were increased by hCG challenge while no concomitant change was observed in ovarian steroid hormone excretion. Conclusion These data demonstrate a positive adrenal androgen response to LH/CG in older female higher primates and suggests a mechanism for the rise in adrenal androgen production during the menopausal transition in women. These results also illustrate that the nonhuman primate animal model can be

  5. Premature menopause or early menopause and risk of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Miller, Virginia M.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The general consensus has been that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS). We reviewed new observational studies that challenge this simple conclusion. Methods This was a review of observational studies of the association of premature or early menopause with stroke or IS published in English from 2006 through 2010. Results Three cohort studies showed an increased risk of all stroke in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy compared with women who conserved their ovaries before age 50 years. The increased risk of stroke was reduced by hormonal therapy (HT) in one of the studies, suggesting that estrogen deprivation is involved in the association. Four additional observational studies showed an association of all stroke or IS with the early onset of menopause or with a shorter lifespan of ovarian activity. In three of the seven studies, the association was restricted to IS. Age at menopause was more important than type of menopause (natural vs induced). Conclusions The findings from seven recent observational studies challenge the consensus that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for IS and can be reconciled by a unifying timing hypothesis. We hypothesize that estrogen is protective for IS before age 50 years and may become a risk factor for IS after age 50 years or, possibly, after age 60 years. These findings are relevant to women who experienced premature or early menopause, or to women considering prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of natural menopause. PMID:21993082

  6. Cellulite in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leszko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  7. Cellulite in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszko, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  8. Clinical correlation between premature ovarian failure and a chromosomal anomaly in a 22-year-old Caucasian woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’Edera Domenico

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Premature ovarian failure is defined as the cessation of ovarian activity before the age of 40 years. It is biochemically characterized by low levels of gonadal hormones (estrogens and inhibins and high levels of gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. Case presentation Our patient, a 22-year-old Caucasian woman under evaluation for infertility, had experienced secondary amenorrhea from the age of 18. No positive family history was noted regarding premature menopause. An examination of our patient’s karyotype showed the presence of a reciprocal translocation, apparently balanced, which had the X chromosome long arm (q13 and the 14 chromosome short arm (p12 with consequent karyotype: 46, X, t(X; 14(q13;p12. Conclusions Our study has underlined that karyotyping is one of the fundamental investigations in the evaluation of amenorrhea. It highlighted a genetic etiology, in the form of a chromosomal abnormality, as the causal factor in amenorrhea.

  9. Binding sites for gonadotropins in human postmenopausal ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, R.; Shima, K.; Yamoto, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Nishimori, K.; Hiraoka, J.

    1989-02-01

    The binding of human LH and human FSH to postmenopausal ovarian tissue from 21 patients with cervical carcinoma was analyzed. The binding sites for FSH and LH were demonstrated in postmenopausal ovarian tissue. The surface-binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the cells of cortical stroma of the postmenopausal ovary. In addition, diffuse cytoplasmic staining of endogenous estrogen and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity were detected immunohistochemically and histochemically in the cells of the cortical stroma. Electron microscopic study also suggested steroidogenic function in the cells of the cortical stroma. The results of the present study suggest that postmenopausal ovaries contain specific binding sites for pituitary gonadotropins and play a role in ovarian steroidogenesis.

  10. The relationship between variation in size of the primordial follicle pool and age at natural menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depmann, M.; Faddy, M. J.; Van Der Schouw, Y. T.; Peeters, P. H M; Broer, S. L.; Kelsey, T. W.; Nelson, S. M.; Broekmans, F. J M

    2015-01-01

    Context: Menopause has been hypothesized to occur when the nongrowing follicle (NGF) number falls below a critical threshold. Age at natural menopause can be predicted using NGF numbers and this threshold. These predictions support the use of ovarian reserve tests, reflective of the ovarian follicle

  11. Age at menopause in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus : the OVADIA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarde, F.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; de Valk, H. W.; Franx, A.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Spierings, W.; Fauser, Bart; Broekmans, F. J. M.

    STUDY QUESTION: Is type 1 diabetes a determinant of advanced ovarian ageing, resulting in an early age at natural menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER: No clear evidence was provided that type 1 diabetes is a determinant of accelerated ovarian ageing resulting in an early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The

  12. Early or Premature Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email updates Enter email Submit Early or premature menopause Menopause that happens before age 40 is called ... What is the difference between early and premature menopause? Early or premature menopause happens when ovaries stop ...

  13. Hubungan Jumlah Paritas dengan Usia Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadya Gorga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakMenopause merupakan waktu penghentian menstruasi secara permanen yang terjadi setelah hilangnya aktivitas ovarium. Saat ini jumlah wanita usia menopause meningkat seiring dengan peningkatan usia harapan hidup. Studi tentang menopause sangat penting, terutama terkait akibat yang akan terjadi pasca menopause seperti penyakit kardiovaskuler dan osteoporosis. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan usia menopause alami dan menganalisis hubungannya terhadap jumlah paritas pada wanita di Kelurahan Bandar Buat Padang. Penelitian  ini merupakan  studi analitik cross-sectional terhadap wanita usia 45-60 tahun yang berada di Kelurahan Bandar Buat Padang. Pengumpulan data dilakukan melalui  wawancara dengan  menggunakan kuesioner  di rumah atau di tempat kerja mereka. Hasil penelitian menunjukan 69 wanita yang diteliti didapatkan rata-rata jumlah paritas adalah 3,663 dengan jumlah paritas 1 dan terbanyak memiliki 10 orang anak. Rata-rata usia menopause responden dalam penelitian ini adalah usia 50,65 tahun dengan usia termuda 46 tahun dan tertua 58 tahun. Terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara jumlah paritas dan usia menopause di Kelurahan Bandar Buat  dengan hasil p< 0,01.Kata kunci: menopause, jumlah paritas, penyakit kardiovaskuler, osteoporosis AbstractMenopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation period that occurs after the loss of ovarian activity. Currently, the number of women of menopausal age increases as the increase in life expectancy. The study of menopause is very important, especially related to the consequences that will occur after the menopause such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to determine the age of natural menopause and analyze its relationship on the amount of parity in the Village Bandar Buat Padang. This study was a cross-sectional analytic study to women aged 45-60 years  in the Village of Bandar Buat Padang. Data collected through interviews using a

  14. Immunoregulation of follicular renewal, selection, POF, and menopause in vivo, vs. neo-oogenesis in vitro, POF and ovarian infertility treatment, and a clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the regulation of tissue homeostasis ("tissue immune physiology"). Function of distinct tissues during adulthood, including the ovary, requires (1) Renewal from stem cells, (2) Preservation of tissue-specific cells in a proper differentiated state, which differs among distinct tissues, and (3) Regulation of tissue quantity. Such morphostasis can be executed by the tissue control system, consisting of immune system-related components, vascular pericytes, and autonomic innervation. Morphostasis is established epigenetically, during morphogenetic (developmental) immune adaptation, i.e., during the critical developmental period. Subsequently, the tissues are maintained in a state of differentiation reached during the adaptation by a “stop effect” of resident and self renewing monocyte-derived cells. The later normal tissue is programmed to emerge (e.g., late emergence of ovarian granulosa cells), the earlier its function ceases. Alteration of certain tissue differentiation during the critical developmental period causes persistent alteration of that tissue function, including premature ovarian failure (POF) and primary amenorrhea. In fetal and adult human ovaries the ovarian surface epithelium cells called ovarian stem cells (OSC) are bipotent stem cells for the formation of ovarian germ and granulosa cells. Recently termed oogonial stem cells are, in reality, not stem but already germ cells which have the ability to divide. Immune system-related cells and molecules accompany asymmetric division of OSC resulting in the emergence of secondary germ cells, symmetric division, and migration of secondary germ cells, formation of new granulosa cells and fetal and adult primordial follicles (follicular renewal), and selection and growth of primary/preantral, and dominant follicles. The number of selected follicles during each ovarian cycle is determined by autonomic innervation. Morphostasis is altered with advancing age, due

  15. Lipid profile of women with premature ovarian failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knauff, Erik A. H.; Westerveld, Hendrika E.; Goverde, Angelique J.; Eijkemans, Marinus J.; Valkenburg, Olivier; van Santbrink, Evert J. P.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Earlier menopause is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular events later in life. Concurrent with the ages of menopausal transition, a shift in lipid profile takes place. Premature ovarian failure (POF) or premature menopause allows LIS to Study the effect of cessation of

  16. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 745. Nelson, L. M. (2009). Primary ovarian insufficiency. New England Journal of Medicine, 360 , 606–614 . What are common symptoms? » Related A-Z Topics Infertility and Fertility Women's Health Menopause NICHD News Spotlights Getting to Know the New NICHD Director In Search of Answers for Those ...

  17. Morpho-physiological features associated with menopause: recent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from loss of ovarian follicular activity which happens as a result of depletion of primary follicles which is basically an aging effect. Depletion of ovarian follicles is reflected as declined production of oestradiol which is currently known to be central to the ...

  18. Menopause in patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    Menopause represents a time of significant clinical and hormonal change. Given the incompletely understood interrelationship between gonadal hormones and the immune system, it is possible that menopause may affect, or be affected by, the presence of autoimmune disease. Menopause has significant effects on a number of organ systems including the cardiovascular, skeletal, central nervous and genitourinary systems. Premature ovarian failure is related to autoimmune factors in a proportion of cases, but is not generally associated with systemic autoimmune disorders unless secondary to treatment with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. Gonadal hormones have been suggested to relate to both onset and activity in certain autoimmune diseases. For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, disease activity is lower, and damage accrual higher, in the postmenopausal years, but the mechanisms responsible may relate to age, duration of disease, menopause changes, long-term effects of therapy, or some combination of these factors. Early menopause is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, and post-menopausal status in RA is associated with greater damage and disability. Systemic sclerosis and giant cell arteritis may also be adversely affected by onset of menopause. Importantly, autoimmune disease and menopause may have an additive effect on risk for common comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Does the time interval between antimüllerian hormone serum sampling and initiation of ovarian stimulation affect its predictive ability in in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Nelson, Scott M; Stoop, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether the time interval between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) sampling and initiation of ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) may affect the predictive ability of the marker for low and excessive ovarian response.......To investigate whether the time interval between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) sampling and initiation of ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) may affect the predictive ability of the marker for low and excessive ovarian response....

  20. Epilepsy and menopause: potential implications for pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2014-09-01

    Being a woman with epilepsy is not the same as being a man with the disease. There is a complex multidirectional interaction between sex hormones, seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with gender-specific implications. Estrogen can be a potent proconvulsant, whereas progesterone is an anticonvulsant in experimental models. It is well established that women with epilepsy can have changes in seizure propensity related to their menstrual cycle (catamenial epilepsy). There is good evidence that the gonadotropin-releasing hormone cell population in the hypothalamus can be affected by seizures originating in the limbic system, possibly leading to anovulatory menses, possibly contributing to lower fertility, and earlier menopause among women with epilepsy. Data on the effects of menopause on epilepsy are scarce. In general, menopause appears to have limited effects on seizure control, with the possible exception of women with catamenial epilepsy who may experience an increase in seizure frequency during perimenopause and a decrease after menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has the potential to increase seizure frequency and thus cannot be recommended for women with epilepsy. Of particular relevance for menopause is the adverse effect on bone mineral density caused by enzyme inducers and other AEDs. In general, there is a remarkable shortage of studies on the impact of menopause on epilepsy and on its implications for epilepsy treatment.

  1. Hormonal changes in the menopause transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Henry G; Dudley, Emma C; Robertson, David M; Dennerstein, Lorraine

    2002-01-01

    The menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from the loss of ovarian follicular activity. It is heralded by the menopausal transition, a period when the endocrine, biological, and clinical features of approaching menopause begin. A common initial marker is the onset of menstrual irregularity. The biology underlying the transition to menopause includes central neuroendocrine changes as well as changes within the ovary, the most striking of which is a profound decline in follicle numbers. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is an established indirect marker of follicular activity. In studies of groups of women, its concentration, particularly in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, begins to increase some years before there are any clinical indications of approaching menopause. The rise in FSH is the result of declining levels of inhibin B (INH-B), a dimeric protein that reflects the fall in ovarian follicle numbers, with or without any change in the ability of the lining granulosa cells to secrete INH-B. Estradiol levels remain relatively unchanged or tend to rise with age until the onset of the transition and are usually well preserved until the late perimenopause, presumably in response to the elevated FSH levels. During the transition, hormone levels frequently vary markedly - hence, measures of FSH and estradiol are unreliable guides to menopausal status. Concentrations of testosterone have been reported to fall by about 50% during reproductive life, between the ages of 20 and 40. They change little during the transition and, after menopause, may even rise. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEAS, its sulphate, on the other hand, decline with age, without any specific influence of the menopause. Symptoms of the menopause can be interpreted as resulting primarily from the profound fall in estradiol, occurring over a 3- to 4-year period around final menses, a fall that presumably contributes importantly to the beginning, in the

  2. Menarche menopause breast cancer risk individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer; Bausch-Goldbohm, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected

  3. Premature Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal abnormalities are reported in. 10‑20% of cases involving X sex chromosomes.[3]. Genetic causes of premature menopause: • Examples of Chromosomal abnormalities. ‑ Turner's syndrome. ‑ Pure gonadal dysgenesis. ‑ Familial. ‑ Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 13. Metabolic. • 17 alpha‑hydroxylase deficiency.

  4. Controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF pregnancy in a trisomy X carrier with associated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarotti, Claudia; Fiorio, Patrizia; Gastaldi, Roberto; Rosaia De Santis, Lucia; Pastorino, Daniela; Remorgida, Valentino; Anserini, Paola

    2017-10-01

    We describe successful controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the first known IVF pregnancy in a trisomy X carrier with associated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) linked to a chromosome 4 double mutation in the allele of the Gonadotropins Releasing Hormone receptor (GnRHr) gene. Previous administration of low dose of gonadotropins, as recommended in patients with HH, led to poor follicular recruitment. Since trisomy X is a risk factor for diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) and premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), higher doses of gonadotropins led to better ovarian response. The report readknowledges the importance of a correct genetic evaluation in a competent laboratory as a reliable base for treatment planning in this kind of patients.

  5. MR evaluation of postmenopausal ovarian size. Comparison with surgical specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joja, Ikuo; Ishida, Kana; Matsushita, Toshi; Mimura, Seiichi; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Akagi, Noriaki; Miyagi, Yasunari; Hara, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    We investigated ovarian size after menopause using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and gross specimens obtained from patients with uterine cancer after menopause in whom normal ovaries were confirmed at the time of surgery. The relationships between size of ovarian long axis and age, the number of years since menopause, and age at menopause were statistically evaluated for 130 ovaries observed in short-axis T 2 -weighted MR images of the uterine corpus and in 147 ovarian gross specimens. No significant relationships were found between size of ovarian long axis and these 3 factors. When the sizes of the ovaries in MR images were compared with those in gross specimens, the latter were larger, with a statistically significant difference. Similarly, when the sizes of the ovaries observed or not observed in MR images were compared in gross specimens, the former were larger, with a statistically significant difference. These results indicate that the size of the ovarian long axis observed in MR images does not accurately reflect the true size of the long axis, but ovarian size strongly affects visualization of the ovaries in MR images after menopause. In addition, these results indicate that there are no significant relationships between ovarian size after menopause and age, the number of years since menopause, or age at menopause. (author)

  6. Management of menopause in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, A J

    2015-10-01

    Increasing breast cancer incidence and decreasing mortality have highlighted the importance of survivorship issues related to breast cancer. A consideration of the issues related to menopause is therefore of great importance to both women and clinicians. Menopause/menopausal symptoms, with significant negative effects on quality of life and potential long-term health impacts, may in women with breast cancer be associated with: (1) natural menopause occurring concurrently with a breast cancer diagnosis; (2) recurrence of menopausal symptoms following cessation of hormone replacement therapy; (3) treatment-induced menopause (chemotherapy, ovarian ablation/suppression) and adjuvant endocrine therapy. A variety of non-hormonal pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been investigated as therapeutic options for menopausal symptoms with mixed results, and ongoing research is required. This review presents a summary of the causes, common problematic symptoms of menopause (vasomotor, genitourinary and sexual dysfunction), and longer-term consequences (cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis) related to menopause. It proposes an evidenced-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of menopause/menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer.

  7. Menopause and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links ...

  8. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  9. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video Series-2016 Video Series-2017 Commercial Supporters Advertise in Menopause NAMS Corporate Liaison Council Outreach Opportunities ... menopause source Menopause Guidebook Sexual Health Module MenoPro Mobile App Hormone Therapy MenoNote NAMS Video Series Homepage ...

  10. Managing menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert; Abramson, Beth L; Blake, Jennifer; Desindes, Sophie; Dodin, Sylvie; Johnston, Shawna; Rowe, Timothy; Sodhi, Namrita; Wilks, Penny; Wolfman, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    To provide updated guidelines for health care providers on the management of menopause in asymptomatic healthy women as well as in women presenting with vasomotor or urogenital symptoms and on considerations related to cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, urogynaecology, and sexuality. Lifestyle interventions, prescription medications, and complementary and alternative therapies are presented according to their efficacy in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Counselling and therapeutic strategies for sexuality concerns in the peri- and postmenopausal years are reviewed. Approaches to the identification and evaluation of women at high risk of osteoporosis, along with options for prevention and treatment, are presented in the companion osteoporosis guideline. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library in August and September 2012 with the use of appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., hormone therapy, menopause, cardiovascular diseases, and sexual function) and key words (e.g., hormone therapy, perimenopause, heart disease, and sexuality). Results were restricted to clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Results were limited to publication dates of 2009 onwards and to material in English or French. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline until January 5, 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, and clinical practice guideline collections.

  11. Factors affecting age of onset of menopause and determination of quality of life in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Burcu; Özerdoğan, Nebahat

    2015-03-01

    Menopause is a process in the climacteric period, characterized by a reduction in ovarian activity, a fall in the fertility rate, and a range of symptoms including irregular menstruation intervals. Most women enter menopause in their 40s, but this can vary from one individual to another. Although there are many factors affecting the age of menopause onset, there is no general agreement on them. Studies have shown many factors to affect the age of menopause, such as the mother's age at menopause, the age at menarche, gestational age, use of oral contraceptives, irregular menstrual cycle, number of pregnancies, body mass index, use of tobacco and alcohol, physical activity, unilateral oophorectomy, serum lead levels, consumption of polyunsaturated fat, socioeconomic status and educational level. During this period, hormonal and biochemical changes give rise to various symptoms in the woman's body. In menopause period, physical, psychological, social and sexual changes have a negative effect on quality of life in women. Recently, different measures have been used to assess women's quality of life in this period of change. The purpose of this review was to examine the factors affecting the onset age of menopause and the measures of quality of life related to menopause.

  12. Premature ovarian failure : from phenotype to genotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knauff, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Postponement of childbearing has led to increased rates of age-related female subfertility. Age-related decreases in ovarian follicle numbers and decay in oocyte quality influence the natural loss of fecundity and ultimately the start of menopause. The rate of ovarian ageing is highly variable among

  13. Ovarian function after uterine artery embolisation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-05

    Aug 5, 2009 ... Premature menopause has been documented in 1 - 2% of patients after UAE and was believed to result from non- target embolisation of vessels to the ovaries from the uterine arteries.8 Doppler studies on ovarian vasculature showed evidence of significant vascular derangements in ovarian arterial ...

  14. Standardization of androstenedione and estrone radioimmunoassay and profile of sex steroids, gonadotropins and prolactin - in patients with chronic anovulation due to inappropriate feedback (polycystic ovarian syndrome); Padronizacao do radioimunoensaio da androstenediona e da estrona e o perfil dos esteroides sexuais, gonadotrofinas e prolactina em pacientes com anovulacao cronica por retrocontrole improprio (sindrome dos ovarios policisticos)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, Maria do Socorro Veras

    1992-12-01

    Full text. In order to evaluate the profile of the sex steroids gonadotropin and prolactin in polycystic ovarian syndrome (POS), 24 patients with POS were studied and compared with 20 normal women during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Radioimmunoassay techniques for androstenedione (A) and estrone (E{sub 1}) were standardized for the purpose of the study. Androstenedione and estrone were extracted from plasma with ethyl ether. The assays were maintained in equilibrium and the labelled hormone-antibody complex was then separated from the free hormone using dextran charcoal. The sensitivity of the method was 6.8 pg/tube for A and 3.7 pg/tube for E{sub 1}. Nonspecific binding ws 3.4 for A and 3.3 for E{sub 1}. The interessay error at the D50 level was 15.6 for A and 8.6 for E{sub 1}. Patients with POS had significantly higher basal levels of LH, A, T E{sub 1} and PRL and similar FSH and DHEA-S levels when compared with normal women. The LH/FSH ratio was significantly elevated and the A/T ratio was significantly decreased. The A/E{sub 1} and T/E{sub 2} ratios were elevated and the E{sub 1}/E{sub 2} was decreased, although the differences were not statistically significant. A positive correlation between A and E{sub 1} was observed in patients with POS. In view of the above data, it was concluded that: the quality control parameters of the radioimmunoassay for A and E{sub 1} standardized in the present study are considered satisfactory, and the assay could be used for diagnosis and research; the patients with POS have a different sex steroid and gonadotropin profile when compared normal women during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle

  15. Effects of pelvic telecobalt irradiation on gonadotropin secretin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfenninger, R.

    1978-01-01

    The pitnitary reaction in women operated according to Wertheim who had menstruated regularly was investigated during telecobalt irradiation. The pitnitary reaction was observed with the aid of the gonadotropin releasing factor. A dose of 25 mcg RH-LH was applied. Releasing factor examinations were carried out before exposure with functioning ovaries, after a dose of 2000 R (i.e., after 10 exposures), and after 6000 R. In the meantime, separate gonadotropin examinations were carried out continuously. A FSH reaction was observed already after 14 days, and the values were raised to almost menopause values. After this, the FSH increased further, while the LH reaction was not observed until much later. The investigation suggests an interrelation between follicle apparatus and FSH, oestrogens and LH. (orig./AJ) [de

  16. Corifollitropin alfa compared to daily rFSH or HP-HMG in GnRH antagonist controlled ovarian stimulation protocol for patients undergoing assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Priscila Morais Galvão; Carvalho, Bruno Ramalho de; Nakagawa, Hitomi Miura; Rassi, Thalita Reis Esselin; Barbosa, Antônio César Paes; Silva, Adelino Amaral

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the outcomes of controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with corifollitropin alfa versus daily recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rRFSH) or highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin (HP-HMG) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols. The primary endpoints were total number of oocytes and mature oocytes. This retrospective study looked into 132 controlled ovarian stimulation cycles from IVF or oocyte cryopreservation performed in a private human reproduction center between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Enrollment criteria: women aged 0.05). There were no significant differences in fertilization (76.9% vs. 76.8%, p=1.0), biochemical pregnancy (66.7% vs. 47.2%, p=0.1561) or embryo implantation rates (68.7% vs. 50%, p=0.2588) between the groups using corifollitropin alfa and rFSH or HMG, respectively. Corifollitropin alfa seems to be as effective as rFSH or HP-HMG when used in the first seven days of ovulation induction for patients undergoing assisted reproduction in GnRH antagonist protocols.

  17. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6663) • Hormone Health Network information about menopause —— www.hormone.org/Menopause —— www.hormone.org/MenopauseMap • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of ... in Spanish at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  18. Life course exposure to smoke and early menopause and menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Hebatullah; Kline, Jennie; Jacobson, Judith; Tehranifar, Parisa; Protacio, Angeline; Flom, Julie D; Cirillo, Piera; Cohn, Barbara A; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-10-01

    Early age at menopause is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, osteoporosis, and all-cause mortality. Cigarette smoke exposure in adulthood is an established risk factor for earlier age at natural menopause and may be related to age at the menopausal transition. Using data from two US birth cohorts, we examined the association between smoke exposure at various stages of the life course (prenatal exposure, childhood exposure to parental smoking, and adult smoke exposure) and menopause status in 1,001 women aged 39 to 49 years at follow-up. We used logistic regression analysis (adjusting for age at follow-up) to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) relating smoke exposure to natural menopause and the menopausal transition. The magnitudes of the associations for natural menopause were similar but not statistically significant after adjustment for confounders among (i) women with prenatal smoke exposure who did not smoke on adult follow-up (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.8-9.4) and (ii) current adult smokers who were not exposed prenatally (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 0.9-9.0). Women who had been exposed to prenatal smoke and were current smokers had three times the risk of experiencing earlier natural menopause (adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.1-10.3) compared with women without smoke exposure in either period. Only current smoking of long duration (>26 y) was associated with the timing of the menopausal transition. Our data suggest that exposure to smoke both prenatally and around the time of menopause accelerates ovarian aging.

  19. Nonsupplemented luteal phase characteristics after the administration of recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin, recombinant luteinizing hormone, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist to induce final oocyte maturation in in vitro fertilization patients after ovarian stimulation with recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and GnRH antagonist cotreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Macklon (Nick); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); M. Ludwig (Michael); R.E. Felberbaum; K. Diedrich; S. Bustion; E. Loumaye; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); N.G.M. Beckers (Nicole)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractReplacing GnRH agonist cotreatment for the prevention of a premature rise in LH during ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) by the late follicular phase administration of GnRH antagonist may render supplementation of the luteal phase redundant, because

  20. [Spermatogenesis of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone infusion versus gonadotropin therapy in male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingkun; Mao, Jiangfeng; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Nie, Min; Wu, Xueyan

    2015-05-26

    To compare the efficacies of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) versus human chorionic gonadotropin/human menopausal gonadotropin (HCG/HMG) for spermatogenesis in male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). For this retrospective study, a total of 92 male IHH outpatients from May 2010 to October 2014 were recruited and categorized into GnRH (n = 40) and HCG/HMG (n = 52) groups. Each subject selected one specific therapy voluntarily. The gonadotropin levels were measured in the first week and monthly post-treatment in GnRH group. And serum total testosterone (TT), testicular volume (TV) and rate of spermatogenesis were observed monthly post-treatment in two groups. Spermatogenesis, TT and TV were compared between two groups. All IHH patients were treated for over 3 months. The median follow-up periods in GnRH and HCG/HMG groups was 8.2 (3.0-18.4) and 9.2 (3.0-18.6) months respectively (P = 0.413). In GnRH group, LH ((0.5 ± 0.6) vs (3.4 ± 2.4) U/L, P < 0.01) and FSH ((1.3 ± 1.1) vs (5.8 ± 3.8) U/L, P < 0.01) increased after 1-week treatment. In GnRH group, at the end of follow-up, TT ((1.0 ± 1.0) vs (7.4 ± 5.2) nmol/L, P < 0.01) and TV ((2.3 ± 1.5) vs (8.1 ± 4.0) ml, P < 0.01) significantly increased compared to baseline. In HCG/HMG group, TT ((0.8 ± 0.6) vs (14.4 ± 8.0) nmol/L, P < 0.01) and TV ((2.3 ± 2.1) vs (7.6 ± 4.2) ml, P < 0.01) significantly increased after therapy. The success rate of spermatogenesis was 50.0% (20/40) in GnRH group versus 28.8% (15/52) in HCG/HMG group (P = 0.038). GnRH group required a shorter treatment time for initial sperm appearance than HCG/HMG group ((6.5 ± 3.1) vs (10.8 ± 3.7) months, P = 0.001). Pulsatile GnRH requires a shorter time for initiation of spermatogenesis than gonadotropin therapy in IHH male patients.

  1. Effect of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on in vitro oocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro exposure of Barilius vagra ovarian follicles to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) influenced the position of germinal vesicle and resulted in a maturation of oocyte, although the response was time dependent. There was slight but significant (P<0.05) increased in germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD, 12.42 vs.

  2. The evolutionary origin and significance of Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollycove, Ricki; Naftolin, Frederick; Simon, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary human females have long life expectancy (81y US), especially relative to age at menopause (51y US). Menopause is a consequence of reproductive aging and follicular depletion (ovarian failure), yielding very low circulating estrogen* serum concentrations and biologically disadvantageous metabolic alterations. Stated in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy, the ongoing hypoestrogenic endocrine environment, beneficial during lactation, results in acceleration of several age-related health conditions following menopause (i.e. late postmenopausal osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline). In contrast, the complex hypoestrogenic hormonal milieu present during postpartum lactation provides biologic advantages to both mother and newborn. The lactational hormonal milieu causes symptoms similar to those of the late perimenopause and early postmenopause, prompting theories for their biologic selective advantage. The precepts of evolutionary medicine encourage a reassessment of hormone therapy. Based on data presented, the authors propose additional opportunities for disease prevention and morbidity reduction in postmenopausal women. PMID:21252729

  3. The evolutionary origin and significance of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollycove, Ricki; Naftolin, Frederick; Simon, James A

    2011-03-01

    Contemporary women have long life expectancy (81 y, United States), especially relative to the age at menopause (51 y, United States). Menopause is a consequence of reproductive aging and follicular depletion (ovarian failure), yielding very low circulating estrogen serum concentrations and biologically disadvantageous metabolic alterations. Stated in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy, the ongoing hypoestrogenic endocrine environment, beneficial during lactation, results in acceleration of several age-related illnesses after menopause (ie, late postmenopausal osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive decline). Specifically, the similar hypoestrogenic hormonal milieu present during postpartum lactation provides biologic advantages (fitness) to both mother and newborn. These precepts of evolutionary medicine encourage a reassessment of hormone therapy, and on the basis of data presented the authors propose additional opportunities for disease prevention and morbidity reduction in postmenopausal women.

  4. Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation Increase the Number of Luteinized Follicles and the Progesterone Level Compared with Cabergoline Stimulation in Anoestrus Bitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczak, A; Domosławska, A; Bukowska, B; Janowski, T

    2016-08-01

    In this study, ovarian morphologies and blood progesterone concentrations following oestrous induction in bitches were examined. Fifty-three clinically healthy anoestrus bitches received cabergoline at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg of body weight per os for 21 days (group I) or subcutaneous equine chorionic gonadotropin at a dose of 20 IU/kg of body weight for five consecutive days with an additional 500 IU s.c. per bitch of human chorionic gonadotropin on the last day of treatment (group II). Twenty bitches that spontaneously displayed oestrous signs were left untreated and served as controls (group III). The induced oestrous rates and ovulation rates in groups I and II were 60.0% vs 64.3% and 86.7% vs 83.3%, respectively. Morphological assessments of the ovarian structures after ovariohysterectomy revealed an increase in the number of luteinized follicles and cysts in group II compared with the two other groups (p gonadotropin group (II) was increased (p gonadotropin treatment is associated with an increased progesterone level during the periovulatory period that probably originates from luteinized follicles, whereas cabergoline treatment induces cycles with both physiological progesterone concentrations and ovarian morphologies. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS...

  6. Ovarian stem cells and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, W; Bastu, E

    2012-04-01

    To review successes to date in the field of ovarian stem cell research and discuss the evidence supporting their potential to rejuvenate the follicular pool during adult life; to present factors that may contribute to their competence; and to address the question of why menopause is an inevitable outcome of advanced age if ovarian stem cells exist. In a review of the literature, relevant articles were identified through a PubMed literature search from inception to July 2010. The current concept that mammalian ovaries possess a static ovarian reserve is at odds with the experimental results discussed in this review. Ovarian stem cells are likely to be the source of germline stem cells during fetal and adult life, due to their potential to differentiate into competent oocytes given a suitable environment. Stem cells in different compartments share properties such as pluripotency, self-renewal, and diminished regenerative potential in old age. Our model of ovarian stem cell aging suggests that menopause is driven by an age-related decline in ovarian stem cell function rather than depletion of a non-renewable follicular reserve. Understanding how ovarian stem cells interact with their surrounding environment moves us a step closer to controlling the female biological clock when it might be clinically desirable.

  7. Paraneoplastic syndromes revealing ovarian teratoma in young and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paraneoplastic syndromes revealing ovarian teratoma in young and menopausal women: report of two cases. Majdouline Boujoual, Ihsan Hakimi, Farid Kassidi, Youssef Akhoudad, Nawal Sahel, Adil Rkiouak, Mohamed Allaoui, Hafsa Chahdi, Mohamed Oukabli, Jaouad Kouach, Driss Rahali Moussaoui, Mohamed ...

  8. Anti-Müllerian Hormone as a Sensitive Marker of Ovarian Function in Young Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Krawczuk-Rybak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated ovarian function by measuring the levels of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH, estradiol, and gonadotropins in 83 young women treated for cancer during childhood and adolescence, and classified according to post-treatment gonadal toxicity versus 38 healthy females. Results. The mean AMH values were lower in the entire cohort independently of the risk group as compared to the control, whereas FSH was elevated only in the high risk group. The lowest AMH values were noted in patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT and those treated for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. Nineteen patients (22.9% had elevated FSH. They all had low AMH values. Lowered AMH values (but with normal FSH and LH were observed in 43 patients (51.8%. There was no effect of age at the time of treatment (before puberty, during or after puberty on AMH levels. Conclusion. Our results show the utility of AMH measurement as a sensitive marker of a reduced ovarian reserve in young cancer survivors. Patients after BMT and patients treated for HL, independently of age at treatment (prepuberty or puberty, are at the highest risk of gonadal damage and early menopause.

  9. Sexual Health and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MenoNotes MenoPro Mobile App MenoPause Blog Sexual Health & Menopause Online Changes at Midlife How to Navigate This Online Resource ... on the left. We start by reviewing midlife changes related to menopause and aging. We then discuss common sexual problems ...

  10. Exercise through Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  11. Surgical versus natural menopause: cognitive issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Victor W; Sherwin, Barbara B

    2007-01-01

    Women who undergo both natural and surgical menopause experience the loss of cyclic ovarian production of estrogen, but hormonal and demographic differences distinguish these two groups of women. Our objective was to review published evidence on whether the premature cessation of endogenous estrogen production in women who underwent a surgical menopause has deleterious consequences for cognitive aging and to determine whether consequences differ for women if they undergo natural menopause. Studies of estrogen-containing hormone therapy are relevant to this issue. We reviewed evidence-based research, including the systematic identification of randomized clinical trials of hormone therapy with cognitive outcomes that included an objective measure of episodic memory. As inferred from very small, short-term, randomized, controlled trials of high-dose estrogen treatment, surgical menopause may be accompanied by cognitive impairment that primarily affects verbal episodic memory. Observational evidence suggests that the natural menopausal transition is not accompanied by substantial changes in cognitive abilities. For initiation of hormone therapy during perimenopause or early postmenopause when the ovaries are intact, limited clinical trial data provide no consistent evidence of short-term benefit or harm. There is stronger clinical trial evidence that initiation of hormone therapy in late postmenopause does not benefit episodic memory or other cognitive skills. Further research is needed on the long-term cognitive consequences of surgical menopause and long-term cognitive consequences of hormone therapy initiated near the time of surgical or natural menopause. A potential short-term cognitive benefit might be weighed when a premenopausal woman considers initiation of estrogen therapy at the time of, or soon after, hysterectomy and oophorectomy for benign conditions, although data are still quite limited and estrogen is not approved for this indication. Older

  12. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-10-03

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture of the hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but also other biologically active contaminants, such as growth factors, binding proteins and prion proteins. The actual amount of molecular LH in hMG preparations varies considerably due to the purification process, thus hCG, mimicking LH action, is added to standardise the product. However, unlike LH, hCG plays a different role during the natural human menstrual cycle. It is secreted by the embryo and placenta, and its main role is to support implantation and pregnancy. More recently, recombinant gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional differences between LH and hCG and assesses the clinical implications of hCG-supplemented urinary therapy compared with recombinant therapies used for ART.

  13. Radiation-induced premature menopause: a misconception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Berit L.; Giudice, Linda; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To disprove the common view that women who have undergone irradiation to fields excluding the pelvis are at risk for radiation-induced premature menopause, we reviewed menstrual function and fertility among women treated with subtotal lymphoid irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease. Methods and Materials: Treatment and follow-up records of all women less than age 50 at the time of diagnosis of Stage I or II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's Disease, treated with subtotal lymphoid irradiation alone and enrolled in radiotherapy trials from 1967 to 1985, were reviewed. In addition, patients were surveyed regarding their menstrual status and fertility history. Results: Thirty-six women, aged 10 to 40 years, with normal menstrual function at the time of Hodgkin's diagnosis, were identified. Mean follow-up was 14 years, with a range of 1.25-22.75 years. The average radiation dose to mantle and paraaortic fields was 40-44 Gy; the calculated scatter radiation dose to the pelvis at the ovaries was 3.2 Gy. There were 38 pregnancies in 18 women; all offspring are normal. One of 36 women (2.7%) experienced premature menopause. The reported rate of premature menopause in women who have not undergone irradiation is 1-3%; not significantly different than the rate in our study. There is a syndrome whereby antibodies to several endocrine organs occur (including the ovary), which is associated with premature ovarian failure. This syndrome may be associated with prior radiation to the thyroid, such as that given by mantle-irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease. We report such a case. Conclusion: There is little risk of premature menopause in women treated with radiation fields that exclude the pelvis. Women with presumed radiation-induced premature menopause warrant an evaluation to exclude other causes of ovarian failure, such as autoimmune disorders

  14. Hormonal changes and biomarkers in late reproductive age, menopausal transition and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, G E; Burger, H G

    2009-02-01

    This chapter describes current definitions of the climacteric, perimenopause, menopausal transition and menopause, and discusses the 2001 Stages of Reproductive Aging (STRAW) criteria in relation to more recently proposed categorization criteria for reproductive aging. Data from endocrine studies on women throughout the menopausal transition are discussed from earliest to most recent. The earlier studies focused on the changes in levels of steroid hormones and gonadotrophins, and established that follicle-stimulating hormone undergoes the first detectable change while menstrual cycles remain regular. Erratic and less predictable changes in steroid hormones follow, especially with the onset of irregular cycles. Later serum hormone studies on the inhibins and anti-Mullerian hormone established that diminishing ovarian follicle number contributes to the endocrine changes with advancing reproductive age. A classification system of cycle types incorporating all available endocrine data and their associated menstrual cycle patterns is proposed, and the application of biological markers as diagnostic tools for reproductive staging is discussed.

  15. Obesity and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Polotsky, Alex J

    2015-05-01

    Over the recent decades, the prevalence of obesity in the United States has increased to epidemic proportions to more than 35% of adults, along with an increased risk of a number of health conditions, including hypertension, adverse lipid concentrations, and type 2 diabetes. The relationships between menopausal transition, weight gain, and obesity are reported but incompletely understood. The association between menopause and these measures has been the subject of many studies, along with examining their effect on reproductive hormones and menopausal symptoms. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is published in the literature on this subject and examine it through: (1) the possible impact of obesity on the timing of menopause; (2) the effect of obesity on menopausal symptoms and reproductive hormones around the time of menopause; and (3) the effect of menopause on obesity, weight gain, and body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. -Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Russell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiated liposarcomas may display a variety of “heterologous” lines of differentiation, including osseous, vascular, skeletal, and/or smooth muscular. There have been six previously reported examples of leiomyosarcomas associated with high levels of serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG production, comprised of cases originating from the retroperitoneum, spermatic cord, small intestine, and uterus. This report describes the first example of a dedifferentiated liposarcoma that combined both of the aforementioned features: extensive heterologous (leiomyosarcomatous differentiation and -hCG production (maximum serum levels 1046 mIU/ml, reference <5 mIU/ml. The tumor, which originated in the retroperitoneum in the region of the right kidney, was rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal within three months of its diagnosis. In addition to characteristic morphologic features, lipogenic and smooth muscle differentiation were confirmed with immunohistochemical stains for MDM2 and smooth muscle actin, respectively. The tumor also displayed diffuse immunoreactivity for -hCG in both primary and metastatic sites. This case further expands the clinicopathologic spectrum of lipogenic tumors.

  17. The Menopause Time of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet examines menopause and the changes associated with it. Menopause is briefly described, surgical menopause is explained, and the relationship between menopause and the reproductive cycle is discussed. Signs of menopause are described, including hot flashes and vaginal and urinary tract changes. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is explained…

  18. Endocrine regulation of gonadotropin glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa-Aguirre, A; Maldonado, A; Damián-Matsumura, P; Timossi, C

    2001-01-01

    The pituitary gonadotropins--luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone--as well as the placental choriogonadotropin belong to the family of glycoprotein hormones. These structurally related hormones, which regulate several major reproductive functions of the body, are heterodimers consisting of a common alpha-subunit noncovalently bound to a beta-subunit. The N- and O-linked oligosaccharide chains of these gonadotropins play an important role in intracellular folding, assembly, secretion, metabolic clearance, and biological activity of the hormone. Gonadotropin glycosylation is a highly complex process; within the gonadotropes it is modulated by a variety of extrapituitary factors of hypothalamic and gonadal origin. In particular, estrogens and androgens appear to regulate terminal sialylation and/or sulfation of the oligosaccharide attachments and hence some functional properties of the gonadotropin molecule determined by these residues, i.e., metabolic clearance and in vivo biopotency. Through these extrapituitary inputs, the anterior pituitary may not only regulate the quantity but also the quality of the gonadotropin signal delivered to the gonads in a given physiologic or pathologic condition.

  19. Premature ovarian failure in twins: case report | Wanyoike-Gichuhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Premature ovarian failure (POF)is a serious life-changing condition that affects young women, remains an enigma and the researchers' challenge. POF, premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), premature menopause, premature dysfunction (POD), or hypergonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the most perplexing disorders ...

  20. The effect of soy intake on menopausal symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pérez-Rovira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The menopause is characterized by a reduction in ovarian function and estrogen production. Altogether, these changes together lead to a series of disorders that may affect the woman’s life style. Currently, medicine, influenced by the pharmaceutical industry, is prone to act aggressively against any symptoms, resulting in. polymedicated population. Doctors usually prescribe treatments such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT, to help them manage menopause symptoms. However, recently, several studies have reported adverse effects associated with this treatment. The influence of diet on several chronic diseases in western societies is currently well known. Therefore, dietary therapies, including dietary soy and isoflavone supplements, have been proposed for the reduction of menopause symptoms. Several published studies have suggested isoflavones, which have a great estrogenic power, as an HRT alternative for the relief of menopause symptoms. However, our current understanding on the effects of isoflavone supplements on the menopause symptoms is limited, and scientific publications show heterogenous results. Due to those arguments, the objective of this review is to address some of the mechanisms of isoflavones and their role in the menopausal period, postulating that, as food supplements, they could be used as a complementary therapy for menopause symptoms.

  1. Menopause in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Kavitha; Hou, Susan

    2018-03-09

    Most women with dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 (CKD stage 5D) are in the postmenopausal age group. Early menopause is reported for all CKD stages (stages 3-5D). The traditional definition of menopause is not applicable in CKD stage 5(D) because menses can resume with hormone replacement therapy or kidney transplantation. Treatment of vasomotor symptoms continues to be the primary indication for hormone replacement therapy, with no dosing studies done specifically for CKD or kidney transplantation populations. Similarly, the risk for cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in menopause is well described in healthy women, but the role that menopause plays in accelerating the risk further in CKD/kidney transplantation is yet to be explored. Lack of data and specific guidance on management make the long-term effects of menopause one of the most under-recognized and neglected patient problems in clinical nephrology. The efficacy and side effects of widely available therapeutic options in healthy women for menopause-related clinical manifestations, be it hormone replacement therapy for vasomotor symptoms or antiresorptive agents for osteoporosis, are to be tested in kidney transplantation and CKD populations. Longitudinal clinical trials are in need to define menopause in CKD and determine the role that CKD plays in menopause transition and menopause on CKD manifestations. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Herbal Treatment in Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Gun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The digest has been prepared to review available clinical evidence on herbs used in treatment of menopause symptoms. Effectiveness of Humulus lupulus, Vitex agnus-castus, Dioskorea vilosa, Linum usitatissimum, Pinus pinaster, cruciferous vegetables, Cimicifuga racemosa L., Angelica sinensis, Oenothera biennis L., Hypericum perforatum L., Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, Glycine soja, Trifolium pratense and Piper methysticum herbs were assessed for treatment of menopausal symptoms in the studies. Herbs used as alternative supplementary treatment for menopause symptoms have been found to have a limited effect. Thus more studies are warranted to assess effectiveness of herbal treatments for menopausal symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 520-530

  3. The Menopausal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Janice L

    2017-06-01

    A clear understanding of the physiology of the menopausal transition, clinical symptoms, and physical changes is essential for individualized patient management, maximizing benefits and minimizing risks for the present and the future. Menopause, defined by amenorrhea for 12 consecutive months, is determined retrospectively and represents a permanent end to menses. Many physical changes occur during the menopausal transition and beyond. Knowledge of symptoms and findings experienced by women undergoing the menopausal transition allow individualized care- improving quality of life and enhancing wellbeing for years to come. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic disorders in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Grzegorz; Pertyński, Tomasz; Pertyńska-Marczewska, Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance - IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus - T2DM) or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women's life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases) in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT). According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy). Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  5. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  6. Expression of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 during follicle development in the rat ovary. Effects of gonadotropin stimulation and hypophysectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2012-01-01

    Daily oscillations of clock genes have recently been demonstrated in the ovaries of several species. Clock gene knockout or mutant mice demonstrate a variety of reproductive defects. Accumulating evidence suggests that these rhythms act to synchronise the expression of specific ovarian genes...... examined the ovaries of prepubertal rats, of prepubertal rats stimulated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and of hypophysectomised adult animals. Using quantitative reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridisation histochemistry...

  7. Radioimmunoassay for rhesus monkey gonadotropins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiman, C.; Stearns, E.L.; Winter, J.S.D.; Reyes, F.I.; Hobson, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Heterologous double-antibody radioimmunoassay methods are described for the measurement of circulating levels of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) FSH and LH; the latter assay is also applicable to rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (CG) estimations. The FSH assay utilizes purified rat FSH for trace, either of two anti-human FSH antisera and a semipurified rhesus pituitary standard. The LH assay utilizes purified ovine LH for trace, an anti-human CG antiserum and the same rhesus pituitary standard. The use of these systems obviates the necessity of purifying rhesus gonadotropins which are required for the development of homologous radioimmunoassay systems. (U.S.)

  8. Study on the differences between the serum sex hormones levels in menopausal women and patients with secondary amenorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhaohui

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the differences between the ovarian function in menopausal women and patients with secondary amenorrhea with measurement of serum sex hormones levels. Methods: Serum FSH, LH, E 2 prolactin, progesterone and testosterone levels were measured with RIA in: (1) 40 women with normal menstration (2) 40 menopausal women and (3) 40 patients with secondary amenorrhea. Results: Among the three groups, the serum FSH and LH levels wre highest in the menopausal women with secondary amenorrhea patients the next. On the contrary, the serum E 2 levels were lowest in the menopausal women with secondary amenorrhea patients the next. The sreum prolactin levels in women with normal menstruation and menopausal women were about the same and both were significantly lower than those in patients with secondary amenorrhea. The serum progestrone levels were extremely low in menopausal women (0.63 ± 0.39 ng/ml), while the levels in patients with secondary menopause were only moderately decreased (4.91 ± 2. 83 ng/ml vs 11.25 ± 4.51 ng/ml in women with normal menstruation), indicating possible presence of ovulation. Testosterone levels were also lowest in menopausal women. Conclusion: Ovarian atrophy with functional failure was present in menopausal women. Secondury amenorrhea was usually due to dysfunction of hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary-uterus axis (HPOV axis) with rentention of ovarian function. (authors)

  9. A mild ovarian stimulation strategy in women with poor ovarian reserve undergoing IVF: a multicenter randomized non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, M A; van Wely, M; Al-Inany, H; Madani, T; Jahangiri, N; Khodabakhshi, S; Alhalabi, M; Akhondi, M; Ansaripour, S; Tokhmechy, R; Zarandi, L; Rizk, A; El-Mohamedy, M; Shaeer, E; Khattab, M; Mochtar, M H; van der Veen, F

    2017-01-01

    In subfertile women with poor ovarian reserve undergoing IVF does a mild ovarian stimulation strategy lead to comparable ongoing pregnancy rates in comparison to a conventional ovarian stimulation strategy? A mild ovarian stimulation strategy in women with poor ovarian reserve undergoing IVF leads to similar ongoing pregnancy rates as a conventional ovarian stimulation strategy. Women diagnosed with poor ovarian reserve are treated with a conventional ovarian stimulation strategy consisting of high-dose gonadotropins and pituitary downregulation with a long mid-luteal start GnRH-agonist protocol. Previous studies comparing a conventional strategy with a mild ovarian stimulation strategy consisting of low-dose gonadotropins and pituitary downregulation with a GnRH-antagonist have been under powered and their effectiveness is inconclusive. This open label multicenter randomized trial was designed to compare one cycle of a mild ovarian stimulation strategy consisting of low-dose gonadotropins (150 IU FSH) and pituitary downregulation with a GnRH-antagonist to one cycle of a conventional ovarian stimulation strategy consisting of high-dose gonadotropins (450 IU HMG) and pituitary downregulation with a long mid-luteal GnRH-agonist in women of advanced maternal age and/or women with poor ovarian reserve undergoing IVF between May 2011 and April 2014. Couples seeking infertility treatment were eligible if they fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: female age ≥35 years, a raised basal FSH level >10 IU/ml irrespective of age, a low antral follicular count of ≤5 follicles or poor ovarian response or cycle cancellation during a previous IVF cycle irrespective of age. The primary outcome was ongoing pregnancy rate per woman randomized. Analyses were on an intention-to-treat basis. We randomly assigned 195 women to the mild ovarian stimulation strategy and 199 women to the conventional ovarian stimulation strategy. Ongoing pregnancy rate was 12.8% (25/195) for mild

  10. Long-term function of ovarian tissue transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman J. Silber

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The long term duration of function of ovarian cortical tissue grafts is reviewed in this paper by describing cases of restoration of fertility by transplant of ovarian cortical tissue from matching donors where the recipient was in need of the transplant due to sterilizing effects of leukemia, premature ovarian failure (POF, and to reflect that it may be possible to postpone the normal time of menopause or to alleviate its symptoms.

  11. Adrenal androgens and the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasley, Bill L; Crawford, Sybil; McConnell, Daniel S

    2011-09-01

    The concept that adrenal androgen production gradually declines with age has changed after analysis of longitudinal data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). It is now recognized that 4 adrenal androgens rise during the menopausal transition in most women. Ethnic and individual differences in sex steroids are more apparent in circulating adrenal steroids than in either estradiol or cyclic ovarian steroid hormone profiles, particularly during the early and late perimenopause. Thus, adrenal steroid production may play a larger role in the occurrence of symptoms and the potential for healthier aging than previously recognized.

  12. Disturbances of sleep continuity in women during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słopień, Radosław; Wichniak, Adam; Pawlak, Michał; Słopień, Agnieszka; Warenik-Szymankiewicz, Alina; Sajdak, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of sleep continuity disorders in women during menopausal transition, to evaluate the relationship between disturbances of sleep continuity and the severity of menopausal syndrome and the occurrence of various symptoms of this syndrome, as well as to evaluate the association between the presence of sleep disturbances and serum concentrations of gonadotropins, prolactin and sex hormones. Consecutive 140 women (mean age 54.4 ± 4.7 years) searching for the treatment in the Clinic for Gynaecological Endocrinology who reported symptoms of menopausal syndrome were investigated. The type and severity of disturbances of sleep continuity were evaluated using a survey based on the sleep related questions from Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The severity of symptoms of menopausal syndrome was assessed using the Kupperman Index. The concentration of the following hormones in blood serum was tested: FSH, LH, 17β-estradiol, PRL, total testosterone, DHEAS and SHBG. Disturbances of sleep continuity were a prevalent complaint in the studied group of women. Difficulties in falling asleep were found in 57.8% of women, difficulties in maintaining sleep in 70%, waking up too early in 60.7%. The severity of all three types of sleep continuity disturbances was related to the severity of menopausal syndrome as measured with Kupperman Index (Spearman correlation coefficient r = 0.63, r = 0.61, r = 0.52, respectively; p sleep were negatively correlated with the concentration of FSH (r = - 0.19; p Sleep continuity disturbances are frequently reported by women during the menopausal transition. Interventions aimed at reducing the symptoms of menopausal syndrome should be considered as important action to improve sleep quality in this population of patients.

  13. Menopause and Methodological Doubt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Menopause and methodological doubt begins by making a tongue-in-cheek comparison between Descartes' methodological doubt and the self-doubt that can arise around menopause. A hermeneutic approach is taken in which Cartesian dualism and its implications for the way women are viewed in society are examined, both through the experiences of women…

  14. Menopause and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rina; Assalman, Iyas; Bottlender, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    We have come a long way from our understanding of the menopause as it was described in the 11th century by Trotula of Salerno, a female gynaecologist who said 'there are older women who give forth blood matter especially as menopause approaches them'. Yet very little is known about the impact menopause has on the mental health of women especially severe and enduring illnesses like schizophrenia. A lot of research has shown that estrogen acts as a protective factor due to its antidopaminergic properties, thus providing an explanation for the increase in risk of a new psychotic disorder during the menopause. This has further led to the hypothesis of hormone replacement therapy providing benefits in the management of these disorders in menopausal women. This review article highlights the importance of a clear understanding of this phase of life in patients suffering from or who present with a risk of developing schizophrenia.

  15. SELUK BELUK MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannywati Ghani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Menopause, especially the symptoms and complications, is always an interesting topic to be discussed. It is actually a normal part of woman's life entering ages of 50. The symptoms of menopause are highly individual to each woman. Some may experience multiple physical and psychological symptoms that may continue to social impacts. Misinterpretation as other disease symptoms could happen and lead to incorrect treatment. Many studies have been done to learn more about the menopause physiological process, symptoms, complication, and treatment. So many preventive and treatment options are offered, including hormone therapy and practicing healthy life style. By understanding the menopause, it is expected that symptoms could be controlled and complications could be avoided.   Key words : Woman, Menstrual Period, Menopause, Healthy

  16. Hand osteoarthritis, menopause and menopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest musculoskeletal conditions, primarily affecting women over the age of 50, typically around the age of the menopause. Symptomatic disease can give rise to substantial pain, impairment of hand function and quality of life, leading to significant socioeconomic cost. There is currently no disease-modifying therapy, representing a huge unmet clinical need. The evidence for a relationship between hand OA and the menopause is summarised. Whether there is evidence for an effect of menopausal hormonal therapy on the incidence, prevalence or severity of symptomatic hand OA is critically reviewed, and gaps in our knowledge identified. Lastly, the potential mechanisms by which estrogen, or newer agents such as SERMs, might act to interfere with disease pathogenesis are overviewed. The need for specifically designed, controlled trials of agents in cohorts with symptomatic hand OA, refractory to standard symptomatic management is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anthropology and the study of menopause: evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy

    2014-10-01

    This work aims to consider how the discipline of anthropology contributes to the study of menopause through evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives. This study was a review of skeletal and ethnographic evidence for menopause and postreproductive life in humans' distant past, hypotheses for the evolution of menopause and long postreproductive life, variation in age at menopause with focus on childhood environments, and the study of variation in symptom experience across populations. Longevity, rather than capacity for menopause, sets humans apart from other primates. Skeletal evidence demonstrates that some Neanderthals and archaic Homo sapiens lived to the age at menopause and that at least one third of women in traditional foraging populations live beyond menopause. The evolutionary reasons for why women experience a long postreproductive life continue to be debated. A developmental perspective suggests that early childhood may be a critical time for the environment to irreversibly influence the number of oocytes or rate of follicular atresia and, ultimately, age at menopause. A comparative perspective examines symptom experience at midlife through participant observation, qualitative interviews, and quantitative instruments to gain a holistic understanding of the meaning, experience, and sociocultural context of menopause. An evolutionary perspective suggests that menopause is not a recent phenomenon among humans. A developmental perspective focuses on the influence of early childhood on ovarian function. A comparative perspective expands clinical norms and provides knowledge about the range of human variations.

  18. Ovarian Aging : Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, F. J.; Soules, M. R.; Fauser, B. C.

    Menopause is the final step in the process referred to as ovarian ageing. The age related decrease in follicle numbers dictates the onset of cycle irregularity and the final cessation of menses. The parallel decay in oocyte quality contributes to the gradual decline in fertility and the final

  19. Immature ovarian teratoma in a postmenopausal woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornvold, K; Detlefsen, G U; Horn, T

    1987-01-01

    We report the first case of immature ovarian teratoma occurring after menopause in a 57-year-old, 3 years postmenopausal woman. Within one year after resection of the teratoma she developed peritoneal botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma, which probably originated from initially unrecognized rhabdomyoblasts...

  20. Elevated human chorionic gonadotropin and hyperandrogenemia in a woman with Müllerian agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickler, Robyn L; Hoffman, Mitchel S; Plosker, Shayne M

    2014-02-01

    Müllerian agenesis is a congenital malformation characterized by absence of the uterus, cervix, and upper vagina. A positive home pregnancy test in a woman with Müllerian agenesis mandated evaluation for malignancy. A woman with Müllerian agenesis presented with elevated levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), abdominal and pelvic computed tomography scan, chest computed tomography scan, brain MRI, and body positron emission tomography scan did not identify a malignancy. Human chorionic gonadotropin characterization revealed 74% hyperglycosylated and 1.6% free β-hCG, suggesting a trophoblast-containing tumor. Interventional ovarian venous sampling and repeat pelvic MRI suggested a right adnexal source. After laparoscopic removal of a stage 1C right ovarian dysgerminoma, hCG and testosterone returned to normal. A dysgerminoma coincident with Müllerian agenesis expressed hCG before detection by MRI. Human chorionic gonadotropin molecular characterization, ovarian vein sampling, and repeat pelvic MRI led to successful treatment.

  1. The preservation of ovarian function in young women undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseinzadeh, N.; Nahhas, W.A.; Velkley, D.E.; Whitney, C.W.; Mortel, R.

    1984-01-01

    Because cervical carcinoma rarely metastasizes to the ovaries, it became logical to preserve ovarian function by the method of lateral ovarian transposition as part of the management of young women with this disease. This technique prevents castration should subsequent radiation therapy be planned or become necessary. Forty patients with carcinoma of the cervix or vagina underwent unilateral or bilateral ovarian transposition. Eighteen patients received radiation therapy. Of these, 16 had gonadotropin measurements and only 6 (37%) had levels elevated to the postmenopausal range. If patients whose ovaries were not shielded or who received paraaortic radiotherapy are excluded, then only two (17%) had elevated gonadotropin values. It is concluded that, if properly performed, lateral ovarian transposition and ovarian shielding will protect ovarian function in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy

  2. Efficacy and Outcome Predictors of Gonadotropin Treatment for Male Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoxiang; Mao, Jangfeng; Wu, Xueyan; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Huang, Bingkun; Zheng, Junjie; Nie, Min; Zhang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gonadotropin induces masculinization and spermatogenesis in men with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). However, large cohort studies for the efficacy and reliable predictors of this therapy need to be conducted. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of gonadotropin treatment in a large cohort of male CHH patients and analyze putative predictors for successful spermatogenesis. This retrospective study included 223 CHH azoospermic patients without puberty development treated between 2005 and 2014. All patients received combined human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) and were followed up for >6 months (5109 person-months). Serum total testosterone level, testicular size, spermatogenesis, and pregnancy outcome were recorded at each visit. After gonadotropin therapy, testicular size was enlarged from 2.1 ± 1.6 to 8.1 ± 4.6 mL (P 0/mL) occurred at a median period of 15 months (95% confidence interval 13.5–16.5). Larger basal testicular volume (P = 0.012) and noncryptorchidism history (P = 0.028) are independent predictors for earlier sperm appearance. Sixty four percent (143/223) of patients succeeded in producing sperms and the average time for initial sperm detection was 14 ± 8 months. However, their sperm concentrations (11.7 [2.1, 24.4] million/mL) and sperm progressive motility (A + B 36.9% ± 20.2%) are significantly lower than World Health Organization standards. Of the 34 patients who desired for fathering children, 19 patients impregnanted their partners during the treatment. Gonadotropin therapy induces spermatogenesis in male CHH patients. A larger basal testicular size and noncryptorchidism history are favorable indicators for earlier spermatogenesis. PMID:26945370

  3. HDL and the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoudary, Samar R

    2017-08-01

    To summarize recent provocative findings on conventional and novel metrics of HDL including HDL-C, HDL subclasses and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity as related to menopause. Pattern of menopause-related changes in HDL-C are not consistent, suggesting a complex relationship between HDL and menopause. Growing body of literature indicates that higher levels of HDL-C may not be consistently cardio-protective in midlife women, suggesting a potential change in other metrics of HDL that could not be captured by the static metric HDL-C. It is also possible that higher HDL-C at certain conditions could be a marker of HDL metabolism dysfunctionality. Significant alterations in other metrics of HDL have been reported after menopause and found to be related to estradiol. The impact of changes in novel metrics of HDL over the menopausal transition on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk later in life is not clear in women. Much of our understanding of how the menopausal transition may impact HDL metrics comes from cross-sectional studies. Future longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate other metrics of HDL shown to better reflect the cardio-protective capacities of HDL, so that the complex association of menopause, HDL and CVD risk could be characterized.

  4. Dual trigger with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin improves in vitro fertilization outcome in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seval, Mehmet Murat; Özmen, Batuhan; Atabekoğlu, Cem; Şükür, Yavuz Emre; Şimşir, Coşkun; Kan, Özgur; Sönmezer, Murat

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether dual trigger with leuprolide acetate plus recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) improves in vitro fertilization outcome in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycles. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with mild male factor, unexplained or tubal factor infertility were enrolled in the study. All subjects were allocated into one of two groups: the dual trigger group (leuprolide acetate 500 μg + recombinant hCG 250 μg) and the standard group (recombinant hCG 250 μg) according to the selected trigger method. Oocyte trigger was performed when at least three follicles >17 mm were observed. Pregnancy rate, number of collected oocytes, number of metaphase II oocytes, number of grade-A embryos, cycle cancellation rate, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rate were the main outcome measures for the study. The mean number of grade-A embryos (1.6 ± 1.5 vs 1.1 ± 1.4, P = 0.01) and of metaphase II oocytes (7.9 ± 4.6 vs 6.3 ± 5.8, P = 0.02) was significantly higher in the dual-trigger group. Pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the dual-trigger group than in the standard group (54.8 vs 37.5%, P = 0.006). Two cases of mild ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome were observed in each group. This novel and more physiological trigger approach using 500 μg leuprolide acetate plus 250 μg recombinant hCG may lead to an increase in the number of metaphase II oocytes, grade-A embryos, and may improve pregnancy rates. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy is associated with earlier spermatogenesis compared to combined gonadotropin therapy in patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Feng Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH infusion and combined gonadotropin therapy (human chorionic gonadotropin and human menopausal gonadotropin [HCG/HMG] are effective to induce spermatogenesis in male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH. However, evidence is lacking as to which treatment strategy is better. This retrospective cohort study included 202 patients with CHH: twenty had received pulsatile GnRH and 182 had received HCG/HMG. Patients had received therapy for at least 12 months. The total follow-up time was 15.6 ± 5.0 months (range: 12-27 months for the GnRH group and 28.7 ± 13.0 months (range: 12-66 months for the HCG/HMG group. The median time to first sperm appearance was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-10.4 in the GnRH group versus 18 months (95% CI: 16.4-20.0 in the HCG/HMG group (P 1 × 10 6 ml−1 was 43.7% ± 20.4% (16 samples in the GnRH group versus 43.2% ± 18.1% (153 samples in the HCG/HMG group (P = 0.921. Notably, during follow-up, the GnRH group had lower serum testosterone levels than the HCG/HMG group (8.3 ± 4.6 vs 16.2 ± 8.2 nmol l−1 , P < 0.001. Our study found that pulsatile GnRH therapy was associated with earlier spermatogenesis and larger testicular size compared to combined gonadotropin therapy. Additional prospective randomized studies would be required to confirm these findings.

  6. Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy is associated with earlier spermatogenesis compared to combined gonadotropin therapy in patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiang-Feng; Liu, Zhao-Xiang; Nie, Min; Wang, Xi; Xu, Hong-Li; Huang, Bing-Kun; Zheng, Jun-Jie; Min, Le; Kaiser, Ursula Brigitte; Wu, Xue-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Both pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) infusion and combined gonadotropin therapy (human chorionic gonadotropin and human menopausal gonadotropin [HCG/HMG]) are effective to induce spermatogenesis in male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). However, evidence is lacking as to which treatment strategy is better. This retrospective cohort study included 202 patients with CHH: twenty had received pulsatile GnRH and 182 had received HCG/HMG. Patients had received therapy for at least 12 months. The total follow-up time was 15.6 ± 5.0 months (range: 12-27 months) for the GnRH group and 28.7 ± 13.0 months (range: 12-66 months) for the HCG/HMG group. The median time to first sperm appearance was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-10.4) in the GnRH group versus 18 months (95% CI: 16.4-20.0) in the HCG/HMG group (P 1 × 10 6 ml-1 was 43.7% ± 20.4% (16 samples) in the GnRH group versus 43.2% ± 18.1% (153 samples) in the HCG/HMG group (P = 0.921). Notably, during follow-up, the GnRH group had lower serum testosterone levels than the HCG/HMG group (8.3 ± 4.6 vs 16.2 ± 8.2 nmol l-1 , P < 0.001). Our study found that pulsatile GnRH therapy was associated with earlier spermatogenesis and larger testicular size compared to combined gonadotropin therapy. Additional prospective randomized studies would be required to confirm these findings.

  7. Gonadotropins studies in female egyptian subjects under different physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nabarawy, F.S.; Megahed, Y.M.; Ibrahim, M.

    2002-01-01

    This study is concerned with the role of the hypothalamic hypophyseal regulatory hormonal mechanisms in the control of gonadal secretions in a selected normal egyptian female subjects with varying ages under different physiological conditions. The study allowed precise definition of the modulator influence of a number of key factors triggering appropriate alteration in circulating serum levels of FSH and LH determined by IRMA technique in pre-pubertal female children (9-11), post-pubertal adolescents females (13-16). Adult married females (27-33) and post-menopausal (58-63). The levels of FSH and LH were increased markedly with age but children less than 11 years old had only nocturnal increase in levels of FSH (p.O.I) and LH(P< 0.001). post-pubertal aged girls had significant nocturnal elevation only of LH levels (P< 0.001), adult married females did not exhibit significant difference in gonadotropin concentrations. whereas significant elevation in FSH and LH levels (P<0.001) in post-menopausal females were observed

  8. An Update on Ovarian Aging and Ovarian Reserve Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migraci Tosun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovaries are the female organs that age more quickly than other tissues such as the uterus, the pituitary gland or pancreas. Different from males, an interesting question is why and how the females lose fertility so rapidly. During the aging process, both the number and quality of the oocytes in the ovaries decrease and reach to a point beyond that no more viable offspring may be produced and the associated cyclic endocrinological activities cease, entering the menopause in females at an average age of 50 years. Females who delayed childbearing with or without their willing until their 30 years or 40 years constitute the largest portion of the total infertility population. Ovarian reserve tests (ORTs provide an indirect estimate of a female�s diminishing ovarian reserve or remaining follicular pool. This article briefly reviews recent progresses in relation to ovarian aging and ORTs.

  9. Delayed menopause due to granulosa cell tumor of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Murkey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old patient presented with complaints of menorrhagia. Endometrial biopsy revealed simple hyperplasia of the endometrium. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy was carried out. The ovaries looked grossly normal, but histopathology reported granulosa cell tumor of the right ovary. Granulosa cell tumors belong to the sexcord stromal category and account for approximately 2% of all ovarian tumors. We review the features and treatment of granulosa cell tumors and the importance of screening for ovarian tumors in a case of endometrial hyperplasia and delayed menopause.

  10. Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Whiteman, David C

    2013-01-01

    (13 548 cases and 17 913 controls). We combined study-specific adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a random-effects model. We further examined the associations by histological subtype, menopausal status and post-menopausal hormone use. High BMI (all time-points) was associated with increased risk......-grade serous invasive tumours (1.13, 1.03–1.25) and in pre-menopausal women (1.11; 1.04–1.18). Among post-menopausal women, the associations did not differ between hormone replacement therapy users and non-users. Whilst obesity appears to increase risk of the less common histological subtypes of ovarian cancer...

  11. Tamoxifen and ovarian function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Berliere

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some studies suggest that the clinical parameter "amenorrhea" is insufficient to define the menopausal status of women treated with chemotherapy or tamoxifen. In this study, we investigated and compared the ovarian function defined either by clinical or biological parameters in pre-menopausal breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen administered as adjuvant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1999 and 2003, 138 premenopausal patients consecutively treated for early breast cancer were included. Sixty-eight received tamoxifen in monotherapy as the only adjuvant systemic treatment (Group I and 70 were treated with tamoxifen after adjuvant chemotherapy (Group II. All patients had a confirmed premenopausal status based on clinical parameters and hormonal values at study entry. They were followed prospectively every 3 months for 3 years: menses data, physical examination and blood tests (LH, FSH, 17-beta-estradiol. Vaginal ultrasonography was carried out every 6 months. After 3 years, prospective evaluation was completed and monitoring of ovarian function was performed as usual in our institution (1x/year. All data were retrospectively evaluated in 2011. RESULTS: Three patients were excluded from the study in group I and 2 were excluded in group II. Patients were divided into 4 subgroups according to clinical data, i.e. menses patterns. These patterns were assessed by questionnaires. a: Regular menses (>10 cycles/year b: Oligomenorrhea (5 to 9 cycles/year c: Severe oligomenorrhea (1 to 4 cycles/year d: Complete amenorrhea Estrogen levels did not appear to have any impact on disease-free survival rates after 3 or 8 years. FSH values were also documented and analyzed. They exhibited the same profile as estradiol values. CONCLUSIONS: Amenorrhea is an insufficient parameter to define menopausal status in patients receiving tamoxifen. Low estradiol levels must be coupled with other biological parameters to characterize endocrine status

  12. Managing menopause at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or supplements. Eat high calcium foods, such as cheese, leafy green vegetables, low-fat milk and other ... unable to manage your symptoms of menopause with home care only. Also call if you have any ...

  13. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Bioidentical Hormones January 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Howard ... take HT for symptom relief. What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  14. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake, i.e. eating and energy expenditure (EE). Severe obesity is more prevalent in women than men worldwide, and obesity pathophysiology and the resultant obesity-related disease risks differ in women and men. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Pre-clinical and clinical research indicate that ovarian hormones may play a major role. We systematically reviewed the clinical and pre-clinical literature on the effects of ovarian hormones on the physiology of adipose tissue (AT) and the regulation of AT mass by energy intake and EE. Articles in English indexed in PubMed through January 2016 were searched using keywords related to: (i) reproductive hormones, (ii) weight regulation and (iii) central nervous system. We sought to identify emerging research foci with clinical translational potential rather than to provide a comprehensive review. We find that estrogens play a leading role in the causes and consequences of female obesity. With respect to adiposity, estrogens synergize with AT genes to increase gluteofemoral subcutaneous AT mass and decrease central AT mass in reproductive-age women, which leads to protective cardiometabolic effects. Loss of estrogens after menopause, independent of aging, increases total AT mass and decreases lean body mass, so that there is little net effect on body weight. Menopause also partially reverses women's protective AT distribution. These effects can be counteracted by estrogen treatment. With respect to eating, increasing estrogen levels progressively decrease eating during the follicular and peri-ovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle. Progestin levels are associated with eating during the luteal phase, but there does not appear to be a causal relationship. Progestins may increase binge eating and eating stimulated by negative emotional states during the luteal phase. Pre-clinical research indicates that one mechanism for the pre-ovulatory decrease in eating is a

  15. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  16. MENOPAUSE AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Anichkov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A role of menopause as a cardiovascular risk factor is reviewed. Menopause influence on the cardiovascular system may be mediated by body fat re-allocation, metabolic, hemodynamic and pro-inflammatory changes. Besides, estrogen deprivation has a direct effect on the arterial wall. Lifestyle modification, lipid-lowering and antihypertensive treatment should be considered for cardiovascular risk reduction in postmenopausal women.

  17. The timing of natural menopause after uterine fibroid embolization: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropeano, Giovanna; Amoroso, Sonia; di Stasi, Carmine; Vizzielli, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Scambia, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether uterine fibroid embolization before the age of 45 years advances the timing of natural menopause. Prospective cohort study. University tertiary-care center. Forty-three regularly cycling women aged 35-44 years who underwent embolization and 43 age-matched control subjects. Annual assessments of menopausal status using prospectively recorded menstrual diaries and hormonal (serum FSH and E(2)) and ultrasound measures (ovarian volume and antral follicle count). Women were followed for 7 years or until they reached menopause. Age at menopause as computed by subtracting the date of birth from the exact date of the last menstrual period. Over the study period, 9 patients (25%) and 12 control subjects (33%) became menopausal, 19 patients (53%) and 18 control subjects (50%) entered the menopausal transition (irregular cycles), and 8 patients (22%) and 6 control subjects (17%) continued to menstruate regularly. Mean menopausal age in the embolization group (48.94 ± 2.48 years) was not significantly different from that in the control group (49.52 ± 1.25 years). There was no significant difference of menopause occurrence between the groups. Longitudinal changes in hormonal and ultrasound measures were similar for the two groups. This long-term follow-up study found no evidence for fibroid embolization advancing the timing of menopause in women before the age of 45 years. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Voice impairment and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Berit; van Trotsenburg, Michael; Hanke, Gunda; Bigenzahn, Wolfgang; Huber, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Menopause rating scales still do not regard voice impairment as a genuine climacteric symptom, although voice changes are frequently reported. The purpose of this study was both to register and differentiate voice alterations and disorders in menopausal women. A total of 107 women between 37 and 71 years of age who were rated as postmenopausal according to their hormonal status answered a questionnaire on voice changes and vocal discomfort. Of this group, 49 women mentioned voices changes, and 35 of those women associated these changes with subjective discomfort, whereas 58 women mentioned neither voice changes nor discomfort. Sixteen of the women who mentioned voice changes and eight who did not participated in a comprehensive investigation, which included completion of the Klimax questionnaire, a head and neck examination, videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation of voice sound, voice range profile measurements, and voice dysfunction index determination. Voice changes during menopause might be a common problem seen in clinical practice. Therefore, an additional systematic registration of voice impairment in future menopause rating scales should be considered if further studies confirm our findings of a high prevalence of voice complaints associated with menopause. Severe menopausal voice impairments, even without other climacteric symptoms, should be regarded as an indication for phoniatric examination.

  19. Treating schizophrenia during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Amnon; Brzezinski-Sinai, Noa A; Seeman, Mary V

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this review is to examine three questions: What are the risks and benefits of treating women with schizophrenia with hormone therapy (HT) at menopause? Should the antipsychotic regimen be changed at menopause? Do early- and late-onset women with schizophrenia respond differently to HT at menopause? MEDLINE databases for the years 1990 to 2016 were searched using the following interactive terms: schizophrenia, gender, menopause, estrogen, and hormones. The selected articles (62 out of 800 abstracts) were chosen on the basis of their applicability to the objectives of this targeted narrative review. HT during the perimenopause in women with schizophrenia ameliorates psychotic and cognitive symptoms, and may also help affective symptoms. Vasomotor, genitourinary, and sleep symptoms are also reduced. Depending on the woman's age and personal risk factors and antipsychotic side effects, the risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease may be increased. Antipsychotic types and doses may need to be adjusted at menopause, as may be the mode of administration. Both HT and changes in antipsychotic management should be considered for women with schizophrenia at menopause. The question about differences in response between early- and late-onset women cannot yet be answered.

  20. [Urinary incontinence and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Ringa, V; Lesavre, M; Fernandez, H

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the relationship between menopause and urinary incontinence (UI). Our work is based on a review of the literature on the epidemiology of UI in women and the effects of hormone therapy on symptoms of urinary leakage. A search of the Medline database between January 2000 and April 2012 was performed by crossing the keywords "urinary incontinence, stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge incontinence, over active bladder, menopause, estrogen therapy". Twenty-nine articles over the 482 articles were initialy selected. The UI was a common symptom during menopause, with a prevalence of 15 to 30% and an annual incidence of 5 to 10%. The association between UI and menopause was controversial. Indeed, although underpinned by pathophysiological mechanisms such as the sensitivity of tissues of the urogenital sinus to estrogen, the epidemiological data available were contradictory and should be interpreted, if possible, depending on the type of UI. Thus, it remained difficult to distinguish the effect of menopause of the aging. The effects of estrogen on IU differed depending on the route of administration and of the type of UI. Randomized trials showed that oral administration of estrogen after menopause increased the occurrence of UI or SUI. However a vaginal administration of estrogen improved urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and overactive bladder. The data of this review were consistent with the French and European guidelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical study on osteopenia, serum sexual hormones and BGP level in the menopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liu; Guo Hui; Duan Liusheng

    2003-01-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of osteogenesis and osteopenia of the menopausal women, serum [Ca 2+ ], [P 3+ ], AKP, sexual hormones and BGP level were investigated. The blood samples were taken from 177 female individuals who were divided into 5 groups based on different ages of menopause. Serum estradiol, testosterone and BGP were measured by RIA. Serum LH, FSH and PRL were determined by IRMA. Serum [Ca 2+ ], [P 3+ ], AKP were determined by biochemistry analytical methods. Results showed that serum E 2 and T levels in the menopausal women were lower than those in the normal, E 2 decreased significantly. Meanwhile, serum PRL level was only a little lower, but the menopausal female had the higher levels of LH and FSH. Conclusion: the most important cause of osteopenia for the menopausal women is the deficiency of estrogen and degeneration of ovarian function

  2. Ovarian function and ovarian blood supply following premenopausal abdominal hysterectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrazak, Khaled M.; Elbiaa, Assem A.M.; Farghali, Mohamed M.; Essam, Amr; Zhurabekova, Gulmira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The issue of conserving the ovaries at hysterectomy in premenopausal women with benign gynecologic disease has been the subject of considerable controversy. Some clinicians prefer prophylactic oophorectomy in premenopausal women during hysterectomy to prevent future development of malignant changes in conserved ovaries. Other clinicians prefer to conserve apparently normal ovaries, because bilateral oophorectomy in premenopausal women results in an abrupt imbalance, sudden onset of menopausal symptoms, decreased libido, increased cardiovascular risk and osteoporosis. Material and methods Two hundred and twenty multipara women (who had completed their families), with benign uterine pathology were included in this prospective study for abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral ovarian preservation. Pre-operative vaginal ultrasound, Doppler studies, diagnostic hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy were done followed by laboratory studies including Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol for all studied women. Doppler studies, AMH, FSH and estradiol were repeated 6 and 12 months post-operative for assessment of the ovarian function and ovarian blood supply after hysterectomy. Results Pre-operative AMH, FSH and estradiol of the studied women were statistically insignificant compared to AMH, FSH and estradiol 6 and 12 months post-operative. Twelve months post-operative right and left ovarian volumes (6.92 ± 0.18 and 6.85 ± 0.19 cm3, respectively) were significantly larger than pre-operative right and left ovarian volumes (6.19 ± 0.22 and 5.86 ± 0.23 cm3, respectively), and, 12 months post-operative right and left ovarian pulsatility indices (2.92 ± 0.15 and 2.96 ± 0.16 cm/s, respectively) were significantly lower than pre-operative right and left ovarian pulsatility indices (3.45 ± 0.19 and 3.36 ± 0.2 cm/s, respectively). Eight (3.6%) cases of the studied women developed an ovarian cyst 6 months after hysterectomy, 3

  3. Menopause-induced uterine epithelium atrophy results from arachidonic acid/prostaglandin E2 axis inhibition-mediated autophagic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Shengtao Zhou; Linjie Zhao; Tao Yi; Yuquan Wei; Xia Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Women experience menopause later in life. Menopause is characterized by dramatically decreased circulating estrogen level secondary to loss of ovarian function and atrophic state of genital organs. However, the molecular mechanisms for this process are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms that underlie menopause-induced uterine endometrial atrophy. Our data showed that autophagy was activated in the uterine epithelial cells of both ov...

  4. Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists: Expanding vistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Magon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonists are derived from native GnRH by amino acid substitution which yields the agonist resistant to degradation and increases its half-life. The hypogonadotropic hypogonadal state produced by GnRH agonists has been often dubbed as "pseudomenopause" or "medical oophorectomy," which are both misnomers. GnRH analogues (GnRH-a work by temporarily "switching off" the ovaries. Ovaries can be "switched off" for the therapy and therapeutic trial of many conditions which include but are not limited to subfertility, endometriosis, adenomyosis, uterine leiomyomas, precocious puberty, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, chronic pelvic pain, or the prevention of menstrual bleeding in special clinical situations. Rapidly expanding vistas of usage of GnRH agonists encompass use in sex reassignment of male to female transsexuals, management of final height in cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and preserving ovarian function in women undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy. Hypogonadic side effects caused by the use of GnRH agonists can be tackled with use of "add-back" therapy. Goserelin, leuprolide, and nafarelin are commonly used in clinical practice. GnRH-a have provided us a powerful therapeutic approach to the treatment of numerous conditions in reproductive medicine. Recent synthesis of GnRH antagonists with a better tolerability profile may open new avenues for both research and clinical applications. All stakeholders who are partners in women′s healthcare need to join hands to spread awareness so that these drugs can be used to realize their full potential.

  5. The utility of measuring anti-Müllerian hormone in predicting menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, B; Mirkin, S

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is a relevant phase in a woman's reproductive life. Accurate estimation of the time of menopause could improve the preventive management of women's health. Reproductive hormones reflect the activity of follicle pools and provide information about ovarian aging. Anti-Mu llerian hormone (AMH) is secreted from small antral follicles and its level is correlated to the ovarian reserve. AMH declines with age, and data suggest that it can provide information on menopausal age and reproductive lifespan. Serum AMH levels become low approximately 5 years before the final menstrual period and are undetectable in postmenopausal women. The majority of studies indicate that AMH is relatively stable throughout the menstrual cycle; however, there are interindividual variabilites of serum AMH concentration under different conditions. AMH is an independent predictor of time to menopause. AMH coupled with age for menopause prediction provides stronger information than using age alone. Ongoing research is focused on constructing a multivariate model including AMH values, genes related to follicular recruitment and maternal age of menopause that would predict more precisily time to menopause.

  6. Endometriosis after menopause: physiopathology and management of an uncommon condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streuli, I; Gaitzsch, H; Wenger, J-M; Petignat, P

    2017-04-01

    Endometriosis is a hormone-dependent inflammatory disease that is usually characterized by infertility and pain symptoms. This disease mainly occurs during the reproductive years and is rarely diagnosed after menopause. We discuss the physiopathology of this condition after menopause as well as treatment options and the risk of malignant transformation. Occurrence or progression of postmenopausal endometriosis lesions could be related to extra-ovarian production of estrogen by endometriosis lesions and adipose tissue, which becomes the major estrogen-producing tissue after menopause. Postmenopausal women with symptomatic endometriosis should be managed surgically because of the risk of malignancy; medical treatments can be used in cases of pain recurrence after surgery. Aromatase inhibitors act by decreasing extra-ovarian estrogen production and by blocking the feed-forward stimulation loop between inflammation and aromatase within endometriosis lesions. The evidence is currently insufficient to support a conclusion about the optimal hormone replacement therapy for women with endometriosis. The question of malignant transformation of endometriosis in response to hormone replacement therapy in women with a history of endometriosis remains unanswered and needs a long-term follow-up study to evaluate the risk of an adverse outcome. Further studies should be performed to determine the optimal management of menopausal women with endometriosis.

  7. Temporal expression of tenascin-C and type I collagen in response to gonadotropins in the immature rat ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagavandoss, P

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian morphogenesis and physiology in mammals take place in the context of hormones, paracrine factors and extracellular matrix molecules. Both fibrillar type I collagen and the multidomain tenascin-C are matrix molecules capable of modulating the behavior of both normal and neoplastic cells in many organs. Therefore, the objective of this qualitative study was to simultaneously examine the distribution of both tenascin-C and type I collagen in ovarian follicles and corpora lutea induced to develop in response to gonadotropin treatments. In preantral follicles both matrix proteins were present in the focimatrix, theca externa and the interstitium. Equine gonadotropin induced the appearance of both proteins in the theca interna. Subsequent to administration with human chorionic gonadotropin, tenascin-C appearance in the thecal capillaries preceded type I collagen expression. Tenascin-C was also observed in the capillaries of functional and regressing corpora lutea, while type I collagen was predominantly present in the interstitium and tunica albuginea. Western blots showed both an increase in and degradation of tenascin-C in the regressing corpora lutea. The ovarian surface epithelium also showed immunoreactivity for both tenascin-C and type I collagen. The study reveals that tenascin-C and type I collagen may participate in the morphogenesis of ovarian follicles, and in the formation and regression of corpora lutea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep and menopause: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Joan L; Woods, Nancy F

    2015-08-01

    Our overall aim-through a narrative review-is to critically profile key extant evidence of menopause-related sleep, mostly from studies published in the last decade. We searched the database PubMed using selected Medical Subject Headings for sleep and menopause (n = 588 articles). Using similar headings, we also searched the Cochrane Library (n = 1), Embase (n = 449), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (n = 163), Web of Science (n = 506), and PsycINFO (n = 58). Articles deemed most related to the purpose were reviewed. Results were articulated with interpretive comments according to evidence of sleep quality (self-reported) and sleep patterns (polysomnography and actigraphy) impact as related to reproductive aging and in the context of vasomotor symptoms (VMS; self-reported), vasomotor activity (VMA) events (recorded skin conductance), depressed mood, and ovarian hormones. Predominantly, the menopausal transition conveys poor sleep beyond anticipated age effects. Perceptions of sleep are not necessarily translatable from detectable physical sleep changes and are probably affected by an emotional overlay on symptoms reporting. Sleep quality and pattern changes are mostly manifest in wakefulness indicators, but sleep pattern changes are not striking. Likely contributing are VMS of sufficient frequency/severity and bothersomeness, probably with a sweating component. VMA events influence physical sleep fragmentation but not necessarily extensive sleep loss or sleep architecture changes. Lack of robust connections between perceived and recorded sleep (and VMA) could be influenced by inadequate detection. There is a need for studies of women in well-defined menopausal transition stages who have no sleep problems, accounting for sleep-related disorders, mood, and other symptoms, with attention to VMS dimensions, distribution of VMS during night and day, and advanced measurement of symptoms and physiologic manifestations.

  9. Menopause accelerates biological aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Morgan E.; Lu, Ake T.; Chen, Brian H.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E.; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D. J.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Horvath, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the “epigenetic clock”), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  10. Effect of menopause on lipid profile in relation to body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Bade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause is a natural event in the ageing process and signifies the end of reproductive years with cessation of cyclic ovarian function as manifested by cyclic menstruation. Lipid profile is altered in menopause because of various reasons. Objectives: The study was aimed to compare the lipid profile in women with normal body mass index (BMI = 18.9-24.9 and women with BMI = 25-29.9 in both pre- and post-menopausal group. Materials and Methods: Estimation of total cholesterol (TC by CHOD-PAP Cholesterol Oxidase - Peroxidase + Aminophenazone + Phenol method, triglyceride (TG by enzymatic calorimetric method, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C phosphotungstic acid method, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C by using Friedewald formula and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL was done by using the formula -VLDL = TG/5 in 30 women selected in each group. Results: Our study revealed that serum levels of TC, TG and LDL-C were significantly higher in post-menopausal women in comparison to their pre-menopausal counterparts, irrespective of BMI (P < 0.05. Similarly, HDL-C levels were significantly lower in post-menopausal women as compared with pre-menopausal women of similar BMI (P < 0.05. Conclusions: We found that serum levels of TC, TG and LDL-C were significantly higher in post-menopausal women in comparison to their pre-menopausal counterparts, irrespective of BMI. Similarly, HDL-C levels were significantly lower in post-menopausal women as compared to pre-menopausal women of similar BMI. Since we found similar changes in women of different BMIs, the difference in hormonal status is the probable cause of altered lipid profile. Hence, all post-menopausal women irrespective of body weight and BMI should be strongly counseled to have proper physical exercise and dietary habits to avoid the possible cardiovascular complications.

  11. Menopause or climacteric, just a semantic discussion or has it clinical implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, J E; Lavín, P; Vallejo, M S; Sarrá, S

    2014-06-01

    Climacteric and menopause are two terms that are indistinctly used to name clinical expected events related to the decline in ovarian function. Thus, in the literature and in clinical settings we read and hear 'menopausal symptoms' or 'climacterics symptoms'. Globally, the term menopause is much more frequently used than climacteric but, before we use either one, we should consider that 'menopause' is referring to a specific event, the cessation of menses, and 'climacteric' to gradual changes of ovarian function that start before the menopause and continue thereafter for a while. In the premenopause period, hormonal changes will take place that are associated with symptoms, which deteriorate the quality of life, and with metabolic changes which increase the risk of chronic diseases. Therefore, the word climacteric ('steps' in Greek) seems more adequate to refer to the symptoms and chronic diseases associated with the gradual decrease of ovarian function, and we should leave the term 'menopause' only for naming the event of cessation of menstruation that will happen later as the consequence of the decline in ovarian activity. This differentiation has clinical importance, because it implies that, during the premenopausal period, the impact that the decrease in estrogen has on the health status of women must be assessed and, if it is pertinent, we should indicate lifestyle changes, hormonal therapy, hypolipidemic drugs, etc. It does not seem proper to wait for the cessation of menstrual bleeding before some intervention is started. The decay of women's health starts many years before menopause and prevention of its consequences is a must for us, the clinicians.

  12. Menopause perception and care of menopausal women in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menopause is one area that has been shrouded in myths and taboos especially as related to the behaviour of women. The study therefore examined the perception of menopause and the adjustment practices adopted by menopausal women in Nigeria. The study involved both Quantitative and Qualitative method.

  13. Toward a Biology of Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Madeleine

    1980-01-01

    Discusses research dealing with the study of menopause. Underscores the problems with the case study method. Discusses two population-based studies and the problems of age adjustment and measurement in menopause research. Highlights alternate research strategies. (MK)

  14. Verbal memory and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Pauline M

    2015-11-01

    Midlife women frequently report memory problems during the menopausal transition. Recent studies validate those complaints by showing significant correlations between memory complaints and performance on validated memory tasks. Longitudinal studies demonstrate modest declines in verbal memory during the menopausal transition and a likely rebound during the postmenopausal stage. Clinical studies that examine changes in memory following hormonal withdrawal and add-back hormone therapy (HT) demonstrate that estradiol plays a critical role in memory. Although memory changes are frequently attributed to menopausal symptoms, studies show that the memory problems occur during the transition even after controlling for menopausal symptoms. It is well established that self-reported vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are unrelated to objective memory performance. However, emerging evidence suggests that objectively measured VMS significantly correlate with memory performance, brain activity during rest, and white matter hyperintensities. This evidence raises important questions about whether VMS and VMS treatments might affect memory during the menopausal transition. Unfortunately, there are no clinical trials to inform our understanding of how HT affects both memory and objectively measured VMS in women in whom HT is indicated for treatment of moderate to severe VMS. In clinical practice, it is helpful to normalize memory complaints, to note that evidence suggests that memory problems are temporary, and to counsel women with significant VMS that memory might improve with treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Physiological effects of ovarian hormones: clinical aspects and compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, B; Pedersen, A T

    1996-01-01

    Menopause is marked by the permanent cessation of menstrual bleeding. Deprivation of ovarian hormones due to decreasing ovarian activity causes widespread physiological effects. Disturbances in menstrual pattern and hot flashes are major reasons for hormone replacement therapy (HRT), but prevention...... of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease are other considerations. Despite the large number of different hormone treatment regimens available, such problems as continued bleeding and concern about side effects engenders low compliance. To enhance compliance, it is important to ensure that post-menopausal women...... and their physicians are aware of the probable risks and benefits of hormone therapy before deciding whether or not to use preventive HRT....

  16. Menopause and the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mutneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications.

  17. Liver disease in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Carla W

    2015-07-07

    There are numerous physiologic and biochemical changes in menopause that can affect the function of the liver and mediate the development of liver disease. Menopause represents a state of growing estrogen deficiency, and this loss of estrogen in the setting of physiologic aging increases the likelihood of mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, declining immune responses to injury, and disarray in the balance between antioxidant formation and oxidative stress. The sum effect of these changes can contribute to increased susceptibility to development of significant liver pathology, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as accelerated progression of fibrosis in liver diseases, as has been particularly demonstrated in hepatitis C virus liver disease. Recognition of the unique nature of these mediating factors should raise suspicion for liver disease in perimenopausal and menopausal women and offer an opportunity for implementation of aggressive treatment measures so as to avoid progression of liver disease to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure.

  18. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen affected all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appears to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit: risk profile and safety of hormone therapy. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients’ risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely impacts the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit: risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  19. Management of Menopausal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunitz, Andrew M; Manson, JoAnn E

    2015-10-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women's Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen increased all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appear to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit-risk profile and safety of HT. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65 years; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients' risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely affects the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low-dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit-risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms.

  20. Differentiating between borderline and invasive malignancies in ovarian tumors using a multivariate logistic regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabin Chen

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Differentiation between borderline and invasive ovarian tumors can be achieved using a model based on the following criteria: menopausal status; cancer antigen 125 level; and ultrasound parameters. The model is helpful to oncologists and patients in the initial evaluation phase of ovarian tumors.

  1. Vitamin D and calcium intake and risk of early menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue-Smithe, Alexandra C; Whitcomb, Brian W; Szegda, Kathleen L; Boutot, Maegan E; Manson, JoAnn E; Hankinson, Susan E; Rosner, Bernard A; Troy, Lisa M; Michels, Karin B; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R

    2017-06-01

    Background: Early menopause, defined as the cessation of ovarian function before the age of 45 y, affects ∼10% of women and is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and other conditions. Few modifiable risk factors for early menopause have been identified, but emerging data suggest that high vitamin D intake may reduce risk. Objective: We evaluated how intakes of vitamin D and calcium are associated with the incidence of early menopause in the prospective Nurses' Health Study II (NHS2). Design: Intakes of vitamin D and calcium from foods and supplements were measured every 4 y with the use of a food-frequency questionnaire. Cases of incident early menopause were identified from all participants who were premenopausal at baseline in 1991; over 1.13 million person-years, 2041 women reported having natural menopause before the age of 45 y. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate relations between intakes of vitamin D and calcium and incident early menopause while accounting for potential confounding factors. Results: After adjustment for age, smoking, and other factors, women with the highest intake of dietary vitamin D (quintile median: 528 IU/d) had a significant 17% lower risk of early menopause than women with the lowest intake [quintile median: 148 IU/d; HR: 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.95); P -trend = 0.03]. Dietary calcium intake in the highest quintile (median: 1246 mg/d) compared with the lowest (median: 556 mg/d) was associated with a borderline significantly lower risk of early menopause (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.00; P -trend = 0.03). Associations were stronger for vitamin D and calcium from dairy sources than from nondairy dietary sources, whereas high supplement use was not associated with lower risk. Conclusions: Findings suggest that high intakes of dietary vitamin D and calcium may be modestly associated with a lower risk of early menopause. Further studies evaluating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, other

  2. Risk of chronic liver disease in post-menopausal women due to body mass index, alcohol and their interaction: a prospective nested cohort study within the United Kingdom Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Trembling

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the risk of chronic liver disease (CLD due to alcohol consumption and body mass index (BMI and the effects of their interaction in a prospective cohort study of women recruited to the UKCTOCS trial. Methods 95,126 post-menopausal women without documented CLD were stratified into 12 groups defined by combinations of BMI (normal, overweight, obese and alcohol consumption (none, <1–15, 16–20 and ≥21 units/week, and followed for an average of 5.1 years. Hazard ratios (HR were calculated for incident liver-related events (LRE. Results First LREs were reported in 325 (0.34% participants. Compared to women with normal BMI, HR = 1.44 (95% CI; 1.10–1.87 in the overweight group and HR = 2.25 (95% CI; 1.70–2.97 in the obese group, adjusted for alcohol and potential confounders. Compared to those abstinent from alcohol, HR = 0.70 (95% CI; 0.55–0.88 for <1–15 units/week, 0.93 (95% CI; 0.50–1.73 for 16–20 units/week and 1.82 (95% CI; 0.97–3.39 for ≥21 units/week adjusted for BMI and potential confounders. Compared to women with normal BMI drinking no alcohol, HR for LRE in obese women consuming ≥21 units/week was 2.86 (95% CI; 0.67–12.42, 1.58 (95% CI; 0.96–2.61 for obese women drinking <1–15 units/week and 1.93 (95% CI; 0.66–5.62 in those with normal BMI consuming ≥21 units/week after adjustment for potential confounders. We found no significant interaction between BMI and alcohol. Conclusion High BMI and alcohol consumption and abstinence are risk factors for CLD in post-menopausal women. However, BMI and alcohol do not demonstrate significant interaction in this group. Trial registration UKCTOCS is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN22488978 . Registered 06/04/2000.

  3. Inhibin A and B as markers of menopause: a five-year prospective longitudinal study of hormonal changes during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlie, Inger; Mørkrid, Lars; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Moen, Mette H; Holte, Arne

    2005-03-01

    A more direct and precise hormonal marker of the menopause has been required for some time. The aim of this study was to identify the most accurate marker of the menopause, based on analyses of inhibin A and B, FSH, LH and estradiol (E(2)), among 59 healthy women without hormonal treatment during the perimenopause and early postmenopause. Fifty-nine women, aged 46-56 years (mean age 51.2 years), were examined annually for 5 years during the menopausal transition and had venous blood drawn simultaneously for later analyses of the above-mentioned hormones. Inhibin A showed a steady decline from at least 4 years before the final menstrual period (FMP) until 1 year before menopause, whereas inhibin B had a shorter lasting decline from year 3 to year 2 before menopause, concomitant with a rise in FSH and LH. The present study confirmed previous observations that inhibin A had a continuous decline starting before the decline of inhibin B, suggesting that an increasing part of the cycle was anovulatory. The fall in inhibin B and the increase in FSH constitute markers of ovarian aging. One year prior to menopause neither inhibin A nor inhibin B could be detected. The disappearance of these peptide hormones is an important predictor of the approaching menopause.

  4. Stimulation of vitellogenin uptake in Stage IV Xenopus oocytes by treatment with chorionic gonadotropin in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, H.S.; Dumont, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    Ovarian fragments from Xenopus laevis were incubated with various concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and Stage IV oocytes were subsequently tested for their ability to incorporate vitellogenin. Such oocytes displayed incorporation rates up to 350% greater than controls. This was accompanied by increased endocytotic activity. hCG-stimulated uptake is dose dependent and reaches a maximum at 100 IU/ml, at which concentration ovulation also occurs. At 100 IU/ml of hCG, there is a lag period of at least 12 h between gonadotropin treatment and increased vitellogenin incorporation. Because hCG has little effect on isolated (dissected) cultured Stage IV oocytes which have lost their follicle cells, it is postulated that intact follicle cells are required for the induction of vitellogenin uptake

  5. The advantage of letrozole over tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial is consistent in younger postmenopausal women and in those with chemotherapy-induced menopause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Sun, Zhuoxin; Smith, Ian

    2012-01-01

    subclinical ovarian estrogen production), and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause who may experience return of ovarian function. In these situations tamoxifen may be preferable to an aromatase inhibitor. Among 4,922 patients allocated to the monotherapy arms (5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen......) in the BIG 1-98 trial we identified two relevant subpopulations: patients with potential residual ovarian function, defined as having natural menopause, treated without adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and age ≤ 55 years (n = 641); and those with chemotherapy-induced menopause (n = 105). Neither...... of the subpopulations examined showed treatment effects differing from the trial population as a whole (interaction P values are 0.23 and 0.62, respectively). Indeed, both among the 641 patients aged ≤ 55 years with natural menopause and no chemotherapy (HR 0.77 [0.51, 1.16]) and among the 105 patients...

  6. Active immunization of gilts against gonadotropin-releasing hormone: effects on secretion of gonadotropins, reproductive function, and responses to agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbenshade, K L; Britt, J H

    1985-10-01

    Sexually mature gilts were actively immunized against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by conjugating GnRH to bovine serum albumin, emulsifying the conjugate in Freund's adjuvant, and giving the emulsion as a primary immunization at Week 0 and as booster immunizations at Weeks 10 and 14. Antibody titers were evident by 2 wk after primary immunization and increased markedly in response to booster immunizations. Active immunization against GnRH caused gonadotropins to decline to nondetectable levels, gonadal steroids to decline to basal levels, and the gilts to become acyclic. Prolactin concentrations in peripheral circulation were unaffected by immunization against GnRH. The endocrine status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis was examined by giving GnRH and two agonists to GnRH and by ovariectomy. An i.v. injection of 100 micrograms GnRH caused release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in control animals, but not in gilts immunized against GnRH. In contrast, administration of 5 micrograms D-(Ala6, des-Gly-NH2(10] ethylamide or 5 micrograms D-(Ser-t-But6, des-Gly-NH2(10] ethylamide resulted in immediate release of LH and FSH in both control and GnRH-immunized gilts. Circulating concentrations of LH and FSH increased after ovariectomy in the controls, but remained at nondetectable levels in gilts immunized against GnRH. Prolactin concentrations did not change in response to ovariectomy. We conclude that cyclic gilts can be actively immunized against GnRH and that this causes cessation of estrous cycles and inhibits secretion of LH, FSH, and gonadal steroids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Triggering final oocyte maturation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) versus human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in breast cancer patients undergoing fertility preservation: an extended experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jhansi; Turan, Volkan; Bedoschi, Giuliano; Moy, Fred; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the cycle outcomes and the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), when oocyte maturation was triggered by gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) versus human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in breast cancer patients undergoing fertility preservation. One hundred twenty-nine women aged ≤ 45 years, diagnosed with stage ≤ 3 breast cancer, with normal ovarian reserve who desired fertility preservation were included in the retrospective cohort study. Ovarian stimulation was achieved utilizing letrozole and gonadotropins. Oocyte maturation was triggered with GnRHa or hCG. Baseline AMH levels, number of oocytes, maturation and fertilization rates, number of embryos, and the incidence of OHSS was recorded. The serum AMH levels were similar between GnRHa and hCG groups (2.7 ± 1.9 vs. 2.1 ± 1.8; p = 0.327). There was one case of mild or moderate OHSS in the GnRHa group compared to 12 in the hCG group (2.1 % vs. 14.4 %, p = 0.032). The maturation and fertilization rates, and the number of cryopreserved embryos were significantly higher in the GnRHa group. GnRHa trigger improved cycle outcomes as evidenced by the number of mature oocytes and cryopreserved embryos, while significantly reducing the risk of OHSS in breast cancer patients undergoing fertility preservation.

  8. Oxidative stress contributes to large elastic arterial stiffening across the stages of the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Kerry L; Kohrt, Wendy M; Moreau, Kerrie L

    2014-06-01

    It is unclear how changes in ovarian hormones during the menopausal transition contribute to age-associated arterial stiffening. We sought to evaluate differences in arterial stiffness and the role of oxidative stress across the stages of the menopausal transition in healthy women. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance and ultrasound) was measured during immediate infusions of saline (control) and ascorbic acid (experimental model to immediately decrease oxidative stress) in 97 healthy women (22-70 y) classified as premenopausal (n = 24; mean [SD] age, 33 [7] y), early perimenopausal (n = 21; 49 [3] y) or late perimenopausal (n = 21; 50 [4] y), or postmenopausal (n = 31; 57 [5] y). Basal carotid artery compliance was different among the groups (P menopausal transition in healthy women. This seems to be mediated, in part, by oxidative stress, particularly during the late perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods. It remains uncertain whether this is specifically caused by loss of ovarian function or aging.

  9. Long-term health consequences of premature or early menopause and considerations for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S.; Kuhle, Carol L.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Rocca, Walter A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To review the current evidence concerning the long-term harmful effects of premature or early menopause, and to discuss some of the clinical implications. Material and methods Narrative review of the literature. Results Women undergoing premature or early menopause, either following bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy or because of primary ovarian insufficiency, experience the early loss of estrogen and other ovarian hormones. The long-term consequences of premature or early menopause include adverse effects on cognition, mood, cardiovascular, bone, and sexual health, as well as an increased risk of early mortality. The use of hormone therapy has been shown to lessen some, although not all of these risks. Therefore, multiple medical societies recommend providing hormone therapy at least until the natural age of menopause. It is important to individualize hormone therapy for women with early estrogen deficiency, and higher dosages may be needed to approximate physiological concentrations found in premenopausal women. It is also important to address the psychological impact of early menopause and to review the options for fertility and the potential need for contraception, if the ovaries are intact. Conclusions Women who undergo premature or early menopause should receive individualized hormone therapy and counseling. PMID:25845383

  10. Alternative Menopause Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hot flashes more than placebo Cautions and Side Effects: May not be for women with conditions affected by hormones (such as breast, ovarian, or uterine cancer); consult your doctor before taking phytoestrogens Valerian — May ...

  11. Sleep disturbance in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameratunga, D; Goldin, J; Hickey, M

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance during menopause is a common and important complaint faced by many women. There are many factors that may play a role in this problem, including vasomotor symptoms and changing hormone levels, circadian rhythm abnormalities, exacerbation of primary insomnia, mood disorders, coexistent medical conditions as well as lifestyle factors. Sleep can be measured both objectively and subjectively; however, correlation between the two measures is not high. Most of the menopause-related sleep disturbances have been reported as qualitative in nature; however, there have also been studies showing changes in objective measures. This discrepancy has implications with regard to evaluation of research in sleep and menopause, as well as application in the clinical setting. Investigations of inadequate sleep and sleep problems during the menopausal period and obtaining a thorough understanding of the factors contributing to these problems are essential in formulating treatment strategies. Such strategies can vary from hormonal treatment and medications to lifestyle and behavioural modification. © 2012 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Thyroid and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Ghianda, S; Tonacchera, M; Vitti, P

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common in the general population especially in women. All thyroid diseases are in fact more common in women than in men and may interfere with the reproductive system. Thyroid function and the gonadal axes are related throughout the woman's fertile period. The relationship between the two glands is mutual. In particular, thyroid hormones affect the reproductive function both directly and indirectly through several actions. Studies on the relationship between menopause and thyroid function are few and do not allow to clarify whether menopause has an effect on the thyroid regardless of aging. With aging, the main changes regarding thyroid physiology and function are: a reduction of thyroid iodine uptake, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine synthesis and catabolism of free thyroxine while reverse triiodothyronine increases; the level of thyroid stimulating hormone remains normal with sometimes a tendency to higher limits. These changes are present in both sexes without distinction between males and females. The complexity of the relationships can be summarized in three aspects: thyroid status does not influence significantly the climacteric syndrome; menopause may modify the clinical expression of some thyroid diseases, particularly the autoimmune ones; thyroid function is not directly involved in the pathogenesis of the complications of menopause. However, coronary atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be aggravated in the presence of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. The effects of postmenopausal estrogen replacement on thyroxine requirements in women with hypothyroidism should be considered.

  13. Oral Manifestations of Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    manifested in the oral cavity.[9] The teeth and gums are more affected by the hormonal changes occurring before menopause, which decrease the body's ability to fight minor infections or maintain a healthy balance of useful and harmful bacteria within the oral environment.[10] The dentist needs to be aware of oral ...

  14. Long-term duration of function of ovarian tissue transplants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Silber, Sherman J; Berghold, Stinne Holm

    2012-01-01

    tissue transplanted, and two women underwent fresh ovarian tissue transplants. The function of ovarian cortical strips has continued for more than 7years in these three women, with the birth of eight healthy babies following a single graft per patient. In addition to these three cases, transplantation...... (repeatedly in some cases) of cryopreserved ovarian tissue has restored reproductive function to all other women in the study centres' programmes for some years. The sustained longevity of function of the transplanted tissue suggests that it may also be possible to postpone the normal time of menopause...... frozen ovarian tissue transplanted, and two women underwent fresh ovarian tissue transplants. Function of ovarian cortical strips has continued for more than 7years in these three women, with the birth of eight healthy babies following a single graft per patient. In addition to these three cases...

  15. Mother's menopausal age is associated with her daughter's early follicular phase urinary follicle-stimulating hormone level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Anne Z; Baird, Donna D; Kesner, James S

    2008-01-01

    Early follicular phase follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a marker of ovarian reserve, has been used to predict time to menopause. A mother's age at menopause is related to her daughter's age at menopause, possibly because of genetic factors. In this study we sought to determine the relationship between maternal age at menopause and early follicular phase FSH of premenopausal daughters. The Uterine Fibroid Study enrolled women randomly selected from a prepaid health plan, collected questionnaire data, and obtained early follicular phase urine samples for a subset of participants. For this secondary analysis, premenopausal women between the ages of 35 and 46 years, who provided a urine sample on cycle day 2, 3, 4, or 5 and their mother's age at natural menopause (n = 182) were selected from the original cohort. Initially bivariate analysis and subsequently regression modeling were performed to assess the independent relationship between maternal age at menopause and urinary creatinine-corrected FSH. Unadjusted analyses and those adjusting for age (mean +/- SD, 40.5 +/- 3.2 y), smoking status (16% current smokers), and body mass index (26.8 +/- 6.9 kg/m) showed a significant association between maternal age at menopause and daughter's urinary FSH level (P menopause had higher urinary FSH levels. The significantly increased FSH values among women whose mothers experienced early menopause is consistent with previously reported associations between mother's and daughter's age of menopause. FSH, a marker of ovarian reserve, is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Future epidemiologic studies on FSH should include collection of information on maternal age at menopause.

  16. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling: An alternative but not the ultimate in the management of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Subarna; Nayak, Prasanta Kumar; Agrawal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1984, laparoscopic ovarian drilling has evolved into a safe and effective surgical treatment for anovulatory, infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), unresponsive to clomiphene citrate. It is as effective as gonadotropins in terms of pregnancy and live birth rates, but without the risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancies. It improves ovarian responsiveness to successive ovulation induction agents. Its favorable reproductive and endocrinal effects are sustained long. Despite its advantages, its use in unselected cases of PCOS or for non-fertility indications is not prudent owing to the potential risks of iatrogenic adhesions and ovarian insufficiency. PMID:25810633

  17. A rare cause of virilization; Ovarian steroid cell tumor, not otherwise specified (NOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Taşdemir, Nicel; Çelik, Cem; Abalı, Remzi; Aksu, Erson; Öznur, Meltem; Yılmaz, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Sex cord–stromal tumors account for 5% of ovarian tumors and 2% of malignant ovarian tumors. Steroid cell tumors (SCT), not otherwise specified (NOS), are rare sex cord–stromal tumors of the ovary and account for less than 0.1% of all ovarian tumors. We report a rare case of a post-menopausal woman presented with hirsutism, virilism and with findings of hyperestrogenism.

  18. Hubungan Jumlah Paritas dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Hadya Gorga; Putri Sri Lasmini; Arni Amir

    2016-01-01

    AbstrakMenopause merupakan waktu penghentian menstruasi secara permanen yang terjadi setelah hilangnya aktivitas ovarium. Saat ini jumlah wanita usia menopause meningkat seiring dengan peningkatan usia harapan hidup. Studi tentang menopause sangat penting, terutama terkait akibat yang akan terjadi pasca menopause seperti penyakit kardiovaskuler dan osteoporosis. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menentukan usia menopause alami dan menganalisis hubungannya terhadap jumlah paritas pada wanita di Kel...

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; Hickey, Martha; Giles, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    This article aims to review currently available evidence for women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and menopause and to propose clinical management algorithms. Key studies addressing HIV and menopause have been reviewed, specifically age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women, frequency of menopausal symptoms, comorbidities associated with HIV and aging (including cardiovascular disease and bone disease), treatment of menopausal symptoms, and prevention of comorbidities in HIV-infected women. Studies suggest an earlier onset of menopause in HIV-infected women, with increased frequency of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease risk may be increased in this population, with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and chronic inflammation associated with HIV, contributing to increased risk. Chronic inflammation and cART have been independently implicated in bone disease. No published data have assessed the safety and efficacy of hormone therapy in relation to symptoms of menopause, cardiovascular risk, and bone disease among HIV-infected women. Few studies on menopause have been conducted in HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women. Many questions regarding age of menopause onset, frequency of menopausal symptoms and associated complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular disease, and efficacy of treatment among HIV-infected women remain. The incidence and severity of some of these factors may be increased in the setting of HIV and cART.

  20. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH as a good predictor of time of menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kruszyńska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH in women is secreted by granulosa cells in late preantral and small antral follicles. AMH seems to be a very stable marker having some advantages over other biochemical and biophysical markers and is very useful in the assessment of ovarian reserve. AMH measurement may be used in cases of premature ovarian failure, including iatrogenic, due to treatment for cancer, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and lastly, in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. It is also a very specific marker of ovarian tumors – folliculomas. According to outcomes of some studies, AMH seems to be highly predictive for the timing of menopause. There are mathematical models in which a single AMH measurement is used to predict the time of menopause even in very young women, many years before the last period.

  1. Anti-mullerian hormone as a predictor of time to menopause in late reproductive age women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Sammel, Mary D; Lin, Hui; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2012-05-01

    Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) has emerged as a marker of ovarian reserve and a possible surrogate measure of reproductive aging. The aim of the study was to evaluate the predictive value of AMH levels in determining the median time to menopause for late reproductive age women and the predictive ability of AMH compared to FSH and inhibin b. A 14-yr follow-up in the Penn Ovarian Aging Study, 1996-2010, was conducted for a randomly identified population-based cohort. A total of 401 late reproductive age women participated in the study. Observed time to menopause was measured. All participants were premenopausal, with a mean (SD) age of 41.47 (3.52) yr and a median AMH level of 0.68 ng/ml at baseline. AMH strongly predicted time to menopause; age further improved predictions. Among women with a baseline AMH level below 0.20 ng/ml, the median time to menopause was 5.99 yr [95% confidence interval (CI), 4.20-6.33] in the 45- to 48-yr age group and 9.94 yr (95% CI, 3.31-12.73) in the 35- to 39-yr age group. With higher baseline AMH levels above 1.50 ng/ml, the median time to menopause was 6.23 yr in the oldest age group and more than 13.01 yr in the youngest age group. Smoking significantly reduced the time to menopause (hazard ratio, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.19-2.19; P = 0.002). AMH was a stronger predictor of time to menopause than FSH or inhibin b. AMH is a strong predictor of median time to menopause in late reproductive age women. Age and smoking are significant and independent contributors to the predictions of AMH.

  2. Assessment of current and future ovarian reserve status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian ageing is the gradual decline in the number of oocytes and the simultaneous decrease of the quality of the remaining oocytes. The changes in quantity and quality will lead to four milestones in the reproductive lifespan: subfertility, the end of natural fertility, menopausal transition and

  3. Evaluation of Ovarian Lesions Inducing Endometrial Hyperplasia or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Follicular cyst was the predominant lesion associated with endometrial hyperplasia and endometrioid adenocarcinoma of endometrium in post-menopausal age group. In addition, hyperplastic lesions in endometrium can occur in non-hormonal secreting ovarian epithelial tumors possibly due to functioning ...

  4. Dual ovarian stimulation and random start in assisted reproductive technologies: from ovarian biology to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiarelli, Alberto; Venturella, Roberta; Vizziello, Damiano; Bulletti, Francesco; Ubaldi, Filippo M

    2017-06-01

    The opportunity to use gonadotropins to stimulate the growth of antral follicles coming from different follicular waves available in different moment of the menstrual cycle allowed the implementation of innovative protocols in assisted reproductive technologies. The purpose of this review is to explore the possible advantages related to these new controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) strategies. Women exhibit major and minor wave patterns of ovarian follicular development during the menstrual cycle, as it is in animal species. These observations led to the introduction of two new strategies for COS: the random start and the double ovarian stimulation within a single menstrual cycle. The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist COS protocols, started randomly at any day of the menstrual cycle, is today a standard procedure in those cases where obtaining oocytes is an urgent task, such as in case of fertility preservation for malignant diseases or other medical indications.On the other hand, in poor prognosis patients, double ovarian stimulation has been suggested with the aim of maximizing the number of oocytes retrieved within a single menstrual cycle and, in turn increasing the chance to obtain a reproductively competent embryo. Randomized control trials are necessary to confirm these preliminary findings.

  5. Major Cardiovascular Risk Factors for Menopausal and Non-menopausal Women Compared with Men of the Same Age in Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Mahdavian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Menopause refers to the cessation of menstruation due to hormonal changes and ovarian inactivity in women. These changes in hormone levels lead to various health consequences. This period of physiological changes usually starts in women with 40-50 years of age, and is characterized by the reduction of estrogen level. The mortality rate of premenopausal women, due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, is one fifth of men, though it rapidly increases after the menopause. Therefore, this descriptive study was conducted in order to determine the cardiovascular risk factors for menopausal and non-menopausal women in comparison with men of the same age. Materials and Methods: The study sample included patients referring to the cardiovascular department of Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. The subjects were divided into 4 groups: non-menopausal women (n=35, men of the same age (as the non-menopausal women, n=35, menopausal women (n=50, and men of the same age (as the menopausal women, n=50. All criteria related to major cardiovascular risk factors including systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, cholesterol, triglyceride (TG, and low and high-density lipoprotein (LDL and HDL were measured and compared in all four groups. In order to analyze the data, Fisher's exact test was carried out using SPSS version 16. Results: There was a significant difference between non-menopausal women and men of the same age with regard to high SBP and DBP, hypercholesterolemia, low HDL, and high LDL. However, no significant difference was observed among two groups, regarding high levels of TG. The menopausal women and men of the same age showed significant differences in terms of high SBP and low HDL.  However, no differences were observed in DBP, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and high LDL. Conclusion: Both non-menopausal and menopausal women and men had significant differences in relation to high SBP and low HDL. But a

  6. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  8. Radioimmunoassay and chromatographic similarity of circulating endogenous gonadotropin releasing hormone and hypothalamic extracts in man. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, C.H. (St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London); McNeilly, A.S.; Rees, L.H.; Lowry, P.J.; Gilmore, D.; Dobbie, H.G.

    1976-10-01

    A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay for the gonadotropin releasing hormone has been developed in order to study its physiological importance in man. In view of the expected low concentrations in peripheral blood, large volumes of human plasma were extracted by two different methods and the characteristics of the radioimmunoassayable material compared with those of synthetic decapeptide and extracts of human hypothalami. The results indicate that radioimmunoassayable gonadotropin releasing hormone is present in some human plasmas but the plasma concentrations are less than 2.5 pg/ml. Peripheral levels were more consistently measurable in women at midcycle and after the menopause. The hormone was undetectable in the plasma of normal men, human cerebrospinal fluid, and fetal cerebral tissue, but was present in fetal hypothalami.

  9. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with...

  10. Menopause 101: A Primer for the Perimenopausal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abstracts Media Award Recipients Media Policy Media Requests Menopause 101: A primer for the perimenopausal The information ... about 2 years earlier. Common Body Changes at Menopause Each woman’s experience of menopause is different. Many ...

  11. Diabetes and Menopause: A Twin Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes and menopause: A twin challenge Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body. Here's what to ... to stay in control. By Mayo Clinic Staff Menopause — and the years leading up to it — may ...

  12. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  13. Obesity and reproductive hormone levels in the transition to menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Sammel, Mary D; Lin, Hui; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate associations of obesity with reproductive hormone levels as women progress from premenopausal to postmenopausal status. This was a longitudinal study conducted in the population-based Penn Ovarian Aging Cohort (N = 436). At cohort enrollment, the women were premenopausal, ages 35 to 47 years, with equal numbers of African Americans and whites. Anthropometric measures, menopause status, and reproductive hormone measures were evaluated for 12 years. Associations of the anthropometric measures with estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, and inhibin B in the menopausal transition were estimated using generalized linear regression models for repeated measures. Associations between obesity and hormone levels differed by menopause status as indicated by significant interactions between each hormone and menopausal stage. Premenopausal obese and overweight women had significantly lower estradiol levels compared with nonobese women, independent of age, race, and smoking (obese: 32.8 pg/mL [95% CI, 30.6-35.2] vs nonobese: 39.8 pg/mL [95% CI, 37.0-42.8], P hormone levels were lowest in postmenopausal obese compared with nonobese women (P hormone dynamics independent of age, race, and smoking in midlife women, although the mechanisms remain unclear.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  15. Vaginal microbiota in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinus Tarina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human vagina together with its resident, microbiota, comprise a dynamic ecosystem. Normal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus species, and pathogen microbiota such as Gardnerella species and Bacteroides species can occur due to decrease in Lactobacillus domination. Lactobacillus plays an essential role in keeping normal vaginal microbiota in balance. Vaginal microbiota adapts to pH change and hormonal value. Changes in the vaginal microbiota over a woman’s lifespan will influence the colonization of pathogenic microbes. They include changes in child, puberty, reproductive state, menopause, and postmenopause. Estrogen levels change will affect the colonization of pathogenic microbium, leading to genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Vulvovaginal atrophy is often found in postmenopausal women, and dominated by L. iners, Anaerococcus sp, Peptoniphilus sp, Prevotella sp, and Streptococcus sp. The normal vaginal microbiota’s imbalance in menopause will cause diseases such as bacterial vaginosis, and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis due to hormonal therapies. Changes in the vaginal microbiota due to bacterial vaginosis are characterized by decrease in H2O2-producing Lactobacillus. They are also caused by the increase in numbers and concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and other anaerob species such as Peptostreptococci, Prevotella spp, and Mobiluncus spp.

  16. [Phytoestrogens and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torella, M; La Rezza, F; Labriola, D; Ammaturo, F P; Ambrosio, D; Zarcone, R; Trotta, C; Schettino, M T; De Franciscis, P

    2013-12-01

    Menopause is the interruption of menstrual and reproductive capacity, therefore, that occurs naturally in all women between 48 and 55 years, due to a lower production of gonadal steroids. The period becomes progressively irregular and lack of ovulation and menstrual flow decrease, and finally disappears. The time between the first symptoms and the cessation of the menstrual cycle is called menopause. With the onset of menopause the woman undergoes a series of changes related to estrogen deficiency, which occur in all tissues of the body. In this period one can distinguish an early stage, characterized by hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats and insomnia, and a late phase in which we highlight more symptoms related to the interruption of hormonal such as osteoporosis, obesity, at urogenital and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. In Italy, only 5.2% of women aged 45-64 years used hormone replacement therapy, and only 20-30% follow a therapy for more than two years, both for psychological reasons, and for fear of side effects. Not surprisingly, therefore, phytoestrogens are given a high importance, as they are considered a natural alternative tank to to their plant origin. Interest in phytoestrogens was born from the observation that postmenopausal women who live in the East have a lower incidence of symptoms, cardiovascular disease, cancer and osteoporosis hormone use, compared to Western women.

  17. Inhibitory role of prohibitin in human ovarian epithelial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin; Ren, Jian-Min; Wang, Yi-Ying; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Qing; Kong, Bei-Hua; Zheng, Wen-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize the exact individual roles of gonadotropins on ovarian epithelial carcinogenesis, an earlier study showed that prohibitin was significantly up-regulated by luteinizing hormone (LH). To further clarify the role of prohibitin in ovarian carcinogenesis and its association with LH, herein we studied the expression of prohibitin in various ovarian tissues including different developmental stages of ovarian epithelial tumors. Methods: A total of 135 samples were studied by immunohistochemistry. These included benign ovarian cases with follicles, ovarian surface epithelia and ovarian epithelial inclusions (OEI) (n=30), serous cystadenoma (n=14), serous borderline tumor (n=12), serous carcinoma (n=20), mucinous cystadenoma (n=10), mucinous borderline tumor (n=10), mucinous carcinomas (n=10), endometrioid carcinomas (n=12), poorly/undifferentiated carcinomas (n=5), and fallopian tube (n=12). Results: Strong and diffuse staining of prohibitin was detected in luteinized ovarian stromal cells, follicular cells, fallopian tube, and OEI with serous differentiation. A significantly higher prohibitin expression in luteinized stromal cells than in non-luteinized stromal cells was observed (POEI. However, compared to the level of prohibitin expression in OEI, it showed a trend of gradual loss from benign ovarian tumors, to borderline tumors and to carcinomas (POEI. Conclusions: These data further suggest that prohibitin plays a tumor suppressing role, which is probably associated with LH mediated protection role against ovarian epithelial carcinoma. In addition to the tumor suppressive role of prohibitin, it also plays a role in cellular differentiation, which may be helpful to differentiate ovarian mucinous tumors from the tumors with serous differentiation in clinical settings. More importantly, our findings are supportive that the ovarian epithelial cancers, particularly the serous cancers including those precursors with serous differentiation are

  18. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contraceptives may have a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. But oral contraceptives do have risks, so discuss whether the benefits outweigh those risks based on your situation. Discuss your risk factors ... of breast and ovarian cancers, bring this up with your doctor. Your doctor ...

  19. Increased Progesterone/Estradiol Ratio on the Day of hCG Administration Adversely Affects Success of In Vitro Fertilization–Embryo Transfer in Patients Stimulated with Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist and Recombinant Follicle-stimulating Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Che Ou

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: Premature luteinization, defined as late follicular P/E2 ratio of > 1 in long GnRHa cycles with rFSH stimulation, adversely affected ovarian responses and clinical outcomes. It seems unrelated to preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH elevation and LH/hCG content of gonadotropins and could be associated with poor ovarian response and the presence of dysmature follicles. [Taiwan J Obstet Cynecol 2008;47(2:1 68-1 74

  20. Determination of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Alfthan, Henrik

    2013-12-01

    Determination of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is used for diagnosis and monitoring of pregnancy, pregnancy related disorders, for trophoblastic and some nontrophoblastic tumors. In addition, hCG is determined for doping control in males. Assay of hCG is complicated by the occurrence of different molecular forms, which are detected to various degrees by different assays. The main form of hCG in circulation and in patients with trophoblastic tumors is intact heterodimeric hCG. The free β subunit (hCGβ) is a minor form in plasma in both conditions, but it may be the major form aggressive trophoblastic cancer. Therefore, assays measuring hCG and hCGβ together are mainly used for diagnosis of pregnancy and trophoblastic diseases. When excreted into urine, most of hCG (and hCGβ) is broken down to the core fragment of hCGβ (hCGβcf), which is the main immunoreactive form of hCG in urine during pregnancy. Specific determination of hCGβ is of value in screening for Down's syndrome and diagnosis of nontrophoblastic cancer. hCGbcf is of limited utility but it is important because it may disturb assay of hCG in pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. of menopause and sexual satisfaction in menopausal women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    menopause and the prevalence rates of depression fall post- menopause.“ Genazzani', Spinetti, Gallo, et ... previous history of poor physical and psychosocial health at age 36 also reported more symptoms at 47 ..... Hammer M, Berg G and Hindgren R: Does physical exercise influence the frequency ofpostmenopausal hot ...

  2. Antral Follicle Count Predicts Natural Menopause in a Population-Based Sample: The CARDIA Women’s Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa F.; Bates, Gordon Wright; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Lewis, Cora E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The timing of menopause is associated with multiple chronic diseases. Tools to predict this milestone have relevance for clinical and research purposes. Among infertile women, a positive relationship exists between antral follicle count (AFC) and response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, a marker of ovarian reserve. However, a relationship between AFC and menopause that is age-independent has not been demonstrated. Thus, our objective was to evaluate the relationship between AFC measured in women at ages 34–49 and incident natural menopause over 7-years of follow-up. Methods The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is a longitudinal community-based study (Chicago, Illinois; Birmingham, Alabama; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Oakland, California) begun in 1985–1986. In 2002–03, the CARDIA Women’s Study measured FSH levels and performed a transvaginal ultrasound protocol that included AFC (2mm–10mm follicles on both ovaries). Incident natural menopause was assessed by survey in 2005–06 and 2009–10. Results In our sample (n=456), median AFC and FSH were 5 (IQR 2–9) and 7.8 mIU/mL (IQR 5.6–11.0), respectively, at a mean age of 42 (range 34–49) in 2002–03. 101 women reported natural menopause by 2009–10. In Cox models, current smoking, stable menses, FSH>13, and AFC ≤4 were independently associated with incident natural menopause. Compared to AFC >4, those with AFC ≤4 were nearly twice as likely to have undergone menopause over 7-years of follow-up (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.19–3.02) after adjustment for covariates. Conclusion AFC is independently associated with natural menopause over 7-years of follow-up after controlling for other markers of ovarian aging. PMID:23422869

  3. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Fenton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used "premature ovarian failure" which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI.

  4. Specific activity of radioiodine-labelled human chorionic gonadotropin ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi, M.; Kay, G.W.; Van der Walt, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    The article deals with the determination of the specific activity of radioiodine-labbelled human chorionic gonadotropin ligand. The iodiation of human chorionic gonadotropin and the counting efficiency of 125 I are discussed

  5. Menopause, a Self Care Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maria Cristina; And Others

    Written for women from the three main cultural groups in New Mexico (Native American, Hispanic, and Anglo), this pamphlet discusses the causes and symptoms, some remedies for the symptoms of menopause, and presents ideas for organizing support groups to help middle-aged women and their families deal with menopausal problems. Explanations of the…

  6. Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargarten, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

  7. Menopause: Salient Issues for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Marilyn M.; Lynch, Ann Q.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding menopause, with the idea that counselors are in an ideal position to help change attitudes toward viewing menopause as a time of positive change rather than a time of psychological distress. Reviews historical, sociological, psychological, and attitudinal factors that account for negative responses associated with…

  8. Menopause: A Life Cycle Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarts, Barbara Kess; Baldwin, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    Family therapists need to address the issue of menopause proactively to be of benefit to couples and families during this transitional period in the family life cycle. Physical, psychological, and psychosocial factors affecting the menopausal woman and her family, and ways to address these issues in counseling are discussed. (Author/EMK)

  9. Ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Yukari; Yachida, Meri; Akata, Soichi; Kawana, Koji; Kotake, Fumio; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Negishi, Noriyuki; Akiya, Kiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In 40 patients undergoing pre-treatment for an ovarian tumor, a CT scan of the pelvis and measurements of their CA 125, CA 19 - 9, IAP (immunosupressive acidic antigen), and TPA (tissue polypeptide antigen were performed. The specificity and sensitivity of the CT diagnosis was found to be better than any of other tumor markers measurements. Comparison of the 4 markers showed that the CA 125 testing had the greatest sensitivity in detecting an ovarian cancer. Moreover, the sensitivity of CA 125, was better than a combination of the 4 markers. Thus, a CT scan still remains necessary for the diagnosis of an ovarian cancer. (author)

  10. MENOPAUSE AND NATURAL HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Vrabič Dežman

    2008-12-01

    The studies could not decisively confirm the effectiveness of various phytoestrogens inamelioration of climacteric symptoms. Most studies have proven the effectiveness of thenatural medication made of Cimicifuga racemosa and its safe short-term use. Gynecologists should be familiar with the basics of phytotherapy and the results of clinical studiesin this field in order to confidently advise women to use the natural medications in caseswhere despite the climacteric symptoms they cannot or will not use HRT, consequentlygreatly reducing the quality of their lives. In cases where climacteric symptoms are mild tomoderate, some menopausal societies around the globe suggest trying natural medicationfirst, and only later implementing HRT

  11. Natural menopause among women below 50 years in India: A population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ogollah, Reuben; Singh, Abhishek; Dean, Tara; Dewey, Ann; Stones, William

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The age at which menopause naturally occurs may reflect nutritional and environmental circumstances as well as genetic factors. In this study we examined natural menopause as a marker of women's health at the population level in India and in some major States. Methods: Data from the Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS) carried out during 2007-2008 covering 643,944 ever-married women aged 15-49 yr were used; women of older ages were not included in this survey. Since not all women in this age group had achieved natural menopause at the time of survey, Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed to obtain the median age of women reporting a natural menopause, excluding those who underwent hysterectomy. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated for key socio-economic and reproductive variables that could potentially affect the age at natural menopause menopause prior to age 40 was reported by approximately 1.5 per cent of women. In the national data set, significant associations with age at natural menopause were identified with marriage breakdown or widowhood, poverty, Muslim religious affiliation, ‘scheduled caste’ status, not having received schooling, rural residence, having never used contraceptive pills, not been sterilized or had an abortion, low parity and residence in the western region. Within data from five selected States examined separately, the strength of these associations varied. Interpretation & conclusions: Associations of natural menopause with sociocultural, family planning and demographic variables were noted. Most importantly, there was an association with poverty that would require further investigation as to causality. The proportion of women experiencing early menopause may represent a useful overall indicator of women's health. The data are reassuring with regard to possible late effects of sterilization on ovarian function. PMID:28139535

  12. Ovarian volume throughout life: a validated normative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham; Greve, Tine; Andersen, Claus Y; Anderson, Richard A; Wallace, W Hamish B

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of ovarian volume has been shown to be a useful indirect indicator of the ovarian reserve in women of reproductive age, in the diagnosis and management of a number of disorders of puberty and adult reproductive function, and is under investigation as a screening tool for ovarian cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from conception to 82 years of age. This model shows that 69% of the variation in ovarian volume is due to age alone. We have shown that in the average case ovarian volume rises from 0.7 mL (95% CI 0.4-1.1 mL) at 2 years of age to a peak of 7.7 mL (95% CI 6.5-9.2 mL) at 20 years of age with a subsequent decline to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis and management of a number of diverse gynaecological and reproductive conditions in females from birth to menopause and beyond.

  13. Common diseases as determinants of menopausal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Mikael; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A

    2016-12-01

    Can the diagnosis of common diseases before menopause influence age at natural menopause (ANM) onset? Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and depression were observed to delay menopause. It has been observed that women who undergo early menopause experience a higher burden of health problems related to metabolic syndromes, heart disease and depression, but whether ANM can be influenced by common adult diseases has not been studied extensively. All women attending mammography screening or clinical mammography at four hospitals in Sweden were invited to participate in the Karolinska Mammography Project for Risk Prediction of Breast Cancer (KARMA) study. Between January 2011 and March 2013, 70 877 women were recruited. Information from the baseline questionnaire filled out upon enrollment was used in this cross-sectional analysis on predictors of ANM onset. We limited our analyses to 61 936 women with complete data on ANM and covariates and a follow-up time (from birth to menopause or censoring) of at least 35 years. Premenopausal diagnoses of depression, anorexia, bulimia, PCOS, ovarian cyst, heart failure, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke, preeclampsia, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia were examined as time-dependent variables in multivariable Cox regression analyses, adjusting for reproductive factors (age at menarche, menstrual cycle regularity in adult life, number of children and premenopausal oral contraceptive use) and risk factors of common diseases (education, physical activity at 18 years and information at the time of questionnaire including BMI, ever smoking and alcohol consumption). Women with PCOS and depression were independently associated with later menopause (hazard ratio (95% CI): 0.44 (0.28-0.71) and 0.95 (0.91-1.00), respectively), compared to women with no such histories. The associations remained significant in a subset of women who had never received gynecological surgery or hormone treatment (n = 32313, 0.21 (0

  14. Anti-Müllerian Hormone as a marker of ovarian reserve in relation to cardio-metabolic health : A narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kat, Annelien C.; Broekmans, Frank J M; Laven, Joop S.; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2015-01-01

    The final hallmark of diminishing ovarian reserve is menopause, a state known to be inextricably linked to the deterioration of female cardiovascular health. The menopausal transition is associated with an increased risk of future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, irrespective of chronological

  15. Epidemiology of the symptoms of menopause – an intercontinental review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Teresa Makara-Studzińśka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The age of menopause is a time of many changes in the psychophysical-social functioning of women, with reduced ovarian hormonal activity and estrogen levels. The most common, troublesome symptoms of menopause age include depressive disorders, sleep disorders, sexual dysfunction, discomfort associated with muscle pain, joint aches, osteoporosis and characteristic hot flashes. Aim of the study is to determine and compare the rate of menopausal symptoms among women living in continents of both Americas, Africa, Australia and Eurasia. Material and methods : The results of this work were obtained in 2014 on the basis of the data from a review of the 64 most important studies using the PubMed database. Research published in the period 2000-2014, from Africa, both Americas, Australia and Eurasia, were taken into account. Results : The prevalence of menopausal symptoms in African women is disconcertingly high. Women from South America complain about occurrence of depressive, sexual dysfunctions and discomfort associated with muscle pain and joint aches. Symptoms most reported by women in the United States are pains associated with muscles and joints. Women in Australia suffer mainly due to vasomotor symptoms and sexual dysfunction, while in the group of women surveyed in Asia there is observed an alarming increase in the proportion of women reporting depressive disorders. In Europe there was a much greater incidence of sleep disorders and depressive disorders. Conclusions : Women around the world suffer from ailments characteristic for the menopausal period regardless of ethnic origin, skin color or socio-demographic factors.

  16. Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about ovarian and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  17. The influence of ovarian hyperstimulation drugs on morphometry and morphology of human oocytes in ICSI program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Fatemeh; Alemzadeh Mehrizi, Arezoo; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Halvaei, Iman

    2018-04-01

    To compare the influences of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) drugs using recombinant follicular stimulating hormone (rFSH) versus human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG) on morphometry and morphology of MII oocytes in ICSI cycles. In this prospective study, 363 MII oocytes from 50 ICSI cycles with male factor infertility were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to the protocols of COH: I- rFSH and II- hMG. The immature oocytes were excluded from the study. All oocytes were categorized into four morphological groups of normal, and those with single, double, or multiple defects. The inclusive morphometrical criteria were: areas and diameters of oocyte, ooplasm, and zona pellucida (ZP). Also, circumferences of oocyte and ooplasm were assessed. The ZP area and ooplasm diameter for both normal and abnormal oocytes were significantly higher in group I (P: .05; P: .028, respectively) compared to group II (P: .023; P: .003, respectively). In abnormal oocytes, ooplasm diameter was higher in group I compared to group II. Furthermore, ooplasm area for abnormal oocytes was significantly higher in group I compared to group II. There was an increasing trend for number of mature oocytes, in abnormal oocytes, for group I (5.53 ± 3.1) in comparison with group II (4.4 ± 2.97; P = .25). The rate of oocytes with normal morphology was significantly higher in hMG, when compared to rFSH groups. Morphometrical parameters were increased in rFSH group, but the normal morphology of oocytes were significantly enhanced in hMG group. Treatment with proper dosage of ovulation induction drugs may enhance the number of normal sized oocytes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Tindakan Bedah Mulut Pada Pasien Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Andriani

    2008-01-01

    Menopause diartikan sebagai suatu proses dimana wanita tidak mengalami menstruasi lagi. Usia rata - rata seorang wanita mengalami menopause adalah 51 tahun. Pada masa menjelang menopause, ovarium mulai mengalami penuaan sehingga produksi hormon estrogen menurun dan terjadi gangguan keseimbangan hormon. Kekurangan hormon estrogen ini menyebabkan keluhan keluhan yang dikenal sebagai sindroma defisiensi estrogen. Wanita menopause sering disertai dengan penyakit – penyakit sistemik seperti o...

  19. Hubungan Penggunaan Kontrasepsi Pil dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Fitriyani Fitriyani; Ratna Djuwita

    2013-01-01

    Menopause merupakan menstruasi yang berhenti secara permanen yang disebabkan kehilangan fungsi folikel sel-sel telur. Wanita yang memasuki menopause mengalami penurunan hormon estrogen yang mengganggu aktivitas sehari-hari, bahkan menurunkan kualitas hidup. Penggunaan kontrasepsi pil berhubungan dengan penundaan usia dan keluhan menopause. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui hubungan antara penggunaan kontrasepsi pil terhadap usia menopause. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain potong lintang. P...

  20. The effect of adverse intrauterine conditions, early childhood growth and famine exposure on age at menopause: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadrzadeh, S.; Verschuuren, M.; Schoonmade, L. J.; Lambalk, C. B.; Painter, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    When the follicle reserve, which is developed solely during the fetal period, is depleted, women enter menopause. Intrauterine and childhood adverse conditions might affect the ovarian capacity by influencing follicle production in the first trimester, limiting the initial follicle pool or mediate

  1. Occurrence of postmenopausal-like acidic follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) isoforms precedes the rise of FSH before menopause.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, C.M.G.; Span, P.N.; Smeenk, J.M.J.; Hanssen, R.G.; Braat, D.D.M.; Sweep, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the glycoform distribution patterns of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) during the menstrual cycle at different ages and FSH levels, after menopause, and with premature ovarian failure (POF). DESIGN: Controlled clinical study. SETTING: Healthy

  2. A case report of spontaneous pregnancy during hormonal replacement therapy for premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premature ovarian failure (POF is a common condition; its incidence is estimated to be as great as 1 in 100 by the age of 40 years. Physiologic replacement of ovarian steroid hormones seems rational until the age of normal menopause. Temporary return of ovarian function and pregnancy may occur rarely in women with POF. We report a case of POF who conceived during hormone replacement therapy.Case: A 30 years-old woman with confirmed POF after pelvic surgery and sever emotional stress conceived spontaneously.Conclusion: Return of ovarian function and achievement of pregnancy is possible in women with POF.

  3. A case report of spontaneous pregnancy during hormonal replacement therapy for premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Asbagh, Firoozeh; Ebrahimi, Mahbod

    2011-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a common condition; its incidence is estimated to be as great as 1 in 100 by the age of 40 years. Physiologic replacement of ovarian steroid hormones seems rational until the age of normal menopause. Temporary return of ovarian function and pregnancy may occur rarely in women with POF. We report a case of POF who conceived during hormone replacement therapy. A 30 years-old woman with confirmed POF after pelvic surgery and sever emotional stress conceived spontaneously. Return of ovarian function and achievement of pregnancy is possible in women with POF.

  4. Hormone replacement therapy after menopause and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Neuhausen, Susan L; Senter, Leigha; Demsky, Rochelle; Foulkes, William D; Eng, Charis; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Singer, Christian F; Sun, Ping; Lubinski, Jan; Narod, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Many BRCA1 mutation carriers undergo elective surgical oophorectomy (often before menopause) to manage their elevated risk of developing ovarian cancer. It is important to clarify whether or not the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to mitigate the symptoms associated with surgical or natural menopause is safe in women with an inherited BRCA1 mutation and no personal history of breast or ovarian cancer. We conducted a case-control analysis of 432 matched pairs of women with a BRCA1 mutation. Detailed information on HRT use after menopause (duration, type, age at first/last use, formulation) was obtained from a research questionnaire administered at the time of study enrollment. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) associated with HRT use. The mean duration of HRT use after menopause was 4.3 years among the cases and 4.4 years among the controls (P = 0.83). The adjusted OR for breast cancer comparing all women who ever used HRT to those who never used HRT was 0.80 (95 % CI 0.55-1.16; P = 0.24). Findings did not differ by type of menopause (natural vs. surgical), by recency of use, by duration of use, and by formulation type. These findings suggest that a short course of HRT should not be contra-indicated for BRCA1 mutation carriers who have undergone menopause and who have no personal history of cancer.

  5. Natural menopause among women below 50 years in India: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ogollah, Reuben; Singh, Abhishek; Dean, Tara; Dewey, Ann; Stones, William

    2016-09-01

    The age at which menopause naturally occurs may reflect nutritional and environmental circumstances as well as genetic factors. In this study we examined natural menopause as a marker of women's health at the population level in India and in some major States. Data from the Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS) carried out during 2007-2008 covering 643,944 ever-married women aged 15-49 yr were used; women of older ages were not included in this survey. Since not all women in this age group had achieved natural menopause at the time of survey, Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed to obtain the median age of women reporting a natural menopause, excluding those who underwent hysterectomy. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated for key socio-economic and reproductive variables that could potentially affect the age at natural menopause family planning and demographic variables were noted. Most importantly, there was an association with poverty that would require further investigation as to causality. The proportion of women experiencing early menopause may represent a useful overall indicator of women's health. The data are reassuring with regard to possible late effects of sterilization on ovarian function.

  6. Hormonal status affects the progression of STZ-induced diabetes and diabetic renal damage in the VCD mouse model of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Maggie; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Cai, Qi; Hoyer, Patricia B; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2007-07-01

    Changes in the estrogen/testosterone balance at menopause may negatively influence the development of diabetic kidney disease. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that changes in hormone levels during perimenopause may influence disease development. Injection of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) in B(6)C(3)F(1) mice induces gradual ovarian failure, preserving both the perimenopausal (peri-ovarian failure) and menopausal (post-ovarian failure) periods. To address the impact of the transition into menopause on the development of diabetes and diabetic kidney damage, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in the VCD model of menopause. After 6 wk of STZ-induced diabetes, blood glucose was significantly increased in post-ovarian failure (post-OF) diabetic mice compared with cycling diabetic mice. In peri-ovarian failure (peri-OF) diabetic mice, blood glucose levels trended higher but were not significantly different from cycling diabetic mice, suggesting a continuum of worsening blood glucose across the menopausal transition. Cell proliferation, an early marker of damage in the kidney, was increased in post-OF diabetic mice compared with cycling diabetic mice, as measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry. In post-OF diabetic mice, mRNA abundance of early growth response-1 (Egr-1), collagen-4alpha1, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were increased and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4 (3beta-HSD4) and transforming growth factor-beta(2) (TGF-beta(2)) were decreased compared with cycling diabetic mice. In peri-OF diabetic mice, mRNA abundance of Egr-1 and 3beta-HSD4 were increased, and TGF-beta(2) was decreased compared with cycling diabetic mice. This study highlights the importance and utility of the VCD model of menopause, as it provides a physiologically relevant system for determining the impact of the menopausal transition on diabetes and diabetic kidney damage.

  7. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: Individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamajima, N; Hirose, K; Tajima, K; Rohan, T; Friedenreich, CM; Calle, EE; Gapstur, SM; Patel, AV; Coates, RJ; Liff, JM; Talamini, R; Chantarakul, N; Koetsawang, S; Rachawat, D; Marcou, Y

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected women. METHODS: Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone thera...

  8. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor sequence from fish. G KUMARESAN, T VENUGOPAL, A VIKAS, T J PANDIAN andS MATHAVAN*. Department of Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, India. *Corresponding author (Fax, 91-452-859134; Email, ...

  9. Fresh versus frozen embryo transfer after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycles among high responder women: A randomized, multi-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of embryo cryopreservation excludes the possible detrimental effects of ovarian stimulation on the endometrium, and higher reproductive outcomes following this policy have been reported. Moreover, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist cycles as a substitute for standard human chorionic gonadotropin trigger, minimizes the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS in fresh as well as frozen embryo transfer cycles (FET. Objective: To compare the reproductive outcomes and risk of OHSS in fresh vs frozen embryo transfer in high responder patients, undergoing in vitro fertilization triggered with a bolus of GnRH agonist. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, multi-centre study, 121 women undergoing FET and 119 women undergoing fresh ET were investigated as regards clinical pregnancy as the primary outcome and the chemical pregnancy, live birth, OHSS development, and perinatal data as secondary outcomes. Results: There were no significant differences between FET and fresh groups regarding chemical (46.4% vs. 40.2%, p=0.352, clinical (35.8% vs. 38.3%, p=0.699, and ongoing (30.3% vs. 32.7%, p=0.700 pregnancy rates, also live birth (30.3% vs. 29.9%, p=0.953, perinatal outcomes, and OHSS development (35.6% vs. 42.9%, p=0.337. No woman developed severe OHSS and no one required admission to hospital. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that GnRHa trigger followed by fresh transfer with modified luteal phase support in terms of a small human chorionic gonadotropin bolus is a good strategy to secure good live birth rates and a low risk of clinically relevant OHSS development in in vitro fertilization patients at risk of OHSS.

  10. Induction of Gonadotropins for Reproductive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Much of the recent research on gonadotropin – related control processes of reproduction and reproductive maturation has concentrated on the neuronal and molecular biology of gonadotropin release. The reproductive development of healthy mammals requires appropriate fetal develompment and migration of the neural network controlling and including the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH – producing neurons that are needed to regulate GnRH and luteinizing hormone (LH release. GnRH is also necessary for the development of the gonadotropin – producing pituitary gland. The fetal gonads respon to GnRH – induced LH production by producing the gonadal steroids required for further reproductive differentiation. Pubertal maturation is characterised by increases in LH levels, representing the corresponding pulsatile release of GnRH. This GnRH pulse generator appears to be an intrinsic property of the arcuate nucleus at the medial basal hypothalamus. The generator activity can be mediated by the neurotransmitter aspartate which activates neurons of the hypothalamus, inducing acuate releases of GnRH and hence initiates puberty. A major factor in human reproductive maturation is the decrease in the age of puberty, caused by improvement of nutritional conditions due to the socio – economic development. This implies that the pubertal activation of GnRH secretion depends on metabolic conditions. Of the substances that mediate the metabolic condition to the neuronal network regulating GnRH secretion, the role of the neuropeptide Y (NPY appears instrumental : for healthy mammals less food means more NPY, and accumulated NPY makes food to become sex. NPY does this by regulating the appropriate hypothalamic functions including the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin release.

  11. Cosmetics use and age at menopause: is there a connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Erika T; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi

    2016-09-15

    Cosmetics contain a vast number of chemicals, most of which are not under the regulatory purview of the Food and Drug Administration. Only a few of these chemicals have been evaluated for potential deleterious health impact: parabens, phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and siloxanes. A review of the ingredients in the best-selling and top-rated products of the top beauty brands in the world, as well as a review of highlighted chemicals by nonprofit environmental organizations, reveals 11 chemicals and chemical families of concern: butylated hydroxyanisole/butylated hydroxytoluene, coal tar dyes, diethanolamine, formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, parabens, phthalates, 1,4-dioxane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, talc/asbestos, and triclosan. Age at menopause can be affected by a variety of mechanisms, including endocrine disruption, failure of DNA repair, oxidative stress, shortened telomere length, and ovarian toxicity. There is a lack of available studies to make a conclusion regarding cosmetics use and age at menopause. What little data there are suggest that future studies are warranted. Women with chronic and consistent use of cosmetics across their lifespan may be a population of concern. More research is required to better elucidate the relationship and time windows of vulnerability and the effects of mixtures and combinations of products on ovarian health. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sulpiride-Induced Hyperprolactinemia in Mature Female Rats: Evidence for Alterations in The Reproductive System, Pituitary and Ovarian Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Mostafapour; Samad Zare; Rajab Ali Sadrkhanlou; Abbas Ahmadi; Mazdak Razi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia following administration of conventional antipsychotic drugs requires further investigation. The current study is designed to evaluate the effect of sulpiride (SPD)-induced hyperprolactinemia on alterations to ovarian follicular growth, gonadotropins, and ovarian hormones and to analyze the extent of potential problems in mammary glands. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 albino Wistar rats were divided into four groups: con...

  13. The menopause and urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to study the possible role of the menopause in adult female urinary incontinence (UI) etiology, using a cross-sectional population study comprising a random sample of adult females and self-reported data based on postal questionnaires. The study group comprised 915 women who...... prevalence in 1987 of episodes of stress and urge urinary incontinence; prevalence of menopause and exposure to childbirth, gynecologic surgery, cystitis and obesity as indicated by body mass index more than 29; prevalence relative risks, as indicated by odds ratio of UI conditional on menopause and other...... the year of final menstruation. The findings suggest perimenopausal processes rather than the menopause in general to be responsible for an increased risk of developing UI. The elevation of UI prevalence in the perimenopause may reflect the adjustment of the female continence mechanism to function...

  14. Prevention of diseases after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, R A; Davis, S R; De Villiers, T J; Gompel, A; Henderson, V W; Hodis, H N; Lumsden, M A; Mack, W J; Shapiro, S; Baber, R J

    2014-10-01

    Women may expect to spend more than a third of their lives after menopause. Beginning in the sixth decade, many chronic diseases will begin to emerge, which will affect both the quality and quantity of a woman's life. Thus, the onset of menopause heralds an opportunity for prevention strategies to improve the quality of life and enhance longevity. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, cognitive decline, dementia and depression, and cancer are the major diseases of concern. Prevention strategies at menopause have to begin with screening and careful assessment for risk factors, which should also include molecular and genetic diagnostics, as these become available. Identification of certain risks will then allow directed therapy. Evidence-based prevention for the diseases noted above include lifestyle management, cessation of smoking, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, a healthy diet and moderate exercise, as well as mentally stimulating activities. Although the most recent publications from the follow-up studies of the Women's Health Initiative do not recommend menopause hormonal therapy as a prevention strategy, these conclusions may not be fully valid for midlife women, on the basis of the existing data. For healthy women aged 50-59 years, estrogen therapy decreases coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality; this interpretation is entirely consistent with results from other randomized, controlled trials and observational studies. Thus. as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic disease after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered as part of the armamentarium.

  15. Understanding weight gain at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S R; Castelo-Branco, C; Chedraui, P; Lumsden, M A; Nappi, R E; Shah, D; Villaseca, P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the literature regarding the impact of the menopause transition on body weight and body composition. We conducted a search of the literature using Medline (Ovid, 1946-present) and PubMed (1966-2012) for English-language studies that included the following search terms: 'menopause', 'midlife', 'hormone therapy' or 'estrogen' combined with 'obesity', 'body weight' or 'body composition'. Whereas weight gain per se cannot be attributed to the menopause transition, the change in the hormonal milieu at menopause is associated with an increase in total body fat and an increase in abdominal fat. Weight excess at midlife is not only associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, but also impacts adversely on health-related quality of life and sexual function. Animal and human studies indicate that this tendency towards central abdominal fat accumulation is ameliorated by estrogen therapy. Studies mostly indicate a reduction in overall fat mass with estrogen and estrogen-progestin therapy, improved insulin sensitivity and a lower rate of development of type 2 diabetes. The hormonal changes across the perimenopause substantially contribute to increased abdominal obesity which leads to additional physical and psychological morbidity. There is strong evidence that estrogen therapy may partly prevent this menopause-related change in body composition and the associated metabolic sequelae. However, further studies are required to identify the women most likely to gain metabolic benefit from menopausal hormone therapy in order to develop evidence-based clinical recommendations.

  16. Luteal Coasting and Individualization of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Dose after Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Triggering for Final Oocyte Maturation—A Retrospective Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lawrenz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian stimulation in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocol with the use of GnRH agonist for final oocyte maturation is the state-of-the-art treatment in patients with an expected or known high response to avoid or at least reduce significantly the risk for development of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS. Due to a shortened LH surge after administration of GnRH agonist in most patients, the luteal phase will be characterized by luteolysis and luteal phase insufficiency. Maintaining a sufficient luteal phase is crucial for achievement of a pregnancy; however, the optimal approach is still under debate. Administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG within 72 h rescues the corpora lutea function; however, the so far often used 1,500 IU still bear the risk for development of OHSS. The recently introduced concept of “luteal coasting” individualizes the luteal phase support by monitoring the progesterone concentrations and administering a rescue dosage of hCG when progesterone concentrations drop significantly. This retrospective proof-of-concept study explored the correlation between hCG dosages ranging from 375 up to 1,500 IU and the progesterone levels in the early and mid-luteal phases as well as the likelihood of pregnancy, both early and ongoing. The chance of pregnancy is highest with progesterone level ≥13 ng/ml at 48 h postoocyte retrieval. Among the small sample size of 52 women studied, it appears that appropriate progesterone levels can be achieved with hCG dosages as low as 375 IU. This may well optimize the chance of pregnancy while reducing the risk of OHSS associated with higher doses of hCG supplementation in the luteal phase.

  17. Impact of Estrogen Therapy on Lymphocyte Homeostasis and the Response to Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Post-Menopausal Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Engelmann

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that changes in levels of ovarian steroids modulate severity of autoimmune disease and immune function in young adult women. These observations suggest that the loss of ovarian steroids associated with menopause could affect the age-related decline in immune function, known as immune senescence. Therefore, in this study, we determined the impact of menopause and estrogen therapy (ET on lymphocyte subset frequency as well as the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccine in three different groups: 1 young adult women (regular menstrual cycles, not on hormonal contraception; 2 post-menopausal (at least 2 years women who are not receiving any form of hormone therapy (HT and 3 post-menopausal hysterectomized women receiving ET. Although the numbers of circulating CD4 and CD20 B cells were reduced in the post-menopausal group receiving ET, we also detected a better preservation of naïve B cells, decreased CD4 T cell inflammatory cytokine production, and slightly lower circulating levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Following vaccination, young adult women generated more robust antibody and T cell responses than both post-menopausal groups. Despite similar vaccine responses between the two post-menopausal groups, we observed a direct correlation between plasma 17β estradiol (E2 levels and fold increase in IgG titers within the ET group. These findings suggest that ET affects immune homeostasis and that higher plasma E2 levels may enhance humoral responses in post-menopausal women.

  18. ANG II-induced hypertension in the VCD mouse model of menopause is prevented by estrogen replacement during perimenopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollow, Dennis P.; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J.; Sanchez, Jessica N.; Konhilas, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Premenopausal females are resistant to the development of hypertension, and this protection is lost after the onset of menopause, resulting in a sharp increase in disease onset and severity. However, it is unknown how a fluctuating ovarian hormone environment during the transition from perimenopause to menopause impacts the onset of hypertension, and whether interventions during perimenopause prevent disease onset after menopause. A gradual transition to menopause was induced by repeated daily injections of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD). ANG II (800 ng·kg−1·min−1) was infused into perimenopausal and menopausal female mice for 14 days. A separate cohort of mice received 17β-estradiol replacement during perimenopause. ANG II infusion produced significantly higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in menopausal vs. cycling females, and 17β-estradiol replacement prevented this increase. In contrast, MAP was not significantly different when ANG II was infused into perimenopausal and cycling females, suggesting that female resistance to ANG II-induced hypertension is intact during perimenopause. ANG II infusion caused a significant glomerular hypertrophy, and hypertrophy was not impacted by hormonal status. Expression levels of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a collecting duct protein, have been suggested to reflect blood pressure. AQP2 protein expression was significantly downregulated in the renal cortex of the ANG II-infused menopause group, where blood pressure was increased. AQP2 expression levels were restored to control levels with 17β-estradiol replacement. This study indicates that the changing hormonal environment in the VCD model of menopause impacts the severity of ANG II-induced hypertension. These data highlight the utility of the ovary-intact VCD model of menopause as a clinically relevant model to investigate the physiological mechanisms of hypertension that occur in women during the transition into menopause. PMID:26491098

  19. ANG II-induced hypertension in the VCD mouse model of menopause is prevented by estrogen replacement during perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollow, Dennis P; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Sanchez, Jessica N; Konhilas, John P; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2015-12-15

    Premenopausal females are resistant to the development of hypertension, and this protection is lost after the onset of menopause, resulting in a sharp increase in disease onset and severity. However, it is unknown how a fluctuating ovarian hormone environment during the transition from perimenopause to menopause impacts the onset of hypertension, and whether interventions during perimenopause prevent disease onset after menopause. A gradual transition to menopause was induced by repeated daily injections of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD). ANG II (800 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was infused into perimenopausal and menopausal female mice for 14 days. A separate cohort of mice received 17β-estradiol replacement during perimenopause. ANG II infusion produced significantly higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in menopausal vs. cycling females, and 17β-estradiol replacement prevented this increase. In contrast, MAP was not significantly different when ANG II was infused into perimenopausal and cycling females, suggesting that female resistance to ANG II-induced hypertension is intact during perimenopause. ANG II infusion caused a significant glomerular hypertrophy, and hypertrophy was not impacted by hormonal status. Expression levels of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a collecting duct protein, have been suggested to reflect blood pressure. AQP2 protein expression was significantly downregulated in the renal cortex of the ANG II-infused menopause group, where blood pressure was increased. AQP2 expression levels were restored to control levels with 17β-estradiol replacement. This study indicates that the changing hormonal environment in the VCD model of menopause impacts the severity of ANG II-induced hypertension. These data highlight the utility of the ovary-intact VCD model of menopause as a clinically relevant model to investigate the physiological mechanisms of hypertension that occur in women during the transition into menopause. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological

  20. Expression of estrogen receptor α 36 (ESR36 in the hamster ovary throughout the estrous cycle: effects of gonadotropins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabuddha Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Estradiol-17β (E plays an important role in ovarian follicular development. Evidence indicates that some of the effect of E is mediated by the transmembrane estrogen receptor. In this study, we examined the spatio-temporal expression of recently discovered ERα36 (ESR36, a splice variant of Esr1 and a receptor for non-genomic E signaling, in the hamster ovary during the estrous cycle and the role of gonadotropins and ovarian steroid hormones in ESR36 expression. ESR36 expression was high on estrus (D1:0900 h and declined precipitously by proestrus (D4:0900 h and remained low up to D4:1600 h. Immunofluorescence findings corroborated immunoblot findings and revealed that ESR36 was expressed only in the cell membrane of both follicular and non-follicular cells, except the oocytes. Ovarian ESR36 was capable of binding to the E-affinity matrix, and have different molecular weight than that of the ESR1 or GPER. Hypophysectomy (Hx resulted in a marked decline in ESR36 protein levels. FSH and LH, alone or combined, markedly upregulated ESR36 protein in Hx hamsters to the levels observed in D1 hamsters, but neither E nor P had any effect. Inhibition of the gonadotropin surge by phenobarbital treatment on D4:1100 h attenuated ESR36 expression in D1:0900 h ovaries, but the decline was restored by either FSH or LH replacement on D4 afternoon. This is the first report to show that ESR36, which is distinct from ESR1 or GPER is expressed in the plasma membrane of ovarian follicular and non-follicular cells, binds to E and its expression is regulated directly by the gonadotropins. In light of our previous findings, the results suggest that ovarian cells contain at least two distinct membrane estrogen receptors, such as GPER and ESR36, and strongly suggest for a non-genomic action of E regulating ovarian follicular functions.

  1. Regulation of P450 oxidoreductase by gonadotropins in rat ovary and its effect on estrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uesaka Miki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P450 oxidoreductase (POR catalyzes electron transfer to microsomal P450 enzymes. Its deficiency causes Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS, and about half the patients with ABS have ambiguous genitalia and/or impaired steroidogenesis. POR mRNA expression is up-regulated when mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiate into steroidogenic cells, suggesting that the regulation of POR gene expression is important for steroidogenesis. In this context we examined the regulation of POR expression in ovarian granulosa cells by gonadotropins, and its possible role in steroidogenesis. Methods Changes in gene expression in MSCs during differentiation into steroidogenic cells were examined by DNA microarray analysis. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of POR in the rat ovary or in granulosa cells induced by gonadotropin treatment were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Effects of transient expression of wild-type or mutant (R457H or V492E POR proteins on the production of estrone in COS-7 cells were examined in vitro. Effects of POR knockdown were also examined in estrogen producing cell-line, KGN cells. Results POR mRNA was induced in MSCs following transduction with the SF-1 retrovirus, and was further increased by cAMP treatment. Expression of POR mRNA, as well as Cyp19 mRNA, in the rat ovary were induced by equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. POR mRNA and protein were also induced by follicle stimulating hormone in primary cultured rat granulosa cells, and the induction pattern was similar to that for aromatase. Transient expression of POR in COS-7 cells, which expressed a constant amount of aromatase protein, greatly increased the rate of conversion of androstenedione to estrone, in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of mutant POR proteins (R457H or V492E, such as those found in ABS patients, had much less effect on aromatase activity than expression of wild

  2. Osteoporosis in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aliya; Fortier, Michel

    2014-09-01

    To provide guidelines for the health care provider on the prevention, diagnosis, and clinical management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Strategies for identifying and evaluating high-risk individuals, the use of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers in assessing diagnosis and response to management, and recommendations regarding nutrition, physical activity, and the selection of pharmacologic therapy to prevent and manage osteoporosis. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library on August 30 and September 18, 2012, respectively. The strategy included the use of appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., oteoporosis, bone density, menopause) and key words (e.g., bone health, bone loss, BMD). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, practice guidelines, randomized and controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English or French. The search was limited to the publication years 2009 and following, and updates were incorporated into the guideline to March 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.

  3. Beta Human Chorionic Gonadotropin - Induction of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-00-1-0682 TITLE: Beta Human Chorionic Gonadotropin ...Beta Human Chorionic Gonadotropin – Induction of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-00-1-0682 5c...is increased in breast cancer cells after treatment with hCG 9 REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: 1. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) induction of

  4. 76 FR 17927 - Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications; Chorionic Gonadotropin; Cuprimyxin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0151] Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications; Chorionic Gonadotropin; Cuprimyxin... Gonadotropin for (063323) River Rd., suite 500, Rosemont, IL Injection. 60018. (chorionic gonadotropin...

  5. Menopausal women's positive experience of growing older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged.......This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged....

  6. What Are the Symptoms of Menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the symptoms of menopause? Perimenopause begins with a change in a woman's ... longer than a week. A common symptom of menopause is the appearance of hot flashes (sometimes called ...

  7. Menopause: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Aging) Also in Spanish Living With Healthy Lifestyle: Women's Health (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Also ... Spanish Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) ... (North American Menopause Society) What You ...

  8. A gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist model demonstrates that nocturnal hot flashes interrupt objective sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Hadine; Crawford, Sybil; Economou, Nicole; Kim, Semmie; Regan, Susan; Hall, Janet E; White, David

    2013-12-01

    Sleep interruption is often reported by women with hot flashes and night sweats (or vasomotor symptoms, VMS). Although women report that VMS awaken them, polysomnography (PSG) studies have not consistently supported this contention. We mimicked menopause using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) to investigate whether VMS increase awakenings and wake after sleep onset (WASO). VMS, serum estradiol, and at-home PSGs (two pretreatment, two posttreatment) were measured before and after 4 weeks on GnRHa. Regression models were used to determine the effect of increasing VMS frequency on awakenings and WASO, as measured objectively and subjectively. Twenty-nine healthy women (mean 27.3 y). Academic medical center. Depot GnRHa (leuprolide 3.75-mg). Serum estradiol was rapidly and uniformly suppressed on GnRHa. Persistent VMS were reported by 69% of women. The number of nighttime VMS correlated directly with the degree of sleep disturbance. Each additional reported nighttime VMS was associated with a 62% increase from baseline in PSG-measured WASO (P = 0.007), a 3% increase in awakenings (P = 0.05), and 6% increase in %N1 sleep (P = 0.02). Nighttime VMS were also associated with increased perceived WASO (312%; P = 0.02), awakenings (16%; P = 0.007), Insomnia Severity Index (P = 0.03), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P = 0.03) scores, and decreased perceived sleep efficiency (P = 0.01). Objectively recorded nighttime VMS correlated with PSG-measured WASO (rs = 0.45, P = 0.02). This menopause model demonstrates that nighttime vasomotor symptoms correlate with increased sleep fragmentation. These findings are consistent with a specific contribution of vasomotor symptoms to polysomnography-measured sleep interruption suggesting that nighttime vasomotor symptoms interrupt sleep in the setting of menopause.

  9. A review of hormonal changes during the menopausal transition: focus on findings from the Melbourne Women's Midlife Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, H G; Hale, G E; Robertson, D M; Dennerstein, L

    2007-01-01

    The menopause, defined as the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from the loss of ovarian follicular activity, marks the end of natural female reproductive life. It is preceded by a period of menstrual cycle irregularity, the menopausal transition, which usually begins in the mid-40s and is conventionally divided into early and late phases. The endocrine changes, which underlie the transition, are predominantly the consequence of a marked decline in ovarian follicle numbers. The most significant changes include a decrease in early cycle inhibin B and in anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels. The decline in inhibin B results in an increase in FSH, which appears to be an important factor in the maintenance of estradiol (E2) concentrations until late in reproductive life. In the post-menopause, FSH levels are markedly raised, E2 levels are low, whereas inhibin B and AMH are undetectable. The menopausal transition is a time of marked hormonal instability. The Melbourne Women's Midlife Health Project has been an extremely productive study in which it has been possible to describe longitudinal changes in hormone levels throughout the menopause transition and to separate the effects of hormone change from the effects of ageing on a number of endpoints. This review provides the background for an accompanying manuscript in which a novel approach to modelling the hormonal changes during the transition is described.

  10. Menopause, hormone therapy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuenkel, C A

    2017-02-01

    Over the past three decades, the prevalence of diabetes has increased four-fold. Coupled with the global obesity epidemic and aging of the world's population, a perfect metabolic storm is brewing. The influence of menopause and exogenous estrogen and progestogens must be included in this equation. In this review, criteria for diagnosing diabetes and recommendations for screening are described. The reported effects of menopause on diabetes risk in healthy women are reviewed as well as the relationship between established diabetes and the timing of menopause. The effects of menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) on glucose control in women with diabetes and the effect of MHT on diabetes risk in menopausal women without diabetes are described. Evidence-based strategies to prevent diabetes in midlife women are highlighted. The augmenting effect of diabetes on chronic health concerns of aging women, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cancer, along with current recommendations for screening and prevention are presented. Given the current demographics of today's world, the content of this review may apply to as many as one-third of the average practitioner's postmenopausal patient population.

  11. Testing evolutionary theories of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Daryl P; Sear, Rebecca; Mace, Ruth; Kirkwood, Thomas B L

    2007-12-07

    Why do women cease fertility rather abruptly through menopause at an age well before generalized senescence renders child rearing biologically impossible? The two main evolutionary hypotheses are that menopause serves either (i) to protect mothers from rising age-specific maternal mortality risks, thereby protecting their highly dependent younger children from death if the mother dies or (ii) to provide post-reproductive grandmothers who enhance their inclusive fitness by helping to care and provide for their daughters' children. Recent theoretical work indicates that both factors together are necessary if menopause is to provide an evolutionary advantage. However, these ideas need to be tested using detailed data from actual human life histories lived under reasonably 'natural' conditions; for obvious reasons, such data are extremely scarce. We here describe a study based on a remarkably complete dataset from The Gambia. The data provided quantitative estimates for key parameters for the theoretical model, which were then used to assess the actual effects on fitness. Empirically based numerical analysis of this nature is essential if the enigma of menopause is to be explained satisfactorily in evolutionary terms. Our results point to the distinctive (and perhaps unique) role of menopause in human evolution and provide important support for the hypothesized evolutionary significance of grandmothers.

  12. TUBAL LIGATION, REPRODUCTIVE EXPERIENCES AND RISK OF OVARIAN CANCER- A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessy Binu Sam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system. Risk of ovarian cancer increases with age, but the rate of increase slows after the menopause. Tubal ligation confers long-term protection against ovarian cancer. This observational study examines the factors affecting the ovarian cancer risk and also studies the correlation between ovarian cancer risks with reproductive experiences. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted at Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, for a period of one year. Information was collected from 112 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer as treatment group and 336 women without ovarian cancer as control group. A binary logit regression analysis was conducted to study the factors that are affecting the ovarian cancer. The Chi-square test was done to find the association of ovarian cancer risk with different reproductive experiences. RESULTS We found that months of lactation, tubal ligation and oral contraceptive pills had a negative impact on ovarian cancer risk. Our study also proved that age of first pregnancy, age of menarche and age of menopause had a significant association with ovarian cancer risk. CONCLUSION Our findings signify the importance of providing awareness to the public regarding the prevalence, symptomatology, screening/diagnostic techniques, treatment modalities and prognosis of ovarian cancer. The dual benefits of tubal ligation need to be made aware among the public and tubal sterilisation rates have to be enhanced. We recommend the promotion of tubal ligation as a permanent method of contraception in those who have completed their families.

  13. Antral follicle count predicts natural menopause in a population-based sample: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Women's Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa F; Bates, Gordon Wright; Schreiner, Pamela J; Siscovick, David S; Sternfeld, Barbara; Lewis, Cora E

    2013-08-01

    The timing of menopause is associated with multiple chronic diseases. Tools that predict this milestone have relevance for clinical and research purposes. Among infertile women, a positive relationship exists between antral follicle count (AFC) and response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, a marker of ovarian reserve. However, an age-independent relationship between AFC and menopause has not been demonstrated. Thus, our objective was to evaluate the relationship between AFC measured in women aged 34 to 49 years and incident natural menopause during 7 years of follow-up. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study is a longitudinal community-based study (Chicago, IL; Birmingham, AL; Minneapolis, MN; and Oakland, CA) begun in 1985-1986. In 2002-2003, the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Women's Study measured follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and performed a transvaginal ultrasound protocol that included AFC (2-10 mm follicles on both ovaries). Incident natural menopause was assessed by surveys in 2005-2006 and 2009-2010. In our sample (n = 456), the median (interquartile range) AFC and FSH level were 5 (2-9) and 7.8 (5.6-11.0) mIU/mL, respectively, at a mean (range) age of 42 (34-49) years in 2002-2003. One hundred one women reported natural menopause by 2009-2010. In Cox models, current smoking, stable menses, FSH level higher than 13 mIU/mL, and AFC of 4 or less were independently associated with incident natural menopause. Compared with AFC higher than 4, those with an AFC of 4 or less were nearly twice as likely to have undergone menopause during 7 years of follow-up (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.19-3.02) after adjustment for covariates. AFC has been found to be independently associated with natural menopause during 7 years of follow-up after controlling for other markers of ovarian aging.

  14. Reserva endocrina ovárica en mujeres con falla ovárica prematura Endocrine ovarian reserve in women with premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén S. Padrón Durán

    2002-12-01

    complementary examinations were made to define the cause. The basal levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, estradiol (E2, Prolactin (Prl, and Thyrotropin (TSH were determined.The steroideal ovarian reserve was also determined by the dynamic test of hypophyseal inhibition of gonadotropins (Gn with ethynyl estradiol and, later, it was estimulated with gonadotropic menopausic hormone (GMH.The basal levels of FSH, LH, E2, testosterone (T and androstenedione (A'd were calculated during inhibition and after the stimulation with GMH. It was found that the mean basal levels of FSH were higher than those of LH, the levels of E2 were low and Prl was normal on analyzing them as a group. The mean basal level of E2 was low and there was no increase of its mean levels after the stimulation with GMH. The mean basal levels of T were normal, unlike A'd that was low. No rise was observed poststimulation on being analyzed as a group. It was proved that 52.6 % of these patients have an ovarian estrogenic reserve, whereas only 20 % have an androgenic reserve. There were no important differences in the results of the dynamic test on dividing patients into 2 groups, according to the chronological age, time of amenorrhea and cause of POF, excepting that the reserve of T that was only found in those of idiopathic cause, which was not observed in those of immunological cause.

  15. Positive aspects of menopause: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, L

    2001-01-01

    As a part of a larger study, "Menopause described from the woman's perspective", it has been the aim to explore whether women have any positive experiences in relation to menopause, and if so, the nature of these experiences.......As a part of a larger study, "Menopause described from the woman's perspective", it has been the aim to explore whether women have any positive experiences in relation to menopause, and if so, the nature of these experiences....

  16. Prophylactic bilateral salpingectomy as a prevention strategy in women at high risk of ovarian cancer: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess eSchenberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is a proven strategy to reduce the risk of serous ovarian cancer associated with germline BRCA mutations. It is most effective when performed before natural menopause but it will render a woman prematurely menopausal. The tubal hypothesis of serous ovarian cancer brings with it the possibility of the alternative surgical approach in younger women comprising of risk-reducing bilateral salpingectomy while conserving their ovaries until nearer the age of natural menopause when a delayed bilateral oophorectomy can be performed. This article will review the evidence behind the tubal hypothesis of serous ovarian cancer and explore the opportunities for translating this into clinical cancer prevention practice.

  17. Clomiphene based ovarian stimulation in a commercial donor program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to compare an extended clomiphene-based ovarian stimulation regimen with the conventional antagonist protocol in donor-recipient cycles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 170 (N donors were stimulated between January 2013 and December 2013. Conventional antagonist protocol (group I was employed in (n1 = 31 cycles, and clomiphene was used in (n2 = 139 donor cycles (group II. 50 mg clomiphene was given simultaneously with gonadotropins from day 2 of the cycle until the day of trigger. The analysis was performed retrospectively for oocytes retrieved, fertilization rates, cycle cancelation, blastocyst formation, and pregnancy rates. The dosages, cost, and terminal E2 (estradiol were also compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The donor age groups were comparable in both the groups. There were no unsuccessful egg retrievals with clomiphene. The pregnancy rate (positive beta human chorionic gonadotropin was significantly higher in the clomiphene group (odds ratio: 2.453; P = 0.02. Similarly, fertilization rate was significantly higher in the clomiphene group (59.5/50.5, P = 0.04. Eggs retrieved were similar in both groups, but the terminal E2 was significantly higher in the clomiphene group (P = 0.001. Average gonadotropin used was also significantly lower in clomiphene group (P < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Clomiphene can effectively prevent luteinizing hormone surge and limit the dose of gonadotropins thus bringing down the costs and its negative impact on the endometrium and oocyte quality.

  18. Dietary supplementation of yucca (Yucca schidigera) affects ovine ovarian functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlčková, Radoslava; Sopková, Drahomíra; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Valocký, Igor; Kádasi, Attila; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Petrilla, Vladimír; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2017-01-15

    Yucca (Yucca schidigera) is a popular medicinal plant due to its many positive effects on animal and human physiology, including their reproductive systems. To examine the effect of supplemental yucca feeding on sheep reproduction, including ovarian functions and their hormonal regulators, ewes were fed (or not fed, control) yucca powder (1.5 g/head/day, 30 days). Macromorphometric indexes of the oviduct, ovary, and ovarian folliculogenesis were measured. Reproductive hormone levels in the blood were measured using a radioimmunoassay. Granulosa cells were aspirated from the ovary, and their proliferation and apoptosis were detected using immunocytochemistry. To assess secretory activity and its response to gonadotropin, ovarian fragments of treated and control ewes were cultured with and without follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH; 0, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 IU/mL), and the release of reproductive hormones into the culture medium was evaluated. Finally, to examine the direct action of yucca on the ovary, ovarian fragments from control ewes were cultured with and without yucca extract (1, 10, or 100 μg/mL), and the release of reproductive hormones was measured. Yucca supplementation significantly decreased the size of small antral follicles (2 to yucca supplementation did not affect the size of larger follicles and number of follicles, volume and weight of ovaries, length and weight of oviducts, caspase 3 accumulation, cell proliferation, testosterone (T) or IGF-I serum levels, or T or E2 release by cultured ovarian fragments and their response to FSH. Yucca addition to culture medium inhibited P4 and IGF-I, but not T or E2 release at the lowest (1 μg/mL) dose, and stimulated P4, but not T, E2, or IGF-I release at the highest (100 μg/mL) dose. These data suggest that yucca supplementation can reduce small antral ovarian follicle development possibly via the stimulation of apoptosis of their granulosa cells, suppression of ovarian P4 and E2 release, and

  19. Terapi Hormonal Pasca Menopause: Peran Preparat Testosteron

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Muhammad Fidel Ganis

    2016-01-01

    Menopause adalah hal yang normal, fase alami yang terjadi pad a wanita. Selama masa transisi dari tahun reproduktif .ke masa menopause dan sesudahnya, wanita mengalami banyak perubahan fisiko Walaupun banyak wanita menopause asimptomatik dan berhubungan dengan gangguan kecil hidup normal dan kesejahteraan, banyak wan ita mengalami gejala terkadang berat sehingga mempengaruhi kualitas kehidupan mereka .. Salah satunya adalah perubahan siklus menstruasi, hot flashes, gangguan ...

  20. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Risk for First-Episode Major Depression During the Menopause Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, C Neill; Sammel, Mary D; Bale, Tracy L; Kim, Deborah R; Conlin, Sarah; Scalice, Stephanie; Freeman, Katharine; Freeman, Ellen W

    2017-03-01

    Stress exposures may have a differential impact on risk and resilience for depression depending on their timing across development. We sought to determine whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their onset with respect to puberty contribute to the increased risk observed in first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD) during the menopause transition. Participants were from the Penn Ovarian Aging Study cohort, which is composed of women from Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, who underwent behavioral, cognitive, and endocrine evaluations approximately yearly from 1996 to 2012 and completed the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire at study end point (n = 243). ACEs that first occurred 2 or more years before menarche were considered prepubertal. Incident menopause MDD was defined as first observed onset of the disorder in the perimenopause to postmenopause transition using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R and the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Incident menopause MDD occurred in 48% of the 100 women who reported lifetime MDD. Women reporting ≥ 2 total ACEs were at significantly greater risk for lifetime MDD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.05, P = .034) and incident menopause MDD (aOR = 2.58, P = .03) compared to those reporting 0 ACEs; women with ≥ 2 postpubertal ACEs were 2.3 times more likely to experience incidence menopause MDD (P = .024) after controlling for race, smoking, body mass index, and employment. Experiencing only 1 ACE in the prepubertal window, regardless of additional ACEs in postpuberty, was associated with reduced risk for lifetime and incident menopause MDD. Timing and number of adverse experiences with respect to puberty differentially impacted risk and resilience for MDD across the female life span and during the menopause transition in this community cohort. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg; Duffy, Michael J; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher

    2016-01-01

    sensitivity (50-62% for early stage epithelial ovarian cancer) and limited specificity (94-98.5%), cancer antigen (CA) 125 (CA125) is not recommended as a screening test in asymptomatic women. The Risk of Malignancy Index, which includes CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, and menopausal status, is recommended.......0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially....

  2. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Distress During the Menopause Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianna Nosek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, nearly 400 million women worldwide were of menopause age (45-54. Although many women transition through menopause with ease, some experience distress and a subsequent decrease in quality of life. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of distress in women during the menopause transition. A narrative analysis methodology was used maintaining participants’ complete narratives when possible. In-person interviews of 15 midlife women were digitally audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Women shared narratives of distress related to menstrual changes, emotional instability, vaginal dryness, and decreased libido affected by their relationships with self, partners, work, and family. Some experiences were presented against a backdrop of the past and influenced by concerns for the future. Detailed stories illuminated the effect that distressful symptoms had on quality of life and captured how intricately woven symptoms were with the women’s interpersonal and social lives.

  4. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  5. [Menopause: social and practical representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelcastre-Villafuerte, B; Garrido-Latorre, F; de León-Reyes, V

    2001-01-01

    To characterize the meanings attributed to menopause, as a first approximation to the representational world of this event. A qualitative study was conducted between September and October 1998, in twenty women aged 45-65 years, residents of Cuernavaca and Emiliano Zapata, municipalities of Morelos state, Mexico. Twenty in-depth interviews were conducted using a guide, to collect data on sociodemographic variables, diagnosis, feelings and emotions, changes in life style, and physiological changes. Findings show that menopause is represented as the end of fertility and the beginning of old age. Characterization of menopause is related to womanhood, body, and sexuality representations. This paper analyzes women's practices related to life experiences such as medical visits. Implications of these findings are discussed using the social construction of meanings framework.

  6. Prospective, randomized comparison between pulsatile GnRH therapy and combined gonadotropin (FSH+LH) treatment for ovulation induction in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and underlying polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourdieu, Sophie; Fréour, Thomas; Dessolle, Lionel; Barrière, Paul

    2013-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of pulsatile GnRH therapy versus combined gonadotropins for ovulation induction in women with both hypothalamic amenorrhoea and polycystic ovarian syndrome (HA/PCOS) according to their current hypothalamic status. This single-centre, prospective, randomized study was conducted in the Nantes University Hospital, France. Thirty consecutive patients were treated for ovulation induction with either pulsatile GnRH therapy or combined gonadotropins (rFSH+rLH). Frequency of adequate ovarian response (mono- or bi-follicular) and clinical pregnancy rate were then compared between both groups. Ovarian response was similar in both groups with comparable frequency of adequate ovarian response (73% vs 60%), but the clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the pulsatile GnRH therapy group than in the combined gonadotropin group (46% vs 0%). HA/PCOS is a specific subgroup of infertile women. Pulsatile GnRH therapy is an effective and safe method of ovulation induction that can be used successfully in these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Partner relationships in menopausal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpak, Rafał; Folwarczny, Wiesław; Drozdzol, Agnieszka; Szuścik, Adam; Skrzypulec, Agnieszka; Skrzypulec, Violetta

    2010-02-01

    Evaluation of partner relationships in menopausal period. A questionnaire study was performed in a group of 67 women (age: 45-55 years) and their partners. The inclusion criteria were: presence of climacteric symptoms, stable partnership, consent to research. 40 women and their spouses were included into the final study group. The investigative tool was based on 3 scales: Marriage Bond Scale (SWM); Scale of Attractiveness (SKAT); GREEN Scale evaluating intensification of menopausal symptoms and a set of additional questions concerning socio-demographical data, marital sexuality and substitute hormonal therapy. Mean age of respondents was 52 years. Most of the women demonstrated an amenorrhea (90%). Climacteric symptoms such as: hot flush, stress, depressive moods (87.5% each), musculoarticular pain (80%) occurred in various degree. 97.5% of women did not use a substitute hormonal treatment. The mean result of SWM for women and their partners scored 237 which is 79% of the total value. A correlation between exacerbation of menopausal signs and SWM score was not found. The co-attractiveness ratio counted on the basis of SKAT scale scored 30 points on average, which constitutes 74% of the maximum. Approximately 58% of the men accepted symptoms related to menopause in their partners; they tolerated changes appearing in the climacteric period, however; 100% of men did not talk about menopausal problems with their partners and did not support them in this difficult time. Men find their partners attractive in the perimenopausal period, accepting their partners and problems related to menopause. Most of the male respondents understand changes occurring in their partners, however, they do not help them to deal with them.

  9. Osteoporosis and years since menopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Saburo; Hirota, Yoshio; Hotokebuchi, Takao; Takasugi, Shin-ichiro; Sugioka, Yoichi; Hayabuchi, Hitomi

    1999-01-01

    In Fukuoka Prefecture, in south-western Japan, a regional screening program for osteoporosis was conducted from 1994 to 1995. The screening level in the bone mineral density (BMD) at the distal non-dominant radius was equal to or less than two standard deviations below age-specific mean (≤ -2.0 SD). In 1177 examinees with natural menopause (mean age: 61.4, range: 42-88), 56 of those who were screened were subsequently radiologically confirmed by orthopedic specialists to have osteoporosis (case group). They were then compared with 802 normal BMD (≥ -1.0 SD) women (reference group) with their lifestyle and reproductive characteristics. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a logistic regression model. A significant increase in the ORs for osteoporosis based on the number of years since menopause was observed for 7-13 years since menopause (OR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.0-5.4) compared with <7 years, however, no increasing trend in risk was evident in 14+ years since menopause (OR=1.4; 95% CI: 0.4-5.1). Thus, the elevated risk continued up to around 10 years since menopause. These findings are consistent with previous studies that reported an alternation in the calcium metabolism and bone loss related to the length of time after menopause. Both the childhood and current milk consumption were also associated with a decreased risk: ORs were 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2-0.9) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.3-1.0), respectively

  10. [Hypertension in women after menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Michel

    2006-06-01

    Menopause coincides with an increase in the incidence of hypertension in women. A direct role of estrogen deprivation in this increased blood pressure remains a topic of debate. Menopause probably accelerates the arterial changes related to aging. Hormone replacement therapy does not influence blood pressure significantly and is not contraindicated in hypertensive women. The effect of hormone replacement treatment on cardiovascular risk was recently the object of controversy. It does not increase risk except in cases of late treatment in older women who already have atherosclerosis. Hypertension management in women is otherwise similar to management in men.

  11. MRI features of ovarian fibromas: emphasis on their relationship to the ovary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.N.; Rha, S.E.; Byun, J.Y.; Lee, Y.J.; Jung, S.E.; Jung, C.K.; Kim, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of ovarian fibromas, emphasizing the presence and shape of the ovary on the same side of the fibroma. Materials and methods: MR images from 23 patients with 24 histologically proven ovarian fibromas were reviewed by two radiologists. Eleven were pre-menopausal and 12 were postmenopausal. The presence and shape of the ovarian tissue on the same side of the fibroma were evaluated on T2-weighted MR images. Results: In 11 (46%) of the 24 ovarian fibromas, the ipsilateral ovary was detected on T2-weighted images. The ovary was crescent-shaped along the periphery of the fibroma in six (55%) of 11 fibromas and had a normal, oval shape in five (45%). Of these five tumours, the ovary was connected to the fibromas by a pedicle-like structure in three and was closely attached to the periphery of the fibromas in two. The ipsilateral ovary was detected in 10 (83%) of 12 fibromas in pre-menopausal patients, and in one (8%) of 12 fibromas in postmenopausal patients. There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) in the presence of detectable ipsilateral ovary between pre-menopausal and postmenopausal women. Conclusions: Detection of the remaining ovary on the same side as the fibroma is not unusual on MRI, especially in pre-menopausal women, and the shape of the ovary may be normal in cases of fibromas with exophytic growth from the periphery of the ovary

  12. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  13. Right ventricular thrombus: a rare complication of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamirian, Mahmood; Moaref, Ali Reza; Alavi, Seyed Hosein; Zarrabi, Khalil

    2012-12-01

    A 22 years old lady was admitted because of progressive dyspnea, severe abdominal protrusion and lower extremity edema. She had undergone ovarian hyperstimulation for primary infertility by Clomiphen and Human chorionic gonadotropin for 3 months. Abdominopelvic ultrasonography revealed bilateral enlarged multi cystic ovaries and massive ascites. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a large thrombus in right ventrice apex. Spiral chest CT scan showed normal pulmonary vasculature with no evidence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Heparin was started and repeat echocardiographic study showed gradual disappearance of right ventricular thrombus. Human chorionic gonadotropin is the most important substance which leads to capillary leakage and fluid accumulation in third space. Fluid shift and hypovolemia may cause hypotension, hemoconcentration and formation of vascular thrombus.

  14. Right Ventricular Thrombus: A Rare Complication of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Zamirian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A 22 years old lady was admitted because of progressive dyspnea, severe abdominal protrusion and lower extremity edema. She had undergone ovarian hyperstimulation for primary infertility by Clomiphen and Human chorionic gonadotropin for 3 months. Abdominopelvic ultrasonography revealed bilateral enlarged multi cystic ovaries and massive ascites. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a large thrombus in right ventrice apex. Spiral chest CT scan showed normal pulmonary vasculature with no evidence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Heparin was started and repeat echocardiographic study showed gradual disappearance of right ventricular thrombus. Human chorionic gonadotropin is the most important substance which leads to capillary leakage and fluid accumulation in third space. Fluid shift and hypovolemia may cause hypotension, hemoconcentration and formation of vascular thrombus.

  15. Isolated ovarian tuberculosis mimicking ovarian carcinoma: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although genitourinary tuberculosis is common, reports of isolated ovarian tuberculosis are rare. However, its presentation can mimick that of an ovarian tumour, leading to diagnostic difficulties. A woman of 17 years presented with chronic pelvic pain, weight loss, a right ovarian mass on ultrasound, and a significantly ...

  16. Menopause prediction and potential implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daan, Nadine M P; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-11-01

    Reproductive ageing in women is characterized by a decline in both the quantity and quality of oocytes. Menopause is reached upon exhaustion of the resting primordial follicle pool, occurring on average at 51 years of age (range 40-60 years). The mean global age at natural menopause (ANM) appears robust, suggesting a distinct genetic control. Accordingly, a strong correlation in ANM is observed between mothers and daughters. Few specific genetic determinants of ANM have been identified. Substantial efforts have been made to predict ANM by using anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels. AMH serum concentrations at reproductive age predict ANM, but precision is currently limited. Early ANM is associated with early preceding fertility loss, whereas late menopause is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality later in life. Menopause affects various women's health aspects, including bone density, breast, the cardiovascular system, mood/cognitive function and sexual well-being. If the current trend of increasing human life expectancy persists, women will soon spend half their life postmenopause. Unfortunately, increased longevity does not coincide with an equal increase in years spend in good health. Future research should focus on determinants of long term health effects of ANM, and efforts to improve women's postmenopausal health and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Paradoxical consequence of human chorionic gonadotropin misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektezel, Mehmet Yasir; Bas, Demet Funda; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is commonly misused as a weight reducing or performance enhancing agent but is associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events. A 29-year-old female with a history of obesity was admitted to our center with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Etiologic workup revealed a large patent foramen ovale and history of recent use of hCG as part of a weight loss regimen. This report highlights the potential complications of hCG therapy, particularly when used for unapproved indications and without medical supervision. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adjuvant exemestane with ovarian suppression in premenopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Olivia; Regan, Meredith M; Walley, Barbara A; Fleming, Gini F; Colleoni, Marco; Láng, István; Gomez, Henry L; Tondini, Carlo; Burstein, Harold J; Perez, Edith A; Ciruelos, Eva; Stearns, Vered; Bonnefoi, Hervé R; Martino, Silvana; Geyer, Charles E; Pinotti, Graziella; Puglisi, Fabio; Crivellari, Diana; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Winer, Eric P; Rabaglio-Poretti, Manuela; Maibach, Rudolf; Ruepp, Barbara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Bernhard, Jürg; Luo, Weixiu; Ribi, Karin; Viale, Giuseppe; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Goldhirsch, Aron; Francis, Prudence A

    2014-07-10

    Adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor improves outcomes, as compared with tamoxifen, in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. In two phase 3 trials, we randomly assigned premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer to the aromatase inhibitor exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 years. Suppression of ovarian estrogen production was achieved with the use of the gonadotropin-releasing-hormone agonist triptorelin, oophorectomy, or ovarian irradiation. The primary analysis combined data from 4690 patients in the two trials. After a median follow-up of 68 months, disease-free survival at 5 years was 91.1% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, second invasive cancer, or death, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 0.85; P<0.001). The rate of freedom from breast cancer at 5 years was 92.8% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group, as compared with 88.8% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for recurrence, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.80; P<0.001). With 194 deaths (4.1% of the patients), overall survival did not differ significantly between the two groups (hazard ratio for death in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.51; P=0.37). Selected adverse events of grade 3 or 4 were reported for 30.6% of the patients in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group and 29.4% of those in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group, with profiles similar to those for postmenopausal women. In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. (Funded by Pfizer and others; TEXT and SOFT ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00066703 and NCT00066690, respectively.).

  19. The non-target bi-ovarian branches occlusion in fibroids embolization on resumption of menses and ovarian function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Wenbo; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Zhuang Wenquan; Yao Shuzhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of the non-target bi-ovarian branches occlusion in fibroids embolization on resumption of menses and ovarian function. Methods: The patients with the non-target bi-ovarian branches occlusion in uterine fibroids embolization (UFE) were classified into two groups, one for lipiodol deposited in bi-ovarian areas (Group A) , another for non lipiodol deposited in ovarian areas or in single ovarian area (Group B of non lipiodol deposited in bi-ovarian areas). The statistical difference between the data of group A and group B were assessed with Fisher test. All UFE were performed with the mixture of lipiodol and pingyangmycin. The serum level of Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E2) were measured before UFE and 6 months after UFE. The statistical difference between the data of before and after UFE was assessed with t test. Results: Fifteen patients [age ranged 26-46 years, average (39.00 ± 5.62) years] had been followed up for an average (30.5±6.4) months (range 16-47 months). In 12 of 15, regular menses resumed after an average of (3.0 ±0.3) weeks (range 2-6 weeks). In 3 of 15 (20%), regular menses did not resume. The sexual hormone findings of menopause were found in three cases with amenorrhea after UFE. Amenorrhea was found in three cases with lipiodol deposited in bi-ovarian areas (Group A). Non-amenorrhea was found in the group of non-lipiodol deposited in bi-ovarian areas (Group B). There were significant statistical difference between Group A and Group B (P=0.002 19). Non amenorrhea was found in the patients aged over 45 years old. Three patients were found amenorrhea in the patients aged younger than 45 years old. There were no significant statistical difference between the serum level of FSH, LH and E2 before and 6 months after UFE (P>0.05). Conclusion: The incidence of amenorrhea is very high in the patients with lipiodol deposited in bi-ovarian areas when the bi-ovarian branches of

  20. Duration of ovarian hormone exposure and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Korean women: the Korean Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keum Ji; Kim, Mee-Ran; Yun, Young Duk; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Jee, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Although reproductive and hormonal factors, such as menarche and menopause, have been reported as independent risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), few studies have examined these factors in East Asian populations. In the Korean Heart Study, ASCVD risk related to duration of ovarian hormone exposure was examined in a cohort of 66,104 Korean women. Study members were recruited from participants of routine health examinations at health promotion centers across South Korea in 1996-2004. Ovarian hormone exposure was defined as duration between menarche and menopause. Incidence rates for ASCVD, stroke, and ischemic heart disease were examined in relation to ovarian hormone exposure. The mean duration of ovarian hormone exposure at study baseline was 33.7 years, and risk for ASCVD was negatively associated with duration. Women with shorter ovarian hormone exposure (hormone exposure (35-35 y). In similar comparison groups, women with ovarian hormone exposure shorter than 30 years were at increased risk for developing total stroke (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.00-1.38), thrombotic stroke (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.61), ischemic heart disease (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.19-1.63), and acute myocardial infarction (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.08-2.47). Our study provides further confirmation of increased cardiovascular risk with shorter reproductive years. Therefore, women with reduced lifetime ovarian hormone exposure should focus on minimizing ASCVD risk by lifestyle modifications such as smoking avoidance or increased physical activities.

  1. Cigarettes, genetic background, and menopausal timing: the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes is associated with increased risk of natural menopause in European-American smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Samantha F.; Sammel, Mary D.; Greer, Christine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Boorman, David W.; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate associations between variations in genes involved in the metabolism of environmental chemicals and steroid hormones and risk of menopause in smokers. Methods Survival analysis was performed on 410 eligible participants from the Penn Ovarian Aging study (ongoing for 14 years), a cohort study of late-reproductive-age women. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at the following loci were studied: COMT Val158Met, CYP1B1*4 Asn452Ser, CYP1B1*3 Leu432Val, and CYP3A4*1B. Results Significant interactions between smoking and single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in European-American carriers of CYP3A4*1B and CYP1B1*3, supporting a greater risk of menopause entry compared with those not carrying these alleles. Among CYP1B1*3 carriers, smokers had a greater risk of menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% CI, 1.4–3.67; median time to menopause, 10.42 and 11.07 y, respectively). No association between smoking and menopause was identified in CYP1B1 wild types. Among CYP3A4*1B carriers, smokers were at greater risk for menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted HR, 15.1; 95% CI, 3.31–69.2; median time to menopause, 11.36 and 13.91 y, respectively). Risk of menopause entry in CYP3A4 wild types who smoked was far lower (adjusted HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.03–2.44). Heavily smoking CYP1B1*3 carriers (adjusted HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.54–5.84; median time to menopause, 10.41 y) and heavily smoking CYP3A4*1B carriers (adjusted HR, 17.79; 95% CI, 3.21–98.65; median time to menopause, 5.09 y) had the greatest risk of menopause entry. Conclusions Our finding that the risk of menopause entry in European-American smokers varies depending on genetic background represents a novel gene-environment interaction in reproductive aging. PMID:24448104

  2. Cigarettes, genetic background, and menopausal timing: the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes is associated with increased risk of natural menopause in European-American smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Samantha F; Sammel, Mary D; Greer, Christine; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Boorman, David W; Freeman, Ellen W

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate associations between variations in genes involved in the metabolism of environmental chemicals and steroid hormones and risk of menopause in smokers. Survival analysis was performed on 410 eligible participants from the Penn Ovarian Aging study (ongoing for 14 years), a cohort study of late-reproductive-age women. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at the following loci were studied: COMT Val158Met, CYP1B1*4 Asn452Ser, CYP1B1*3 Leu432Val, and CYP3A4*1B. Significant interactions between smoking and single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in European-American carriers of CYP3A4*1B and CYP1B1*3, supporting a greater risk of menopause entry compared with those not carrying these alleles. Among CYP1B1*3 carriers, smokers had a greater risk of menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% CI, 1.4-3.67; median time to menopause, 10.42 and 11.07 y, respectively). No association between smoking and menopause was identified in CYP1B1 wild types. Among CYP3A4*1B carriers, smokers were at greater risk for menopause entry than nonsmokers (adjusted HR, 15.1; 95% CI, 3.31-69.2; median time to menopause, 11.36 and 13.91 y, respectively). Risk of menopause entry in CYP3A4 wild types who smoked was far lower (adjusted HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.03-2.44). Heavily smoking CYP1B1*3 carriers (adjusted HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.54-5.84; median time to menopause, 10.41 y) and heavily smoking CYP3A4*1B carriers (adjusted HR, 17.79; 95% CI, 3.21-98.65; median time to menopause, 5.09 y) had the greatest risk of menopause entry. Our finding that the risk of menopause entry in European-American smokers varies depending on genetic background represents a novel gene-environment interaction in reproductive aging.

  3. Premature ovarian failure risk factors in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassemzadeh A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Alieh Ghassemzadeh1,2, Laya Farzadi1,2, Elaheh Beyhaghi1,21Women’s Reproductive Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 2Alzahra University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: The aim of this study was to determine possible correlates of premature ovarian failure (POF in an Iranian population.Methods: In a case-control study, 80 patients with POF were compared with 80 controls enrolled from the same setting during 2007–2008. A food diary was used to assess food consumption habits.Results: Mean age of starting ovarian failure symptoms was 19.3 ± 5.7 years and mean age of menopause was 22.6 ± 6.3 years. Familial coincidence was observed in 16 POF patients versus no one in the control group (P < 0.05. POF patients had lower frequency of both eating red meat and fish when compared with controls (P < 0.001. POF and control subjects consumed similar amounts of dairy products, being 5.3 ± 3.2 times per week in POF and 5.6 ± 2.1 times in the control groups.Conclusion: In this study, an association between POF and lower red meat or fish consumption was found.Keywords: POF, etiology, case-control, nutrition, premature menopause, premature ovarian dysfunction, primary ovarian insufficiency

  4. Expression and Role of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 2 and Its Receptor in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy T. Desaulniers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1 and its receptor (GnRHR1 drive mammalian reproduction via regulation of the gonadotropins. Yet, a second form of GnRH (GnRH2 and its receptor (GnRHR2 also exist in mammals. GnRH2 has been completely conserved throughout 500 million years of evolution, signifying high selection pressure and a critical biological role. However, the GnRH2 gene is absent (e.g., rat or inactivated (e.g., cow and sheep in some species but retained in others (e.g., human, horse, and pig. Likewise, many species (e.g., human, chimpanzee, cow, and sheep retain the GnRHR2 gene but lack the appropriate coding sequence to produce a full-length protein due to gene coding errors; although production of GnRHR2 in humans remains controversial. Certain mammals lack the GnRHR2 gene (e.g., mouse or most exons entirely (e.g., rat. In contrast, old world monkeys, musk shrews, and pigs maintain the coding sequence required to produce a functional GnRHR2. Like GnRHR1, GnRHR2 is a 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor that interacts with Gαq/11 to mediate cell signaling. However, GnRHR2 retains a cytoplasmic tail and is only 40% homologous to GnRHR1. A role for GnRH2 and its receptor in mammals has been elusive, likely because common laboratory models lack both the ligand and receptor. Uniquely, both GnRH2 and GnRHR2 are ubiquitously expressed; transcript levels are abundant in peripheral tissues and scarcely found in regions of the brain associated with gonadotropin secretion, suggesting a divergent role from GnRH1/GnRHR1. Indeed, GnRH2 and its receptor are not physiological modulators of gonadotropin secretion in mammals. Instead, GnRH2 and GnRHR2 coordinate the interaction between nutritional status and sexual behavior in the female brain. Within peripheral tissues, GnRH2 and its receptor are novel regulators of reproductive organs. GnRH2 and GnRHR2 directly stimulate steroidogenesis within the porcine testis. In the female, GnRH2 and

  5. Ovarian failure and cancer treatment: Incidence and interventions for premenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Ovarian failure may be a long-term consequence of cancer treatment for premenopausal women. Caused by several treatments, including radiation therapy and the alkylating agents, it produces signs and symptoms associated with menopause: hot flashes, amenorrhea, dyspareunia, loss of libido, and irritability. Critical factors that determine ovarian functioning after treatment for cancer are the patient's age at the time of therapy, the amount of radiation that the ovaries received, and the dose of the antineoplastic agent(s). Medical interventions, such as hormonal therapy and surgical repositioning of the ovaries, may maintain ovarian function for some women. Nursing intervention includes assessment, education, and counseling. Counseling focuses on how the prematurely menopausal patient feels about herself as indicated by self-esteem, body image, and sexuality

  6. Ovarian failure and cancer treatment: Incidence and interventions for premenopausal women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, J.E.

    1989-09-01

    Ovarian failure may be a long-term consequence of cancer treatment for premenopausal women. Caused by several treatments, including radiation therapy and the alkylating agents, it produces signs and symptoms associated with menopause: hot flashes, amenorrhea, dyspareunia, loss of libido, and irritability. Critical factors that determine ovarian functioning after treatment for cancer are the patient's age at the time of therapy, the amount of radiation that the ovaries received, and the dose of the antineoplastic agent(s). Medical interventions, such as hormonal therapy and surgical repositioning of the ovaries, may maintain ovarian function for some women. Nursing intervention includes assessment, education, and counseling. Counseling focuses on how the prematurely menopausal patient feels about herself as indicated by self-esteem, body image, and sexuality.

  7. Staying Healthy After Menopause | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Staying Healthy After Menopause Past Issues / ... menopause/menopause-basics/index.html Staying healthy after menopause may mean making some changes in the way you live. Don't smoke. ...

  8. Maternal menopause as a predictor of anti-Mullerian hormone level and antral follicle count in daughters during reproductive age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, J G; Forman, J L; Larsen, E C

    2013-01-01

    the generalizability. STUDY FUNDING/POTENTIAL COMPETING INTERESTS: This study was co-financed by PhD scholarships where funding was covered by the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation, Copenhagen Graduate School of Health Science (CGSHS) and the Fertility Clinic at Copenhagen University Hospital...... this prospective cohort whose mothers' age at natural menopause was known. PARTICIPANTS, SETTING AND METHODS: Participants were recruited from female health care workers aged 20-40 years employed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, and were enrolled in the study between September 2008 and February...... 2010. The response rate was 52.1%. Endocrine and ovarian parameters related to reproductive ageing (AMH and AFC) were assessed by serum AMH analyses and transvaginal ovarian sonography on cycle Day 2-5. Data on reproductive history, including age at natural maternal menopause, were obtained through...

  9. Unilateral laparoscopic ovariectomy in a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) with an ovarian cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Y; Jung, Dong H; Park, Se J; Seek, Seong H; Yang, Jeong J; Lee, Jae W; Lee, Bae K; Lee, Hee C; Yeon, Seong C

    2014-09-01

    Unilateral laparoscopic ovariectomy was attempted in a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) with an ovarian cyst through single portal access. The ovarian cyst was resistant to conservative therapy using gonadotropin-releasing hormone. A 10-mm laparoscope with an operating channel was introduced into the abdomen via a 12-mm umbilical portal. The left ovary and cyst (34.1 x 30.8 mm) were fixed to the left abdominal wall by a transabdominal suspension suture. The ovarian pedicles and ligaments were progressively cauterized and transected with a multifunction bipolar electrocoagulation forceps. The resected cystic ovary was exteriorized through the umbilical portal site. The surgical time was 42 min, and no intra- and postoperative complications were encountered. Two months after the surgery mating was observed, and the fox gave birth to three healthy cubs 56 days after the mating. This is the first report of using laparoscopy in the red fox with an ovarian cyst.

  10. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Pirie, K.

    2012-01-01

    by age at menopause were stronger for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (p effects of menarche and menopause on breast cancer risk might not be acting merely by lengthening women's total number of reproductive......Background Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected...... women. Methods Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone therapy, were included in the analyses. We calculated adjusted relative risks (RRs) associated with menarche...

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triggering with concomitant administration of low doses of human chorionic gonadotropin or a freeze-all strategy in high responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Karacan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the live birth rates and moderate/severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS rates of 2 different approaches using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist triggering in high responder women. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed to evaluate intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and embryo transfer (ET outcomes in high responder women who underwent ovulation induction with a GnRH antagonist protocol between April 2011 and March 2015. In group 1 (n=74, GnRH agonist was used for ovulation triggering with the concomitant use of 1500 IU of urinary human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG immediately after oocyte retrieval followed by fresh ET and standard luteal support. In group 2 (n=48, GnRH agonist was used for triggering after freezing all embryos and subsequent frozen/thawed embryo transfer (FET; this approach is considered the “freeze-all” approach. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. The clinical pregnancy rates for group 1 was 45.9% and group 2 was 43.8% (p=0.812, chi-squared test and live birth rates for group 1 was 40.5% and for group 2 41.7% (p=0.902, chi-squared test were comparable between groups. In group 1, late-onset OHSS was observed (one severe case and one moderate case in 2 patients (2.7%. In group 2, none of the patients experienced moderate/severe OHSS. Conclusion: The live birth rate with GnRH agonist triggering and concomitant use of 1500 IU of hCG immediately after oocyte retrieval was similar to that obtained with the freeze-all approach and FET in a subsequent cycle. The administration of a low dose of hCG in GnRH agonist trigger cycles caused moderate/severe OHSS in 2.7% of the patients.

  12. Evaluation of dual trigger with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin in improving oocyte maturity rates: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mahajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mature oocytes are prerequisite for achieving the process of in vitro fertilization. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is the standard trigger used for stimulating ovulation but is associated with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger achieves oocyte maturation and lowers the incidence of OHSS, but it has limitations of higher pregnancy loss rate and miscarriage rates. Coadministration of both hormones is found to improve the pregnancy rates and the number of mature oocytes retrieved. We aimed to assess if the dual trigger is better than the conventional hCG in triggering oocyte maturation. METHODOLOGY: The study included 76 female patients aged 24–43 years who were randomly divided into two groups with 38 patients in each arm. The study included patients with antimullerian hormone (AMH 4 ng/ml and AFC/ovary >12 to avoid OHSS risk with hCG trigger. RESULTS: The study showed statistically insignificant differences between dual group versus hCG group in terms of the number of oocytes retrieved (10.0 ± 5.6 vs. 8.7 ± 5.0; P = 0.2816, the number of mature oocytes recovered (8.4 ± 5.0 vs. 7.2 ± 4.0; P = 0.2588, fertilization rate (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 5.6 ± 3.3; P = 0.7390, and the number of usable embryos on day 3 (4.0 ± 3.0 vs. 4.0 ± 2.4; P = 0.8991. CONCLUSION: The dual trigger is equivalent to hCG in triggering oocyte maturation.

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triggering with concomitant administration of low doses of human chorionic gonadotropin or a freeze-all strategy in high responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, Meric; Erdem, Erkan; Usta, Akin; Arvas, Ayse; Cebi, Ziya; Camlibel, Teksen

    2017-06-01

    To compare the live birth rates and moderate/severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) rates of 2 different approaches using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triggering in high responder women. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed to evaluate intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and embryo transfer (ET) outcomes in high responder women who underwent ovulation induction with a GnRH antagonist protocol between April 2011 and March 2015. In group 1 (n=74), GnRH agonist was used for ovulation triggering with the concomitant use of 1500 IU of urinary human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) immediately after oocyte retrieval followed by fresh ET and standard luteal support. In group 2 (n=48), GnRH agonist was used for triggering after freezing all embryos and subsequent frozen/thawed embryo transfer (FET); this approach is considered the "freeze-all" approach. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. The clinical pregnancy rates for group 1 was 45.9% and group 2 was 43.8% (p=0.812, chi-squared test) and live birth rates for group 1 was 40.5% and for group 2 41.7% (p=0.902, chi-squared test) were comparable between groups. In group 1, late-onset OHSS was observed (one severe case and one moderate case) in 2 patients (2.7%). In group 2, none of the patients experienced moderate/severe OHSS. Conclusion: The live birth rate with GnRH agonist triggering and concomitant use of 1500 IU of hCG immediately after oocyte retrieval was similar to that obtained with the freeze-all approach and FET in a subsequent cycle. The administration of a low dose of hCG in GnRH agonist trigger cycles caused moderate/severe OHSS in 2.7% of the patients.

  14. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-01-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with 131 I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after 131 I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women

  15. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-07-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with /sup 131/I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after /sup 131/I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women.

  16. [Early breast cancer in pre-menopausal women and endocrine treatment: which factors impact on decision-making process?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotto, Marta; Puglisi, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    Incidence of breast cancer (BC), particularly in younger women, has increased in last decade. About forty percent of all BC are observed in women under the age of 50 years and, accordingly, in pre-menopausal women. Luminal-like is the most common subtype. Pre-menopausal status is associated with clinical, social and psychological issues that must be addressed as part of oncology care to guarantee the best global health outcomes after treatment. This review aims to answer the most common questions on endocrine treatment in pre-menopausal women. In particular, it focuses on the decision-making process that drives the choice about ovarian function suppression, use of aromatase inhibitors, and duration of therapy.

  17. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  18. Life-course origins of the ages at menarche and menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Michele R; Mangini, Lauren D; Thelus-Jean, Rosenie; Hayward, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    A woman’s age at menarche (first menstrual period) and her age at menopause are the alpha and omega of her reproductive years. The timing of these milestones is critical for a woman’s health trajectory over her lifespan, as they are indicators of ovarian function and aging. Both early and late timing of either event are associated with risk for adverse health and psychosocial outcomes. Thus, the search for a relationship between age at menarche and menopause has consequences for chronic disease prevention and implications for public health. This article is a review of evidence from the fields of developmental biology, epidemiology, nutrition, demography, sociology, and psychology that examine the menarche–menopause connection. Trends in ages at menarche and menopause worldwide and in subpopulations are presented; however, challenges exist in constructing trends. Among 36 studies that examine the association between the two sentinel events, ten reported a significant direct association, two an inverse association, and the remainder had null findings. Multiple factors, including hormonal and environmental exposures, socioeconomic status, and stress throughout the life course are hypothesized to influence the tempo of growth, including body size and height, development, menarche, menopause, and the aging process in women. The complexity of these factors and the pathways related to their effects on each sentinel event complicate evaluation of the relationship between menarche and menopause. Limitations of past investigations are discussed, including lack of comparability of socioeconomic status indicators and biomarker use across studies, while minority group differences have received scant attention. Suggestions for future directions are proposed. As research across endocrinology, epidemiology, and the social sciences becomes more integrated, the confluence of perspectives will yield a richer understanding of the influences on the tempo of a woman

  19. Milk, yogurt, and lactose intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Tang, Wenru; Sang, Lei; Dai, Xiaoli; Wei, Danping; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Inconclusive information for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may associate with adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels in animal models and ecological studies. Up to now, several studies have indicated the association between dairy food intake and risk of ovarian cancer, but no identified founding was reported. We performed this meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer risk. Using the data from 19 available publications, we examined dairy food including low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose in relation to risk of ovarian cancer by meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association. We observed a slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of whole milk, but has no statistical significance (OR = 1.228, 95% CI = 1.031-1.464, P = 0.022). The results of other milk models did not provide evidence of positive association with ovarian cancer risk. This meta-analysis suggests that low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose intake has no associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. Further studies with larger participants worldwide are needed to validate the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer.

  20. Hormone production in ovarian carcinomas. Histochemical approach in stroma reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiderer, A; Teufel, G

    1976-01-01

    Enzymatically active stromal cells (EASC) in different ovarian tumors are concerned with hormon production. 198 cases of ovarian tumors were investigated by different histochemical methods. Distribution of lactate-and glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase was investigated by plaimetric measurement.--EASC were found in benign ovarian tumors in 48%, in malignant in 30%. They are found exclusively in ovarian tumors and are completely absent in metastases. Incidence is dependent on histological type of tumor. With regard to untreated ovarian carcinoma containing EASC, these cells cover an aerea of 1.9% (0.5-5.9%). EASC occur in a very high percentage after menopause and are reduced by chemotherapy or radioation. Incidence of EASC in ovarian tumors is in relation with postmenopausal bleeding. Glandular-cystic endometrium is noticed only in connection with EASC. There is a positive relation between the quantity of EASC and the incidence of bleeding.--EASC are characterized by a strong NADP-dependent-dehydrogenase-reaction and reactions for lactate-, malate-dehydrogenases and alcaline phosphatases. Apart from that these cells are not all uniform. It seems that the enzymatically active fibrocytes are the first step of theca-like cells which are then luteinized and finally filled up with cholesterol. Histochemistry of EASC in comparison with other steroid-producing tissues make possible, that these cells have an estrogenic and more seldomly also an androgenic activity.

  1. Menopause: developing a rational treatment plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Danielle; Naftolin, Frederick; Naftoilin, Frederick; Taylor, Hugh S

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, growing importance has been afforded to assisting women in coping with the menopausal transition. Menopause is a normal stage of development and a woman's attitude toward this transition embodies biological, psychological and social influences. An enlarging body of conflicting data concerning menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) demands reassessment of established paradigms of disease prevention and menopausal health. Currently, a woman's decision to participate in or abstain from menopausal HT is personal. It involves not only consideration of risk stratification of potential harm and benefit, but also involves her expectations and attitudes toward perceived physical and emotional changes associated with this change. Through the use of extensive patient history, quality-of-life questionnaires and powerful biological profiling, we may be able to develop a rational approach to menopausal HT that safely guides our patients through this transition.

  2. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  3. HUBUNGAN TINGKAT STATUS GIZI WANITA MENOPAUSE DENGAN PERUBAHAN FISIK PADA MASA MENOPAUSE KOTA SEMARANG

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Elliana; Anita Murniwati

    2017-01-01

    Latar belakang : Menopause terjadi akibat dari penurunan produksi hormon estrogen yang dihasilkan oleh kelenjar endokirin dimana pada usia sekitar 45-55 tahun ditandai dengan keluhan haid yang mulai tidak teratur. Berdasarkan studi pendahuluan terhadap 10 wanita yang berumur 45-55 tahun di Kelurahan Bendanduwur Kecamatan Gajahmungkur kota Semarang, didapatkan bahwa 7 dari 10 wanita menopause (70%) berstatus gizi baik dan 2 orang wanita menopause (20%) telah mengalami perubahan fisik menopause...

  4. Estrogen receptor β-selective phytoestrogenic formulation prevents physical and neurological changes in a preclinical model of human menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Schneider, Lon S; Brinton, Roberta D

    2011-10-01

    As an alternative to estrogen therapy, the efficacy of an estrogen receptor β-selective phytoestrogenic (phyto-β-SERM) formulation to regulate climacteric symptoms and decline in brain responses associated with ovarian hormone loss in menopause was assessed. A phyto-β-SERM formulation-containing diet was compared with a commercial soy extract diet and a phytoestrogen-free base/control diet in an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model of human menopause. Two treatment studies were conducted: (1) a 2-month study assessed the effects of experimental diets on tail skin temperature as a model of menopausal hot flashes, and (2) a 9-month study assessed the long-term impact of the diets on overall health, hair thinning/loss, spatial working memory, and associated protein expression in the hippocampus. The phyto-β-SERM diet prevented OVX-induced menopause-like changes including the rise in skin temperature, hair thinning/loss, deficit in spatial memory function, and reversed OVX-induced decline in the expression of hippocampal proteins involved in neural plasticity and β-amyloid degradation/clearance. The soy extract diet had no effect or exacerbated OVX-induced changes. Overall, the phyto-β-SERM diet induced physical and neurological responses comparable with ovary-intact mice, suggesting the therapeutic potential of the phyto-β-SERM formulation for the prevention/alleviation of climacteric symptoms and decline in brain responses induced by ovarian hormone loss, which provides the basis for further work in postmenopausal women.

  5. Understanding and Managing Menopause | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Understanding and Managing Menopause Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Menopause, or the "change of life," is different for each woman. For ...

  6. Menopause Treatments | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Menopause Treatments Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents ... you should use hormones to help relieve some menopause symptoms. It's hard to know what to do, ...

  7. Menopause Symptoms | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Menopause: A Woman's Change of Life Menopause Symptoms Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Women may have different signs or symptoms at menopause. That's because estrogen is used by many parts ...

  8. Menopause Weight Gain: Stop the Middle Age Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but excess pounds aren't inevitable. To minimize menopause weight gain, step up your activity level and ... In fact, many women gain weight around the menopause transition. Menopause weight gain isn't inevitable, however. ...

  9. An overview of menopause associated Vaso Motor Symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Vasomotor Symptoms are the most common and distressing menopausal complaint, for which women seek advice from their physician. OBJECTIVE: To review menopausal associated vasomotor symptoms and options available in its management. METHODS: Pertinent literature on menopause associated ...

  10. Age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Hautaniemi, Susan I

    2003-04-01

    Comparisons of age at menopause are made difficult by the different methodologies applied across populations. This study extended an opportunity to apply different methodologies to the same data to draw some preliminary conclusions about age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico. Among 755 women aged 28 to 70 interviewed in the capital city of Puebla, Mexico, 447 (59.6%) were naturally or surgically postmenopausal. Mean recalled age at natural menopause in Puebla (46.7 years) appears to be similar to mean recalled age at menopause in Mexico City (46.5 years), suggesting that age at menopause is similar in urban Mexican populations. However, median age at menopause computed by probit analysis was later in the city of Puebla (49.6 years) compared to the median age computed by the same method in the capital city of León, Guanajuato, Mexico (48.2 years). Median age at menopause computed by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis suggests that age at menopause in Puebla (50.0 years) is older still, and close to that of the United States (51.1 years). The differences in median ages at menopause in Puebla are solely due to methodological choices and highlight the difficulty inherent in making inferences across studies of age at menopause between biological and/or cultural groups. Factors associated with age at menopause offer another avenue for comparing and understanding variation in this basic biological process. In Puebla, smoking, low levels of education, and nulliparity are associated with an earlier age at menopause.

  11. Portraits of menopause in the mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, L; Stevens, J

    1998-01-01

    This examination of menopause as presented by the popular print media was conducted in the context of furthering our understanding of the development of attitudes toward menopause. All articles indexed under "menopause" in the Reader's Guide in the years 1981, 1982, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1994 were located and examined. The data revealed that, although there has been an increase in the frequency of articles on menopause in the last 15 years, the media's portrayal of menopause is problematic in several respects: (a) in spite of the increased attention, the information available on menopause through the popular media is minimal and insufficient; (b) there was little variability in terms of perspective, discipline, or focus; almost all were focused on menopause as a negative experience or disease and in need of medical treatment; (c) there was considerable contradiction and inconsistency among the articles with respect to descriptions of menopause and intervention advice for menopausal women; (d) aging, stress, life-style factors, race and ethnicity, exercise and diet were, with few exceptions, ignored or trivialized.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF IRON STATUS AMONG SUDANESE MENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Siham Khalifa Abd Allah; Mohamed Abedelrahman Syid; Areeg Alsail Mohmmed; Raian Bakhet Yassein; Nosiba Abdelmajid Alballah; Nada Omer Alseedig

    2017-01-01

    Menopause is very important turning phase in the life of a female and is associated with hormonal changes. These hormones affect the overall personality however menopause is also associated with varied menopausal symptoms. Menopause women are a high risk group for iron level disturbance in your bodies. This was descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to determine the serum iron level in menopause women. Following informed consent, fifty subjects in menopause period, and sex matched fifty heal...

  13. Menstrual Cycle Hormone Changes in Women Traversing Menopause: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nanette; Crawford, Sybil L; El Khoudary, Samar R; Allshouse, Amanda A; Burnett-Bowie, Sherri-Ann; Finkelstein, Joel; Derby, Carol; Matthews, Karen; Kravitz, Howard M; Harlow, Sioban D; Greendale, Gail A; Gold, Ellen B; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; McConnell, Dan; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Pavlovic, Jelena; Randolph, John; Weiss, Gerson; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Lasley, Bill

    2017-07-01

    Menstrual cycle hormone patterns in women approaching menopause are inadequately studied. To describe day-to-day menstrual cycle hormones in women as they approach menopause from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Daily Hormone Study (DHS). DHS enrollees collected daily urine for one entire menstrual cycle or up to 50 days, whichever came first, annually, up to the final menstrual period (FMP) or for up to 10 years. Seven sites across the United States. A total of 511 premenopausal or early perimenopausal women at enrollment, within 10 years before menopause. Time-to-FMP measurement. Evidence of luteal activity (ELA), determined using objective algorithms. Menstrual cycle/segment length; whole cycle, and segment integrated urinary luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, estrone conjugates, and pregnanediol glucuronide (Pdg) for each year, organized around the FMP. Mean menstrual cycle length was remarkably preserved at 26 to 27 days in ELA cycles; non-ELA cycles had greater variability. The percentage of cycles that were ELA remained high until 5 years before the FMP (87.9%); only 22.8% of cycles within 1 year of the FMP were ELA. Whole cycle hormones remained relatively stable up to 3 years before the FMP, when gonadotropins began to increase. Pdg excretion declined slowly with progress to the FMP, but Pdg patterns of ELA cycles remained distinguishable from non-ELA. Menstrual cycle hormone patterns in perimenopausal women resemble those of midreproductive-aged women until 5 years before menopause, and presumably ovulatory cycles retain a potentially fertile pattern up to the end of reproductive life. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  14. Differential genetic basis for pre-menopausal and post-menopausal salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L M Herrera

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension affects 75% of post-menopausal women in the United States causing greater cardiovascular complications compared with age-matched men and pre-menopausal women. Hormone replacement and current anti-hypertensive therapies do not correct this post-menopausal increased risk suggesting a distinct pathogenic framework. We investigated the hypothesis that distinct genetic determinants might underlie susceptibility to salt sensitive hypertension in pre-menopausal and post-menopausal states. To determine whether distinct genetic loci contribute to post-menopausal salt-sensitive hypertension, we performed a genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting blood pressure (BP in 16-month old post-menopausal F2 (Dahl S×R-intercross female rats characterized for blood pressure by radiotelemetry. Given identical environments and high salt challenge, post-menopausal BP levels were significantly higher than observed in pre-menopausal (post-menopausal versus pre-menopausal SBP, P<0.0001 and ovariectomized (post-menopausal versus ovariectomized SBP, P<0.001 F2-intercross female rats. We detected four significant to highly significant BP-QTLs (BP-pm1 on chromosome 13, LOD 3.78; BP-pm2 on chromosome 11, LOD 2.76; BP-pm3 on chromosome 2, LOD 2.61; BP-pm4 on chromosome 4, LOD 2.50 and two suggestive BP-QTLs (BP-pm5 on chromosome 15, LOD 2.37; BP-f1 on chromosome 5, LOD 1.65, four of which (BP-pm2, BP-pm3, BP-pm4, BP-pm5 were unique to this post-menopausal cohort. These data demonstrate distinct polygenic susceptibility underlying post-menopausal salt-sensitive hypertension providing a pathway towards the identification of mechanism-based therapy for post-menopausal hypertension and ensuing target-organ complications.

  15. Reducing inappropriate testing in the diagnosis of the menopause and peri-menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jac; Currie, Heather; Foster, Adele; Anderson, Julia

    2016-09-01

    The menopause should be diagnosed based on age, menstrual history and clinical symptoms, and as such, follicle stimulating hormone testing may be considered inappropriate when diagnosing the menopause or peri-menopause in women aged 45 and over. As part of a demand optimisation programme, the number of follicle stimulating hormone tests requested to diagnose the menopause in this age group was quantified and educational interventions were implemented to reduce inappropriate testing. The number of follicle stimulating hormone tests requested to diagnose the menopause in women aged 45 and over was successfully and sustainably reduced. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Management of Nonpregnant Women with Elevated Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Bernd C.; Reilly, Aimee; Oehler, Martin K.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is useful in evaluating and monitoring early pregnancy as well as trophoblastic disease. Here we describe the management of women with elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin in a case of a 51-year-old female who was unsuccessfully treated for ectopic pregnancy. She was subsequently diagnosed with pituitary hCG production, which should be considered as differential diagnosis before treatment is initiated.

  17. The first woman to give birth to two children following transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik; Bergholdt, Stinne; Jørgensen, Jan Stener

    2010-01-01

    of ovarian cortex, after having experienced a period of menopause has now conceived again following natural conception. She gave birth to a healthy girl on 23 September 2008 and is therefore the first woman in the world to have had two children, from separate pregnancies, born as a result of transplanting...

  18. Association of Mid-Life Changes in Body Size, Body Composition and Obesity Status with the Menopausal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Karvonen-Gutierrez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mid-life period is a critical window for increases in body weight and changes in body composition. In this review, we summarize the clinical experience of the menopausal transition by obesity status, and examine the evidence regarding the menopausal transition and reproductive hormones effects on body weight, body composition, or fat distribution. Mid-life obesity is associated with a different menopausal experience including associations with menstrual cycle length prior to the final menstrual period (FMP, age at the FMP, and higher prevalence of vasomotor symptoms. The menopausal transition is associated with weight gain and increased central body fat distribution; the majority of evidence suggests that changes in weight are due to chronological aging whereas changes in body composition and fat distribution are primarily due to ovarian aging. Continuous and regular physical activity during mid-life may be an efficacious strategy to counteract the age-related and menopause-related changes in resting energy expenditure and to prevent weight gain and abdominal adiposity deposition.

  19. Ovarian cancer and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V; Gaitskell, K; Hermon, C

    2012-01-01

    Smoking has been linked to mucinous ovarian cancer, but its effects on other ovarian cancer subtypes and on overall ovarian cancer risk are unclear, and the findings from most studies with relevant data are unpublished. To assess these associations, we review the published and unpublished evidence....

  20. Hubungan Penggunaan Kontrasepsi Hormonal dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Kudadiri, Liza

    2016-01-01

    Kontrasepsi hormonal merupakan suatu metode untuk mencegah kehamilan dengan cara pemberian hormon steroid. Menopause merupakan suatu fase dalam kehidupan wanita dimana masa kesuburan sudah berakhir yang ditandai dengan berhentinya siklus haid sekurang-kurangnya selama 1 tahun. Penggunaan kontrasepsi hormonal dapat menyebabkan pergeseran usia menopause menjadi lebih tua. Desain penelitian yang digunakan adalah deskriptif korelasi yang bertujuan mengidentifikasi hubungan pengg...

  1. Psychosocial Adjustment Needs of Menopausal Women | Dimkpa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychosocial adjustment needs of menopausal women. The population of the study consisted of 623 menopausal women who were out-patients in Federal Medical Centre and a private hospital in Yenagoa Local Government Area, Bayelsa State of. Nigeria. The sample ...

  2. Distinguishing benign from malignant pelvic mass utilizing an algorithm with HE4, menopausal status, and ultrasound findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Karen KL; Chen, Chi-An; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ochiai, Kazunori; Aw, Tar-Choon; Sabaratnam, Subathra; Hebbar, Sudarshan; Sickan, Jaganathan; Schodin, Beth A; Charakorn, Chuenkamon; Sumpaico, Walfrido W

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a risk prediction score for distinguishing benign ovarian mass from malignant tumors using CA-125, human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), ultrasound findings, and menopausal status. The risk prediction score was compared to the risk of malignancy index and risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA). Methods This was a prospective, multicenter (n=6) study with patients from six Asian countries. Patients had a pelvic mass upon imaging and were scheduled to undergo surgery. Serum CA-125 and HE4 were measured on preoperative samples, and ultrasound findings were recorded. Regression analysis was performed and a risk prediction model was developed based on the significant factors. A bootstrap technique was applied to assess the validity of the HE4 model. Results A total of 414 women with a pelvic mass were enrolled in the study, of which 328 had documented ultrasound findings. The risk prediction model that contained HE4, menopausal status, and ultrasound findings exhibited the best performance compared to models with CA-125 alone, or a combination of CA-125 and HE4. This model classified 77.2% of women with ovarian cancer as medium or high risk, and 86% of women with benign disease as very-low, low, or medium-low risk. This model exhibited better sensitivity than ROMA, but ROMA exhibited better specificity. Both models performed better than CA-125 alone. Conclusion Combining ultrasound with HE4 can improve the sensitivity for detecting ovarian cancer compared to other algorithms. PMID:25310857

  3. The effect of adverse intrauterine conditions, early childhood growth and famine exposure on age at menopause: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrzadeh, S; Verschuuren, M; Schoonmade, L J; Lambalk, C B; Painter, R C

    2018-04-01

    When the follicle reserve, which is developed solely during the fetal period, is depleted, women enter menopause. Intrauterine and childhood adverse conditions might affect the ovarian capacity by influencing follicle production in the first trimester, limiting the initial follicle pool or mediate an accelerated follicular loss thereafter. To investigate if adverse early life influences result in younger age at menopause, the following online databases were systematically searched: PubMed, EMBASE, CINHAL (EBSCO) and Cochrane library (Wiley) up to 1 January 2017. Eligibility, data extraction and quality assessment was independently performed by two researchers. A total of 5278 studies were identified, 11 studies were deemed eligible and included. Nine were cohort studies, 1 case-control study and 1 twin study. Due to the diversity of reported data and risk estimates we were unable to pool data or perform meta-analysis on pooled data. Prenatal and childhood exposure to famine was significantly associated to an earlier age at menopause in three studies. Mean differences in age at menopause varied from 4 months up to 1.7 years between famine exposed and unexposed women. Three studies described a significant association between a low weight at ages 1 or 2 and a younger age at menopause. A younger age at menopause was associated with a higher weight at birth in only one study and with a high ponderal index, a measure for fatness at birth in another study. None of the nine studies reporting on low birth weight and age at natural menopause find a significant association.

  4. Serum estradiol should be monitored not only during the peri-menopausal period but also the post-menopausal period at the time of aromatase inhibitor administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zembutsu Hitoshi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase inhibitor (AI therapy is being extensively used as postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with hormone receptor-positive postmenopausal breast cancer. On the other hand, it has been reported that ovarian function was restored when AI was administered to patients who had undergone chemical menopause with chemotherapy or tamoxifen. However, there have been no reports of comprehensive monitoring of estradiol (E2 in breast cancer patients with ordinary menopause who were being administered AI. Patients and Methods Beginning in March 2008, regular monitoring of the serum levels of E2, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH was performed for 66 postmenopausal breast cancer patients who had been started on AI therapy. For this study, we chose anastrozole as the AI. The assays of those hormones were outsourced to a commercial clinical laboratory. Results In 4 of the 66 patients the serum E2 level was decreased at 3 months but had then increased at 6 months, while in 2 other patients E2 was decreased at both 3 and 6 months but had increased at 9 months. Conclusion The results indicate that, in some breast cancer patients with ordinary menopause, E2 rebounds following AI therapy. In the future, E2 monitoring should be performed for a larger number of patients being administered AI therapy. Trial registration Our trial registration number is 19-11-1211.

  5. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  6. Life-course origins of the ages at menarche and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forman MR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michele R Forman,1 Lauren D Mangini,1 Rosenie Thelus-Jean,2 Mark D Hayward31Nutritional Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 2Office of the Surgeon General, Department of the Army, Washington DC, 3Population Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: A woman's age at menarche (first menstrual period and her age at menopause are the alpha and omega of her reproductive years. The timing of these milestones is critical for a woman's health trajectory over her lifespan, as they are indicators of ovarian function and aging. Both early and late timing of either event are associated with risk for adverse health and psychosocial outcomes. Thus, the search for a relationship between age at menarche and menopause has consequences for chronic disease prevention and implications for public health. This article is a review of evidence from the fields of developmental biology, epidemiology, nutrition, demography, sociology, and psychology that examine the menarche–menopause connection. Trends in ages at menarche and menopause worldwide and in subpopulations are presented; however, challenges exist in constructing trends. Among 36 studies that examine the association between the two sentinel events, ten reported a significant direct association, two an inverse association, and the remainder had null findings. Multiple factors, including hormonal and environmental exposures, socioeconomic status, and stress throughout the life course are hypothesized to influence the tempo of growth, including body size and height, development, menarche, menopause, and the aging process in women. The complexity of these factors and the pathways related to their effects on each sentinel event complicate evaluation of the relationship between menarche and menopause. Limitations of past investigations are discussed, including lack of comparability of socioeconomic status indicators and biomarker use across studies, while

  7. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN OVARIAN CANCER RISK AND CONTRACEPTIVE METHODS- AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessy Binu Sam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system. Risk of ovarian cancer increases with age, but the rate of increase slows after the menopause. Use of contraceptives confers long-term protection against ovarian cancer. This observational study examines the correlation between ovarian cancer risks with different contraceptive methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted at Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, for a period of one year. Information was collected from 112 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer as treatment group and 336 women without ovarian cancer as control group. The Chi-square test was done to find the association of ovarian cancer risk with different contraceptive methods. RESULTS In the sample of 112 women with ovarian cancer, 53.6% women were using any of the contraceptive methods, whereas in the control group, only 5.1% women were using contraceptive methods. Our study found out a significant association of ovarian cancer risk with oral contraceptives and tubal ligation. There was no significant association of ovarian cancer risk with IUCD, sheath and vasectomy. CONCLUSION Tubal ligation and oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. The dual benefits of tubal ligation need to be made aware among the public and tubal sterilisation rates have to be enhanced. Oral contraceptive pill use has to be propagated as a temporary contraceptive method due to its added advantage. We recommend future research on the association of ovarian cancer risk and contraceptive methods using large samples comparable to those done in developed countries.

  8. The urogenital system and the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Agius, J; Brincat, M P

    2015-01-01

    The major cause of urogenital atrophy in menopausal women is estrogen loss. The symptoms are usually progressive in nature and deteriorate with time from the menopausal transition. The most prevalent urogenital symptoms are vaginal dryness, vaginal irritation and itching. The genitourinary syndrome of menopause includes vulvovaginal atrophy and the postmenopausal modifications of the lower urinary tract. Dyspareunia and vaginal bleeding from fragile atrophic skin are common problems. Other urogenital complaints include frequency, nocturia, urgency, stress urinary incontinence and urinary tract infections. Atrophic changes of the vulva, vagina and lower urinary tract can have a large impact on the quality of life of the menopausal woman. However, hormonal and non-hormonal treatments can provide patients with the solution to regain the previous level of function. Therefore, clinicians should sensitively question and examine menopausal women, in order to correctly identify the pattern of changes in urogenital atrophy and manage them appropriately.

  9. Surgical menopause versus natural menopause and cardio-metabolic disturbances: A 12-year population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, M; Ramezani Tehrani, F; Bahri Khomami, M; Noroozzadeh, M; Azizi, F

    2015-07-01

    Menopausal status exposes women to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study was performed to compare the effect of menopausal types, including surgical and natural, on metabolic syndrome and other metabolic disorders 3 years before and after menopause. Of 437 postmenopausal women, who participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, 13 women with surgical menopause and 39 age-matched controls with natural menopause were selected. During the follow-up period, changes in metabolic and biochemical profiles were compared between surgical and natural menopause women. Odds of incidence of metabolic syndrome in surgical menopause women, compared to natural menopause women, was 9.7 (95 % CI 1.8-51.8). Metabolic disturbances after menopause are highly influenced by type of menopause and are more prevalent in those undergoing surgical menopause.

  10. Length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect the risk of early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Bennett, Claire E.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range associated with the risk of early menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER The length of repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect risk of early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is a strong, well-established relationship between length of premutation FMR1 alleles and age at menopause, suggesting that this relationship could continue into the normal range. Within the normal range, there is conflicting evidence; differences in ovarian reserve have been identified with FMR1 repeat allele length, but a recent population-based study did not find any association with age at menopause as a quantitative trait. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION We analysed cross-sectional baseline survey data collected at recruitment from 2004 to 2010 from a population-based, prospective epidemiological cohort study of >110 000 women to investigate whether repeat allele length was associated with early menopause. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD We included 4333 women from the Breakthrough Generations Study (BGS), of whom 2118 were early menopause cases (menopause under 46 years) and 2215 were controls. We analysed the relationship between length of FMR1 alleles and early menopause using logistic regression with allele length as continuous and categorical variables. We also conducted analyses with the outcome age at menopause as a quantitative trait as well as appropriate sensitivity and exploratory analyses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was no association of the shorter or longer FMR1 allele or their combined genotype with the clinically relevant end point of early menopause in our main analysis. Likewise, there were no associations with age at menopause as a quantitative trait in our secondary analysis. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Women with homozygous alleles in the normal range may have undetected FMR1 premutation alleles, although there was no evidence to suggest this. We

  11. A histerectomia simples realizada no menacme e a densidade mineral óssea da mulher na pós-menopausa Pre-menopausal simple hysterectomy and post-menopausal female bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Daniel Hobeika

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi avaliar a densidade mineral óssea de mulheres na pós-menopausa, com o antecedente de histerectomia com conservação ovariana bilateral, realizada no menacme, comparadas a um grupo de mulheres com menopausa natural, não histerectomizadas. Tratou-se de um estudo de corte transversal, com trinta mulheres na pós-menopausa e histerectomizadas no menacme e 102 mulheres menopausadas naturalmente, comparando-se as respectivas densitometrias ósseas, em nível do fêmur e coluna lombar. A análise mostrou que as variáveis idade e índice de massa corporal estavam fortemente associadas à densidade mineral óssea do fêmur e da coluna lombar, sendo o índice de massa corporal diretamente e a idade inversamente associados. Posteriormente, as trinta mulheres histerectomizadas, foram pareadas por idade e índice de massa corporal, com trinta mulheres não-histerectomizadas, não apresentando diferenças estatisticamente significantes da densidade mineral óssea. Esses resultados sugerem que a histerectomia com conservação ovariana bilateral, realizada em mulheres no menacme, não parece ocasionar redução adicional da massa óssea, quando avaliadas na pós-menopausa.This study aimed to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD of post-menopausal women with previous pre-menopausal hysterectomy including bilateral ovarian conservation compared to a group of non-hysterectomized women with natural menopause. Data from a cross-sectional study of 30 pre-menopausally hysterectomized women evaluated in the post-menopause were compared with 102 naturally post-menopausal women, analyzing their respective bone densitometry, measuring the femoral and lumbar spinal BMD. Multiple regression analysis of the 132 women showed that age and body mass index (BMI were heavily associated with femoral and lumbar spinal BMD, BMI directly associated, and age inversely associated with BMD. In addition, 30 hysterectomized women were matched by age and BMI to the

  12. Premature ovarian failure (POF in Brazilian fragile X carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Vianna-Morgante

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The gynecological and reproductive histories of 193 women from fragile X families were surveyed. Among the 101 carriers of the premutation, 14 experienced premature menopause, contrarily to their 37 fully mutated and 55 noncarrier female relatives. Although premature menopause showed a tendency to cluster in certain fragile X families, as a group, the premutated women experienced menopause earlier than noncarriers. This suggests that premature menopause may be the extreme effect of a spectrum of ovarian anomalies associated with the fragile X premutation.Entrevistamos 193 mulheres de famílias com afetados pela síndrome do cromossomo X frágil, quanto a sua história ginecológica e reprodutiva. Entre as 101 portadoras da pré-mutação, 14 tiveram menopausa precoce, mas nenhuma das 37 portadoras da mutação completa ou das 55 não portadoras apresentaram esta anomalia. Observamos uma tendência para a concentração da menopausa precoce em certas famílias, o que poderia significar uma peculiariedade de certas pré-mutações. Entretanto, o fato de as mulheres pré-mutadas tenderem a entrar em menopausa mais cedo do que as não portadoras sugere que a menopausa precoce seja o extremo do espectro de efeitos ovarianos da pré-mutação.

  13. Evaluation of the ovarian reserve in women transplanted with frozen and thawed ovarian cortical tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Tine; Schmidt, Kirsten Tryde; Kristensen, Stine Gry

    2012-01-01

    To investigate ovarian reserve and ovarian function in women transplanted with frozen/thawed ovarian tissue.......To investigate ovarian reserve and ovarian function in women transplanted with frozen/thawed ovarian tissue....

  14. Aberrant effects of altrenogest and exposure to exogenous gonadotropins on follicular cysts appearance in gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziecik, A J; Klos, J; Przygrodzka, E; Milewski, R; Jana, B

    2017-02-01

    Research was conducted to determine the effect of altrenogest and exposure to exogenous gonadotropins on ovarian function in prepubertal and mature gilts. Crossbred, presumably sexually mature gilts (n = 51), were fed with altrenogest for 18 consecutive days and the day after the last feeding with altrenogest, gilts were treated with eCG and 72 hours later challenged with hCG. Animals were slaughtered on Days 10 to 13 of their gonadotropins synchronized estrous cycle. Ovaries were examined for the number of CL, number of follicular cysts, and presence of corpora albicantia. Gilts were divided into two groups: those possessing corpora albicantia (group A-mature; n = 36) and those without corpora albicantia (Group W-prepubertal; n = 15) on their ovaries. In addition, each group was divided into two subgroups depending on the presence of follicular cysts (AC and WC) or their absence (AO and WO). There was no difference between the number of CL in group A and group W. Presence of corpora albicantia determined percentage of gilts possessing follicular cysts (13.9% group A vs. 66.7% group W). Gilts without follicular cysts (AO plus WO; n = 36) had higher number of CL (P gilts bearing cysts (AC plus WC; n = 15). Comparison AO-AC did not show significant difference (P = 0.075) between CL number in mature cyst-free and cysts bearing gilts. A prepubertal gilts not bearing follicular cysts (WO) had higher (P gilts bearing cysts. A significant negative correlation between the number of CL and number of follicular cysts was found (r = -0.664; P = 0.007). There were no differences in blood plasma progesterone and estradiol concentration between cyst-free and cyst-bearing gilts. These results indicate: (1) a higher follicular cysts appearance in prepubertal than mature gilts challenged with altrenogest and exposed to exogenous gonadotropins and (2) a negative effect of follicular cysts on the number of CL (ovulations) in prepubertal gilts. Copyright © 2016

  15. Menopausal Status, Depression, and Life-Satisfaction among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the study revealed that (I) currently menopausal women experienced a significantly higher level of depression and a lower level of life satisfaction than non-menopausal and post menopausal women. (ii) women who experienced late menopause were more depressed and less satisfied with life than women who ...

  16. Menopause: Prevention and Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mª Rivas Hidalgo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that climacteric constitutes a physiological state in woman’s life, which covers a large stage of her life cycle, it is important that nursery professionals will develop an Action Plan, whose main objective will be health. Covering, then, this stage from a multidisciplinary and holistic field is going to contribute to both: the adoption of healthy life habits and the repercussions that symptoms and physiological processes associated with menopause have on women. Another objective for nurses there must be to provide all our knowledge in a detailed and focused on the individual needs that may come up way. That way, we lay the foundations for facing climacteric with the minimum deterioration of the quality of life and well being.This article is an analysis of the etiology of every one of the most prevalent menopause problems, the predisposing factors to suffer them or to make them get worse, and the habits that are going to prevent larger spill-over effects of those problems. Furthermore, a revision about how nutrition, exercise, toxic substances consumption, etc. have repercussions on musculoskeletal problems, vascular symptoms, urogenital problems, psychological alterations, and gynaecological and breast cancer is made.

  17. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler-Toprak, Susanne; Treeck, Oliver; Ortmann, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is well known as a malignancy being strongly influenced by female steroids. Pregnancy is a protective factor against breast cancer. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is a candidate hormone which could mediate this antitumoral effect of pregnancy. For this review article, all original research articles on the role of HCG in breast cancer were considered, which are listed in PubMed database and were written in English. The role of HCG in breast cancer seems to be a paradox. Placental heterodimeric HCG acts as a protective agent by imprinting a permanent genomic signature of the mammary gland determining a refractory condition to malignant transformation which is characterized by cellular differentiation, apoptosis and growth inhibition. On the other hand, ectopic expression of β-HCG in various cancer entities is associated with poor prognosis due to its tumor-promoting function. Placental HCG and ectopically expressed β-HCG exert opposite effects on breast tumorigenesis. Therefore, mimicking pregnancy by treatment with HCG is suggested as a strategy for breast cancer prevention, whereas targeting β-HCG expressing tumor cells seems to be an option for breast cancer therapy. PMID:28754015

  18. Ovarian Reserve Assessment in Users of Oral Contraception Seeking Fertility Advice on their Reproductive Lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K. Birch; Hvidman, H. W.; Forman, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    in the antral follicles of 5-7 and 8-10 mm with the highest number of AMH secreting granulosa cells. It is essential to be aware of the impact of OC use on ovarian reserve parameters when guiding OC users on their fertility status and reproductive lifespan. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: The FAC Clinic......STUDY QUESTION: To what extent does oral contraception (OC) impair ovarian reserve parameters in women who seek fertility assessment and counselling to get advice on whether their remaining reproductive lifespan is reduced? SUMMARY ANSWER: Ovarian reserve parameters defined by anti...... ageing. In women, AMH declines with age and data suggest a relationship with remaining reproductive lifespan and age at menopause. OC may alter parameters related to ovarian reserve assessment but the extent of the reduction is uncertain. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A cross-sectional study of 887 women...

  19. Ovarian reserve assessment in users of oral contraception seeking fertility advice on their reproductive lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch Petersen, K; Hvidman, H W; Forman, J L

    2015-01-01

    in the antral follicles of 5-7 and 8-10 mm with the highest number of AMH secreting granulosa cells. It is essential to be aware of the impact of OC use on ovarian reserve parameters when guiding OC users on their fertility status and reproductive lifespan. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: The FAC Clinic......STUDY QUESTION: To what extent does oral contraception (OC) impair ovarian reserve parameters in women who seek fertility assessment and counselling to get advice on whether their remaining reproductive lifespan is reduced? SUMMARY ANSWER: Ovarian reserve parameters defined by anti...... ageing. In women, AMH declines with age and data suggest a relationship with remaining reproductive lifespan and age at menopause. OC may alter parameters related to ovarian reserve assessment but the extent of the reduction is uncertain. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A cross-sectional study of 887 women...

  20. The Prevention of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer: A Personal View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narod Steven

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Options for the prevention of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer include screening, preventive surgery and chemoprevention. Screening studies with magnetic resonance imaging of the breast are promising but the technology is not widespread and MRI is unlikely to be available as a screening tool in the near future. Prophylactic oophorectomy and mastectomy are effective preventive measures and are gaining in acceptance by patients and physicians. Preventive mastectomy is effective against both primary and contralateral breast cancer. Oophorectomy prevents ovarian cancer, and if done prior to menopause, will prevent breast cancer as well. Tamoxifen has been shown to prevent contralateral breast cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers but is not widely accepted as a means of primary prevention. Oral contraceptives and tubal ligation will reduce the risk of hereditary ovarian cancer and should be considered in women who wish to retain ovarian function.

  1. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype: An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Elizabeth M.; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A.; Patel, Alpa V.; Setiawan, V. Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A.; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M.; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V.; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gram, Inger T.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V.; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P.; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J.; Sjöholm, Louise K.; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). Patients and Methods Among 1.3 million women from 21 studies, 5,584 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers were identified (3,378 serous, 606 endometrioid, 331 mucinous, 269 clear cell, 1,000 other). By using competing-risks Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by study and birth year and adjusted for age, parity, and oral contraceptive use, we assessed associations for all invasive cancers by histology. Heterogeneity was evaluated by likelihood ratio test. Results Most risk factors exhibited significant heterogeneity by histology. Higher parity was most strongly associated with endometrioid (relative risk [RR] per birth, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) and clear cell (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76) carcinomas (P value for heterogeneity [P-het] < .001). Similarly, age at menopause, endometriosis, and tubal ligation were only associated with endometrioid and clear cell tumors (P-het ≤ .01). Family history of breast cancer (P-het = .008) had modest heterogeneity. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of mucinous (RR per 20 pack-years, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.46) but a decreased risk of clear cell (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) tumors (P-het = .004). Unsupervised clustering by risk factors separated endometrioid, clear cell, and low-grade serous carcinomas from high-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas. Conclusion The heterogeneous associations of risk factors with ovarian cancer subtypes emphasize the importance of conducting etiologic studies by ovarian cancer subtypes. Most established risk factors were more strongly associated with nonserous carcinomas, which demonstrate challenges for risk prediction of serous cancers, the most fatal subtype. PMID:27325851

  2. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype: An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poole, Elizabeth M; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A; Patel, Alpa V; Setiawan, V Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Gram, Inger T; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J; Sjöholm, Louise K; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2016-08-20

    An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). Among 1.3 million women from 21 studies, 5,584 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers were identified (3,378 serous, 606 endometrioid, 331 mucinous, 269 clear cell, 1,000 other). By using competing-risks Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by study and birth year and adjusted for age, parity, and oral contraceptive use, we assessed associations for all invasive cancers by histology. Heterogeneity was evaluated by likelihood ratio test. Most risk factors exhibited significant heterogeneity by histology. Higher parity was most strongly associated with endometrioid (relative risk [RR] per birth, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) and clear cell (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76) carcinomas (P value for heterogeneity [P-het] < .001). Similarly, age at menopause, endometriosis, and tubal ligation were only associated with endometrioid and clear cell tumors (P-het ≤ .01). Family history of breast cancer (P-het = .008) had modest heterogeneity. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of mucinous (RR per 20 pack-years, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.46) but a decreased risk of clear cell (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) tumors (P-het = .004). Unsupervised clustering by risk factors separated endometrioid, clear cell, and low-grade serous carcinomas from high-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas. The heterogeneous associations of risk factors with ovarian cancer subtypes emphasize the importance of conducting etiologic studies by ovarian cancer subtypes. Most established risk factors were more strongly associated with nonserous carcinomas, which demonstrate challenges for risk prediction of serous cancers, the most fatal subtype. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. A proposed classification system for menstrual cycles in the menopause transition based on changes in serum hormone profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David M; Hale, Georgina E; Fraser, Ian S; Hughes, Claude L; Burger, Henry G

    2008-01-01

    To characterize menstrual cycles in women in late reproductive age and the menopause transition, based on changes in serum hormone levels. Serum levels of estradiol, progesterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, inhibin A, inhibin B, and antimüllerian hormone, as previously reported as mean data grouped according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop proposals, were analyzed in 55 women aged 45 to 55 and compared with those in 21 women aged 21 to 35. The ovulatory cycles in the older women were divided into three types. Type 1 cycles (n = 14, 33%) were those with hormone concentrations similar to the women aged 21 to 35 except for 20-fold lower antimüllerian hormone levels. Type 2 cycles (n = 24; 53%) had increased FSH, decreased inhibin B, and increased FSH-to-inhibin B ratios but normal estradiol and progesterone levels. Type 3 cycles had the same characteristics as type 2 cycles (n = 5; 12%) in addition to lower luteal phase progesterone and increased luteinizing hormone. The changes in hormone levels indicated in cycle types 1 to 3 closely reflect the changes in ovarian-pituitary activity as menopause approaches and are likely to be directly attributable to a decrease in ovarian follicle reserve. The findings suggest that FSH-to-inhibin B ratios and antimüllerian hormone are distinct early indicators of the menopause transition and are likely to be useful biomarkers of impending menopause. Furthermore, this classification may provide an improved basis for the study of reproductive endocrine disorders associated with the menopause transition.

  4. Early Alterations in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells and Induction of Ovarian Epithelial Tumors Triggered by Loss of FSH Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlei Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the behavior of the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE, which plays a central role in ovarian cancer etiology. It has been suggested that incessant ovulation causes OSE changes leading to transformation and that high gonadotropin levels during postmenopause activate OSE receptors, inducing proliferation. We examined the chronology of OSE changes, including tumor appearance, in a mouse model where ovulation never occurs due to deletion of follitropin receptor. Changes in epithelial cells were marked by pan-cytokeratin (CK staining. Histologic changes and CK staining in the OSE increased from postnatal day 2. CK staining was observed inside the ovary by 24 days and increased thereafter in tumor-bearing animals. Ovaries from a third of aged (1 year mutant mice showed CK deep inside, indicating cell migration. These tumors resembled serous papillary adenoma of human ovaries. Weak expression of GATA-4 and elevation of PCNA, cyclooxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase-2, and plateletderived growth factor receptors α and β in mutants indicated differences in cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammation. Thus, we report that OSE changes occur long before epithelial tumors appear in FORKO mice. Our results suggest that neither incessant ovulation nor follicle-stimulating hormone receptor presence in the OSE is required for inducing ovarian tumors; thus, other mechanisms must contribute to ovarian tumorigenesis.

  5. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa, Patrizia; Ornello, Raffaele; Degan, Diana; Tiseo, Cindy; Stewart, Janet; Pistoia, Francesca; Carolei, Antonio; Sacco, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. PMID:26316824

  6. Analysis of the Relationship between Estradiol and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Concentrations and Polymorphisms of Apolipoprotein E and LeptinGenes in Women Post-Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rył, Aleksandra; Jasiewicz, Andrzej; Grzywacz, Anna; Adler, Grażyna; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Rotter, Iwona; Sipak-Szmigiel, Olimpia; Rumianowski, Bogdan; Karakiewicz, Beata; Jurczak, Anna; Parczewski, Miłosz; Urbańska, Anna; Grabowska, Marta; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2016-05-28

    Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation due to loss of ovarian follicular activity. A review of the available literature indicates that correlations between the changes that take place in a woman's body after menopause and different genetic variants are still being sought. The study was conducted in 252 women who had completed physiological menopause. The women were divided into groups according to the time elapsed since menopause. The total concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone were determined by means of electrochemiluminescence. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) and lepitn (LEP) genotypes were determined by real-time PCR and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, respectively. We observed that people with the APOE3/E3 genotype entered menopause insignificantly later compared to other genotypes. Additionally, in the group of patients with the APOE3/E3 genotypes, differences in the E2 concentration were significantly related to the time since their last menstruation. There is no association found in the literature between these polymorphisms of the LEP gene and hormones. To date, attempts to formulate a model describing the association between E2 and FSH concentration with the polymorphisms of various genes of menopause in women have not been successful. This relationship is difficult to study because of the number of nongenetic factors. Environmental factors can explain variation in postmenopausal changes in hormone levels.

  7. Analysis of the Relationship between Estradiol and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Concentrations and Polymorphisms of Apolipoprotein E and LeptinGenes in Women Post-Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rył

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstruation due to loss of ovarian follicular activity. A review of the available literature indicates that correlations between the changes that take place in a woman’s body after menopause and different genetic variants are still being sought. Methods: The study was conducted in 252 women who had completed physiological menopause. The women were divided into groups according to the time elapsed since menopause. The total concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone were determined by means of electrochemiluminescence. The apolipoprotein E (APOE and lepitn (LEP genotypes were determined by real-time PCR and polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism, respectively. Results: We observed that people with the APOE3/E3 genotype entered menopause insignificantly later compared to other genotypes. Additionally, in the group of patients with the APOE3/E3 genotypes, differences in the E2 concentration were significantly related to the time since their last menstruation. There is no association found in the literature between these polymorphisms of the LEP gene and hormones. Conclusions: To date, attempts to formulate a model describing the association between E2 and FSH concentration with the polymorphisms of various genes of menopause in women have not been successful. This relationship is difficult to study because of the number of nongenetic factors. Environmental factors can explain variation in postmenopausal changes in hormone levels.

  8. Histomorphometric Evaluation of Superovulation Effect on Follicular Development after Autologous Ovarian Transplantation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Tamadon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of superovulation by pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG on autologous transplanted ovaries in the lumbar muscles of mice was histomorphometrically evaluated using the indices of number and volume of different kind of follicles and volume of corpora lutea, ovary, and stroma. Angiogenesis was observed after mouse ovarian transplantation on days 14 and 21 after ovarian grafting. After transplantation, the total number and volume of primary and secondary follicles reduced, while PMSG superovulation increased the total number and total volume of tertiary follicles and also the ovarian volume after transplantation. Transplantation increased the average size of primary, secondary, and tertiary follicles. Therefore, primary and secondary follicles can survive after autologous transplantation but their reservations diminished by increasing the time of transplantation. However, number of tertiary follicles and their response to superovulation increased over time after transplantation.

  9. Expression of Siglec-11 by human and chimpanzee ovarian stromal cells, with uniquely human ligands: implications for human ovarian physiology and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Chow, Renee; Deng, Liwen; Anderson, Dan; Weidner, Noel; Godwin, Andrew K; Bewtra, Chanda; Zlotnik, Albert; Bui, Jack; Varki, Ajit; Varki, Nissi

    2011-01-01

    Siglecs (Sialic acid-binding Immunoglobulin Superfamily Lectins) are cell surface signaling receptors of the I-type lectin group that recognize sialic acid-bearing glycans. CD33-related-Siglecs are a subset with expression primarily in cells of hematopoietic origin and functional relevance to immune reactions. Earlier we reported a human-specific gene conversion event that markedly changed the coding region for the extracellular domain of Siglec-11, associated with human-specific expression in microglia (Hayakawa T, Angata T, Lewis AL, Mikkelsen TS, Varki NM, Varki A. 2005. A human-specific gene in microglia. Science. 309:1693). Analyzing human gene microarrays to define new patterns of expression, we observed high levels of SIGLEC11 transcript in the ovary and adrenal cortex. Thus, we examined human and chimpanzee tissues using a well-characterized anti-Siglec-11 mouse monoclonal antibody. Although adrenal expression was variable and confined to infiltrating macrophages in capillaries, ovarian expression of Siglec-11 in both humans and chimpanzees was on fibroblasts, the first example of Siglec expression on mesenchyme-derived stromal cells. Cytokines from such ovarian stromal fibroblasts play important roles in follicle development and ovulation. Stable transfection of SIGLEC11 into a primary human ovarian stromal fibroblast cell line altered the secretion of growth-regulated oncogene α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-7, transforming growth factor β1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, cytokines involved in ovarian physiology. Probing for Siglec-11 ligands revealed distinct and strong mast cell expression in human ovaries, contrasting to diffuse stromal ligands in chimpanzee ovaries. Interestingly, there was a trend of increased Siglec-11 expression in post-menopausal ovaries compared with pre-menopausal ones. Siglec-11 expression was also found on human ovarian stromal tumors and in polycystic ovarian syndrome, a human-specific disease. These results indicate potential

  10. Comparison of the Usefulness of four Risk-of-Malignancy Indices using Ultrasonography in Ovarian masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Moo Sung; Moon, Su Hyun; Joo, Jong Kil; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Yoon, Man Soo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of four Risk-of- Malignancy Indices (RMI) in women with ovarian masses. Between January 2007 and December 2008, 344 women who visited our hospital for surgical exploration due to an ovarian mass were enrolled in this study. Each RMI was based on the combination of menopausal status, ultrasound findings of ovarian masses, and absolute level of serum CA-125. A cutoff level of 200 was chosen as the threshold for determining between malignant and benign ovarian masses in RMI 1, RMI 2, and RMI 3. A cutoff level of 450 was chosen as the threshold in RMI 4. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were determined. The combination of four malignancy indices is more accurate than menopausal status, ultrasound findings, and serum CA-125 alone, respectively for determining whether a mass is benign or malignant. RMI 1 and RMI 4 were found to be better than RMI 2 and RMI 3. RMI 4 was the most reliable test among them. The relationship between RMI 1 and RMI 4 was not statistically significant. With the cutoff level for RMI 4 at 450, the corresponding, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.1%, 88.0%, 56.4%, 93.9%, respectively. All four RMI were reliable tests for determining whether ovarian masses are malignant or benign, and RMI 4 was the most reliable index among them

  11. Menopausal symptoms: do life events predict severity of symptoms in peri- and post-menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Filipa; Leal, Isabel; Maroco, João; Ramos, Catarina

    2012-08-01

    Hormonal changes during menopausal transition are linked to physical and psychological symptoms' emergence. This study aims to explore if life events predict menopausal symptoms. This cross-sectional research encompasses a community sample of 992 women who answered to socio-demographic, health, menopause-related and lifestyle questionnaires; menopausal symptoms and life events were assessed with validated instruments. Structural equation modeling was used to build a causal model. Menopausal status predicted only three symptoms: skin/facial hair changes (β=.136; p=.020), sexual (β=.157; p=.004) and, marginally, vasomotor symptoms (β=.094; p=.054). Life events predicted depressive mood (β=-.391; p=.002), anxiety (β=-.271; p=.003), perceived cognitive impairment (β=-.295; p=.003), body shape changes (β=-.136; p=.031), aches/pain (β=-.212; p=.007), skin/facial hair changes (β=-.171; p=.021), numbness (β=-.169; p=.015), perceived loss of control (β=-.234; p=.008), mouth, nails and hair changes (β=-.290; p=.004), vasomotor (β=-.113; p=.044) and sexual symptoms (β=-.208; p=.009). Although women in peri- and post-menopausal manifested higher symptoms' severity than their pre-menopausal counterparts, only three of the menopausal symptoms assessed were predicted by menopausal status. Since the vast majority of menopausal symptoms' severity was significantly influenced by the way women perceived their recent life events, it is concluded that the symptomatology exacerbation, in peri- and post-menopausal women, might be due to life conditions and events, rather than hormonal changes (nonetheless, the inverse influence should be investigated in future studies). Therefore, these should be accounted for in menopause-related clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for prolonged and unique amenorrhea-related symptoms in women with premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allshouse, Amanda A; Semple, Amy L; Santoro, Nanette F

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to describe premature ovarian failure (POF)/primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) symptoms experienced by women from a non-clinic-based sample of members of a POF/POI-specific support group. Two hundred ninety women were surveyed for 6 weeks. The survey included demographics, health history, and a validated menopause-related quality-of-life questionnaire. Symptom prevalence was described. One hundred sixty (55%) women aged 18 to 63 years (mean [SD], 39.3 [7.3] y) responded. Age at diagnosis ranged from 10 to 39 years (median [interquartile range], 30 [24-35] y). Most respondents were white (87%), college educated (76%), and employed full time (61%). Among women reporting a history of depression (43%), 26% reported that depression occurred more than 5 years before POF/POI diagnosis. Of 29 commonly assessed menopausal symptoms, women reported a mean (SD) of 14.7 (7.4) symptoms; symptom scores did not substantially decrease with time since diagnosis, and relationship with age at diagnosis was negligible. Other common symptoms included mood swings and mental fog (>75%); hair loss, dry eyes, cold intolerance, and joint clicking (>50%); tingling in limbs and low blood pressure (∼33%); hypothyroidism (17%); hypoglycemia (16%); and gluten allergies (10%). Ninety unique symptoms were written in as free text. Symptom checklists created for age-appropriate postmenopausal women do not adequately capture the scope of symptoms observed in this sample. Menopausal symptoms do not seem to diminish across time in women with POF/POI, in contrast to women with age-appropriate menopause. Depression is very commonly reported in this sample, with some women clearly experiencing depression well before their diagnosis of POF/POI. Hypothyroidism in this sample is more than three times the population mean.

  13. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  14. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... an Endocrinologist Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  15. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Amenorrhea About NICHD Research Information Find a Study More ... What are common symptoms? » Related A-Z Topics Amenorrhea Menstruation and Menstrual Problems Women's Health NICHD News ...

  16. The control of reproductive physiology and behavior by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; McGuire, Nicolette L.; Calisi, Rebecca M.; Perfito, Nicole; Bentley, George E.

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls the reproductive physiology and behavior of vertebrates by stimulating synthesis and release of gonadotropin from the pituitary gland. In 2000, another hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), was discovered in quail and found to be an inhibiting factor for gonadotropin release. GnIH homologs are present in the brains of vertebrates, including birds, mammals, amphibians, and fish. These peptides, categorized as RF amide-...

  17. Prognosis of human chorionic gonadotropin-producing seminoma treated by postoperative radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mirimanoff, R-O; Sinzig, M; Krüger, M; Miralbell, R; Thöni, A; Ries, G; Bosset, J-F; Bernier, J; Bolla, M; Nguyen, T-D; COUCKE, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    To clarify the controversy about the management and prognosis of human chorionic gonadotropin-producing seminoma, the records of 132 patients with abnormal human chorionic gonadotropin values treated with radiotherapy were analyzed. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The records of 1169 patients with pure seminoma treated in 10 institutions were screened for serum or urinary human chorionic gonadotropin. One hundred and thirty two patients with elevated human chorionic gonadotropin were found: 96 Stage I...

  18. Avoiding OHSS: Controlled Ovarian Low-Dose Stimulation in Women with PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; Reisenbüchler, C; Rösner, S; Haussmann, J; Wimberger, P; Goeckenjan, M

    2016-06-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome is a common endocrine disorder which influences outcome and potential risks involved with controlled ovarian stimulation for artificial reproductive techniques (ART). Concrete practical recommendations for the dosage of gonadotropins, the preferred protocol and preventive methods to avoid ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) are lacking. We present retrospective data of 235 individually calculated gonadotropin low-dose stimulations for ART in a single center from 2012 to 2014. Clinical data and outcome parameter of patients diagnosed with PCOS according to Rotterdam criteria (n = 39) were compared with patients without PCOS (n = 196). The starting dose of gonadotropins was individually calculated depending on patients' age, BMI, ovarian reserve, ovarian response in previous cycles, and diagnostic criteria of PCOS. Mean age and duration of infertility did not differ between the groups, whereas mean BMI (p = 0.007) and AMH (p PCOS-group. A lower mean FSH-starting and maximum dose was administered to women with PCOS (p PCOS-patients did not differ from those of the control group (42.2 % and 34.4 % respectively). Neither mild, nor moderate or severe manifestation of OHSS occurred significantly more often in patients with PCOS. Our study supports the use of a calculated low-dose FSH-stimulation strategy in ART for patients with PCOS. Further randomized clinical trials should confirm this strategy and lead to define individual risk factors for OHSS, which can be used for recommendation of safer ART-techniques like in vitro maturation.

  19. Sleep in post-menopausal women: differences between early and late post-menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, Helena; Bittencourt, Lia Rita Azeredo; Soares, José Maria; Tufik, Sergio; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in sleep between women of early and late post-menopause. Thirty post-menopausal women who came to the climacteric service of their own volition were selected. Fourteen were in early post-menopause (less than 5 years after menopause), and sixteen were in late post-menopause (more than 5 years since menopause). None of the women were suffering from any other clinical diseases. Participants had no previous history of hormone therapy or hypnotic drug use. These patients were not previously selected with regard to any sleep complaints. All participants answered a sleep questionnaire and underwent a polysomnography recording. Subjective complaints included body pain, bruxism, anxiety, depression, lack of concentration, and sleepiness (measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale). These complaints were more frequent in the late post-menopause group. In contrast, complaints of memory impairment were more frequent in the early post-menopause group (psleep were higher in the late post-menopausal group.

  20. Risk prediction for breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer in white women aged 50 y or older: derivation and validation from population-based cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Pfeiffer

    Full Text Available Breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers share some hormonal and epidemiologic risk factors. While several models predict absolute risk of breast cancer, there are few models for ovarian cancer in the general population, and none for endometrial cancer.Using data on white, non-Hispanic women aged 50+ y from two large population-based cohorts (the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial [PLCO] and the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study [NIH-AARP], we estimated relative and attributable risks and combined them with age-specific US-population incidence and competing mortality rates. All models included parity. The breast cancer model additionally included estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy (MHT use, other MHT use, age at first live birth, menopausal status, age at menopause, family history of breast or ovarian cancer, benign breast disease/biopsies, alcohol consumption, and body mass index (BMI; the endometrial model included menopausal status, age at menopause, BMI, smoking, oral contraceptive use, MHT use, and an interaction term between BMI and MHT use; the ovarian model included oral contraceptive use, MHT use, and family history or breast or ovarian cancer. In independent validation data (Nurses' Health Study cohort the breast and ovarian cancer models were well calibrated; expected to observed cancer ratios were 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96-1.04 for breast cancer and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.97-1.19 for ovarian cancer. The number of endometrial cancers was significantly overestimated, expected/observed = 1.20 (95% CI: 1.11-1.29. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs; discriminatory power were 0.58 (95% CI: 0.57-0.59, 0.59 (95% CI: 0.56-0.63, and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.66-0.70 for the breast, ovarian, and endometrial models, respectively.These models predict absolute risks for breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers from easily obtainable risk factors and may

  1. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system... Test Systems § 862.1155 Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. (a) Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system intended for the early detection of pregnancy—(1) Identification. A human...

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation and pretreatment with [D-Leu6,des-Gly10] luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide on developing rat ovarian follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; McMahon, A.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.

    1987-01-01

    To assess the effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, [D-Leu6,des-Gly10] luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide, in ameliorating the damage caused by ionizing radiation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist was administered to rats from day 22 to 37 of age in doses of 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 microgram/day or vehicle and the rats were sacrificed on day 44 of age. There were no effects on estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing, or follicle-stimulating hormone, nor an effect on ovarian follicle numbers or development. In separate experiments, rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in doses of 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, or 1.0 microgram/day were either irradiated or sham irradiated on day 30 and all groups sacrificed on day 44 of age. Irradiation produced a reduction in ovarian weight and an increase in ovarian follicular atresia. Pretreatment with the agonist prevented the reduction in ovarian weight and numbers of primordial and preantral follicles but not healthy or atretic antral follicles. Such putative radioprotection should be tested on actual reproductive performance

  3. Hormonal management of migraine at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Sances, Grazia; Detaddei, Silvia; Ornati, Alessandra; Chiovato, Luca; Polatti, Franco

    2009-06-01

    In this review, we underline the importance of linking migraine to reproductive stages for optimal management of such a common disease across the lifespan of women. Menopause has a variable effect on migraine depending on individual vulnerability to neuroendocrine changes induced by estrogen fluctuations and on the length of menopausal transition. Indeed, an association between estrogen 'milieu' and attacks of migraine is strongly supported by several lines of evidence. During the perimenopause, it is likely to observe a worsening of migraine, and a tailored hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) to minimize estrogen/progesterone imbalance may be effective. In the natural menopause, women experience a more favourable course of migraine in comparison with those who have surgical menopause. When severe climacteric symptoms are present, postmenopausal women may be treated with continuous HRT. Even tibolone may be useful when analgesic overuse is documented. However, the transdermal route of oestradiol administration in the lowest effective dose should be preferred to avoid potential vascular risk.

  4. The emergence of the menopause in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, A

    2003-06-01

    A total of 130 million Indian women are expected to live beyond the menopause into old age by 2015. The menopause is emerging as an issue owing to rapid globalization, urbanization, awareness and increased longevity in urban middle-aged Indian women, who are evolving as a homogeneous group. Improved economic conditions and education may cause the attitude of rural working women to be more positive towards the menopause. However, most remain oblivious of the short- and long-term implications of the morbid conditions associated with middle and old age, simply because of lack of awareness, and the unavailability or ever-increasing cost of the medical and social support systems. Evidence-based medicine is accessible to still only a few Indian women. Most menopausal women go untreated or use unproven alternative therapies.

  5. Challenges and opportunities to manage depression during the menopausal transition and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Claudio N; Frey, Benicio N

    2010-06-01

    Women are at a higher risk than men of developing depression and anxiety and such increased risk might be particularly associated with reproductive cycle events. Recent evidence suggests that the transition to menopause may constitute a window of vulnerability for some women for the development of new onset and recurrent depression. Several biological and environmental factors seem to be independent predictors or modulating factors for the occurrence of depression in menopausal women; they include the presence and severity of hot flushes, sleep disturbances, history of severe premenstrual syndrome or postpartum blues, stressful life events, history of depression, socioeconomic status, and use of hormones and psychotropic agents. The regulation of monoaminergic systems by ovarian hormones might explain, at least in part, the emergence of depressive symptoms and/or anxiety in biologically predisposed subpopulations. The use of transdermal estradiol, as well as serotonergic and noradrenergic antidepressants, is an efficacious strategy in the treatment of depression and vasomotor symptoms in symptomatic women in midlife. In this review, the authors discuss the existing evidence of a greater risk for the development of depression during the menopausal transition and the putative underlying mechanisms contributing to this window of vulnerability. Hormonal and nonhormonal treatment strategies for depression and anxiety in this particular population are critically examined, although more tailored treatment options are still needed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic recreational physical inactivity and epithelial ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    , weekly recreational physical activity were classified as inactive. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to estimate the ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between inactivity and EOC risk overall and by subgroups based upon histotype, menopausal status, race, and body mass......Background: Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive, and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk....... We conducted a pooled analysis of nine studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium to investigate the association between chronic recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. Methods: In accordance with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, women reporting no regular...

  7. Premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persani Luca

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Premature ovarian failure (POF is a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years (secondary amenorrhea. It is a heterogeneous disorder affecting approximately 1% of women e.g. Turner syndrome represent the major cause of primary amenorrhea associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Despite the description of several candidate genes, the cause of POF remains undetermined in the vast majority of the cases. Management includes substitution of the hormone defect by estrogen/progestin preparations. The only solution presently available for the fertility defect in women with absent follicular reserve is ovum donation.

  8. The effectiveness of natural and gonadotropin stimulation of young gilts

    OpenAIRE

    Jan DYBAŁA; Wojciech KAPELAŃSKI; JOANNA WIŚNIEWSKA; Aleksandra CEBULSKA

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of stimulation of gilts puberty by natural method and with gonadotropins. The results of reproduction parameters of gilts were also compared. Gilts were also supported by diet with easilly assimilated carbohydrates. The study was carried out on the group of 80 gilts which were divided into 2 groups (A and B) according to the method of inducing puberty: by using mature boar or gonadotropins eCG and hCG. In each group were isolated two subgr...

  9. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  10. Dental considerations in pregnancy and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Chaveli López, Begonya; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The present study offers a literature review of the main oral complications observed in women during pregnancy and menopause, and describes the different dental management protocols used during these periods and during lactation, according to the scientific literature. To this effect, a PubMed-Medline search was made, using the following key word combinations: “pregnant and dentistry”, “lactation and dentistry”, “postmenopausal and dentistry”, “menopausal and dentistry” and “oral ...

  11. Lycium chinense Improves Post-Menopausal Obesity via Regulation of PPAR-γ and Estrogen Receptor-α/β Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Eun-Jung; Choi, You Yeon; Hong, Jongki; Yang, Woong Mo

    2017-01-01

    The fruit of Lycium chinense Miller (Solanaceae) is used as a functional food and a medicinal herb for treating many specific health concerns. Weight gain induced by estrogen deficiency is a problem for post-menopausal women around the globe. The present study investigates the effects of aqueous extract of L. chinense (LC) on post-menopausal obesity. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and fed on high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks to induce post-menopausal obesity. LC extract (1[Formula: see text]mg/kg and 10[Formula: see text]mg/kg) was orally administrated for 6 weeks with continuous HFD feeding. Ovarian adipose tissues and uterus were weighed. Serum triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fasting glucose levels were analyzed. The expressions of adipocyte-specific factors and estrogen receptors (ERs) were investigated. Additionally, lipid accumulation was confirmed in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Increased body weight due to post-menopausal obesity was ameliorated about 14.7% and 17.76% by treatment of 1[Formula: see text]mg/kg and 10[Formula: see text]mg/kg LC, respectively. LC treatment reduced both of serum lipid and fasting blood glucose levels. Adipocyte hypertrophy and fatty liver were ameliorated in LC-treated groups. In LC-treated adipocyte cells, lipid accumulation was significantly inhibited. The expression of perilipin in adipose tissues was decreased by LC. In addition, expression of PPAR-[Formula: see text] protein was down-regulated in adipose tissues and differentiated adipocytes, while GLUT4 expression was increased in adipose tissues by LC treatment. Moreover, LC treatment up-regulated the expressions of ER-[Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] accompanied with increased uterine weight. These results showed the ameliorative effects of LC on overweight after menopause. Post-menopausal obesity may be improved by LC treatment.

  12. Erlotinib Plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. Insomnia in women approaching menopause: Beyond perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Fiona C; Willoughby, Adrian R; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Colrain, Ian M; de Zambotti, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    The menopausal transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40-60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43-57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopausal transition. Sleep quality was assessed with two weeks of sleep diaries and one laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording. In multiple regression models controlling for menopausal transition stage, menstrual cycle phase, depression symptoms, and presence of objective hot flashes, a diagnosis of insomnia predicted PSG-measured total sleep time (p insomnia had, on average, 43.5 min less PSG-measured sleep time (p insomnia reported more WASO (p = 0.002), more night-to-night variability in WASO (p insomnia in the approach to menopause have a measurable sleep deficit, with almost 50% of the sample having less than 6h of sleep. Compromised sleep that develops in the context of the menopausal transition should be addressed, taking into account unique aspects of menopause like hot flashes, to avoid the known negative health consequences associated with insufficient sleep and insomnia in midlife women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Urinary incontinence: the role of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutnovsky, Gerda; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman; Mann, Kristy Pamela; Dietz, Hans P

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of menopause and hormone therapy on the symptoms and signs of stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. Records of women who attended a tertiary urogynecological unit were reviewed retrospectively. A standardized interview included evaluations of symptoms, menopause age (ie, time since last menstrual period or onset of menopausal symptoms), current or previous hormone use, and visual analogue scales for bother. Multichannel urodynamics, including urethral pressure profilometry and determination of abdominal leak point pressure, was performed. Of 382 women seen during the inclusion period, 62% were postmenopausal. Current systemic or local hormone use was reported by 7% and 6%, respectively. Two hundred eighty-eight women (76%) reported symptoms of stress urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 5.7, and 273 women (72%) reported symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, with a mean bother of 6.4. On univariate analysis, symptoms and bother of urge incontinence were significantly related to menopause age, whereas this relationship was not found for stress incontinence. After calendar age was controlled for, length of menopause showed no significant relationship with any symptom or sign of urinary incontinence. Hormone deficiency after menopause is unlikely to play a major role in urinary incontinence.

  15. Value of Post-transfer Day-12 Beta Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels for Pregnancy Outcome Prediction of Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoğlu, İnci; Demir, Berfu; Ertürk Aksakal, Sezin; Kaplanoğlu, İskender; Mollamahmutoğlu, Leyla

    2017-09-29

    Several markers were studied previously in order to predict the pregnancy outcome of assisted reproductive techniques; however, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin was found to be the most predictive marker. To evaluate the value of serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin levels in discriminating biochemical and clinical pregnancies 12 days after embryo transfer, while determining the factors predicting ongoing pregnancy was established as the secondary aim. Retrospective cross-sectional study. A total of 445 pregnant cycles were retrospectively analysed in 2359 embryo transfer cycles. Patients were divided into two groups according to the outcome of pregnancy: biochemical and clinical. The cut-off value of beta human chorionic gonadotropin levels on day 12 in predicting clinical pregnancies was 86.8 IU/mL with 65.1% sensitivity and 74.7% specificity [CI: 0.76 (0.71-0.81). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed different cut-off values for embryo transfer days (57 mIU/mL for day 3 embryo transfer CI: 0.59-0.79 and 87 mIU/mL for day 5 embryo transfer, CI: 0.74-0.86). Subgroup analysis of clinical pregnancies revealed a significant difference between ongoing pregnancies and early fetal losses regarding duration of infertility (81.3±54.4 vs. 100.2±62.2 months), serum oestradiol on hCG day (2667.4±1276.4 vs. 2094.6±1260.5 pg/mL), number of transferred embryos (1.9±0.8 vs. 1.5±0.7) and the prevalence of diminished ovarian reserve as an indication (2.3% vs 12.2%). Beta human chorionic gonadotropin levels on day 12 following embryo transfer provide an important parameter for the prediction of clinical pregnancy; however, other stimulation parameters are indicated in the prediction of ongoing pregnancies.

  16. The significance of monitoring sex hormones levels after ovarian tissue auto-transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiuwei; Xu Peizhen; Yu Bin; Zhou Hong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of monitoring serum sex hormones levels after ovarian tissue auto-transplantation. Methods: Twenty-five patients with stage IV recurrent endometriosis after one or two times of conservative surgeries underwent radical surgery. Their ovarian tissue fragments were transplanted to greater omentum. Serum follicle-stimulation hormone (FSH), Luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E 2 ) levels were measured monthly since fourth month post-operatively. After E 2 was increased, based body temperature was measured and vaginal hormone cytology was examined weekly for maturation index (MI) to assess the ovulatory phase and luteal phase in those with viable ovarian tissues. Serum levels of FSH, LH and E 2 in ovulatory phase and luteal phase were determined 20 women with viable ovarian tissues for three cycles as well as in 20 normal sexually mature women and 20 operative menopausal women. Results: There were 12 cases who had increasing of E 2 at four months post operatively and 8 cases more at six months. The other 5 cases with low serum E 2 levels and high FSH and LH levels at 12 months were designated as failures. The survival rate of transplanted ovarian tissue was 80.0%. There were no significant differences of the serum FSH, LH and E 2 levels in ovulatory phase and luteal phase between women with viable grafted ovarian tissues and normal sexually mature women. Conclusion: Monitoring of sex hormones is a good means to assess the viability of the transplanted ovarian tissue fragments

  17. Bone mineral density and fractures after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in women at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, Ingrid E.; Abma, Elske Marije; Westrik, Iris G.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van der Veer, Eveline; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Mourits, Marian J. E.

    AIM: Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) reduces ovarian cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers. RRSO is assumed to decrease bone mineral density (BMD) and increase fracture risk more than natural menopause. We aimed to compare BMD and fracture incidence after premenopausal RRSO to general

  18. Impact of Exogenous Gonadotropin Stimulation on Circulatory and Follicular Fluid Cytokine Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ellissa Baskind

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The natural cycle is the prototype to which we aspire to emulate in assisted reproduction techniques. Increasing evidence is emerging that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH with exogenous gonadotropins may be detrimental to oogenesis, embryo quality, and endometrial receptivity. This research aimed at assessing the impact of COH on the intrafollicular milieu by comparing follicular fluid (FF cytokine profiles during stimulated in vitro fertilization (IVF and modified natural cycle (MNC IVF. Methods. Ten women undergoing COH IVF and 10 matched women undergoing MNC IVF were recruited for this pilot study. 40 FF cytokine concentrations from individual follicles and plasma were measured by fluid-phase multiplex immunoassay. Demographic/cycle/cytokine data were compared and correlations between cytokines were computed. Results. No significant differences were found between COH and MNC groups for patient and cycle demographics, including outcome. Overall mean FF cytokine levels were higher in the MNC group for 29/40 cytokines, significantly so for leukaemia inhibitory factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1α. Furthermore, FF MNC cytokine correlations were significantly stronger than for COH data. Conclusions. These findings suggest that COH perturbs intrafollicular cytokine networks, in terms of both cytokine levels and their interrelationships. This may impact oocyte maturation/fertilization and embryo developmental competence.

  19. The effects of perceived stress and attitudes toward menopause and aging on symptoms of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Marcianna; Kennedy, Holly Powell; Beyene, Yewoubdar; Taylor, Diana; Gilliss, Catherine; Lee, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study of midlife women, the aim of this investigation was to describe the intensity of menopausal symptoms in relation to the level of perceived stress in a woman's life and her attitudes toward menopause and aging. Data were collected on 347 women between 40 and 50 years of age in Northern California who began the study while premenopausal. Women self-identified as African American, European American, or Mexican/Central American. Data collected over three time points in the first 12 months were used for this analysis. An investigator-developed tool for the perception of specific types of stress was used. Attitudes toward menopause and aging were measured using the Attitudes Toward Menopause and Attitude Toward Aging scales. Attitudes toward aging and menopause, perceived stress, and income were related to intensity of symptoms. There was no ethnic group difference in perceived stress or attitude toward menopause. However, European and African Americans had a more positive attitude toward aging than Mexican/Central Americans. A lower income, higher perceived stress, a more negative attitude toward aging, and a more positive attitude toward menopause influenced menopausal symptom experience. Copyright 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Manufacturing Menopause: An Analysis of the Portrayal of Menopause and Information Content on Pharmaceutical Web Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Deborah Hile

    2010-01-01

    Consumer-targeted prescription drug advertising serves as an interesting lens through which we can examine the portrayal of menopause in online drug advertisements. The aim of this study was to explore the portrayal of menopause on web sites sponsored by pharmaceutical companies for hormone therapies (HT). To unravel this question, a qualitative…

  1. Type of Menopause, Age at Menopause, and Risk of Developing Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianyi; Lin, Brian M; Redline, Susan; Curhan, Gary C; Hu, Frank B; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2018-01-22

    Despite established sex differences and longstanding hypotheses of sex hormones in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) etiology, no studies have evaluated type of menopause and age at menopause, which affect postmenopausal hormonal milieu, in relation to OSA risk in women. We followed 50,473 postmenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) between 2002-2012 and 53,827 postmenopausal women from the NHSII between 1995-2013, with 1,712 and 2,560 incident OSA diagnoses, respectively. Compared with natural menopause, the pooled HR for OSA was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.17, 1.38) for surgical menopause by hysterectomy/oophorectomy. The association remained the same after further accounting for age at menopause (HR=1.26; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.38). The risk associated with surgical menopause was higher in non-obese women as well as women who never used hormone therapy (P-interactionmenopause was associated with higher OSA risk prior to adjustment for type of menopause (HR comparing menopause was independently associated with higher OSA risk in postmenopausal women. Our results provide additional evidence for a role of sex hormones, particularly abrupt hormonal changes, in modulating OSA risk. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Current smoking at menopause rather than duration determines the onset of natural menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselt, Kristel M.; Kok, Helen S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; te Velde, Egbert R.; Pearson, Peter L.; Peeters, Petra H. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Smoking has frequently been associated with early menopause. However, studies of this association have been inconclusive with regard to duration and intensity of smoking. A major problem in analyzing the effect of smoking duration on menopausal age is that both exposure and outcome are

  3. Prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms and associated factors across menopause status in Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Gyeyoon; Ahn, Younjhin; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Lim, Joong-Yeon; Kang, Danbee; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Jiin; Choi, Yuni; Cho, Juhee; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms experienced by Korean women aged 44 to 56 years and their associated factors. A cross-sectional study was performed on 2,201 women aged 44 to 56 years in health checkup centers between November 2012 and March 2013. The 29-item Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire was used to assess vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, and sexual symptoms related to menopause. The guidelines for the classification of reproductive aging stages proposed at the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop were used. Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with severity of menopause symptoms. Among participants, 42.6% were premenopausal, 36.7% were perimenopausal, and 20.7% were postmenopausal. Although physical symptoms were the most severe menopause symptoms experienced by premenopausal and perimenopausal women, postmenopausal women reported sexual symptoms as the most bothersome. The mean scores for each domain increased from the premenopausal period through the postmenopausal period (P for trend menopause symptoms (P menopause than inactive women. Postmenopausal women experience the most severe symptoms. Obesity and physical activity are the main modifiable factors associated with symptom severity. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of physical activity promotion and weight control interventions on preventing menopause symptoms in Korean women.

  4. Age of menopause and determinants of menopause age: A PAN India survey by IMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Ahuja

    2016-01-01

    Results: Average age of menopause of an Indian woman is 46.2 years much less than their Western counter parts (51 years. A definite rural and urban division was also seen. There was a correlation between the age of menopause and social and economic status, married status, and parity status.

  5. MMP3 in Comparison to CA 125, HE4 and the ROMA Algorithm in Differentiation of Ovarian Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymbaluk-Ploska, Aneta; Chudecka-Glaz, Anita; Surowiec, Anna; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Machalinski, Boguslaw; Menkiszak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly malignant neoplasm with high mortality rates. Research to identify markers facilitating early detection has been pursued for many years. Currently, diagnosis is based on the CA 125 and HE4 markers, as well as the ROMA algorithm. The search continues for new proteins that meet the criteria of good markers A total of 90 patients were included in the present study, allocated into: group 1, ovarian cancer, with 29 patients; group 2, endometrial cysts, with 30s; and group 3, simple ovarian cysts, with 31. Following histopathological verification, the CA 125, HE4, and metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) levels were determined and the ROMA algorithm was calculated for all patients. The mean concentrations of all determined proteins, CA 125, HE4, and MMP3, as well as the ROMA values, were significantly higher in group 1 (ovarian cancer) compared to group 3 (simple ovarian cysts). The highest significant differences for the CA 125 levels (CA 125, HE4, and MMP3 levels, as well as the ROMA values ( 0,93 / 0,96 / 0,75 / 0,98). After removing the post-menopausal patients, the MMP3 AUC value for ovarian cancer vs. benign ovarian cysts increased to 0.814. For post-menopausal women, the MMP3 AUC value for ovarian cancer vs. endometrial cysts was 0.843. As suggested by the results above, both the CA 125 and HE4 markers, as well as the ROMA algorithm, meet the criteria of a good diagnostic test for ovarian cancer. MMP3 seems to meet the criteria of a good diagnostic test, particularly in postmenopausal women; however, it is not superior to the tests used to date.

  6. Patterns of ovarian morphology in polycystic ovary syndrome: a study utilising magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Thomas M.; Smith, Rachel; Marland, Anne; Wass, John A.H. [Churchill Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Oxford (United Kingdom); Alvey, Christopher [John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford MRI Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); Greenslade, Tessa [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gooding, Mark [University of Oxford, Department of Engineering, Oxford (United Kingdom); Barber, Debbie; Child, Tim [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oxford (United Kingdom); McCarthy, Mark I. [Churchill Hospital, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Oxford (United Kingdom); Franks, Stephen [Imperial College (Hammersmith Campus), Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology, London (United Kingdom); Golding, Stephen J. [John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford MRI Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Department of Engineering, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate and compare MRI-based ovarian morphology in groups of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and controls. All PCOS cases (n = 44) had oligo-amenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism irrespective of ovarian morphology, and fulfilled NIH/Rotterdam diagnostic criteria for PCOS. All control women (n = 40) had normal menses and normoandrogenaemia. All subjects were of white British/Irish origin and pre-menopausal. Group comparisons were based on independent-sample t tests. Polycystic ovarian morphology was defined by at least 12 follicles 2-9 mm in diameter and/or an ovarian volume greater than 10 cm{sup 3}. Ovarian morphology differed significantly in PCOS cases and controls (follicle number geometric mean [SD range] 18.6 [9.9, 35.0] vs 6.6 [3.1, 14.2], unadjusted P = 1.3 x 10{sup -16}; calculated ovarian volume 8.8 cm{sup 3} [5.0, 15.5] vs 5.1 cm{sup 3} [2.5, 10.3], unadjusted P = 3.0 x 10{sup -7}; peripheral follicle location in 55% vs 18% of ovaries, P = 7.9 x 10{sup -6}; visible central ovarian stroma in 61% vs 24% of ovaries, P = 2.3 x 10{sup -5}). Follicle number and calculated ovarian volume were not concordant with clinical/biochemical assignment of PCOS/control status in 36 (23%) and 52 (34%) of ovaries, respectively. Ovarian morphology overlaps in PCOS cases and controls, emphasising the importance of considering clinical/biochemical presentation together with imaging ovarian morphology in the diagnosis of PCOS. (orig.)

  7. Patterns of ovarian morphology in polycystic ovary syndrome: a study utilising magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Thomas M.; Smith, Rachel; Marland, Anne; Wass, John A.H.; Alvey, Christopher; Greenslade, Tessa; Gooding, Mark; Barber, Debbie; Child, Tim; McCarthy, Mark I.; Franks, Stephen; Golding, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate and compare MRI-based ovarian morphology in groups of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and controls. All PCOS cases (n = 44) had oligo-amenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism irrespective of ovarian morphology, and fulfilled NIH/Rotterdam diagnostic criteria for PCOS. All control women (n = 40) had normal menses and normoandrogenaemia. All subjects were of white British/Irish origin and pre-menopausal. Group comparisons were based on independent-sample t tests. Polycystic ovarian morphology was defined by at least 12 follicles 2-9 mm in diameter and/or an ovarian volume greater than 10 cm 3 . Ovarian morphology differed significantly in PCOS cases and controls (follicle number geometric mean [SD range] 18.6 [9.9, 35.0] vs 6.6 [3.1, 14.2], unadjusted P = 1.3 x 10 -16 ; calculated ovarian volume 8.8 cm 3 [5.0, 15.5] vs 5.1 cm 3 [2.5, 10.3], unadjusted P = 3.0 x 10 -7 ; peripheral follicle location in 55% vs 18% of ovaries, P = 7.9 x 10 -6 ; visible central ovarian stroma in 61% vs 24% of ovaries, P = 2.3 x 10 -5 ). Follicle number and calculated ovarian volume were not concordant with clinical/biochemical assignment of PCOS/control status in 36 (23%) and 52 (34%) of ovaries, respectively. Ovarian morphology overlaps in PCOS cases and controls, emphasising the importance of considering clinical/biochemical presentation together with imaging ovarian morphology in the diagnosis of PCOS. (orig.)

  8. Pengaruh Konsep Diri Wanita terhadap Penyesuaian Diri pada Masa Menopause di Kota Binjai

    OpenAIRE

    Sibero, Jitasari Tarigan

    2017-01-01

    Menopause is the cessation of menstruation. At menopause there is a change of physical and psychological. The number of grievances felt women during menopause can cause high stress. Menopausal women will experience emotional instability if they are difficult to adjust to changes that occur during menopause. The totality of self adjustment ability of menopausal women on menopause and social environment influenced by the the self concept. When individuals are experiencing menopause have a posit...

  9. Oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors and risk of ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilidis, K K; Allen, N E; Key, T J; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Bakken, K; Lund, E; Fournier, A; Overvad, K; Hansen, L; Tjønneland, A; Fedirko, V; Rinaldi, S; Romieu, I; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Engel, P; Kaaks, R; Schütze, M; Steffen, A; Bamia, C; Trichopoulou, A; Zylis, D; Masala, G; Pala, V; Galasso, R; Tumino, R; Sacerdote, C; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van Duijnhoven, F J B; Braem, M G M; Onland-Moret, N C; Gram, I T; Rodríguez, L; Travier, N; Sánchez, M-J; Huerta, J M; Ardanaz, E; Larrañaga, N; Jirström, K; Manjer, J; Idahl, A; Ohlson, N; Khaw, K-T; Wareham, N; Mouw, T; Norat, T; Riboli, E

    2011-10-25

    It is well established that parity and use of oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the associations with other reproductive variables are less clear. We examined the associations of oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors with ovarian cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 327,396 eligible women, 878 developed ovarian cancer over an average of 9 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models stratified by centre and age, and adjusted for smoking status, body mass index, unilateral ovariectomy, simple hysterectomy, menopausal hormone therapy, and mutually adjusted for age at menarche, age at menopause, number of full-term pregnancies and duration of oral contraceptive use. Women who used oral contraceptives for 10 or more years had a significant 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.75) lower risk compared with users of 1 year or less (P-trend, cancer (>52 vs ≤ 45 years: HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.06-1.99; P-trend, 0.02). Age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, incomplete pregnancies and breastfeeding were not associated with risk. This study shows a strong protective association of oral contraceptives and parity with ovarian cancer risk, a higher risk with a late age at menopause, and no association with other reproductive factors.

  10. South African Menopause Society revised consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidozzi, Franco; Alperstein, A; Bagratee, J S; Dalmeyer, P; Davey, M; de Villiers, T J; Hirschowitz, S; Kopenhager, T; Moodley, S P; Roos, P; Shaw, A; Shimange, O; Smith, T; Thomas, C; Titus, J; van der Spuy, Z; van Waart, J

    2014-06-19

    The South African Menopause Society (SAMS) consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy (HT) 2014 is a revision of the SAMS Council consensus statement on menopausal HT published in the SAMJ in May 2007. Information presented in the previous statement has been re-evaluated and new evidence has been incorporated. While the recommendations pertaining to HT remain similar to those in the previous statement, the 2014 revision includes a wider range of clinical benefits for HT, the inclusion of non-hormonal alternatives such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors for the management of vasomotor symptoms, and an appraisal of bioidentical hormones and complementary medicines used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. New preparations that are likely to be more commonly used in the future are also mentioned. The revised statement emphasises that commencing HT during the 'therapeutic window of opportunity' maximises the benefit-to-risk profile of therapy in symptomatic menopausal women.

  11. Discourses on menopause--Part II: How do women talk about menopause?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte; Gannik, Dorte Effersøe

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe which of the different available discourses women relate to as revealed in the way they talk about menopause. We use a discourse analytic approach, which implies that meaning is ascribed to things according to how we talk about them. Twenty-four menopausal...... women from Denmark were interviewed. They were selected to cover a broad spectrum of Danish women with different menopausal experiences and social background factors. Seven previously identified discourses could be found in the interviews, though to varying degrees from woman to woman. Nearly all women...... the menopause was talked about almost became kaleidoscopic when images speedily changed from the decrepit osteoporotic woman or a woman with lack of vitality and sex-appeal to a healthy and strong woman with control over her body and self. Since many women contact doctors in relation to menopause, and since...

  12. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer, ovarian cancer, colon cancer, or endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus ) Personal history of breast cancer Mutations in BRCA1 ... If a woman is thought to have ovarian cancer, surgery usually is recommended to remove the uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes . Lymph nodes and tissues ...

  13. Ectopic ovarian pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, P.S.; Jatoi, N.; Memon, R.A.; Sachdev, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A case of ectopic ovarian pregnancy is presented occurring in a 24 years old woman after natural conception. The clinical diagnosis was ruptured tubal pregnancy. Gross findings were suggestive of ruptured corpus luteum cyst on exploration. The histopathological examination of specimen brought forward the diagnosis of ovarian pregnancy. (author)

  14. The neuropeptide Gonadotropin-releasing hormone modifies the spontaneous muscular contraction in the earthworm: Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis Quintanar, J; Gutiérrez-García, Karina; Castillo-Hernández, Luis

    2011-12-01

    We investigated whether the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone affects the spontaneous muscular contraction in the earthworm Eisenia foetida. In addition, we investigated the presence of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in ventral nerve cord by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone induced a significant increase on both amplitude and muscular tone and decrease in the frequency of spontaneous muscular contraction. We found the presence of immunoreactive material to Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the ventral nerve cord, likewise the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression. In conclusion, the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone modifies the spontaneous muscular contraction in E. foetida and these effects can be due to the activation of the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

  15. Circulating Prolactin Levels and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenen, Tess V.; Arslan, Alan A.; Lokshin, Anna E.; Liu, Mengling; Lundin, Eva; Koenig, Karen L; Berrino, Franco; Hallmans, Goran; Idahl, Annika; Krogh, Vittorio; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Marrangoni, Adele; Muti, Paola; Nolen, Brian M.; Ohlson, Nina; Shore, Roy E.; Sieri, Sabina; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Indirect evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies suggests that prolactin may be involved in ovarian cancer development. However, the relationship between circulating prolactin levels and risk of ovarian cancer is unknown. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of 230 cases and 432 individually-matched controls within three prospective cohorts to evaluate whether pre-diagnostic circulating prolactin is associated with subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. We also assessed whether lifestyle and reproductive factors are associated with circulating prolactin among controls. Results Prolactin levels were significantly lower among post- vs. pre-menopausal women, parous vs. nulliparous women, and past vs. never users of oral contraceptives in our cross-sectional analysis of controls. In our nested case-control study, we observed a non-significant positive association between circulating prolactin and ovarian cancer risk (ORQ4vsQ1: 1.56, 95% CI: 0.94, 2.63, p-trend: 0.15). Our findings were similar in multivariate-adjusted models and in the subgroup of women who donated blood ≥5 years prior to diagnosis. We observed a significant positive association between prolactin and risk for the subgroup of women with BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (ORQ4vsQ1: 3.10, 95% CI: 1.39, 6.90), but not for women with BMI prolactin may be associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer, particularly in overweight/obese women. Factors associated with reduced risk of ovarian cancer, such as parity and use of oral contraceptives, were associated with lower prolactin levels, which suggests that modulation of prolactin may be a mechanism underlying their association with risk. PMID:23378139

  16. Influence of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on the Fertility Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out on the influence of human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCG) on the fertility rate of rabbit does under artificial insemination. The rabbit does (7-8 months old) were used for the trial. The hCG was administered to the rabbit does at varying doses: 0, 50, 100 and 150 I.U representing ...

  17. The effects of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) injection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the importance of lambing rate to profitability of sheep holders, this trial investigated the effects of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) injection a day prior or at controlled intravaginal drug-releasing device (CIDR) removal on multiple births in synchronized Afshari ewes. 16 cycling, multiparous fat-tailed ...

  18. The effectiveness of natural and gonadotropin stimulation of young gilts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan DYBAŁA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of stimulation of gilts puberty by natural method and with gonadotropins. The results of reproduction parameters of gilts were also compared. Gilts were also supported by diet with easilly assimilated carbohydrates. The study was carried out on the group of 80 gilts which were divided into 2 groups (A and B according to the method of inducing puberty: by using mature boar or gonadotropins eCG and hCG. In each group were isolated two subgroups in which gilts were mated in first or second estrus (A1, A2 and B1, B2. The first estrus occured earlier in gilts induced naturally. More numerous litters were obtained from gilts mated in the second estrus independently of method of puberty stimulation. The highest effectiveness of mating was obtained in gilts induced by gonadotropins in second estrus and the lowest also in gilts stimulated by gonadotropins but mated in first estrus. More piglets for 21st day were reared by gilts mated in second estrus independently on puberty induction method.

  19. A procedure for the radioimmunochemical determination of human chorionic gonadotropin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, M.; Rauch, P.; Galoci, J.; Matejka, P.; Machan, V.

    1989-01-01

    In the procedure, an antibody against human chorionic gonadotropin is immobilized on activated porous glass of 3-30 μm particle size, and this system is treated with chorionic gonadotropin labelled, e.g., with 125 I, in a volume ratio of 2:1 to 3:1 with respect to the immobilized antibody. The blood serum or urine sample analyzed is then added in a volume ratio of 1:2 to 1:3 with respect to the final mixture. After incubation for 0.5-2 hrs, the immunochemical complex is centrifuged and the human chorionic gonadotropin content is determined radiometrically. For the immobilization, the glass substrate is activated by treatment with 5-50% gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and, subsequently, with 5-15% glutaraldehyde, or by treatment with a 10-20% solution of a transition metal chloride (e.g. TiCl 3 in concentrated HCl), followed by hydrolysis with water. The solution of the labelled chorionic gonadotropin can be dyed with saturated LG 200% red in a concentration of 30-60 mg/1 buffer, and the suspension with the immobilized antibody can be dyed with saturated L4G 300% blue in a concentration of 10-20 mg/1 buffer. (P.A.)

  20. Changes in bone resorption across the menopause transition: effects of reproductive hormones, body size, and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, MaryFran R; Zheng, Huiyong; Greendale, Gail A; Neer, Robert M; Cauley, Jane A; Ellis, Jayne; Johnson, Sarah; Finkelstein, Joel S

    2013-07-01

    Our objective was to characterize changes in bone resorption in relation to the final menstrual period (FMP), reproductive hormones, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity. Urinary type I collagen N-telopeptide (NTX), estradiol, and FSH levels were measured annually for up to 8 years spanning the menopause transition in 918 African American, Chinese, Japanese, or Caucasian women. Urinary NTX began to increase sharply about 2 years before the FMP, reaching its peak level about 1 to 1.5 years after the FMP. NTX levels declined modestly from 2 to 6 years after the FMP but remained about 20% higher than before the menopause transition. The sharp rise in FSH occurred in conjunction with a sharp decline in estradiol and shortly after FSH levels began increasing rapidly. The mean increase in urinary NTX across the menopause transition was greatest in women with BMI 30 kg/m². Increases in NTX were greatest in Japanese women and smallest in African Americans. These differences were attenuated, but not eliminated, when analyses were adjusted for covariates, particularly BMI. During the menopause transition, a decline in ovarian function beginning about 2 years before the FMP is followed by an increase in bone resorption and subsequently by bone loss. The magnitude of the increase in bone resorption is inversely associated with BMI. Ethnic differences in changes in bone resorption are attenuated, but not eliminated, by adjustment for BMI. Ethnic differences in BMI, and corresponding ethnic differences in bone resorption, appear to account for much of the ethnic variation in perimenopausal bone loss.

  1. Age of menopause and determinants of menopause age: A PAN India survey by IMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    Age of menopause is a very important biomarker of not only the loss of fertility but also an increased risk for various mid-life diseases and problems. Many of these diseases can be prevented by timely intervention of lifestyle modification, menopausal hormone therapy, or other supplementations such as calcium, Vitamin D, and micronutrients. In India age of menopause is less than our counterparts in the Western world. This means that the fertility potential of Indian women starts compromising early, so we need to start with the preventive measures much early. Earlier studies in India have been done on a limited population, and small sample size and not all the determinants of menopause age were considered. Survey was conducted in 21 chapters of Indian Menopause Society and all regions South, West, East and North were covered. There were 23 Medical practitioners who participated. Consent was taken and inclusion and exclusion criteria was set. Set questions were asked The questionnaire comprised of identification of the participants' religion, education, and various socioeconomic parameters. They were also inquired about their marital and parity status, abortion, or contraceptive use. The menopausal women were asked their menopause age and whether it was natural or surgical. The perimenopausal women were asked to enlist the date of their last period. All women with <1 year to menopause were classified as perimenopausal. The height, weight, and waist circumference were noted for all the women, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The women were also inquired about their food habits and social habits including alcohol consumption or smoking. Hence, this study was planned as a PAN India study. Average age of menopause of an Indian woman is 46.2 years much less than their Western counter parts (51 years). A definite rural and urban division was also seen. There was a correlation between the age of menopause and social and economic status, married status, and parity

  2. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  3. Ovarian reserve parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, J G; Forman, Julie Lyng; Pinborg, Anja

    2012-01-01

    2-5 of the menstrual cycle or during withdrawal bleeding, blood sampling and transvaginal sonography was performed. After adjusting for age, ovarian reserve parameters were lower among users than among non-users of hormonal contraception: serum AMH concentration by 29.8% (95% CI 19.9 to 38...... was observed between duration of hormonal-contraception use and ovarian reserve parameters. No dose-response relation was found between the dose of ethinyloestradiol and AMH or AFC. This study indicates that ovarian reserve markers are lower in women using sex steroids for contraception. Thus, AMH...... concentration and AFC may not retain their accuracy as predictors of ovarian reserve in women using hormonal contraception. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentration is an indirect marker of the number of small follicles in the ovary and thereby the ovarian reserve. The AMH concentration is now widely...

  4. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrizia Ripa,1 Raffaele Ornello,1 Diana Degan,1 Cindy Tiseo,1 Janet Stewart,2 Francesca Pistoia,1 Antonio Carolei,1 Simona Sacco1 1Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, Institute of Neurology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 2Psychology Division, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland, UK Abstract: Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. Keywords: headache, female, menstrual cycle, sex hormones

  5. Multiple metastases from ovarian cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most common ovarian tumours. Ovarian cancer affects women in the age group >60 years much more frequently than younger women. At the time of diagnosis, cancer will already have spread beyond the ovaries in approximately 75% of cases. We report a case of epithelial ovarian ...

  6. Dienogest treatment after ovarian endometrioma removal in infertile women prior to IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Valeria; Kogan, Igor; Yarmolinskaya, Maria; Niauri, Dariko; Gzgzyan, Alexandr; Aylamazyan, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Severe forms of genital endometriosis are known to be associated with infertility and its subsequent treatment failure. Both gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs (a-GnRH) and dienogest have been suggested as additional hormone therapy for patients with endometriomas. However, the result of hormonal suppression before an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle remains undetermined. A prospective cohort study of 144 infertile women planning IVF after laparoscopic surgery of ovarian endometriomas was conducted at our department in 2012-2015. Patients were divided into three groups: group I (N = 38) with dienogest course, group II (N = 70) with a-GnRH group III (N = 70) without any hormonal therapy within 6 months preceding IVF. The study groups did not differ by removed endometriomas size and ovarian reserve indicators. The gonadotropin dose per Cycle was higher, while the number of retrieved oocytes was lower in group III patients (p dienogest pretreatment, clinical pregnancy rate was 2.5 times (44.7% versus 16.7%, p = .012) and delivery rate - three times higher (36.8% versus 11.1%, p = .013) as compared with those from group III. The present study confirms the necessity of pre-cycle medical interventions in women with ovarian forms of endometriosis undergoing IVF. We suggest dienogest to be possibly more efficient treatment option for this kind of patients.

  7. Predicting and preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS: the need for individualized not standardized treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiedler Klaus

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS is the most serious complication of controlled ovarian stimulation (COS as part of assisted reproductive technologies (ART. While the safety and efficacy of ART is well established, physicians should always be aware of the risk of OHSS in patients undergoing COS, as it can be fatal. This article will briefly present the pathophysiology of OHSS, including the key role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, to provide the foundation for an overview of current techniques for the prevention of OHSS. Risk factors and predictive factors for OHSS will be presented, as recognizing these risk factors and individualizing the COS protocol appropriately is the key to the primary prevention of OHSS, as the benefits and risks of each COS strategy vary among individuals. Individualized COS (iCOS could effectively eradicate OHSS, and the identification of hormonal, functional and genetic markers of ovarian response will facilitate iCOS. However, if iCOS is not properly applied, various preventive measures can be instituted once COS has begun, including cancelling the cycle, coasting, individualizing the human chorionic gonadotropin trigger dose or using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist (for those using a GnRH antagonist protocol, the use of intravenous fluids at the time of oocyte retrieval, and cryopreserving/vitrifying all embryos for subsequent transfer in an unstimulated cycle. Some of these techniques have been widely adopted, despite the scarcity of data from randomized clinical trials to support their use.

  8. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriquez, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  9. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo C

    2004-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  10. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  11. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo C

    2005-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  12. Characterization of the Chicken Ovarian Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodriguez, Gustavo

    2003-01-01

    .... Unlike other ovarian cancer models, which require experimental induction of ovarian tumors, chickens develop ovarian adenocarcinoma spontaneously, with an incidence ranging from 13 to 40 percent...

  13. Medical management of an ovarian ectopic pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Ozer; Erkan, Mustafa Melih; Ozbey, Ertugrul Gazi; Arslan, Deniz

    2015-12-20

    Primary ovarian ectopic pregnancy is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy which has an estimated prevalence ranging from 1:7000 to 1:70,000 accounting for almost 3 % of all ectopic cases. Here we report the case of a 25-year-old woman who presented to our clinic with abdominal pain, 6 weeks' delay of menstruation and 3 days of vaginal bleeding, whose transvaginal ultrasonography showed an ectopic gestational sac with yolk sac inside, in her right ovary. This case shows that early diagnosis is very important particularly in places like the Sub-Saharan region of Africa. A 25-year-old African woman was referred to our clinic with 6 weeks' delay of menstruation, frequent increasing abdominal pain and 3 days of vaginal bleeding. Her general condition was good and her vital signs were normal. She felt tenderness in an abdominal examination and had a small amount of vaginal bleeding. Transvaginal ultrasonography showed an ectopic gestational sac with yolk sac inside, in her right ovary. Our final diagnosis was ectopic ovarian pregnancy and we successfully treated her with methotrexate. After 3 weeks of methotrexate administration her beta human chorionic gonadotropin was negative and a sonographic examination was completely normal. Ectopic ovarian pregnancy is a very important medical situation. It should be diagnosed in its early stages otherwise it could be life-threatening and surgical treatment may be inevitable. Because of the importance of fertility, medical treatment is an acceptable option and can be feasible with early diagnosis.

  14. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS, which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  15. Mechanisms and Chemoprevention of Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    gonadotropin (Sigma, St. Louis, MO) and human chorionic gonadotropin (Ferring Pharmaceuticals, Los Angeles, CA), once every 2 weeks, starting at 2 months after...Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (in bacteriostatic water) were administered i.p. and i.m., respectively, each at a...effects on the underlying stroma. As demonstrated earlier, treatment of rats with pregnant mare’s serum gonadotropin and/or human chorionic

  16. Quantitative automated human chorionic gonadotropin measurement in urine using the Modular Analytics E170 module (Roche).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajubi, Nasser E; Nijholt, Nine; Wolthuis, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing demands on laboratory performance require optimization of processes. An obvious way to achieve this is to reduce manual labor in favor of automated methods. We describe the validation of an automated quantitative urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) analysis on the Roche Modular E170 analyzer to replace the manual qualitative pregnancy test in urine. At urine hCG concentrations of 476, 45 and 11 U/L, we found inter-assay variation of 4.3%, 4.3% and 6.8% and average intra-assay variation of 3.0%, 2.6% and 3.0%, respectively. The analytical detection limit was 0.7 U/L. We did not detect any loss (due to degradation or adsorption) during a storage period of 5 days at 4 degrees C or at -20 degrees C. Recoveries of hCG in urine of a pregnant woman diluted with urine of a pre-menopausal non-pregnant woman (concentration range between 6 and 800 mU/L) were between 93% and 112% (y=0.997x-3.843, r 2 =0.999). Diluting a serum sample (hCG 42,000 U/L) with urine (negative for hCG) up to 8000-fold yielded a completely linear hCG response, indicating that the assay was not affected by the urine matrix. In a correlation study with 60 urine samples (of which 10 were of male origin), we did not find any discrepancies between results for the manual pregnancy test and the hCG test on the Roche Modular E170 (using a cutoff value of 50 U/L).

  17. Dual trigger of triptorelin and HCG optimizes clinical outcome for high ovarian responder in GnRH-antagonist protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Saijiao; Zhou, Danni; Yin, Tailang; Xu, Wangming; Xie, Qingzhen; Cheng, Dan; Yang, Jing

    2018-01-12

    In this paper, a retrospective cohort study was conducted to the high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist protocols of IVF/ICSI cycles. The purpose of the study is to investigate whether dual triggering of final oocyte maturation with a combination of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) can improve the clinical outcome compared with traditional dose (10000IU) HCG trigger and low-dose (8000IU) HCG trigger for high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycles. Our study included 226 couples with high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist protocols of IVF/ICSI cycles. Standard dosage of HCG trigger (10000 IU of recombinant HCG) versus dual trigger (0.2 mg of triptorelin and 2000 IU of recombinant HCG) and low-dose HCG trigger (8000IU of recombinant HCG) were used for final oocyte maturation. Our main outcome measures were high quality embryo rate, the number of usable embryos, the risk of OHSS, duration of hospitalization and incidence rate of complications. Our evidence demonstrated that dual trigger is capable of preventing severe OHSS while still maintaining excellent high quality embryo rate in in high ovarian responders of GnRH-antagonist protocols.

  18. Renal and Hepatic Functions after A Week of Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation during In Vitro Fertilization Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romito Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One the main aspects of in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle is to avoid any possible systemic damage on women undergoing a controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH. The aim of this work is to evaluate renal and hepatic function blood tests in patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation during IVF cycles. Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective cohort analysis. All patients re- ceived a long stimulation protocol with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH analogues by daily administration, since the twenty-first day of the previous ovarian cycle followed by COH with recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH. The daily dose of exogenous gonadotropins for every single patient was modified according to her follicular growth. The oocytes were retrieved during the oocyte pick up and fertilized by standard procedures of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. The blood samples to evaluate renal and hepatic functions were taken at the 7th day of ovarian stimulation. Results: We enrolled 426 women aged between 19 and 44 years, with a mean body mass index (BMI of 24.68 Kg/m2. The mean value of blood urea nitrogen was 14 ± 3.16 mg/ dl, creatinine: 1 ± 0.45 mg/dl, uric acid: 4 ± 1.95 mg/dl, total proteins: 7 ± 3.93 mg/dl, aspartate aminotransferase: 18 ± 6.29 mU/ml, alanine aminotransferase: 19 ± 10.41 mU/ ml, alkaline phosphatase: 81 ± 45.25 mU/ml, total bilirubin 1 ± 0.35 mg/dL. All of the results were considered as a normal range following the Medical Council of Canada. Conclusion: Our data suggest that, unlike ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS, COH patients did not show any alteration to renal and hepatic functions.

  19. Sexual function among married menopausal women in Amol (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Omidvar

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Findings revealed high percentage of sexual desire disorder and sexual arousal disorder in menopausal women. Therefore, we should have emphasis on counseling and education about sexual activities during the menopause period.

  20. Correlation between hormonal and lipid status in women in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesalić, Lejla; Tupković, Emir; Kendić, Sulejman; Balić, Devleta

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that menopause leads to changes in hormonal status, metabolism and lipid profile. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of menopause on the concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins and, the influence of estradiol, progesterone, FSH, LH on lipid profile in menopausal women as well. The menopausal women had higher but non-significant (p>0,05) concentrations of total cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, and triglycerides than women with regular menstruation. The concentration of HDL was significantly lower in menopausal women than in women with regular menstruation (pmenopausal women (p0,05). Estrogen concentration has significant negative correlation with VLDL and triglycerides (pmenopausal women. Progesterone concentration has shown no correlation with concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins in menopause. We can conclude that menopause leads to changes in lipid profile by reducing HDL, and elevating apolipoprotein B levels, thus increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease. These changes were caused by reduction of estrogen concentrations in menopause.