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Sample records for menisci tibial

  1. Unicompartmental knee prostheses: in vitro wear assessment of the menisci tibial insert after two different fixation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affatato, S.; Spinelli, M.; Zavalloni, M.; Carmignato, S.; Lopomo, N.; Marcacci, M.; Viceconti, M.

    2008-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a complex clinical scenario where many biological and mechanical factors influence the severity of articular degenerative changes. Minimally invasive knee prosthetic surgery, with only a compartment replacement (unicompartmental knee replacement), might be a good compromise between osteotomy and total knee prosthesis. The focus of this study was to develop and validate a protocol to assess the fixation method of the femoral components in mechanical simulation, for pre-clinical validation; the wear behaviour of two different fixation frames was quantified and compared. In particular, two different wear tests were conducted using the same knee simulator, the same load profiles and the same kinematics; two different fixation methods were applied to the femoral sleds (synthetic femur and metal block). Surface characterization on both articulating bearings was performed by a roughness measuring machine and coordinate measuring machine. The wear produced by the tibial inserts using the synthetic femur was considerably higher than the wear registered by the metal-block holder. Roughness measurements on femoral sleds showed a limited number of scratches with high Rt values for the metal-block set-up; the damaged surface broadened in the case of femoral condyles and tibial inserts mounted on composite bone, but lower Rt and linear penetration values were measured. The two holding frames showed different wear activities as a consequence of dissimilar dynamic performance. Further observations should be made in vivo to prove the actual importance of synthetic bone simulations and specific material behaviour.

  2. Unicompartmental knee prostheses: in vitro wear assessment of the menisci tibial insert after two different fixation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Viceconti, M [Laboratorio di Tecnologia Medica, Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano, 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Carmignato, S [Laboratorio di Metrologia Geometrica e Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padova (Italy); Lopomo, N; Marcacci, M [Laboratorio di Biomeccanica, Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: affatato@tecno.ior.it

    2008-10-07

    Knee osteoarthritis is a complex clinical scenario where many biological and mechanical factors influence the severity of articular degenerative changes. Minimally invasive knee prosthetic surgery, with only a compartment replacement (unicompartmental knee replacement), might be a good compromise between osteotomy and total knee prosthesis. The focus of this study was to develop and validate a protocol to assess the fixation method of the femoral components in mechanical simulation, for pre-clinical validation; the wear behaviour of two different fixation frames was quantified and compared. In particular, two different wear tests were conducted using the same knee simulator, the same load profiles and the same kinematics; two different fixation methods were applied to the femoral sleds (synthetic femur and metal block). Surface characterization on both articulating bearings was performed by a roughness measuring machine and coordinate measuring machine. The wear produced by the tibial inserts using the synthetic femur was considerably higher than the wear registered by the metal-block holder. Roughness measurements on femoral sleds showed a limited number of scratches with high R{sub t} values for the metal-block set-up; the damaged surface broadened in the case of femoral condyles and tibial inserts mounted on composite bone, but lower R{sub t} and linear penetration values were measured. The two holding frames showed different wear activities as a consequence of dissimilar dynamic performance. Further observations should be made in vivo to prove the actual importance of synthetic bone simulations and specific material behaviour.

  3. Unicompartmental knee prostheses: in vitro wear assessment of the menisci tibial insert after two different fixation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Viceconti, M; Carmignato, S; Lopomo, N; Marcacci, M

    2008-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a complex clinical scenario where many biological and mechanical factors influence the severity of articular degenerative changes. Minimally invasive knee prosthetic surgery, with only a compartment replacement (unicompartmental knee replacement), might be a good compromise between osteotomy and total knee prosthesis. The focus of this study was to develop and validate a protocol to assess the fixation method of the femoral components in mechanical simulation, for pre-clinical validation; the wear behaviour of two different fixation frames was quantified and compared. In particular, two different wear tests were conducted using the same knee simulator, the same load profiles and the same kinematics; two different fixation methods were applied to the femoral sleds (synthetic femur and metal block). Surface characterization on both articulating bearings was performed by a roughness measuring machine and coordinate measuring machine. The wear produced by the tibial inserts using the synthetic femur was considerably higher than the wear registered by the metal-block holder. Roughness measurements on femoral sleds showed a limited number of scratches with high R t values for the metal-block set-up; the damaged surface broadened in the case of femoral condyles and tibial inserts mounted on composite bone, but lower R t and linear penetration values were measured. The two holding frames showed different wear activities as a consequence of dissimilar dynamic performance. Further observations should be made in vivo to prove the actual importance of synthetic bone simulations and specific material behaviour

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of menisci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Yasushi; Hachiya, Yudo; Murano, Hiromichi; Sakai, Takashi; Banno, Tatsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty six patients with 37 menisci suspicious of meniscal injury of the knee joint have been examined by MRI since Septemper 1989. All the menisci were also evaluated by arthroscopy. Gradient echo technique for T 2 * weighted image showed better tissue contrast of deranged menisci compared with usual spin echo sequence. Grading and classification of meniscal tears were also reviewed. As a result, MRI was able to depict 92% of meniscal injuries which were revealed on arthroscopy. (author)

  5. MRI profiles of menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Kimizo; Akahori, Osamu; Suwa, Shinichi

    1992-01-01

    The rate of correct diagnosis of disorders of menisci is considered to exceed 95% by arthrography and arthroscopy, but these examinations are both invasive and effective only for evaluation of changes on the surface of meniscus. Diagnosis of injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is difficult by athrography, and that of injury of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus is difficult by arthroscopy. MRI is a non-invasive examination that allows the diagnosis of changes of the surface and the inside of the meniscus. This study reviewed 44 cases in which MRI findings could be confirmed by arthroscopy or at operating among 114 patients who underwent MRI to rule out the possibility of meniscus injury during the period between August 1988 and June 1991. The total number of patients who underwent MRI during this period was 6,983. The apparatus used was a 1.5-Tesla superconductive MR system, and evaluation was based mainly on the control T1-weighted image obtained by the spin-echo mode and sagittal image double-echo sequence. Characteristics of MRI were described as follows. Four cases of injury of the medial meniscus are (1) typical bucket-handle injury; (2) horizontal tear visible by arthroscopy; (3) horizontal tear difficult to observe by arthroscopy; (4) horizontal tear after partial meniscectomy under arthroscopy. Four cases of injury of the lateral meniscus are (1) multiple tear and artifact of foreign body of needle-fragment; (2) longitudinal tear; (3) multiple injury of discoid meniscus; (4) locking of discoid meniscus. MRI was considered to be advantageous over arthrography or arthroscopy in injury of medial meniscus (especially horizonal tear extending to the lower surface on the tibial side), meniscus ganglion, injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and discoid menisci of children. From the findings in these 44 cases, MRI is considered to provide important information for the diagnosis of injury of menisci. (author)

  6. Geometric Evaluation of Fresh Menisci and Menisci Preserved in 98% Glycerin : Study in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Perez Berrio, Diana Marcela; Lancheros Suárez, Valery Jose; Martínez Martínez, Mastoby Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Meniscus alloimplants have been used as a source of tissue for replacement in case of breakage or irreparable damage. To determine possible changes by conservation, the study proposed to geometrically evaluate fresh menisci and menisci preserved in 98% glycerin. 15 medial menisci from eight albino rabbits of New Zealand breed were used, divided into three groups: five fresh menisci (GI); five menisci preserved in 98% glycerin for eight months (GII), and five menisci preserved in 98% glycerin ...

  7. Geometric Evaluation of Fresh Menisci and Menisci Preserved in 98% Glycerin: Study in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Marcela Perez Berrio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus alloimplants have been used as a source of tissue for replacement in case of breakage or irreparable damage. To determine possible changes by conservation, the study proposed to geometrically evaluate fresh menisci and menisci preserved in 98% glycerin. 15 medial menisci from eight albino rabbits of New Zealand breed were used, divided into three groups: five fresh menisci (GI; five menisci preserved in 98% glycerin for eight months (GII, and five menisci preserved in 98% glycerin for eight months and then rehydrated in 0.9% saline solution for 24 hours (GIII. All menisci were measured with vernier caliper at seven points of their geometric structure. The study established that there were no statistical differences in the measurements of GII and GIII when compared to GI; there was no difference either in the measurements of GIII when compared to GII, thus rehydration in antibiotic saline solution for 24 hours can be considered unnecessary.

  8. HYSTOMORPHOLOGIC CHANGES IN INJURED MENISCI IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Bogatov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was studying histological changes in the injured menisci in children. The histological evaluation of injured menisci received during arthroscopy was performed. The prescription of injury varied from several days till 3 years. It was shown that injured fragment of the meniscus is viable up to 3 months since trauma. It was also obvious that active migration of the meniscus cells occur in the injured fragment and microvessels are seen in 50% of the meniscus tissues.

  9. MRI of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki University Hospital - Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Tielinen, Laura; Lindahl, Jan; Hirvensalo, Eero [Helsinki University Hospital - Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    To analyze with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the signal appearance of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows. Forty-four patients with 47 meniscal tears treated with bioabsorbable arrows underwent follow-up conventional MRI examination. The time interval between the surgery and MRI varied from 5 to 67 months (mean 26 months). Twenty-six patients also had concurrent repair of torn anterior cruciate ligament. The following grades were used to classify meniscal signal intensity: (a) G0; low signal intensity on all sequences and regular configuration in every plane, (b) G1; increased signal intensity within the meniscus, not extending to the meniscal surface, (c) G2; increased signal intensity linear in shape, which may or may not communicate with the capsular margin of the meniscus, without extending to the meniscal surface, and (d) G3; increased signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface. Thirteen menisci (27.5%) had normal signal intensity, 13 menisci (27.5%) Grade 1 signal intensity, 9 menisci (19%) Grade 2 signal intensity and 12 menisci (26%) Grade 3 signal intensity. The time difference between operation and MRI was statistically significant between the G0 (36 months) and G3 groups (14 months; P=0.0288). There was no statistical significance in different grades between medial and lateral meniscus or between patients with operated or intact ACL. On physical examination sixteen patients reported slight symptoms, seen evenly in each group. (orig.)

  10. MRI of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti; Koskinen, Seppo K.; Tielinen, Laura; Lindahl, Jan; Hirvensalo, Eero

    2006-01-01

    To analyze with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the signal appearance of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows. Forty-four patients with 47 meniscal tears treated with bioabsorbable arrows underwent follow-up conventional MRI examination. The time interval between the surgery and MRI varied from 5 to 67 months (mean 26 months). Twenty-six patients also had concurrent repair of torn anterior cruciate ligament. The following grades were used to classify meniscal signal intensity: (a) G0; low signal intensity on all sequences and regular configuration in every plane, (b) G1; increased signal intensity within the meniscus, not extending to the meniscal surface, (c) G2; increased signal intensity linear in shape, which may or may not communicate with the capsular margin of the meniscus, without extending to the meniscal surface, and (d) G3; increased signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface. Thirteen menisci (27.5%) had normal signal intensity, 13 menisci (27.5%) Grade 1 signal intensity, 9 menisci (19%) Grade 2 signal intensity and 12 menisci (26%) Grade 3 signal intensity. The time difference between operation and MRI was statistically significant between the G0 (36 months) and G3 groups (14 months; P=0.0288). There was no statistical significance in different grades between medial and lateral meniscus or between patients with operated or intact ACL. On physical examination sixteen patients reported slight symptoms, seen evenly in each group. (orig.)

  11. Relationship between knee alignment and T1ρ values of articular cartilage and menisci in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@hotmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University, School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Vieira, Renata La Rocca, E-mail: relarocca@gmail.com [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Rybak, Leon D., E-mail: Leon.Rybak@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Babb, James S., E-mail: James.Babb@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Department of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of the femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with mild (Kellgren–Lawrence grade 1) to moderate (KL3) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Materials and methods: 26 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of KL1-3 OA were included and subdivided into three subgroups: varus, valgus, and neutral. All subjects were evaluated on a 3 T MR scanner. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine any statistically significant differences in subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci among the three subgroups of KL1-3 OA patients. Results: Medial femoral anterior cartilage subregion in varus group had significantly higher (p < 0.05) T1ρ values than all cartilage subregions in valgus group. Medial tibial central cartilage subregion had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.05) than lateral tibial central cartilage subregion in varus group. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus in neutral group had significantly higher T1ρ values (p < 0.0029) than all meniscus subregions in valgus group. Conclusion: There exists some degree of association between knee alignment and subregional T1ρ values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with clinical OA.

  12. MRI characteristics of torn and untorn post-operative menisci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Rosas, Humberto; Liu, Fang; Williams, Adam

    2017-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of torn and untorn post-operative menisci. The study group consisted of 140 patients with 148 partially resected menisci who were evaluated with a repeat knee MRI examination and subsequent repeat arthroscopic knee surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively assessed the following MRI characteristics of the post-operative meniscus: contour (smooth or irregular), T2 line through the meniscus (no line, intermediate signal line, intermediate-to-high signal line, and high fluid-like signal line), displaced meniscus fragment, and change in signal pattern through the meniscus compared with baseline MRI. Positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated using arthroscopy as the reference standard. All 36 post-operative menisci with no T2 line were untorn at surgery (100% NPV), whereas 46 of the 79 post-operative menisci with intermediate T2 line, 16 of the 18 post-operative menisci with intermediate-to-high T2 line, and 14 of the 15 post-operative menisci with high T2 line were torn at surgery (58.2%, 88.9%, and 93.3% PPV respectively). Additional MRI characteristics associated with torn post-operative meniscus at surgery were irregular meniscus contour (PPV 85.7%), displaced meniscus fragment (PPV 100%), and change in signal pattern through the meniscus (PPV 99.4%). Post-operative menisci with no T2 signal line were untorn at surgery. The most useful MRI characteristics for predicting torn post-operative menisci at surgery were change in signal pattern through the meniscus compared with baseline MRI, and displaced meniscus fragment followed by high T2 line through the meniscus, intermediate-to-high T2 line through the meniscus, and irregular meniscus contour. (orig.)

  13. MRI characteristics of torn and untorn post-operative menisci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Rosas, Humberto; Liu, Fang [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Williams, Adam [Radiology and Imaging Consultants, Colorado Springs (United States)

    2017-10-15

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of torn and untorn post-operative menisci. The study group consisted of 140 patients with 148 partially resected menisci who were evaluated with a repeat knee MRI examination and subsequent repeat arthroscopic knee surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively assessed the following MRI characteristics of the post-operative meniscus: contour (smooth or irregular), T2 line through the meniscus (no line, intermediate signal line, intermediate-to-high signal line, and high fluid-like signal line), displaced meniscus fragment, and change in signal pattern through the meniscus compared with baseline MRI. Positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated using arthroscopy as the reference standard. All 36 post-operative menisci with no T2 line were untorn at surgery (100% NPV), whereas 46 of the 79 post-operative menisci with intermediate T2 line, 16 of the 18 post-operative menisci with intermediate-to-high T2 line, and 14 of the 15 post-operative menisci with high T2 line were torn at surgery (58.2%, 88.9%, and 93.3% PPV respectively). Additional MRI characteristics associated with torn post-operative meniscus at surgery were irregular meniscus contour (PPV 85.7%), displaced meniscus fragment (PPV 100%), and change in signal pattern through the meniscus (PPV 99.4%). Post-operative menisci with no T2 signal line were untorn at surgery. The most useful MRI characteristics for predicting torn post-operative menisci at surgery were change in signal pattern through the meniscus compared with baseline MRI, and displaced meniscus fragment followed by high T2 line through the meniscus, intermediate-to-high T2 line through the meniscus, and irregular meniscus contour. (orig.)

  14. Anatomy of the anterior root attachments of the medial and lateral menisci: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Christopher M; Ellman, Michael B; Rasmussen, Matthew T; James, Evan W; Wijdicks, Coen A; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    While the biomechanical importance of the meniscal roots has been demonstrated, the anatomy of the anterior meniscal roots remains largely unknown. Defining the quantitative anatomy of the anterior meniscal root attachments is essential for developing improved diagnostic and surgical techniques. The anterior medial (AM) and anterior lateral (AL) meniscal roots could be quantitatively defined relative to open and arthroscopic surgical landmarks. Descriptive laboratory study. Twelve nonpaired human cadaveric knees were used (average age, 51.3 years). A coordinate measuring device quantified the anatomic relationships of the AM and AL root attachments to open and arthroscopic surgical landmarks. The tibial attachments of both anterior roots were defined and quantified by categorizing the fibers of the root as either central, dense attachments or peripheral, supplemental attachments. The center of the tibial tuberosity and the medial tibial eminence apex were 27.0 mm lateral and distal and 27.5 mm posterior to the center of the AM root, respectively. The center of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the lateral tibial eminence apex were 5.0 mm posteromedial and 14.4 mm posterolateral to the center of the AL root, respectively. The AM root attachment had a mean area of 110.4 mm(2) (95% CI, 92.2-128.5) with a central attachment of 56.3 mm(2) (95% CI, 46.9-65.8). The AL root attachment had a mean area of 140.7 mm(2) (95% CI, 121.6-159.8) and inserted deeply beneath the ACL in all specimens. The overlap of the ACL on the AL root averaged 88.9 mm(2) (95% CI, 63.3-114.6), comprising 63.2% of the AL root attachment. The anterior meniscal roots were identified in relation to pertinent open and arthroscopic landmarks. The extended overlap between the AL root and ACL attachment revealed a more intimate tibial attachment relationship than previously recognized. Quantitative descriptions of the anterior meniscal roots elucidate the relationship between the root attachments

  15. Interfacial phenomena and microscale transport processes in evaporating ultrathin menisci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchamgam, Sashidhar S.

    The study of interfacial phenomena in the three-phase contact line region, where a liquid-vapor interface intersects a solid surface, is of importance to many equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes. However, lack of experimental data on microscale transport processes controlled by interfacial phenomena has restricted progress. This thesis includes a high resolution image analyzing technique, based on reflectivity measurements, that accurately measures the thickness, contact angle and curvature profiles of ultrathin films, drops and curved menisci. In particular, the technique was used to emphasize measurements for thicknesses, delta contact line region. Experiments included flow instabilities in HFE-7000 meniscus on quartz (System S1), the spreading of a pentane (System S2 and S3), octane (System S4) and binary mixture menisci (System S5) during evaporation. The main objectives of the work are to present a new experimental technique, new observations, new data, and the use of a simple control volume, continuum and Kelvin-Clapeyron models to discuss the results. In addition, the interplay and importance of the microscopic fundamental forces, i.e., van der Waals forces, capillary forces and Marangoni stresses, during evaporation of the wetting fluids on the quartz surface is emphasized.

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on biochemical and physical properties of human menisci (preliminary data)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, I.; Kaminski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The menisci, composed mostly of water (-70%) and collagen (-20%, predominantly type I), are integral structural components of human knee, aiding in shock absorption, joint stability, lubrication, and nutrition. Total or partial meniscectomies are associated with altered load bearing across the knee, frequently resulting in degenerative osteoarthritis. Therefore meniscal replacement has been advocated in case of extensive meniscus damage or after its removal. Among different natural and artificial materials, the use of meniscal allografts is the most promising method. However, the application of non-sterilised menisci is connected with the risk of infection disease transmission. The aim of the initial part of our study was to assess the effect of ionising radiation on biochemical properties of human menisci preserved with various methods and then irradiated with a dose 35 kGy. Twenty eight menisci from cadaveric donors were procured using standard operating procedures and then divided into the following groups: 1) fresh menisci irradiated at -70 degree C; 2) fresh menisci irradiated at room temperature (RT); 3) lyophilised menisci irradiated at -70 degree C; 4) lyophilised menisci irradiated at RT. Samples from each experimental group were irradiated with a dose of 35 kGy with 10 MeV electron accelerator. Non-irradiated menisci served as controls. Meniscal allografts were pulverised in the liquid nitrogen mill and quantitatively extracted to measure neutral soluble collagen (NSC) and acid soluble collagen (ASC) by colorimetric assay of hydroxyproline, released under extraction from tissue samples. The amount of released hydroxyproline reflects the level of collagen degradation caused by ionising radiation. As in our previous studies concerning other connective tissue allografts (bones, tendons), collagen fragmentation in menisci was also affected by preservation and sterilisation conditions. The choice of proper conditions allows one to diminish the

  17. MR imaging appearance of discoid menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.; Mink, J.H.; Deutsch, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Although discoid menisci of the knee have been recognized with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, there are no MR criteria for their diagnosis. In this paper the authors define a discord meniscus as three or more 5-mm-thick interleaved sagittal sections that demonstrate continuity of the meniscus between the anterior and posterior horns. High-resolution coronal images allow more graphic depiction of the abnormally wide meniscus. They present a total of 29 cases imaged with MR. In approximately one-third of their cases, the measurable height difference between the discoid meniscus and the adjacent meniscus was at least 2 mm. Surgical correlation revealed only two discrepancies between MR imaging and arthrography

  18. Risk factors for lesions of the knee menisci among workers in South Korea's national parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Donghee; Youn, Kanwoo; Lee, Eunja; Lee, Myeongjun; Chung, Hweemin; Kim, Deokweon

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of the menisci lesions in national park workers and work factors affecting this prevalence. The study subjects were 698 workers who worked in 20 Korean national parks in 2014. An orthopedist visited each national park and performed physical examinations. Knee MRI was performed if the McMurray test or Apley test was positive and there was a complaint of pain in knee area. An orthopedist and a radiologist respectively read these images of the menisci using a grading system based on the MRI signals. To calculate the cumulative intensity of trekking of the workers, the mean trail distance, the difficulty of the trail, the tenure at each national parks, and the number of treks per month for each worker from the start of work until the present were investigated. Chi-square tests was performed to see if there were differences in the menisci lesions grade according to the variables. The variables used in the Chi-square test were evaluated using simple logistic regression analysis to get crude odds ratios, and adjusted odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis after establishing three different models according to the adjusted variables. According to the MRI signal grades of menisci, 29 % were grade 0, 11.3 % were grade 1, 46.0 % were grade 2, and 13.7 % were grade 3. The differences in the MRI signal grades of menisci according to age and the intensity of trekking as calculated by the three different methods were statistically significant. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed for three models. In model 1, there was no statistically significant factor affecting the menisci lesions. In model 2, among the factors affecting the menisci lesions, the OR of a high cumulative intensity of trekking was 4.08 (95 % CI 1.00-16.61), and in model 3, the OR of a high cumulative intensity of trekking was 5.84 (95 % CI 1.09-31.26). The factor that most

  19. Mapping surface tension induced menisci with application to tensiometry and refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avanish; Kulkarni, Varun; Khor, Jian-Wei; Wereley, Steve

    2015-07-28

    In this work, we discuss an optical method for measuring surface tension induced menisci. The principle of measurement is based upon the change in the background pattern produced by the curvature of the meniscus acting as a lens. We measure the meniscus profile over an inclined glass plate and utilize the measured meniscus for estimation of surface tension and refractive index.

  20. Tibial Plateau Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsøe, Rasmus

    This PhD thesis reported an incidence of tibial plateau fractures of 10.3/100,000/year in a complete Danish regional population. The results reported that patients treated for a lateral tibial plateau fracture with bone tamp reduction and percutaneous screw fixation achieved a satisfactory level...... of radiological outcomes and a level of health related quality of life (Eq5d) below but not significantly different from the Danish reference population at a mean of 5.2 years follow-up. Furthermore, a knee injury-specific questionnaire (KOOS) reported a level of disability close to a reference population...... with only the subgroup Sport significantly below the age matched reference population. The thesis reports a level of health related quality of life (Eq5d) and disability (KOOS) significantly below established reference populations for patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fracture treated with a ring...

  1. The effect of tibial slope in acute ACL-insufficient patients on concurrent meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Isabelle; Zantop, Thore; Zeman, Florian; Seitz, Johannes; Angele, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the medial and lateral posterior tibial slope (MPTS, LPTS) in patients with acutely ruptured ACL on the menisci. It was hypothesized that medial and lateral meniscus lesions are seen more often with high PTS (posterior tibial slope). We hypothesized that in case of a high tibial slope a possible meniscus lesion is more often located in the posterior horn of the meniscus than in knees with a low tibial slope. We identified 537 patients with ACL insufficiency between 2012 and 2013. Of these, 71 patients were eligible for the study according to the study's criteria. PTS was measured via MRI and classified into two groups: >10° for high tibial slope and ≤10° for low tibial slope. Any meniscal lesion was documented during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction and evaluated regarding meniscal lesion patterns with high and low PTS, taking into account the type and the location of the tear (anterior horn, intermediate part and posterior horn). Statistical analysis for differences in meniscal lesion was performed using Chi-square tests and McNemar tests for dependent variables. The level of significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. High PTS (MPTS and LPTS) was associated with a higher incidence of meniscal lesions with an odds ratio of 2.11, respectively, 3.44; however, no statistical significance was found. Among the total number of ACL-insufficient knees studied, the meniscal lesion spread more often to the posterior part in the group with a low PTS. In contrast, less damage of the posterior horn of the meniscus could be found in the group with a high PTS. High PTS seems to predetermine for meniscal lesion in an acute ACL-insufficient knee. More damage to the posterior part of the menisci could generally be seen but was not associated with a high PTS. There was no statistical significance to support the initial hypothesis. Further research is needed to find out if factors other than tibial slope are risk factors for meniscal

  2. Propriedades mecânicas de meniscos frescos de coelhos e preservados em glicerina 98% Mechanical properties of the fresh rabbit menisci and of the menisci preserved in glycerin 98%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Mesquita Vilela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo avaliou a resistência à compressão de meniscos mediais de coelhos da raça Nova Zelândia, por meio de teste mecânico de compressão. Trinta meniscos foram distribuídos em três grupos: grupo MF, composto por dez meniscos frescos; grupo MG, dez meniscos preservados em glicerina 98%, por 30 dias, e grupo MR, dez meniscos preservados em glicerina 98%, por 30 dias e reidratados em NaCl 0,9%, por 12 horas. Os meniscos de cada grupo foram submetidos ao teste de compressão no sentido perpendicular ao seu plano anatômico regular e foram avaliados o limite de elasticidade, a deformação elástica, a tensão ao ponto de ruptura e ao limite de elasticidade e ainda, o índice de rigidez. Os meniscos dos grupos preservados, MG e MR, tiveram o limite elástico semelhante ao grupo de meniscos frescos (MF. O grupo de meniscos em glicerina (MG apresentou menor capacidade de deformação elástica (PThe present study evaluated the compressive strength of medial menisci of New Zealand rabbits, through mechanical compression test. Thirty menisci were distributed in three groups: group MF, composed by ten fresh menisci; MG group, composed by ten menisci preserved in 98% glycerin for 30 days; and, group MR, ten menisci preserved in 98% glycerin for 30 days and rehydrated in NaCl 0.9% for 12 hours. The menisci in each group were submitted to compression test in the perpendicular direction to the anatomical plane and had the elasticity limit, the elastic deformity, the rupture stress point and the stiffness index evaluated. The menisci from the preserved groups MG and MR had the elastic limit similar to the fresh menisci group (MF. The group of menisci preserved in glycerin (MG presented lower elastic deformity capacity (P<0.05 if compared to the other groups, MF and MR, and a higher tension capacity at elastic limit. The menisci from group (MG presented higher stiffness (P<0.05 than the ones in the MF and MR groups. It can be concluded that

  3. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Y.; Uetani, M.; Fuchi, K.; Eguchi, H.; Hayashi, K.

    1999-01-01

    To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion

  4. MR assessment of movement and morphologic change in the menisci during knee flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Y.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Fuchi, K.; Eguchi, H.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To examine movement and morphologic alteration in the menisci during knee flexion. Material and Methods: Twenty healthy knees were imaged at 0 , 45 , and 90 of passive non-weight-bearing flexion in the sagittal plane with MR. In each meniscus, posterior movement distance during knee flexion and the ratio of anteroposterior (a.p.) diameter at flexion to that at extension were calculated. Results: Each meniscus moved posteriorly during knee flexion. Movement was greater in the anterior horn than in the posterior horn, and greater in the medial meniscus than in the lateral meniscus (p<0.05). The a.p. diameter of each meniscus was reduced at flexion (p<0.05). Conclusion: Knee flexion normally leads to posterior movement and shortening of the a.p. diameter of the menisci, which may be related to the positioning and curvature of femoral condyles at the femorotibial contact point at knee flexion. (orig.)

  5. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical...

  6. Fraturas do planalto tibial Tibial plateau fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Kfuri Júnior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas do planalto tibial são lesões articulares cujos princípios de tratamento envolvem a redução anatômica da superfície articular e a restauração funcional do eixo mecânico do membro inferior. Contribuem para a tomada de decisões no tratamento dessas fraturas o perfil do paciente, as condições do envelope de tecidos moles, a existência de outros traumatismos associados e a infraestrutura disponível para abordagens cirúrgicas. Para as fraturas de alta energia, o tratamento estagiado, seguindo o princípio do controle de danos, tem como prioridade a manutenção do alinhamento do membro enquanto se aguarda a resolução das más condições de tecidos moles. Já nos traumas de baixa energia, desde que os tecidos moles não sejam um fator adverso, o tratamento deve ser realizado em tempo único, com osteossíntese definitiva. Fixação estável e movimento precoce são variáveis diretamente relacionadas com os melhores prognósticos. Desenvolvimentos recentes, como os implantes com estabilidade angular, substitutos ósseos e imagens tridimensionais para controle intraoperatório, deverão contribuir para cirurgias menos invasivas e melhores resultados.Tibial plateau fractures are joint lesions that require anatomical reduction of joint surface and functional restoration of mechanical axis of a lower limb. Patient profile, soft tissue conditions, presence of associated injuries and the available infrastructure for the treatment all contribute to the decision making about the best treatment for these fractures. High-energy fractures are usually approached in a staged manner respecting the principle of damage control, and are primarily targeted to maintain limb alignment while the resolution unfavorable soft tissue conditions is pending. Low-energy trauma can be managed on a single-stage basis, provided soft tissues are not an adverse factor, with open reduction and internal f-ixation. Stable fixation and early painless joint

  7. Pediatric Tibial Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brad; Street, Matthew; Leigh, Warren; Crawford, Haemish

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis shows a strong predilection for the tibia in the pediatric population and is a significant source of complications. The purpose of this article is to retrospectively review a large series of pediatric patients with tibial osteomyelitis. We compare our experience with that in the literature to determine any factors that may aid diagnosis and/or improve treatment outcomes. A 10-year retrospective review was performed of clinical records of all cases of pediatric tibial osteomyelitis managed at the 2 children's orthopaedic departments in the Auckland region. The Osteomyelitis Database was used to identify all cases between 1997 and 2007, at Starship Children's Hospital, and 1998 and 2008 at Middlemore's Kids First Hospital. One hundred ninety-one patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and had a review of clinical notes and relevant investigations. The average duration of symptoms before presentation to hospital was 5.7 days. Less than 40% of patients had a recent episode of trauma. Almost 60% of patients could not bear weight on admission. Over 40% of patients had a temperature above 38°C. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in 78% and the C-reactive protein was elevated in 90% of patients. In total, 42% of blood cultures and almost 75% of tissue cultures were positive, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly cultured organism. X-rays, bone scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were all used to aid the diagnosis. About 43% of patients had surgery. Treatment length was an average of 2 weeks 6 days of intravenous antibiotics followed by 3 weeks 2 days of oral treatment. Six postsurgical complications and 46 readmissions were noted: 25 for relapse, with the remainder due to social and antibiotic-associated complications. Although generally diagnosed on presentation, pediatric tibial osteomyelitis can require more sophisticated investigations and prolonged management. Treatment with intravenous and oral antibiotics and surgical

  8. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture....... The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...

  9. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...... after 2 weeks in the diaphyseal fractures and after 6 weeks in the condylar fractures. The degradation of type I collagen increased after 4 days and reached a maximum at 2 weeks in both groups. The interindividual variation was wide. On a group basis, the turnover of types I and III collagen had...

  10. Effect of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy on femorotibial contact mechanics and stifle kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Lewis, Daniel D

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) on femorotibial contact mechanics and 3-dimensional (3D) kinematics in cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifles of dogs. In vitro biomechanical study. Unpaired pelvic limbs from 8 dogs, weighing 28-35 kg. Digital pressure sensors placed subjacent to the menisci were used to measure femorotibial contact force, contact area, peak and mean contact pressure, and peak pressure location with the limb under an axial load of 30% body weight and a stifle angle of 135 degrees. Three-dimensional static poses of the stifle were obtained using a Microscribe digitizing arm. Each specimen was tested under normal, CrCL-deficient, and TPLO-treated conditions. Repeated measures analysis of variance with a Tukey post hoc test (Pmeasured contact mechanical variables were evident after CrCL transection, which corresponded to marked cranial tibial subluxation and increased internal tibial rotation in the CrCL-deficient stifle. No significant differences in 3D femorotibial alignment were observed between normal and TPLO-treated stifles; however, femorotibial contact area remained significantly smaller and peak contact pressures in both medial and lateral stifle compartments were positioned more caudally on the tibial plateau, when compared with normal. Whereas TPLO eliminates craniocaudal stifle instability during simulated weight bearing, the procedure fails to concurrently restore femorotibial contact mechanics to normal. Progression of stifle osteoarthritis in dogs treated with TPLO may be partly the result of abnormal stifle contact mechanics induced by altering the orientation of the proximal tibial articulating surface.

  11. T1rho MRI of menisci and cartilage in patients with osteoarthritis at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ligong; Chang, Gregory; Xu, Jian; Vieira, Renata L.R.; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Abramson, Steven; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare subregional and whole T1rho values (median ± interquartile range) of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with doubtful (Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grade 1) to severe (KL4) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3T. Materials and methods: 30 subjects with varying degrees of OA (KL1–4, 13 females, 17 males, mean age ± SD = 63.9 ± 13.1 years) were evaluated on a 3T MR scanner using a spin-lock-based 3D GRE sequence for T1rho mapping. Clinical proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) images in sagittal (without fat saturation), axial, and coronal (fat-saturated) planes were acquired for cartilage and meniscus Whole-organ MR imaging score (WORMS) grading. Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences between subregional and whole T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in subjects with doubtful to severe OA. Results: Lateral (72 ± 10 ms, median ± interquartile range) and medial (65 ± 10 ms) femoral anterior cartilage subregions in moderate–severe OA subjects had significantly higher T1rho values (P < 0.05) than cartilage subregions and whole femorotibial cartilage in doubtful–minimal OA subjects. There were statistically significant differences in meniscus T1rho values of the medial posterior subregion of subjects with moderate–severe OA and T1rho values of all subregions and the whole meniscus in subjects with doubtful–minimal OA. When evaluated based on WORMS, statistically significant differences were identified in T1rho values between the lateral femoral anterior cartilage subregion in patients with WORMS5–6 (advanced degeneration) and whole femorotibial cartilage and all cartilage subregions in patients with WORMS0–1 (normal). Conclusion: T1rho values are higher in specific meniscus and femorotibial cartilage subregions. These findings suggest that regional damage of both femorotibial hyaline cartilage and menisci may be associated with

  12. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  13. Estrutura e celularidade de meniscos frescos de coelhos (Oryctolagus cuniculus preservados em glicerina Structure and cellularity of the fresh menisci (Oryctolagus cuniculus of rabbits and the menisci preserved in glycerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana M. Vilela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo foi avaliada a arquitetura tecidual, a população celular, assim como a integridade e a distribuição dos tipos celulares em meniscos frescos de coelhos e preservados em glicerina 98%. Foram analisados meniscos mediais de coelhos recém abatidos, que foram distribuídos em três grupos: o grupo MF (n=7, composto por meniscos frescos, correspondeu ao grupo controle; o grupo MG (n=7, composto por meniscos preservados em glicerina 98%, por 30 dias, e o grupo MR (n=7, por meniscos preservados em glicerina 98% e reidratados em NaCl 0,9%, por 12 horas. Em todos os meniscos foram identificados e quantificados os diferentes tipos celulares: fibroblastos/fibrócitos e condrócitos. A população celular foi estatisticamente semelhante nos três grupos de meniscos, sendo que os meniscos preservados, grupos MG e MR, apresentaram menor intensidade de coloração e retração das fibras colágenas, diminuição de volume e maior intensidade de coloração dos núcleos (condensação da cromatina, em relação aos meniscos frescos (MF, caracterizando o fenômeno de lise celular. A matriz fibrocartilaginosa dos meniscos preservados revelou- se bem preservada mantendo a arquitetura tecidual dos meniscos. Conclui-se que a glicerina 98% é uma opção de meio de preservação para meniscos objetivando aloenxerto, com matriz colágena desvitalizada.In the present study was evaluated the tissue architecture, the percentage of cellular population, as well as viability and distribution of cells in fresh menisci of rabbits and preserved in 98% glycerin. Were analyzed medial menisci of rabbits freshly slaughtered, which were distributed into three groups: the MF group (n=7, composed of fresh menisci, corresponded to the control group; the MG group (n=7, composed by menisci preserved in 98% glycerin, for 30 days, and the MR group (n=7 by menisci preserved in 98% glycerin and rehydrated in NaCl 0.9% for 12 hours. In all menisci were identified and

  14. Tibial microdissection for diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, V; Vincent, G; Ngongang, C; Ledent, G; Hubermont, G

    2012-02-01

    Few data are available focusing on controlled blunt microdissection during below-the-knee interventions as sole or synchronous technique coupled to subintimal angioplasty, particularly in the management of diabetic critical-ischemic foot wounds. We present two cases of targeted recanalizations in the tibial and pedal trunks for plantar and forefoot diabetic ischemic tissue defects, following an angiosome-model for perfusion.

  15. Medial tibial “spackling” to lessen chronic medial tibial soft tissue irritation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Martin, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique, utilitarian reconstructive treatment option known as tibial “spackling” for chronic, localized medial joint line pain corresponding with progressive radiographic peripheral medial tibial bone loss beneath a well-fixed revision total knee arthroplasty tibial baseplate. It is believed that this localized pain is due to chronic irritation of the medial capsule and collateral ligament from the prominent medial edge of the tibial component. In the setting of failed nonoperative treatment, our experience with utilizing bone cement to reconstruct the medial tibial bone defect and create a smooth medial tibial surface has been successful in eliminating chronic medial soft tissue irritation.

  16. Do Not Hallow until You Are out of the Wood! Ultrasonographic Detection of CPP Crystal Deposits in Menisci: Facts and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Filippou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Ultrasonography (US has been demonstrated to be an important tool in the diagnosis of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP crystal deposition disease. The aim of our study was to individuate and describe possible pitfalls in US detection of such deposits in menisci. Patients and Methods. We enrolled all patients waiting to undergo knee replacement surgery due to osteoarthritis, for one-month period. Each patient underwent US examination of the knee, focusing on the menisci. After surgery, the menisci were examined by US, macroscopically and microscopically, using the microscopic analysis as the gold standard for CPP deposition. Results. 11 menisci of 6 patients have been studied. Ex vivo examination of menisci performed better in CPP identification than in vivo examination. The possible reasons of misinterpretation or misdiagnosis of the in vivo exam were identified and are extensively described in the paper. Also a new sign of CPP crystal deposits was found. Conclusions. This study permitted to highlight some difficulties in CPP crystal detection by US in menisci. Further studies are needed to define completely US CPP crystal aspect and to improve the sensibility and specificity of US in CPP deposition diagnosis.

  17. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Jae Gue; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05), but differences in the prevalence and location of meniscal tears were not (p>0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion.

  18. Material properties of individual menisci and their attachments obtained through inverse FE-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freutel, Maren; Galbusera, Fabio; Ignatius, Anita; Dürselen, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Meniscal properties for computational methods have already been proposed. However, it is well known that there is high intra subject variability in the material properties of soft tissues and that disruption of the fiber network alters the biomechanics of the meniscus. Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish a non invasive method to determine the material properties of the individual menisci and their attachments using inverse FE-analyses. In a previous study, the 3D displacements of the meniscus and its attachments under axial joint loads were determined for intact porcine knees. To simulate the experimental response in individual FE-analyses (n=5), an anisotropic, hyperelastic meniscus matrix was embedded in a poroelastic model. During a particle swarm optimization, the difference between the force applied to the meniscus during the experiment and the femoral surface reaction force of the FE model at equilibrium was minimized by varying four material parameters. Afterwards, a prediction error was determined to describe how well the material parameter fit to each of the three displacement directions. Additionally, the stresses occurring in the meniscus were evaluated. The error of the material parameter optimization was on average 6.5±4.4%. The best fitting material parameter combination revealed an error of 1.2%. The highest stresses occurred in the region between the pars intermedia and posterior horn of the meniscus. The individual material properties of the meniscus were successfully obtained with a combination of previously reported, noninvasively measured 3D displacements and inverse FE-analyses. The methodology presented in this study is a promising contribution to the detection of degeneration within the meniscus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tibial Torsion Among Filipinos: A Cadaveric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villamin CAC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tibial torsion, the twisting of the tibia about its long axis, can affect rotational positioning in total knee replacement. This angle varies depending on the ethnicity of the subject. There are no published studies to date to determine the tibial torsion among Filipinos. In this study, 28 cadaveric limbs were examined. Our results show that the average tibial torsion among adult Filipinos is 28.9°.

  20. Tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Steven; Hosalkar, Harish; Cameron, Danielle B; Heath, Aaron; David Horn, B; Ganley, Theodore J

    2008-12-01

    Tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents are uncommon. We retrospectively reviewed all tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents (10-19) who presented to our level 1 pediatric trauma center over a 7-year period to review fracture morphology, mechanism of injury, fracture management including return to play, as well as complications. Additionally, we present a review of the literature and treatment algorithm. We reviewed the clinical charts and radiographs of consecutive patients with tibial tuberosity fractures between 01 January 2000 and 01 January 2007. Data parameters included the following: patients age and gender, involved side, injury classification, co-morbidities, mechanism of injury, treatment, return to activity and complications. Data were extracted and reviewed, and a treatment algorithm is proposed with some additional insights into the epidemiology of the injury. Nineteen patients met the inclusion criteria. There were 19 patients with 20 tibial tuberosity fractures. The mean age was 13.7 years. There were 18 males and 1 female patient. There were nine left-sided injuries and eleven right-sided including one patient with bilateral fractures. Mechanism of injuries included basketball injury (8), running injury (5), football injury (3), fall from a scooter (2), high jump (1) and fall (1). Co-morbidities included three patients with concurrent Osgood-Schlatter disease and one with osteogenesis imperfecta. All were treated with ORIF, including arthroscopic-assisted techniques in two cases. Complications included four patients with pre-operative presentation of compartment syndrome all requiring fasciotomy, one post-operative stiffness and one painful hardware requiring removal. Range of motion was started an average of 4.3 weeks post-operatively and return to play was an average of 3.9 months post-operatively. Although uncommon, tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents are clinically important injuries. Early recognition and treatment (closed or open

  1. The MRI study of usefulness for the injury of cruciate ligaments and menisci in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Yoichi; Komatsu, Mitsuru; Harada, Masayuki; Muraoka, Yoshitaka; Hoshi, Tadayuki.

    1989-01-01

    From March 1988 through February 1989, 80 knees from 76 consecutive patients have been examined by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI scans were available for review in 47 knees (43 patients) which were concurrently examined by arthroscopy. Sagittal appearances of the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) were morphologically classified into (I) disappearance (signal disappearance of the normal ACL); (II) tear on the side of the femur; (III) midsubstance tear (tear in the central part); (IV) incomplete tear (swelling associated with some tonicity); (V) tear on the side of the tibia; and (VI) others (unclassified). Using arthroscopy as the standard, an overall diagnostic accuracy of this classification was 70%. Depending upon the time of MRI scanning, it varied from 80% within 2 weeks after injury to 65% after 2 weeks. When swelling associated with some tonicity was seen on sagittal views, the presence or absence of tear in the ACL and the posterior cruciate ligaments was easy to diagnose (diagnostic accuracy of 98% for ACL and 100% for PCL). Meniscal tears of the knee were graded on a scale of 0-4: 0= homogeneously low signal intensities; 1= irregular signal intensities within the menisci without communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 2= linear shadow without communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 3= linear or spherical shadow with communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 4= disappearance of signals in the menisci. The menisci scored as scales 3 or more was judged as having tear. A diagnostic accuracy for meniscal tears was 88%. MRI may prove to be useful for screening the presence or absence of meniscal tears. (N.K.)

  2. The MRI study of usefulness for the injury of cruciate ligaments and menisci in the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Yoichi (National Hirosaki Hospital, Aomori (Japan)); Komatsu, Mitsuru; Harada, Masayuki; Muraoka, Yoshitaka; Hoshi, Tadayuki

    1989-09-01

    From March 1988 through February 1989, 80 knees from 76 consecutive patients have been examined by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI scans were available for review in 47 knees (43 patients) which were concurrently examined by arthroscopy. Sagittal appearances of the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) were morphologically classified into (I) disappearance (signal disappearance of the normal ACL); (II) tear on the side of the femur; (III) midsubstance tear (tear in the central part); (IV) incomplete tear (swelling associated with some tonicity); (V) tear on the side of the tibia; and (VI) others (unclassified). Using arthroscopy as the standard, an overall diagnostic accuracy of this classification was 70%. Depending upon the time of MRI scanning, it varied from 80% within 2 weeks after injury to 65% after 2 weeks. When swelling associated with some tonicity was seen on sagittal views, the presence or absence of tear in the ACL and the posterior cruciate ligaments was easy to diagnose (diagnostic accuracy of 98% for ACL and 100% for PCL). Meniscal tears of the knee were graded on a scale of 0-4: 0= homogeneously low signal intensities; 1= irregular signal intensities within the menisci without communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 2= linear shadow without communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 3= linear or spherical shadow with communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 4= disappearance of signals in the menisci. The menisci scored as scales 3 or more was judged as having tear. A diagnostic accuracy for meniscal tears was 88%. MRI may prove to be useful for screening the presence or absence of meniscal tears. (N.K.).

  3. A comparison of MR images and histological findings in menisci of persons in middle or advanced age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Furufu, Teruo; Suguro, Tohru

    2005-01-01

    Signal abnormalities in magnetic resonance (MR) images of the meniscus can result from various factors and may lead to a decrease in the diagnostic accuracy for meniscal tears. In particular, change in intrameniscal signal intensity has been frequently noted in persons in middle or advanced age, and is presumed to be related to the degeneration of meniscus. However, the types of histological change that might cause a change in signal intensity have not been determined. The present study compared MR images of menisci in persons of middle or advanced age with corresponding surgical and arthroscopic findings. The mean age of subjects was 62.1 years at the time of the study; 102 knees underwent arthroscopy or surgery after MRI. Regarding the validity of MR imaging, the sensitivity was as high as 83.5%, but specificity and accuracy were low (87.5% and 86.8%, respectively). There were many cases in which a change in intrameniscal signal intensity mimicked meniscal tears in persons in middle or advanced age. In order to demonstrate how a given change in intrameniscal signal intensity corresponded to a particular morbid condition, menisci were histologically examined and compared with the corresponding MR images. A total of 65 knees (21 knees from above-knee amputations and 44 removed during surgery) were studied from subjects with a mean age of 65.9 years; there were 87 medial and lateral menisci in total. The menisci were removed after MRI, and the specimens were prepared after macroscopic observation, after which they were investigated pathohistologically. The MR images were classified into 5 grades, from 0 to 4. In total, the normal signal intensity group (Grade 0) comprised 52% of specimens. Among anterior segments, Grade 0 was 73%, and the normal, low signal intensity group comprised the majority of specimens. Among posterior segments, a change in signal intensity (Grades 1 to 4) was noted in 75%. Analysis of MR grade and macroscopic findings revealed that almost no

  4. Incomplete linear tibial fractures in two horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.J.; Allhands, R.V.; Baker, G.J.; Boero, M.J.; Foreman, J.H.; Hyyppa, T.; Huhn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Incomplete linear tibial fractures were identified in two horses with the aid of scintigraphy. Both horses were treated successfully by strict stall confinement, and both returned to normal athletic activity. Scintigraphy can be used to facilitate the generally difficult diagnosis of incomplete tibial fractures

  5. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moen, Maarten H.; Tol, Johannes L.; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; de Winter, Theodorus C.

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise,

  6. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  7. Incidence and epidemiology of tibial shaft fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsøe, Rasmus; Hansen, Sandra Hope

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The literature lacks recent population-based epidemiology studies of the incidence, trauma mechanism and fracture classification of tibial shaft fractures. The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date information on the incidence of tibial shaft fractures in a large and compl......Introduction: The literature lacks recent population-based epidemiology studies of the incidence, trauma mechanism and fracture classification of tibial shaft fractures. The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date information on the incidence of tibial shaft fractures in a large...... the highest frequency between the age of 30 and 40. AO-type 42-A1 was the most common fracture type, representing 34% of all tibial shaft fractures. The majority of tibial shaft fractures occur during walking, indoor activity and sports. The distribution among genders shows that males present a higher...... frequency of fractures while participating in sports activities and walking. Women present the highest frequency of fractures while walking and during indoor activities. Conclusion: This study shows an incidence of 16.9/100,000/year for tibial shaft fractures. AO-type 42-A1 was the most common fracture type...

  8. Correlation between bone contusion and ligament, menisci injury of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lijuan; Li Pei; Tu Changzhuo; Wu Guangren; Qi Yuliang; Yan Xiaoqun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between bone contusion and ligament, meniscus injury of knee joint with MR imaging. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute trauma of knee joint were studied retrospectively. All eases showed negative on X-ray and bone cont, -sion on MR imaging. Results: in all patients, ligament and meniscus injury were seen in 25 cases (71%), incorporate anterior cruciate ligament injury in 12 cases, posterior cruciate ligament in 6, tibial collateral ligament in 8 cases, fibular collateral ligament in 6 cases, medial meniscus tear in 4 cases, lateral meniscus tear in 5 cases, and hydrops in 29 cases. There were only 3 patients with ligament or meniscus injury but no bone contusion during the same period. Conclusion: It is necessary to check by MR for the patients with acute trauma of knee joint, who have clinical symptom such as ache, swelling, move un-freely showing bone contusion on MR Imaging but without any abnormality on X-ray in order to avoid failure in diagnosing injury of ligament and meniscus. (authors)

  9. The effect of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy position on cranial tibial subluxation: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowaleski, Michael P; Apelt, Detlef; Mattoon, John S; Litsky, Alan S

    2005-01-01

    To compare centered versus distal tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) position on cranial tibial subluxation, postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA), and tibial long axis shift (TLAS). In vitro biomechanical evaluation. Six pairs of canine cadaveric hind limbs. One limb of each pair was randomly assigned to the distal (TPLO-D) or centered (TPLO-C) osteotomy group. Cranial tibial subluxation (CTS) under load was quantified sequentially under 3 conditions: intact, after cranial cruciate ligament transection, and after TPLO; a corrected CTS value was also calculated. Postoperative TPA and TLAS were measured. Comparisons were made using 1-way repeated measures ANOVA with a Tukey's multiple comparison post hoc test for CTS, and a Wilcoxon's sign rank test for TPA and TLAS. Significance was set at Pcranial tibial thrust. The centered osteotomy position is geometrically more precise, and biomechanically more effective than the distal position.

  10. Measurement of tibial torsion by computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.-H.; Heller, M.; Dallek, M.; Schoettle, H.

    1981-01-01

    A CT procedure for objective measurements of tibial torsion independent of axial rotation in the nearby joints is described. Transverse sections in defined planes of the tibia permit easy calculation of normal and abnormal congenital or posttraumatic angles of torsion. In 69 limbs normal tibial torsion was 40 0 +-9 0 . In a series of 42 limbs with complicated healing of a fracture of both bones of the leg it is shown that tibial maltorsion is a deformity which in most cases leads to arthrosis of the ankle joint. (Auth.)

  11. Measurement of tibial torsion by computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Heller, M.; Dallek, M.; Schoettle, H. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1981-01-01

    A CT procedure for objective measurements of tibial torsion independent of axial rotation in the nearby joints is described. Transverse sections in defined planes of the tibia permit easy calculation of normal and abnormal congenital or posttraumatic angles of torsion. In 69 limbs normal tibial torsion was 40/sup 0/+-9/sup 0/. In a series of 42 limbs with complicated healing of a fracture of both bones of the leg it is shown that tibial maltorsion is a deformity which in most cases leads to arthrosis of the ankle joint.

  12. [TIBIAL PERIOSTEAL FLAP PEDICLED WITH INTERMUSCULAR BRANCH OF POSTERIOR TIBIAL VESSELS COMBINED WITH AUTOLOGOUS BONE GRAFT FOR TIBIAL BONE DEFECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yulong; Gao, Shunhong; Zhang, Jingyu; Dong, Huishuang; Zhang, Yunpeng; Fu, Jiansong

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of posterior tibial vessels combined with autologous bone graft in the treatment of tibial bone defects. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 19 cases of traumatic tibia bone and soft tissue defects were treated. There were 14 males and 5 females, aged from 18 to 49 years (mean, 28 years). The tibial fracture site located at the middle tibia in 6 cases and at the distal tibia in 13 cases. According to Gustilo type, 4 cases were rated as type III A, 14 cases as type III B, and 1 case as type III C (injury of anterior tibial artery). The length of bone defect ranged from 4.3 to 8.5 cm (mean, 6.3 cm). The soft tissue defects ranged from 8 cm x 5 cm to 17 cm x 9 cm. The time from injury to operation was 3 to 8 hours (mean, 4 hours). One-stage operation included debridement, external fixation, and vacuum sealing drainage. After formation of granulation tissue, the fresh wound was repaired with sural neurovascular flap or posterior tibial artery perforator flap. The flap size ranged from 10 cmx6 cm to 19 cm x 11 cm. In two-stage operation, tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of posterior tibial vessels combined with autologous bone graft was used to repair tibial defect. The periosteal flap ranged from 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm to 9.0 cm x 5.0 cm; bone graft ranged from 4.5 to 9.0 cm in length. External fixation was changed to internal fixation. All flaps survived with soft texture, and no ulcer and infection occurred. All incisions healed by the first intention. All patients were followed up 18-40 months (mean, between normal and affected sides.The function of the knee an ankle joint was good without infection, malunion, and equinus. According to the Johner standard at last follow-up, the results were excellent in 15 cases, good in 3 cases, and fair in 1 case, with an excellent and good rate of 94.7%. Tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of

  13. The risk of iatrogenic injury to anterior tibial artery variations during tibial nail distal interlocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanter, Nathan J; Inouye, Sandra E; Beiser, Christopher W

    2017-01-01

    Tibial intramedullary nailing remains a common tibial fracture fixation method. Tibial nailing indications continue to expand. Neurovascular complications from tibial nailing have been described; however, the proximity of distal tibial locking bolts to the anterior tibial artery (ATA) variants has not. 52 cadaveric legs were dissected identifying three common ATA variants. Each ATA variant received an intraluminal wire to facilitate fluoroscopic identification. Three different intramedullary tibial nails were inserted in each of the three ATA variant specimens. With fluoroscopy, the proximity of the distal locking holes of each tibial nail to the intraluminal wire representing the ATA variant course was measured. Of the 40 measurements, the intraluminal wire was directly in the bolt insertional path in 8 of 40 (20%) and within 5 mm in 16 of 40 (40%). All specimens had the wire cross the locking bolt insertional path at least once in each of the nails. The ATA variant taking a more lateral course deep to the extensor digitorum longus and peroneus tertius to overlay the lateral malleolus had the highest occurrence of measurements less than 5 mm. The close proximity of tibial nail distal locking bolt holes to ATA variants presents a risk for iatrogenic vascular injury during insertion. The coronal locking bolts pose the greatest iatrogenic risk to the most laterally positioned ATA variant.

  14. Improving tibial component coronal alignment during total knee arthroplasty with use of a tibial planing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shantanu; D'Lima, Darryl D; Fait, James M; Colwell, Clifford W

    2007-02-01

    The outcomes of knee arthroplasty have been shown to be affected by component alignment. Intramedullary and extramedullary alignment instrumentation are fairly effective for achieving the desired mean tibial component coronal alignment. However, there are outliers representing >3 degrees of varus or valgus alignment with respect to the anatomic tibial shaft axis. We measured the efficacy of a custom tibial planing device for reducing the outliers in tibial alignment. We designed a tibial planing tool in an effort to improve tibial alignment. In one cohort (100 knees), we used traditional intramedullary alignment instrumentation to make the tibial bone cut. In a second cohort (120 knees), we used intramedullary alignment instrumentation to make the cut and also used a custom tool to check the cut and to correct an inexact cut. Tibial tray alignment relative to the long axis of the tibial shaft was measured in the coronal and sagittal planes on postoperative radiographs. The target coronal alignment was 90 degrees with respect to the tibial shaft axis (with alignment). A total of 100 anteroposterior radiographs and sixty-five lateral radiographs were analyzed for the group that was treated with traditional instrumentation alone, and a total of 120 anteroposterior radiographs and fifty-five lateral radiographs were analyzed for the group that was treated with use of the custom tibial planing device. The mean coronal alignment of the tibial component was 89.5 degrees +/- 2.1 degrees in the group that was treated with traditional instrumentation alone and 89.6 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees in the group that was treated with use of the custom planing device. Although the mean coronal alignment was not significantly different, the number of outliers was substantially reduced when the custom planing device was used. All 120 components that had been aligned with use of the custom planing device were within 3 degrees of the target coronal alignment, compared with only eighty

  15. Return to Sport After Tibial Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Greg A. J.; Wood, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acute tibial shaft fractures represent one of the most severe injuries in sports. Return rates and return-to-sport times after these injuries are limited, particularly with regard to the outcomes of different treatment methods. Objective: To determine the current evidence for the treatment of and return to sport after tibial shaft fractures. Data Sources: OVID/MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration Database, Web of Science, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, and Google Sch...

  16. Application of cell and biomaterial-based tissue engineering methods in the treatment of cartilage, menisci and ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz; Richter, Magdalena; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Augustyniak, Ewelina; Lach, Michał; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Over 20 years ago it was realized that the traditional methods of the treatment of injuries to joint components: cartilage, menisci and ligaments, did not give satisfactory results and so there is a need of employing novel, more effective therapeutic techniques. Recent advances in molecular biology, biotechnology and polymer science have led to both the experimental and clinical application of various cell types, adapting their culture conditions in order to ensure a directed differentiation of the cells into a desired cell type, and employing non-toxic and non-immunogenic biomaterial in the treatment of knee joint injuries. In the present review the current state of knowledge regarding novel cell sources, in vitro conditions of cell culture and major important biomaterials, both natural and synthetic, used in cartilage, meniscus and ligament repair by tissue engineering techniques are described, and the assets and drawbacks of their clinical application are critically evaluated.

  17. Injury to the anterior tibial system during percutaneous plating of a proximal tibial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Joshua L; Sciadini, Marcus F

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures has grown in popularity in recent years. This article describes a patient with a Schatzker type VI proximal tibial fracture (AO/OTA type 41.C3) and previous compartment syndrome treated with definitive fixation 8 weeks after initial injury with a precontoured proximal tibial plate and a distal targeting device. Brisk bleeding occurred during percutaneous insertion of a cortical screw at the midshaft of the tibia. Surgical exploration revealed sidewall tearing of the anterior tibial artery and vein, which were clipped at the screw insertion site. After the bleeding was controlled, the patient had a strong palpable posterior tibial pulse with no palpable dorsalis pedis pulse, and the foot remained well perfused. Function of the deep peroneal nerve was normal postoperatively. Previous concerns regarding the percutaneous treatment of proximal tibial fractures have focused on the risks of damage to the superficial peroneal nerve from distal screws. Based on cadaveric studies, percutaneously and laterally based screw placement in the distal tibial metaphysis threatens injury to the anterior tibial system. However, with alterations to the normal anatomy caused by severe trauma, previously described safe zones may be changed and neurovascular structures may be exposed to risk in locations that were previously thought safe. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Anatomic single-bundle ACL surgery: consequences of tibial tunnel diameter and drill-guide angle on tibial footprint coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, H; Verhelst, L; Stuyts, B; Page, B; Bellemans, J; Verdonk, P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the consequences of differences in drill-guide angle and tibial tunnel diameter on the amount of tibial anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint coverage and the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. Twenty fresh-frozen adult human knee specimens with a median age of 46 years were used for this study. Digital templates mimicking the ellipsoid aperture of tibial tunnels with a different drill-guide angle and a different diameter were designed. The centres of these templates were positioned over the geometric centre of the tibial ACL footprint. The amount of tibial ACL footprint coverage and overhang was calculated. Risk factors for overhang were determined. Footprint coverage and the risk of overhang were also compared between a lateral tibial tunnel and a classic antero-medial tibial tunnel. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will create significant more footprint coverage and overhang. In 45% of the knees, an overhang was created with a 10-mm diameter tibial tunnel with drill-guide angle 45°. Furthermore, a lateral tibial tunnel was found not to be at increased risk of overhang. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will increase the amount of footprint coverage. Inversely, larger tibial tunnel diameters and smaller drill-guide angles will increase the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. A lateral tibial tunnel does not increase the risk of overhang.

  19. Osteochondritis of the Distal Tibial Epiphysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firass EL Hajj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis is a very rare entity. 9 cases have been described in 7 articles and 8 other cases have been mentioned in textbooks. This paper describes the 10th case of osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis and summarizes the clinical and radiological presentations of the 9 other cases. The etiology of this entity is well debated in the literature. We believe that it results from a vascular abnormality in the distal tibial epiphysis associated with a mechanical stress (trauma, excessive overload, etc.. Since it is a self-limited disease, the prognosis is good and the younger the patient is the better the prognosis will be. In general, this entity responds well to conservative treatment.

  20. Tibial Stress Injuries: Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of "Shin Splints."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Christopher J.; Karlson, Kristine A.

    2002-01-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called shin splints, often result when bone remodeling processes adopt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who are caring for athletic patients must have a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are…

  1. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunne...

  2. Tibial and fibular developmental fields defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, N.J.; Haddad, M.C.; Hourani, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Malformations of the lower limbs are rare and heterogeneous anomalies. To explain the diversity and complexity of these abnormalities, authors introduced the concept of tibial and fibular developmental fields. Defects in these fields are responsible for different malformations, which have been described, to our knowledge, in only one report in the radiology literature. We present a case of a newborn with femoral bifurcation, absent fibulae and talar bones, ankle and foot malformations, and associated atrial septal defect. Our case is an example of defects in both fibular and tibial developmental fields. (orig.)

  3. Contact Angle Effects on Pore and Corner Arc Menisci in Polygonal Capillary Tubes Studied with the Pseudopotential Multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoun Son

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In porous media, pore geometry and wettability are determinant factors for capillary flow in drainage or imbibition. Pores are often considered as cylindrical tubes in analytical or computational studies. Such simplification prevents the capture of phenomena occurring in pore corners. Considering the corners of pores is crucial to realistically study capillary flow and to accurately estimate liquid distribution, degree of saturation and dynamic liquid behavior in pores and in porous media. In this study, capillary flow in polygonal tubes is studied with the Shan-Chen pseudopotential multiphase lattice Boltzmann model (LBM. The LB model is first validated through a contact angle test and a capillary intrusion test. Then capillary rise in square and triangular tubes is simulated and the pore meniscus height is investigated as a function of contact angle θ. Also, the occurrence of fluid in the tube corners, referred to as corner arc menisci, is studied in terms of curvature versus degree of saturation. In polygonal capillary tubes, the number of sides leads to a critical contact angle θc which is known as a key parameter for the existence of the two configurations. LBM succeeds in simulating the formation of a pore meniscus at θ > θc or the occurrence of corner arc menisci at θ < θc. The curvature of corner arc menisci is known to decrease with increasing saturation and decreasing contact angle as described by the Mayer and Stoewe-Princen (MS-P theory. We obtain simulation results that are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the analytical solutions in terms of height of pore meniscus versus contact angle and curvature of corner arc menisci versus saturation degree. LBM is a suitable and promising tool for a better understanding of the complicated phenomena of multiphase flow in porous media.

  4. Anterior tibial curved cortex is a reliable landmark for tibial rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Jak; Lee, Ki Woong; Han, Hyuk Soo; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Myung Chul

    2017-06-12

    Rotational alignment of the tibial component is important for long-term success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study aimed to compare five axes in normal and osteoarthritic (OA) knees to determine a reliable landmark for tibial rotational alignment in TKA. One hundred twenty patients with OA knees and 40 with normal knees were included. The angle between a line perpendicular to the surgical transepicondylar axis and each of five axes were measured on preoperative computed tomography. The five axes were as follows: a line from the center of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) to the medial border of the patellar tendon (PCL-PT), medial border of the tibial tuberosity (PCL-TT1), medial one-third of the tibial tuberosity (PCL-TT2), and apex of the tibial tuberosity (PCL-TT3), as well as the anteroposterior axis of the tibial prosthesis along the anterior tibial curved cortex (ATCC). For all five axes tested, the mean angles were smaller in OA knees than in normal knees. In normal knees, the angle of the ATCC axis had the smallest mean value and narrowest range (1.6° ± 2.8°; range, -1.7°-7.7°). In OA knees, the mean angle of the ATCC axis (0.8° ± 2.7°; range, -7.9°-9.2°) was larger than that of the PCL-TT1 axis (0.3° ± 5.5°; range, -19.7°-10.6°) (P = 0.461), while the angle of the ATCC axis had the smallest SD and narrowest range. The ATCC was found to be the most reliable and useful anatomical landmark for tibial rotational alignment in TKA.

  5. Irreducible tibial pilon fracture caused by incarceration of the fibula in the tibial medullary canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellanti, Prasad; Hammad, Yassir; Kosutic, Damir; Grieve, Philip P

    2012-01-01

    Fractures can be irreducible for several reasons, including soft tissue or bone fragment interposition. We report an unusual fracture configuration of a comminuted tibial pilon fracture in which the distal fibular shaft fragment was occupying the medullary canal of the proximal tibial shaft fragment and inhibiting reduction and fixation. To the best of our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in a published study. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A posterior tibial tendon skipping rope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, M. N.; Haverkamp, D.; van Dijk, C. N.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an athletic patient with swelling and progressive pain on the posteromedial side of his right ankle on weight bearing. MRI demonstrated tenosynovitis and suspicion of a length rupture. On posterior tibial tendoscopy, there was no rupture, but medial from the tendon a tissue cord

  7. TIBIAL LANDMARKS IN ACL ANATOMIC REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Demesсhenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify anatomical landmarks on tibial articular surface to serve as reference in preparing tibial canal with respect to the center of ACL footprint during single bundle arthroscopic repair.Materials and methods. Twelve frozen knee joint specimens and 68 unpaired macerated human tibia were studied using anatomical, morphometric, statistical methods as well as graphic simulation.Results. Center of the tibial ACL footprint was located 13,1±1,7 mm anteriorly from posterior border of intercondylar eminence, at 1/3 of the distance along the line connecting apexes of internal and external tubercles and 6,1±0,5 mm anteriorly along the perpendicular raised to this point.Conclusion. Internal and external tubercles, as well as posterior border of intercondylar eminence can be considered as anatomical references to determine the center of the tibial ACL footprint and to prepare bone canals for anatomic ligament repair.

  8. Kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and abnormal tibial contact kinematics during passive flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2017-09-07

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), high tibial forces, large differences in tibial forces between the medial and lateral compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion indicate abnormal knee function. Because the goal of kinematically aligned TKA is to restore native knee function without soft tissue release, the objectives were to determine how well kinematically aligned TKA limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion. Using cruciate retaining components, kinematically aligned TKA was performed on thirteen human cadaveric knee specimens with use of manual instruments without soft tissue release. The tibial forces and tibial contact locations were measured in both the medial and lateral compartments from 0° to 120° of passive flexion using a custom tibial force sensor. The average total tibial force (i.e. sum of medial + lateral) ranged from 5 to 116 N. The only significant average differences in tibial force between compartments occurred at 0° of flexion (29 N, p = 0.0008). The contact locations in both compartments translated posteriorly in all thirteen kinematically aligned TKAs by an average of 14 mm (p forces due to the soft tissue restraints were limited to 116 N, average differences in tibial forces between compartments were limited to 29 N, and a net posterior translation of the tibial contact locations was observed in all kinematically aligned TKAs during passive flexion from 0° to 120°, which are similar to what has been measured previously in native knees. While confirmation in vivo is warranted, these findings give surgeons who perform kinematically aligned TKA confidence that the alignment method and surgical technique limit high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between

  9. Effect of lesion location on fixation strength of the meniscal viper repair system: an in vitro study using porcine menisci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haw Chong; Caborn, David N M; Nyland, John; Burden, Robert

    2006-04-01

    The Meniscal Viper Repair System (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a novel suture-based all-inside meniscal repair system. This study was performed to test whether the Meniscal Viper Repair System would provide superior fixation characteristics for vertical longitudinal meniscal lesions located closer to the periphery compared with those located further away from the periphery. Vertical longitudinal lesions were created either 1 to 2 mm or 3 to 4 mm away from the periphery of porcine menisci. After repair with the Meniscal Viper Repair System, fixation characteristics were studied during cyclic (500 cycles, 5 to 50 N) and load to failure testing (5 mm/min) in a servo hydraulic device. Meniscal lesion repair location did not show significant differences in displacement or stiffness during cyclic testing. During load to failure testing, meniscal lesion repairs located 1 to 2 mm from the periphery showed superior load at failure (188.8 +/- 45.4 N) compared with repairs located 3 to 4 mm from the periphery (114.4 +/- 35.0 N) (P = .01). Stiffness and displacement during load to failure testing did not show statistically significant differences. The Meniscal Viper Repair System provides stronger meniscal repair strength when lesions are located within 1 to 2 mm of the periphery. The Meniscal Viper Repair System is better suited for repair of peripheral meniscal lesions located within 1 to 2 mm of the periphery. For lesions located in zone 2 (within the central 50%), careful assessment of their distance from the periphery is recommended. For lesions located more than 3 to 4 mm away from the periphery, alternative repair systems or augmentation with other devices may be prudent.

  10. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the tibial shaft are relatively common injuries. There are indications that tibial shaft fractures share characteristics in terms of site, type and local fracture mechanisms. In this study, we aimed to set up a mathematical, computer-based model using finite element...... of bony healing. The biomechanical results are the basis for fracture healing, biomechanical fall analysis and stability analysis of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A finite element model of the bony part of the lower leg was generated on the basis of computed tomography data from the Visible Human...... Project. The data consisted of 21,219 3D elements with a cortical shell and a trabecular core. Three types of load of torsion, a direct lateral load and axial compression were applied. RESULTS: The finite element linear static analysis resulted in relevant fracture localizations and indicated relevant...

  11. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the tibial shaft are relatively common injuries. There are indications that tibial shaft fractures share characteristics in terms of site, type and local fracture mechanisms. In this study, we aimed to set up a mathematical, computer-based model using finite element...... analysis of the bones of the lower leg to examine if such a model is adequate for prediction of fracture locations and patterns. In future studies, we aim to use these biomechanical results to examine fracture prevention, among others, and to simulate different types of osteosynthesis and the process...... of bony healing. The biomechanical results are the basis for fracture healing, biomechanical fall analysis and stability analysis of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A finite element model of the bony part of the lower leg was generated on the basis of computed tomography data from the Visible Human...

  12. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA. Background and Purpose. A stress fracture in the high performance collegiate athlete presents a difficult problem...et al. (1987) noted that varus malalignment (genu & tibial) was often present in athletes with stress fractures. This patient exhibits significant...force and neural potentiation in athletes . Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 22:2, S69, April, 1990. Ebbeling, C. J., Hamill, J., Freedson

  13. Anterior Tibial Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Tor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aneurysmsatic changes of the infrapopliteal arteries are rarely seen. They are pseudoaneurysms rather than true aneursyms. The most important cause of them is trauma. There is not a standart treatment for infrapopliteal aneursyms. In this study, we have evaluated a case operated for anterior tibial artery pseudoaneurysm developed after penetrant trauma and diagnosed two weeks later. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(3.000: 172-175

  14. Systematic radiographic evaluation of tibial hemimelia with orthopedic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan-List, Katia [Rochester General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Rochester, NY (United States); Klionsky, Nina B. [University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rochester, NY (United States); Sanders, James O. [University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rochester, NY (United States); Katz, Michael E. [St. Mary' s Medical Center and Palm Beach Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare lower-extremity pre-axial longitudinal deficiency characterized by complete or partial absence of the tibia. The reported incidence is 1 in 1 million live births. In this pictorial essay, we define tibial hemimelia and describe associated conditions and principles of preoperative imaging assessment for a child with tibial hemimelia. We also indicate the imaging findings that might influence the choice of treatment, describe the most widely used classification systems, and briefly discuss current treatment approaches. (orig.)

  15. Systematic radiographic evaluation of tibial hemimelia with orthopedic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan-List, Katia; Klionsky, Nina B.; Sanders, James O.; Katz, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare lower-extremity pre-axial longitudinal deficiency characterized by complete or partial absence of the tibia. The reported incidence is 1 in 1 million live births. In this pictorial essay, we define tibial hemimelia and describe associated conditions and principles of preoperative imaging assessment for a child with tibial hemimelia. We also indicate the imaging findings that might influence the choice of treatment, describe the most widely used classification systems, and briefly discuss current treatment approaches. (orig.)

  16. Radiographic quantitative assessment of cranial tibial subluxation before and after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley E; Lewis, Daniel D; Pozzi, Antonio; Seibert, Rachel L; Winter, Matthew D

    2011-03-01

    To determine the influence of stifle joint flexion angle, cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) integrity, tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO), and cranial tibial subluxation on the distance between the location of the origin and insertion of the CrCL (CrCL(d)) in dogs. 4 pairs of pelvic limbs from adult dog cadavers weighing 23 to 34 kg. Procedures-Mediolateral projection radiographs of each stifle joint were obtained with the joint flexed at 90°, 105°, 120°, 135°, and 150°. Radiopaque markers were then placed at the sites of origin and insertion of the CrCL. Afterward, radiography was repeated in the same manner, before and after CrCL transection, with and without TPLO. Following CrCL transection, radiographs were obtained before and after inducing overt cranial tibial subluxation. Interobserver variation in measuring the CrCL(d) without fiduciary markers was assessed. The effect of CrCL integrity, cranial tibial subluxation, flexion angle, and TPLO on CrCL(d) was also determined. Interobserver agreement was strong, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.859. The CrCL(d) was significantly shorter (Cranial tibial subluxation caused a 25% to 40% increase in CrCL(d). No effect of TPLO on CrCL(d) was found, regardless of CrCL integrity, forced stifle joint subluxation, or flexion angle. Overt cranial tibial subluxation in CrCL-deficient stifle joints can be detected on mediolateral projection radiographs by comparing CrCL(d) on neutral and stressed joint radiographs at joint angles between 105° and 150°, regardless of whether a TPLO has been performed.

  17. A retrospective study of tibial plateau translation following tibial plateau levelling osteotomy stabilisation using three different plate types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbridge, N; Corr, S A; Grierson, J; Arthurs, G

    2011-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate mediolateral translation of the proximal tibial segment (tibial plateau) after tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO), stabilised with three types of plate. Pre- and postoperative radiographs of 79 dogs that had TPLO surgery using three different types of plates were reviewed. Two plate types incorporated non-locking screws: Slocum (22 cases) and Orthomed Delta (33 cases) plates. The third plate type incorporated locking screws: Synthes TPLO Locking Compression Plate (LCP) (24 cases). The radiographs were viewed by three Diplomate surgeons who were blinded to the type of implant used. Medial or lateral translation of the proximal tibial plateau relative to the tibial diaphysis was assessed and measured at the lateral tibial cortex at the osteotomy site. Mean lateral translation of the tibial plateau was significantly greater when using the Synthes TPLO LCP with locking screws (+2.1 mm) compared to the non-locking Slocum (+0.4 mm) or Orthomed Delta (0.0 mm) plates. The use of the Synthes TPLO LCP will maintain a malalignment of the tibial plateau. Accurate alignment of the tibial plateau must be ensured prior to application of the Synthes TPLO LCP.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with tibial attachment preserving hamstring graft without implant on tibial side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skand Sinha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial attachment preserving hamstring graft could prevent potential problems of free graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction such as pull out before graft-tunnel healing or rupture before ligamentization. Different implants have been reportedly used for tibial side fixation with this technique. We investigated short-term outcome of ACL reconstruction (ACLR with tibial attachment sparing hamstring graft without implant on the tibial side by outside in technique. Materials and Methods: Seventy nine consecutive cases of ACL tear having age of 25.7 ± 6.8 years were included after Institutional Board Approval. All subjects were male. The mean time interval from injury to surgery was of 7.5 ± 6.4 months. Hamstring tendons were harvested with open tendon stripper leaving the tibial insertion intact. The free ends of the tendons were whip stitched, quadrupled, and whip stitched again over the insertion site of hamstring with fiber wire (Arthrex. Single bundle ACLR was done by outside in technique and the femoral tunnel was created with cannulated reamer. The graft was pulled up to the external aperture of femoral tunnel and fixed with interference screw (Arthrex. The scoring was done by Lysholm, Tegner, and KT 1000 by independent observers. All cases were followed up for 2 years. Results: The mean length of quadrupled graft attached to tibia was 127.65 ± 7.5 mm, and the mean width was 7.52 ± 0.78 mm. The mean preoperative Lysholm score of 47.15 ± 9.6, improved to 96.8 ± 2.4 at 1 year. All cases except two returned to the previous level of activity after ACLR. There was no significant difference statistically between preinjury (5.89 ± 0.68 and postoperative (5.87 ± 0.67 Tegner score. The anterior tibial translation (ATT (KT 1000 improved from 11.44 ± 1.93 mm to 3.59 ± 0.89 mm. The ATT of operated knee returned to nearly the similar value as of the opposite knee (3.47 ± 1.16 mm. The Pivot shift test was negative in

  19. Reconstruction of bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tibial aplasia is of heterogeneous aetiology, the majority of reports are sporadic. We describe the reconstruction procedures in two subjects - a daughter and father manifested autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance of the bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot syndrome. Materials and Methods: ...

  20. Tibial sequestrectomy in the management of Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trail, I A

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of patients with symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease were compared over a 4-5 year follow-up period. One group was treated surgically by tibial sequestrectomy and the other group was managed conservatively. Tibial sequestrectomy was found to offer no significant benefit over simple conservative methods of treatment. In addition, a significant complication rate was identified with this procedure.

  1. Tibial Plateau Fracture Characteristics: Reliability and Diagnostic Accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Jos J.; Doornberg, Job N.; Molenaars, Rik J.; Ring, David; Kloen, Peter; Babis, George C.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Prayson, Michael J.; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Acacio, Ramos; Verbeek, Diederik O.; Melvanki, Parag; Kreis, Barbara E.; Mehta, Samir; Meylaerts, S.; Wojtek, S.; Yeap, Ewe J.; Haapasalo, Heidi; Kristan, Anže; Coles, Chad; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Mormino, Matthew; Memon, Matthew; Tyllianakis, Minos; Schandelmaier, Peter; Jenkinson, R. J.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Shahriar, Chegini M. H.; Belangero, William D.; Leonidovich, Golovakha M.; Davenport, J. H.; Kabir, Koroush; Althausen, Peter L.; Weil, Yoram; Toom, Alar; Sa da Costa, Daniel; Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Manidakis, Nikolaos; van den Bogaert, Max; Patczai, Balázs; Grauls, Anthony; Kurup, Harish; van den Bekerom, Michel P.; Lansdaal, Joris R.; Vale, Mário; Ousema, Paul; Barquet, Antonio; Cross, Brian J.; Broekhuyse, Henry; Haverkamp, Daniel; Merchant, Milind; Harvey, Edward; Stojkovska Pemovska, Emilija; Frihagen, Frede; Seibert, Franz Josef; Garnavos, Christos; van der Heide, Huub; Villamizar, Harold Alonso; Harris, Ian; Borris, Lars C.; Brink, Ole; Choudhari, Pradeep; Swiontkowski, Marc; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Tosounidis, Theodoros; van Rensen, Inge; Martinelli, N.; Park, D. H.; Lasanianos, Nikolaos; Vide, J.; Engvall, A.; Zura, R. D.; Jubel, Axel; Kawaguchi, Alan; Goost, Hans; Bishop, Julius; Mica, Ladislav; Pirpiris, Marinis; van Helden, S. H.; Bouaicha, Samy; Schepers, T.; Havliček, Tomo; Giordano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the interobserver reliability and diagnostic accuracy for 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT)-based evaluation of tibial plateau fracture characteristics. We hypothesized that recognition of specific tibial plateau fracture

  2. The influence of gluteus maximus on transverse plane tibial rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preece, S.J.; Graham-Smith, P.; Nester, C.J.; Howard, D.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Herrington, L.; Bowker, P.

    There is a common clinical belief that transverse plane tibial rotation is controlled by the rearfoot. Although distal structures may influence the motion of the tibia, transverse plane tibial rotation could be determined by the proximal hip musculature. Cadaver studies have identified gluteus

  3. Coverage of extensive tibial bone exposure in burn patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Covering tibial bone exposure from third degree burns to the lower limbs is a challenging task for the plastic surgeon. We present our experience of covering tibial exposure from burns in three different patients, where four limbs were involved and three muscular flaps were used in conjunction with one another; i.e. the ...

  4. Posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions: topographic anatomy and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide anatomical and morphometric basis of the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions in order to assist the creation of anatomical tibial tunnels, in the ligament surgical reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The topographic anatomy and morphometry of the posterior cruciate ligament's anterolateral and posteromedial bundles' tibial insertions were analyzed in 24 anatomical knee pieces. The pieces were photographed by a digital camera and the images obtained were studied by the software ImageJ, where the bundles' insertion areas were measured in square millimeters, and the length of structures and the distances between significant points were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: In 54.2% of the knees the insertion' shape was concave; in most pieces (41.6% the form of insertion was oval. The average posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion total area was 88.33 ± 21.66 mm2; the average anterolateral bundle's tibial insertion area was 46.79 ± 14.10 mm2 and it was 41.54 ± 9.75 mm2 for the posteromedial bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The anterolateral bundle has a tibial insertion area larger than the posteromedial bundle; the insertion areas of those bundles in our study, were smaller than the ones found in the literature. The variations in the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion area suggest that there should be an indication for anatomical reconstructions of this ligament using single or double tibial tunnels according to individual characteristics.

  5. Increased external tibial torsion and osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, J. A. M.; Maas, M.; Dallinga, R. J.; te Slaa, R. L.; Vergroesen, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    In the past, osteochondritis dissecans of the knee was associated with increased tibial exotorsion, established with a clinical measuring method. Now the gold standard for determining tibial torsion is computed tomography. The aim of the current study was to establish whether the abovementioned

  6. Therapeutical Management of the Tibial Plateau Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obada B.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to identify the role of surgical treatment of tibial plateau fractures, its functional outcome and complications. Demographic data for the patients and details of current clinical and radiological follow-up findings were obtained to assess range of motion, clinical stability, alignment of the knee, and posttraumatic arthrosis (Kellgren/Lawrence score. 64 cases of tibial plateau fractures treated by different surgical methods and variuos implants type were studied from 2013 to 2015 and followed-up for minimum period of 6 months. The systematisation of the casuitry was made using Schatzker and AO classifications. The treatment methods consist of: percutaneous cannulated cancellous screws, ORIF with buttress plate with or without bone grafting, locking or nonlocking plates, external fixator. As complications we found: redepression 4 case, malunion 2 cases, knee stiffness 9, wound dehiscence in 1 cases and non-union or infection in none of our cases. The average flexion of the injured knee was significantly lower in comparison with the contralateral side (124.9°/135.2°. Knee stability did not differ statistically significantly. There were no signs of posttraumatic arthrosis in 45% of cases, mild signs in 30%, clear signs in 18%, and severe signs in 7%. As conclusion we found that surgical management of tibial plateau fractures will give excellent anatomical reduction and rigid fixation to restore articular congruity, facilitate early motion and reduce arthrosis risk and hence to achieve optimal knee function. The choice of optimal surgical methods, proper approach and implant is made in relation to fracture type according Schatzker and AO classification.

  7. [Closed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verret, G

    1995-08-01

    To assess patient outcome after nailing of the tibial shaft with the unreamed AO/ASIF nail. A retrospective study of 54 nailed fractures of the tibial shaft treated between 1990 and 1994. Follow-up was done at the outpatient clinic and included measurements of the lower limbs and x-rays. The study was conducted at the Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, a centre specializing in trauma care. Fifty-four acute displaced fractures of the tibial shaft occurring in 52 patients were studied. Nailing with the Synthes AO/ASIF unreamed locked nails. Time to bone fusion, rate of infection, incidence of deformity and failure rate of the implants, especially the lock screws. The majority of fractures were associated with a high-speed trauma (40/54 or 74% of cases) and 18 (33%) were open fractures. Osteitis developed in one (1.8%) open type IIIA fracture. Bone fusion was observed clinically and radiologically after 29 weeks on average; none of the fractures presented residual deformity on rotation of more than 5 degrees or a difference in length of more than 1 cm or a frontal or sagittal displacement of more than 10 degrees. A single case of pseudoarthrosis was noted. One or more lock screws became deformed or broke in 16 (34%) tibias; however, this did not lead to any reduction loss. Four compartment syndromes were diagnosed. Excellent results were obtained with respect to limb alignment and length. Loss of joint mobility was minimal. The number of lock screw failures indicates that a delayed weight bearing could prevent this complication, especially when an interfragment space remains after the nail placement.

  8. Effects of counteracting external valgus moment on lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions and tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriram, Duraisamy; Parween, Rizuwana; Lee, Yee Han Dave; Subburaj, Karupppasamy

    2017-07-01

    Knee osteoarthritis that prevalently occurs at the medial compartment is a progressive chronic disorder affecting the articular cartilage of the knee joint, and lead to loss of joint functionality. Valgus braces have been used as a treatment procedure to unload the medial compartment for patients with medial osteoarthritis. Valgus braces through the application of counteracting external valgus moment shift the load from medial compartment towards the lateral compartment. Previous biomechanical studies focused only on the changes in varus moments before and after wearing the brace. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of opposing external valgus moment applied by knee braces on the lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions using a 3D finite element model of the knee joint. Finite element simulations were performed on the knee joint model without and with the application of opposing valgus moment to mimic the unbraced and braced conditions. Lateral tibial cartilage contact pressures and contact area, and tibial rotation (varus-valgus and internal-external) were estimated for the complete walking gait cycle. The opposing valgus moment increased the maximum contact pressure and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage compared to the normal gait moment. A peak contact pressure of 8.2 MPa and maximum cartilage loaded area of 28% (loaded cartilage nodes) on the lateral cartilage with the application of external valgus moment were induced at 50% of the gait cycle. The results show that the use of opposing valgus moment may significantly increase the maximum contact pressures and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage and increases the risk of articular cartilage damage on the lateral compartment.

  9. Return to Sport After Tibial Shaft Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Greg A. J.; Wood, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acute tibial shaft fractures represent one of the most severe injuries in sports. Return rates and return-to-sport times after these injuries are limited, particularly with regard to the outcomes of different treatment methods. Objective: To determine the current evidence for the treatment of and return to sport after tibial shaft fractures. Data Sources: OVID/MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration Database, Web of Science, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, and Google Scholar were all searched for articles published from 1988 to 2014. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria comprised studies of level 1 to 4 evidence, written in the English language, that reported on the management and outcome of tibial shaft fractures and included data on either return-to-sport rate or time. Studies that failed to report on sporting outcomes, those of level 5 evidence, and those in non–English language were excluded. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: The search used combinations of the terms tibial, tibia, acute, fracture, athletes, sports, nonoperative, conservative, operative, and return to sport. Two authors independently reviewed the selected articles and created separate data sets, which were subsequently combined for final analysis. Results: A total of 16 studies (10 retrospective, 3 prospective, 3 randomized controlled trials) were included (n = 889 patients). Seventy-six percent (672/889) of the patients were men, with a mean age of 27.7 years. Surgical management was assessed in 14 studies, and nonsurgical management was assessed in 8 studies. Return to sport ranged from 12 to 54 weeks after surgical intervention and from 28 to 182 weeks after nonsurgical management (mean difference, 69.5 weeks; 95% CI, –83.36 to −55.64; P Fractures treated surgically had a return-to-sport rate of 92%, whereas those treated nonsurgically had a return rate of 67% (risk ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.57; P displaced fractures

  10. [Treatment of Tibial Shaft Fractures with the Stable Angle Tibial Nail Targon TX].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielnicki, M; Prokop, A

    2016-10-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are among the most common long bone fractures in humans. The incidence is 1-2 per 100,000. The gold standard of treatment for AO type 42 A-C fractures is a locking intramedullary nail. The development of new implants has extended the indications for this minimally invasive technique, so that now AO types 41 and 43 can also be treated with special nails. Fixed-angle screw anchors increase primary stability and supplemental locking devices located proximally and distally extend the spectrum of use to metaphyseal fractures. The cannulated Targon TX titanium nail can be introduced, either with or without reaming. Using an operative video, the treatment of a tibial fracture with an intramedullary nail is demonstrated in stages and the operative steps further illustrated on artificial bone. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Tibial bowing in children - what is normal? A radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, Isabella; Rutz, Erich; Jacobson, Jon A.; Magerkurth, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    To define osseous landmarks on tibia radiographs in order to establish age-related normal values characterizing physiological tibial bowing in children. Five hundred and twenty-six patients aged 0-17 years with normal radiographs of the lower legs were identified and retrospectively reviewed by two blinded radiologists. In anteroposterior (ap)/lateral (lat)-views, 3 lines defined tibial length and angulation. Line-A connecting proximal to distal corner of tibial metaphysic, lines B and C corresponding to corners of tibial metaphysis. Angle A/B defines proximal, A/C distal tibial-angulation. Tibial curvature is defined by distance of line-D parallel to A and tangential to tibial cortex. Normal values were calculated with linear-regression. Intra-/Interreader agreement were tested with a Bland-Altman-plot. Intrareader-agreement: Reader 1 showed a bias of -0.1, standard-deviation of bias was 1.9 and 95 %-limits-of-agreement -3.9- 3.7. Reader 2: -0.01, 2.4 and -4.7- 4.7. Interreader: 0.2, 1.6 and -2.9- 3.3. Angle-A/B ap was 80-100 , increasing with age (86.5-88); angle-AC ap was 82-107 (96.8-90.5), angle-AB lat was 81-107 (93.0-98.0); angle-AC lat was 76-102 (89.5-86.5); depth of curve ap was 0-11 % (8-3.5) and lat 2-13 %, (8.5-3.5). Age dependent tibial bowing can be assessed with this new measurement system and age-related normal-values characterizing physiological tibial bowing in children is established. (orig.)

  12. The anatomical tibial axis: reliable rotational orientation in knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J P; Dixon, H; Dandachli, W; Iranpour, F

    2008-08-01

    The rotational alignment of the tibia is an unresolved issue in knee replacement. A poor functional outcome may be due to malrotation of the tibial component. Our aim was to find a reliable method for positioning the tibial component in knee replacement. CT scans of 19 knees were reconstructed in three dimensions and orientated vertically. An axial plane was identified 20 mm below the tibial spines. The centre of each tibial condyle was calculated from ten points taken round the condylar cortex. The tibial tubercle centre was also generated as the centre of the circle which best fitted eight points on the outside of the tubercle in an axial plane at the level of its most prominent point. The derived points were identified by three observers with errors of 0.6 mm to 1 mm. The medial and lateral tibial centres were constant features (radius 24 mm (SD 3), and 22 mm (SD 3), respectively). An anatomical axis was created perpendicular to the line joining these two points. The tubercle centre was found to be 20 mm (SD 7) lateral to the centre of the medial tibial condyle. Compared with this axis, an axis perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was internally rotated by 6 degrees (SD 3). An axis based on the tibial tubercle and the tibial spines was also internally rotated by 5 degrees (sd 10). Alignment of the knee when based on this anatomical axis was more reliable than either the posterior surfaces or any axis involving the tubercle which was the least reliable landmark in the region.

  13. Patella height changes post high tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ghim Gooi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO is a well-described treatment in early medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. However, two undesirable sequelae may follow –patella baja and changes in the posterior tibial slope (TS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in patients who underwent HTO in our center between September 2009 and February 2017. Preoperative and 6-week postoperative long-leg weight bearing films and lateral knee radiographs were assessed. Pre- and postoperative radiological measurements include the Caton-Deschamps Index (CDI, the mechanical axis deviation (MAD, and the posterior TS. Independant t-test and Pearson correlation test were performed. Results: A total of 106 knees were recruited. The mean age was 48.8 ± 10.8 years. 66 (62.3% and 40 (37.7% knees were from males and females, respectively. The mean pre- and postoperative measurements was (−9.70° ± 3.67° to 0.08° ± 2.80° (−varus; +valgus for the MAD, (7.14° ± 1.78° to 8.72° ± 3.11° for posterior TS, and (0.93° ± 0.084° to 0.82° ± 0.13° for CDI (P ≤ 0.001 for all. The association between patella height change and the level of osteotomy (supra-tubercle vs. infra-tubercle was statistically significant (P < 0.001. A supra-tubercle osteotomy cut significantly lowering patella height (P = 0.011. There was otherwise no statistically significant correlations between patella height changes and the correction angle (P = 0.187 or posterior TS change (P = 0.744. Conclusions: A medial opening wedge HTO above the tibial tubercle was significantly associated with lowering patella height or reducing CDI postoperatively. Based on our results, we would recommend the use of an infra-tubercle osteotomy during the corrective surgery to prevent the complication of patella baja.

  14. External skeletal fixation of the tibial shaft fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Milenković Saša; Mitković Milorad B.; Radenković Mile

    2005-01-01

    Aim. To present the possibility of a successful use of external skeletal fixation in treating the open and closed tibial shaft fractures with Mitković’s external fixator. Methods. External fixation was used in 115 patients with 118 fresh tibial shaft fractures, 82 males (71.3%) and 33 females (28.7%), average age 43.92 years (16−84). Open tibial shaft fractures were present in 37 (31.36%). All the fractures were treated with Mitković’s external fixator type M 20. Results. The results of exter...

  15. A novel jig arm to measure tibial plateau angle during tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restle, Kyle N; Biskup, Jeffery J

    2017-10-01

    To determine the ability of a novel device attached to the proximal tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) jig pin to accurately predict intraoperative change in tibial plateau angle (TPA). In vitro cadaveric study. Left hindlimbs of adult dogs (n = 9). A modified Slocum tibial plateau leveling (TPL) jig with the Rotational Osteotomy Measuring Arm (ROMA) was placed on the tibia and a radial TPLO osteotomy was performed. Based on preoperative radiographic TPA measurements, the proximal segment was rotated using the traditional method of marking points on the osteotomy a specified distance apart. After rotation, the predicted TPA was recorded based on the ROMA. Postoperative TPA was measured on radiographs. The ability of the ROMA to predict postoperative TPA was compared to that of the traditional method. The average final TPA achieved with the traditional method was 6.4° (range, 3.0-10.0°). The ROMA predicted a final TPA of 5.8° (range, 3.8-10.1°). No significant difference was found between the TPA predicted based on the traditional method and ROMA method. The ROMA may be an alternative to the traditional method of measuring proximal segment rotation during TPLO procedure. Performing a TPLO with the ROMA may accurately predict the postoperative TPA while eliminating the need for measuring chord length, making reference marks, or referencing TPA charts for various osteotomy blade sizes. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good.

  17. Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrö, A; Lamppu, M; Böstman, O

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-four displaced tibial shaft fractures were treated using intramedullary nailing, either primarily or after an attempt at conservative treatment, which consisted of closed reduction under anaesthesia and immobilisation in a long-leg plaster cast. There were 37 closed and 27 open fractures. Three patients had a fracture of both tibiae. The median time period from the intramedullary nailing of the closed solitary fractures to union was about the same after primary nailing as after delayed nailing. Although the fractures were different in these groups, it is possible that the time spent in conservative treatment before intramedullary nailing brings no additional benefits. The incidence of deep infection in open fractures after primary nailing was 1/16. The fractures, in which an acceptable position could not be maintained using conservative methods, were mainly spiral in configuration and located in the distal third or at the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the tibia.

  18. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction techniques should be considered if anatomic fracture alignment cannot be achieved by closed means. Favorable union rates above 90 % can be achieved by both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Despite favorable union rates, patients continue to have functional long-term impairments. In particular, anterior knee pain remains a common complaint following intramedullary tibial nailing. Malrotation remains a commonly reported complication after tibial nailing. The effect of postoperative tibial malalignment on the clinical and radiographic outcome requires further investigation.

  19. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases a% local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 4 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  20. Do Capacitively Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases at local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 2-3 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  1. Do Capacitively Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases at local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 2-3 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  2. Management of Posterior Articular Depression in Tibial Plateau Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John David; Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Fractures involving the posterior aspect of the tibial plateau are challenging fractures to treat. Articular depression in tibial plateau fractures is usually addressed by elevation of the fragment(s), filling the residual defect with bone graft or bone substitute, and "raft" support of the articular fracture reduction with screws through a medially and/or laterally based plate. Posterior tibial plateau articular depression presents unique challenges for obtaining and maintaining fracture reduction. To obtain the goals of anatomic reduction and stable fixation, a thorough understanding of the fracture, specific approaches, reduction techniques, and stabilization strategies is needed. This article reviews the most current strategies for treating tibial plateau fracture patients with posterior articular depression. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    USA Corresponding author Belinda R. Beck, Ph.D. Griffith University School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre Q...accelerate tibial stress fracture healing? Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise , 31(5, Suppl. 1): 2006 2. Beck B.R., Bergman G., Arendt E...Predicting Recovery from Tibial Stress Fracture Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise , 31(5, Suppl. 1): 2007 (submitted) 15 Presentations

  4. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Treatment of Pediatric Tibial Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Gurung; Dipendra KC; Roshni Khatri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tibia fractures in the skeletally immature patient can usually be treated with above knee cast or patellar tendon bearing cast. The purpose of our study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of Elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixation of pediatric tibial shaft fractures treated at our institution. Methods: Over a period of one year, fifty pediatric patients of tibial shaft fractures, with average age of 9.68 yr (SD=2.37), were treated with elastic stable intramedul...

  5. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Results Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Interpretation Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence—especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted. PMID:22489887

  6. Displaced tibial shaft fractures treated with ASIF compression internal fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Larsen, T K; Petersen, O C

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one tibial shaft fractures treated by ASIF compression osteosynthesis were seen at follow-up at a median time of 46 weeks after injury. Twenty-four were open fractures and the patients received prophylactic antibiotics. The median stay in hospital was 15 days for open fractures and 6 days...... for closed fractures. There were complications in 26 cases, with deep infection in 9 cases. At present we cannot advocate the use of ASIF compression osteosynthesis for displaced tibial fractures....

  7. [Custom-designed 3D tibial augmentation for knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirman, R; Vavrík, P; Horák, Z

    2009-02-01

    Reconstruction with the use of custom-made implants aims at optimal replacement of lost or damaged bone structures and restoration of their funkction. In this study the development and construction of a custom-made implant and the operative technique used for the treatment of an extensive tibial defect are described. The patient was a 65-year-old man treated for over 20 years for psoriatic arthritis and severe instability of the right knee, particularly in the frontal plane, with a worsening varus deformity. The radiogram showed an extensive destruction of the medial tibial condyle that also deeply involved the lateral condyle. The extent of defect made it impossible to use any commercial tibial augmentation. The geometry of the custom-designed implant for the medial tibial condyle was constructed on the basis of a 3D defect model and the shape of the medial tibial condyle of the collateral knee seen on CT scans. After its correct shape was verified on a plastic model, its coordinates were set in the software of a machine tool, and a titanium augmentation otherwise compatible with a standard knee replacement was produced.The use of such a custom implant to complete standard total knee arthroplasty has so far been demanding in terms of organisation and manufacture. Its production in the future could be facilitated by substituting titanium for plastic material such as poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Key words: custom-made implant, tibial augmentation, knee prosthesis.

  8. Nonreamed interlocked intramedullary tibial nailing. One community's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwelius, P J; Schmidt, A H; Rubinstein, R A; Green, J M

    1995-06-01

    Forty-nine acute displaced tibial fractures (31 closed, 18 open: 5 Grade I, 7 Grade II, 4 Grade IIIA, and 2 Grade IIIB) were treated in 1 community with a standard operative protocol using a distractor without a fracture table, and an unreamed interlocked tibial nail. Forty-six fractures healed (94%). Complications included 3 nonunions (6%), 2 deep infections (4%), 9 delayed unions (18%), 4 angular malunions (8%), 2 rotatory malunions (4%), and 12 interlocking screws bent or broke (24%). Twenty-eight patients (57%) required at least 1 additional operation to obtain union, most commonly dynamization of a statically locked nail. The authors conclude that unreamed tibial nails provide adequate stabilization of displaced tibial fractures and can be used in the management of most open or closed tibial fractures. However, static locking is required in axially unstable fractures. Early dynamization or exchange nailing and bone grafting should be considered to hasten union and avoid screw failure. The distractor is an excellent adjunctive technique for reduction and alignment of tibial shaft fractures during intramedullary nailing.

  9. Eight years' clinical experience with the Orthofix tibial nailing system in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babis, George C; Benetos, Ioannis S; Karachalios, Theofilos; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2007-02-01

    Intramedullary nailing has become a popular and effective procedure for the treatment of most tibial fractures. However, concerns regarding difficulties with reduction, the use and extent of intramedullary reaming, and hardware failure are probably the only constraints to its widespread use. In this prospective study, we present the clinical and radiographic results of the Orthofix tibial nailing system used in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. One hundred and fifteen fresh tibial fractures in the same number of patients with a mean age of 37.5 years (17-85 years) were treated with operative stabilisation using the Orthofix tibial nailing system. All of the operations took place in a conventional operating theatre, on a simple tranlucent operating table and with manual reduction of the fracture. In the majority of the cases closed reduction and conventional reaming were performed and the mean duration of the operation was 38 min. Fracture healing occurred at 16 weeks (11-30 weeks) and was confirmed both clinically and radiographically. In six cases (two severely comminuted and four segmental fractures) delayed union occurred, however there were no tibial non-unions necessitating re-operation. There were no substantial differences in time to fracture union or in the rate of complications related to minimal open reduction. In addition, there seem to be more benefits than risks in the use of power intramedullary reaming during intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures. In conclusion, most tibial shaft fractures can effectively and safely be treated using this type of locking intramedullary nailing device, with relatively few complications, and with satisfactory long-term clinical results.

  10. In vitro comparison of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy with and without use of a tibial plateau leveling jig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerbach, Kay Ingo; Boeltzig, Christian Konrad Matthias; Reif, Ullrich; Wieser, Jan Carsten; Keller, Thomas; Grevel, Vera

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of a tibial plateau leveling jig on osteotomy orientation, fragment reduction, and postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA) during tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). In vitro experimental study. Large-breed canine cadavers (n=20). TPLO was performed on 40 hindlimbs using 4 methods. Group 1: Jig; dogs in dorsal recumbency with the osteotomy parallel to the distal jig pin. Groups 2-4: No jig; dogs in lateral recumbency with the osteotomy in a vertical orientation (group 2: tibia parallel to the table top; group 3: controlled superimposition of the femoral condyles; group 4: internal rotation of the tibia). Postoperative TPA, fragment reduction, and osteotomy orientation relative to the tibial plateau were compared. Positive or negative values denoted deviation from parallel relative to the tibial plateau. Postoperative TPA, fragment reduction, and proximodistal osteotomy orientation were not significantly different between groups. Craniocaudal osteotomy orientation was significantly different (Pjig is not essential for osteotomy orientation, tibial plateau rotation, or fragment reduction. Comparable results were achieved performing a vertical osteotomy with the tibia slightly internally rotated (10 degrees -15 degrees) and parallel to the table surface. TPLO without use of a jig reduces surgical trauma, is less time consuming, and reduces cost.

  11. Influence of knee flexion and atraumatic mobilisation of infrapatellar fat pad on incidence and severity of anterior knee pain after tibial nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Andrija; Korac, Zelimir; Bozic, Nenad-Bozo; Stedul, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the incidence and aetiology of anterior knee pain (AKP) in a series of patients that underwent intramedullary nailing for stabilisation of tibial fractures. During the preparation of the entry site no excision of the infrapatellar fat was allowed and electrical haemostasis was kept at the lowest level. Medullary canal was reamed and the nails inserted in position of knee flexion over 100 degrees. All fractures were fixed using medial paratendinous approach. Functional outcome was measured using Lysholm knee score. The knee range of movement and return to previous level of activity were also documented and analysed. Mean follow up was 38.9 months (range 12-84 months). In total 60 patients with 62 tibial shaft fractures were analysed. The mean age at the time of final follow up was 49.4 years (range 20-87). In 22 (35.5%) a newly developed and persisting pain in the anterior region of the operated knee was reported. According to VAP scale, the pain was mild (VAS 1-3) in 12 cases (19.4%) and moderate (VAS 4-6) in 10 (16.1%). In 16 cases (73%) the pain was noticed 6-12 months after injury and subjectively related to return to full range of working and recreational activities. The mean Lysholm knee score in the group without AKP was 90.8. In the AKP group with mild pain it was 88.4 and in the group with moderate AKP it was 79.9. Complete return to previous professional and recreational activities occurred in 49/60 patients (81.7%). Content with the treatment regarding expectations in recovery dynamics and return to desired level of activity was present in 98.3% of patients; one patient was unsatisfied with the treatment. Our results indicate that respecting the physiological motion of Hoffa pad and menisci during knee flexion, accompanied with atraumatic mobilisation of retrotendinous fat, reduces incidence and severity of anterior knee pain following intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. External skeletal fixation of the tibial shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Saša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To present the possibility of a successful use of external skeletal fixation in treating the open and closed tibial shaft fractures with Mitković’s external fixator. Methods. External fixation was used in 115 patients with 118 fresh tibial shaft fractures, 82 males (71.3% and 33 females (28.7%, average age 43.92 years (16−84. Open tibial shaft fractures were present in 37 (31.36%. All the fractures were treated with Mitković’s external fixator type M 20. Results. The results of external fixation were excellent or good in 94.07% of the cases, and bad in 5.08%. Pin tract infection appeared in 7 (5.93% patients. In only 3 cases an external fixator was removed and treatment continued with the functional braces. Nonunion occurred in 6 (5.08% patients, of which 4 were with open fractures (2 Gustilo type IIIB, 1 Gustilo type IIIA, 1 Gustilo type II and 2 with the segment fractures. Compartment syndrome was observed in 1 (0.85% patient with closed fracture. Malunion was found in 2 (1.69% patients. Conclusion. External fixation of tibial shaft fractures is a simple and effective method to enable the safe healing of fractures, early mobilization of the patients, early weight-bearing, as well as early rehabilitation. Fixation of tibial shaft fractures was unilateral with convergent pins orientation, and there was also a possibility of compression and distraction.

  13. [External skeletal fixation of the tibial shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Sasa; Mitković, Milorad; Radenković, Mile

    2005-01-01

    To present the possibility of a succesfful use of external skelatal fixation in treating the open and closed tibial shaft fractures with Mitković's external fixator. External fixation was used in 115 patients with 118 fresh tibial shaft fractures, 82 males (71.3%) and 33 females (28.7%), average age 43.92 years (16-84). Open tibial shaft fractures were present in 37 (31.36%). All the fractures were treated with Mitković's external fixator type M 20. The results of external fixation were excellent or good in 94.07% of the cases, and bad in 5.08%. Pin tract infection appeared in 7 (5.93%) patients. In only 3 cases an external fixator was removed and treatment continued with the functional braces. Nonunion occurred in 6 (5.08%) patients, of which 4 were with open fractures (2 Gustilo type IIIB, 1 Gustilo type IIIA, 1 Gustilo type II) and 2 with the segment fractures. Compartment syndrome was observed in 1 (0.85%) patient with closed fracture. Malunion was found in 2 (1.69%) patients. External fixation of tibial shaft fractures is a simple and effective method to enable the safe healing of fractures, early mobilization of the patients, early weight-bearing, as well as early rehabilitation. Fixation of tibial shaft fractures was unilateral with convergent pins orientation, and there was also a possibility of compression and distraction.

  14. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence: a video demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotouras, Alexander; Allison, Marion; Currie, Ann; Knowles, Charles H; Chan, Christopher L; Thaha, Mohamed A

    2012-06-01

    Fecal incontinence is an increasingly common condition with significant negative impact on quality on life and health care resources. It frequently presents a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Emerging evidence suggests that percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is an effective treatment for fecal incontinence with the added benefit of being minimally invasive and cost effective. Pursuant to the preliminary report of our early experience of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in patients with fecal incontinence published in this journal in 2010, in this dynamic article, we now describe and demonstrate the actual technique that can be performed in a nurse-led clinic or outpatient or community setting. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is a technically simple procedure that can potentially be performed in an outpatient or community setting. The overall early success rate of 68% following its use reported by our unit compares favorably with the success rate following other forms of neuromodulation, including sacral nerve stimulation. When completed, our long-term outcome data will provide further information on the efficacy of tibial nerve stimulation in a larger cohort of patients (n > 100). Future studies, including our currently planned randomized controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation vs sham stimulation, will provide controlled efficacy data and may provide information on its exact mechanism of action.

  15. Spontaneous collapse of the tibial plateau: radiological staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpintero, P.; Leon, F.; Zafra, M.; Montero, R.; Carreto, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a radiological staging system for necrosis of the tibial plateau, similar to those already developed for the hip and the medial femoral condyle. We retrospectively studied the clinical case histories and radiographic findings of 14 patients (15 affected knees) with histologically proven osteonecrosis of the tibial plateau. Stage I was marked by normal radiograph, but increased uptake in bone scan and subchondral areas of abnormal marrow signal intensity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as reported in other osteonecrosis sites. Stage II was characterised by cystic and sclerotic changes, and stage III fracture of the medial rim of the medial tibial plateau and tibial plateau collapse were present. Stage IV was marked by joint narrowing. These changes appeared earlier and were more pronounced when there was genu varum/valgum or involvement of the lateral tibial plateau. The radiological evolution of the disease appears to follow a four-stage course over a period of roughly one year from the onset of symptoms. (orig.)

  16. Reconstrucción tibial: transferencia sóleo-peroné ipsilateral. Tibialización peroneal Tibial reconstruction: ipsilateral soleus-fibula transfer. Fibular tibialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Revelo Jiron

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Las transferencias óseas peroneales en forma libre o ipsilateral han sido propuestas para la reconstrucción de grandes defectos tibiales. Están también descritas varias modificaciones al respecto, siendo una de ellas la constitución de un colgajo compuesto soleo-peroné realizado como transferencia libre. En este estudio presentamos nuestra experiencia con esta variante, pero en forma ipsilateral. logrando la reconstrucción del defecto tibial por medio de la tibialización peroneal. Escogimos realizar un colgajo compuesto soleo-peroné ipsilateral a flujo anterógrado o retrogrado para la reconstrucción de una serie personal de 14 pacientes consecutivos, 13 hombre y 1 mujer, con edad media de 30 años, y con amplios defectos tibiales y de tejidos blandos causados por accidentes de transito en 12 casos, 1 por proyectil balístico y 1 por artefacto explosivo artesanal. El promedio de tamaño del defecto tibial fue de 9.4 cm. Elegimos la forma ipsilateral por no disponer de infraestructura adecuada para realizar una transferencia libre. La serie de estudio se realizó durante el periodo comprendido entre Abril de 1995 y Abril del 2005. Todos los colgajos sobrevivieron. Dos pacientes desarrollaron pseudoartrosis. El apoyo completo y la marcha en 12 pacientes, se logró en un periodo promedio de 9 meses. El seguimiento postoperatorio ha sido de 3 a 6 años. Doce pacientes se han incorporado a la vida activa. Discutimos algunos aspectos prácticos de la técnica como resultado de la experiencia quirúrgica obtenida de esta serie personal. Consideramos que el método es fiable, fácil de realizar y proporciona excelentes resultados.Fibular flaps such as in there free form or as ipsilateral transfers have been proposed for reconstruction of large tibial defects. Several modifications have been described for the use of this flap. In this study we will present our experience using the ipsilateral transfer of an osteomuscular soleous fibular flap

  17. Rotura em "alça de balde" simultânea dos meniscos no mesmo joelho Simultaneous "bucket-handle" tear of both menisci on the same knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Francisco Gomes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotura em "alça de balde" de ambos os meniscos do mesmo joelho é um fenômeno raro. Apresentamos o caso de um paciente em que a ressonância magnética demonstrou rotura em "alça de balde" dos meniscos medial e lateral do mesmo joelho, associada a rotura do ligamento cruzado anterior, confirmado por videoartroscopia. A ressonância magnética demonstra sinais que permitem o diagnóstico preciso.Simultaneous "bucket-handle" tear of menisci on the same knee is a rare phenomenon. We describe a case of a bucket-handle tear of menisci and tear of anterior cruciate ligament of the same knee showed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by arthroscopy. The magnetic resonance imaging can provide accurate diagnosis of this type of injury.

  18. Tibial rotational osteotomy and distal tuberosity transfer for patella subluxation secondary to excessive external tibial torsion: surgical technique and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, M; Dwyer, T; Dolkart, O; Goldstein, Y; Steinberg, E L; Chakravertty, R; Cameron, J C

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent patella subluxation may be secondary to excessive external tibial torsion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients undergoing tibial derotation osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transfer for recurrent patella subluxation in association with excessive external tibial torsion. A combined tibial derotation osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transfer was performed in 15 knees (12 patients) with recurrent patella subluxation secondary to excessive external tibial torsion. Clinical evaluation was carried out using preoperative and post-operative Knee Society Score (KSS), Kujala Patellofemoral score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire, the short form-12 (SF-12) and a visual analogue score (VAS) pain scale. The median follow-up period was 84 months (range 15-156) and median patient age was 34 years (range 19-57 years). The median preoperative external tibial torsion was 62° (range 55°-70°), with a median rotational correction of 36° (range 30°-45°) after surgery. Significant improvement (p 45° who underwent tibial derotation osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transfer achieved a satisfactory outcome in terms of pain relief and improved function. A significant complication was seen in 2/15 patients. Case series, Level IV.

  19. Bilateral tibial agenesis and syndactyly in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dona, Francesco; Murino, Carla; Della Valle, Giovanni; Fatone, Gerardo

    2016-07-19

    A three-year-old cat was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Naples, Italy. The cat had severe pelvic limb deformity, and abnormal development of all four paws. Radiographs revealed bilateral tibial agenesis, syndactyly, and digital hypoplasia. No treatment was instituted because of the severity of the injury, the adaptation of the cat to the abnormal condition, and the owner's refusal to permit any treatment. Congenital limb deformities are rarely reported in the cat and tibial agenesis is considered a very rare disease. This congenital anomaly is well documented and classified in man, and it has been associated with other abnormalities in more complex syndromes. This paper reports clinical and radiographic findings in a cat affected by bilateral complete tibial agenesis associated with other congenital anomalies.

  20. Increased external tibial torsion in Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Bonetti, Massimo G; Greco, Francesco

    2003-08-01

    We studied the relationship between Osgood-Schlatter disease and torsional abnormalities of the lower limb in 21 boys with this condition and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. 3 groups of knees (20 control knees, 21 symptomatic and 21 asymptomatic or less symptomatic knees) were subjected to clinical, radiographic and CT evaluation. We found no statistically significant differences between patients and controls, as regards femoral anteversion, patellar congruence angle, patellar tilt angle and anterior tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, but the condylomalleolar angle and tibial torsion angle were greater in patients. We found no differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic or less symptomatic knees in any of the parameters. All the symptomatic knees were on the side preferentially involved in jumping and sprinting. This increase in external tibial torsion may play a role as a predisposing mechanical factor in the onset of Osgood-Schlatter disease in male athletes.

  1. Osteoarthritis Imaging by Quantification of Tibial Trabecular Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Joselene

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) includes complex events in the whole joint. In this project, we combined machine-learning techniques in a texture analysis framework and evaluated it in a longitudinal study, where magnetic resonance images of knees were used to quantify the tibial trabecular...... bone in both a marker for OA diagnosis and another marker for prediction of tibial cartilage loss. By multiple-instance learning, we also investigated which region of the tibia provided the best prognosis for cartilage loss. The inferior part of the tibial bone was classified as the most relevant...... region and a preliminary radiological reading of the knees with high and low risks of cartilage loss suggested the prognosis marker captured aspects of the tibia vertical trabecularization to define the prognosis. Besides presenting a bone marker able to predict disease progression and diagnostic marker...

  2. Modified fracture brace for tibial fracture with varus angulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S F; Au, T L; Wong, A M; Lee, M Y

    1995-08-01

    Sarmiento introduced the functional fracture brace for the management of tibial shaft fracture in 1963. However, tibial angulation with varus deformity cannot be prevented or corrected by such a device. In this paper, a case of tibial shaft fracture with varus angulation treated with a modified below-knee fracture brace was reported.

  3. tibialization of the fibula in a child with chronic osteomyelitis of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    used in tibial reconstruction after resection of Ewing's sarcoma (6). A case report from Congo detailed how a 10-centimeter tibial bone loss was treated by inter- tibiofibula bone grafting, resulting in tibialization of the fibula. The patient was reviewed after 10 years; and the clinical result was satisfactory and stable (7).

  4. Tibial tuberosity excision for symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, M J; Bhadreshwar, D R

    1995-01-01

    A modified Ferciot procedure was used to excise the tibial tubercle in patients with persistently symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease. Forty-two knees in 35 patients were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 5 years to assess outcome. The results revealed relief of pain in 95% of patients and reduction of prominence in 85.5% with minimal complication, in particular no evidence of genu recurvatum. The pathogenesis of the condition is outlined, and some of the theories and treatment modalities discussed. Tibial tubercle excision is recommended as the treatment of choice in those few cases that fail with conservative treatment.

  5. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, G.; Haga, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Tomoko

    1998-01-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. (orig.)

  6. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, G. [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine (Japan); Haga, Yoshihiko [Department of Orthopaedics, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Aoki, Katsuhiko [Department of Radiology, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Hasegawa, Tomoko [Division of Clinical Genetics, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 8 refs.

  7. Tibial and fibular angles in homozygous sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamaguna, A.I.; Odita, J.C.; Ugbodaga, C.I.; Okafor, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the tibial and fibular angles made on ankle radiographs of 34 patients with sickle cell disease were compared with those of 36 normal Nigerians. Widening of the fibular angle, which is an indication of tibiotalar slant, was demonstrated in about 79% of sickle cell disease patients. By using fibular angle measurements as an objective method of assessing subtle tibiotalar slant, it is concluded that the incidence of this deformity is much higher among sickle cell disease patients than previously reported. The mean values of tibial and fibular angles in normal Nigerians are higher than has been reported amongst Caucasians. (orig.)

  8. Clinical applications of free medial tibial flap with posterior tibial artery for head and neck reconstruction after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qi; Fang, Jugao; Huang, Zhigang; Chen, Xiaohong; Hou, Lizhen; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pingdong; Ma, Hongzhi; Xu, Hongbo

    2017-06-01

    Tumor resection causes damage in the head and neck which creates problems in swallowing, chewing, articulation, and vision, all of which seriously affect patients' quality of life. In this work, we evaluated the application of a free medial tibial flap in reconstruction of head and neck defects after tumor resection. We discussed the anatomy, surgical technique, and the advantages and disadvantages of the flap. We found several benefits for the flap, such as, it is especially effective for the defects that require thin-layer epithelium to cover or the separated soft tissue defect; a two-team approach can be used because the donor site is far away from the head and neck; and the flap is easy to integrate because of the subcutaneous fat layer of the free medial tibial flap is thin and the flap is soft. Thus, the medial tibial flap could replace the forearm flap for certain applications.

  9. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Osano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure.

  10. Partial resection of the PCL insertion site during tibial preparation in cruciate-retaining TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyen, Hans; Van Opstal, Nick; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-12-01

    Based on the anatomy of the tibial PCL insertion site, we hypothesized that at least part of it is damaged while performing a standard tibial cut in a PCL-retaining total knee replacement. The purpose of this study was to determine and quantify the amount of resection of the tibial PCL attachment with a 9 mm tibial cut with 3 degrees of posterior slope. Twenty cadaver tibias were used. The borders of the PCL footprint were demarcated, and calibrated digital pictures were taken in order to determine the surface area. A standard tibial intramedullary guide was used to prepare and perform a tibial cut at a depth of 9 mm with 3 degrees posterior slope. After the tibial cut was made, a second digital picture was taken using the same methodology to measure the surface area of the remaining PCL insertion. The mean surface area of the intact tibial PCL footprint before the cut was 148.9 ± 25.8 mm(2) and after the tibial cut 47.1 ± 28.0 mm(2). On average, 68.8 ± 15.3 % of the surface area of the PCL insertion was removed. The results of this study, therefore, indicate that the conventional technique for tibial preparation in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty can result in damage or removal of a significant part of the tibial PCL insertion.

  11. Rotational profile of lower limb and axis for tibial component alignment in varus osteoarthritic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Shahnawaz; Seon, Jong Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo

    2012-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe the changes in tibial torsion and knee rotation in varus osteoarthritic knees and to check the reliability of reference axis, for tibial component placement, based on femoral transepicondylar axis in these patients. A secondary goal was to determine which reference axis based on proximal tibia is most accurate for determining tibial component rotation. Fifty-two varus osteoarthritic knees and 20 normal knees were analyzed using computed tomographic scan. Tibial torsion and knee rotation were significantly reduced in patients with osteoarthritis. Reference axis based on posterior tibial condyles was most accurate and least variable for tibial component alignment. A significant negative correlation was found between knee rotation and tibial axis based on transepicondylar axis (r = -0.485). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome : Diagnosis, Treatment and Outcome Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, M.

    2017-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), also known as shin splints, is one of the most common sports injuries. Although 20% of the jumping and running athletes have MTSS at some point while engaging in sporting activities, we know little about it. There is a lack of knowledge regarding making the

  13. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom); M. Reijman (Max); A. Furlan (Alessandro); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee

  14. Functional treatment of tibial fractures with a custom made brace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Leeuwen

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of fracture treatment is rapid bone union with the preservation of perfect function, resulting in the patients' early return to normal daily activities with a minimum of complications. Many conservative and operative methods are used for the treatment of tibial fractures.

  15. Contact Stress Generation on the UHMWPE Tibial Insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Petrović Savić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Total knee replacement (TKR is considered, during last years, as a very successful surgical technique for removing knee joint deformities and eliminating pain caused by cartilage damage. In literature, as primary causes for knee joint endoprothesis damage are cited complex movements which cause occurrences of complex stress conditions, sagital radius conformity, sliding, types of materials etc. Aim of this study is analysis of contact stresses that occur on tibial implant for 15°, 45° and 60° knee flexion and 50 kg, 75 kg, 100 kg and 125 kg weight. Knee joint prosthesis model and finite elements method (FEM analysis are done in software Catia V5. For this analysis we used ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE for tibial implant material and AISI 316, AISI 317, AISI 321, 17-4PH, CoCrMo, Ti6Al4V and SAE A-286 for femoral component materials. Results show that area of maximal contact stress is identified in medial and lateral part of tibial implant. Von Mises stress values vary regarding of flexion degree and weight, but values are approximate for types of chosen materials. Contact stress location corresponds to damage that occur on tibial implant during exploitation.

  16. Multichannel recording of tibial-nerve somatosensory evoked potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wassenberg, W. J. G. van; Kruizinga, W. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Leenders, K. L.; Maurits, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Study aims. -The topography of the peaks of tibial.-nerve somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) varies among healthy subjects, most likely because of differences in position and orientation of their cortical generator(s). Therefore, amplitude estimation with a standard one- or two-channel derivation

  17. Management of segmental tibial fractures | Motsitsi | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three currently favored methods of treatment are intramedullary locking nail , external Fixators (with their different constructs and versatility) and Plaster of Paris. It is important to note that more than two-thirds of segmental tibial fractures will require more than one surgical intervention. The surgeon therefore, needs to plan ...

  18. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  19. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction failure after tibial shaft malunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Russell M; Gorczyca, John T; Maloney, Michael D

    2012-02-17

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common, with >100,000 procedures performed each year in the United States. Several factors are associated with failure, including poor surgical technique, graft incorporation failure, overly aggressive rehabilitation, and trauma. Tibial shaft fracture is also common and frequently requires operative intervention. Failure to reestablish the anatomic alignment of the tibia may cause abnormal forces across adjacent joints, which can cause degenerative joint disease or attritional failure of the surrounding soft tissues. This article describes a case of ACL reconstruction failure after a tibial fracture that resulted in malunion. Excessive force across the graft from lower-extremity malalignment and improper tunnel placement likely contributed to the attritional failure of the graft. This patient required a staged procedure for corrective tibial osteotomy followed by revision ACL reconstruction. This article describes ACL reconstruction failure, tibial shaft malunions, their respective treatments, the technical details of each procedure, and the technical aspects that must be considered when these procedures are done in a staged manner by 2 surgeons. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Svalastoga, Eiliv Lars

    guide surgical treatment. The TTTG measures tibial tuberosity position relative to the axis of the femoral trochlea. A preliminary investigation of TTTG measurement was performed using the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers as a morphologically similar and homogenous substitute for dog cadavers. CT...

  2. Avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle associated with patellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of combined avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle (AFTT) and avulsion of the patellar ligament in a 15-year-old boy. This injury was treated by open reduction and fixation of both lesions using staples with satisfactory results. This constellation of injury is rare but a high index of suspicion is needed when ...

  3. Epidemiology of open tibial fractures in a teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This is a prospective observational study of all open tibial fractures seen at the Accident and Emergency department of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) over a twelve- month period (July 2002- June 2003). Data from a pre-designed proforma for the study was analyzed and descriptive ...

  4. Locked intramedullary nailing for displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Ekeland, A; Strømsøe, K; Follerås, G; Thoresen, B O

    1990-09-01

    We analysed the results of 93 tibial shaft fractures treated with the Grosse-Kempf locked nail. Twenty-six fractures were comminuted, 19 were open grade I to II, and 54 were located outside the middle third of the tibia. The deep infection rate was 3.2%. There were only two poor results. The use of this method is recommended and discussed.

  5. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction by bone imprisonment | Zejjari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The posterior tibial tendon showed longitudinal laceration was sutured and the internal retromalleolar canal was closed. The race and the freedom of the tendon were considered satisfactory by the end of surgery. The evolution was marked by the disappearance of pain, recovery of a satisfactory sport and professional ...

  6. The influence of gluteus maximus on transverse plane tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Stephen J; Graham-Smith, Philip; Nester, Chris J; Howard, Dave; Hermens, Hermie; Herrington, Lee; Bowker, Peter

    2008-05-01

    There is a common clinical belief that transverse plane tibial rotation is controlled by the rearfoot. Although distal structures may influence the motion of the tibia, transverse plane tibial rotation could be determined by the proximal hip musculature. Cadaver studies have identified gluteus maximus as having the largest capacity for external rotation of the hip. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the effect of gluteus maximus on tibial motion. Kinematic data were collected from the foot and tibia along with EMG data from gluteus maximus for 17 male subjects during normal walking. A number of kinematic parameters were derived to characterise early stance phase. Gluteus maximus function was characterised using RMS EMG and EMG on/off times. No differences in muscle timing were found to be associated with any of the kinematic parameters. In addition, no differences in gluteal activation levels were found between groups of subjects who had different amounts of tibial rotation. However, there was a significant difference (pgluteus maximus activation when groups were defined by the time taken to decelerate the tibia (time to peak internal velocity). Specifically, subjects with greater gluteus maximus activity had a lower time to decelerate the tibia. We suggest that a high level of gluteus maximus activity results in a larger external torque being applied to the femur, which ultimately leads to a more rapid deceleration of the tibia.

  7. Unilateral proximal focal femoral deficiency, fibular aplasia, tibial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... Unilateral proximal focal femoral deficiency, fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia and oligosyndactyly in an Egyptian child – Probable. FFU syndrome. Rabah M. ... We report for the first time an Egyptian child with a rare unilateral .... 4th and 5th metatarsal bones are absent), absent middle phalanx of the 2nd ...

  8. Treatment of medial tibial stress syndrome: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, Marinus; Eskes, Michel; Weir, Adam; Moen, Maarten H.; Backx, Frank J. G.; Bakker, Eric W. P.

    2013-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common exercise-induced leg injury among athletes and military personnel. Several treatment options have been described in the literature, but it remains unclear which treatment is most effective. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the

  9. Injuries associated with fractured tibial shaft | Ikeanyi | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest cause of the injuries was motorcycle accidents (25.7%) followed closely by motor vehicular accidents (25%). The most common associated injuries in order of frequency were: ipsilateral fibular fractures, ankle injuries, ipsilateral femoral fractures and pelvic fractures. Conclusion: Tibial shaft fractures are ...

  10. Intrinsic factors associated with medial tibial stress syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is the most common lower-leg injury in athletes, and is thought to be caused by bony overload. To prevent MTSS, both pathophysiological and aetiological factors specific to MTSS need to be identified. The intrinsic risk factors that contribute to the development of MTSS are ...

  11. IMPRESSION FRACTURE OF THE TIBIAL CONDYLES – TIPICAL CARVING SKIINJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Veselko

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we present typical mechanism of the fracture of the tibial condyle, due tosudden turn of the ski with carved edges. Mathematical model explains how the force transmitted to the knee multiplies due to sudden decrease of the carved turn radius, or due tosudden additional bowing of skies

  12. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R. H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2016-01-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true

  13. Conventional trans-tibial versus anatomic medial portal technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-12

    Oct 12, 2015 ... Aim: Method of femoral tunnel preparation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. In this study, we aimed to determine if there is any difference between the clinical outcomes of two most commonly used drilling techniques; which are conventional trans-tibial (TT) drilling of femoral ...

  14. Conventional trans‑tibial versus anatomic medial portal technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we aimed to determine if there is any difference between the clinical outcomes of two most commonly used drilling techniques; which are conventional trans‑tibial (TT) drilling of femoral tunnel and anatomic preparation of femoral tunnel through medial portal (MP), in patients who underwent ACL reconstruction.

  15. Fatigue behavior of Ilizarov frame versus tibial interlocking nail in a comminuted tibial fracture model: a biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahel Philip F

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for comminuted tibial shaft fractures include plating, intramedullary nailing, and external fixation. No biomechanical comparison between an interlocking tibia nail with external fixation by an Ilizarov frame has been reported to date. In the present study, we compared the fatigue behaviour of Ilizarov frames to interlocking intramedullary nails in a comminuted tibial fracture model under a combined loading of axial compression, bending and torsion. Our goal was to determine the biomechanical characteristics, stability and durability for each device over a clinically relevant three month testing period. The study hypothesis was that differences in the mechanical properties may account for differing clinical results and provide information applicable to clinical decision making for comminuted tibia shaft fractures. Methods In this biomechanical study, 12 composite tibial bone models with a comminuted fracture and a 25 mm diaphyseal gap were investigated. Of these, six models were stabilized with a 180-mm four-ring Ilizarov frame, and six models were minimally reamed and stabilized with a 10 mm statically locked Russell-Taylor Delta™ tibial nail. After measuring the pre-fatigue axial compression bending and torsion stiffness, each model was loaded under a sinusoidal cyclic combined loading of axial compression (2.8/28 lbf; 12.46/124.6 N and torque (1.7/17 lbf-in; 0.19/1.92 Nm at a frequency of 3 Hz. The test was performed until failure (implant breakage or ≥ 5° angulations and/or 2 cm shortening occurred or until 252,000 cycles were completed, which corresponds to approximately three months testing period. Results In all 12 models, both the Ilizarov frame and the interlocking tibia nail were able to maintain fracture stability of the tibial defect and to complete the full 252,000 cycles during the entire study period of three months. A significantly higher stiffness to axial compression and torsion was

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of the tibial resection plane relative to the arthritic tibial plateau in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J Michael; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Midillioğlu, Mehmet Rüştü; Nedopil, Alexander J; Howell, Stephen M

    2017-08-08

    Kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty strives to correct the arthritic deformity by restoring the native tibial joint line. However, the precision of such surgical correction needs to be quantified in order to reduce recuts of the resection and to design assisting instrumentation. This study describes a method for novel three-dimensional analysis of tibial resection parameters in total knee arthroplasty. Pre-operative versus post-operative differences in the slopes of the varus-valgus and flexion-extension planes and the proximal-distal level between the tibia resection and the arthritic tibial joint line can reliably be measured using the three-dimensional models of the tibia and fibula. This work uses the proposed comparison method to determine the parameters for resecting the tibia in kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty. Three-dimensional shape registration was performed between arthritic surface models segmented from pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging scans and resected surface models segmented from post-operative computed tomography scans. Mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence intervals were determined for all measurements.  RESULTS: Results indicate that kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty consistently corrects the varus deformity and restores the slope of the flexion-extension plane and the proximal-distal level of the arthritic tibial joint line. The slope of the varus-valgus plane is most precisely associated with the overall arthritic slope after approximately 3° of correction and the posterior slope is biased towards the overall arthritic plateau, though less precisely than the varus correlation. Use of this analysis on a larger population can quantify the effectiveness of the tibial resection for correcting pathologies, potentially reduce imprecisions in the surgical technique, and enable development of instrumentation that reduces the risk of resection recuts. The kinematic alignment technique consistently

  17. POSTERIOR TIBIAL SLOPE AS A RISK FACTOR FOR ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RUPTURE IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçkin Şenışık

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is the primary stabilizer of the knee. An impairment of any of the dynamic or static stability providing factors can lead to overload on the other factors and ultimately to deterioration of knee stability. This can result in anterior tibial translation and rupture of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of tibial slope on ACL injury risk on soccer players. A total of 64 elite soccer players and 45 sedentary controls were included in this longitudinal and controlled study. The angle between the tibial mid-diaphysis line and the line between the anterior and posterior edges of the medial tibial plateau was measured as the tibial slope via lateral radiographs. Individual player exposure, and injuries sustained by the participants were prospectively recorded. Eleven ACL injuries were documented during the study period. Tibial slope was not different between soccer players and sedentary controls. Tibial slope in the dominant and non-dominant legs was greater for the injured players compared to the uninjured players. The difference reached a significant level only for the dominant legs (p 0.05, a higher tibial slope was observed in dominant legs of injured players (p < 0.05. Higher tibial slope on injured soccer players compared to the uninjured ones supports the idea that the tibial slope degree might be an important risk factor for ACL injury.

  18. Is conservative treatment of displaced tibial shaft fractures justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J F; Williams, E A; Hargadon, E J; Davies, D R

    1984-01-01

    All tibial shaft fractures treated at one hospital during a five-year period were studied in a prospective trial. Ninety-one displaced fractures in adults were treated using a conservative policy that included early bone grafting when indicated. Sound bony union was obtained in all cases. Those that healed primarily took on average 16.3 weeks whereas the 24 per cent that required bone grafts took 35.1 weeks. The number of complications, most of which were minor, was considered acceptable. It is concluded that provided early bone grafting is performed when necessary, a basically conservative policy of treatment is satisfactory; bony union of all displaced tibial fractures is achieved in a reasonable period of time.

  19. Asymmetry in gait pattern following tibial shaft fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Læssøe, Uffe; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the high number of studies evaluating the outcomes following tibial shaft fractures, the literature lacks studies including objective assessment of patients' recovery regarding gait pattern. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether gait patterns at 6 and 12...... months post-operatively following intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture are different compared with a healthy reference population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study design was a prospective cohort study. The primary outcome measurement was the gait patterns at 6 and 12 months post......-operatively measured with a 6-metre-long pressure-sensitive mat. The mat registers footprints and present gait speed, cadence as well as temporal and spatial parameters of the gait cycle. Gait patterns were compared to a healthy reference population. RESULTS: 49 patients were included with a mean age of 43.1 years (18...

  20. MR evaluation of femoral neck version and tibial torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, James Karl; Dwek, Jerry R.; Pring, Maya E.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities of femoral neck version have been associated with a number of hip abnormalities in children, including slipped capital femoral epiphysis, proximal femoral focal deficiency, coxa vara, a deep acetabulum and, rarely, developmental dysplasia of the hip. Orthopedic surgeons also are interested in quantifying the femoral neck anteversion or retroversion in children especially to plan derotational osteotomies. Historically, the angle of femoral version and tibial torsion has been measured with the use of radiography and later by CT. Both methods carry with them the risks associated with ionizing radiation. Techniques that utilize MR are used less often because of the associated lengthy imaging times. This article describes a technique using MRI to determine femoral neck version and tibial torsion with total scan times of approximately 10 min. (orig.)

  1. Tibial acceleration profiles during the menstrual cycle in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Erik; Bryant, Adam L; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Reaburn, Peter; Tetsworth, Kevin; Imhoff, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Fluctuating levels of endogenous estrogen are thought to have an adverse effect on lower limb biomechanics, given the observed higher rate of ACL injury at certain phases of the menstrual cycle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fluctuating endogenous estrogen levels during the menstrual cycle on acceleration transients at the proximal tibia in young physically active females. Eleven females aged 16-18 years participated in this study and were compared to a male control group. Female subjects were tested at each of the four phases of the menstrual cycle: menses, follicular, ovulation and luteal. On each test occasion, acceleration transients at the proximal tibia were measured while subjects performed an abrupt deceleration task (simulated netball landing). No significant differences were found between the different phases of the menstrual cycle for peak tibial acceleration (PTA; P = 0.57), and time to zero tibial acceleration (TZTA; P = 0.59). However, there was a significant difference for time to peak tibial acceleration (TPTA) between menstruation and follicular (P = 0.04), menstruation and ovulation (P = 0.001), menstruation and luteal phase (P = 0.002), and follicular phase and ovulation (P = 0.007). In the male control group, no significant between-test session differences were observed for PTA (P = 0.48), TZTA (P = 0.08) and TPTA (P = 0.29). While there were no significant between-group differences for PTA (P = 0.21) and TZTA (P = 0.48), significant between-group differences were observed for TPTA (P = 0.001). The results of this project strongly suggest that serum estrogen fluctuations have an effect on tibial acceleration profiles in young female athletes during different phases of the menstrual cycle.

  2. Biomechanical Factors in the Etiology of Tibial Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    because we initially advertised this study as a tibial stress fracture study and not as a running injury study. We have since changed this advertising ...1-0515. Appendix B Advertisement Flyer 1 ATTENTION FEMALE RUNNERS We are looking for Female Distance Runners who...Newsletter, Fall, 1990. Hamill, J., Clarkson, P. M., Holt, K. G., Freedson, P. S. Muscle Soreness. Nike Sport Research Review, December/March, 1991

  3. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Zelle, Boris A.; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction ...

  4. Tibial shaft fracture and ankle injury - Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Caio; Campos, Felipe Augusto Garcez de; Foni, Noel Oizerovici; Souza, Rafael Carboni; Christian, Ralph Walter; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    The authors report on a case of tibial shaft fracture associated with ankle injury. The clinical, radiological and surgical characteristics are discussed. Assessment of associated injuries is often overlooked and these injuries are hard to diagnose. When torque occurs in the lower limb, the ankle becomes susceptible to simultaneous injury. It is essential to make careful assessment based on clinical, radiographic, intraoperative and postoperative characteristics in order to attain functional recovery.

  5. Tibial shaft fracture and ankle injury - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Zamboni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The authors report on a case of tibial shaft fracture associated with ankle injury. The clinical, radiological and surgical characteristics are discussed. Assessment of associated injuries is often overlooked and these injuries are hard to diagnose. When torque occurs in the lower limb, the ankle becomes susceptible to simultaneous injury. It is essential to make careful assessment based on clinical, radiographic, intraoperative and postoperative characteristics in order to attain functional recovery.

  6. [Tibial plateau fractures in winter sports. Current treatment options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, V

    2014-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures overall and especially in winter sports are rare. However, the incidence in recent years is increasing. In a retrospective study from 2009-2012, we found 52 injuries affiliated with winter sports. Noticeable was the high rate of severe injury patterns. In 20 of the 52 cases, there were complete articular or bicondylar fractures (38 %). In 25 cases (48 %), fragment dislocation corresponding to the Moore classification was observed. The operative algorithm was based on the initial soft tissue damage and the type of fracture. A two or more stage procedure with first line soft tissue management and temporary external fixation stabilization was performed 12 times. The final internal osteosynthesis was based on the morphology of the fracture, i.e., direct exposition and stabilization of relevant fracture patterns. In 24 cases (46 %), there was a need for two (or more) approaches. In the anterior aspect of the tibial head, customary implants were used; posterior pathologies were stabilized with low-dimension implants. Summarizing with regard to the literature, there is a more discriminating view of tibial plateau fractures, regarding all relevant fracture patterns. Thus, different options in operative access and choice of implants can be made.

  7. Do Tibial Plateau Fractures Worsen Outcomes of Knee Ligament Injuries? A Matched Cohort Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cinque, Mark E.; Godin, Jonathan A.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Chahla, Jorge; Kruckeberg, Bradley M.; Pogorzelski, Jonas; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tibial plateau fractures account for a small portion of all fractures; however, these fractures can pose a surgical challenge when occurring concomitantly with ligament injuries. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare 2-year outcomes of soft tissue reconstruction with or without a concomitant tibial plateau fracture and open reduction internal fixation. We hypothesized that patients with a concomitant tibial plateau fracture at the time of soft tissue surgery...

  8. A STUDY ON ROLE OF INTERLOCK NAILING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TIBIAL DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateswara Rao; Chinta Shyam; Anvesh

    2015-01-01

    Tibial fractures are one of the commonest orthopedic injuries. Tibial fractures are one of the commonest orthopedic injuries. In the past several years there has been a trend towards by use of small diameter nails without remaining in the management of unstable tibial shaft fractures. However it is important to remember that many closed fractures with less severe soft tissue injury, Treatment with an intramedullary nail with reaming allows placement of larger implan...

  9. Predictors of dimercaptosuccinic acid chelatable lead and tibial lead in former organolead manufacturing workers

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, B. S.; Stewart, W. F.; Todd, A. C.; Links, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of tibial and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) chelatable lead in 543 organolead manufacturing workers with past exposure to organic and inorganic lead. METHODS: In this cross sectional study, tibial lead (by 109Cd K-shell x ray fluorescence), DMSA chelatable lead (4 hour urinary lead excretion after oral administration of 10 mg/kg), and several exposure measures were obtained on study participants, mean (SD) age 57.6 (7.6) years. RESULTS: Tibial lead co...

  10. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of distal tibial fractures using anterolateral locking plate: Evaluation of results and complications

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhotia, Devendra; Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Kavin; Kumar, G.N. Kiran; Sharma, Vijay; Farooque, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Soft tissue healing is of paramount importance in distal tibial fractures for a successful outcome. There is an increasing trend of using anterolateral plate due to an adequate soft tissue cover on anterolateral distal tibia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of minimally invasive anterolateral locking plate in distal tibial fractures. Methods This is a retrospective study of 42 patients with distal tibial fractures treated with minimally invasive ant...

  11. Role of the fibula in the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures fixed by intramedullary nailing

    OpenAIRE

    Galbraith, John G.; Daly, Charles J.; Harty, James A.; Dailey, Hannah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: For tibial fractures, the decision to fix a concomitant fibular fracture is undertaken on a case-by-case basis. To aid in this clinical decision-making process, we investigated whether loss of integrity of the fibula significantly destabilises midshaft tibial fractures, whether fixation of the fibula restores stability to the tibia, and whether removal of the fibula and interosseous membrane for expediency in biomechanical testing significantly influences tibial interfragmentary m...

  12. Aneurisma verdadeiro bilateral de artéria tibial posterior True bilateral aneurysm of the posterior tibial artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Romero de Barros Marques

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, faz-se o relato de um caso de aneurisma verdadeiro bilateral da artéria tibial posterior em paciente de 57 anos. Os aneurismas surgiram em épocas diferentes. Os aspectos clínicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos deste caso são discutidos. Este relato é importante, pois os autores não têm conhecimento de caso semelhante na literatura consultada.This article reports a case of true bilateral aneurysm of the tibial posterior artery in a 57 year-old patient. The aneurysms occurred at different times. The clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this case are discussed. This report is important because the authors did not find a similar description in the literature.

  13. Osteotomia tibial alta em pacientes com artrose do joelho High tibial osteotomy in patients with knee arthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Avakian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o tratamento da gonartrose medial com osteotomia tibial tipo cunha de fechamento lateral associado à liberação da articulação tibiofibular proximal. MÉTODOS: Realizamos esta técnica associado com liberação da articulação tibiofibular proximal no tratamento da gonartrose medial em 36 pacientes (41 joelhos de janeiro de 1995 a abril de 2003, com idade de 53,4 anos (média, seguidos por 51,6 meses (média. RESULTADOS: Na avaliação notamos que as osteotomias tibiais com cunha de fechamento lateral permitem correção satisfatória da deformidade fêmorotibial, com angulação femorotibial final em torno de 7º de valgo; o eixo mecânico foi desviado da região tibial medial (posição 1,2% para o centro do joelho (posição 50,5%; a inclinação tibial na incidência perfil pré-operatória de 9,8º foi corrigida para 6,5º (média; a mobilidade articular apresentou perda de 2,3º na extensão (média. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica permite correção satisfatória da deformidade em varo fêmorotibial, porém não é isenta de complicações (14,6%. O grau de satisfação (Lysholm dos pacientes teve incremento de 27,3 para 89. Assim, constitui uma parte essencial no arsenal de tratamento da gonartrose.PURPOSE: To assess medial gonarthrosis treatment with wedge-like side-closed tibial osteotomy combined with proximal tibial-fibular joint release. METHODS: we employed this technique combined with proximal tibial-fibular joint release in the treatment of medial gonarthrosis in 36 patients (41 knees, from January 1995 to April 2003, with mean age of 53.4 years, followed-up for 51.6 months (in average. RESULTS: In the assessment, we noticed that wedge-like side-closed tibial osteotomies allow for a satisfactory repair of the femorotibial deformity, with end femorotibial angle of about 7° valgus; the mechanical axis was dislocated from the medial region of the tibia (position: 1.2% to knee center (position: 50.5%; the 9.8° tibial

  14. Tibial rotational osteotomy for idiopathic torsion. A comparison of the proximal and distal osteotomy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krengel, W F; Staheli, L T

    1992-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 52 rotational tibial osteotomies (RTOs) performed on 35 patients with severe idiopathic tibial torsion. Thirty-nine osteotomies were performed at the proximal or midtibial level. Thirteen were performed at the distal tibial level with a technique previously described by one of the authors. Serious complications occurred in five (13%) of the proximal and in none of the distal RTOs. For severe and persisting idiopathic tibial torsion, the authors recommend correction by RTO at the distal level. Proximal level osteotomy is indicated only when a varus or valgus deformity required concurrent correction.

  15. Preoperative Measurement of Tibial Resection in Total Knee Arthroplasty Improves Accuracy of Postoperative Limb Alignment Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hui Wu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Using conventional surgical instruments, preoperative measurement of resection thickness of the tibial plateau on radiographs could improve the accuracy of conventional surgical techniques.

  16. The Tibial Slope in Patients With Achondroplasia: Its Characterization and Possible Role in Genu Recurvatum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jaysson T; Bernholt, David L; Tran, Kevin V; Ain, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Genu recurvatum, a posterior resting position of the knee, is a common lower extremity deformity in patients with achondroplasia and has been thought to be secondary to ligamentous laxity. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the tibial slope has not been investigated, and no studies describe the tibial slope in patients with achondroplasia. Our goals were to characterize the tibial slope in children and adults with achondroplasia, explore its possible role in the development of genu recurvatum, and compare the tibial slope in patients with achondroplasia to that in the general population. We reviewed 252 lateral knee radiographs of 130 patients with achondroplasia seen at our clinic from November 2007 through September 2013. Patients were excluded if they had previous lower extremity surgery or radiographs with extreme rotation. We analyzed patient demographics and, on all radiographs, the tibial slope. We then compared the mean tibial slope to norms in the literature. Tibial slopes >90 degrees had an anterior tibial slope and received a positive prefix. Statistical analysis included intraclass and interclass reliability, Pearson correlation coefficient, and the Student t tests (significance, Pachondroplasia than in the general population; however, this difference diminishes as patients' age. An anterior tibial slope may predispose to a more posterior resting knee position, also known as genu recurvatum. Level IV-retrospective case series.

  17. Intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures using an expandable nail: early results of 54 acute tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Ely L; Geller, David S; Yacoubian, Shahan V; Shasha, Nadav; Dekel, Shmuel; Lorich, Dean G

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate and present our experience using the expandable nail system for the treatment of acute tibial shaft fractures. Retrospective study. Two level-1 trauma centers-University teaching hospitals. Fifty-four consecutive patients were treated by this nail system for acute tibial shaft fracture. Two nail diameters were used, 8.5 mm and 10 mm. Operation, hospitalization and healing times, reaming versus nonreaming, isolated versus multiple injuries, and reoperations were recorded and analyzed statistically. Follow-up was obtained either until fracture healing or for a minimum of 1 year with an average of 14 months (12 to 24). All fractures healed in an average time of 72 days (21 to 204). The average healing times for patients treated with 8.5-mm and 10-mm nails were 77.2 days (27 to 204) and 63.4 days (21 to 121), respectively. Average operative time was 103 minutes (40 to 185) if reamed and 56 minutes (30 to 80) if unreamed. Average healing times were 65.4 days (21 to 190) if reamed and 79.5 days (42 to 204) if unreamed. There were 11 complications (20.4%) related to the nailing: 3 deep infections, 2 superficial infections, 2 bone shortenings of 1 cm secondary to nail protrusion in the knee, 1 compartment syndrome, 1 fracture propagation, 1 distal malalignment, and 1 delayed union. Hardware was removed in 6 patients (3 infections, 2 patients' request and 1 protrusion into the knee), and 1 additional patient underwent exchange nailing due to a delayed union. The expandable nail offers the theoretical advantages of improved load sharing and rotational control without the need for interlocking screws. This study demonstrates satisfactory healing and alignment for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures using this device. However, caution must be exercised when using this nail in cases of significant comminution and in cases where the fracture pattern involves the more proximal or distal aspect of the tibial shaft.

  18. Stress analysis of the tibial plateau according to the difference of blade path entry in opening wedge high tibial osteotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Woo; Xin, YuanZhu; Yang, Seok Jo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Jong Hun; Panchal, Karnav; Kwon, Oh Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been used to successfully treat patients with genu varus deformities that can improve mechanical function and condition in the knee joint. Clinical studies have reported that bow legs often occur with a concentrated load on the varus of the tibia. This study aimed to analyze and verify the clinical test data result by utilizing the three-dimensional (3D) static finite element method (FEM). The 3D model of lower extremities, which include the femur, tibia, meniscus, and knee articular cartilage, was created using the images from a computer tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging. In this report, we compared changes in stress distribution and force reaction on the tibial plateau because of critical problems caused by unexpected changes in the tibial posterior-slope angle because of HTO. The results showed that the 5 .deg. wedge-angle virtual opening wedge HTO without and with the posterior-slope angle shows has a load concentration of approximately 60% and 45% in the medial region, respectively.

  19. Low Rates of Aseptic Tibial Loosening in Obese Patients With Use of High-Viscosity Cement and Standard Tibial Tray: 2-Year Minimum Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, David A; Berend, Keith R; Nam, Denis; Barrack, Robert L; Adams, Joanne B; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2017-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is overall a very successful surgery, but complications do occur. These complications include aseptic loosening of the tibial component, and obese patients are among the highest risk group. High-viscosity cement (HVC) has been implicated as a possible cause for aseptic loosening of the tibial component. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of aseptic loosening of the tibial component in obese patients with the use of HVC and standard tibial tray. We identified 1366 obese patients (1851 knees) with a body mass index >35 kg/m 2 and 2-year minimum follow-up who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty using HVC and a symmetrical, grit-blasted, cobalt-chrome tibial component with 40-mm stem. Preoperative and postoperative range of motion, Knee Society (KS) scores, complications, and reoperations were evaluated. Specifically, we assessed the rate of tibial aseptic loosening. At a mean 5.4 years follow-up, only 1 in 1851 knees had aseptic loosening of the tibial component for an incidence of 0.054%. There was a mean increase of 3.3 degrees of knee range of motion. KS pain level decreased by 38.6 points (50 point scale). KS clinical scores improved by 52.2, Knee Society functional scores improved by 19.5, University of California, Los Angeles, activity score improved by 0.9, and Oxford Knee Score by 15.7. All these improvements were statistically significant with P < .001. Standard tibial components and HVC can be used in most patients, including the high-risk obese group, with low rates of tibial aseptic loosening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical practice guideline on closed tibial plateau fractures in adulthood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocegueda-Sosa, Miguel Ángel; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Aldaco-García, Víctor Daniel; Flores-Aguilar, Sergio; Manilla-Lezama, Nicolás; Pérez-Hernández, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Closed tibiae plateau fractures are common injuries in the emergency room. The optimal treatment is not well defined or established. For this reason, there are several surgical management options: open reduction and internal fixation, closed reduction and percutaneous synthesis, external fixation, and even conservative treatment for this kind of fracture. The mechanism of production of this fracture is through large varus or valgus deformation to which is added a factor of axial load. The trauma may be direct or indirect. The degree of displacement, fragmentation and involvement of soft tissues like ligaments, menisci, vascular and nerve structures are determined by the magnitude of the force exerted. Any intra-articular fracture treatment can lead to an erroneous instability, deformity and limitation of motion with subsequent arthritic changes, leading to joint incongruity, limiting activity and significantly altering the quality of life. Open reduction and internal fixation with anatomic restitution is the method used in this type of fracture. However, the results of numerous publications can be questioned due to the inclusion in the same study of fractures treated with very different methods.

  1. THE TIBIAL APERTURE SURFACE ANALYSIS IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION PROCESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Zoran; Tabaković, Slobodan; Vićević, Marija; Obradović, Mirko; Vranjes, Miodrag; Milankov, Miroslav Z

    2016-01-01

    The tibial tunnel aperture in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is usually analyzed as an ellipse, generated as an intersection between a tibial plateau and a tibial bone tunnel. The aim of this study is to show that the tibial tunnel aperture, which utilizes 3D tibial surface bone model, differs significantly from common computations which present the tibial tunnel anterior cruciate ligament aperture surface as an ellipse. An interactive program system was developed for the tibial tunnel aperture analysis which included the real tibia 3D surface bone model generated from a series of computed tomography images of ten male patients, their mean age being 25 years. In aperture calculation, the transverse drill angle of 10 degrees was used, whereas sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees were used with the drill-bit diameter set to 10 mm. The real 3D and 2D tibial tunnel aperture surface projection was calculated and compared with an ellipse. According to the calculations, generated 3D aperture surfaces were different for every patient even though the same drill parameters were used. For the sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees, the mean difference between the projected 3D and 2D area on the tibial plateau was 19.6 +/- 5.4%, 21.1 +/- 8.0% and 21.3 +/- 9.6%, respectively. The difference between the projected 3D area on the tibial plateau and ellipse surface was 54.8 +/- 16.3%, 39.6 +/- 10.4% and 25.0 +/- 8.0% for sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees, respectively. The tibial tunnel aperture surface area differs significantly from the ellipse surface area, which is commonly used in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction analysis. Inclusion of the 3D shape of the tibial attachment site in the preoperative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction planning process can lead to a more precise individual anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the tibial bone. Both

  2. Korrekturosteotomie bei lateraler Tibiakopfimpression und Valgusfehlstellung == Correction of lateral tibial plateau depression and valgus malunion of the proximal tibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marti, René K.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Rademakers, Maarten V.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Improvement of joint congruency in malunited lateral tibial plateau fractures, reduction of pain, prevention of osteoarthritis. INDICATIONS: Valgus malalignment of the proximal tibia combined with intraarticular depression of the tibial plateau. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Patients in poor general

  3. Significance of the position of the proximal tip of the tibial nail: An important factor related to anterior knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Ziaei, Ehsan; Osanloo, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for the majority of tibial shaft fractures and anterior knee pain is the most common complication of this surgery; however, its etiology is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the predicting factors related to anterior knee pain following tibial nailing. Materials and Methods: Patients with isolated, unilateral tibial shaft fracture who had undergone tibial nailing were identified retrospectively. Data includ...

  4. Proximal tibial varus osteotomy. Indications, technique, and five to twenty-one-year results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marti, R. K.; Verhagen, R. A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Moojen, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    Although high tibial osteotomy has been proved effective for the treatment of painful osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee, the role of proximal tibial varus osteotomy for the treatment of painful osteoarthritis of the lateral compartment still remains controversial. From 1974 to

  5. The effect of posterior tibial slope on simulated laxity tests in cruciate-retaining TKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco A.; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan; Janssen, Dennis; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tibial slope can affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More posterior slope potentially helps releasing a too tight flexion gap and it is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However, the mechanism by which tibial slope affects the

  6. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3590 Section 888.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  7. Tibial component with and without stem extension in a trabecular metal cone construct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje F.; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Stevens, Martin; Reininga, Inge H.F.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Verdonschot, N.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate stability and strain distribution of a tibial plateau reconstruction with a trabecular metal cone while the tibial component is implanted with and without a stem, and whether prosthetic stability was influenced by bone mineral density. Trabecular

  8. Tibial component with and without stem extension in a trabecular metal cone construct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje F; Boerboom, Alexander L; Stevens, Martin; Reininga, Inge H F; Janssen, Dennis W; Verdonschot, N; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate stability and strain distribution of a tibial plateau reconstruction with a trabecular metal cone while the tibial component is implanted with and without a stem, and whether prosthetic stability was influenced by bone mineral density. Trabecular

  9. Immediate weight-bearing after osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures may be allowed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haak, Karl Tobias; Palm, Henrik; Holck, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Immediate weight-bearing following osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures is traditionally not allowed due to fear of articular fracture collapse. Anatomically shaped locking plates with sub-articular screws could improve stability and allow greater loading forces. The purpose of this study...... was to investigate if immediate weight-bearing can be allowed following locking plate osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures....

  10. Effect of referencing technique for the tibial slope in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Wymenga, A.B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tibial slope was shown to majorly affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More slope of the tibial component could help releasing a too tight flexion gap in cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA and is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However,

  11. Metachronous Bilateral Posterior Tibial Artery Aneurysms in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Bonatti, Hugo; Sabri, Saher; Arslan, Bulent; Harthun, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is a life-threatening genetic connective tissue disorder. We report a 24-year-old woman with EDS-IV who presented with metachronous bilateral aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms of the posterior tibial arteries 15 months apart. Both were treated successfully with transarterial coil embolization from a distal posterior tibial approach.

  12. Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by means of tibial tunnel: anatomical study on cadavers for tunnel positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Altenor Bessa de Queiroz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To determine the reference points for the exit of the tibial guidewire in relation to the posterior cortical bone of the tibia.Methods:Sixteen knees from fresh cadavers were used for this study. Using a viewing device and a guide marked out in millimeters, three guidewires were passed through the tibia at 0, 10 and 15 mm distally in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia. Dissections were performed and the region of the center of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL was determined in each knee. The distances between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and the posterior tibial border (CB and between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and wires 1, 2 and 3 (CW1, CW2 and CW3 were measured.Results:In the dissected knees, we found the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL at 1.09 ± 0.06 cm from the posterior tibial border. The distances between the wires 1, 2 and 3 and the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL were respectively 1.01 ± 0.08, 0.09 ± 0.05 and 0.5 ± 0.05 cm.Conclusion:The guidewire exit point 10 mm distal in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia was the best position for attempting to reproduce the anatomical center of the PCL.

  13. Effect of triple tibial osteotomy on femorotibial stability in canine cranial cruciate ligament deficient stifles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S.; Vedel, T.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    ° (± 8.5°). Two different complications were observed during TTO. These were fracture of the caudal tibial cortex and fracture of the distal tibial tuberosity. The complication rate was respectively 100% and 44%. Conclusion: TTO significantly reduced CTS in this CrCl and medial meniscus deficient stifle...

  14. Bilateral transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, F; Collins, B; Thomas, G P; Askari, A; Tan, E; Nicholls, R J; Vaizey, C J

    2016-02-01

    Chronic constipation is difficult to treat when symptoms are intractable. Colonic propulsion may be altered by distal neuromodulation but this is conventionally delivered percutaneously. Transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is noninvasive and cheap: this study aimed to assess its efficacy in chronic constipation. Eighteen patients (median age 46 years, 12 female) with chronic constipation were recruited consecutively. Conservative and behavioural therapy had failed to improve symptoms in all 18. Thirty minutes of daily bilateral transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation was administered by each patient at home for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a change in the Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QoL) score. Change in Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptoms (PAC-SYM), weekly bowel frequency and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were also measured. Fifteen patients (12 female) completed the trial. The PAC-QoL score improved significantly with treatment [pretreatment, median 2.95, interquartile range (IQR) 1.18; posttreatment, median 2.50, IQR 0.70; P = 0.047]. There was no change in PAC-SYM score (pretreatment, median 2.36, IQR 1.59; posttreatment, median 2.08, IQR 0.92; P = 0.53). Weekly stool frequency improved as did VAS score, but these did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.229 and 0.161). The PAC-QoL and PAC-SYM scores both improved in four (26%) patients. Two patients reported complete cure. There were no adverse events reported. Bilateral transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation appears to be effective in a quarter of patients with chronic constipation. Carefully selected patients with less severe disease may benefit more. This requires further study. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. ß-TCP bone substitutes in tibial plateau depression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolvien, Tim; Barvencik, Florian; Klatte, Till Orla; Busse, Björn; Hahn, Michael; Rueger, Johannes Maria; Rupprecht, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The use of beta-tricalciumphospate (ß-TCP, Cerasorb®) ceramics as an alternative for autologous bone-grafting has been outlined previously, however with no study focusing on both clinical and histological outcomes of ß-TCP application in patients with multi-fragment tibial plateau fractures. The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term results of ß-TCP in patients with tibial plateau fractures. 52 patients were included in this study. All patients underwent open surgery with ß-TCP block or granulate application. After a mean follow-up of 36months (14-64months), the patients were reviewed. Radiography and computed-tomography were performed, while the Rasmussen score was obtained for clinical outcome. Furthermore, seven patients underwent biopsy during hardware removal, which was subsequently analyzed by histology and backscattered electron microscopy (BSEM). An excellent reduction with two millimeters or less of residual incongruity was achieved in 83% of the patients. At follow-up, no further changes occurred and no nonunions were observed. Functional outcome was good to excellent in 82%. Four patients underwent revision surgery due to reasons unrelated to the bone substitute material. Histologic analyses indicated that new bone was built around the ß-TCP-grafts, however a complete resorption of ß-TCP was not observed. ß-TCP combined with internal fixation represents an effective and safe treatment of tibial plateau depression fractures with good functional recovery. While its osteoconductivity seems to be successful, the biological degradation and replacement of ß-TCP is less pronounced in humans than previous animal studies have indicated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prolonged operative time increases infection rate in tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Matthew; Wright, Adam; Gruen, Gary; Siska, Peter; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Tarkin, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau present a treatment challenge and are susceptible to both prolonged operative times and high postoperative infection rates. For those fractures treated with open plating, we sought to identify the relationship between surgical site infection and prolonged operative time as well as to identify other surgical risk factors. We performed a retrospective controlled analysis of 309 consecutive unicondylar and bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated with open plate osteosynthesis at our institution's level I trauma centre during a recent 5-year period. We recorded operative times, injury characteristics, surgical treatment, and need for operative debridement due to infection. Operative times of infected cases were compared to uncomplicated surgical cases. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for postoperative infection. Mean operative time in the infection group was 2.8h vs. 2.2h in the non-infected group (p=0.005). 15 fractures (4.9%) underwent four compartment fasciotomies as part of their treatment, with a significantly higher infection rate than those not undergoing fasciotomy (26.7% vs. 6.8%, p=0.01). Open fracture grade was also significantly related to infection rate (closed fractures: 5.3%, grade 1: 14.3%, grade 2: 40%, grade 3: 50%, pinfection rates (13.9% vs. 8.7%, p=0.36). Multivariable logistic regression analysis of the entire study group identified longer operative times (OR 1.78, p=0.013) and open fractures (OR 7.02, psite infection. Operative times approaching 3h and open fractures are related to an increased overall risk for surgical site infection after open plating of the tibial plateau. Dual incision approaches with bicolumnar plating do not appear to expose the patient to increased risk compared to single incision approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Return to Sport After Tibial Shaft Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wood, Alexander M

    2016-07-01

    Acute tibial shaft fractures represent one of the most severe injuries in sports. Return rates and return-to-sport times after these injuries are limited, particularly with regard to the outcomes of different treatment methods. To determine the current evidence for the treatment of and return to sport after tibial shaft fractures. OVID/MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration Database, Web of Science, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, and Google Scholar were all searched for articles published from 1988 to 2014. Inclusion criteria comprised studies of level 1 to 4 evidence, written in the English language, that reported on the management and outcome of tibial shaft fractures and included data on either return-to-sport rate or time. Studies that failed to report on sporting outcomes, those of level 5 evidence, and those in non-English language were excluded. Systematic review. Level 4. The search used combinations of the terms tibial, tibia, acute, fracture, athletes, sports, nonoperative, conservative, operative, and return to sport. Two authors independently reviewed the selected articles and created separate data sets, which were subsequently combined for final analysis. A total of 16 studies (10 retrospective, 3 prospective, 3 randomized controlled trials) were included (n = 889 patients). Seventy-six percent (672/889) of the patients were men, with a mean age of 27.7 years. Surgical management was assessed in 14 studies, and nonsurgical management was assessed in 8 studies. Return to sport ranged from 12 to 54 weeks after surgical intervention and from 28 to 182 weeks after nonsurgical management (mean difference, 69.5 weeks; 95% CI, -83.36 to -55.64; P Fractures treated surgically had a return-to-sport rate of 92%, whereas those treated nonsurgically had a return rate of 67% (risk ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.57; P displaced fractures and to attempt nonsurgical management for undisplaced fractures. Primary surgical intervention of undisplaced

  18. Outcomes of The Isolated Closed Tibial Shaft Fractures Treated Nonsurgically

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    Dawood Jafari

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of the tibia are important for their commonness and controversy in their management. Both conservative and surgical techniques have been introduced in an effort to speed time to union while minimizing the occurrence of complications. Standard treatment for low-energy tibial shaft fractures includes closed reduction and cast immobilization.The purpose of our study was to analyze retention of reduction after cast immobilization of simple isolated closed tibial fractures.Methods:All cases of the diagnosed isolated closed tibial shaft fracture treated non-surgically at Shafa Yahyaeian Hospital, between 2006 and 2009 were retrieved from medical records. We reviewed all medical records and radiographs of these patients to inquire about the patients’ demographic data used to analyze the outcomes of the non-surgical treatment.Results:Of the 26 patients examined, males were more commonly affected. The mean age was 27.46   (SD=7.58.The most common causes of injury were direct blow and motorcycle to pedestrian accident. Followup duration for each patient had an average of 9.12 months (SD=2.36. Using AO/OTA classification, distributed as 38.5% A1.1, 26.9% A2.1 and 34.6% A3.1 fractures. Most fractures were sustained in the lower third of the tibia (53.85%. All fractures eventually healed in an average of 13.7 weeks (SD=3.24. There was one case of delayed union in the 22nd week. In 92.3% of patients, shortening of bone was less than 1 cm, while in 7.7% patients, was more than 1.5 cm. We observed an anterior or posterior angulation > 10 ° in 2 (7.69% patients. Moreover, in 4 (15.38% patients we found varus angulation > 5°. Therefore, final deformity was observed in 8 (30.77% patients. No patient had non-union, rotational malalignment of more than 10 degrees, an infection, or a compartment syndrome.Conclusion : Our non-surgical treatment’s outcomes were not satisfactory, despite applying all principles for conservative treatment and

  19. Age variations in the properties of human tibial trabecular bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Danielsen, CC

    1997-01-01

    We tested in compression specimens of human proximal tibial trabecular bone from 31 normal donors aged from 16 to 83 years and determined the mechanical properties, density and mineral and collagen content. Young's modulus and ultimate stress were highest between 40 and 50 years, whereas ultimate...... amount of collagen) varied with failure energy. Collagen concentration was maximal at younger ages but varied little with age. Our results suggest that the decrease in mechanical properties of trabecular bone such as Young's modulus and ultimate stress is mainly a consequence of the loss of trabecular...

  20. External tibial torsion and the effectiveness of the solid ankle-foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankoski, S J; Michaud, S; Dias, L

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the influence of external tibial torsion on the effectiveness of the ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) in children with lumbosacral myelomeningocele. Forty patients with normal tibial rotation and 18 patients with excessive external tibial torsion were evaluated with three-dimensional gait analysis at their comfortable walking speed. The group with normal tibial rotation showed significantly greater knee extension and lower mean extension moment compared with the group with external tibial torsion (p 20 degrees demand close inspection as candidates for derotation osteotomy. The AFO will continue to stabilize the ankle-foot complex, but improved knee motion, knee-extensor activity, and ultimately walking efficiency may be compromised.

  1. A Patient with Unilateral Tibial Aplasia and Accessory Scrotum: A Pure Coincidence or Nonfortuitous Association?

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    Zoran Gucev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tibial aplasia is an uncommon lower limb malformation that can occur isolated or be part of a more complex malformation pattern. We describe a 9-year-old boy born after uneventful pregnancy and delivery. Family history was negative for maternal diabetes and other malformations. The patient presented with left tibial aplasia and homolateral prexial foot polydactyly. He also displayed enamel dysplasia and bifid scotum with cryptorchidism. Literature review failed to identify a significant syndromic association between lower limb defects of the tibial type and the genital anomalies reported here. The combination of tibial aplasia with midline genital malformations further supports the hypothesis that the tibial ray development mirrors the morphogenetic process of the radial structures. Accordingly, the malformation pattern observed in the present patient may be pathogenetically explained by an insult occurring during late blastogenesis.

  2. Varus femoral and tibial coronal alignments result in different kinematics and kinetics after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mutsumi; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Nishitani, Kohei; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-11-01

    Abnormal knee motion under various conditions has been described after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, differences in kinematics and kinetics of knees with varus femoral versus varus tibial alignment have not been evaluated. It was hypothesized that varus femoral and tibial alignments have the same impact on knee motion. A musculoskeletal computer simulation was used. Femoral and tibial alignment in the coronal plane was each varied from neutral to 5° of varus in 1° increments. Lift-off, defined as an intercomponent distance of >2 mm, and tibiofemoral contact forces were evaluated during gait up to 60° of knee flexion. Knee kinematics and contact stresses were also examined during squat, with up to 130° of knee flexion. During gait, lift-off occurred readily with more than 3° of varus tibial alignment and slight lateral joint laxity. In contrast, lift-off did not occur with varus femoral or tibial alignment of up to 5° during squat. Peak medial contact forces with varus femoral alignment were approximately twice those observed with varus tibial alignment. The lowest points of the femoral condyles moved internally with varus femoral alignment, contrary to the kinematics with neutral or varus tibial alignment. On the other hand, there was femoral medial sliding and edge loading against the tibia in mid-flexion with varus tibial alignment. Varus femoral alignment affects the non-physiological rotational movement of the tibiofemoral joint, whereas varus tibial alignment causes medial-lateral instability during mid-flexion. Varus femoral and tibial alignments might lead to post-TKA discomfort and unreliability.

  3. Percutaneous tibial physeal fracture repair in small animals: technique and 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Pfeil, Dirsko J F; Glassman, Mathieu; Ropski, Meaghan

    2017-07-20

    To retrospectively describe cases treated via percutaneous tibial physeal fracture repair (PTPFR), using intra-operative fluoroscopy (IFL) or digital radiography (DR). To describe a technique ("spiking"), used to treat tibial tuberosity avulsion fractures. Clinical data of 14 dogs and three cats were included. The "spiking" technique was described. Intra-operative fluoroscopy (n = 11) and DR (n = 6) were successfully used in 11 tibial tuberosity avulsion fractures, one combined proximal physeal and tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture, and five distal tibial/fibular physeal fractures. Surgery times ranged from eight to 54 minutes. The "spiking" technique was successfully applied in six tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture cases. Return to function was at a mean (± standard deviation) of 1.9 (± 1.6) weeks. Long-term (>12 months; n = 17) follow-up was available at a mean of 40.6 (± 13.4) months. Major complications consisted of skin irritation from a pin (distal tibia / fibula physeal fracture case; 8 weeks post-PTPFR), and a bilateral grade II medial patella luxation (tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture case; 1.5 years post-PTPFR). One case developed a mild tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture re-avulsion. All conditions in these three cases were not of clinical concern at follow-up and final outcome was graded as good in these and excellent in the other 14 cases. Percutaneous tibial physeal fracture repair can be considered as a technique to treat tibial physeal fractures. The "spiking" technique was successfully applied in six dogs. A larger, prospective case series is indicated to provide additional clinical information.

  4. Tibial internal rotation negatively affects clinical outcomes in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Ascione, Francesco; Rossini, Marco; Braile, Adriano; Corona, Katia; Vasso, Michele; Hirschmann, Michael T

    2017-12-15

    The aim of this systematic review is to analyze the effect of tibial rotational alignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on clinical outcomes and assess the eventual cut-off values for tibial TKA rotation leading to poor outcomes. A detailed and systematic search from 1997 to 2017 of the Pubmed, Medline, Cochrane Reviews, and the Google Scholar databases was performed using the keyword terms "total knee arthroplasty", "total knee replacement", "tibial alignment", "tibial malalignement", "tibial rotation", "rotational error", "axis", "angle", "tibial malrotation", "clinical outcome", in several combinations. The modified Coleman scoring methodology (mCMS) was used. All the primary TKAs studies analyzing correlation between clinical results and tibial rotation were included. Five articles met the inclusion criteria. A total of 333 arthroplasties were included in this review; 139 had tibial component malalignment, while 194 were in control groups. The mean age of patients was 67.3 (SD 0.57) years. The mean average postoperative follow-up delay was 34.7 months (range 21-70). The mean mCMS score was 59.2 points indicating good methodological quality in the included studies. Functional outcomes were assessed through KSS, OKS, KOOS and VAS, negatively related to tibial internal rotation. Our review confirmed that excessive internal rotation of the tibial TKA component represents a significant risk factor for pain and inferior functional outcomes after TKA (> 10° of internal rotation demonstrated the common value), since external rotation does not affect the results. However, a universal precise cut-off value has not been found in the available literature and there remains a debate about CT rotation assessment and surgical intra-operative landmarks. III.

  5. Standing balance in people with trans-tibial amputation due to vascular causes: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Mayank; Lamberg, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Balance is an important variable to consider during the rehabilitation process of individuals with trans-tibial amputation. Limited evidence exists on the balance abilities of people with trans-tibial amputation due to vascular causes. The purpose of this article is to review literature and determine if standing balance is diminished in people with trans-tibial amputation due to vascular causes. Literature review. Data were obtained from PubMed, Google Scholar, OandP.org , CINHAL, and Science Direct. Studies were selected only if they included standing balance assessment of people with unilateral trans-tibial amputation due to vascular causes. The review yielded seven articles that met the inclusion criteria. The general test methodology required participants to stand still on force platforms, with feet together, while center of pressure or postural sway was recorded. According to the findings of this review, individuals with trans-tibial amputees due to vascular causes have diminished balance abilities. Limited evidence suggests their balance might be further diminished as compared to individuals with trans-tibial amputation due to trauma. Although the evidence is limited, because of the underlying pathology and presence of comorbidities in individuals with trans-tibial amputation due to vascular causes, one cannot ignore these findings, as even a minor injury from a fall may develop into a non-healing ulcer and affect their health and well-being more severely than individuals with trans-tibial amputation due to trauma. Clinical relevance Individuals with trans-tibial amputation due to vascular causes have diminished balance abilities compared to healthy individuals and individuals with trans-tibial amputation due to trauma. This difference should be considered when designing and fabricating prostheses. Prosthetists and rehabilitation clinicians should consider designing amputation cause-specific rehabilitation interventions, focussing on balance and other

  6. Thrombosed Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm as Herald of Tibial Osteochondroma

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    A.M. Ruales Romero

    Full Text Available Background: Osteochondroma is the most common non-malignant tumour of bone, accounting for approximately one third of benign lesions in the skeleton. They often develop around the knee in the distal femur and in the proximal tibia and fibula. They present as a painless slow growing mass during adolescence and have been reported to cause damage to adjacent structures such as blood vessels; arterial damage is more common than venous injury and is usually a result of compression, stretching, and rubbing of the arterial wall. Such lesions include stenosis, thrombosis, and pseudoaneurysm formation possibly causing lower limb claudication or acute limb ischemia. Methods: An 18 year old male patient with a 4 week history of pain, hematoma, and oedema of the left calf without previous trauma is reported. A computed tomography scan (CT revealed a large popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm and its close relationship to a protrusion of the proximal tibia. Results: The popliteal artery was repaired by an external saphenous patch and the exostosis was removed. The patient had palpable popliteal and distal pulses after surgery and during the first year follow-up. Conclusions: Tibial osteochondroma should be considered in the differential diagnosis in young patients, among the potential causes of pseudoaneurysm of the femoral or popliteal artery. Surgical repair should be performed to restore normal blood flow with resection of the exostosis to prevent recurrence. Keywords: Popliteal artery, Pseudoaneurysm, Tibial exostosis, Osteochondroma

  7. Outcome of intramedullary interlocking SIGN nail in tibial diaphyseal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.; Javed, S.; Khan, G.N.; Aziz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome of intramedullary interlocking surgical implant generation network (SIGN) nail in diaphyseal tibial fractures in terms of union and failure of implant (breakage of nail or interlocking screws). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Orthopaedics and Spinal Surgery, Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital, Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore, from September 2008 to August 2009. Methodology: Fifty patients aged 14 - 60 years, of either gender were included, who had closed and Gustilo type I and II open fractures reported in 2 weeks, whose closed reduction was not possible or was unsatisfactory and fracture was located 7 cm below knee joint to 7 cm above ankle joint. Fractures previously treated with external fixator, infected fractures and unfit patients were excluded. All fractures were fixed with intramedullary interlocking SIGN nail and were followed clinically and radiographically for union and for any implant failure. Results: Forty one (88%) patients had united fracture within 6 months, 5 (10%) patients had delayed union while 4 (8%) patients had non-union. Mean duration for achieving union was 163 + 30.6 days. Interlocking screws were broken in 2 patients while no nail was broken in any patient. Conclusion: Intramedullary interlocking nailing is an effective measure in treating closed and grade I and II open tibial fractures. It provides a high rate of union less complications and early return to function. (author)

  8. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Treatment of Pediatric Tibial Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Gurung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tibia fractures in the skeletally immature patient can usually be treated with above knee cast or patellar tendon bearing cast. The purpose of our study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of Elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixation of pediatric tibial shaft fractures treated at our institution. Methods: Over a period of one year, fifty pediatric patients of tibial shaft fractures, with average age of 9.68 yr (SD=2.37, were treated with elastic stable intramedullary nail. Demographic data, union and complication rate were evaluated. Results: There were 36 closed and 14 open fractures. The average time to union was 11.6 weeks  (SD=2.65 for close and  14.3 weeks (SD=2.62 for open fracture. There were no instances of growth arrest, remanipulations, or refracture. Conclusion: We conclude that flexible intramedullary fixation is an easy and effective method of management of both open and closed unstable fractures of the tibia in children.

  9. Posterior coronal plating for tibial fractures: technique and advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montu Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Tibial shaft fractures are straightforward to treat but when associated with soft tissue injury particularly at the nail entry/plate insertion site or there is significant comminution proximally or a large butterfly fragment/a second split component in the posterior coronal plane, it is a challenge to the treating surgeon. The aim of the present report is to describe the technique of posterior coronal plating in such a scenario and its advantages. Methods:Between July 2008 and June 2011, 12 patients were pro spectively treated by this approach using 4.5 mm broad dynamic compression plates. Results:The time of bony consolidation and full weight bearing averaged 21.7 weeks (range, 16-26 weeks. Patients were followed up for at least 24 months (range, 24-48 months. At 1 year postoper atively, no loss in reduction or alignment was observed. Mean Hospital for Lower Extremity Measurement Functional Score was 72.8 (range, 64-78. All patients were satisfied with their treatment outcomes. Conclusion:Direct posterior approach and fixation using prone position helps to visualise the fracture fragments and provide rigid fixation. The approach is simple and extensile easily, apart from advantages of less soft tissue and hardware problems compared to standard medial or lateral plating. Key words: Tibial fractures; Bone plates; Orthopedic procedures

  10. Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Open Pediatric Tibial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkul, Emin; Gem, Mehmet; Arslan, Hüseyin; Alemdar, Celil; Azboy, İbrahim; Arslan, Seher G

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness and reliability of limited-contact locking plates in minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis (MIPO) of the lateral tibia. A retrospective study. The retrospective study included 14 patients who were operatively treated with an MIPO technique due to open tibial fractures between 2006 and 2012. The patients were 11 males and 3 females with a mean age of 13.2 (range, 9 to 16) years. The patients were followed up for a mean period of 2.4 (range, 1 to 5) years. The mechanism of the injuries included a motor vehicle accident (n=11), a shotgun injury (n=2), and a fall from height (n=1). According to the Gustilo-Anderson classification, 10 patients had type I (72%), 2 had type II (14%), and 2 had type III (14%) open fractures. The mean time to radiologic union was 18 (range, 11 to 32) weeks. No infection was detected that would require implant removal. No complications such as early epiphyseal closure, angulation, or limb-length inequality were observed. Limited-contact locking plates in MIPO of the lateral tibia is an effective alternative method in the treatment of open pediatric tibial fractures. Level IV-therapeutic.

  11. Isokinetic performance of the thigh muscles after tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, S E; Kannus, P; Natri, A; Latvala, K; Järvinen, M J

    1997-01-01

    The isokinetic performance of thigh muscles was evaluated in 37 patients at an average of 7 years after sustaining a fracture of the tibial plateau. The mean torque deficit in the quadriceps of the injured limb was an average of 15% at a speed of 60 degrees/s and 16% at 180 degrees/s, while the corresponding deficits in the hamstrings were 3% and 8%. The radiological appearance of the injured knee correlated significantly to the quadriceps deficit at both speeds. Limited knee movement and thigh atrophy also correlated with the deficit at the lower speed. The strength deficit tended to decrease during follow-up. A multiple step-wise regression analysis showed that the radiological result, length of follow-up and thigh atrophy accounted for 47% of the variation in loss of quadriceps strength. At the higher speed, the functional result was associated with the deficit in quadriceps strength, and older patients had greater deficits than younger. Regression analysis indicated that the radiological and functional result accounted for 31% of the variation in quadriceps strength. Anatomical restoration of the tibial plateau and good muscle rehabilitation are important in obtaining good long term results after this fracture.

  12. Complications of Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Plating for Distal Tibial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Nasir; Bhat, Rafiq; Yasin, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    The management of distal tibia fractures continues to remain a source of controversy and debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the various complications of minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) using a locking plate for closed fractures of distal tibia in a retrospective study. Twenty-five patients with distal tibial fractures, treated by minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis, were evaluated in a retrospective study. We studied the rate, probable etiological factors and preventive and corrective measures of various complications associated with minimally invasive plating of distal tibia. Mean age of the patients was 41.16 years (range 22 - 65). There were 13 male and 12 female patients. All fractures united at an average duration of 16.8 weeks. There were two cases of superficial and two cases of deep infection, and deep infections required removal of hardware for cure. There were four cases of ankle stiffness, most of them occurring in intra-articular fractures, three cases of palpable implant, three cases of malunion, one case of loss of reduction and one patient required reoperation. The average AO foot and ankle score was 83.6. We found MIPPO using locking plate to be a safe and effective method for the treatment of distal tibial fractures in properly selected patients yet can result in a variety of complications if proper precautions before, during and after surgery are not taken care of.

  13. Discondroplasia tibial: mecanismos de lesão e controle

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    Pizauro Junior JM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A discondroplasia tibial (DT é atribuída a uma assincronia no processo de diferenciação dos condrócitos, levando à formação de uma camada de condrócitos pré-hipertróficos e de uma cartilagem na tíbia proximal que não é calcificada, mas é resistente à invasão vascular. Além disso, tem sido proposto que, na discondroplasia tíbial, a etapa final do processo de calcificação não ocorre devido ao fato de que os efetores de alguns genes, relacionados com o mecanismo de calcificação do disco de crescimento podem apresentar algumas de suas propriedades químicas ou biológicas alteradas e/ou não serem expressos. Nesse sentido, a compreensão do mecanismo de ação e o papel das biomoléculas e dos minerais relacionados com a discondroplasia tibial poderão contribuir para o conhecimento de doenças do tecido ósseo e estabelecer estratégias de prevenção e tratamento.

  14. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, M. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden); Thuomas, K.Aa. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Messner, K. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.).

  15. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, M.; Thuomas, K.Aa.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.)

  16. Varus tibial alignment is associated with greater tibial baseplate migration at 10 years following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Matthew G; Naudie, Douglas D; McCalden, Richard W; Yuan, Xunhua; Holdsworth, David W; MacDonald, Steven J; Lanting, Brent A

    2017-11-16

    To examine implant migration and articular behavior of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) at 10 years after index surgery and correlate to implant alignment. Thirty-five patients underwent a cemented posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty with a surgical objective of neutral alignment and were enrolled in a long-term radiostereometric analysis (RSA) study. At 10 years after surgery, patients were analyzed for implant migration using RSA as well as radiographic assessment of articular behavior at four positions of knee flexion. Implant position and alignment was measured on full-length radiographs. Patient demographics and reported outcomes were also collected. No difference between patient demographics or patient-reported outcomes were found. When categorized into neutral and varus groupings, no difference in migration was present. If alignment was considered as a continuous variable, there was no correlation between overall leg alignment and migration, however, migration increased with an increasing varus tibial alignment. Although contact location did not differ between neutral and varus groups through a range of motion, condylar liftoff was much more common in the varus group, of which all were lateral liftoff. Increased tibial varus results in increased implant migration. Overall varus limb alignment is correlated with isolated lateral compartment liftoff, and liftoff occurs more commonly than in neutral aligned knees. The increased migration and liftoff raise concerns about the longevity of malaligned total knee replacements. If a goal of overall varus limb alignment is desired for TKA, the tibia should remain neutral. Level III.

  17. Comparison of tibial plateau angle changes after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy fixation with conventional or locking screw technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkling, Amanda L; Fagin, Bennett; Daye, R Mark

    2010-06-01

    To compare the effects of locking and conventional screws on postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA), osteotomy healing, and complication rate after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs treated for naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Prospective clinical study. Dogs (n=118) with CCL rupture. Dogs (> or =20 kg) with unilateral CCL rupture and sufficient bone stock for TPLO and use of a 3.5-mm-broad or -narrow TPLO plate were sequentially allocated to have plate fixation with locking or conventional screws. Data analyzed included breed, age, sex, body weight, body condition score, limb operated, implants used, meniscal status, operative time, and days to recheck. Preoperative, immediate postoperative, and 8-week recheck mediolateral radiographs were reviewed, and TPA, complications, and healing status were evaluated. Stifles in the locking screw group had significantly less change in postoperative TPA than stifles in the conventional screw group. Locking screw fixation also had significantly higher grades of osteotomy healing, assessed on a mediolateral radiographic view. TPLO plates secured with locking screws are acceptable when compared with those secured with conventional screws; osteotomy healing is improved and TPA better conserved when using locking screws. Locking screw fixation serves to increase stabilization of TPA during TPLO healing and provides improved radiographic evidence of osteotomy healing.

  18. Radiographic study on the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish the radiographic distances from posterior cruciate ligament (PCL tibial insertions centers to the lateral and medial tibial cortex in the anteroposterior view, and from these centers to the PCL facet most proximal point on the lateral view, in order to guide anatomical tunnels drilling in PCL reconstruction and for tunnel positioning postoperative analysis.STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study.METHODS: Twenty cadaver knees were evaluated. The PCL's bundles tibial insertions were identified and marked out using metal tags, and the knees were radiographed. On these radiographs, the bundles insertion sites center location relative to the tibial mediolateral measure, and the distances from the most proximal PCL facet point to the bundle's insertion were determined. All measures were calculated using the ImageJ software.RESULTS: On the anteroposterior radiographs, the mean distance from the anterolateral (AL bundle insertion center to the medial tibial edge was 40.68 ± 4.10 mm; the mean distance from the posteromedial (PM bundle insertion center to the medial tibial edge was 38.74 ± 4.40 mm. On the lateral radiographs, the mean distances from the PCL facet most proximal point to AL and PM bundles insertion centers were 5.49 ± 1.29 mm and 10.53 ± 2.17 mm respectively.CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to establish a radiographic pattern for PCL tibial bundles insertions, which may be useful for intraoperative tunnels locations control and for postoperative tunnels positions analysis.

  19. Mapping of the anterior tibial profile to identify accurate reference points for sagittal alignment of tibial component in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinotti, G; Caruso, E; Orsina, L; La Torre, G; Ripani, F R

    2017-10-01

    Although standard instrumentation is the procedure most frequently used to implant a Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), high rates of malalignment of tibial component are reported using this technique. Anatomical landmarks for sagittal alignment have been little investigated and the best reference axis, which parallels the mechanical axis, is yet to be established. Mapping the Anterior Tibial Profile (ATP) may allow the identification of segmental zones of the ATP parallel to the mechanical axis which can be used to align the extramedullary rod. An intramedullary rod was positioned in line with the mechanical axis in 47 dried cadaveric tibiae. The rod was connected to a cutting jig and to an extramedullary rod. Digitalized images of lateral view radiographs were taken and the distance between the ATP and the extramedullary rod was measured at 10-mm intervals and at interpolated distances corresponding to every 2% of the tibial length. Segmental portions of the ATP exhibit an alignment parallel to the mechanical axis between points located at 58% and 90% and at 62% and 88% of the tibial length. Points placed at 50% of tibial length and 5mm proximal to the ankle joint generate the longer axis parallel to the mechanical axis. The orientation of sagittal tibial cut may be improved by aligning the extramedullary rod parallel to the ATP at definite points. Points placed at 50% of the tibial length and 5mm proximal to the ankle joint may be preferred since they generate the longer axis parallel to the mechanical axis and are more easily identified at surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Extramedullary versus intramedullary tibial cutting guides in megaprosthetic total knee replacement

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    Karade Vikas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a standard total knee replacement, tibial component alignment is a key factor for the long term success of the surgery. The purpose of this study is to compare the accuracy of extramedullary and intramedullary tibial cutting guides used in indigenous and imported implants respectively, in positioning of the tibial components in megaprosthetic knee replacements. Methods A comparative study of the accuracy of extramedullary and intramedullary tibial cutting guides was carried out in 92 megaprosthetic knee replacements for distal femoral tumors. For the proximal tibia cut for tibial component placement, an extramedullary guide was used in 65 patients and an intramedullary guide was used in 27 patients. Tibial component alignment angles were measured in postoperative X-rays with the help of CAD software. Results There was more varus placement in coronal plane with extramedullary cutting guide (−1.18 +/− 2.4 degrees than the intramedullary guide (−0.34 +/− 2.31 degrees but this did not reach statistical significance. The goal of 90 +/− 2 degrees alignment of tibial component was achieved in 54% of patients in the extramedullary group versus 67% in the intramedullary group. In terms of sagittal plane alignment, extramedullary guide showed less accurate results (2.09 +/− 2.4 degrees than intramedullary guide (0.50 +/− 3.80 degrees for tibial component alignment, though 78% of patients were aligned within the goal of 0–5 degrees of tibial slope angle in extramedullary group versus 63% in intramedullary group. The mean error in the measurements due to rotation of the knee during taking the X-rays was less than 0.1 degrees and distribution of the X-rays with the rotation of knee was similar in both the groups. Conclusions Overall, in megaprosthetic knee replacement intramedullary guides gave more accurate results in sagittal plane and exhibited similar variability as of extramedullary guides in coronal plane.

  1. The accuracy of intramedullary tibial guide of sagittal alignment of PCL-substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyuk-Soo; Kang, Seung-Baik; Jo, Chris H; Kim, Sun-Hong; Lee, Jung-Ha

    2010-10-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the accuracy of the intramedullary alignment method have produced different results, and few have addressed accuracy in the sagittal plane. Reported deviations are not only attributable to the alignment method but also to radiological errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the intramedullary alignment method in the sagittal plane using computed tomography (CT) and 3-dimensional imaging software. Thirty-one TKAs were performed using an intramedullary alignment method involving the insertion of a long 8-mm diameter rod into the medullary canal to the distal metaphysis of the tibia. All alignment instruments were set to achieve an ideal varus/valgus angle of 0° in the coronal plane and a tibial slope of 0° in the sagittal plane. The accuracy of the intramedullary alignment system was assessed by measuring the coronal tibial component angle and sagittal tibial slope angles, i.e., angles between the tibial anatomical axis and the tangent to the medial and lateral tibial plateau or the cut-surface. The mean coronal tibial component angle was 88.5° ± 1.2° and the mean tibial component slope in the sagittal plane was 1.6° ± 1.2° without anterior slope. Our intramedullary tibial alignment method, which involves passing an 8-mm diameter long rod through the tibial shaft isthmus, showed good accuracy (less than 3 degrees of variation and no anterior slope) in the sagittal plane in neutral or varus knees.

  2. Management of tibial non-unions according to a novel treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nando; Marais, Leonard Charles

    2015-12-01

    Tibial non-unions represent a spectrum of conditions that are challenging to treat. The optimal management remains unclear despite the frequency with which these diagnoses are encountered. The aim of this study was to determine the outcome of tibial non-unions managed according to a novel tibial non-union treatment algorithm. One hundred and eighteen consecutive patients with 122 uninfected tibial non-unions were treated according to our proposed tibial non-union treatment algorithm. All patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically for a minimum of six months after external fixator removal. Four patients were excluded because they did not complete the intended treatment process. The final study population consisted of 94 men and 24 women with a mean age of 34 years. Sixty-seven non-unions were stiff hypertrophic, 32 mobile atrophic, 16 mobile oligotrophic and one true pseudoarthrosis. Six non-unions were classified as type B1 defect non-unions. Bony union was achieved after the initial surgery in 113/122 (92.6%) tibias. Nine patients had failure of treatment. Seven persistent non-unions were successfully retreated according to the tibial non-union treatment algorithm. This resulted in final bony union in 120/122 (98.3%) tibias. The proposed tibial non-union treatment algorithm appears to produce high union rates across a diverse group of tibial non-unions. Tibial non-unions however, remain difficult to treat and should be referred to specialist units where advanced reconstructive techniques are practiced on a regular basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intercalary bone segment transport in treatment of segmental tibial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, A.; Amin, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results and complications of intercalary bone segment transport in the treatment of segmental tibial defects. Design: This is a retrospective analysis of patients with segmental tibial defects who were treated with intercalary bone segment transport method. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from September 1997 to April 2001. Subjects and methods: Thirteen patients were included in the study who had developed tibial defects either due to open fractures with bone loss or subsequent to bone debridement of infected non unions. The mean bone defect was 6.4 cms and there were eight associated soft tissue defects. Locally made unilateral 'Naseer-Awais' (NA) fixator was used for bone segment transport. The distraction was done at the rate of 1mm/day after 7-10 days of osteotomy. The patients were followed-up fortnightly during distraction and monthly thereafter. The mean follow-up duration was 18 months. Results: The mean time in external fixation was 9.4 months. The m ean healing index' was 1.47 months/cm. Satisfactory union was achieved in all cases. Six cases (46.2%) required bone grafting at target site and in one of them grafting was required at the level of regeneration as well. All the wounds healed well with no residual infection. There was no residual leg length discrepancy of more than 20 mm nd one angular deformity of more than 5 degrees. The commonest complication encountered was pin track infection seen in 38% of Shanz Screws applied. Loosening occurred in 6.8% of Shanz screws, requiring re-adjustment. Ankle joint contracture with equinus deformity and peroneal nerve paresis occurred in one case each. The functional results were graded as 'good' in seven, 'fair' in four, and 'poor' in two patients. Overall, thirteen patients had 31 (minor/major) complications with a ratio of 2.38 complications per patient. To treat the bone defects and associated complications, a mean of

  4. Treatment of Tibial Non-Unions - State of the Art and Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märdian, S; Giesecke, M; Haschke, F; Tsitsilonis, S; Wildemann, B; Schwabe, P

    2016-01-01

    healing disturbances occur in 5-10% of the cases. The anatomical region of the lower limb predisposes the tibia for bone healing disturbances. Reports about the incidence of non-unions of the tibial shaft are inhomogeneous. Different treatment strategies have been published which depend on the type of non-union as well as the history of the patient. These range from conservative approaches to complex procedures including segmental resection and bone transport. This review aimed to summarize the state of the art treatment of tibial non-unions and report about recent basic research results that may improve bone healing. Key words: tibial non-unions, treatment strategies, bone healing.

  5. Medial parapatellar approach leads to internal rotation of tibial component in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiapparelli, Filippo-Franco; Amsler, Felix; Hirschmann, Michael T

    2017-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the type of approach [medial parapatellar approach (MPA) versus lateral parapatellar approach with tibial tubercle osteotomy (LPA)] influences rotation of femoral and/or tibial component and leg axis in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It was the hypothesis that MPA leads to an internally rotated tibial TKA component. This study included 200 consecutive patients in whom TKA was performed using either a parapatellar medial (n = 162, MPA) or parapatellar lateral approach with tibial tubercle osteotomy (n = 38, LPA). All patients underwent clinical follow-up, standardized radiographs and computed radiography (CT). TKA components' position and the whole leg axis were assessed on 3D reconstructed CT scans (sagittal, coronal and rotational). Mean values of TKA component position and the whole leg alignment of both groups were compared using a t test. The tibial component was graded as internally rotated (6° ER). The femoral component was graded as internally rotated [>3° of internal rotation (IR)], neutral rotation (equal or between -3° IR and 3° of ER) and externally rotated (>3° ER). There was no significant difference in terms of whole leg axis after TKA between both groups (MPA: 0.2° valgus ± 3.4; LPA: 0.0° valgus ± 3.5). Means of tibial component rotation were 2.7° ER ± 6.1 (MPA) and 7.6° ER ± 5.4 (LPA). Patients of group LPA presented a significantly less internally rotated (LPA: 18.4%; MPA: 48.8%) and more externally rotated (LPA: 52.6%; MPA: 22.8%) tibial component (p approach (medial versus lateral) significantly influenced tibial TKA component rotation. It appears that a MPA tends to internally rotate the tibial TKA component and a LPA tends to externally rotate the tibial TKA. The anterior cortex should not be used as landmark for tibial TKA component placement when using the lateral approach with tibial tubercle osteotomy. Retrospective comparative study, Level III.

  6. Outcomes after arthroscopic fixation of tibial eminence fractures with bioabsorbable nails in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaya, Amit M; Read, Connor; Steirer, Megan; Estes, Reed

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the outcomes and any complications with arthroscopic bioabsorbable nail fixation of tibial eminence fractures in skeletally immature patients. We retrospectively reviewed all surgically treated tibial eminence fractures treated by a single surgeon and seven patients were identified with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Mean deficits of flexion and extension were minimal. Satisfactory Tegner levels, Lysholm knee scores, and International Knee Documentation Committee subjective scores were reported. Arthroscopic fixation of tibial eminence fractures with bioabsorbable nails yields satisfactory outcomes for this uncommon injury and obviates the need for future hardware removal.

  7. Complex Tibial Fractures: Tips and Tricks for Intramedullary Nail Fixation

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    Michael Githens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal and segmental tibia fractures can be technically challenging for a variety of reasons. Restoring length, alignment and rotation of the injured limb requires careful preoperative planning and meticulous attention to surgical technique, while avoiding common pitfalls. Understanding the deforming forces on the fracture segments and normal tibial osteology provides a background for recognizing the most common pitfalls when nailing these fractures. Many adjuncts for obtaining and maintaining fracture reduction while nailing have been described, including extended positioning, use of the femoral distractor, blocking screws, and provisional plating. We discuss these techniques as well as the role of intramedullary fixation for treating metaphyseal fractures with articular extension. The purpose of this paper is to describe the background and technique for a variety of operative tips and tricks to facilitate intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal and segmental tibia fractures.

  8. Double segmental tibial fractures - an unusual fracture pattern

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    Bali Kamal

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】A case of a 50-year-old pedestrian who was hit by a bike and suffered fractures of both bones of his right leg was presented. Complete clinical and radiographic assessment showed double segmental fractures of the tibia and multisegmental fractures of the fibula. Review of the literature revealed that this fracture pattern was unique and only a single case was reported so far. Moreover, we discussed the possible mechanisms which can lead to such an injury. We also discussed the management of segmental tibial fracture and the difficulties encountered with them. This case was managed by modern osteosynthesis tech- nique with a pleasing outcome. Key words: Fracture, bone; Tibia; Fibula; Nails

  9. Sagittal accuracy of tibial osteotomy position during in vivo tibial plateau levelling osteotomy performed without an alignment jig and cutting guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew; Witte, Philip Georg; Scott, Harry William

    2017-01-16

    To assess the accuracy of tibial osteotomy location for tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) in the sagittal plane and its effect on the postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA), when performed without an alignment jig and saw guide. Also, to document the improvement gained with experience. Medical records and stifle radiographs of dogs undergoing TPLO, without the use of an alignment jig and saw guide, by one surgeon were reviewed (2010-2014). Postoperative radiographs were reviewed to record the distance and direction of eccentricity. Postoperative TPA was also recorded. In a series of 401 TPLO procedures, 231 met the inclusion criteria. The absolute distance of eccentricity (DOE) for all dogs was 3.0 ± 1.6 mm. When evaluating surgical experience, the DOE for the final 77 cases (2.72 ± 1.43 mm), the middle 77 cases (3.18 ± 1.49 mm), and the first 77 cases (3.24 ± 1.7 mm) were not significantly different (p = 0.07157). There was a very weak correlation between DOE and postoperative TPA (R = 0.029). The location of the tibial osteotomy when performing TPLO without an alignment jig and saw guide compared favourably with previously documented use of an alignment jig and saw guide. Whilst the location of the tibial osteotomy has a theoretical impact on the postoperative TPA, other factors appear to be of greater importance. Surgeon experience did not result in significant improvement in accuracy up to 231 procedures.

  10. Distal tibial fractures: evaluation of different fixation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöstl, Julian; Tiefenböck, Thomas Manfred; Hofbauer, Marcus; Winnisch, Markus; Lang, Nikolaus; Hajdu, Stefan; Sarahrudi, Kambiz

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of the most commonly used surgical techniques (external fixation, intramedullary nailing, and plate fixation) for the treatment of distal tibial fractures (AO/OTA classification 42-A, B, C or 43-A, B1). A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent surgical treatment for distal tibial fractures between 1992 and 2011 was performed. A total of 93 patients (52 male/41 female) met inclusion criteria. Statistically significant differences were found regarding the consolidation time of the intramedullary-nailing (147.32 ± 91.16 days) and the plate-fixation group (135.75 ± 110.75 days) versus the external-fixation group (163.12 ± 96.79 days; P = 0.001; P = 0.01). Significant differences were also observed in the range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint in the intramedullary-nailing and plate-fixation group versus the ROM in the external-fixation group (P = 0.044; P = 0.025). The overall complication rate was 13/93 (14 %). Out of 66 patients treated with intramedullary nailing, 8 (12 %) suffered from complications. Out of the 15 patients treated with plate and 12 patients with external fixation, 2 (13 %) and 3 (25 %) showed complications, respectively. Our results demonstrate advantages in terms of shorter mobilization time and a better ROM of the ankle joint for intramedullary nailing and plate fixation compared with external fixation. Due to our results, we suggest internal fixation (intramedullary nailing or plate fixation) whenever patient's condition and the local fracture situation allow it.

  11. Unexplained proximal tibiofibular joint pain after high tibial osteotomy

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    Enrique Adrian Testa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems of the proximal tibiofibular joint (pTFj after high tibial osteotomy (HTO are rare. With this case report, we strive to highlight the importance of investigating the pTFj in patients with unexplained knee pain after HTO. A 44 year old male patient presented with diffuse pain on his left knee 3 years after medial opening wedge HTO due to medial compartment overloading in a varus knee. Patient described persistent anterior tibial and lateral knee pain. 2 years after HTO, patient underwent implant removal but the knee pain persisted. As the reason for the persistent pain was not identified, further radiological evaluation was done. Single photon emission computerized tomography/computerized tomography (SPECT/CT revealed that there was no increased uptake within the tibiofemoral joint, indicating a biologically well performed correction of the varus deformity. However, markedly increased tracer uptake was found at the pTFj. On the inherent axial CT scans, it was seen that the proximal screws were too long and placed within the pTFj. Along with this a severe osteoarthritis of the pTFj was identified. The cause of the patient′s pain was then confirmed by a CT guided infiltration of local anesthetic. An arthrodesis of the pTFj was performed and at 12 months followup after the arthrodesis the patient was pain free. This case highlights how important it is to evaluate the pTFj in patients with unexplained pain after HTO. SPECT/CT was helpful in identifying the patient′s problem in this challenging case.

  12. Evaluating Glucocorticoid Administration on Biomechanical Properties of Rats’ Tibial Diaphysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidouni, Mohammadjavad; Nejati, Hossein; Salimi, Maryam; Bayat, Mohammad; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Asgharie, Mohammad Ali; Rezaian, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a disease, which causes bone loss and fractures. Although glucocorticoids effectively suppress inflammation, their chronic use is accompanied by bone loss with a tendency toward secondary osteoporosis. Objectives: This study took into consideration the importance of cortical bone in the entire bone's mechanical competence. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of different protocols of glucocorticoid administration on the biomechanical properties of tibial bone diaphysis in rats compared to control and low-level laser-treated rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. We used systematic random sampling to divide 40 adult male rats into 8 groups with 5 rats in each group. Groups were as follows: 1) control, 2) dexamethasone (7 mg/week), 3) dexamethasone (0.7 mg/week), 4) methylprednisolone (7 mg/kg/week), 5) methylprednisolone (5 mg/kg twice weekly), 6) dexamethasone (7 mg/kg three times per week), 7) dexamethasone (0.7 mg/kg thrice per week), and 8) low-level laser-treated rats. The study periods were 4-7 weeks. At the end of the treatment periods, we examined the mechanical properties of tibial bone diaphysis. Data were analyzed by statistical analyses. Results: Glucocorticoid-treated rats showed weight loss and considerable mortality (21%). The biomechanical properties (maximum force) of glucocorticoid-treated rats in groups 4 (62 ± 2.9), 6 (63 ± 5.1), and 7 (60 ± 5.3) were comparable with the control (46 ± 1.5) and low-level laser-treated (57 ± 3.2) rats. Conclusions: In contrast to the findings in humans and certain other species, glucocorticoid administration caused anabolic effect on the cortical bone of tibia diaphysis bone in rats. PMID:26019900

  13. Tibial plateau fractures: compared outcomes between ARIF and ORIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'oca, C; Maluta, T; Lavini, F; Bondi, M; Micheloni, G M; Bartolozzi, P

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare arthroscopic assisted reduction internal fixation (ARIF) treatment with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) treatment in patients with tibial plateau fractures. We studied 100 patients with tibial plateau fractures (54 men and 46 women) examined by X-rays and CT scans, divided into 2 groups. Group A with associated meniscus tear was treated by ARIF technique, while in group B ORIF technique was used. The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 116 months. The patients were evaluated both clinically and radiologically according to the Rasmussen and HSS (The Hospital for Special Surgery knee-rating) scores. In group A, the average Rasmussen clinical score is 27.62 ± 2.60 (range, 19-30), while in group B is 26.81 ± 2.65 (range, 21-30). HSS score in group A was 76.36 ± 14.19 (range, 38-91) as the average clinical result, while in group B was 73.12 ± 14.55 (range, 45-91). According to Rasmussen radiological results, the average score for group A was 16.56 ± 2.66 (range, 8-18), while in group B was 15.88 ± 2.71 (range, 10-18). Sixty-nine of 100 patients in our study had associated intra-articular lesions. We had 5 early complications and 36 late complications. The study suggests that there are no differences between ARIF and ORIF treatment in Schatzker type I fractures. ARIF technique may increase the clinical outcome in Schatzker type II-III-IV fractures. In Schatzker type V and VI fractures, ARIF and ORIF techniques have both poor medium- and long-term results but ARIF treatment, when indicated, is the best choice for the lower rate of infections.

  14. Effect of step width manipulation on tibial stress during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Derrick, Timothy R

    2014-08-22

    Narrow step width has been linked to variables associated with tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of step width on bone stresses using a standardized model of the tibia. 15 runners ran at their preferred 5k running velocity in three running conditions, preferred step width (PSW) and PSW±5% of leg length. 10 successful trials of force and 3-D motion data were collected. A combination of inverse dynamics, musculoskeletal modeling and beam theory was used to estimate stresses applied to the tibia using subject-specific anthropometrics and motion data. The tibia was modeled as a hollow ellipse. Multivariate analysis revealed that tibial stresses at the distal 1/3 of the tibia differed with step width manipulation (p=0.002). Compression on the posterior and medial aspect of the tibia was inversely related to step width such that as step width increased, compression on the surface of tibia decreased (linear trend p=0.036 and 0.003). Similarly, tension on the anterior surface of the tibia decreased as step width increased (linear trend p=0.029). Widening step width linearly reduced shear stress at all 4 sites (p<0.001 for all). The data from this study suggests that stresses experienced by the tibia during running were influenced by step width when using a standardized model of the tibia. Wider step widths were generally associated with reduced loading of the tibia and may benefit runners at risk of or experiencing stress injury at the tibia, especially if they present with a crossover running style. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Results of open tibial fracture treatment using external fixation

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    Golubović Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Open lower leg fractures are the most common open fractures of the locomotor system and their treatment is associated with a number of complications. Objective. The aim of the paper was to present the results of the treatment of 68 patients with open lower leg fractures, as well as the complications that accompany the treatment of these fractures. Methods. In the analyzed group, there were 45 (66.18% men and 23 (33.82% women. The majority of patients - 33 (48.53% of them - were injured in motor vehicle accidents, whereas 24 (35.29% patients sustained injuries due to falls from heights. In two (2.94% patients the cause of open tibial fractures was gunshot injuries. In the analyzed group, there were 18 (26.47% type I open fractures, 21 (30.88% type II open fractures, 19 (27.94% type IIIA open fractures, seven (10.29% type IIIB open fractures, and three (4.41% type IIIC open fractures. Results. The tibial shaft fracture healed without serious complications in 50 (73.53% patients, whereas in 18 (26.47% patients we observed some complications. Nonunion was found in 10 (14.71% patients, osteitis in four (5.88, malunion in two (2.94% patients. Milder complications such as soft tissue pin tract infection developed in 13 (19.12% patients, infection of the open fracture wound soft tissue was observed in four (5.88% patients. Conclusion. Basic principles in the treatment of open lower leg fractures in this study are thorough primary open fracture wound treatment followed by the delayed wound closure, stable fracture fixation using unilateral external skeletal device, proper antibiotic treatment and tetanus prophylaxis. The results correlate with similar studies. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41017: Virtual Human Osteoarticular System and its Application in Preclinical and Clinical Practice

  16. Anterior tibial laxity using the GNRB® device in healthy knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Y; Murgier, J; Beaufils, P; Boisrenoult, P; Steltzlen, C; Pujol, N

    2018-01-01

    GRNB® is a non-radiating power tool that allows the evaluation of the anterior tibial translation. The pressure exerted by the system against the patella and the body mass index (BMI) could affect the anterior tibial translation when we repeat the measurements in healthy knees. We retrospectively evaluated the measurements of anterior knee laxity in healthy knees carried out by the GNRB® in 69 consecutive patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair in the contralateral knee. Two measurements were carried out, the initial measurements (M1), and then repeated at a mean of seven months (M2) (4.9 to 13months). There were 38 women and 31 men with an average age of 31years. In healthy knees, the Mean average anterior translation was 5.4±4mm with an average patellar force of 35.8 at time M1. The average anterior translation was 4.9±4mm with an average patellar force of 47 at time M2. There was a significant difference between the measurements M1 and M2 (P<0.03). The tightening force was significantly different between the two sets of measurements (P<10-7). There was a negative correlation between the pressure applied on the patella and anterior knee laxity (P<0.01). The pressure force exerted on the patella during GNRB® affects the measurement of anterior laxity in healthy knees. This raises the problem of the reproducibility of the measurements during repeated examinations at different times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurovascular risk of bicortical tibial drilling for screw and spiked washer fixation of soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, William R.; King, Stephen S.

    2001-03-01

    PURPOSE: As the use of soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts, including hamstring grafts, has become more prominent and the benefits of aggressive rehabilitation have become clear, maximizing fixation with screw and spiked washers is important. Bicortical fixation may be superior. We were concerned about potential neurovascular risks and designed this study to define the posterior neurovasculature structures at risk when drilling for bicortical tibial screw fixation during ACL reconstruction. Type of Study: Consecutive sample. METHODS: We placed the tibial tunnel arthroscopically in 10 cadaveric knees using a standard tibial drill guide. Accurate tibial tunnel position was documented in each knee by lateral radiograph. A 4.5-mm bicortical drill hole was placed perpendicular to the tibial surface 1 cm distal to the tibial tunnel. The distances from the posterior tibial drill exit point to nearby neurovascular structures were measured with a caliper. RESULTS: The closest structure to the exit point was the bifurcation of the popliteal artery/vein (11.4 +/- 0.6 mm; range, 8.4 to 14.0 mm). The next closest was the anterior tibial vein (11.7 +/- 1.6 mm; range, 3.5 to 22.8 mm). The closest any individual hole came to a neurovascular structure was 3.5 mm from the anterior tibial vein. CONCLUSIONS: Bicortical drilling for fixation of soft tissue grafts appears reasonably safe. The structures at greatest risk for injury are the bifurcation of the popliteal artery/vein and the anterior tibial vein.

  18. Dynamic and static tibial translation in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency initially treated with a structured rehabilitation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Sofi; Kvist, Joanna

    2017-08-01

    To compare dynamic and static tibial translation, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency, at 2- to 5-year follow-up, with the tibial translation after 4 months of rehabilitation initiated early after the injury. Secondarily, to compare tibial translation in the injured knee and non-injured knee and explore correlations between dynamic and static tibial translation. Twelve patients with ACL rupture were assessed at 3-8 weeks after ACL injury, after 4 months of structured rehabilitation, and 2-5 years after ACL injury. Sagittal tibial translation was measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during gait (dynamic translation) using a CA-4000 electrogoniometer. Static tibial translation was increased bilateral 2-5 years after ACL injury, whereas the dynamic tibial translation was unchanged. Tibial translation was greater in the injured knee compared with the non-injured knee (Lachman test 134 N 9.1 ± 1.0 vs. 7.0 ± 1.7 mm, P = 0.001, gait 5.6 ± 2.1 vs. 4.7 ± 1.8 mm, P = 0.011). There were no correlations between dynamic and static tibial translation. Dynamic tibial translation was unchanged in spite of increased static tibial translation in the ACL-deficient knee at 2- to 5-year follow-up compared to directly after rehabilitation. Dynamic tibial translation did not correlate with the static tibial translation. A more normal gait kinematics may be maintained from completion of a rehabilitation programme to mid-term follow-up in patients with ACL deficiency treated with rehabilitation only. IV.

  19. [Spontaneous avulsion of the tibial tuberosity following Osgood-Schlatter disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, J; Broeng, L

    1995-05-22

    Two cases of spontaneous fracture and dislocation of the tibial tuberosity in boys (15 and 19 years of age), who had both suffered from Osgood-Schlatter disease are described. The treatment and prognosis are discussed.

  20. The Maquet procedure: effect of tibial shingle length on patellofemoral pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H Q; Kish, V; Boyd, R D; Burr, D B; Radin, E L

    1993-03-01

    The Maquet procedure--elevation of the anterior tibial tubercle--has been recommended for treatment of symptomatic osteoarthrosis of the patellofemoral joint. Although the operation was first described 30 years ago, it remains controversial, both on a clinical and on a biomechanical basis. In addition, deterioration of the long-term results has been suggested. One of the variables that has been ignored in both clinical and biomechanical studies has been tibial shingle length. In order to judge its effect, we examined contact pressures and areas in 15 cadaver knees with 7 and 20 cm tibial shingle lengths. We found significant patellofemoral pressure diminution only with 2 cm elevations. The short anterior tibial shingle with 2 cm of elevation tipped the patella on its superior pole, with a significant change in angle between the patella and the shingle. We suggest that this creates a potentially less than desirable biomechanical circumstance and believe it may explain the discrepancies among previously published reports.

  1. Treatment preferences in Turkey for open fracture of the tibial diaphysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güzelali Özdemir

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: A wide variation was observed among orthopedics and traumatology specialists in Turkey regarding treatment of open tibial diaphysis fracture in adults. Data obtained from this study together with the available literature may be useful to further develop therapeutic approaches.

  2. Randomized trial of reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Tornetta, Paul; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Walter, Stephen D.; Gregory Tennent Sanders, David W.; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Ford, Michael; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; McKee, Michael D.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward C. O.; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a compelling biological rationale for both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. Previous small trials have left the evidence for either approach inconclusive. We compared reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing with

  3. Outcomes of selective tibial artery repair following combat-related extremity injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Gabriel E; Cox, Mitchell; Clouse, W Darrin; Porras, Chantel; Gifford, Shaun M; Williams, Ken; Propper, Brandon W; Rasmussen, Todd E

    2010-07-01

    Selective tibial revascularization refers to the practice of vessel repair vs ligation or observation based on factors observed at the time of injury. Although commonly employed, the effectiveness of this strategy and its impact on sustained limb salvage is unknown. The objective of this study is to define the factors most relevant in selective tibial artery revascularization and to characterize limb salvage following tibial-level vascular injury. The cohort of active-duty military patients undergoing infrapopliteal artery repair comprises the tibial Bypass group. A similarly injured cohort of patients that did not undergo operative vascular intervention (No Bypass group) was identified. All tibial vessel injuries were documented by angiography. Data were compiled via medical records and patient interview. The primary outcome measure was failure of limb salvage. Multivariate regression was performed to identify factors associated with revascularization and to describe factors associated with amputation. Between March 2003 and September 2008, 135 of 1332 patients with battle-related vascular injuries had documented tibial vessel disruption or occlusion. Of these, 104 were included for analysis. Twenty-one underwent autologous vein bypass at the time of injury (Bypass group), and the remaining 83 patients were managed without revascularization (No Bypass group). Mean follow-up (39 vs 41 months; P = .27), age (25 vs 27 years; P = .66), and mechanism of injury (88% vs 92% penetrating blast; P = .56) were similar, but the No Bypass group had higher Injury Severity Scores (ISS; 16.3 vs 11.7; P Injury characteristics, including Gustilo III classification (49% vs 43%; P = .81) and nerve injury (55% vs 53%; P = 1.0), were similar. Subjects were more likely to receive tibial bypass with an increasing number of tibial vessel occlusions and documented ischemia on initial exam. However, of the 23 in the No Bypass group with initially unobtainable Doppler signals, 17 (74

  4. Incidence and risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fracture in high school runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shigenori; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and tibial stress fracture (SF) are common lower leg disorders in runners. A prospective study was done to identify the incidence of MTSS and SF in high school runners and to determine risk factors. A total of 230 runners participating in high school running teams were evaluated. All runners aged 15 years as first grade of high school were involved in the study. They were followed up for 3 years. The measured items included height, weight, body mass index (BMI), range of hip and ankle motion, straight leg raising (SLR), intercondylar and intermalleolar interval, Q-angle, navicular drop test, hip abductor strength and physical conditioning. Each runner was followed for 3 years to report occurrence of MTSS and SF. A total number of 102 MTSS (0.29 athlete exposures) and 21 SF (0.06 athlete exposures) were identified. In females, BMI significantly increased the risk of MTSS after adjustment for the other variables in this study (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95 % confidence interval, 0.31-0.86). Increased internal rotation of the hip significantly increased the risk of MTSS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.91; 95 % confidence interval, 0.85-0.99). In males, limited SLR also significantly increased the risk of SF with adjustment for the other variables in this study (adjusted odds ratio, 1.38; 95 % confidence interval, 1.04-1.83). A significant relationship was found between BMI, internal hip rotation angle and MTSS in females, and between limited SLR and SF in males. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  5. Effect of Icariin on Tibial Dyschondroplasia Incidence and Tibial Characteristics by Regulating P2RX7 in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD is a disease of rapid growing chickens that occurs in many avian species; it is characterized by nonvascular and nonmineralized growth plates, along with tibia bone deformation and lameness. Icariin is widely used to treat bone diseases in humans, but no report is available regarding the effectiveness of icariin against avian TD. Therefore, this study was designed to determine its effect against TD. For this purpose, a total of 180 broiler chicks were distributed into three groups including control, TD, and icariin group. Control group was given a standard normal diet, while TD and icariin groups received normal standard diet containing 50 mg/kg thiram to induce TD from days 3 to 7 after hatch. After the induction of TD, the chicks of icariin group were fed with standard normal diet by adding 10 mg/kg icariin in water. Then morphological and production parameters analysis of tibial bone indicators, physiological index changes, and gene expression were examined. The results showed that icariin administration not only decreased the mortality but also mitigated the lameness and promoted the angiogenesis, which diminished the TD lesion and significantly increased the expression of P2RX7 (P<0.05 in TD affected thiram induced chicks. In conclusion, present findings suggest that icariin has a significant role in promoting the recovery of chicken growth plates affected by TD via regulating the P2RX7. Our findings reveal a new target for clinical treatment and prevention of TD in broiler chickens.

  6. Fracutres of the proximal tibia and tibial condyles: a clinical and laboratory comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, A; Kinman, P B; Latta, L L; Eng, P

    1979-01-01

    Angulatory deformities frequently develop following condylar and proximal diaphyseal tibial fractures. Laboratory studies conducted in cadaver specimens with artificially created fractures closely resembled the behavior of fractures treated with functional braces. Providing that the fibula factor is properly assessed, selected condylar and proximal tibial shaft fractures can be successfully treated by nonsurgical means including early knee motion in a brace followed by graduated weight-bearing ambulation.

  7. Tibial Plateau Fracture in a Female Soccer Player: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Giulietti, Jeff A.; Denegar, Craig R.; Harner, Christopher D.

    1994-01-01

    In general, tibial plateau fractures are rarely associated with noncontact, twisting, injuries to the knee in athletics. A 23-year-old woman sustained a noncontact valgus injury to her left knee while playing indoor soccer. Evaluation on-site and the following morning revealed no deformity and only mild pain over the anterolateral tibial plateau. All stress tests of the knee were negative. A 2+ effusion was noted the day after injury, causing us to suspect an internal derangement of the left ...

  8. Conservative management or closed nailing for tibial shaft fractures. A randomised prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, G J; Keddell, R G; Penny, I D

    1991-01-01

    We performed a prospective randomised trial on matched groups of patients with displaced tibial shaft fractures to compare conservative treatment with closed intramedullary nailing. The results showed conclusively that intramedullary nailing gave more rapid union with less malunion and shortening. Nailed patients had less time off work with a more predictable and rapid return to full function. We therefore consider that closed intramedullary nailing is the most efficient treatment for displaced fractures of the tibial shaft.

  9. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia: 23 children followed to skeletal maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Heon; Agashe, Mandar Vikas; Huh, Young-Jae; Hwang, Soon-Young; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2012-06-01

    Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with achondroplasia. We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence-especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL AVULSION FRACTURE OF THE TIBIAL TUBEROSITY IN A TEENAGER: CASE REPORT AND THERAPY USED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; Giordano, Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Pires; Puell, Thiago; E Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in teenagers is a rare lesion. We describe the first case in the literature, in a teenage girl who sustained a fall while jumping during a volleyball match. No predisposing factors were iden tified. The lesions were treated with open surgical reduction and internal fixation. The aim of the present study was to present a case of simultaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in a teenage girl and the therapy used.

  11. Fractures for extraction of the anterior tibial tuberosity in immature skeleton - Report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon Plata, Gustavo A; Pardo Laverde, Carlos E; Munoz Vargas, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    The paper is about of the fractures for extraction of the anterior tibial tuberosity, those which relatively frequent and they are generally presented in patients that carry out sport activities and in most of the cases they have association with the Syndrome of Osgood Schlatter; three cases are presented of patient with fractures with extraction of the anterior tibial tuberosity in immature skeleton, their treatment and their definitive result

  12. Complex Medial Meniscus Tears Are Associated With a Biconcave Medial Tibial Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Getelman, Mark H; Berry, Kathy L

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether an association exists between a biconcave medial tibial plateau and complex medial meniscus tears. A consecutive series of stable knees undergoing arthroscopy were evaluated retrospectively with the use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiographs, and arthroscopy documented by intraoperative videos. Investigators independently performed blinded reviews of the MRI or videos. Based on the arthroscopy findings, medial tibial plateaus were classified as either biconcave or not biconcave. A transverse coronal plane ridge, separating the front of the tibial plateau from the back near the inner margin of the posterior body of the medial meniscus, was defined as biconcave. The medial plateau slope was calculated with MRI sagittal views. General demographic information, body mass index, and arthroscopically confirmed knee pathology were recorded. A total of 179 consecutive knees were studied from July 2014 through August 2015; 49 (27.2%) biconcave medial tibial plateaus and 130 (72.8%) controls were identified at arthroscopy. Complex medial meniscus tears were found in 103. Patients with a biconcave medial tibial plateau were found to have more complex medial meniscus tears (69.4%) than those without a biconcavity (53.1%) (P = .049) despite having lower body mass index (P = .020). No difference in medial tibial plateau slope was observed for biconcavities involving both cartilage and bone, bone only, or an indeterminate group (P = .47). Biconcave medial tibial plateaus were present in 27.4% of a consecutive series of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy. A biconcave medial tibial plateau was more frequently associated with a complex medial meniscus tear. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring movement symmetry using tibial-mounted accelerometers for people recovering from total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Cory L; Bade, Michael J; Paxton, Roger J; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine movement symmetry changes over the first 26weeks following unilateral total knee arthroplasty in community environments using skin-mounted tibial accelerometers. Comparisons to healthy participants of similar age were also made. Patients (N=24) with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (mean (SD), 65.2 (9.2) years) scheduled to undergo total knee arthroplasty and a control group (N=19 healthy people; mean (SD), 61.3 (9.2) years) were recruited. The total knee arthroplasty group participated in a standardized course of physical rehabilitation. Tibial acceleration data were recorded during a Stair Climb Test and 6-Minute Walk Test. Tibial acceleration data were reduced to initial peak acceleration for each step. An inter-limb absolute symmetry index of tibial initial peak acceleration values was calculated. The total knee arthroplasty group had greater between limb asymmetry for tibial initial peak acceleration and initial peak acceleration absolute symmetry index values five weeks after total knee arthroplasty, during the Stair Climb Test and the 6-Minute Walk Test. Tibial accelerometry is a potential tool for measuring movement symmetry following unilateral total knee arthroplasty in clinical and community environments. Accelerometer-based symmetry outcomes follow patterns similar to published measures of limb loading recorded in laboratory settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tibial developmental field defect is the most common lower limb malformation pattern in VACTERL association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola

    2008-05-15

    VACTERL association is one of the most common recognizable patterns of human malformation and has been recently defined as a multiple polytopic developmental field defect. Limb anomalies are a key component of this condition and characteristically reflect perturbation of radial ray development. However, the pattern of appendicular malformations in VACTERL association is wider and includes a broad spectrum of additional and apparently nonspecific anomalies. We report on the sporadic case of a 4-10/12-year-old boy presenting with multiple costovertebral defects, dextrocardia, bilateral radial ray hypo/aplasia, unilateral kidney agenesis and anal atresia. Homolaterally to the more severe radial ray defect and kidney aplasia, he also has a complex lower limb malformation, consisting of distal tibial aplasia, clubfoot, hallucal deficiency and preaxial polydactyly. Literature review identifies 24 additional patients with VACTERL manifestations and lower limb malformations (excluding cases with isolated secondary deformations). Tibial hypo/aplasia with or without additional tibial field defects, reported in about 2/3 (68%) of the patients, represents the most common finding, while involvement of the fibular ray is rare (20%) and very often accompanies tibial anomalies. The relatively high frequency of tibial ray anomalies in VACTERL patients could easily be explained by the principle of homology of the developmental field theory. Careful search of lower limb anomalies of the "tibial type" is, therefore, indicated in all patients with multiple polytopic developmental field defects. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Locking internal fixator with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for the proximal and distal tibial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TONG Da-ke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the efficacy of the locking internal fixator (LIF, which includes the locking compression plate (LCP and the less invasive stable system (LISS, in the proximal and distal tibial fractures. Methods: We did a retrospective study on a total of 98 patients with either proximal or distal tibial fractures from January 2003 to January 2007, who had received the opera- tion with LIF by the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO technique. The data consisted of 43 proximal tibial fractures (type AO41C3 and 55 distal tibial fractures (type AO43C3. Results: No complications were observed in all patients after operation. The mean healing time was 8.4 months (range 5-14 months. Only two cases of delayed union occurred at postoperative 10 months. No infections were reported after the definitive surgery even in the cases of open fractures. All patients reached a full range of motion at postoperative 6 to 9 months and regained the normal functions of knee and ankle joints. Conclusion: Using LIF in MIPO technique is a reliable approach towards the proximal and distal tibial fractures that are not suitable for intramedullary nailing. Key words: Internal fixator; Tibial fractures; Fracture fixation, intramedullary; Bone plates

  16. Prediction of Tibial Rotation Pathologies Using Particle Swarm Optimization and K-Means Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Murat; Tuna, Can; Akogul, Serkan

    2018-03-28

    The aim of this article is to investigate pathological subjects from a population through different physical factors. To achieve this, particle swarm optimization (PSO) and K-means (KM) clustering algorithms have been combined (PSO-KM). Datasets provided by the literature were divided into three clusters based on age and weight parameters and each one of right tibial external rotation (RTER), right tibial internal rotation (RTIR), left tibial external rotation (LTER), and left tibial internal rotation (LTIR) values were divided into three types as Type 1, Type 2 and Type 3 (Type 2 is non-pathological (normal) and the other two types are pathological (abnormal)), respectively. The rotation values of every subject in any cluster were noted. Then the algorithm was run and the produced values were also considered. The values of the produced algorithm, the PSO-KM, have been compared with the real values. The hybrid PSO-KM algorithm has been very successful on the optimal clustering of the tibial rotation types through the physical criteria. In this investigation, Type 2 (pathological subjects) is of especially high predictability and the PSO-KM algorithm has been very successful as an operation system for clustering and optimizing the tibial motion data assessments. These research findings are expected to be very useful for health providers, such as physiotherapists, orthopedists, and so on, in which this consequence may help clinicians to appropriately designing proper treatment schedules for patients.

  17. Passive Posterior Tibial Subluxation on Routine Knee MRI as a Secondary Sign of PCL Tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Andrew J.; Maldjian, Catherine; Adam, Richard J.; Harner, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior drawer test is an accurate clinical test to diagnose posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), indicating laxity of the PCL that allows posterior tibial translation. This study aimed to determine whether posterior tibial translation relative to the femur on routine MRI could serve as an additional sign of PCL tear. Routine knee MRI in eleven patients (7 males, 4 females) with arthroscopically confirmed isolated PCL tears were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Measurements of tibial translation were made in the medial and lateral compartments of patients and controls (10 males, 12 females) without clinical or MRI evidence of ligament injury. Significant medial compartment posterior tibial translation was present in patients with PCL tear compared to controls (+2.93 mm versus +0.03 mm, P = 0.002) with excellent interobserver agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.94). No significant difference in lateral compartment tibial translation was observed (+0.17 mm versus −0.57 mm, P = 0.366) despite excellent interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.96). Posterior tibial translation in the midmedial compartment may be a secondary sign of isolated PCL tear on routine knee MRI with passive extension without manipulation or weight bearing. Additional work in a larger cohort may better address the accuracy of this finding. PMID:25587446

  18. Passive Posterior Tibial Subluxation on Routine Knee MRI as a Secondary Sign of PCL Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Degnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The posterior drawer test is an accurate clinical test to diagnose posterior cruciate ligament (PCL, indicating laxity of the PCL that allows posterior tibial translation. This study aimed to determine whether posterior tibial translation relative to the femur on routine MRI could serve as an additional sign of PCL tear. Routine knee MRI in eleven patients (7 males, 4 females with arthroscopically confirmed isolated PCL tears were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Measurements of tibial translation were made in the medial and lateral compartments of patients and controls (10 males, 12 females without clinical or MRI evidence of ligament injury. Significant medial compartment posterior tibial translation was present in patients with PCL tear compared to controls (+2.93 mm versus +0.03 mm, P=0.002 with excellent interobserver agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.94. No significant difference in lateral compartment tibial translation was observed (+0.17 mm versus −0.57 mm, P=0.366 despite excellent interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.96. Posterior tibial translation in the midmedial compartment may be a secondary sign of isolated PCL tear on routine knee MRI with passive extension without manipulation or weight bearing. Additional work in a larger cohort may better address the accuracy of this finding.

  19. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmar Stieven Filho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL.METHODS: Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1 standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2 inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3 control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength.RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05.CONCLUSION: There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw.

  20. Is intact fibula a disadvantage in treatment of tibial diaphysis fracture with intramedullary nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz; Sökücü, Sami; Özcan, Çağrı; Beng, Kubilay; Lapçin, Osman; Demir, Bilal

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare solitary tibial diaphysis fractures and tibial diaphysis fractures associated with fibula fracture treated with the intramedullary nailing method. Records of 254 patients diagnosed with tibial diaphysis fracture and treated with intramedullary nailing between 2010 and 2013 were examined and 30 patients were included in the study. Group 1 comprised patients with solitary tibial diaphysis fracture, and Group 2 was made up of patients with tibial diaphysis fractures associated with fibula fracture. Patients in both groups were compared in terms of time to surgery, duration of surgical tourniquet, time to union, and varus, valgus, recurvatum, and antecurvatum deformities of the tibia at final follow-up. No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups in time to surgery, duration of surgical tourniquet, time to union, or varus, valgus, recurvatum, and antecurvatum deformities. Results indicated that intact fibula in tibial diaphysis fracture treated with intramedullary nailing was not a disadvantage; it did not affect rate of union or lead to loss of reduction, non-union, or malunion.

  1. Effects of different preservation temperatures and periods menisci cellularity in rabbits Efeitos de diferentes temperaturas e períodos de preservação na celularidade de meniscos em coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro José Reckers

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Quantify the progressive decrease of the cellular viability of rabbit meniscus preserved for transplants over a 30 day period at different freezing temperatures. METHODS: 180 menisci were removed from 45 rabbits. Menisci were frozen from 2 to 30 days at -7.2°Celsius -21.4°Celsius and -73°Celsius. Four menisci from each temperature were thawed every two days and the number of present cells was quantified. RESULTS: On the 14th freezing day at -7.2°Celsius, there were 92.38% mean viable cells. However, as from the 16th day, there has been a significant 12% decrease (p = 0.001, as compared to 14th day mean. Mean cell viability at -21.4°Celsius and -73ºCelsius, until the 16th day was statistically similar. As from the 18th day at -21.4°Celsius, there has been significant cell count decrease (p OBJETIVO: Quantificar a diminuição progressiva da viabilidade celular de meniscos de coelhos preservados para transplantes durante trinta dias em três temperaturas diferentes de congelamento. MÉTODOS: Retirou-se 180 meniscos de 45 coelhos. Os meniscos foram congelados, de dois até trinta dias, a -7,2°Celsius -21,4°Celsius e -73°Celsius. A cada dois dias, de cada temperatura, foram descongelados quatro meniscos e quantificou-se o número de células presentes. RESULTADOS: No 14º dia de congelamento a -7,2°Celsius, a média de células viáveis foi de 92,38%. Entretanto, a partir do 16º dia observou-se uma redução significante de 12% (p=0,001, comparando-se com a média no 14° dia. A média da viabilidade celular, nas temperaturas -21,4°Celsius e -73ºCelsius, até 16º dia apresentou comportamento estatisticamente semelhante. A partir do 18º dia na temperatura de -21,4°Celsius a redução do número de células foi significante (p<0,001, especialmente do 28° (54,5% para o 30° dia (30% de congelamento. O número de células viáveis a -73°Celsius mostrou uma redução não significante (p=1,000 de 2,3% no número de células vi

  2. Reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of open and closed tibial fractures: a subgroup analysis of randomised trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Deting; Zheng, Qiang; Li, Hang; Qian, Shengjun; Zhang, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The choice between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of open and closed tibial fractures is an ongoing controversy. We carried out a comprehensive search strategy. Six eligible randomised controlled trials were included. Three reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted outcome data. Analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.0. The results showed lower risks of tibial fracture nonunion and implant failures with reamed nails compared to unreamed nails in closed tibial fractures [relative risk (RR): 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21–0.89, P = 0.008 for nonunion and RR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.22–0.56, P reamed and unreamed nails in open tibial fractures. In conclusion, our study recommended reamed nails for the treatment of closed tibial fractures. But the choice for open tibial fractures remains uncertain. PMID:19841919

  3. Outcome of limb reconstruction system in open tibial diaphyseal fractures

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    Anand Ajmera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of open tibial diaphyseal fractures with bone loss is a matter of debate. The treatment options range from external fixators, nailing, ring fixators or grafting with or without plastic reconstruction. All the procedures have their own set of complications, like acute docking problems, shortening, difficulty in soft tissue management, chronic infection, increased morbidity, multiple surgeries, longer hospital stay, mal union, nonunion and higher patient dissatisfaction. We evaluated the outcome of the limb reconstruction system (LRS in the treatment of open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss as a definative mode of treatment to achieve union, as well as limb lengthening, simultaneously. Materials and Methods: Thirty open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss of at least 4 cm or more with a mean age 32.5 years were treated by using the LRS after debridement. Distraction osteogenesis at rate of 1 mm/day was done away from the fracture site to maintain the limb length. On the approximation of fracture ends, the dynamized LRS was left for further 15-20 weeks and patient was mobilized with weight bearing to achieve union. Functional assessment was done by Association for the Study and Application of the Methods of Illizarov (ASAMI criteria. Results: Mean followup period was 15 months. The mean bone loss was 5.5 cm (range 4-9 cm. The mean duration of bone transport was 13 weeks (range 8-30 weeks with a mean time for LRS in place was 44 weeks (range 24-51 weeks. The mean implant index was 56.4 days/cm. Mean union time was 52 weeks (range 31-60 weeks with mean union index of 74.5 days/cm. Bony results as per the ASAMI scoring were excellent in 76% (19/25, good in 12% (3/25 and fair in 4% (1/25 with union in all except 2 patients, which showed poor results (8% with only 2 patients having leg length discrepancy more than 2.5 cm. Functional results were excellent in 84% (21/25, good in 8% (2/25, fair in 8% (2/25. Pin

  4. Static and dynamic tibial translation before, 5 weeks after, and 5 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagesson, Sofi; Öberg, Birgitta; Kvist, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate static and dynamic tibial translation before, 5 weeks after, and 5 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. To explore whether static and dynamic tibial translation are correlated. Ten patients undergoing quadruple hamstring tendon graft ACL reconstruction were evaluated before, 5 weeks after, and 5 years after ACL reconstruction. Sagittal tibial translation was measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during gait (dynamic translation) using a CA-4000 electrogoniometer. Five years after ACL reconstruction, static tibial translation did not differ between knees (Lachman test 90 N and 134 N n.s.). In contrast, there was greater maximal anterior tibial translation during gait in ACL-reconstructed knees than in uninjured knees (5.5 ± 1.4 vs. 4.5 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.028). There were no differences in static or dynamic tibial translation between the 5-year follow-up and before ACL reconstruction or between the 5-year follow-up and the 5-week follow-up. There were no correlations between static and dynamic tibial translation. Although static tibial translation did not differ between knees 5 years after ACL reconstruction, dynamic tibial translation during gait was greater in ACL-reconstructed knees than in uninjured knees. Neither static nor dynamic tibial translation changed 5 years after ACL reconstruction as compared to before surgery and 5 weeks after surgery. Static tibial translation did not correlate with dynamic tibial translation. This study indicates that although the knee is stable during static measurements, kinematics during gait is impaired 5 years after ACL reconstruction. This may affect the return to sport and risk of osteoarthritis. Case series, Level IV.

  5. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R H; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2016-09-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true lateral radiographs were obtained of both knees with the patient in supine position and knees in full passive extension with heels on a standardized bolster. ATS was measured on the radiographs by two independent and blinded observers. ATS was calculated as the side-to-side difference in tibial position relative to the femur. An independent t test was used to compare ATS between those undergoing anatomic reconstruction for an acute versus chronic ACL injury. Chronic ACL deficiency was defined as more than 12 weeks from injury to surgery. Patients averaged 26.4 ± 11.5 years (mean ± SD) of age, 43.6 % were female, and 48.1 % suffered an injury of the left knee. There were 30 and 22 patients in the acute and chronic groups, respectively. The median duration from injury to reconstruction for the acute group was 5 versus 31 weeks for the chronic group. After anatomic ACL reconstruction, the mean ATS was 1.0 ± 2.1 mm. There was no statistical difference in ATS between the acute and chronic groups (1.2 ± 2.0 vs. 0.6 ± 2.3 mm, n.s.). Assessment of inter-tester reliability for radiographic evaluation of ATS revealed an excellent intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.894. Anatomic ACL reconstruction reduces ATS with a mean difference of 1.0 mm from the healthy contralateral limb. This study did not find a statistical difference in ATS between patients after anatomic ACL reconstruction in the acute or chronic phase. These observations suggest that anatomic ACL reconstruction, performed in either the acute or the chronic phase, approaches the normal AP relationship of the tibiofemoral joint. IV.

  6. Effect of cranial cruciate ligament deficiency, tibial plateau leveling osteotomy, and tibial tuberosity advancement on contact mechanics and alignment of the stifle in flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Lewis, Daniel D

    2010-04-01

    To assess contact mechanics and 3-dimensional (3-D) joint alignment in cranial cruciate ligament (CCL)-deficient stifles before and after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) and tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) with the stifle in 90 degrees of flexion. In vitro biomechanical study. Cadaveric pelvic limb pairs (n=8) from dogs weighing 28-35 kg. Contralateral limbs were assigned to receive TPLO or TTA. Digital pressure sensors were used to measure femorotibial contact area, peak and mean contact pressure, and peak pressure location with the limb under a load of 30% body weight and stifle flexion angle of 90 degrees . 3-D poses were obtained using a Microscribe digitizer. Specimens were tested under normal, CCL deficient, and treatment conditions. Significant disturbances in alignment were not observed after CCL transection, although medial contact area was 10% smaller than normal (P=.003). There were no significant differences in contact mechanics or alignment between normal and TTA conditions; TPLO induced 6 degrees varus angulation (PCranial tibial subluxation is nominal in CCL-deficient stifles loaded in flexion. Stifle alignment and contact mechanics are not altered by TTA, whereas TPLO causes mild varus and a subsequent increase in medial compartment loading. Cranial tibial subluxation of CCL-deficient stifles may not occur during postures that load the stifle in flexion. The significance of minor changes in loading patterns after TPLO is unknown.

  7. Delay in weight bearing in surgically treated tibial shaft fractures is associated with impaired healing: a cohort analysis of 166 tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, I B; Raaben, M; Van Basten Batenburg, M; Blokhuis, T J

    2018-04-09

    The relation between timing of weight bearing after a fracture and the healing outcome is yet to be established, thereby limiting the implementation of a possibly beneficial effect for our patients. The current study was undertaken to determine the effect of timing of weight bearing after a surgically treated tibial shaft fracture. Surgically treated diaphyseal tibial fractures were retrospectively studied between 2007 and 2015. The timing of initial weight bearing (IWB) was analysed as a predictor for impaired healing in a multivariate regression. Totally, 166 diaphyseal tibial fractures were included, 86 cases with impaired healing and 80 with normal healing. The mean age was 38.7 years (range 16-89). The mean time until IWB was significantly shorter in the normal fracture healing group (2.6 vs 7.4 weeks, p bearing is independently associated with impaired fracture healing in surgically treated tibial shaft fractures. Unlike other factors such as fracture type or soft tissue condition, early resumption of weight bearing can be influenced by the treating physician and this factor therefore has a direct clinical relevance. This study indicates that early resumption of weight bearing should be the treatment goal in fracture fixation. 3b.

  8. Flat midsubstance of the anterior cruciate ligament with tibial "C"-shaped insertion site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebold, Rainer; Schuhmacher, Peter; Fernandez, Francis; Śmigielski, Robert; Fink, Christian; Brehmer, Axel; Kirsch, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    This anatomical cadaver study was performed to investigate the flat appearance of the midsubstance shape of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and its tibial "C"-shaped insertion site. The ACL midsubstance and the tibial ACL insertion were dissected in 20 cadaveric knees (n = 6 fresh frozen and n = 14 paraffined). Magnifying spectacles were used for all dissections. Morphometric measurements were performed using callipers and on digital photographs. In all specimens, the midsubstance of the ACL was flat with a mean width of 9.9 mm, thickness of 3.9 mm and cross-sectional area of 38.7 mm(2). The "direct" "C"-shaped tibial insertion runs from along the medial tibial spine to the anterior aspect of the lateral meniscus. The mean width (length) of the "C" was 12.6 mm, its thickness 3.3 mm and area 31.4 mm(2). The centre of the "C" was the bony insertion of the anterior root of the lateral meniscus overlayed by fat and crossed by the ACL. No posterolateral (PL) inserting ACL fibres were found. Together with the larger "indirect" part (area 79.6 mm(2)), the "direct" one formed a "duck-foot"-shaped footprint. The tibial ACL midsubstance and tibial "C"-shaped insertion are flat and are resembling a "ribbon". The centre of the "C" is the bony insertion of the anterior root of the lateral meniscus. There are no central or PL inserting ACL fibres. Anatomical ACL reconstruction may therefore require a flat graft and a "C"-shaped tibial footprint reconstruction with an anteromedial bone tunnel for single bundle and an additional posteromedial bone tunnel for double bundle.

  9. The rotational axis of the tibia and relationship to the tibial torsion in varus osteoarthritic knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotanaphuti, Thanainit; Srisawasdi, Ruthasiri; Rattanaprichavej, Piti; Laoruengthana, Artit

    2012-10-01

    A transepicondylar axis is a useful reference for femoral component rotation and is demonstrated as a functional flexion-extension axis of a knee. Conversely, a rotational orientation of the tibial component was less clearly demonstrated and many anatomical landmarks were proposed. It has been reported that Asian people had more medial torsion of the tibia particularly with an osteoarthritic knee. The present study aims to address the relationship between the torsion variation of the tibia and the rotational axis of the tibia. Forty knees of 32 women (mean age of 73.3) with varus osteoarthritis underwent a preoperative CT images to identify a surgical epicondylar axis, an axis perpendicular to this line (femoral reference line), lines connecting between the PCL insertion and 3 reference point on the patellar tendon, an AP axis of the ankle and a tibial torsion angle. The mean value of the angle between the line connecting the PCL insertion and 3 different point of the patellar tendon including the medial border medial one-third and middle of the patellar tendon and the femoral reference line was -4.22, +4.37 and +8.47 degree, respectively. The mean of a tibial torsion angle was +16.51 degree. There were 6 cases having the femoral reference line rotated internally to the medial border of the patellar tendon and having less torsion angle (medial tibial torsion) with a mean of +13.78 degree. The femoral reference line in the Thai osteoarthritic knee is passed between medial edge of patellar tendon and medial 1/3 of patellar tendon. This line rotates more internally compared with the patellar tendon if the degree of medial tibial torsion is more severe. An excessive externally rotated tibial component when using the patellar tendon as guidance should be avoided in the knee presenting with medial tibial torsion.

  10. Reliability of the radiographic union scale in tibial fractures (RUST

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    Fernando Antonio Silva de Azevedo Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the inter- and intra observer reproducibility of the radiographic score of consolidation of the tibia shaft fractures. METHODS: Fifty-one sets of radiographs in anteroposterior (AP and profile (P of the tibial shaft treated with intramedullary nail were obtained. The analysis of X-rays was performed in two stages, with a 21-day interval between assessments by a group of nine evaluators. To evaluate the reproducibility of RUST score between the evaluators, the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC with a 95% confidence interval was used. ICC values range from +1, representing perfect agreement, to -1, complete disagreement. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation among all evaluators: ICC = 0.87 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.91. The intraobserver agreement proved to be substantial with ICC = 0.88 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.91 . CONCLUSION: This study confirms that the RUST scale shows a high degree of reliability and agreement.

  11. Posterior tibial tendon insufficiency results at different stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deland, Jonathan T; Page, Alexandra; Sung, Il-Hoon; O'Malley, Martin J; Inda, David; Choung, Steven

    2006-09-01

    The results of surgical treatment of posterior tibial tendon insufficiency (PTTI) may be different at different stages of the disease. No single study has compared the results at different stages. This comparison can be helpful to the patient and physician if the patient asks "What if I wait and the disease progresses, how will my results be different?" A preliminary study comparing results for stage IIa, stage IIb (advanced stage II), and stage III was performed followed by a larger study comparing IIa and IIb with 26 and 22 patients, respectively. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) outcome scores as well as radiographs and functional questions were used. Nearly all patients, regardless of stage, felt they were helped by surgical treatment. However, the lowest AOFAS score was in stage III, the most advanced stage investigated in this study. In comparing stage IIa and IIb patients, stage IIb patients had a statistically higher incidence of lateral discomfort. Although statistically significant differences were not found in all comparisons, this study suggests that the results of surgical treatment for PTTI declines with increasing stage or severity of disease.

  12. Elastic Knee Sleeves Limit Anterior Tibial Translation in Healthy Females

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    Robert Csapo, Simona Hosp, Ramona Folie, Robert Eberle, Michael Hasler, Werner Nachbauer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knee sleeves or braces represent auxiliary tools that have repeatedly been used by athletes, in an attempt to increase knee stability and, thus, reduce the risk of (recurrent ligamentous injuries. Since ACL injuries typically occur in situations involving either torsion or hyperextension of the knee, it has been speculated that braces might protect the ACL by countering excessive anterior translation of the tibia with respect to the femur (Beynnon et al., 1997. However, the preponderance of in vivo studies to test this hypothesis was performed in cohorts of patients suffering from existent ligamentous (Branch et al., 1988; Colville et al., 1986 or other knee injury (Beynnon et al., 1997; Fleming et al., 2000. This complicates the extrapolation of results to healthy subjects. Further, the braces used in these studies were mostly rigid constructs that consisted of either uni- or bilateral hinged bars (Rishiraj et al., 2009. Such braces might hinder performance (Veldhuizen et al., 1991 and would be rejected by the vast majority of healthy athletes. For these reasons, we would like to use this letter to the editor to report the results of our experiments investigating whether a relatively light elastic knee sleeve would limit the degree of anterior tibial translation in computerized arthrometry tests as performed in a sample of non-injured subjects. We recruited ten female college students (age: 23.4 ± 3.2 yrs, height: 1.68 ± 0.05 m, mass: 59.9 ± 5.5 kg who were free of acute or previous injury or any form of orthopaedic disease of the knee joints. The anterior displacement of the tibia was measured using the GNRB® computerized arthrometer (GeNouRob, Laval, France. With subjects lying in the supine position, the lower leg was firmly fixed with plastic caps mounted over the ankle joint and patella. An electrical pressure pad then exerted increasing pressure of up to 250 N on the calf, while a motion sensor, which was positioned on the ventral

  13. [Operative techniques and results of tibial pilon fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, R; Gierer, P

    2017-08-01

    The anatomical reconstruction of tibial pilon fractures is a major challenge with respect to preoperative planning, time management and the intraoperative procedure. Presentation of the various surgical procedures available and the clinical outcome. The established open reduction and internal plate fixation procedures form the basis for new minimally invasive treatment concepts. The current results of comparative studies and basic literature are discussed. The treatment result depends on the severity of the initial fracture and accompanying soft tissue damage. Essential is an anatomical reduction with an articular displacement of less than 2 mm. Overall, only approximately half of all patients return to work within 1 year. The fixation procedure used is not relevant for this purpose. Both plate fixation and the combination of external fixator plus minimally invasive articular reconstruction with and without arthroscopy achieve equivalent results. Good clinical results can be achieved by an accurate preoperative planning with respect to the surgical procedure, time of surgery and the surgical steps. In cases of disregarding these points and inadequate surgical expertise, loss of function and reduced quality of life are impending.

  14. Clinical and functional outcomes of tibial intercalary allograft reconstructions

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    Lucas López Millán

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the survival, the complications and the functional outcome of intercalary tibial allografts reconstructions following tumor resections. Methods Intercalary tibia segmental allografts were implanted in 26 consecutive patients after segmental resections. Average follow-up was 6 years. Allograft survival was determined with the Kaplan-Meier method. Function was evaluated with the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system (MSTS. Results The rate of survival was 84% (CI 95%: 90%- 70% at 5 years and 79% at 10 years (CI 95%: 95%-63%. Allografts were removed in 5 patients (3 due to infections and 2 due to local recurrences. Two patients showed diaphyseal nonunion and 3 had an incomplete fracture, but it was not necessary to remove the allografts. Average MSTS functional score was 29 points (range 27 to 30. Conclusions Despite the incidence of complications, this analysis showed an acceptable survival with excellent functional scores. The use of intercalary allograft clearly has a place in the reconstruction of a segmental defect created by the resection of a tumor in the diaphyseal and/or metaphyseal portion of the tibia.

  15. Comparison of Different Approaches for Measuring Tibial Cartilage Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease affecting bones and cartilage especially in the human knee. In this context, cartilage thickness is an indicator for knee cartilage health. Thickness measurements are performed on medical images acquired in-vivo. Currently, there is no standard method agreed upon that defines a distance measure in articular cartilage. In this work, we present a comparison of different methods commonly used in literature. These methods are based on nearest neighbors, surface normal vectors, local thickness and potential field lines. All approaches were applied to manual segmentations of tibia and lateral and medial tibial cartilage performed by experienced raters. The underlying data were contrast agent-enhanced cone-beam C-arm CT reconstructions of one healthy subject’s knee. The subject was scanned three times, once in supine position and two times in a standing weight-bearing position. A comparison of the resulting thickness maps shows similar distributions and high correlation coefficients between the approaches above 0.90. The nearest neighbor method results on average in the lowest cartilage thickness values, while the local thickness approach assigns the highest values. We showed that the different methods agree in their thickness distribution. The results will be used for a future evaluation of cartilage change under weight-bearing conditions.

  16. Influence of Different Tibial Fixation Techniques on Initial Stability in Single-Stage Anterior Cruciate Ligament Revision With Confluent Tibial Tunnels: A Biomechanical Laboratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Treder, Maximilian; Schulze, Martin; Müller, Viktoria; Vasta, Sebastiano; Zampogna, Biaggio; Herbort, Mirco; Kösters, Clemens; Raschke, Michael J; Lenschow, Simon

    2016-01-01

    To kinematically and biomechanically compare 4 different types of tibial tunnel management in single-stage anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision reconstruction with the control: primary ACL reconstruction using a robotic-based knee testing setup. Porcine knees and flexor tendons were used. One hundred specimens were randomly assigned to 5 testing groups: (1) open tibial tunnel, (2) bone plug technique, (3) biodegradable interference screw, (4) dilatation technique, and (5) primary ACL reconstruction. A robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system was used to simulate the KT-1000 (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA) and pivot-shift tests. Cyclic loading and load-to-failure testing were performed. Anterior tibial translation increased significantly with all of the techniques compared with the intact ACL (P .05). The open tunnel and dilated tunnel techniques showed significantly greater anterior tibial translation (P < .05). The results of the simulated pivot-shift test were in accordance with those of the KT-1000 test. No significant differences could be observed regarding stiffness or maximum load to failure. However, elongation was significantly lower in the primary ACL reconstruction group compared with groups 1 and 3 (P = .02 and P = .03, respectively). Filling an incomplete and incorrect tibial tunnel with a press-fit bone plug or a biodegradable interference screw in a standardized laboratory situation provided initial biomechanical properties and knee stability comparable with those of primary ACL reconstruction. In contrast, the dilatation technique or leaving the malplaced tunnel open did not restore knee kinematics adequately in this model. Backup extracortical fixation should be considered because the load to failure depends on the extracortical fixation when an undersized interference screw is used for aperture fixation. Our biomechanical results could help orthopaedic surgeons to optimize the results of primary ACL revision with incomplete, incorrect

  17. The location of the tibial accelerometer does influence impact acceleration parameters during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto; Camacho-García, Andrés; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2017-09-01

    Tibial accelerations have been associated with a number of running injuries. However, studies attaching the tibial accelerometer on the proximal section are as numerous as those attaching the accelerometer on the distal section. This study aimed to investigate whether accelerometer location influences acceleration parameters commonly reported in running literature. To fulfil this purpose, 30 athletes ran at 2.22, 2.78 and 3.33 m · s -1 with three accelerometers attached with double-sided tape and tightened to the participants' tolerance on the forehead, the proximal section of the tibia and the distal section of the tibia. Time-domain (peak acceleration, shock attenuation) and frequency-domain parameters (peak frequency, peak power, signal magnitude and shock attenuation in both the low and high frequency ranges) were calculated for each of the tibial locations. The distal accelerometer registered greater tibial acceleration peak and shock attenuation compared to the proximal accelerometer. With respect to the frequency-domain analysis, the distal accelerometer provided greater values of all the low-frequency parameters, whereas no difference was observed for the high-frequency parameters. These findings suggest that the location of the tibial accelerometer does influence the acceleration signal parameters, and thus, researchers should carefully consider the location they choose to place the accelerometer so that equivalent comparisons across studies can be made.

  18. CT determination of tibial tubercle lateralization in patients presenting with anterior knee pain

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    Jones, R.B. [Dept. of Physiology, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States); Bartlett, E.C. [Dept. of Surgery, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States); Vainright, J.R. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States); Carrol, R.G. [Dept. of Physiology, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Using CT imaging with computerized technique to measure anatomic relationships, we evaluated patients (n = 50) with anterior knee pain for excessive lateralization of the tibial tubercle. The symptomatic knee of each patient was compared with their asymptomatic knee as well as with the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (n = 10) and with the knees of asymptomatic controls (n = 10). The symptomatic knee of patients with suspected patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle (12.2 {+-} 0.5 mm) than did the asymptomatic knee (9.0 {+-} 0.7 mm). The symptomatic knees of patients with patellofemoral malalignment also demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (5.9 {+-} 0.9 mm). When a control population was added to the analysis, the patients with symptomatic patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the controls (6.4 {+-} 0.4 mm). Using a critical value of 9 mm lateralization, the CT diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment had a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 85%. We conclude that CT determination of tibial tubercle position assists the diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment. (orig./MG)

  19. An implantable telemetry device to measure intra-articular tibial forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Townsend, Christopher P; Arms, Steven W; Morris, Beverly A; Colwell, Clifford W

    2005-02-01

    Tibial forces are important because they determine polyethylene wear, stress distribution in the implant, and stress transfer to underlying bone. Theoretic estimates of tibiofemoral forces have varied between three and six times the body weight depending on the mathematical models used and the type of activity analyzed. An implantable telemetry system was therefore developed to directly measure tibiofemoral compressive forces. This system was tested in a cadaver knee in a dynamic knee rig. A total knee tibial arthroplasty prosthesis was instrumented with four force transducers located at the four corners of the tibial tray. These transducers measured the total compressive forces on the tibial tray and the location of the center of pressure. A microprocessor performed analog-to-digital signal conversion and performed pulse code modulation of a surface acoustic wave radio frequency oscillator. This signal was then transmitted through a single pin hermetic feed-through tantalum wire antenna located at the tip of the stem. The radio frequency signal was received by an external antenna connected to a receiver and to a computer for data acquisition. The prosthesis was powered by external coil induction. The tibial transducer accurately measured both the magnitude and the location of precisely applied external loads. Successful transmission of the radio frequency signal up to a range of 3m was achieved through cadaveric bone, bone cement, and soft tissue. Reasonable accuracy was obtained in measuring loads applied through a polyethylene insert. The implant was also able to detect unicondylar loading with liftoff.

  20. Apophysitis of the Tibial Tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter Disease): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Raju; Azizi, Ahmad Tariq; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-09-13

    Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) is a condition in which the patellar tendon insertion on the tibial tuberosity becomes inflamed. It is a well-known condition in late childhood characterized by pain and a bony prominence over the tibial tuberosity. The pain is usually exacerbated by physical activities like running, jumping, and climbing stairs. In the acute stage, the margins of the patellar tendon become blurred in radiographs due to the soft tissue swelling. After three to four months, bone fragmentation at the tibial tuberosity is viewed. In the sub-acute stage, soft tissue swelling resolves, but the bony ossicle remains. In the chronic stage, the bone fragment may fuse with the tibial tuberosity which can appear normal. The primary goal in the treatment of OSD is the reduction of pain and swelling over the tibial tuberosity. The patient should limit physical activities until the symptoms are resolved. In some cases, the patient should restrict physical activities for several months. The presence of pain with kneeling because of an ossicle that does not respond to conservative measures is the indication for surgery. In these cases, the removal of the ossicle, surrounding bursa, and the bony prominence is the treatment of choice.

  1. CT determination of tibial tubercle lateralization in patients presenting with anterior knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.B.; Bartlett, E.C.; Vainright, J.R.; Carrol, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Using CT imaging with computerized technique to measure anatomic relationships, we evaluated patients (n = 50) with anterior knee pain for excessive lateralization of the tibial tubercle. The symptomatic knee of each patient was compared with their asymptomatic knee as well as with the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (n = 10) and with the knees of asymptomatic controls (n = 10). The symptomatic knee of patients with suspected patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle (12.2 ± 0.5 mm) than did the asymptomatic knee (9.0 ± 0.7 mm). The symptomatic knees of patients with patellofemoral malalignment also demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (5.9 ± 0.9 mm). When a control population was added to the analysis, the patients with symptomatic patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the controls (6.4 ± 0.4 mm). Using a critical value of 9 mm lateralization, the CT diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment had a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 85%. We conclude that CT determination of tibial tubercle position assists the diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment. (orig./MG)

  2. A modified tibial compression test for the detection of meniscal injury in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, S; McCabe, C; Maddock, E; Bright, S; Keeley, B

    2017-02-01

    To assess diagnostic efficacy of a modified tibial compression test in predicting medial meniscal injury in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament failure. Dogs admitted for surgical stabilisation of stifles with cranial cruciate ligament failure were examined by five preoperative physical tests to assess medial meniscal injury. Results of each physical test were compared with findings at arthrotomy and used to calculate sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative predictive values. None of the physical tests were accurate in reflecting meniscal integrity for dogs with cranial cruciate failure. Out of the five tests, the modified tibial compression test exhibited the highest concordance and sensitivity for the detection of medial meniscal tears. A palpable click during the modified tibial compression test had a sensitivity and specificity up to 63 and 77%, respectively, for the detection of medial meniscal lesions. Concordance values were up to 40% for the modified tibial compression test, followed by the range of motion test (up to 25%), while all other physical tests had concordance values below 10%. Physical tests are highly available, affordable and can be easily performed, but their efficacy in diagnosing medical meniscal injury is low. Meniscal clicks associated with meniscal tears were more frequently elicited during the modified tibial compression test when compared with other traditional tests. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Increasing lateral tibial slope: is there an association with articular cartilage changes in the knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nasir; Shepel, Michael; Leswick, David A.; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, and College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The geometry of the lateral tibial slope (LTS) plays an important role in the overall biomechanics of the knee. Through this study, we aim to assess the impact of LTS on cartilage degeneration in the knee. A retrospective analysis of 93 knee MRI scans (1.5 T or 3 T) for patients aged 20-45 years with no history of trauma or knee surgery, and absence of internal derangement. The LTS was calculated using the circle method. Chondropathy was graded from 0 (normal) to 3 (severe). Linear regression analysis was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). In our cohort of patients, a statistically significant association was seen between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patellar articular surface and the lateral tibial articular surface (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening chondropathy of the lateral patellar, medial trochlea, lateral trochlea, medial femoral, lateral femoral, and medial tibial articular surfaces. Our results show a statistically significant association between increasing LTS and worsening cartilage degenerative changes in the medial patella and the lateral tibial plateau. We speculate that increased LTS may result in increased femoral glide over the lateral tibial plateau with subsequent increased external rotation of the femur predisposing to patellofemoral articular changes. Future arthroscopic studies are needed to further confirm our findings. (orig.)

  4. Sequential avulsions of the tibial tubercle in an adolescent basketball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying Chieh; Chao, Ying-Hao; Lien, Fang-Chieh

    2010-05-01

    Tibial tubercle avulsion is an uncommon fracture in physically active adolescents. Sequential avulsion of tibial tubercles is extremely rare. We reported a healthy, active 15-year-old boy who suffered from left tibial tubercle avulsion fracture during a basketball game. He received open reduction and internal fixation with two smooth Kirschner wires and a cannulated screw, with every effort to reduce the plate injury. Long-leg splint was used for protection followed by programmed rehabilitation. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. Another avulsion fracture happened at the right tibial tubercle 3.5 months later when he was playing the basketball. From the encouragement of previous successful treatment, we provided him open reduction and fixation with two small-caliber screws. He recovered uneventfully and returned to his previous level of activity soon. No genu recurvatum or other deformity was happening in our case at the end of 2-year follow-up. No evidence of Osgood-Schlatter disease or osteogenesis imperfecta was found. Sequential avulsion fractures of tibial tubercles are rare. Good functional recovery can often be obtained like our case if we treat it well. To a physically active adolescent, we should never overstate the risk of sequential avulsion of the other leg to postpone the return to an active, functional life.

  5. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of distal tibial fractures using anterolateral locking plate: Evaluation of results and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhotia, Devendra; Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Kavin; Kumar, G-N; Sharma, Vijay; Farooque, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue healing is of paramount importance in distal tibial fractures for a successful outcome. There is an increasing trend of using anterolateral plate due to an adequate soft tissue cover on ante- rolateral distal tibia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of minimally invasive anterolateral locking plate in distal tibial fractures. This is a retrospective study of 42 patients with distal tibial fractures treated with minimally invasive anterolateral tibial plating. This study evaluates the bone and soft tissue healing along with emphasis on complications related to bone and soft tissue healing. Full weight bearing was allowed in mean time period of 4.95 months (3-12 months). A major local complication of a wound which required revision surgery was seen in one case. Minor complications were identified in 9 cases which comprised 4 cases of marginal necrosis of the surgical wound, 1 case of superficial infection, 1 case of sensory disturbance over the anterolateral foot, 1 case of muscle hernia and 2 cases of delayed union. Mean distance between the posterolateral and anterolateral incision was 5.7 cm (4.5-8 cm). The minimally invasive distal tibial fixation with anterolateral plating is a safe method of stabilization. Distance between anterolateral and posterolateral incision can be placed less than 7 cm apart depending on fracture pattern with proper surgical timing and technique.

  6. Tibial stress fractures in racing Standardbreds: 13 cases (1989-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, A.J.; Moore, R.M.; Bertone, A.L.; Schneider, R.K.; Bailey, M.Q.

    1996-01-01

    To determine clinical signs, radiographic and scintigraphic findings, and performance outcome of racing Standardbreds with tibial stress fractures. Retrospective case series. 13 racing Standardbreds with tibial stress fractures. Information concerning clinical signs, diagnostic evaluation, and recommendations was obtained by review of the medical records. Performance information before and after diagnosis of the fracture was collected from racing records, and follow-up information was obtained from the owners or trainers by use of a telephone questionnaire. Horses with tibial stress fractures were moderately lame, and diagnosis was made by nuclear scintigraphy and radiography. Fractures were more likely to occur in 2-year-old horses than in older horses. The fracture location was unique for Standardbreds; 11 of 13 developed stress fractures in the mid-diaphysis of the tibia, whereas fractures in Thoroughbreds are usually in the proximal caudal or caudolateral cortex. Fractures occurred in young horses that had raced or were in advanced race training. All horses were treated with rest alone, and 10 of 13 horses raced after injury. The horses that raced after injury were able to return to a level of performance that was equal to or better than the level raced before injury. 8 of 10 horses established a lifetime-best winning time after injury. Tibial stress fractures are a cause of lameness in young racing Standardbreds. Diagnosis is aided by nuclear scintigraphy. The prognosis for return to previous level of performance after a tibial stress fracture is good

  7. Vascularized fibular graft in infected tibial bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cheriyan Kovoor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The treatment options of bone loss with infections include bone transport with external fixators, vascularized bone grafts, non-vascularized autogenous grafts and vascularized allografts. The research hypothesis was that the graft length and intact ipsilateral fibula influenced hypertrophy and stress fracture. We retrospectively studied the graft hypertrophy in 15 patients, in whom vascularized fibular graft was done for post-traumatic tibial defects with infection. Materials and Methods : 15 male patients with mean age 33.7 years (range 18 - 56 years of post traumatic tibial bone loss were analysed. The mean bony defect was 14.5 cm (range 6.5 - 20 cm. The mean length of the graft was 16.7 cm (range 11.5 - 21 cm. The osteoseptocutaneous flap (bone flap with attached overlying skin flap from the contralateral side was used in all patients except one. The graft was fixed to the recipient bone at both ends by one or two AO cortical screws, supplemented by a monolateral external fixator. A standard postoperative protocol was followed in all patients. The hypertrophy percentage of the vascularized fibular graft was calculated by a modification of the formula described by El-Gammal. The followup period averaged 46.5 months (range 24 - 164 months. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r was worked out, to find the relationship between graft length and hypertrophy. The t-test was performed to find out if there was any significant difference in the graft length of those who had a stress fracture and those who did not and to find out whether there was any significant difference in hypertrophy with and without ipsilateral fibula union. The Chi square test was performed to identify whether there was any association between the stress fracture and the fibula union. Given the small sample size we have not used any statistical analysis to determine the relation between the percentage of the graft hypertrophy and stress fracture. Results : Graft

  8. Effectiveness of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in managing refractory constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, L; Liwanag, J; Athanasakos, E; Raeburn, A; Zarate-Lopez, N; Emmanuel, A V

    2017-01-01

    Chronic constipation can be aetiopathogenically classified into slow transit constipation (STC), rectal evacuation difficulty (RED) or a combination (BOTH). Although the efficacy of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in faecal incontinence has been well proved, a current literature search identifies only one study which assessed its effect on constipation. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of PTNS in patients with different causes of constipation. Thirty-four patients [30 women, median age 50 (20-79) years] with constipation who had previously failed maximal laxative and biofeedback therapy participated in the study. All patients underwent a baseline radio-opaque marker transit study and anorectal physiology examination. All had 12 sessions of PTNS of 30 min per session. A fall in the Wexner constipation score to ≤15 or by ≥5 points was taken as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included the results of pre- and post- PTNS transit and anorectal physiology studies. Eleven patients had STC, 14 had RED and nine had BOTH. A response was seen in four patients (1/11 STC, 2/14 RED and 1/9 BOTH). Comparing pre- and post- PTNS, there was no significant change in the mean Wexner score (P = 0.10). There was no change in colonic transit time among the whole population (P = 0.56) or among those with STC (P = 0.47). There was no improvement in balloon expulsion in the whole group (P = 0.73) or in patients with RED (P = 0.69). PTNS is of no benefit to patients with constipation, whatever aetiopathogenic mechanism is responsible for the symptoms. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. The arthroscopic treatment of displaced tibial spine fractures in children and adolescents using Meniscus Arrows(A (R))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diederick B.; de Graaf, Joost S.; Hemmer, Patrick H.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Kramer, William L. M.

    This article summarises the results of a newly developed technique that utilises Meniscus Arrows(A (R)) for the arthroscopic fixation of displaced tibial spine fractures in children and adolescents. Twelve tibial spine fractures in the knees of eleven children between 6 and 15 years old, with an

  10. The effect of tibial slope on the biomechanics of cruciate-retaining TKA : a musculoskeletal simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco A.; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Verdonschot, Nico J.J.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tibial slope can affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More posterior slope potentially helps releasing a too tight flexion gap and it is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However, the mechanism by which tibial slope affects the

  11. Anterior referencing of tibial slope in total knee arthroplasty considerably influences knee kinematics : a musculoskeletal simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Verdonschot, Nico J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the posterior tibial slope is not always reconstructed correctly, and the knee ligaments may become too tight in flexion. To release a tight flexion gap, surgeons can increase the posterior tibial slope using two surgical resection techniques: the anterior

  12. Intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment of the tibial component in the Triathlon knee

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, James P

    2011-08-20

    Abstract Background Long term survivorship in total knee arthroplasty is significantly dependant on prosthesis alignment. Our aim was determine which alignment guide was more accurate in positioning of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty. We also aimed to assess whether there was any difference in short term patient outcome. Method A comparison of intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment jig was performed. Radiological alignment of tibial components and patient outcomes of 103 Triathlon total knee arthroplasties were analysed. Results Use of the intramedullary was found to be significantly more accurate in determining coronal alignment (p = 0.02) while use of the extramedullary jig was found to give more accurate results in sagittal alignment (p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in WOMAC or SF-36 at six months. Conclusion Use of an intramedullary jig is preferable for positioning of the tibial component using this knee system.

  13. Intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment of the tibial component in the Triathlon knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnott Keith

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long term survivorship in total knee arthroplasty is significantly dependant on prosthesis alignment. Our aim was determine which alignment guide was more accurate in positioning of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty. We also aimed to assess whether there was any difference in short term patient outcome. Method A comparison of intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment jig was performed. Radiological alignment of tibial components and patient outcomes of 103 Triathlon total knee arthroplasties were analysed. Results Use of the intramedullary was found to be significantly more accurate in determining coronal alignment (p = 0.02 while use of the extramedullary jig was found to give more accurate results in sagittal alignment (p = 0.04. There was no significant difference in WOMAC or SF-36 at six months. Conclusion Use of an intramedullary jig is preferable for positioning of the tibial component using this knee system.

  14. Does use of a jig influence the precision of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jonathan C; Ness, Malcolm G

    2007-04-01

    To compare the precision of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) surgery when performed with or without a jig. Cadaveric study. Cadaveric, adult greyhound hindlimbs (n=9 pair). TPLO (n=18) was performed on each limb pair; 1 with and 1 without use of a jig. Measurements taken from pre- and postsurgical radiographs were osteotomy position, tibial plateau angle (TPA), varus-valgus malalignment, and tibial torsion. The null hypothesis was that TPLO precision was not affected by use of a jig. Student's t-test was used to investigate differences in TPA, osteotomy location, and frequency and extent of iatrogenic limb malalignment; Pjig. Osteotomy location was significantly more distal when a jig was used (P=.03). Jig use did not improve the precision of TPLO surgery. Performing TPLO without a jig should reduce surgery time, eliminate complications related to placement of the distal jig pin and allow unhindered positioning of the osteotomy.

  15. Tibial nerve intraneural ganglion cyst in a 10-year-old boy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, Judy H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Emery, Kathleen H.; Johnson, Neil [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sorger, Joel [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Orthopedics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are uncommon cystic lesions of peripheral nerves that are typically encountered in adults. In the lower extremity, the peroneal nerve is most frequently affected with involvement of the tibial nerve much less common. This article describes a tibial intraneural ganglion cyst in a 10-year-old boy. Although extremely rare, intraneural ganglion cysts of the tibial nerve should be considered when a nonenhancing cystic structure with intra-articular extension is identified along the course of the nerve. This report also details the unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous treatment with US-guided cyst aspiration and steroid injection, an option recently reported as a viable alternative to open surgical resection. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (pResearch Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Osteochondral lesion of the distal tibial plafond in an adolescent soccer player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Melissa; DeGraauw, Christopher; Hsu, William

    2017-12-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the tibial plafond account for approximately 2.6% of osteochondral lesions in the ankle. There are few cases describing this lesion in the literature, with little information on mechanism of injury, history/physical findings or recommendations for management. A 17-year-old male competitive soccer player presented with a 6-7 month history of medial ankle pain after an inversion sprain. He presented with locking and giving way of the ankle with weight-bearing and pushing off the foot to the contralateral side. Radiographs were negative for fracture or osteochondral involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an osteochondral lesion of the tibial plafond with no injury to the talar dome. This case discusses the clinical presentation, imaging findings, management and outcomes of this osteochondral lesion of the distal tibial plafond.

  18. Age-related variations in the microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Linde, F

    2002-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the microstructure of cancellous bone is crucial for diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment of age-related skeletal diseases. Until now, little has been known about age-related variations in the microstructure of peripheral cancellous bone. This study quantified age......-related changes in the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of human tibial cancellous bone. One hundred and sixty cylindrical cancellous bone specimens were produced from 40 normal proximal tibiae from 40 donors, aged 16-85 years. These specimens were micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanned...... increase of anisotropy and constant connectivity suggest a bone remodeling mechanism that may reorient trabecular volume orientation in aging tibial cancellous bone. The aging trabeculae align more strongly to the primary direction--parallel to the tibial longitudinal loading axis....

  19. Anterior Knee Pain after Tibial Intra-medullary Nailing: Is it Predictable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraganvi PC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intramedullary nailing has been used frequently for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures. Chronic anterior knee pain has been considered the most frequent post-operative complication of this technique. We investigated the relationship between anterior knee pain and position of nail tip in proximal tibia. Methods: 103 patients were selected among patients who underwent interlocking nailing in our institution. Patients with other factors that might cause anterior knee pain were excluded. In all patients intramedullary nailing was done using transpatellar approach. The patients were evaluated in two groups, 42 patients had anterior knee pain (Group A, whereas 61 patients did not have pain (Group B. The distance from nail tip from tibial plateau was measured on lateral radiographs. Nail prominence from anterior tibial cortex was also measured. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to gender and follow up period. Out of 42 patients who had knee pain 21 (50% had nail tip within proximal third distance from plateau to tibial tuberosity. Twenty-four patients (42% among knee pain group had nail prominence of more than 5mm from anterior tibial cortex followed by 12 patients (29% within 5mm and 12 patients (29% nail tip buried within the anterior cortex. Conclusion: A greater incidence of knee pain was found when nail was prominent more than 5mm and when it is in the proximal third distance from tibial plateau to tuberosity. Patients should be aware of high incidence of knee pain when the nail tip is placed in proximal third and prominence of more than 5mm.

  20. Mechanical Failure of Revision Knee Prosthesis at both Femoral and Tibial Modular Metaphyseal Stem Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, Ian G; Rooney, John; Mulford, Johnathan S; Gillies, R Mark

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of a mechanical failure of an S-ROM revision total knee prosthesis. The prosthesis was used as a revision implant following deep peri-prosthetic infection in a morbidly obese male. The prosthesis failed on both the femoral and tibial sides at the modular metaphyseal stem junctions and required a further revision using the same type of implant after infection was excluded. A 57 year old male had previously undergone a left total knee arthroplasty in 1999 for osteoarthritis. He acquired a late deep peri-prosthetic infection with a multi-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The organism was sensitive to vancomycin and rifampicin. A two stage revision was undertaken after clinical signs of infection had resolved and blood parameters had normalized. Intra-operative gram stain was negative for micro-organisms and frozen section of deep tissue was less than five polymorphs per high power field. A cemented S-ROM prosthesis was implanted using a coronal tibial osteotomy and a lateral release for exposure. After three years of the second stage of revision, the patient again presented to the orthopaedic department after reportedly falling on a wet floor six weeks ago. Radiographically, there was a broken tibial wire, osteolysis and pedestal formation around both the femoral and distal tibial stem extensions. The prosthesis was bent at the proximal tibial sleeve and stem junction. The prosthesis was considered loose with mechanical failure. At implant removal, it was noted that the femoral and tibial components at the modular metaphyseal sleeve-stem junction were fractured. Surgeons should be cautious in the use of these implants in morbidly obese patients where the stresses generated maybe above the yield stress of the material and the frictional forces that may overcome the modular taper junction's locking mechanism.

  1. A STUDY ON TIBIAL TORSION IN ADULT DRY TIBIA OF EAST AND SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jami Sagar Prusti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Rotational deformities of the lower limbs are very common. There is increasing evidence that abnormal torsion in the tibia is associated with severe knee and ankle arthritis. Primary knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability in older persons. Varus or valgus alignment increases the risk of osteoarthritis. Coexistence of tibial torsional deformity may increase the risk further. Variability in the tibial torsion has been reported and is due to the torsional forces applied on tibia during development. The aim of the study is to estimate the angle of tibial torsion on both sides and both sexes. The present study was an attempt to provide baseline data of tibial torsion in the East and South Indian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted mechanically on 100 dry adult unpaired human tibia, i.e. 50 male and 50 female bones. The measurements were recorded and statistically analysed using Student’s unpaired t-test using GraphPad Prism 5.0 (free trial version. RESULTS Out of the 100 tibia undertaken, mean value of tibial torsion angle obtained is 25.8°. In males, it is 23.68° and in females it is about 27.86°. Statistical analysis revealed significant greater average angle of tibial torsion in female bones. The angle of the right-sided bones was more and this was statistically significant. CONCLUSION The gender variation for the angle could be the result of the difference in lifestyle in day-to-day activities. The knowledge of the angle in a population could be helpful in understanding the incidence of pathogenesis related to gait and knee osteoarthritis and in view of reconstructive surgeries in orthopaedic practice.

  2. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation vs parasacral transcutaneous neuromodulation for overactive bladder in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Ubirajara; Viterbo, Walter; Bittencourt, Joana; Farias, Tiago; Lordêlo, Patrícia

    2013-08-01

    Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and posterior tibial nerve stimulation have emerged as effective methods to treat overactive bladder in children. However, to our knowledge no study has compared the 2 methods. We evaluated the results of parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and posterior tibial nerve stimulation in children with overactive bladder. We prospectively studied children with overactive bladder without dysfunctional voiding. Success of treatment was evaluated by visual analogue scale and dysfunctional voiding symptom score, and by level of improvement of each specific symptom. Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was performed 3 times weekly and posterior tibial nerve stimulation was performed once weekly. A total of 22 consecutive patients were treated with posterior tibial nerve stimulation and 37 with parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There was no difference between the 2 groups regarding demographic characteristics or types of symptoms. Concerning the evaluation by visual analogue scale, complete resolution of symptoms was seen in 70% of the group undergoing parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and in 9% of the group undergoing posterior tibial nerve stimulation (p = 0.02). When the groups were compared, there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.55). The frequency of persistence of urgency and diurnal urinary incontinence was nearly double in the group undergoing posterior tibial nerve stimulation. However, this difference was not statistically significant. We found that parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is more effective in resolving overactive bladder symptoms, which matches parental perception. However, there were no statistically significant differences in the evaluation by dysfunctional voiding symptom score, or in complete resolution of urgency or diurnal incontinence. Copyright © 2013 American Urological

  3. Can Tibial Shaft Fractures Bear Weight After Intramedullary Nailing? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Steven C; Galos, David K; Taormina, David P; Crespo, Alexander; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2016-07-01

    To examine the potential benefits and risks associated with weight-bearing after intramedullary (IM) nailing of unstable tibial shaft fractures. Randomized controlled trial. Two New York State level 1 trauma centers, one level 2 trauma center, and 1 tertiary care orthopaedic hospital in a large urban center in New York City. Eighty-eight patients with 90 tibial shaft fractures were enrolled. The following were used as inclusion criteria: (1) skeletally mature adult patients 18 years of age or older, (2) displaced fractures of tibial diaphysis (OTA type 42) treated with operative intervention, and (3) radiographs, including injury, operative, and completion of follow-up. Sixty-eight patients with 70 tibial shaft fractures completed follow-up. All patients were treated with locked IM nailing. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate weight-bearing-as-tolerated (WBAT) or non-weight-bearing for the first 6 postoperative weeks (NWB). Fracture union or treatment failure/revision surgery. There was no statistical difference in the observed time to union between groups (WBAT = 22.1 ± 11.7 weeks vs. NWB = 21.3 ± 9.9 weeks; P = 0.76). Rates of complications did not statistically differ between groups. No fracture loss of reduction leading to malunion was encountered. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment scores for all domains did not statistically differ between groups. Immediate weight-bearing after IM nailing of tibial shaft fractures is safe and is not associated with an increase in adverse events or complications. Patients should be allowed to bear weight as tolerated after IM nailing of OTA subtype 42-A and 42-B tibial shaft fractures. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. An observational, prospective study comparing tibial and humeral intraosseous access using the EZ-IO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Chan, Yiong Huak; Oh, Jen Jen; Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative to conventional intravenous access. The proximal tibia and proximal humerus have been proposed as suitable sites for IO access. A nonrandomized, prospective, observational study comparing flow rates and insertion success with tibial and humeral IO access in adults using the EZ-IO-powered drill device was conducted. The tibia was the first site of insertion, and a second IO was inserted in the humerus if clinically indicated for the same patient. Twenty-four patients were recruited, with 24 tibial and 11 humeral insertions. All EZ-IO insertions were successful at the first attempt except for 1 tibial insertion that was successful on the second attempt. All insertions were achieved within 20 seconds. Mean ease of IO insertion score (1=easiest to 10=most difficult) was 1.1 for both sites. We found tibial flow rates to be significantly faster using a pressure bag (165 mL/min) compared with those achieved without a pressure bag (73 mL/min), with a difference of 92 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52, 132). Similarly, humeral flow rates were significantly faster using a pressure bag (153 mL/min) compared with humeral those achieved without pressure bag (84 mL/min), with a difference of 69 mL/min (95% CI: 39, 99). Comparing matched pairs (same patient), there was no significant difference in flow rates between tibial and humeral sites, with or without pressure bag infusion. Both sites had high-insertion success rates. Flow rates were significantly faster with a pressure bag infusion than without. However, we did not find any significant difference in tibial or humeral flow rates.

  5. Autologous Bone Grafting and Revision Plating in a Case of Persistent High Tibial Osteotomy Non-Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tan Shi; Koon, Wong Merng

    2016-01-01

    Uni-compartmental knee arthritis may be treated with several surgical options including uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and high tibial osteotomy. Non-union is a well-established and common complication that may arise from the latter option and few reports have shown successful treatment of persistent non-union of high tibial osteotomy. We present a case of persistent non-union after high tibial osteotomy treated with autologous iliac crest bone grafting and revision plating. At 1 year post-operative interval, successful union was achieved after revision internal fixation. In addition, a good functional outcome was achieved. In this patient with persistent non-union following high tibial osteotomy, the aim of revision was to restore alignment and effect bone healing while preserving adequate tibial bone stock. Revision plating with autologous bone grafting is a good surgical strategy in the treatment ofpersistent non-union with hardware failure.

  6. Posterior Tibial Neuropathy by a Baker’s Cyst: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jun, Jae-Bum; Choi, Choong-Hyeok; Park, Si-Bog; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Hong, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seong Yoon

    2000-01-01

    Baker’s cysts are rare cause of peripheral nerve entrapment and only a few cases of tibial nerve entrapment resulting from the popliteal cyst in the calf muscle have been reported in the literature. We present a case of rheumatoid arthritis complicated by a Baker’s cyst with a tibial nerve entrapment. It is important to diagnose a Baker’s cyst early and to differentiate it from thrombophlebitis, a popliteal aneurysm, tumor or muscle tear to effect optimal therapy and to obviate a potential ne...

  7. Rehabilitation of avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity following Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, G; Ozer, H; Tunay, V B

    2004-03-01

    A sixteen-year-old boy suffered from sharp pain in the knee during a jump while playing basketball. He had a positive history of Osgood Schlatter disease. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated an avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity Type III according to the classification of Watson-Jones. Rehabilitation after avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity is an important consideration for this relatively uncommon adolescent injury. In such avulsion fractures, landing on the ground with the knee fully extended after a jump is the most likely cause. This case report reviews the rehabilitation program, and selected functional outcome measures after rehabilitation are reported. The patient returned to sporting activity after 12 months.

  8. The Avulsion Fracture of Tibial Tubercle in the Basis of Osgood-Schlatter Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Gulacti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available    The avulsion fractures of tibial tubercle are seen very rare and usually occur during sports activities in adolescence boys. The injury mechanism often is sudden  and strong contraction of the quadriceps muscle. Rarely, it can be seen in Osgood- Schlatter disease (OSH with a simple trauma. In this case report, a 16 year-old male patient who admitted to emergency service because of knee pain with Ogden type IIB tibial tuberosity fracture in the basis OSH is discussed with literature.

  9. Flexion-valgus unicondylar tibial plateau depression fracture pattern: Classification and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Song, Lijun; Li, Xiang; Fang, Jiahu

    2018-03-07

    The authors have identified a subset of unicondylar tibial plateau depression fracture patterns caused by a flexion-valgus force. The purpose of this study was to describe this fracture pattern and suggest a modified lateral approach that may allow for improved reduction and stabilization. The preoperative radiographs and CT scans of 102 patients who sustained unicondylar tibial plateau fractures (OTA 41B) were reviewed. Twenty-six fracture patients had posterolateral (PL) tibial plateau depression fractures. By medical record review and telephone follow-up, the injury mechanism of the 22 unicondylar tibial plateau fractures was confirmed as a flexion-valgus force. The radiographic features of those cases were analyzed and measured. To address this specific fracture pattern, a modified approach combined with a novel intra-articular osteotomy was applied. According to the morphological characteristics, this tibial plateau fracture pattern could be divided into two subtypes: type A was a confined, basin-like articular surface depression fracture located in the PL quadrant, and type B was a cancellous fracture involving the PL tibial plateau resulting in a decrease in the posterior slope. One radiographic hallmark of this fracture pattern is an anatomically or a mechanically intact posterior column wall. The novel approach was applied to both types. The postoperative radiographic measurements revealed excellent reduction quality. On axial scans, the distance between the most posterior rafting screw and the tangent line of the tibial plateau rim was 3.0 ± 2.07 mm (from -1.9 to 4.3), and the angulation between them was 8.9 ± 3.02° (from -7.3 to 15.6). These results indicated excellent PL quadrant coverage from the rafting screws. Flexion-valgus force-induced unicondylar tibial plateau depression fracture is a unique injury pattern. We suggest a novel surgical approach to address this injury's key features, which may facilitate exposure and enhance fixation

  10. The cost of infection in severe open tibial fractures treated with a free flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ulrik Kähler; Pedersen, Nicolas Jones; Eckardt, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    of treatment, and to determine the effect of delayed skin closure on this cost. METHODS: We reviewed all records of patients treated with a free flap in our institution for an open tibial fracture from 2002 to 2013. We calculated direct costs based on length of stay (LOS) and orthopaedic and plastic surgical...... rate from 60 to 27 %. CONCLUSIONS: Severe open tibial fractures covered with free flaps, cause over a year of absenteeism. Infection increases direct cost of treatment over 60 % and roughly doubles LOS. Early soft-tissue cover and correct antibiotics have been shown to improve outcomes...

  11. Advances in Intramedullary Nailing: Suprapatellar Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures in the Semiextended Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F

    2015-12-01

    Reamed locked intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Supra-patellar tibial nailing in the semiextended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique that allows mitigating certain challenges of the standard subpatellar approach. Suprapatellar nailing seems to facilitate achieving and maintaining fracture reduction, particularly in proximal third tibia fractures. Preliminary investigations have suggested that this technique is associated with a low rate of complications, including a reduced incidence of postoperative anterior knee pain. Further clinical investigations are necessary to establish overall complication rates and long-term subjective outcomes. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Comparison of functional bracing and locked intramedullary nailing in the treatment of displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Benterud, J G; Høgevold, H E; Ekeland, A; Strømsøe, K

    1992-04-01

    Thirty-five displaced tibial shaft fractures, treated with functional bracing were compared with 43 similar fractures, treated with locked intramedullary nailing. There were 22 excellent/good results in the brace group and 38 in the nail group. There was one infection in the brace group and three in the nailed group. There were five delayed unions and two nonunions in the brace group and one delayed union in the nail group. The functional results in the nailed group were better than the braced group but locked intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures require special resources and training. Locked intramedullary nailing fullfils all the functional criteria for acceptable fracture care.

  13. What is the optimal alignment of the tibial and femoral components in knee arthroplasty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Kirill; Korchi, Mounim; Thomsen, Morten G

    2014-01-01

    Background - Surgeon-dependent factors such as optimal implant alignment are thought to play a significant role in outcome following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Exact definitions and references for optimal alignment are, however, still being debated. This overview of the literature...... components and their role in outcome and implant survival. Methods - We performed a literature search for original and review articles on implant positioning following primary TKA. Definitions for coronal, sagittal, and rotational placement of femoral and tibial components were summarized and the influence...... rates, maltracking, and knee pain. Interpretation - Based on currently available evidence, surgeons should aim for optimal alignment of tibial and femoral components when performing TKA....

  14. Anterior avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in adolescents - Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleilimar Teixeira da Silva Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective here was to report two rare cases of anterior avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in adolescents. Case 1 was a 15-year-old male who became injured through landing on his left knee and presented limited extension. Case 2 was a 16-year-old basketball player who presented sudden pain in the right knee and functional incapacity, after a jump. Imaging examinations (radiographs and computed tomography showed anterior avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity. Surgical fixation was performed using screws and anchors, while avoiding growth plate injury. The cases evolved without lower-limb deformities.

  15. Simultaneous bilateral tibial tubercle avulsion fracture in a male teenager: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Alexandre P; Carvalho, Rogerio T; Ferretti, Mario; Cohen, Moises

    2018-01-01

    Tibial tuberosity avulsion fractures are injuries accounting for less than 3% of all epiphyseal and 1% of all physeal injuries in adolescents. Bilateral injuries are very rare, with only 19 cases described in the literature. These types of fractures occur commonly in male teenagers during sport activities and are often associated with other orthopaedic disorders. We report the case of a male teenager with simultaneous bilateral tibial tubercle fractures, describe the evolution and treatment of this injury and review the literature on this subject. Case report.

  16. Fratura avulsão do planalto tibial medial (Segond reverso Avulsion fracture of the medial tibial plateau (reverse Segond injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Janson Angelini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se neste artigo um padrão de lesão descrito na literatura apenas duas vezes, num total de quatro casos, denominado Segond reverso por apresentar achados clínicos e radiológicos exatamente opostos aos da clássica lesão de Segond. Semelhantemente aos casos previamente descritos, apresentou fratura avulsão do planalto tibial medial, na inserção do ligamento colateral medial profundo, associada a lesão do ligamento cruzado posterior. Assim como em um dos casos prévios, foi constatada lesão do ligamento cruzado anterior. Entretanto, diferiu dos anteriormente relatados por não apresentar lesão do menisco medial.This article reports an injury pattern described only twice in literature, totaling four cases, and referred to as reverse Segond injury for its clinical and radiological findings are precisely opposite to those observed in the classical Segond injury. Similarly to the previously described cases, our case reported avulsion fracture of the medial tibial plateau at the insertion of the deep tibial collateral ligament, associated to posterior cruciate ligament injury. Similarly to one of the previous cases, anterior cruciate ligament injury was found in our case, although it differs from the previous ones because it does not show medial meniscal injury.

  17. "Clothesline technique" for proximal tibial shaft fracture fixation using conventional intramedullary nail: a simple, useful, and inexpensive technique to prevent fracture malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belangero, William Dias; Santos Pires, Robinson Esteves; Livani, Bruno; Rossi, Felipe Lins; de Andrade, Andre Luis Lugnani

    2018-01-23

    Treatment of proximal tibial shaft fractures is always challenging. Despite the development of modern techniques, the literature still shows high complication rates, especially regarding proximal fragment malalignment. It is well known that knee position in flexion during tibial nailing is responsible for extension and valgus deformities of the proximal fragment. Unlike in tibial shaft fractures, nails do not reduce proximal tibial fractures due to the medullary canal width. This study aims to describe a simple, useful, and inexpensive technique to prevent valgus and extension deformities when treating proximal tibial fractures using conventional nails: the so-called clothesline technique.

  18. Tibial Fractures in Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding in Finland: A Retrospective Study on Fracture Types and Injury Mechanisms in 363 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, A; Pakarinen, H; Jalkanen, J; Mälkiä, T; Handolin, L

    2016-09-01

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding share the hazards of accidents accounting for tibial fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture patterns and mechanisms of injury of tibial fractures taking place in downhill skiing and snowboarding. All patients with tibial fracture due to alpine skiing or snowboarding accident treated in four trauma centers next to the largest ski resorts in Finland were analyzed between 2006 and 2012. The hospital records were retrospectively reviewed for data collection: equipment used (skis or snowboard), age, gender, and mechanism of injury. Fractures were classified according to AO-classification. There were 342 skiing and 30 snowboarding related tibial fractures in 363 patients. Tibial shaft fracture was the most common fracture among skiers (n = 215, 63%), followed by proximal tibial fractures (n = 92, 27%). Snowboarders were most likely to suffer from proximal tibial fracture (13, 43%) or tibial shaft fracture (11, 37%). Snowboarders were also more likely than skiers to suffer complex AO type C fractures (23% vs 9%, p jumping (46%). The most important finding was the relatively high number of the tibial plateau fractures among adult skiers. The fracture patterns between snowboarding and skiing were different; the most common fracture type in skiers was spiral tibial shaft fracture compared to proximal tibial fractures in snowboarders. Children had more simple fractures than adults. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2016.

  19. Short-term outcome and complications of TPLO using anatomically contoured locking compression plates in small/medium-breed dogs with "excessive" tibial plateau angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D C; Trinterud, T; Owen, M R; Bush, M A

    2016-06-01

    To report short-term radiographic and clinical outcome and complications following tibial plateau levelling osteotomy for the treatment of cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency in dogs less than 18·1 kg with tibial plateau angle greater than 35° using anatomically contoured six-hole locking compression plates. Retrospective data were collected on: preoperative, postoperative and follow-up tibial plateau angles, plateau segment rotation, tibial tuberosity width and length of the cranial aspect of tibial tuberosity segment from the patellar tendon insertion and rotation of the tibial plateau below the level of the insertion of the patellar ligament. In 26 small dogs (29 stifles in total), mean preoperative, postoperative and follow-up tibial plateau angles were 38·2°, 4·8°, and 4·4°, respectively. Documented postoperative complications were limited to patellar tendinopathy in a single case (3·4%) and tibial tuberosity or fibula fracture were not observed. Short-term radiographic and clinical outcome of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy stabilised with anatomically contoured six-hole locking compression plates for the treatment of small dogs with large tibial plateau angle suggests a very low risk of complications. Rotation beyond the "safe point" is necessary to perform full rotation in some cases, but does not appear to incur an increased risk of tibial tuberosity fracture. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Study of Ender’s Nailing in Paediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu G. Ladani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Closed reduction & plaster is standard and effective form of treatment in majority of paediatric tibial shaft fractures. Operative intervention is necessary in unstable fractures, open fractures, poly trauma patients and compartment syndrome or severe soft tissue compromise. Historically, external fixation and plating were the treatment options available, but having complications like infection, overgrowth and refracture. Reamed locked intramedullary nails pose unnecessary risk to...

  1. Effectiveness of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wall, L.L. de; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a common condition affecting adults and children worldwide, resulting in a substantial economic and psychological burden. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is derived from acupuncture used in Chinese traditional medicine and was first described in the

  2. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in the treatment of overactive bladder: urodynamic data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandoninck, V.; Balken, M.R. van; Finazzi Agro, E.; Petta, F.; Micali, F.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Debruyne, F.M.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate urodynamic changes after percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) for the treatment of complaints related to overactive bladder syndrome and to search for urodynamic-based predictive factors. METHODS: Ninety consecutive patients with symptoms related to

  3. Tibial lengthening for unilateral Crowe type-IV developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Tibial lengthening may effectively correct gait and satisfactorily improve body image in young patients with unilateral Crowe type-IV DDH. Mono-lateral external fixator allows for accelerated postoperative rehabilitation and optimal preservation of ankle movements. Lengthening along with intramedullary nails may significantly reduce the external fixation time and the risk of fixator-related complications.

  4. Editorial Commentary: Tibial Tubercle Prominence After Osgood-Schlatter Disease: What Causes Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2017-08-01

    A novel surgical technique to reduce the tibial tubercle prominence in painful Osgood-Schlatter disease was piloted in a small cohort of patients with chronic anterior knee pain. Midterm results judged by patient-reported outcomes of pain and function show promise for this technique. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interobserver reliability of the Schatzker and Luo classification systems for tibial plateau fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Jos J.; Doornberg, Job N.; Molenaars, Rik J.; Ring, David; Kloen, Peter; Babis, George C.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Prayson, Michael J.; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Acacio, Ramos; Verbeek, Diederik O.; Melvanki, Parag; Kreis, Barbara E.; Mehta, Samir; Meylaerts, S.; Wojtek, S.; Yeap, Ewe J.; Haapasalo, Heidi; Kristan, Anž e; Coles, Chad; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Mormino, Matthew; Menon, Matthew; Tyllianakis, Minos; Schandelmaier, Peter; Jenkinson, R. J.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Shahriar, Chegini M. H.; Belangero, William D.; Kannan, S. G.; Leonidovich, Golovakha M.; Davenport, J. H.; Kabir, Koroush; Althausen, Peter L.; Weil, Yoram; Toom, Alar; Sa da Costa, Daniel; Lijoi, F.; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E.; Manidakis, Nikolaos; van den Bogaert, Max; Patczai, Balá zs; Grauls, Anthony; Kurup, Harish; van den Bekerom, Michel P.; Lansdaal, Joris R.; Vale, M.á rio; Ousema, Paul; Barquet, Antonio; Cross, Brian J.; Broekhuyse, Henry; Haverkamp, Daniel; Merchant, Milind; Harvey, Edward; Stojkovska Pemovska, Emilija; Frihagen, Frede; Seibert, Franz J.; Garnavos, Christos; van der Heide, Huub; Villamizar, Harold A.; Harris, Ian; Borris, Lars C.; Brink, Ole; Brink, Peter R. G.; Choudhari, Pradeep; Swiontkowski, Marc; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Tosounidis, Theodoros; van Rensen, Inge; Martinelli, N.; Park, D. H.; Lasanianos, Nikolaos; Vide, J.; Engvall, A.; Zura, R. D.; Jubel, Axel; Kawaguchi, Alan; Goost, Hans; Bishop, Julius; Mica, Ladislav; Pirpiris, Marinis; van Helden, S. H.; Bouaicha, Samy; Schepers, T.; Havlič ek, Tomo; Giordano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Tibial plateau fracture classification systems have limited interobserver reliability and new systems emerge. The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability of the Luo classification and the Schatzker classification for two-dimensional computed tomography (2DCT) and to study the effect of

  6. Serum chemistry and histopathology of broiler femoral head necrosis and tibial dyschondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) are two major leg problems in young meat type poultry which cause lameness, bone deformity and infections. Whereas FHN results from disarticulation of the femoral growth plate from the articular cartilage, TD lesions are characterized by i...

  7. Tibial shaft fractures - management and treatment options. A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, G; Strohm, P C; Südkamp, N P; Hammer, T O

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of tibial shaft fractures is still discussed controversial. In the present study current literature was reviewed with the objective to demonstrate current recommendations concerning tibial shaft fractures. Tibial shaft fractures are often caused by high-energy trauma with severe concomitant soft-tissue injuries. Solid bone union without hypertrophy, fast mobilization and full range of motion without further soft-tissue damages are the aims of the therapy. Non-displaced tibial shaft fractures in patients with good compliance can be treated conservatively. Deep venous thrombosis, compartment syndrome, soft tissue injury and chronic regional pain syndrome are the major risks of conservative treatment and need to be required. Operative treatment can be performed with several different implants. Intramedullary nailing with a huge biomechanical stability seems to be the implant of choice. Only rare indications for plate osteosynthesis can be found. The use of external fixation has declined even though external fixation is still the implant of choice in first line treatment of multiple trauma according to the damage control principles. Open fractures with precarious blood supply and weak soft tissue covering are vulnerable to complications and remain a challenge for every treating surgeon. Reconstruction of axis, length and rotation is essential for a good outcome. The choice of technique depends on fracture localization, type of fracture, history of concomitant disorders and soft tissue damage.

  8. Hindfoot Valgus following Interlocking Nail Treatment for Tibial Diaphysis Fractures: Can the Fibula Be Neglected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Uzun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated whether intramedullary nail fixation for tibial diaphysis fractures with concomitant fibula fractures (except at the distal one-third level managed conservatively with an associated fibula fracture resulted in ankle deformity and assessed the impact of the ankle deformity on lower extremity function. Methods. Sixty middle one-third tibial shaft fractures with associated fibular fractures, except the distal one-third level, were included in this study. All tibial shaft fractures were anatomically reduced and fixed with interlocking intramedullary nails. Fibular fractures were managed conservatively. Hindfoot alignment was assessed clinically. Tibia and fibular lengths were compared to contralateral measurements using radiographs. Functional results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS and the Foot and Ankle Disability Index Score (FADI. Results. Anatomic union, defined as equal length in operative and contralateral tibias, was achieved in 60 fractures (100%. Fibular shortening was identified in 42 fractures (68%. Mean fibular shortening was 1.2 cm (range, 0.5–2 cm. Clinical exams showed increased hindfoot valgus in 42 fractures (68%. The mean KOOS was 88.4, and the mean FADI score was 90. Conclusion. Fibular fractures in the middle or proximal one-third may need to be stabilized at the time of tibial intramedullary nail fixation to prevent development of hindfoot valgus due to fibular shortening.

  9. Measurement repeatability of tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove offset distance in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, J.E.; Jensen, B.R.; Kirpensteijn, J.; Svalastoga, E.L.; Eriksen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To describe CT image reconstruction criteria for measurement of the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) offset distance, evaluate intra- and inter-reconstruction repeatability, and identify key sources of error in the measurement technique, as determined in vulpine hind

  10. Local and Widespread Hyperalgesia After Isolated Tibial Shaft Fractures Treated with Intramedullary Nailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsøe, Rasmus; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    postoperatively after intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fracture. METHODS: A total of 39 patients were included in this 12-month follow-up study. After 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively the pain intensity was measured on a visual analog scale (VAS) and the pressure pain sensitivity was assessed...

  11. An economic analysis of management strategies for closed and open grade I tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Johnson-Masotti, Ana P; Gafni, Amiram

    2005-10-01

    Closed and open grade I (low-energy) tibial shaft fractures are a common and costly event, and the optimal management for such injuries remains uncertain. We explored costs associated with treatment of low-energy tibial fractures with either casting, casting with therapeutic ultrasound, or intramedullary nailing (with and without reaming) by use of a decision tree. From a governmental perspective, the mean associated costs were USD 3,400 for operative management by reamed intramedullary nailing, USD 5,000 for operative management by non-reamed intramedullary nailing, USD 5,000 for casting, and USD 5,300 for casting with therapeutic ultrasound. With respect to the financial burden to society, the mean associated costs were USD 12,500 for reamed intramedullary nailing, USD 13,300 for casting with therapeutic ultrasound, USD 15,600 for operative management by non-reamed intramedullary nailing, and USD 17,300 for casting alone. Our analysis suggests that, from an economic standpoint, reamed intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for closed and open grade I tibial shaft fractures. Considering financial burden to society, there is preliminary evidence that treatment of low-energy tibial fractures with therapeutic ultrasound and casting may also be an economically sound intervention.

  12. The effect of retained intramedullary nails on tibial bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J C; Lindsey, R W; Hipp, J A; Gugala, Z; Rianon, N; LeBlanc, A

    2008-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing has become a standard treatment for adult tibial shaft fractures. Retained intramedullary nails have been associated with stress shielding, although their long-term effect on decreasing tibial bone mineral density is currently unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if retained tibial intramedullary nails decrease tibial mineral density in patients with successfully treated fractures. Patients treated with statically locked intramedullary nails for isolated, unilateral tibia shaft fractures were studied. Inclusion required that fracture had healed radiographically and that the patient returned to the pre-injury activity level. Data on patient demographic, fracture type, surgical technique, implant, and post-operative functional status were tabulated. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density in selected regions of the affected tibia and the contralateral intact tibia. Image reconstruction software was employed to ensure symmetry of the studied regions. Twenty patients (mean age 43; range 22-77 years) were studied at a mean of 29 months (range 5-60 months) following intramedullary nailing. There was statistically significant reduction of mean bone mineral density in tibiae with retained intramedullary nails (1.02 g/cm(2) versus 1.06 g/cm(2); P=0.04). A significantly greater decrease in bone mineral density was detected in the reamed versus non-reamed tibiae (-7% versus +6%, respectively; Pnails. Intramedullary reaming appears to be a factor potentiating the reduction of tibia bone mineral density in long-term nail retention.

  13. A modelling approach demonstrating micromechanical changes in the tibial cemented interface due to in vivo service.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivasan, P.; Miller, M.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Mann, K.A.; Janssen, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Post-operative changes in trabecular bone morphology at the cement-bone interface can vary depending on time in service. This study aims to investigate how micromotion and bone strains change at the tibial bone-cement interface before and after cementation. This work discusses whether the morphology

  14. A modelling approach demonstrating micromechanical changes in the tibial cemented interface due to in vivo service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivasan, Priyanka; Miller, Mark A.; Verdonschot, Nico; Mann, Kenneth A.; Janssen, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Post-operative changes in trabecular bone morphology at the cement-bone interface can vary depending on time in service. This study aims to investigate how micromotion and bone strains change at the tibial bone-cement interface before and after cementation. This work discusses whether the morphology

  15. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Carlos Jaña Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo-Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive; presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score index; mortality rate; and infection rate. RESULTS: 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%. Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75% and IIIB (25% predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. CONCLUSION: The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions.

  16. Strain shielding in trabecular bone at the tibial cement-bone interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivasan, Priyanka; Miller, Mark A.; Verdonschot, Nico; Mann, Kenneth A.; Janssen, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component remains the leading cause for revision surgery in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Understanding the mechanisms leading to loss of fixation can offer insight into preventative measures to ensure a longer survival rate. In cemented TKA, loosening occurs at the

  17. Preoperative estimation of tibial nail length--because size does matter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, J G

    2012-11-01

    Selecting the correct tibial nail length is essential for satisfactory outcomes. Nails that are inserted and are found to be of inappropriate length should be removed. Accurate preoperative nail estimation has the potential to reduce intra-operative errors, operative time and radiation exposure.

  18. Prediction of progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis using tibial trabecular bone texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woloszynski, T; Podsiadlo, P; Stachowiak, G W

    2012-01-01

    2 sets of knee radiographs taken 4 years apart. We determined medial and lateral compartment tibial TB texture using an automated region selection method. Three texture parameters were calculated: roughness, degree of anisotropy, and direction of anisotropy based on a signature dissimilarity measure...

  19. High altitude hypoxia as a factor that promotes tibial growth plate development in broiler chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucheng Huang

    Full Text Available Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD is one of the most common problems in the poultry industry and leads to lameness by affecting the proximal growth plate of the tibia. However, due to the unique environmental and geographical conditions of Tibet, no case of TD has been reported in Tibetan chickens (TBCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on blood parameters and tibial growth plate development in chickens using the complete blood count, morphology, and histological examination. The results of this study showed an undesirable impact on the overall performance, body weight, and mortality of Arbor Acres chickens (AACs exposed to a high altitude hypoxic environment. However, AACs raised under hypoxic conditions showed an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs and an increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values on day 14 compared to the hypobaric normoxia group. Notably, the morphology and histology analyses showed that the size of tibial growth plates in AACs was enlarged and that the blood vessel density was also higher after exposure to the hypoxic environment for 14 days, while no such change was observed in TBCs. Altogether, our results revealed that the hypoxic environment has a potentially new role in increasing the blood vessel density of proximal tibial growth plates to strengthen and enhance the size of the growth plates, which may provide new insights for the therapeutic manipulation of hypoxia in poultry TD.

  20. Early treatment of trans-tibial amputees: retrospective analysis of early fitting and elastic bandaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, A.D.; Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; Emmelot, C.H.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of early fitting in trans-tibial amputees. The assumption is that compared to elastic bandaging, the use of a rigid dressing in early fitting will result in quicker wound healing and earlier ambulation. A retrospective file search was carried out in three

  1. Reconstruction of bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot syndrome in a father and daughter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial aplasia is of heterogeneous aetiology, the majority of reports are sporadic. We describe the reconstruction procedures in two subjects - a daughter and father manifested autosomal dominant (AD inheritance of the bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot syndrome. Materials and Methods: Reconstruction of these patients required multiple surgical procedures and orthoprosthesis was mandatory. The main goal of treatment was to achieve walking. Stabilization of the ankle joint by fibular-talar-chondrodesis on both sides, followed by bilateral Brown-procedure at the knee joint level has been applied accordingly. Results: The outcome was with improved function of the deformed limbs and walking was achieved with simultaneous designation of orthotic fitting. Conclusion: This is the first study encompassing the diagnosis and management of a father and daughter with bilateral tibial aplasia associated with variable split hand/foot deformity without foot ablation. Our patients showed the typical AD pattern of inheritance of split-hand/foot and tibial aplasia.

  2. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurologic bladder in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Teimoory, Nastaran; Miri, Elahe; Nikfallah, Abolghasem; Naeimi, Mahsa; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a disabling disorder. Treatment of cases with OAB includes behavioral, pharmacological, surgical interventions and peripheral electrical stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on sexual function and pelvic disorders in women with Overactive bladder (OAB). Fifty women were randomly assigned to PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation) plus tolterodine or tolterodine alone treatment. Tolterodine group received 4 mg tolterodine daily for three months while the other group received this treatment plus percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for 12 consequence weeks. Two in PTNS group and 8 in the control group withdrew from the study. Age, education level, and occupation status were not significantly different between two groups. Mean total FSFI and its subscales were not significantly different before and after treatment between two groups. Urine leakage associated with a feeling of urgency and loss of stool or gas from the rectum beyond patient's control became significantly different after treatment between two groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation could help urinary problems in women with a neurologic bladder.

  3. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurologic bladder in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Eftekhar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a disabling disorder. Treatment of cases with OAB includes behavioral, pharmacological, surgical interventions and peripheral electrical stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on sexual function and pelvic disorders in women with Overactive bladder (OAB. Fifty women were randomly assigned to PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation plus tolterodine or tolterodine alone treatment. Tolterodine group received 4 mg tolterodine daily for three months while the other group received this treatment plus percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for 12 consequence weeks. Two in PTNS group and 8 in the control group withdrew from the study. Age, education level, and occupation status were not significantly different between two groups. Mean total FSFI and its subscales were not significantly different before and after treatment between two groups. Urine leakage associated with a feeling of urgency and loss of stool or gas from the rectum beyond patient's control became significantly different after treatment between two groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation could help urinary problems in women with a neurologic bladder.

  4. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be diagnosed reliably using history and physical examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, M.; Bakker, E. W. P.; Moen, M. H.; Barten, C. C.; Teeuwen, R.; Weir, A.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of sporting injuries are clinically diagnosed using history and physical examination as the cornerstone. There are no studies supporting the reliability of making a clinical diagnosis of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Our aim was to assess if MTSS can be diagnosed reliably, using

  5. The medial tibial stress syndrome score: item generation for a new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When focal tibial pain, indicative of a stress fracture, or a medical history with a cruris fracture was present, subjects were excluded.[10]. After item generation, the patients appraised the items in two rounds. In the first round, the authors asked 15 MTSS patients to provide feedback on readability and comprehension using a.

  6. [Influencing factors for trauma-induced tibial infection in underground coal mine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, W Z; Guo, Y J; Liu, Z K; Li, Y F; Wang, G Z

    2016-07-20

    Objective: To investigate the influencing factors for trauma-induced tibial infection in underground coal mine. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 1 090 patients with tibial fracture complicated by bone infection who were injured in underground coal mine and admitted to our hospital from January 1995 to August 2015, including the type of trauma, injured parts, severity, and treatment outcome. The association between risk factors and infection was analyzed. Results: Among the 1 090 patients, 357 had the clinical manifestations of acute and chronic bone infection, 219 had red and swollen legs with heat pain, and 138 experienced skin necrosis, rupture, and discharge of pus. The incidence rates of tibial infection from 1995 to 2001, from 2002 to 2008, and from 2009 to 2015 were 31%, 26.9%, and 20.2%, respectively. The incidence rate of bone infection in the proximal segment of the tibia was significantly higher than that in the middle and distal segments (42.1% vs 18.9%/27.1%, P underground coal mine. The position of tibial fracture and type of fracture are independent risk factors for bone infection. Vacuum sealing drainage and Ilizarov technique can achieve a satisfactory therapeutic effect.

  7. VAC Therapy Direct to the Medullary Cavity for Chronic Tibial Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Satoshi; Tsuji, Shigeyoshi; Iwai, Takao; Hamada, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC) is useful for difficult wound beds, although sites where bleeding or infection is expected are usually regarded as problematic for this therapy. This report outlines the treatment of chronic tibial osteomyelitis (Cierny- Mader type III) due to mixed infection with Nocardia spp and Bacteroi- des fragilis by postoperative VAC therapy direct to the medullary cavity, followed by wound coverage with a gastrocnemius myocutaneous skin flap. A 64-year-old man developed chronic left tibial os- teomyelitis after a work injury. The nonviable tissues were debrided, including a sequestrum. Nocardia spp and B. fragilis were isolated from surgical bone specimens, and chronic tibial osteomyelitis due to mixed infection was diagnosed. Postoperatively, VAC therapy was performed directly to the open medullary cavity of the tibia and sub- sequently covered the residual soft tissue defect with a gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap. The authors could not find any English literature on VAC therapy direct to the medullary cavity combined with transplantation of a myocutaneous flap for osteomyelitis. Nocardia spp can cause a variety of infections, among which osteomyelitis occupies a relatively small percentage. This case raises the possibil- ity of treating chronic tibial osteomyelitis caused by mixed infection with Nocardia spp and B. fragilis by applying postoperative VAC ther- apy directly to the medullary cavity and covering the residual wound with a gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap.

  8. Acute urodynamic effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with MS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjorback, M.V.; Rey, F. van; Pal, F. van der; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.; Petersen, T.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve could suppress detrusor contractions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. METHODS: Two successive slow-fill cystometries (16 ml/min) were

  9. The Changed Route of Anterior Tibial Artery due to Healed Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Gökkuş

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to highlight unusual sequelae of healed distal third diaphyseal tibia fracture that was treated conservatively 36 years ago, in which we incidentally detected peripheral CT angiography. The anterior tibial artery was enveloped three-quarterly by the healing callus of the bone (distal tibia.

  10. The Effect of Patient-Specific Instrumentation Incorporating an Extramedullary Tibial Guide on Operative Efficiency for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-Ryong Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was to determine if patient-specific instrumentation (PSI for total knee arthroplasty (TKA leads to shortened surgical time through increased operating room efficiency according to different tibial PSI designs. 166 patients underwent primary TKA and were categorized into three groups as follows: PSI without extramedullary (EM tibial guide (group 1, n=48, PSI with EM tibial guide (group 2, n=68, and conventional instrumentation (CI group (group 3, n=50. Four factors were compared between groups, namely, operative room time, thickness of bone resection, tibial slope, and rotation of the component. The mean surgical time was significantly shorter in the PSI with EM tibial guide group (group 2, 63.9±13.6 min compared to the CI group (group 3, 82.8±24.9 min (P<0.001. However, there was no significant difference in the PSI without EM tibial guide group (group 1, 75.3±18.8 min. This study suggests that PSI incorporating an EM tibial guide may lead to high operative efficiency in TKA compared to CI. This trial is registered with KCT0002384.

  11. Reliability and validity of measures of hammer toe deformity angle and tibial torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Y; Tuttle, L J; Commean, P K; Mueller, M J

    2009-09-01

    Measures of second-fourth metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) angle (indicator of hammer toe deformity) and clinical measures of tibial torsion have limited evidence for validity and reliability. The purposes of this study are to determine: (1) reliability of using a 3D digitizer (Metrecom) and computed tomography (CT) to measure MTPJ angle for toes 2-4; (2) reliability of goniometer, 3D digitizer, and CT to measure tibial torsion; (3) validity of MTPJ angle measures for toes 2-4 using goniometry and 3D digitizer compared to CT (gold standard) and (4) validity of tibial torsion measures using goniometry and 3D digitizer (Metrecom) compared to CT (gold standard). Twenty-nine subjects participated in this study. 27 feet with hammer toe deformity and 31 feet without hammer toe deformity were tested using standardized gonimetric, 3D digitizer and CT methods. ICCs (3,1), standard error of the measurement (SEM) values, and difference measures were used to characterize intrarater reliability. Pearson correlation coefficients and an analysis of variance were used to determine associations and differences between the measurement techniques. 3D digitizer and CT measures of MTPJ angle had high test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.95-0.96 and 0.98-0.99, respectively; SEM = 2.64-3.35 degrees and 1.42-1.47 degrees, respectively). Goniometry, 3D digitizer, and CT measures of tibial torsion had good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.75, 0.85, and 0.98, respectively; SEM = 2.15 degrees, 1.74 degrees, and 0.72 degree, respectively). Both goniometric and 3D digitizer measures of MTPJ angle were highly correlated with CT measures of MTPJ angle (r = 0.84-0.90, r = 0.84-0.88, respectively) and tibial torsion (r = 0.72, r = 0.83). Goniometry, 3D digitizer, and CT measures were all different from each other for measures of hammer toe deformity (p Goniometry measures were different from CT measures and 3D digitizer measures of tibial torsion (p reliable. Goniometer and 3D digitizer measures of

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament tibial footprint anatomy: systematic review of the 21st century literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Michael D; Piefer, Jason W; Lubowitz, James H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review current arthroscopic and related literature and to characterize the anatomic centrum of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial footprint. On January 31, 2011, 2 independent reviewers performed a Medline search using the terms "anterior cruciate ligament" or "ACL," "tibia" or "tibial," and "anatomy" or "footprint." We included anatomic, cadaveric, and radiographic studies of adult, human, ACL tibial anatomy. Studies not published in the English language, studies published before January 1, 2000, and review articles were excluded. References of included articles were also searched according to our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies were subjectively synthesized, to define the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint. The Medline search produced 1,224 articles. After application of our inclusion and exclusion criteria and additional search of article references, 19 articles were included and systematically reviewed. With regard to arthroscopically relevant landmarks, (1) in the anterior-to-posterior plane, the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint as a whole is 15 mm anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the anatomic centrum of the anteromedial bundle is 20 mm anterior to the PCL, and the anatomic centrum of the posterolateral bundle is 11 mm anterior to the PCL and (2) in the medial-to-lateral (ML) plane, the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint as a whole is two-fifths the ML width of the interspinous distance, the anatomic centrum of the anteromedial bundle is one-half the ML width of the interspinous distance, and the anatomic centrum of the posterolateral bundle is one-fourth the ML width of the interspinous distance. Our results show that the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint is 15 mm anterior to the PCL and two-fifths the ML width of the interspinous distance. This systematic review of basic science studies may have clinical relevance for surgeons

  13. Current practice in the intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tornetta, Paul; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Hanson, Beate; Sprague, Sheila; Syed, Amena; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2002-10-01

    Tibial fractures are the most common of all long bone fractures. Although many tibial fractures may be managed conservatively, a certain subset, including unstable fractures and open fractures, require operative stabilization. Intramedullary nails have become the popular choice of implant in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The variability in outcomes with tibial shaft fractures may reflect technical aspects of the surgical procedure and perioperative care regimens among surgeons. Identifying the distribution of surgeons' preferences in nailing technique, and the rationale for their choices, will aid in focusing educational activities for the orthopedic community and planning future clinical trials. Our objectives were to clarify surgeons' opinions regarding technical aspects of surgery and perioperative care after intramedullary nailing of closed and open tibial shaft fractures, and to identify predictors of surgeons' preferences in technique and perioperative care. This study was a cross-sectional survey using focus groups, key informants, and sampling to redundancy strategies to develop a survey to examine surgeons' preferences in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The survey was pilot tested for clarity and content validity. We mailed this survey in July 2000 to 577 orthopedic surgeons who have an interest in trauma care. These were members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, or European AO International affiliated trauma centers. We used several strategies to improve response rates including personalized cover letters, stamped return envelopes, follow-up telephone calls, and repeat mailing of questionnaires. Main outcome measures included technical issues such as reduction, exposure, intramedullary reaming, and interlocking screws; and factors associated with surgeons' preferences such as age, fellowship, academic practice, and geographic location. Four hundred forty-four surgeons (77%) responded

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Mobile-bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: The Influence of Tibial Component Coronal Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Duo Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controversies about the rational positioning of the tibial component in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA still exist. Previous finite element (FE studies were rare, and the results varied. This FE study aimed to analyze the influence of the tibial component coronal alignment on knee biomechanics in mobile-bearing UKA and find a ration range of inclination angles. Methods: A three-dimensional FE model of the intact knee was constructed from image data of one normal subject. A 1000 N compressive load was applied to the intact knee model for validating. Then a set of eleven UKA FE models was developed with the coronal inclination angles of the tibial tray ranging from 10° valgus to 10° varus. Tibial bone stresses and strains, contact pressures and load distribution in all UKA models were calculated and analyzed under the unified loading and boundary conditions. Results: Load distribution, contact pressures, and contact areas in intact knee model were validated. In UKA models, von Mises stress and compressive strain at proximal medial cortical bone increased significantly as the tibial tray was in valgus inclination >4°, which may increase the risk of residual pain. Compressive strains at tibial keel slot were above the high threshold with varus inclination >4°, which may result in greater risk of component migration. Tibial bone resection corner acted as a strain-raiser regardless of the inclination angles. Compressive strains at the resected surface slightly changed with the varying inclinations and were not supposed to induce bone resorption and component loosening. Contact pressures and load percentage in lateral compartment increased with the more varus inclination, which may lead to osteoarthritis progression. Conclusions: Static knee biomechanics after UKA can be greatly affected by tibial component coronal alignment. A range from 4° valgus to 4° varus inclination of tibial component can be recommended in mobile

  15. Effects of tibial baseplate shape on rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty: three-dimensional surgical simulation using osteoarthritis knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Okazaki, Ken; Ushio, Tetsuro; Murakami, Koji; Hamai, Satoshi; Akasaki, Yukio; Nakashima, Yasuharu

    2018-01-01

    Placement of tibial component is expected to fulfill both maximum surface coverage and recommended anterior-posterior (AP) alignment in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of the tibial baseplate shape on AP axis. Virtual surgery of TKA was performed with three-dimensional bone models reconstructed from 77 osteoarthritis varus knees. Two differently designed tibial baseplates, symmetrically and anatomically, were set to the cut surface under posterior slopes of 0°, 3°, and 7°. The AP axes were defined by connecting the geometrical center of the cut surface with the medial edge (axis MED) and medial 1/3 (axis 1/3MED) of patella tendon attachment. We evaluated the overhang rates as well as the most fitting AP axis which passes through the geometric center. Overhang rates when aligned to axis MED were 12-25% for the symmetrical-type group and 13-22% for the anatomical-type group. Overhang rates when aligned to axis 1/3MED were 42-48% for the symmetrical-type group and 3-7% for the anatomical-type group. The most fitting AP axis of tibial baseplate was located 2.5° external to axis MED for the symmetrical-type group and around 3.3° internal to axis 1/3MED for the anatomical-type group. Symmetrically or anatomically designed tibial baseplates have their own favored AP axis and specific performance on coverage. When aligned to axis 1/3MED, anatomically designed tibial baseplates will effectively lower the mismatch rates compared to a symmetrically designed tibial baseplate. Orthopaedic surgeons are expected to place the tibial components to the cut surface during TKA with full understanding of the features between different baseplate designs, AP axes, and posterior slopes for an ideal tibial rotational position.

  16. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area.

  17. Surgical treatment of refractory tibial stress fractures in elite dancers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Dhotar, Herman S; Rose, Donald J; Egol, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Treatment of tibial stress fractures in elite dancers is centered on rest and activity modification. Surgical intervention in refractory cases has important implications affecting the dancers' careers. Refractory tibial stress fractures in dancers can be treated successfully with drilling and bone grafting or intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 1992 and 2006, 1757 dancers were evaluated at a dance medicine clinic; 24 dancers (1.4%) had 31 tibial stress fractures. Of that subset, 7 (29.2%) elite dancers with 8 tibial stress fractures were treated operatively with either intramedullary nailing or drilling and bone grafting. Six of the patients were followed up closely until they were able to return to dance. One patient was available only for follow-up phone interview. Data concerning their preoperative treatment regimens, operative procedures, clinical union, radiographic union, and time until return to dance were recorded and analyzed. The mean age of the surgical patients at the time of stress fracture was 22.6 years. The mean duration of preoperative symptoms before surgical intervention was 25.8 months. Four of the dancers were male and 3 were female. All had failed nonoperative treatment regimens. Five patients (5 tibias) underwent drilling and bone grafting of the lesion, and 2 patients (3 tibias) with completed fractures or multiple refractory stress fractures underwent intramedullary nailing. Clinical union was achieved at a mean of 6 weeks and radiographic union at 5.1 months. Return to full dance activity was at an average of 6.5 months postoperatively. Surgical intervention for tibial stress fractures in dancers who have not responded to nonoperative management allowed for resolution of symptoms and return to dancing with minimal morbidity.

  18. Management of closed tibial plateau fractures with percutaneous cancellous screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial plateau fractures, intra-articular in nature and caused by high-velocity trauma, constitute approximately 1% of all fractures. Primary goal in the management of proximal tibial articular fracture aims for a stable, congruous, pain-free, mobile joint. Objective: To study the technique, results, and complications of percutaneous cancellous screw fixation for tibial plateau fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three men and seven women aged 18-65 years (mean = 36.8 years underwent closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation for closed tibial plateau fractures with <5 mm depression. According to the Schatzker classification, patients were grouped as type I (n = 18, type II (n = 4, type III (n = 0, type IV (n = 8, type V (n = 2, and type VI (n = 1. Closed reduction was achieved by manual ligamentotaxis technique under image intensifier control and fixed percutaneously with two cancellous screws (6.5 mm with or without washers in a parallel fashion. Results: Functional outcome was evaluated using the Mason Hohl evaluation system. A total score of 19-24 was considered as excellent, 13-18 as good, 7-12 as fair, and <6 as poor. Outcomes were excellent in 10 patients, good in 15, fair in 4, and poor in 1 patient. Patients were allowed partial weight bearing with walker after 1 month and full weight bearing after radiological union in approximately 3-4 months. The mean period of hospital stay was 5 (range 2-15 days. All the fractures united radiologically after a mean of 3 (range 2.5- 5 months. Patients were evaluated at a mean of 3 years after injury. No patient had any complication like infection, wound dehiscence, or hardware problem. Conclusion: Percutaneous cancellous screw fixation for closed tibial plateau fractures is minimally invasive. It reduces hospital stay and cost, enables early mobilization with minimal instrumentation, and achieves satisfactory outcomes.

  19. Quantitative analysis of scintigraphic findings in tibial stress fractures in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Martínez, Alejandro; Seiler, Gabriela; Mai, Wilfried; Bolt, David M; Mudge, Margaret; Dukti, Sarah A; Hubert, Jeremy D

    2008-07-01

    To develop a quantitative method of interpreting tibial scintigrams of Thoroughbred racehorses with tibial stress fractures that may facilitate diagnosis of fractures and to provide prognostic information regarding future performance of affected horses. 35 Thoroughbred racehorses. Static bone-phase scintigrams of tibial stress fractures were quantitatively analyzed by use of ratios of the mean radionuclide counts per pixel in a region of interest (ROI) drawn around the area of increased uptake of radiopharmaceutical to mean counts per pixel in a second ROI drawn around an apparently normal area of the tibial diaphysis. In horses with unilateral fractures, ratios for the contralateral tibia were determined by use of 2 ROIs drawn at the same positions as the ROIs in the fractured tibia. Ratios were compared between fractured versus apparently normal tibias, between horses that returned to racing versus those that did not, and among horses with various grades of lameness. The association between ratios for fractured tibias and intervals between diagnosis and return to racing was also assessed. Mean ratio of ROIs in apparently normal tibias was 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.50); that in tibias with stress fractures was 3.55 (95% CI, 2.50 to 4.60). These ratios were significantly different. None of the associations between ratios for fractured tibias and grades of lameness or performance outcomes were significant. Tibial stress fracture scintigrams can be quantitatively analyzed. A prospective study with a controlled rehabilitation period is necessary to evaluate the possible applications of this method.

  20. Effects of directly autotransplanted tibial bone marrow aspirates on bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Michael; Lohberger, Birgit; Strunk, Dirk; Reich, Karoline M; Acham, Stephan; Jakse, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the pilot trial was to evaluate applicability and effects of directly autotransplanted tibial bone marrow (BM) aspirates on the incorporation of porous bovine bone mineral in a sinus lift model and on the osseointegration of dental implants. Six edentulous patients with bilaterally severely resorbed maxillae requiring sinus augmentation and implant treatment were included. During surgery, tibial BM was harvested and added to bone substitute material (Bio-Oss(®) ) at the randomly selected test site. At control sites, augmentation was performed with Bio-Oss(®) alone. The cellular content of each BM aspirate was checked for multipotency and surface antigen expression as quality control. Histomorphometric analysis of biopsies from the augmented sites after 3 and 6 months (during implantation) was used to evaluate effects on bone regeneration. Osseointegration of implants was evaluated with Periotest(®) and radiographic means. Multipotent cellular content in tibial BM aspirates was comparable to that in punctures from the iliac crest. No significant difference in amount of new bone formation and the integration of bone substitute particles was detected histomorphometrically. Periotest(®) values and radiographs showed successful osseointegration of inserted implants at all sites. Directly autotransplanted tibial BM aspirates did not show beneficial regenerative effects in the small study population (N = 6) of the present pilot trial. However, the proximal tibia proved to be a potential donor site for small quantities of BM. Future trials should clarify whether concentration of tibial BM aspirates could effect higher regenerative potency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Management of open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Boltuc

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The work presents the assessment of the results of treatment of open tibial shaft fractures in polytrauma patients. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 28 patients who underwent surgical treatment of open fractures of the tibial shaft with locked intramedullary nailing. The mean age of the patients was 43 years (range from 19 to 64 years. The criterion for including the patients in the study was concomitant multiple trauma. For the assessment of open tibial fractures, Gustilo classification was used. The most common concomitant multiple trauma included craniocerebral injuries, which were diagnosed in 12 patients. In 14 patients, the surgery was performed within 24 h after the injury. In 14 patients, the surgery was delayed and was performed 8-10 days after the trauma. Results: The assessment of the results at 12 months after the surgery included the following features: time span between the trauma and the surgery and complications in the form of osteomyelitis and delayed union. The efficacy of gait, muscular atrophy, edema of the operated limb and possible disturbances of its axis were also taken under consideration. In patients operated emergently within 24 h after the injury, infected nonunion was observed in three (10.8% males. These patients had grade III open fractures of the tibial shaft according to Gustilo classification. No infectious complications were observed in patients who underwent a delayed operation. Conclusion: Evaluation of patients with open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma showed that delayed intramedullary nailing performed 8-10 days after the trauma, resulted in good outcome and avoided development of delayed union and infected nonunion. This approach gives time for stabilization of general condition of the patient and identification of pathogens from wound culture.

  2. [Analysis of risk factors of infection for complex tibial plateau fractures after operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ju-Lei; Xu, Yun-Qin; Shen, Tu-Gang; Li, Qiang

    2017-10-25

    To analyze the risk factor of infection for complex tibial plateau fractures after operation. Totally clinical data of 293 patients with complex tibial plateau fractures underwent open reduction and internal fixation were retrospectively analyzed from September 2010 to March 2015, including 199 males and 94 females, ranging in age from 17 to 80 years old with an average of 47.3 years old. The possible risk factors such as gender, age, smoking, diabetes, type of fracture(open/closed), classification of open fracture(Gustilo-Anderson classification), classification of soft tissue injury in closed fracture (Tscherne-Gotzen classification), fracture classification(Schatzker V/VI), osteofascial compartment syndrome, ASA score, anesthesia, timing of surgery, operative time(150 min), surgical approach, combined approach or not, internal fixation site were studied. The multivariate Logistic regression model was used to analyze the risk factors. Twelve patients were infected of all 293 patients after operation, the infection rate was 4.10%. Univariate analysis showed that fracture type(χ ² =14.496, P =0.001), fracture classification(χ²=4.560, P =0.033), osteofascial compartment syndrome(χ²=15.631, P =0.001), operative time(χ²=11.233, P =0.001) were correlated with complex tibial plateau fractures postoperative infection. Multivariate analysis showed that open fractures(χ²=9.696, P =0.002) and osteofascial compartment syndrome(χ²=9.119, P =0.003) were complex tibial plateau fracture risk factors for infection after operation. Open fractures and osteofascial compartment syndrome are risk factor of complex tibial plateau fracture for infection after operation. While through debridement for open fracture patients, early diagnosis and promt treatment for osteofascial compartment syndrome could reduce incidence of infection.

  3. Evaluation of cranial tibial and extensor carpi radialis reflexes before and after anesthetic block in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudury, Eduardo Alberto; de Figueiredo, Marcella Luiz; Fernandes, Thaiza Helena Tavares; Araújo, Bruno Martins; Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Silva, Amanda Camilo; Santos, Cássia Regina Oliveira; Rocha, Nadyne Lorrayne Farias Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to test the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats before and after anesthetic block of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, respectively, to determine whether they depend on a myotatic reflex arc. Methods Fifty-five cats with a normal neurologic examination that were referred for elective gonadectomy were divided into group 1 (29 cats) for testing the extensor carpi radialis reflex, and group 2 (26 cats) for testing the cranial tibial reflex. In group 1, the extensor carpi radialis reflex was tested after anesthetic induction and 15 mins after brachial plexus block with lidocaine. In group 2, the cranial tibial, withdrawal and patellar reflexes were elicited in 52 hindlimbs and retested 15 mins after epidural anesthesia. Results In group 1, before the anesthetic block, 55.17% of the cats had a decreased and 44.83% had a normal extensor carpi radialis reflex. After the block, 68.96% showed a decreased and 27.59% a normal reflex. No cat had an increased or absent reflex before anesthetic block. In group 2, prior to the anesthetic block, 15.38% of the cats had a decreased cranial tibial reflex and 84.62% had a normal response, whereas after the block it was decreased in 26.92% and normal in 73.08% of the cats. None of the cats had an increased or absent reflex. Regarding the presence of both reflexes before and after anesthetic block, there was no significant difference at 1% ( P = 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats are not strictly myotatic reflexes, as they are independent of the reflex arc, and may be idiomuscular responses. Therefore, they are not reliable for neurologic examination in this species.

  4. Role of the fibula in the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures fixed by intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, John G; Daly, Charles J; Harty, James A; Dailey, Hannah L

    2016-10-01

    For tibial fractures, the decision to fix a concomitant fibular fracture is undertaken on a case-by-case basis. To aid in this clinical decision-making process, we investigated whether loss of integrity of the fibula significantly destabilises midshaft tibial fractures, whether fixation of the fibula restores stability to the tibia, and whether removal of the fibula and interosseous membrane for expediency in biomechanical testing significantly influences tibial interfragmentary mechanics. Tibia/fibula pairs were harvested from six cadaveric donors with the interosseous membrane intact. A tibial osteotomy fracture was fixed by reamed intramedullary (IM) nailing. Axial, torsion, bending, and shear tests were completed for four models of fibular involvement: intact fibula, osteotomy fracture, fibular plating, and resected fibula and interosseous membrane. Overall construct stiffness decreased slightly with fibular osteotomy compared to intact bone, but this change was not statistically significant. Under low loads, the influence of the fibula on construct stability was only statistically significant in torsion (large effect size). Fibular plating stiffened the construct slightly, but this change was not statistically significant compared to the fibular osteotomy case. Complete resection of the fibula and interosseous membrane significantly decreased construct torsional stiffness only (large effect size). These results suggest that fixation of the fibula may not contribute significantly to the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures and should not be undertaken unless otherwise clinically indicated. For testing purposes, load-sharing through the interosseous membrane contributes significantly to overall construct mechanics, especially in torsion, and we recommend preservation of these structures when possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictive radiographic markers for concomitant ipsilateral ankle injuries in tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottel, Patrick C; Berkes, Marschall B; Little, Milton T M; Lazaro, Lionel E; Nguyen, Joseph T; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2014-02-01

    To quantify the radiographic tibia and fibula shaft fracture characteristics that are associated with a concomitant ipsilateral ankle injury. Retrospective case-control study. Academic level I trauma center. Seventy-one adult patients with an operatively treated tibial shaft fracture met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were categorized according to tibia and fibula fracture pattern, location and spatial relationship to each other. Preoperative computed tomographic scans were then evaluated to assess for the presence of an articular ankle injury. (1) incidence of concomitant tibial shaft fracture and ipsilateral ankle injury; and (2) statistical association between tibia and fibula fracture characteristics in patients with and without an ipsilateral ankle fracture. Thirty-five of 71 (49.3%) tibial shaft fracture patients had a concomitant ipsilateral ankle injury. Of these, 31 (88.6%) ankle injuries occurred in patients with a spiral pattern tibia fracture of the distal third diaphysis (P fracture, a distal one-third tibial shaft fracture location, or a spiral pattern fibula fracture all were significantly associated with the presence of an ipsilateral ankle injury (P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.001; and P = 0.002, respectively). Patients with either a transverse pattern or absent fibula fracture, a nonspiral pattern tibia fracture, or a midshaft diaphyseal tibia fracture location were significantly less likely to have an associated ankle injury (P ≤ 0.001; P ≤ 0.001; and P = 0.012, respectively). Ipsilateral ankle fractures are commonly associated with tibial shaft fractures, specifically distal one-third spiral type injuries. Recognition of an associated ankle injury is important as it can alter operative and postoperative management. Clinical studies are needed to examine patient outcomes with or without ipsilateral ankle injury to determine the clinical significance of this entity. Prognostic level IV. See instructions for authors for a

  6. An intact fibula may contribute to allow early weight bearing in surgically treated tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Ion; Gelber, Pablo Eduardo; Chary, Gaetan; Gomez Masdeu, Mireia; González Ballester, Miguel A; Monllau, Juan Carlos; Noailly, Jerome

    2018-03-01

    The role of the proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) in tibial plateau fractures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess, with finite-element (FE) calculations, differences in interfragmentary movement (IFM) in a split fracture of lateral tibial plateau, with and without intact fibula. It was hypothesized that an intact fibula could positively contribute to the mechanical stabilization of surgically reduced lateral tibial plateau fractures. A split fracture of the lateral tibial plateau was recreated in an FE model of a human tibia. A three-dimensional FE model geometry of a human femur-tibia system was obtained from the VAKHUM project database, and was built from CT images from a subject with normal bone morphologies and normal alignment. The mesh of the tibia was reconverted into a geometry of NURBS surfaces. The fracture was reproduced using geometrical data from patient radiographs, and two models were created: one with intact fibula and other without fibula. A locking screw plate and cannulated screw systems were modelled to virtually reduce the fracture, and 80 kg static body weight was simulated. Under mechanical loads, the maximum interfragmentary movement achieved with the fibula was about 30% lower than without fibula, with both the cannulated screws and the locking plate. When the locking plate model was loaded, intact fibula contributed to lateromedial forces on the fractured fragments, which would be clinically translated into increased normal compression forces in the fractured plane. The intact fibula also reduced the mediolateral forces with the cannulated screws, contributing to stability of the construct. This FE model showed that an intact fibula contributes to the mechanical stability of the lateral tibial plateau. In combination with a locking plate fixation, early weight bearing may be allowed without significant IFM, contributing to an early clinical and functional recovery of the patient.

  7. Reamed interlocking intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures and aseptic nonunions. Can we expect an optimum result?

    OpenAIRE

    Chalidis, Byron E.; Petsatodis, George E.; Sachinis, Nick C.; Dimitriou, Christos G.; Christodoulou, Anastasios G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for reaming and the number of locking screws to be used in intramedullary (IM) tibial nailing of acute fractures as well as routine bone grafting of tibial aseptic nonunions have not been clearly defined. We describe the results of reamed interlocked IM nails in 233 patients with 247 tibial fractures (190 closed, 27 open and 30 nonunions). Ninety-six percent of the fractures were united at review after an average of 4.9?years. No correlation was found between union and nail diameter ...

  8. Cystic degeneration of the tibial nerve. Magnetic resonance neurography and sonography appearances of an intraneural ganglion cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio Silveira, Claudio Regis [Sao Carlos Imaging/Sao Carlos Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging Division, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Maia Vieira, Clarissa Gadelha; Machado Pereira, Brenda [Sao Carlos Imaging/Sao Carlos Hospital, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pinto Neto, Luiz Holanda [Articular Clinic, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern, Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Extra- and intraneural ganglion cysts have been described in the literature. The tibial nerve ganglion is uncommon and its occurrence without intra-articular extension is atypical. The pathogenesis of cystic degeneration localized to connective and perineural tissue secondary to chronic mechanical irritation or idiopathic mucoid degeneration is hypothesized. Since the above pathology is extremely rare and the magnetic resonance imaging examination detects the defining characteristics of the intrinsic alterations of the tibial nerve, the authors illustrate such a case of tibial intaneural ganglion cyst with its magnetic resonance neurography and sonography appearances. (orig.)

  9. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  10. Avaliação do ângulo de inclinação tibial e altura patelar após osteotomia tibial de abertura medial Assessment of tibial slope angle and patellar height after medial-opening tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan de Paula Mozella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Mensurar a variação do ângulo de inclinação tibial posterior e da altura patelar em pacientes submetidos à osteotomia valgizante tibial proximal com técnica de cunha de abertura medial. MÉTODOS: Foram analisadas radiografias panorâmicas de membros inferiores em anteroposterior e perfil do joelho pré e pós-operatórias de 46 pacientes com artrose unicompartimental do joelho, em que se realizou osteotomia tibial. RESULTADOS: Em 23 casos, utilizou-se fixador externo para confecção de cunha de abertura medial gradual e nos outros 23, foi utilizada placa bloqueada com batente como método de fixação. Foram excluídos deste estudo aqueles pacientes com doença tricompartimental do joelho e aqueles submetidos à osteotomias para tratamento de sequelas de fraturas. Após a cirurgia, a inclinação tibial proximal aumentou, em média, 1,7 graus (p OBJECTIVE: To measure the variation in posterior tibial slope angle and patellar height in patients who underwent proximal tibial valgus-producing osteotomy using the medial-opening wedge technique. METHODS: Anteroposterior panoramic radiographs of the lower limbs and lateral radiographs of the knee obtained before and after tibial valgus-producing osteotomy on 46 patients with unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee were analyzed. RESULTS: In 23 patients, an external fixator was used to gradually apply a medial-opening wedge; and in the other 23, a blocked plate with a stop bar was applied as a fixation method. Patients with tricompartmental knee disease and those who underwent osteotomy to treat fracture sequelae were excluded from this study. After surgery, the mean increase in the tibial slope was 1.7 degrees (p < 0.01 in the group in which the blocked plate with a stop bar was used; and 2.7 degrees (p < 0.05 in the group in which the external fixator was used. There was no statistical difference between the groups regarding the increase in the posterior tibial slope. CONCLUSION: The

  11. Peak stresses shift from femoral tunnel aperture to tibial tunnel aperture in lateral tibial tunnel ACL reconstructions: a 3D graft-bending angle measurement and finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Bracht, Hans; Tampere, Thomas; Beekman, Pieter; Schepens, Alexander; Devriendt, Wouter; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of tibial tunnel orientation on graft-bending angle and stress distribution in the ACL graft. Eight cadaveric knees were scanned in extension, 45°, 90°, and full flexion. 3D reconstructions with anatomically placed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts were constructed with Mimics 14.12 ® . 3D graft-bending angles were measured for classic medial tibial tunnels (MTT) and lateral tibial tunnels (LTT) with different drill-guide angles (DGA) (45°, 55°, 65°, and 75°). A pivot shift was performed on 1 knee in a finite-element analysis. The peak stresses in the graft were calculated for eight different tibial tunnel orientations. In a classic anatomical ACL repair, the largest graft-bending angle and peak stresses are seen at the femoral tunnel aperture. The use of a different DGA at the tibial side does not change the graft-bending angle at the femoral side or magnitude of peak stresses significantly. When using LTT, the largest graft-bending angles and peak stresses are seen at the tibial tunnel aperture. In a classic anatomical ACL repair, peak stresses in the ACL graft are found at the femoral tunnel aperture. When an LTT is used, peak stresses are similar compared to classic ACL repairs, but the location of the peak stress will shift from the femoral tunnel aperture towards the tibial tunnel aperture. the risk of graft rupture is similar for both MTTs and LTTs, but the location of graft rupture changes from the femoral tunnel aperture towards the tibial tunnel aperture, respectively. I.

  12. Osteochondral lesion of lateral tibial plateau with extrusion of lateral meniscus treated with retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation and arthroscopic centralisation

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    Jae-Sung An

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: A combination of retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation and arthroscopic centralisation can be a good option to treat the osteochondral lesion of the tibial plateau caused by extrusion of the meniscus.

  13. The effect of polyethylene creep on tibial insert locking screw loosening and back-out in prosthetic knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-10-01

    A prosthetic knee joint typically comprises a cobalt-chromium femoral component that articulates with a polyethylene tibial insert. A locking screw may be used to prevent micromotion and dislodgement of the tibial insert from the tibial tray. Screw loosening and back-out have been reported, but the mechanism that causes screw loosening is currently not well understood. In this paper, we experimentally evaluate the effect of polyethylene creep on the preload of the locking screw. We find that the preload decreases significantly as a result of polyethylene creep, which reduces the torque required to loosen the locking screw. The torque applied to the tibial insert due to internal/external rotation within the knee joint during gait could thus drive locking screw loosening and back-out. The results are very similar for different types of polyethylene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Huys, Maxime; Pariat, Jacques; Roubineau, François; Flouzat Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Dubory, Arnaud

    2018-02-01

    There is no information comparing the results of fixed-bearing total knee replacement and mobile-bearing total knee replacement in the same patients previously treated by high tibial osteotomy. The purpose was therefore to compare fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee replacements in patients treated with previous high tibial osteotomy. We compared the results of 57 patients with osteoarthritis who had received a fixed-bearing prosthesis after high tibial osteotomy with the results of 41 matched patients who had received a rotating platform after high tibial osteotomy. The match was made for length of follow-up period. The mean follow-up was 17 years (range, 15-20 years). The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically. The pre-operative knee scores had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. So was the case with the intra-operative releases, blood loss, thromboembolic complications and infection rates in either group. There was significant improvement in both groups of knees, and no significant difference was observed between the groups (i.e., fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing knees) for the mean Knee Society knee clinical score (95 and 92 points, respectively), or the Knee Society knee functional score (82 and 83 points, respectively) at the latest follow-up. However, the mean post-operative knee motion was higher for the fixed-bearing group (117° versus 110°). In the fixed-bearing group, one knee was revised because of periprosthetic fracture. In the rotating platform mobile-bearing group, one knee was revised because of aseptic loosening of the tibial component. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship for revision at ten years of follow-up was 95.2% for the fixed bearing prosthesis and 91.1% for the rotating platform mobile-bearing prosthesis. Although we did manage to detect significant differences mainly in clinical and radiographic results between the two groups, we found no superiority or inferiority of the mobile

  15. Size correlation between the tibial anterior cruciate ligament footprint and the tibia plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Ryu, Keinosuke; Aizawa, Shin; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to reveal the correlation between the size of the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint and the size of the tibia plateau. Twenty-four non-paired human cadaver knees were used. All soft tissues around the knee were resected except the ACL. The ACL was cut in the middle, and the femoral bone was cut at the most proximal point of the femoral notch. The ACL was carefully dissected, and the periphery of the ACL insertion site was outlined on both the femoral and tibial sides. An accurate lateral view of the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau was photographed with a digital camera, and the images were downloaded to a personal computer. The size of the femoral and tibial ACL footprints, and anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML), lengths of the tibia plateau and area of tibia plateau were measured with Image J software (National Institution of Health). The sizes of the native femoral and tibial ACL footprints were 72.3 ± 24.4 and 134.1 ± 32.4 mm(2), respectively. The AP lengths of the whole, medial and lateral facet of the tibia plateau were as follows: 44.5 ± 4.1, 40.8 ± 4.1 and 36.8 ± 4 mm, respectively. The ML length of the tibia plateau was 68.3 ± 5.5 mm. Total area of tibia plateau was 2,282.9 ± 378.7 mm(2). The AP length of the lateral facet of the tibia plateau (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.508, p = 0.011) and the total area of tibia plateau (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.442, p = 0.031) were significantly correlated with the size of the tibial ACL footprint. For clinical relevance, the AP length of lateral facet of the tibia plateau and total area of tibia plateau are significantly correlated with the size of the tibial ACL footprint. It might be possible to predict the size of the ACL measuring these parameters.

  16. Posterior Tibial Slope Angle Correlates With Peak Sagittal and Frontal Plane Knee Joint Loading During Robotic Simulations of Athletic Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Nesbitt, Rebecca J.; Shearn, Jason T.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Tibial slope angle is a nonmodifiable risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the mechanical role of varying tibial slopes during athletic tasks has yet to be clinically quantified. Purpose To examine the influence of posterior tibial slope on knee joint loading during controlled, in vitro simulation of the knee joint articulations during athletic tasks. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods A 6 degree of freedom robotic manipulator positionally maneuvered cadaveric knee joints from 12 unique specimens with varying tibial slopes (range, −7.7° to 7.7°) through drop vertical jump and sidestep cutting tasks that were derived from 3-dimensional in vivo motion recordings. Internal knee joint torques and forces were recorded throughout simulation and were linearly correlated with tibial slope. Results The mean (6SD) posterior tibial slope angle was 2.2° ± 4.3° in the lateral compartment and 2.3° ± 3.3° in the medial compartment. For simulated drop vertical jumps, lateral compartment tibial slope angle expressed moderate, direct correlations with peak internally generated knee adduction (r = 0.60–0.65), flexion (r = 0.64–0.66), lateral (r = 0.57–0.69), and external rotation torques (r = 0.47–0.72) as well as inverse correlations with peak abduction (r = −0.42 to −0.61) and internal rotation torques (r = −0.39 to −0.79). Only frontal plane torques were correlated during sidestep cutting simulations. For simulated drop vertical jumps, medial compartment tibial slope angle expressed moderate, direct correlations with peak internally generated knee flexion torque (r = 0.64–0.69) and lateral knee force (r = 0.55–0.74) as well as inverse correlations with peak external torque (r = −0.34 to 20.67) and medial knee force (r = −0.58 to −0.59). These moderate correlations were also present during simulated sidestep cutting. Conclusion The investigation supported the theory that increased posterior

  17. The relationship between anterior tibial shear force during a jump landing task and quadriceps and hamstring strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Douglas R; Blackburn, J Troy; Boling, Michelle C; McGrath, Melanie; Walusz, Hollie; Padua, Darin A

    2008-11-01

    Eccentric quadriceps contraction during landing and the resulting anterior tibial shear force are anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors, while hamstring contraction limits anterior cruciate ligament loading. Anterior tibial shear force is derived from quadriceps and hamstring co-contraction, and a greater quadriceps/hamstring strength ratio has been associated with heightened lower extremity injury risk. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate relationships between anterior tibial shear force during landing and quadriceps and hamstring strength. Anterior tibial shear force was calculated during a jump landing task in 26 healthy females. Isokinetic eccentric quadriceps strength and concentric hamstrings strength were assessed at 60 degrees /s, 180 degrees /s, and 300 degrees /s. Correlational analyses were conducted to evaluate relationships between lower extremity strength and anterior tibial shear force. Quadriceps (r=0.126 to 0.302, P>0.05) and hamstrings strength (r=-0.019 to 0.058, P>0.05) and the quadriceps/hamstring ratio (r=0.036 to 0.127, P>0.05) were not significant predictors of anterior tibial shear force. Quadriceps and hamstring strength are not indicative of sagittal-plane knee loading during landing. Contractile force resulting from maximal strength testing may not represent that produced during landing, as it is unlikely that landing requires maximal effort. Additionally, peak anterior tibial shear force, quadriceps torque, and hamstrings torque are generated at different points in the knee flexion/extension range of motion. Therefore, peak anterior tibial shear force is a function of the available strength at a given point in the range of motion rather than of peak strength. These findings illustrate the limitations of peak strength values in predicting dynamic loading during landing.

  18. Bases anatomoradiológicas de los abordajes quirúrgicos para fracturas posteriores de la meseta tibial

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Ruiz, Ramón; Ramos Soto, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Las fracturas de la meseta tibial en cirugía ortopédica son una de las más complejas en abordaje y planificación. El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar un estudio anatomoradiológico de las relaciones anatómicas entre las estructuras de la meseta tibial posterior con el fin de sugerir modificaciones en los abordajes actuales que disminuyan el daño iatrogénico. Grado en Medicina

  19. Technique tip: use of anterior cruciate ligament jig for hindfoot fusion by calcanio-talo-tibial nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Syed; Sarkar, Jay

    2012-08-01

    The use of intramedullary nail fixation for tibio-talo-calcaneal fusion is gaining popularity. There is chance of failure of procedure following faulty operative technique specially alignment. The article describes a useful application of tibial tunnel jig in inserting the calcanio-talo-tibial guide wire. There is precision of few millimeters in the exit point of guide wire on talus. The authors believe that this helps in better positioning of nail and hence better alignment and better operative outcome.

  20. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan A Ramasubbu; Benjamin M Ramasubbu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in th...

  1. Is cementing technique the cause of early aseptic loosening of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty? A report of 22 failed tibial components

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    Stefan Endres

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite excellent results of bicondylar knee resurfacing when both the tibial and femoral components are cemented, loosening of the cemented tibial component (surface cementing occurs in approximately 10% of the implants within a 4-year interval after the procedure. Based on our own experience, we want to report of early failed tibial components in 22 patients after a mean follow up of 51 months, necessitating a revision procedure. We analysed retrospectively 22 cases of failed tibial components in patients after a mean follow up of 51 months, necessitating a revision procedure. This raised the question of whether the cementing technique was implicated in the loosening. Every correlation between early loosening and clinically relevant covariates were investigated. All patients were evaluated for radiolucency and osteolytic lesions at the bone–cement interfaces by radiographic assessment according to Rossi et al. (a.p. view and lateral view divided into two zones. The mean radiographic cement penetration in anterior-posterior view was 1.2 mm (SD 0.8 in zone 1 and 1.6 mm (SD 0.9 in zone 2. The mean radiographic cement penetration in lateral view was 1.1 mm (SD 0.4 in zone 1 and 1.3 mm (SD 0.3 in zone 2. Osteolytic lesions were seen in all cases around the implant after a mean of 51 months. In all cases a revision procedure was done. Based on clinical presentation, haematological screening, joint aspiration (synovial fluid diagnostic, microbiological analyses and histological evaluation of intraoperative samples an infection was excluded. The authors have a critical attitude toward a loosening rate of almost 10% as stated by the recent literature within the first 4 to 5 years and consider that a reduction of the loosening rate when using the full cementation technique /cementing the stem will mean a greater benefit for patients than the possible advantage of a better bone stock in case of revision surgery. Apart from this aspect, the question of

  2. Systematic review shows lowered risk of nonunion after reamed nailing in patients with closed tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S W; Teraa, M; Leenen, L P H; van der Heijden, G J M G

    2010-07-01

    Nonunion after intramedullary nailing (IMN) in patients with tibial shaft fractures occurs up to 16%. There is no agreement whether reaming prior to IMN insertion would reduce the nonunion rate. We aimed to compare the nonunion rate between reamed and unreamed IMN in patients with tibial shaft fractures. A systematic search was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. The selected publications were: (1) randomised controlled trials; (2) comparing the nonunion rate; (3) in patients with tibial shaft fractures; (4) treated with either reamed or unreamed IMN. Seven studies that satisfied the criteria were identified. They showed that reamed IMN led to reduction of nonunion rate compared to unreamed IMN in closed tibial shaft fractures (risk difference ranging 7.0-20%, number needed to treat ranging 5-14), while the difference between compared treatments for open tibial shaft fractures was not clinically relevant. The evidence showed a consistent trend of reduced nonunion rate in closed tibial shaft fracture treated with reamed compared to unreamed IMN. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Increase in the Tibial Slope Reduces Wear after Medial Unicompartmental Fixed-Bearing Arthroplasty of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Weber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee in patients with isolated medial osteoarthritis gives good results, but survival is inferior to that of total knee prosthesis. Knees may fail because positioning of the prosthesis has been suboptimal. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the tibial slope on the rate of wear of a medial fixed-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. We simulated wear on a medial fixed-bearing unicompartmental knee prosthesis (Univation in vitro with a customised, four-station, and servohydraulic knee wear simulator, which exactly reproduced the walking cycle (International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO 14243-1:2002(E. The medial prostheses were inserted with 3 different posterior tibial slopes: 0°, 4°, and 8° (n = 3 in each group. Results. The wear rate decreased significantly between 0° and 4° slope from 10.4 (SD 0.62 mg/million cycles to 3.22 (SD 1.71 mg/million cycles. Increasing the tibial slope to 8° did not significantly change the wear rate. Discussion. As an increase in the tibial slope reduced the wear rate in a fixed-bearing prosthesis, a higher tibial slope should be recommended. However, other factors that are influenced by the tibial slope (e.g., the tension of the ligament must also be considered.

  4. [A cadaveric study of relationships among rotational alignment reference axes of distal femur and tibial mechanical axis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bao-hui; Chen, Bai-cheng; Shao, De-cheng; Wang, Fei; Gao, Shi-jun; Lu, Bo

    2008-07-15

    To investigate the relationships among rotational alignment reference axes of distal femur and tibial mechanical axis, and determine the safest rotational alignment reference axis. Digital photos were taken of 30 cadaveric lower extremities with knee in extension and flexion at 90 degrees , angles were measured among tibial mechanical axis and a line perpendicular to clinical epicondylar axis, a line perpendicular to surgical epicondylar axis, Whiteside's line and femoral mechanical axis. Statistical analysis of relationships among those axes were performed. The angles among the tibial mechanical axis and a line perpendicular to the clinical epicondylar axis, a line perpendicular to the surgical epicondylar axis, Whiteside's line and femoral mechanical axis were 0.6 degrees varus, 3.9 degrees varus, 0.2 degrees valgus and 3.0 degrees varus respectively. The angle between the femoral mechanical axis and the tibial mechanical axis was significantly larger than the angles among the tibial mechanical axis and a line perpendicular to the clinical epicondylar axis, the Whiteside's line (P axis and the tibial mechanical axis. Angles of the clinical epicondylar axis, the surgical epicondylar axis and the Whiteside's line between knee extension and flexion were 2.3 degrees valgus, 0.9 degrees varus and 3.1 degrees valgus respectively. The surgical epicondylar axis rather than the clinical epicondylar axis or the Whiteside's line is the safest femoral rotational alignment reference axis intraoperatively.

  5. Posterolateral Corner Injury Associated with a Schatzker Type 2 Tibial Plateau Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris A. Zelle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated posterolateral corner (PLC injuries are rarely seen with tibial plateau fractures and can be missed during the initial assessment. The objective of this paper is to present a case of a Schatzker type 2 tibial plateau fracture with associated isolated PLC injury and give a discussion on physical exam, diagnostic studies, and treatment options. A twenty-five-year-old female sustained a concomitant Schatzker type 2 fracture and PLC injury. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed an isolated PLC disruption. Open reduction-internal fixation was performed with subsequent PLC repair. At sixteen months postoperatively, the patient had full range of motion and strength of her knee and no signs of laxity. This case emphasizes the importance of physical exam and appropriate imaging modalities in order to diagnose and treat this significant injury in a prompt fashion. In this case, surgical fracture fixation and subsequent repair of the PLC provided a good clinical outcome.

  6. Effectiveness of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wall LL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Liesbeth L de Wall, John PFA Heesakkers Department of Urology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB is a common condition affecting adults and children worldwide, resulting in a substantial economic and psychological burden. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS is derived from acupuncture used in Chinese traditional medicine and was first described in the early 1980s. It is a neuromodulation technique used to modulate bladder function and facilitate storage. Being a minimally invasive, easily applicable, but time-consuming treatment, future developments with implantable devices might be the solution for the logistical problems and economic burden associated with PTNS on the long term. This nonsystematic review provides a current overview on PTNS and its effectiveness in the treatment of OAB for both adults and children. Keywords: overactive bladder, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, neuromodulation, electrical stimulation 

  7. Arthroscopic Reduction and Fixation of Tibial Spine Avulsion Fractures by a Stainless Steel Wiring Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed M; Bayoumy, Maysara Abdelhalim; Elkady, Hesham A; Abdelkawi, Ayman Farouk

    2017-12-01

    Several techniques of arthroscopic treatment of tibial spine avulsion fractures have been described in the literature. These techniques include the use of various fixation devices such as screws, K-wires, wiring, sutures, and suture anchors. In this study, we evaluate a new wiring technique for the treatment of these injuries. This technique involves fixation by stainless steel tension wires passed over the fractured spine and tied over a bone bridge. The advantages of this technique are that it aids in reduction, allows for compression of the tibial spine fragment anatomically in its fracture bed, provides stable fixation in difficult comminuted fractures, and allows for early mobilization and weight bearing because of the solid fixation.

  8. Pedicled Instep Flap and Tibial Nerve Reconstruction in a Cynomolgus Monkey [Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Weiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male cynomolgus monkey experienced extensive soft tissue trauma to the right caudal calf area. Some weeks after complete healing of the original wounds, the monkey developed a chronic pressure sore on plantar surface of the heel of its right foot. A loss of sensitivity in the sole of the foot was hypothesized. The skin defect was closed by a medial sensate pedicled instep flap followed by counter transplantation of a full thickness graft from the interdigital webspace. The integrity of the tibial nerve was revised and reconstructed by means of the turnover flap technique. Both procedures were successful. This is an uncommon case in an exotic veterinary patient as it demonstrates a reconstructive skin flap procedure for the treatment of a chronic, denervated wound in combination with the successful reconstruction of 2.5 cm gap in the tibial nerve.

  9. Age variations in the properties of human tibial trabecular bone and cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2000-01-01

    is parallel to the longitudinal loading axis of the tibia. The mechanical properties of the normal cartilage and bone vary with age and respond simultaneously to mechanical loading. Both cartilage and bone in early-stage OA are mechanically inferior to normal, and OA cartilage and bone have lost their unit......Initiated and motivated by clinical and scientific problems such as age-related bone fracture, prosthetic loosening, bone remodeling, and degenerative bone diseases, much significant research on the properties of trabecular bone has been carried out over the last two decades. This work has mainly...... focused on the central vertebral trabecular bone, while little is known about age-related changes in the properties of human peripheral (tibial) trabecular bone. Knowledge of the properties of peripheral (tibial) trabecular bone is of major importance for the understanding of degenerative diseases...

  10. Plate fixation versus conservative treatment of tibial shaft fractures. A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, W; Larsson, K

    1979-09-01

    One hundred consecutive patients with displaced fractures of the tibial shaft were randomly assigned to two groups, one treated with AO-plate fixation and the other with conservative methods. Strictly conservative treatment failed in two patients because of the interposition of muscles. Comparison of the groups showed that a longer duration of hospital stay was needed in the AO-plate group, and there were also more complications in that group. However, the median healing time was shorter and the anatomical end results were better than in the conservatively treated patients. Closed longitudinal fractures were found to be suitable and open fractures, unsuitable for AO-plate fixation. In the group that was treated conservatively most fractures that healed in malalignment were located in the distal third of the tibial shaft.

  11. The fibular reciprocal fracture in tibial shaft fractures caused by indirect violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böstman, O; Hänninen, A

    1982-01-01

    A series of 200 consecutive junctional middle-distal third tibial shaft fractures caused by indirect violence was analysed with emphasis on the significance of the location of the fibular reciprocal fracture. The fibular fracture was eccentric, i.e. subcapital or malleolar, in 96 patients. This fracture pattern was encountered only in adults and showed significantly more severe initial displacement and with conservative treatment longer union time than fractures with intact fibula or the fibular fracture on the same level with the tibial fracture. Especially for fractures with an initial lateral displacement of more than one half of the diaphyseal diameter and with an eccentric fibular reciprocal fracture internal fixation with uncomplicated postoperative course shortened the union time and prevented residual deformity. A malleolar fibular fracture and the rare separate displaced posterior triangle fracture should in addition as such be regarded as indications for osteosynthesis.

  12. Partial resection of fibula in treatment of ununited tibial shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Mohd Farooq

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In management of fracture of both tibia and fibula, intact fibula may delay union of tibial fractures. Method : Twenty five cases of ununited fractures of tibia were managed between 1997 and 2004, by partial fibulectomy done after 20 weeks after fracture and a POP cast given for 4 weeks which was changed to a PTB cast and weight bearing encouraged at the earliest. Result : All fractures united at an average time of 14 weeks (range 6 to 20 weeks after partial fibulectomy with acceptable alignment in coronal and sagittal planes. There was no neurovascular complication, limitation of joint motion or problem at the osteotomy site. Conclusion : Partial fibulectomy is a viable option in the management of tibial delayed and non-union.

  13. The treatment of avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmat, P; Vichard, P; Pem, R

    1990-05-01

    Avulsion fractures of the tibial tuberosity occur mainly during sport activities and are closely related to the strains exerted on the anterior tibial tuberosity by the extension complex of the thigh. A knowledge of the mechanical aspects of these avulsions may improve understanding of the mechanisms of such injuries. In such avulsion fractures, tensile forces due to the contraction of the quadriceps complex overcome the cohesive forces within the apophyseal cartilage. A 1-month cast immobilisation on an extended knee gives good results in the management of nondisplaced fractures. In minor displacements, such immobilisations follow closed external reductions. Open reductions and stable screw fixations precede a 3-week immobilisation for displaced fractures. Long term results are regularly good in well-managed cases.

  14. Bilateral tibial stress fracture in a young man due to hypercalciuric osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofluoglu, Demet; Ofluoglu, Onder; Akyuz, Gulseren

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is commonly thought of as a disease of postmenopausal women, and older men have a lower risk of fracture than women. A stress fracture is an overuse injury and an important cause of disability in the athletic population. Presented here is a 30-year-old healthy man with pain on the anterior surface of the bilateral tibia. He did not communicate any trauma or overuse activity. The neurologic and locomotor system examinations were normal. Radiological examinations revealed tibial stress fractures in both left and right tibia and he had low bone mineral density. Routine hematological tests, bone resorption and formation markers were normal, except for hypercalciuria. After analyzing the results of these tests, the patient was diagnosed with bilateral tibial stress fractures due to hypercalciuric secondary osteoporosis. Osteoporosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atraumatic insufficiency fractures, especially in young healthy adults.

  15. Comparison of Outcomes of Operatively Treated Bicondylar Tibial Plateau Fractures by External Fixation and Internal Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CC Chan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated with either external fixation (35 patients or internal fixation (24 patients was reviewed. Outcome measures included the Rasmussen score, clinical complications, development of osteoarthritis and the requirement for total knee replacement (TKR. Twenty-two (92% anatomical reductions were achieved in the internal fixation group compared to 27 (77% in the external fixation group. Infective complications were more common in the external fixation group (9 patients, 26% due to pin tract infection. There were no deep infections in the internal fixation group. The mean Rasmussen score was not significantly different (mean score 32 in external fixation and 29 in internal fixation between the two groups and the incidence of osteoarthritis was the same in both groups. Four patients in the external fixation group underwent a TKR compared to 5 patients in the internal fixation group. Bicondylar tibial plateau fractures have similar outcomes following external or internal fixation.

  16. An experimental approach to determining fatigue crack size in polyethylene tibial inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, Carly A; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2016-02-01

    A major limiting factor to the longevity of prosthetic knee joints is fatigue crack damage of the polyethylene tibial insert. Existing methods to quantify fatigue crack damage have several shortcomings, including limited resolution, destructive testing approach, and high cost. We propose an alternative fatigue crack damage visualization and measurement method that addresses the shortcomings of existing methods. This new method is based on trans-illumination and differs from previously described methods in its ability to non-destructively measure subsurface fatigue crack damage while using a simple and cost-effective bench-top set-up. We have evaluated this method to measure fatigue crack damage in two tibial inserts. This new method improves on existing image-based techniques due to its usability for subsurface damage measurement and its decreased reliance on subjective damage identification and measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Bilateral stress fracture of the mid-tibial shaft in a professional dancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčovčík, L; Tomčovčíková, A

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures of the anterior cortex of the mid-tibial shaft in dancers are rare, with a 1.4 % incidence in injured eli- te dancers. Treatment can be difficult and long-lasting and can seriously influence the dancer's career. The authors pre- sent the case of a 26-year-old professional dancer of a folk dance ensemble who suffered rare simultaneous bilateral mid-tibial shaft stress fractures. A conservative method of treatment with avoiding exercise and dancing activities resulted in the resolution of symptoms and healing of the fractures after 6 months. The patient finished his dancing career because of the necessity of a prolonged therapy interfering with his dancing activities. Current options of the treatment are also presented.

  18. Ipsilateral distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyseal growth plate injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabi, Deniz; Erdem, Mehmet; Bulut, Guven; Avci, Cem Coskun; Asci, Murat

    2013-05-31

    Both the isolated distal femoral epiphysiolysis and the isolated proximal tibial epiphysiolysis are the least common epiphyseal injuries. Even though they are uncommon, they have a high incidence rate of complications. We present a case with Gustilo-Anderson grade 3b open and Salter-Harris type 1 epiphysiolysis of the distal femur and proximal tibia caused by a farm machinery accident. The patient was a 10-year-old boy, treated by open reduction and internal fixation. Although distal femoral and proximal tibial growth plate injuries are rarely seen benign fractures, their management requires meticulous care. Anatomic reduction is important, especially to minimize the risk of growth arrest and the development of degenerative arthritis. However, there is a high incidence of growth arrest and neurovascular injury with these type of fractures.

  19. Treatment of low-energy tibial shaft fractures: plaster cast compared with intramedullary nailing

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, J.A.K.; Honkonen, S.E.; Koivisto, A.-M.; Järvinen, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed data from 87 patients who had displaced closed or open grade I simple or spiral wedge tibial shaft fractures caused by low-energy impact. Fifty-four patients were treated with plaster cast and 33 with intramedullary locking nail (IMLN). Delayed union only occurred in 8 patients after plaster cast treatment. Forty-two patients in the IMLN group and one in the plaster cast group suffered from anterior knee pain. Final treatment outcome, healing time, hospitalization time and duratio...

  20. Study of Ender’s Nailing in Paediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu G. Ladani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Closed reduction & plaster is standard and effective form of treatment in majority of paediatric tibial shaft fractures. Operative intervention is necessary in unstable fractures, open fractures, poly trauma patients and compartment syndrome or severe soft tissue compromise. Historically, external fixation and plating were the treatment options available, but having complications like infection, overgrowth and refracture. Reamed locked intramedullary nails pose unnecessary risk to the proximal tibial growth plate. Flexible intramedullary nailing in long bone fractures in children has gained wide spread popularity because of its clinical effectiveness & low risk of complications. Methodology: This is a study of 15 patients of unstable tibial shaft fractures in children treated with Ender’s nailing. 12 were closed & 3 were open grade I fractures with only punctured wounds. Age was ranging from 7 to 16 yrs. There were 8 middle third, one upper third and 6 distal third shaft tibia fractures. In all patients 3.5 Ender’s nails were used, two nails in 11 patients and three nails in 4 patients there was no post-operative wound infection. Average operative time was 40 minutes and average blood loss was 35 cc. Results: Average union time was 9 wks. All fractures united without 2nd operative intervention. In 2 patients there was some proximal migration of nails causing some knee irritation. In all patients implant removed 6 to 7 months after surgery. At final follow-up there were full knee & ankle movements. 2 patients had more than 50 malalignment in A-P or M-L plane. No rotational deformity, no limb length discrepancy or physical arrest. Conclusion: Ender’s nailing is an effective method of treatment in these cases, which allows rapid healing of tibial shaft fractures with an acceptable rate of complications. There is short learning curve with this treatment and implants are inexpensive.

  1. Anterior Knee Pain after Tibial Intra-medullary Nailing: Is it Predictable?

    OpenAIRE

    Soraganvi, PC; Anand-Kumar, BS; Rajagopalakrishnan, R; Praveen-Kumar, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intramedullary nailing has been used frequently for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures. Chronic anterior knee pain has been considered the most frequent post-operative complication of this technique. We investigated the relationship between anterior knee pain and position of nail tip in proximal tibia. Methods: 103 patients were selected among patients who underwent interlocking nailing in our institution. Patients with other factors that might ...

  2. Mechanical Failure of Revision Knee Prosthesis at both Femoral and Tibial Modular Metaphyseal Stem Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Woodgate, Ian G; Rooney, John; Mulford, Johnathan S; Gillies, R Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is a report of a mechanical failure of an S-ROM revision total knee prosthesis. The prosthesis was used as a revision implant following deep peri-prosthetic infection in a morbidly obese male. The prosthesis failed on both the femoral and tibial sides at the modular metaphyseal stem junctions and required a further revision using the same type of implant after infection was excluded. Case Presentation: A 57 year old male had previously undergone a left total knee arthroplas...

  3. CORRELATION BETWEEN PRONATED FOOT AND PELVIC INCLINATION, FEMORAL ANTEVERSION, QUADRICEPS ANGLE AND TIBIAL TORSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishita Gandhi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pronated foot can produce changes in the lower limb kinetic chain. This can affect the gait and increase energy expenditure. However, the relationship between pronated foot and other static alignment factors remains poorly understood. Hence, the objective was to correlate pronated foot with pelvic inclination, femoral anteversion, Q-angle and tibial torsion. Method: An observational study was performed on 60 subjects in the age group of 18-30 years with a BMI of not more than 30. Foot Posture Index was performed on the subjects, and people with a score of +6 or more were selected. Pelvic inclination, femoral anteversion, Q-angle and tibial torsion were measured. Correlation between the Foot Posture Index score and the above four static alignment factors was done using Graph Pad Prism 7 (Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results: There was no significant correlation between Pronated foot and Pelvic inclination (r-value = 0.03309, p-value = 0.8018, Pronated foot and Femoral anteversion (r-value = 0.2185, p-value = 0.0934 Pronated foot and Q-angle (r-value = 0.1801, p-value = 0.1685, Pronated foot and Tibial torsion (r- value = -0.1285, p-value = 0.3277. Conclusion: There is no significant correlation between foot pronation and pelvic inclination, femoral anteversion, Q-angle and tibial torsion. However, the correlation between these factors cannot be completely ignored, and thus, further studies and literature are required to prove the same.

  4. Closed Tibial shaft fractures treated with the Ilizarov method: A ten year case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan David; Paavana, Thumri; McGregor-Riley, Jonathan; Royston, Simon

    2017-07-01

    To review the outcomes of patients treated with the Ilizarov method for an isolated, closed, simple diaphyseal, Tibial fracture at our institution over the last decade. The Ilizarov frame database was used to identify 76 skeletally mature patients who sustained an isolated, closed, extra-articular, simple, diaphyseal Tibial fracture; the injury also known as a "nail-able Tibial fracture." The average age of the patient was 38 (17-70). All 76 patients progressed to union. The average time until union was 148 (55-398) days. The coronal and sagittal alignment was 3° (0-17°) and 4° (0-14°) respectively. No patient suffered from compartment syndrome. No patient developed septic arthritis. No patient had documented anterior knee pain or secondary knee specialist input post frame removal. On average, there were 9(4-29) follow up appointments and 10(5-26) radiographs post frame application. There is a 59% chance of a patient having a difficulty post frame application. The malunion rate was 5%. Persisting pinsite infection post frame removal occurred in 5 patients (6.5%). Drilling of the pinsite sequestrum resolved the infection in four of these patients, giving a deep infection rate of 1.3%. The Ilizarov method has a role to play in the treatment of simple closed Tibial shaft fractures in patients who need to kneel. Patient education is a priority however; the patient must be made aware of the difficulty rate associated with the Ilizarov method when compared to the complication profile of alternative treatments. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Paediatric tibial shaft fractures treated by open reduction and stabilization with monolateral external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A-L; Apostolou, N; Vidal, C; Ferrero, E; Mazda, K; Ilharreborde, B

    2018-02-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing is increasingly used for surgical treatment of tibial shaft fractures, but frequently requires immobilization and delayed full weight-bearing. Therefore, external fixation remains interesting. The aim was to report clinico-radiological outcomes of monolateral external fixation for displaced and unstable tibial shaft fractures in children. All tibial fractures consecutively treated by monolateral external fixation between 2008 and 2013 were followed. Inclusion criteria included skeletal immaturity and closed and open Gustilo I fractures caused by a direct impact. Patients were seen until two years postoperatively. Demographics, mechanism of injury, surgical data and complications were recorded. Anteroposterior and lateral side radiographs were performed at each visit. Full-limb 3D reconstructions using biplanar stereroradiography was performed for final limb length and alignment measures. A total of 45 patients (mean age 9.7 years ± 0.5) were included. In all, 17 were Gustilo I fractures, with no difference between open and closed fractures for any data. Mean time to full weight bearing was 18.2 days ± 0.7. After 15 days, 39 patients returned to school. Hardware removal (mean time to union 15.6 weeks ± 0.8) was performed during consultation under analgesic gas. There were no cases of nonunion. No fracture healed with > 10° of angulation (mean 5.1° ± 0.4°). Leg-length discrepancy > 10 mm was found for six patients. This procedure can be a safe and simple surgical treatment for children with tibial shaft fractures. Few complications and early return to school were reported, with the limitations of non-comparative study. IV.

  6. External versus internal fixation for bicondylar tibial plateau fractures: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, David; Hickson, Craig J; McKee, Lesley; Griffin, Xavier L

    2015-12-01

    It is uncertain whether external fixation or open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) is optimal for patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. A systematic review using Ovid MEDLINE, Embase Classic, Embase, AMED, the Cochrane Library, Open Grey, Orthopaedic Proceedings, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Current Controlled Trials, US National Institute for Health Trials Registry, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The search was conducted on 3rd October 2014 and no language limits were applied. Inclusion criteria were all clinical study designs comparing external fixation with open reduction internal fixation of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. Studies of only one treatment modality were excluded, as were those that included unicondylar tibial plateau fractures. Treatment effects from studies reporting dichotomous outcomes were summarised using odds ratios. Continuous outcomes were converted to standardized mean differences to assess the treatment effect, and inverse variance methods used to combine data. A fixed effect model was used for meta-analyses. Patients undergoing external fixation were more likely to have returned to preinjury activities by six and twelve months (P = 0.030) but not at 24 months follow-up. However, external fixation was complicated by a greater number of infections (OR 2.59, 95 % CI 1.25-5.36, P = 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of deep infection, venous thromboembolism, compartment syndrome, or need for re-operation between the two groups. Although external fixation and ORIF are associated with different complication profiles, both are acceptable strategies for managing bicondylar tibial plateau fractures.

  7. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; dos Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Dar?, Let?cia Rossi; Rosa, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Methods Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the ani...

  8. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto Junior, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira dos; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Daré, Letícia Rossi; Rosa Junior, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Methods Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the...

  9. A CLINICAL STUDY ON SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF TIBIAL PLATEAU FRACTURES - FUNCTIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tremendous advance in mechanization and fastness of travel have been accompanied by steep increase in number and severity of fractures and those of tibial plateau are no exception. Knee being one of the major weight bearing joints of the body, fractures around it will be of paramount importance. AIM OF STUDY: This study is to analyze the functional outcome of CRIF or ORIF with or without bone grafting in tibial plateau fractures in adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 30 cases of tibial plateau fractures treated by various modalities were studied from 1 - 8 - 2012 to 31 - 1 - 2014 at our institution and followed for a minimum of 6 months. Fractures were evaluated using Modified Rasmussen’s Clinical, Radiological grading system. RESULTS : The selected patients were evaluated thoroughly and after the relevant investigations, were taken for surgery. The fractures were classified as per the SCHATZKER’S types and operated accordingly with CRIF with Percutaneous cannulated cancellous screws, ORIF with buttress plate/LCP with or without bone grafting. Immobilization of fractures continued for 3 weeks by POP slab. Early range of motion was then started. Weight bearing up to 6 - 8 weeks was not allowed. The full weight bearing deferred until 12 weeks or complete fracture union . The knee range of motion was excellent to very good, gait and weight bearing after complete union was satisfactory, knee stiffness in 3 cases , wound dehiscence and infection in 1 case and non - union in none of our cases was noted. CONCLUSION: Functional outcome is better in operatively treated tibial plateau fractures in adults, because it gives excellent anatomical reduction and rigid fixation to restore articular congruity and early motion thereby preventing knee stiffness.

  10. Domed (cupola) tibial osteotomy in the treatment of decompensated arthrosis secondary to genu varum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunti, A; Vicenzi, G; Toni, A; Graci, A; Zanotti, G

    1984-06-01

    Decompensated arthrosis secondary to genu varum is always a severely disabling condition. In English speaking countries there is an increasing trend towards prosthetic replacement surgery, but the present paper aims to show that valgising tibial osteotomy is still a valid form of treatment. The authors also discuss the various techniques that have been used and describe the advantages and results of their own preferred technique of "domed" osteotomy.

  11. Primary neurolymphoma of the tibial nerve: A case report with characteristic MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Eun; An, Ji Young; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Moon, Sung Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Primary neurolymphoma (NL) involving the peripheral nervous system is a rare disease that involves the invasion of a nerve or nerve plexus by neoplastic lymphocytes. Although there have been a few reported clinical and pathological cases presenting as primary NL involving the peripheral nerve, the detailed radiological features of NL have not yet been discussed. In this report, we present a case of primary NL involving the tibial nerve and describe the detailed imaging findings on MRI including features used for differential diagnosis.

  12. Combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments avulsion from the tibial side in adult patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of a 28-year-old male patient, victim of motorcycle crash, with direct impact on the right knee, who sustained a bicruciate ligament fracture avulsion from the tibial side, dislocated and with large dimensions, without associated ligamentary lesions; he has undergone surgical treatment - open reduction and internal fixation, of the avulsions, and the follow up was at least six months, presenting good outcome using the Tegner -Lysholm scale.

  13. Tibial component coverage and rotational alignment accuracy after mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo; Sato, Junko; Ishii, Hana; Todoroki, Koji; Toyabe, Shin-Ichi

    2018-02-10

    Tibial component coverage (TCC) and tibial rotational angle (TRA) have been studied simultaneously in simulations, but not in clinical studies after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate TCC and rotational setting postoperatively in mobile-bearing TKA patients and (2) to compare the results with previously published simulation data. We prospectively examined 100 patients who underwent primary TKA using the LCS ® Total Knee System (LCS) posterior cruciate ligament-substituting prosthesis. Clinical outcomes, TCC (coverage area of the tibial component over the tibia), and TRA (relative to the femoral transepicondylar axis (TEA)) were assessed. Quantitative three-dimensional computed tomography was used to assess TCC and TRA. All values are expressed as median (25th percentile, 75th percentile) using minus (-) for internal and plus (+) for external rotation. Hospital for Special Surgery scores improved from 46 (36, 50) preoperatively to 92 (90, 92) postoperatively. TRA showed a median divergence of - 2.0° (- 4.75°, + 2.74°). All knees were located within 10° of the TEA (range - 10.0° to + 9.7°). The median TCC of the knees was 82.7% (80.6, 84.7%), and there were no knees that hung over the tibial component in any direction. The LCS prosthesis had good clinical outcomes, comparable TCC, and improved TRA as compared to previous reports, as all knees were located within 10° of the TEA. Simultaneous optimization of both TCC and TRA may contribute to the excellent long-term outcomes that have been observed with this system. Level II, Prognostic study.

  14. Contact Kinematics Correlates to Tibial Component Migration Following Single Radius Posterior Stabilized Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Matthew G; Perry, Kevin I; Yuan, Xunhua; Howard, James L; Lanting, Brent A

    2018-03-01

    Contact kinematics between total knee arthroplasty components is thought to affect implant migration; however, the interaction between kinematics and tibial component migration has not been thoroughly examined in a modern implant system. A total of 24 knees from 23 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty with a single radius, posterior stabilized implant were examined. Patients underwent radiostereometric analysis at 2 and 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and 1 and 2 years to measure migration of the tibial component in all planes. At 1 year, patients also had standing radiostereometric analysis examinations acquired in 0°, 20°, 40°, and 60° of flexion, and the location of contact and magnitude of any condylar liftoff was measured for each flexion angle. Regression analysis was performed between kinematic variables and migration at 1 year. The average magnitude of maximum total point motion across all patients was 0.671 ± 0.270 mm at 1 year and 0.608 ± 0.359 mm at 2 years (P = .327). Four implants demonstrated continuous migration of >0.2 mm between the first and second year of implantation. There were correlations between the location of contact and tibial component anterior-posterior tilt, varus-valgus tilt, and anterior-posterior translation. The patients with continuous migration demonstrated atypical kinematics and condylar liftoff in some instances. Kinematics can influence tibial component migration, likely through alterations of force transmission. Abnormal kinematics may play a role in long-term implant loosening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distal tibial interosseous osteochondroma with impending fracture of fibula ? a case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Wani, Iftikhar H; Sharma, Siddhartha; Malik, Farid H; Singh, Manjeet; Shiekh, Irfan; Salaria, Abdul Q

    2009-01-01

    Osteochondromas arising from the interosseous border of the distal tibia and involving distal fibula are uncommon. We present a 16 year old young boy with an impending fracture, erosion and weakness of the distal fibula, secondary to an osteochondroma arising from the distal tibia. Early excision of this deforming distal tibial osteochondroma avoided the future risk of pathological fracture of the distal fibula, ankle deformities and syndesmotic complications.

  16. Articular cartilage lesions of the knee. MRI of tibial condylar fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki

    1995-01-01

    Lesions of the articular cartilage are rarely observed in convensional radiography and CT, and may be one of the most important prognostic factors in assessing traumatic or degenerative disorders at the knee joints. To discuss the usefulness of MRI for detecting cartilage lesions, knees with tibial condylar fractures were examined with MRI. 47 patients with tibial condylar fractures were reviewed 4 months to 15 years (average of 4 years) after the fractures. Good to excellent results were obtained in 91.5% of them. It is known that anatomical reduction of conventional radiography is not consistent with the clinical outcome, because radiography can show the changes of bones only. However, the results of MRI examinations are consistent with the clinical outcome, because they can directly show the state of the articular surface, such as defects of cartilage in the joint. In my study, no abnormality of well repaired joint surfaces employing MRI were observed in the patients with excellent or good results, and various degrees of cartilage lesions were detected using MRI in the other patients. MRI is a useful method for noninvasively determining the integrity of articular cartilage, detecting cartilage lesions and degenerative disorders of tibial condyle, and also may be useful in studying and following the natural aging process in osteoarthritis following intra-articular fractures. (author) 52 refs

  17. Removal of interlocking intramedullary nail for relieve of knee pain after tibial fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaodong; Wu, Xiaotao; Liu, Lei; Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intramedullary nail removal after tibial fracture repair. Sixty patients at our hospital were enrolled in a prospective study and divided into moderate/severe knee pain (visual analog scale (VAS) ≥ 4) and mild/no knee pain (VAS knee and ankle pain, the range of motion of the knee and ankle, and Johner-Wruhs criteria before, 6 weeks after operation, and at the last follow-up. Fifty-seven patients were followed for a mean of 8.4 (2-17) months. In patients with moderate or severe knee pain intramedullary nail removal led to significant pain reductions ( p anterior border of tibia (knee pain. Knee pain VAS scores significantly lowered 6 weeks postoperatively and at the last follow-up, compared to before the operation ( p pain VAS scores, range of motion, and Johner-Wruhs criteria ( p > 0.05). For patients complaining knee pain after interlocking intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures, especially with a short distance from the tip of the nail tail to the tibial plateau (anterior border of the tibia (pain significantly.

  18. Incidence of complications associated with tibial tuberosity advancement in Boxer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Dantas, Brigite; Sul, Rui; Parkin, Tim; Calvo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively review and describe the incidence of complications associated with tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) surgical procedures in a group of Boxer dogs (n = 36 stifles) and compare the data with a non-Boxer control population (n = 271 stifles). Retrospective analysis of medical records to identify all dogs that underwent TTA surgery due to cranial cruciate ligament disease. These records were categorized into two groups: Boxer dogs and non-Boxer dogs (controls - all other breeds). Of the 307 stifles included, 69 complications were reported in 58 joints. The complication rate differed significantly for Boxer dogs (16/36 stifles) and non-Boxer dogs (42/271 stifles), corresponding to an odds ratio of 5.8 (confidence interval: 1.96-17.02; p-value Boxer dogs were more likely to undergo revision surgery and to develop multiple complications. The incidence of tibial tuberosity fractures requiring surgical repair (2/36 versus 1/271) and incisional infections requiring antibiotic treatment (three in each group) was significantly higher in the Boxer group. Boxer dogs had more major and multiple complications after TTA surgery than the control non-Boxer group; these complications included higher rates of revision surgery, tibial tuberosity fractures requiring stabilization, and infection related complications. The pertinence and value of breed-specific recommendations for cranial cruciate ligament disease appears to be a subject worthy of further investigation.

  19. In vitro evaluation of a custom cutting jig and custom plate for canine tibial plateau leveling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Harrysson, Ola L A; Cansizoglu, Omer

    2008-07-01

    To design and manufacture custom titanium bone plates and a custom cutting and drill guide by use of free-form fabrication methods and to compare variables and mechanical properties of 2 canine tibial plateau leveling methods with each other and with historical control values. 10 canine tibial replicas created by rapid prototyping methods. Application time, accuracy of correction of the tibial plateau slope (TPS), presence and magnitude of rotational and angular deformation, and replica axial stiffness for 2 chevron wedge osteotomy (CWO) methods were assessed. One involved use of freehand CWO (FHCWO) and screw hole drilling, whereas the other used jig-guided CWO (JGCWO) and screw hole drilling. Replicas used for FHCWO and JGCWO methods had similar stiffness. Although JGCWO and FHCWO did not weaken the replicas, mean axial stiffness of replicas after JGCWO was higher than after FHCWO. The JGCWO method was faster than the FHCWO method. Mean +/- SD TPS after osteotomy was lower for FHCWO (4.4 +/- 1.1 degrees ) than for JGCWO (9.5 +/- 0.4 degrees ), and JGCWO was more accurate (target TPS, 8.9 degrees ). Slight varus was evident after FHCWO but not after JGCWO. Mean postoperative rotation after JGCWO and FHCWO did not differ from the target value or between methods. The JGCWO method was more accurate and more rapid and resulted in more stability than the FHCWO method. Use of custom drill guides could enhance the speed, accuracy, and stability of corrective osteotomies in dogs.

  20. Construction of finite element model and stress analysis of anterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Yang, Liu; Guo, Lin; Wang, Fuyou; Gou, Jingyue; Deng, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a more realistic finite element (FE) model of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial insertion and to analyze the stress distribution in the ACL internal fibers under load. The ACL tibial insertions were processed histologically. With Photoshop software, digital images taken from the histological slides were collaged, contour lines were drawn, and different gray values were filled based on the structure. The data were exported to Amira software and saved as ".hmascii" file. This document was imported into HyperMesh software. The solid mesh model generated using HyperMesh software was imported into Abaqus software. The material properties were introduced, boundary conditions were set, and load was added to carry out the FE analysis. The stress distribution of the ACL internal fibers was uneven. The lowest stress could be observed in the ACL lateral fibers under tensile and shear load. The establishment of ACL tibial insertion FE model and mechanical analysis could reveal the stress distribution in the ACL internal fibers under load. There was greater load carrying capacity in the ACL lateral fibers which could sustain greater tensile and shear forces.

  1. Tibia-based referencing for standard proximal tibial radiographs during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Choxi, Ankeet A; Dhulipala, Sravan C; Evans, Jason M; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    Limited information exists to define standard tibial radiographs. The purpose of this study was to define new landmarks on the proximal tibia for standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In 10 cadaveric knees, fibular head bisection was considered the anteroposterior image, and femoral condyle overlap the lateral image. In another 10 knees, a "twin peaks" anteroposterior view, showing the sharpest profile of the tibial spines, was used. The "flat plateau" lateral image was obtained by aligning the femoral condyles then applying a varus adjustment with overlap of the tibial plateaus. Medial peritendinous approaches were performed, and an entry reamer used to open the medullary canal. A priori analysis showed good to excellent intra-/inter-observer reliability with the new technique (intra-class correlation coefficient ICC 0.61-0.90). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior radiograph was externally rotated 2.7±2.1° compared to the standard radiograph with fibular head bisection. Portal position and incidence of damage to intra-articular structures did not significantly differ between groups (P>.05). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior view and "flat plateau" lateral view can safely be used for nail entry portal creation in the anatomic safe zone. Tibia-based radiographic referencing is useful for intramedullary nailing cases in which knee or proximal tibiofibular joint anatomy is altered.

  2. Tibial Tubercle in Valgus Osteoarthritic Knees Is More Laterally Positioned Than in Varus Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Kazuhisa; Terauchi, Masanori; Saito, Kenichi; Hagiwara, Keiichi; Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    The tibial tubercle (TT) is the most reliable landmark of the tibial component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. However, there is no report comparing the position of the TT between valgus and varus osteoarthritic knees. Using preoperative computed tomography, we measured the TT-posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) distance representing the degree of lateralization of the TT and the angle between Akagi's anteroposterior (AP) axis and the dorsal condylar line (DCL) of the tibia in 36 valgus and 40 varus osteoarthritic knees and compared them. The mean TT-PCL distances in valgus and varus knees were 26.1 (18.2-36.8) and 17.2 mm (10.3-22.6), respectively, with a significant difference (P 24 mm). The mean AP-DCL angles in valgus and varus knees were 103° (95.8°-114.8°) and 93.2° (85.3°-99.6°), respectively, with a significant difference (P varus knees. Also, Akagi's AP axis in valgus knees was significantly more externally rotated relative to the DCL of the tibia than in varus knees. Attention is necessary to correct rotational alignment without posterolateral overhang of the tibial component during total knee arthroplasty, particularly for valgus knees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduction Osteotomy of the Prominent Tibial Tubercle After Osgood-Schlatter Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagenstert, Geert; Wurm, Markus; Gehmert, Sebastian; Egloff, Christian

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the functional and clinical outcome of a new closing-wedge osteotomy for the prominent tibial tubercle after Osgood-Schlatter disease. Between 2010 and 2014, 7 consecutive adults (mean age, 28.6 years; range, 26-35 years) were treated by closing-wedge reduction osteotomy of a painful tibial tubercle. All patients had prior nonsurgical and surgical treatment. Preoperative and postoperative tubercular prominence, Caton-Deschamps index for patellar height, the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Lysholm Knee Score as well as visual analog scale score and Tegner activity scores were recorded. Mean follow-up after reduction osteotomy was 31.3 months (27-41 months). The bony prominence of the tibial tubercle was significantly reduced (mean 8 mm, P Osgood-Schlatter disease and consecutively improved the outcome in terms of knee pain and function. Thus, we can recommend this procedure in selected patients. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Ankle para-articular tibial fracture. Is osteosynthesis with the unreamed intramedullary nail adequate?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D; Hahn, M P; Laun, R A; Ekkernkamp, A; Muhr, G; Ostermann, P A

    1998-05-01

    In a prospective study, 53 fractures of the distal fifth of the tibia were stabilized by unreamed nailing. Additional involvement of the ankle joint occurred in 18 patients. 50 patients returned for follow-up. In 30 patients tibia and fibula were fractured at the same (distal) level; in 20 patients the fracture of the fibula was located more proximally. In 12 patients the fractures extended into the tibial pilon. Severe soft tissue damage was seen in 24 fractures (18 open, 6 closed). Ninety percent of all fractures healed uneventfully without further surgical intervention after unreamed nailing. In two patients the unreamed nail had to be exchanged for a reamed tibial nail. Bone grafting and secondary dynamization of the nail by removal of a proximal interlocking bolt were performed in one case each. Thirty-one fractures healed in anatomical position. Valgus or varsus angulation of less than 5 degrees occurred in 18 patients. One fracture healed with rotatory angulation of 15 degrees. The highest rate of complications (22%) was seen in patients with distal fractures of the fibula without additional plating (of the fibula). There was no deep infection. Tibial fractures close to the ankle joint can be managed by unreamed nailing. Distal fractures of the fibula should be stabilized by additional plating. Because of the unreamed technique of implantation this procedure can also be used in grade II or III open fractures.

  5. Sex difference in the contribution of GABAB receptors to tibial neuromodulation of bladder overactivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Thomas W; Jiang, Xuewen; Bansal, Utsav; Lamm, Vladimir; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the role of γ-aminobutyric acid subtype B (GABA B ) receptors in tibial and pudendal neuromodulation of bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of dilute (0.5%) acetic acid (AA) in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats. To inhibit bladder overactivity, tibial or pudendal nerve stimulation (TNS or PNS) was applied at 5 Hz and two or four times threshold (T) intensity for inducing toe or anal sphincter twitch. TNS at 2T or 4T intensity significantly ( P 217 ± 18.8 and 221.3 ± 22.3% of control capacity, respectively. CGP52432 (a GABA B receptor antagonist) at intravenous dosages of 0.1-1 mg/kg completely removed the TNS inhibition in female cats but had no effect in male cats. CGP52432 administered intravenously also had no effect on control bladder capacity or the pudendal inhibition of bladder overactivity. These results reveal a sex difference in the role of GABA B receptors in tibial neuromodulation of bladder overactivity in cats and that GABA B receptors are not involved in either pudendal neuromodulation or irritation-induced bladder overactivity. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Accelerated tibial fracture union in the third trimester of pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mudussar A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of accelerated tibial fracture union in the third trimester of pregnancy. This is of particular relevance to orthopaedic surgeons, who must be made aware of the potentially accelerated healing response in pregnancy and the requirement for prompt treatment. Case presentation A 40 year old woman at 34 weeks gestational age sustained a displaced fracture of the tibial shaft. This was initially treated conservatively in plaster with view to intra-medullary nailing postpartum. Following an emergency caesarean section, the patient was able to fully weight bear without pain 4 weeks post injury, indicating clinical union. Radiographs demonstrated radiological union with good alignment and abundant callus formation. Fracture union occurred within 4 weeks, less than half the time expected for a conservatively treated tibial shaft fracture. Conclusion Long bone fractures in pregnancy require clear and precise management plans as fracture healing is potentially accelerated. Non-operative treatment is advisable provided satisfactory alignment of the fracture is achieved.

  7. Transfixation pinning and casting of tibial fractures in calves: five cases (1985-1989).

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jean, G; Clem, M F; DeBowes, R M

    1991-01-01

    Medical records of 5 calves with tibial fractures that were reduced and stabilized by transfixation pinning and casting were reviewed. Multiple Steinmann pins were placed transversely through proximal and distal fracture fragments, and the pin ends were incorporated in fiberglass cast material after fracture reduction. Cast material serves as an external frame to maintain pin position and fracture reduction. Calves were between 2 weeks and 6 months old and weighed between 40 and 180 kg. Three fractures were spiral in configuration and 2 were comminuted. One tibial fracture was open. After surgery, all calves were ambulatory within 24 hours. To improve tarsal flexion and achieve normal stance in 3 calves, cast revision was required on the caudal aspect of the limb. Good radiographic and clinical evidence of stability was observed in 5 to 10 weeks (mean 8 weeks), at which time the pis and cast were removed. Return to normal function was rapid and judged to be excellent at follow-up evaluation 3 to 12 months later. Advantages of transfixation pinning and casting in management of tibial fractures include flexibility in pin positioning, adequate maintenance of reduction, early return to weight-bearing status, joint mobility, and ease of ambulation. The inability to adjust fixation and alignment after cast application is a disadvantage of this technique compared with other external fixators.

  8. Construction of finite element model and stress analysis of anterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Yang, Liu; Guo, Lin; Wang, Fuyou; Gou, Jingyue; Deng, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to develop a more realistic finite element (FE) model of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial insertion and to analyze the stress distribution in the ACL internal fibers under load. Methods: The ACL tibial insertions were processed histologically. With Photoshop software, digital images taken from the histological slides were collaged, contour lines were drawn, and different gray values were filled based on the structure. The data were exported to Amira software and saved as “.hmascii” file. This document was imported into HyperMesh software. The solid mesh model generated using HyperMesh software was imported into Abaqus software. The material properties were introduced, boundary conditions were set, and load was added to carry out the FE analysis. Results: The stress distribution of the ACL internal fibers was uneven. The lowest stress could be observed in the ACL lateral fibers under tensile and shear load. Conclusion: The establishment of ACL tibial insertion FE model and mechanical analysis could reveal the stress distribution in the ACL internal fibers under load. There was greater load carrying capacity in the ACL lateral fibers which could sustain greater tensile and shear forces. PMID:26150858

  9. Comparison of Tibial Intramedullary Nailing Guided by Digital Technology Versus Conventional Method: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Xu, Xian; Li, Xu; Wu, Wei; Cai, Junfeng; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-06-12

    BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to compare clinical effects of intramedullary nailing guided by digital and conventional technologies in treatment of tibial fractures. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-two patients (mean age 43 years, 18 males and 14 females) who were treated for tibial fractures from October 2010 to October 2012 were enrolled. They were sequentially randomized to receive intramedullary nailing guided by either digital technology (digital group, n=16) or conventional technology (conventional group, n=16). The operation time, fluoroscopy times, fracture healing time, distance between the actual and planned insertion point, postoperative lower limb alignment, and functional recovery were recorded for all patients. RESULTS The mean operation time in the digital group was 43.1±6.2 min compared with 48.7±8.3 min for the conventional technology (P=0.039). The fluoroscopy times and distance between the actual and planned insertion point were significantly lower in the digital group than in the conventional group (both Pdigital technology. No difference was found in fracture healing time and good postoperative lower limb alignment between the digital and conventional groups (P=0.083 and P=0.310), as well as the effective rate (100% vs. 87.50%, P=0.144). CONCLUSIONS Intramedullary nailing guided by digital technology has many advantages in treatment of tibial fractures compared to conventional technology, including shorter operation time, reduced fluoroscopy times, and decreased distance between the actual and planned insertion point of the intramedullary nail.

  10. Comparison of outcome of ARIF and ORIF in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Tang, Zhibing; Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Jinlian; Xu, Yaozeng

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether arthroscopically assisted reduction and internal fixation (ARIF) is superior to traditional open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures. Fifty-seven patients with tibial plateau fractures (Schatzker type I-IV) treated by ARIF or ORIF from 2010 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study. All patients received pre-operative radiographs and CT scans. The patients were divided into two groups (ARIF or ORIF). All had a minimum follow-up of 24 months and an average follow-up of 44.4 months. The clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated according to the Rasmussen and KSS scores. There was no significant difference in KSS score or Rasmussen clinical score between the two groups. The average Rasmussen radiographic score was 14.1 (SD 2.4, range 10-18), for the ARIF group and 14.9 (SD 2.3, range 10-18) for the ORIF group (p ARIF. Both ARIF and ORIF yielded satisfactory clinical results for the treatment of Schatzker I-IV tibial plateau fractures. ARIF led to better radiological results than ORIF. Concomitant intra-articular soft tissue lesions are common and can be addressed during ARIF. III.

  11. [Use of the orthofix intramedullary nail in tibial shaft fractures. A review of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Juárez, José Dolores; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Bienvenu, Alfonso Tohen; Encalada Díaz, Melchor Iván; Sheldon, Oscar Dáivila

    2007-01-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are common since they account for 9% of all fractures. Intramedullary nailing is described in the literature as the gold standard for their treatment and the most recent research emphasizes minimum exposure. To present the clinical and radiological course of closed, unreamed intramedullary fixation for tibial shaft fractures in a group of patients seen at Medica Sur Hospital. Twenty-two male patients with a diagnosis of tibial shaft fracture were analyzed retrospectively; mean age was 28 years. In all of them the Orthofix nail was inserted through the patellar tendon, with a closed approach and without reaming the medullary cavity. Twenty patients had closed fractures (90.90%) and 2 patients had open fractures (9.09%). The mean time to starting ambulation with protected weight bearing was two weeks in 18 patients (81.81%); with full weight bearing, six weeks in 13 patients (91%). The mean time to full weight bearing without crutches was 10 weeks in 21 patients (95.45%). Mean radiographic grade III-IV healing time was 16 weeks. Complications were: delayed union in two patients (9.09%), compartmental syndrome, in one patient (4.45%). The Orthofix interlocking intramedullary nail placed with a closed approach provides immediate stability due to the proximal and distal locking. Patient rehabilitation is quicker, with total mobility, providing an early stimulation for callus formation and the added benefit of sparing the endosteal blood supply.

  12. Meta-analysis of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for open tibial fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Open fractures of the tibial diaphysis are usually caused by high-energy trauma and associated with severe bone and soft tissue injury. Reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing are often used for treatment of tibial injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for open tibial fractures (OTF). Methods A meta-analysis was conducted according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration using databases containing the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMbase, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese VIP information, and WanFang Database. Randomized and semi-randomized controlled clinical trials of both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for OTF treatment were analyzed using Reviewer Manager (RevMan5.0) software. Results A total of 695 references were initially identified from the selected databases. However, only four studies were assessed, matching all the eligibility criteria conducted by two independent reviewers. The result showed that there was no statistical difference in healing rate, secondary surgery rate, implant failure rate, osteofascial compartment syndrome, and infection during the postoperative period between reamed and unreamed nails in OTF. Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that there was no statistical difference between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing in clinical treatment of OTF. However, the result of this meta-analysis should be cautiously accepted due to some limitations, and further studies are still needed. PMID:25149501

  13. Surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shishui; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infections and to quantify the contribution of independent risk factors to the probability of developing infection after definitive fixation of tibial plateau fractures in adult patients. A retrospective analysis was performed at a level I trauma center between January 2004 and December 2010. Data were collected from a review of the patient's electronic medical records. A total of 251 consecutive patients (256 cases) were divided into two groups, those with surgical site infections and those without surgical site infections. Preoperative and perioperative variables were compared between these groups, and risk factors were determined by univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Variables analyzed included age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, presence of an open fracture, presence of compartment syndrome, Schatzker classification, polytrauma status, ICU stay, time from injury to surgery, use of temporary external fixation, surgical approach, surgical fixation, operative time, and use of a drain. The overall rate of surgical site infection after ORIF of tibial plateau fractures during the 7 years of this study was 7.8% (20 of 256). The most common causative pathogens was Staphylococcus aureus (n=15, 75%). Independent predictors of surgical site infection identified by multivariate analyses were open tibial plateau fracture (odds ratio=3.9; 95% CI=1.3-11.6; p=0.015) and operative time (odds ratio=2.7; 95% CI=1.6-4.4; psite infection. Both open fracture and operative time are independent risks factors for postoperative infection.

  14. Comparison of three fixations for tibial plateau fractures by biomechanical study and radiographic observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-wei; Liu, Guo-dong; Ou, Shan; Jiang, Xie-yuan; Fei, Jun; Wu, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fixation effects of three fixation devices for tibial plateau fracture (AO/OTA classification 41 A1). Sixteen human cadaver tibial specimens were randomly divided into four groups. An A1 fracture model was established. The fractures were subsequently fixed by axial controlled intramedullary nail, external fixation and steel plate fixation. Each specimen was subjected to axial compression, torsion test and three-point bending test. Then a rat model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of these three fixations by evaluation of callus formation time and healing time. It was found that the axial controlled intramedullary nail group obtained superior biomechanical properties of resistance ability of bending, torsional and axial compressive, compared with external fixation and steel plate group. In animal experiments, the axial controlled intramedullary nail group had a significant shorter callus occurrence and healing time than steel plate and external fixator group. The axial controlled intramedullary nail fixation has a superior biomechanical characteristic and fixation effect for tibial plateau fractures than steel plate and external fixator. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with tibial plateau and femoral condyle insufficiency stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, J.A.; Narvaez, J.; Lama, E.De; Sanchez, A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the association between spontaneous osteonecrosis and insufficiency stress fractures of the knee. To determine whether insufficiency stress fracture is associated with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, we retrospectively reviewed the medical charts and imaging studies of all patients with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, studied by MR imaging, seen in a tertiary hospital over an 8-year period. Four women (age range 66-84 years) presented spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau. One of these patients also presented a concomitant insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle. Radiographs were diagnostic of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle in three cases, and insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was detected in one case. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the diagnosis of both conditions in all four cases. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee may be associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle and the medial tibial plateau. This association provides additional arguments in favor of the traumatic etiology of spontaneous osteonecrosis of knee. (orig.)

  16. Polyurethane resins derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) for tibial crest deviation in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria, P.P.; Padilha Filho, J.G.; Canola, J.C.; Castro, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Medial patellar luxation is one of the most common orthopedic problems in small breeds of dogs and tibial crest deviation is a frequent accompaining anatomical abnormality. For that reason, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavior of castor oil derived polyurethane implants when apllied to experimental defects created on the medial side of the proximal tibia of normal puppies. Twelve dogs were randomly divided in 3 groups of 4 animals and were submitted to the same treatment. Histopathological study was performed respectively at 30 (GI), 60 (GII) and 90 (GIII) days post-surgery. Evaluations methods included clinical assessment, radiology, gross and macroscopic study, tomography and statistical analysis. Clinically, there were no signs of implant rejection. Radiology revealed intense periosteal reaction and new bone formation. On gross examination, there was thickening and lateral deviation of the tibial crest and new bone neoformation. On microscopic examination, there was fibrous tissue around the polyurethane, periosteal proliferation on the medial side of the tibia and no bone proliferation towards the implant. Cat scans reveled lateral deviation of the tibial crest in eleven animals, which was statistically significant (p [pt

  17. Rotational position of femoral and tibial components in TKA using the femoral transepicondylar axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglietti, Paolo; Sensi, Lorenzo; Cuomo, Pierluigi; Ciardullo, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Proper femoral and tibial component rotational positioning in TKA is critical for outcomes. Several rotational landmarks are frequently used with different advantages and limitations. We wondered whether coronal axes in the tibia and femur based on the transepicondylar axis in the femur would correlate with anteroposterior deformity. We obtained computed tomography scans of 100 patients with arthritis before they underwent TKA. We measured the posterior condylar angle on the femoral side and the angle between Akagi's line and perpendicular to the projection of the femoral transepicondylar axis on the tibial side. On the femoral side, we found a linear relationship between the posterior condylar angle and coronal deformity with valgus knees having a larger angle than varus knees, ie, gradual external rotation increased with increased coronal deformity from varus to valgus. On the tibial side, the angle between Akagi's line and the perpendicular line to the femoral transepicondylar axis was on average approximately 0 degrees , but we observed substantial interindividual variability without any relationship to gender or deformity. A preoperative computed tomography scan was a useful, simple, and relatively inexpensive tool to identify relevant anatomy and to adjust rotational positioning. We do not, however, recommend routine use because on the femoral side, we found a relationship between rotational landmarks and coronal deformity.

  18. Metaphyseal locking plate as an external fixator for open tibial fracture: Clinical outcomes and biomechanical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ching-Hou; Wu, Chin-Hsien; Jiang, Jiun-Ru; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Lin, Ting-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of using a metaphyseal locking plate as a definitive external fixator for treating open tibial fractures based on biomechanical experiments and analysis of clinical results. A metaphyseal locking plate was used as an external fixator in 54 open tibial fractures in 52 patients. The mean follow-up was 38 months (range, 20-52 months). Moreover, static axial compression and torsional tests were performed to evaluate the strength of the fixation techniques. The average fracture healing time was 34.5 weeks (range, 12-78 weeks). At 4 weeks postoperatively and at the final follow-up, the average Hospital for Special Surgery knee score was 85 (range, 81-100) and 94 (range, 88-100), respectively, and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 88 (range, 80-100) and 96 (range, 90-100), respectively. Based on the static test result, the axial stiffness was significantly different among groups (p=0.002), whereas the torsional stiffness showed no significant difference (p=0.068). Clinical outcomes show that the use of locking plate as a definitive external fixator is an alternative choice for tibial fractures after obtaining appropriate fracture reduction. However, external locked plating constructs were not as strong as standard locked plating constructs. Therefore, the use of external locked plating constructs as a definitive treatment warrants further biomechanical study for construct strength improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. SYNOVIAL CYST IN THE PROJECTION OF TIBIAL TUNNEL AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION (CASE REPORT

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    V. B. Bogatov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ACL  tears  are the  most  widespread  lesions  among  isolated  trauma  of knee  ligaments  that  require  early  surgical treatment especially in young active patients. There  are various ACL reconstruction techniques where femur and tibia tunnels are formed and graft is fixed by cannulated interference screws. One of the possible complications is the formation of a postoperative soft tissue cyst in the projection of tibial tunnel.  The nature  as well as mechanism of cyst formation  is still unclear.A relevant  clinical case of cyst formation  in a patient five years after ACL grating  is described  in this publication. MRI findings demonstrated that  the origin of the cyst was hole of the tibial interference screw.Conclusion. The authors  observed that  synovial cyst was formed due to use of cannulated interference screws where synovial  fluid was leaking  from joint  cavity  through screw holes. Cystectomy and  autografting of tibial  bone tunnel allowed to reduce such complication.

  20. Subjective and novel objective radiographic evaluation of inflatable bone tamp treatment of articular calcaneus, tibial plateau, tibial pilon and distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiney, Jake P; Redfern, Roberta E; Wanjiku, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    There is a growing need to develop tools that allow for better reductions of difficult to treat fractures in minimally disruptive ways. One such technique has been developed using the inflatable bone tamp and a fast setting calcium phosphate. KYPHON(®) XPANDER Inflatable Bone Tamp and the KYPHON(®) Osteo Introducer(®) System were used to reduce the articular fractures and a fast-setting calcium phosphate was introduced into those voids and metal hardware was applied as deemed necessary. Subjects were skeletally mature patients treated for articular fractures of the calcaneus, tibial plateau, tibial pilon, or distal radius. Post-operative day zero and week 12 radiographs were objectively and subjectively evaluated by three independent orthopaedic surgeons. Their objective scores were then translated into subjective categories based on the Heiney-Redfern scaled scoring (H-R score) system established herein. Overall, the thorough radiographic analysis by independent reviewers indicates that the technique is capable of obtaining and maintaining articular reductions in a good or adequate manner at 12-weeks post-operatively. Introduced is a potential novel evaluation scale scoring system for these articular fractures that evaluates the important anatomic considerations reproducibly in fracture reductions. There are many potential benefits that remain speculative to this type of tool within a procedure, and therefore this tool and technique warrants further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Handling of the tibial muscle envelope in tibial plateau levelling osteotomy - to elevate or not? A clinical study of 40 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Pfeil, D J F; Edwards, M R; Nelson, N C

    2013-01-01

    To compare the outcome of the tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) procedure, using a 6-hole 3.5 mm locking TPLO plate and performed with the muscle elevation technique (ET) and placement of sponges, to the TPLO without performing these steps (non-elevation-technique [NET]). Medical records and radiographs of dogs with ET (n = 21) or NET (n = 19) were retrospectively reviewed. Signalment, TPLO procedure side, meniscal treatment, surgery time, haemorrhage, pre- and postoperative tibial plateau angle, assistant, amount of rehabilitation, bone healing (cortical, osteotomy, combined healing scores), complications, limb function, recovery time and follow-up were recorded and analysed using multivariate analysis. A value of p dogs suffered severe haemorrhage. The bone healing scores with the NET and the ET were not significantly different (p = 0.1, p = 0.2, p = 0.1). Complications were rare, minor and not significantly different between groups (p = 0.73). The results of this in vivo study indicate that NET is a feasible technique that can be considered for the clinical setting.

  2. The use of a robotic tibial rotation device and an electromagnetic tracking system to accurately reproduce the clinical dial test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, S K; Siebold, R; Freedberg, H; Jacobs, C; Branch, T P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine whether a robotic tibial rotation device and an electromagnetic tracking system could accurately reproduce the clinical dial test at 30° of knee flexion; (2) compare rotation data captured at the footplates of the robotic device to tibial rotation data measured using an electromagnetic sensor on the proximal tibia. Thirty-two unilateral ACL-reconstructed patients were examined using a robotic tibial rotation device that mimicked the dial test. The data reported in this study is only from the healthy legs of these patients. Torque was applied through footplates and was measured using servomotors. Lower leg motion was measured at the foot using the motors. Tibial motion was also measured through an electromagnetic tracking system and a sensor on the proximal tibia. Load-deformation curves representing rotational motion of the foot and tibia were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Off-axis motions including medial-lateral translation and anterior-posterior translation were also measured using the electromagnetic system. The robotic device and electromagnetic system were able to provide axial rotation data and translational data for the tibia during the dial test. Motion measured at the foot was not correlated to motion of the tibial tubercle in internal rotation or in external rotation. The position of the tibial tubercle was 26.9° ± 11.6° more internally rotated than the foot at torque 0 Nm. Medial-lateral translation and anterior-posterior translation were combined to show the path of the tubercle in the coronal plane during tibial rotation. The information captured during a manual dial test includes both rotation of the tibia and proximal tibia translation. All of this information can be captured using a robotic tibial axial rotation device with an electromagnetic tracking system. The pathway of the tibial tubercle during tibial axial rotation can provide additional information about knee

  3. Anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing using a medial paratendinous approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Si Young; Chang, Ho Geun; Byun, Jae Chul; Kim, Tae Young

    2012-03-01

    To determine the incidence, severity, and etiology of anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary (IM) nailing using a medial paratendinous approach and to investigate the association between anterior knee pain and functional impairment. Retrospective study with current clinical and radiographic assessments. Level I trauma center. Forty-five patients with unilateral, tibial diaphyseal fractures treated with tibial IM nailing between August 2005 and January 2009. The mean follow-up was 22.3 months (range, 12-52 months). All patients underwent tibial IM nailing using a medial paratendinous approach. Anterior knee pain based on a visual analog scale and functional outcomes based on the Tegner activity score and the modified Lysholm score. Of the 45 patients, 16 (36%) were painless (N group), 16 (36%) had mild pain (M group), and 13 (28%) had moderate to severe pain (MS group). No group differences were found with respect to age, sex, body mass index, mode of injury, or type of fracture. With regard to nail prominence, superior nail prominence was greater in the MS group than in the other two groups (P = 0.042). There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of anterior nail prominence (P = 0.221). The nail-apex distance in the MS group was significantly greater than in the other two groups (P = 0.033), and no significant difference was found between the N and M groups. The descending order of the activities with respect to severity of knee pain was kneeling, squatting, running, and stair ascending. Visual analog scale analysis revealed that the MS group had significantly more severe pain for all eight activities examined than the M group. At latest follow-up, the Tegner activity score was significantly lower in the MS group than in the other two groups (P = 0.008), and there were statistically significant intergroup differences in the modified Lysholm score (P Anterior knee pain after tibial IM nailing using a medial paratendinous approach

  4. Arthroscopic guided biopsy and radiofrequency thermoablation of a benign neoplasm of the tibial spines area: a treatment option

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    Zoccali Carmine

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lesions located in the area of the tibial spines are rare. In most cases, treatment follows histological diagnosis, but when imaging and clinical data are considered to be "very" characteristic for benign lesions, such as chondroblastoma or osteoid osteoma, treatment may be performed without biopsy. Traditional curettage requires opening the joint, which presents a high risk of contamination of the joint itself and surrounding structures, such as the popliteal area, with possible contamination of the neurovascular bundle when performing curettage with the posterior approach. In this case, the re-excision of a local recurrence would be extremely difficult. Results We describe a technique using arthroscopic guidance for radiofrequency thermoablation of a benign lesion in the tibial spines area. We report on an illustrative case. The patient so treated, reported immediate relief from the pain, and after two weeks, was free of pain. The biopsy performed before the treatment confirmed the radiological diagnosis of chondroblastoma. At one year of follow-up, the patient is without pain, with a 0-130°range of motion, has no activity limitations and is apparently free of disease. Conclusion This technique allows a radiofrequency thermoablation of a lesion in the tibial spines area and in the posterior tibial surface to be performed without opening the joint, monitoring the tibial plateau surface, probably decreasing the risk of cartilage damage. Unfortunately, in the case presented, the high pressure from the arthroscopy's pump broke the tibial plateau surface creating a communication to the tibial tunnel used for thermoablation.

  5. Retrograde Tibial Nailing: a minimally invasive and biomechanically superior alternative to angle-stable plate osteosynthesis in distal tibia fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, antegrade intramedullary nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) represent the main surgical alternatives in distal tibial fractures. However, neither choice is optimal for all bony and soft tissue injuries. The Retrograde Tibial Nail (RTN) is a small-caliber prototype implant, which is introduced through a 2-cm-long incision at the tip of the medial malleolus with stab incisions sufficient for interlocking. During this project, we investigated the feasibility of retrograde tibial nailing in a cadaver model and conducted biomechanical testing. Methods Anatomical implantations of the RTN were carried out in AO/OTA 43 A1-3 fracture types in three cadaveric lower limbs. Biomechanical testing was conducted in an AO/OTA 43 A3 fracture model for extra-axial compression, torsion, and destructive extra-axial compression. Sixteen composite tibiae were used to compare the RTN against an angle-stable plate osteosynthesis (Medial Distal Tibial Plate, Synthes®). Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t test. Results Retrograde intramedullary nailing is feasible in simple fracture types by closed manual reduction and percutaneous reduction forceps, while in highly comminuted fractures, the use of a large distractor can aid the reduction. Biomechanical testing shows a statistically superior stability (p nail meets the requirements of maximum soft tissue protection by a minimally invasive surgical approach with the ability of secure fracture fixation by multiple locking options. Retrograde tibial nailing with the RTN is a promising concept in the treatment of distal tibia fractures. PMID:24886667

  6. Reamed interlocking intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures and aseptic nonunions. Can we expect an optimum result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalidis, Byron E; Petsatodis, George E; Sachinis, Nick C; Dimitriou, Christos G; Christodoulou, Anastasios G

    2009-10-01

    The need for reaming and the number of locking screws to be used in intramedullary (IM) tibial nailing of acute fractures as well as routine bone grafting of tibial aseptic nonunions have not been clearly defined. We describe the results of reamed interlocked IM nails in 233 patients with 247 tibial fractures (190 closed, 27 open and 30 nonunions). Ninety-six percent of the fractures were united at review after an average of 4.9 years. No correlation was found between union and nail diameter (P = 0.501) or the number of locking screws used (P = 0.287). Nail dynamization was effective in 82% of fractures. Locking screw(s) breakage was associated with nonunion in 25% of cases. Bone grafting during IM nailing was found not to increase the healing rate in tibial nonunions (P = 0.623). None of the IM nails were removed or revised due to infection. A dropped hallux and postoperative compartment syndrome were found in 0.8 and 1.6% of cases, respectively. Anterior knee pain was reported in 42% of patients but nail removal did not alleviate the symptoms in almost half. This series confirms the place of reamed intramedullary nailing for the vast majority of tibial diaphyseal fractures. It provides an optimum outcome and minimizes the need for supplementary bone grafting in aseptic nonunions.

  7. Can a tibial tunnel in ACL surgery be placed anatomically without impinging on the femoral notch? A risk factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, H; Bellemans, J; Victor, J; Verhelst, L; Page, B; Verdonk, P

    2014-02-01

    To analyze anatomical risk factors and surgical technique dependent variables, which determine the risk for femoral notch impingement in anatomically correct placed tibial tunnels for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Twenty fresh frozen adult human knee specimens under the age of 65 years were used. Digital templates mimicking a tibial tunnel aperture at the tibia plateau were designed for different tibial tunnel diameters and different drill-guide angles. The centres of these templates were placed over the geometric centre of the native tibial ACL footprint. The distances between the anterior borders of the templates and the anterior borders of the footprints (graft free zone) were measured and compared. Furthermore, anatomic risk factors for femoral notch impingement were determined. The graft free zone was statistically significantly longer for larger drill-guide angles compared to smaller drill-guide angles (p footprint (p footprint and surgery-related factors. Therefore, in anatomical tibial tunnel placement in single bundle ACL reconstruction surgery, particular attention should be paid to size of the tunnel and drill-guide angle to minimize the risk of femoral notch impingement.

  8. The flexion-extension axis of the knee and its relationship to the rotational orientation of the tibial plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Charles M; Noble, Philip C; Ismaily, Sabir K; Stal, Drew; Incavo, Steve J

    2011-09-01

    We measured the optimal rotational alignment of the tibial component with respect to anatomic landmarks. Kinematic data were collected from functional maneuvers simulated in 20 cadaveric knees mounted in a joint simulator. The axis of knee motion was calculated for squatting and lunging activities over the interval of 30° to 90° of knee flexion. We then examined the accuracy and variability of 5 different anatomic axes in predicting the direction of knee motion. No one landmark guaranteed correct alignment of the tibial component and most predictors were highly variable (range, 6°-21°). The most accurate indicators were the medial third of the tibial tubercle (average error: squatting: 3.5° external rotation; lunging: 9.5°), and the medial-lateral axis of the resected tibial surface (6.7° and 1.1° internal rotation). The correct alignment of the tibial component can be best achieved by splitting the difference between these landmarks to eliminate placement of the component in excessive external and excessive internal rotation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Early weight bearing versus delayed weight bearing in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdaal, Joris Radboud; Mouton, Tanguy; Wascher, Daniel Charles; Demey, Guillaume; Lustig, Sebastien; Neyret, Philippe; Servien, Elvire

    2017-12-01

    The need for a period of non-weight bearing after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy remains controversial. It is hypothesized that immediate weight bearing after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy would have no difference in functional scores at one year compared to delayed weight bearing. Fifty patients, median age 54 years (range 40-65), with medial compartment osteoarthritis, underwent a medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy utilizing a locking plate without bone grafting. Patients were randomized into an Immediate or a Delayed (2 months) weight bearing group. All patients were assessed at one-year follow-up and the two groups compared. The primary outcome measure was the IKS score. Secondary outcome measures included the IKDC score, the VAS pain score and rate of complications. The functional scores significantly improved in both groups. The IKS score increased from 142 ± 31 to 171 ± 26 in the Immediate group (p bearing after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy had no effect on functional scores at 1 year follow-up and did not significantly increase the complication rate. Immediate weight bearing after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy appears to be safe and can allow some patients a quicker return to activities of daily living and a decreased convalescence period. II.

  10. Tibial plato leveling osteotomy / Osteotomia de nivelamento do plato da tíbia

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    Julia Maria Matera

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO is a relatively new and innovative surgical treatment for the cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the canine species. The real intent of the procedure is to provide functional stability to the stifle joint by eliminating or neutralizing the cranial tibial thrust during weight bearing instead to restore the cranial cruciate ligament function. The proposal of this study is to report a review of the TPLO procedure, emphasizing procedure, surgical technique, post operative care and complications. The TPLO procedure consists in a radial osteotomy in the tibial plato and rotation of the caudal plateau in order to obtain a desired angle. After the leveling of the tibial plateau, a bone plate and screws are used to stabilize the osteotomy until bone is healed up. The complications that have been associated with the procedure include tibial tuberosity fracture and patellar tendon tendinosis. This procedure has become increasingly more popular for surgical treatment of cranial cruciate ligament injuries in large breed dog. The long term clinical results have not been completely elucidated yet. It has been showed that this technique doesn’t halt the degenerative joint disease.A osteotomia do platô da tíbia (TPLO é um tratamento relativamente novo e inovador para a ruptura do ligamento cruzado cranial (RLCC na espécie canina. Ao invés de restaurar a função do ligamento, o procedimento promove estabilidade funcional para a articulação do joelho, por eliminar ou neutralizar a força tibial cranial durante a sustentação de peso. A proposta do presente estudo é revisar a técnica de TPLO, enfatizando o procedimento, técnica cirúrgica, cuidados pós-operatórios e complicações. A técnica da TPLO consiste na realização de uma osteotomia circular do platô da tíbia com rotação de sua porção caudal até a obtenção do ângulo desejado. Após o nivelamento do platô da tíbia, placa e parafusos

  11. Combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems in TKA reduces postoperative outliers of rotational alignment of the tibial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Shota; Akamatsu, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Kusayama, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Ken; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2018-02-01

    Rotational malpositioning of the tibial component can lead to poor functional outcome in TKA. Although various surgical techniques have been proposed, precise rotational placement of the tibial component was difficult to accomplish even with the use of a navigation system. The purpose of this study is to assess whether combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems replicate accurately the rotational alignment of tibial component that was preoperatively planned on CT, compared with the conventional method. We compared the number of outliers for rotational alignment of the tibial component using combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems (navigated group) with those of conventional method (conventional group). Seventy-two TKAs were performed between May 2012 and December 2014. In the navigated group, the anteroposterior axis was prepared using CT-based navigation system and the tibial component was positioned under control of the navigation. In the conventional group, the tibial component was placed with reference to the Akagi line that was determined visually. Fisher's exact probability test was performed to evaluate the results. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to the number of outliers: 3 outliers in the navigated group compared with 12 outliers in the conventional group (P rotational outliers of tibial component, and was helpful for the replication of the accurate rotational alignment of the tibial component that was preoperatively planned.

  12. The use of a mono-fluted reamer results in decreased enlargement of the tibial tunnel when using a transtibial ACL reconstruction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Justin R; Condie, Daniel; Querry, Ross; Robertson, William J

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate whether femoral tunnel preparation using a mono-fluted reamer rather than an acorn reamer would result in less tibial tunnel deformation when using a transtibial technique for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Tibial and femoral tunnel preparation was performed in four matched pairs of cadaveric knees. The tibial tunnel was drilled using a standard acorn reamer. The femoral tunnel was prepared using a transtibial technique with a mono-fluted reamer, and then, the same femoral tunnel was re-reamed using an acorn reamer. The anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) dimensions of the tibial tunnel were recorded after each reamer. We then compared the measurements following the use of each reamer using a paired two-sample t test. There was a significantly larger degree of tibial tunnel deformation following femoral tunnel preparation with the acorn reamer when compared with the mono-fluted reamer. The initial tibial tunnel measured 10.5 and 10.1 mm in the AP and ML dimensions, respectively. The resultant AP diameter of the tibial tunnel after femoral reaming was 16.7 mm (p mono-fluted reamer. The ML diameters were 11.3 mm (p = 0.003) versus 10.2 mm (p = 0.07) for the acorn and mono-fluted reamer, respectively. The use of a mono-fluted reamer for femoral tunnel preparation results in less tibial tunnel deformation during transtibial reaming.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of the anterior displacement of Tibial tuberosity (Maquet operation: A computer model study

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    Farahmand F

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Computer model of the patellofemoral joint was developed and the effects on the anterior displacement of the tibial tuberosity were investigated. The input geometrical and verification data for the model were obtained form an experimental study on a cadaver knee, mounted in an instron machine. The computer program found the configuration of the patellofemoral joint which satified both the geometrical and force equilibrium conditions, simultaneously, using a trial graphical approach.verification of the model was achieved by determining the patellar sagittal plane motion and patellofemoral contact locations and comparing the results with the experimental results of the same specimen and published data. Simulation of the anterior displacement of the tibial tuberosity by the model showed that the location of contact area migrates distally on the femur and proximally on the patella following operation. The contact force of the patellofemoral joint decreased significantly by 70% at full extension, 30% at 30 degrees flexion and around 15% at higher flexion angles for a 1 cm anterior displacement of the tibial tuberosity and nearly doubled for a 2cm anterior displacement. The change of the effective moment are of the quadriceps was not considerable. The results suggest that the major effect of the Maquet operation on the contact force appears in extension and mid-flexion rather than deep flexion amgles. Further displacement of the tuberosity enhances the reduction of the contact force, however, the total reduction is less than what was predicted by Maquet. The change of the contact location relieves pain in short term but causes hyperpressure in the proximal retropatellar surface which might be detrimental in long term

  14. Influence of nail prominence and insertion point on anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Shan-Wei; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Renn, Jenn-Huei

    2014-03-01

    Chronic anterior knee pain is the most common complication after tibial nail insertion. Its etiology remains unknown, and multifactorial sources have been suggested. The authors believe that nail prominence and the insertion point of the nail are important in the development of anterior knee pain. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the roles of the insertion point and nail prominence in anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing using a transtendinous approach and a common nail type. A total of 108 patients with tibial shaft fractures underwent reamed intramedullary nailing using a transtendinous approach between 2006 and 2009. Mean follow-up was 26.8±5.0 months. A visual analog scale (0-100) was used to estimate anterior knee pain severity while patients performed 7 activities retrospectively. Radiographic assessments, including nail prominence and insertion point, were performed. Sixty (55.6%) patients experienced knee pain (group P) and 48 (44.4%) did not (group N). Significant differences were not found between the groups with respect to demographics, nail diameters, or fracture classifications. Less superior and more anterior nail prominences in radiographic assessments were significantly associated with anterior knee pain. When the insertion point was over the bottom half of the anterior cortex, the influence of anterior nail prominence was more obvious. Nail removal resulted in diminished pain during the 7 assessed activities. Nail insertion should be over the bottom half of the anterior cortex, with minimal anterior nail prominence. If anterior knee pain occurs, removal of the nail should be considered. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. High tibial closing wedge osteotomy for medial compartment osteoarthrosis of knee

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    Tuli S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most patients of symptomatic osteoarthrosis of knee are associated with varus malalignment that is causative or contributory to painful arthrosis. It is rational to correct the malalignment to transfer the functional load to the unaffected or less affected compartment of the knee to relieve symptoms. We report the outcome of a simple technique of high tibial osteotomy in the medial compartment of osteoarthrosis of the knee. Materials and Methods: Between 1996 and 2004 we performed closing wedge osteotomy in 78 knees in 65 patients. The patients selected for osteotomy were symptomatic essentially due to medial compartment osteoarthrosis associated with moderate genu varum. Of the 19 patients who had bilateral symptomatic disease 11 opted for high tibial osteotomy of their second knee 1-3 years after the first operation. Preoperative grading of osteoarthrosis and postoperative function was assessed using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA rating scale. Results: At a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range 2-9 years 6-10° of valgus correction at the site of osteotomy was maintained, there was significant relief of pain while walking, negotiating stairs, squatting and sitting cross-legged. Walking distance in all patients improved by two to four times their preoperative distance of 200-400 m. No patient lost any preoperative knee function. The mean JOA scoring improved from preoperative 54 (40-65 to 77 (55-85 at final follow-up. Conclusion: Closing wedge high tibial osteotomy performed by our technique can be undertaken in any setup with moderate facilities. Operation related complications are minimal and avoidable. Kirschner wire fixation is least likely to interfere with replacement surgery if it becomes necessary.

  16. Medial Tibial Reduction Osteotomy is Associated with Excellent Outcomes and Improved Coronal Alignment

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    J. Ryan Martin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The medial tibial reduction osteotomy (MTRO was introduced to achieve coronal ligamentous balance in total knee arthroplasty (TKA patients with substantial preoperative varus deformity. Limited data exists on the outcomes of patients requiring an MTRO. This study compares outcomes of a matched cohort of patients that either required or did not require an MTRO during TKA. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 67 patients that underwent an MTRO during primary TKA to achieve coronal balance. This patient population was matched 1:1 to another cohort of TKA patients by age, gender, and BMI that did not require an MTRO. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was utilized to compare the two cohorts. Results: Preoperatively, the tibiofemoral angle was 3.42° valgus versus 6.12° varus in the control and MTRO cohorts respectively (p=0.01. Mean postoperative tibiofemoral angles were 3.40° versus 2.43° valgus respectively. Postoperative Knee Society Scores were superior in the MTRO cohort (183.84 versus 174.58; p=0.04. Intraoperatively, no superficial MCL releases were required to achieve coronal balance in either cohort. Complications were similar and limited in both groups. Medial tibial bone resorption was observed in 64% of MTRO subjects averaging 2.02mm versus only 0.3mm in the control cohort ( p=0.01. Conclusion: Patients requiring an MTRO achieved similar alignment and superior knee scores compared to a control cohort with less varus deformity. This procedure eliminated the need for release of the superficial MCL. Resorption of medial tibial bone was commonly observed, possibly secondary to saw-induced thermal necrosis associated with performing an MTRO.

  17. Limited open reduction is better for simple- distal tibial shaft fractures than minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Zeng, B F; Luo, C F; Song, S; Zhang, C Q; Kong, W Q

    2014-07-24

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects and indications of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) and limited open reduction (LOR) for managing distal tibial shaft fractures. A total of 79 cases of distal tibial shaft fractures were treated surgically in our trauma center. The 79 fracture cases were classified into type A, B, and C (C1) according to the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification, with 28, 32, and 19 cases, respectively. Among the 79 fracture cases, 52 were closed fractures and 27 were open fractures (GUSTILO, I-II). After adequate preparation, 48 cases were treated with LOR and 31 cases were treated with MIPO. All cases were followed up for 12 to 18 months, with an average of 16.4 months. During the follow-up period, 76 fracture cases were healed in the first stage, whereas the 3 cases that developed non-union were treated by changing the fixation device and autografting. For types A, B, and some of C simple fractures (C1), LOR accelerated the fracture healing and lowered the non-union rate. One case suffered from regional soft tissue infection, which was controlled by wound dressing and intravenous antibiotics. Another case that developed local skin necrosis underwent local flap transplant. LOR promoted bone healing and lowered the non-union rate of several simple-distal tibial shaft fractures. Thereafter, the incidence of soft tissue complication was not significantly increased. However, for complex and comminuted fractures, MIPO was the preferred method for correcting bone alignment and protecting soft tissue, leading to functional recovery.

  18. Taylor spatial frame in the treatment of open tibial shaft fractures

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    Al-Sayyad Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Taylor spatial frame (TSF is a modern multiplanar external fixator that combines the ease of application and computer accuracy in the reduction of fractures. A retrospective review of our prospective TSF database for the use of this device for treating open tibial fractures in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients was carried out to determine the effectiveness and complications of TSF in the treatment of these fractures. Materials and Methods: Nineteen male patients with open tibial fractures were included. Of these fractures, 10 were Gustilo Type II, five were Gustilo Type IIIA (two had delayed primary closure and three had split thickness skin grafting, and four were Gustilo Type IIIB (all had rotational flaps. Twelve of our patients presented immediately to the emergency room, and the remaining seven cases presented at a mean of 3 months (range, 2.2-4.5 months after the initial injury. The fractures were located in proximal third (n=1, proximal/middle junction (n=2, middle third (n=3, middle/distal junction (n=8, distal third (n=3, and segmental fractures (n=2. Patients were of an average age of 26 years (range, 6-45years. Mean duration of follow-up was 3.5 years. Results: All fractures healed over a mean of 25 weeks (range, 9-46 weeks. All were able to participate in the activities of daily living without any difficulty and most were involved in sports during the last follow-up. Postoperative complications included pin tract infection in 12 patients. Conclusion: The TSF is an effective definitive method of open tibial fracture care with the advantage of early mobilization, ease of soft tissue management through gradual fracture reduction, and the ability to postoperatively manipulate the fracture into excellent alignment.

  19. Locked plating as an external fixator in treating tibial fractures: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; Xu, Ding; Wu, Jia; Chen, Yi-Heng

    2017-12-01

    This article is a systematic review of the published literature about the biomechanics, functional outcomes, and complications of a locked plate as an external fixator in treating tibial fractures. We searched the PubMed, Ovid Medline, Embase, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane Library databases to retrieve the relevant studies. Studies published in English and Chinese which assessed adult patients and more than 4 cases who had sustained any type of fresh tibial fracture treated with the external locking plate, provided that they reported functional outcomes, range of motion (ROM), union or complication rates, and the biomechanical studies of external locked plating are also included. The electronic search strategy revealed 248 studies, and 2 studies were identified as relevant through manual search of references. Finally, 12 studies were included in this systematic review. These consist of 3 pure biomechanical studies, 8 case series, and 1 study including both of biomechanics and case series. Due to the heterogeneity of biomechanical studies, we can only conclude that external locked plate shows inferior structural stiffness than internal locked plate. The clinical studies reported that external locked plating gave a satisfactory ROM of the knee and ankle, functional outcomes, union rate, and low complication rate. We can only conclude that external locked plate shows inferior structural stiffness than internal locked plate because of the heterogeneity of biomechanical studies. The clinical studies showed locked plating as an external fixator in treating tibial fractures can be considered as a safe and successful procedure. However, as yet, there is unconvincing evidence that it is superior to standard techniques with regards to clinical and functional outcomes. More and well-designed studies about this technique should be carried out.

  20. Effectiveness of Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis (MIPO on Comminuted Tibial or Femoral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Andalib

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Comminuted fractures happen frequently due to traumas. Fixation without opening the fracture site,known as minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO, has recently become prevalent. This study has beendesigned to assess the outcomes of this treatment for tibial and femoral comminuted fractures.Methods: A total of 60 patients with comminuted femoral or tibial fractures were operated with MIPO method in thiscross-sectional study at Alzahra university hospital in 2015. Eleven patients were excluded due to lack of adequatefollow-ups. Patients’data including union time; infection in the fractured site; hip and knee range of motion; and anymalunion or deformities like limb length discrepancy were collected after the surgery in every session.Results: Among 32 femoral and 17 tibial fractures, union was completed in48 patients, while only one patient withfemoral fracture had nonunion. The mean union time was 18.57±2.42 weeks. Femur fractures healed faster than tibia(17.76±2.36 compared to 19±2.37 weeks, respectively, P=0.09. None of the patients suffered from infections or fistula.The range of motion in hip and knee remained intact in approximately all patients. Malunion happened in 3 patients; 100internal rotation in 1 patient; and 1cm limb shortening in 2 patients.Conclusion: According to the result of this study, MIPO is a simple and effective method of fixation with a high rateof union as well as minimal complications for comminuted fractures of long bones. Infection is rare, and malunion orany deformity is infrequent. MIPO appears to be a promising and safe treatment alternative for comminuted fractures.

  1. Treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Coşar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reamed and locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphysis fractures.Materials and methods: The study included 38 patients (26 males, 12 females who were treated with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphysis fractures. Fractures were classified according to Gustilo-Anderson classification and functional results were assessed using the Johner-Wrush criteria.Results: The mean age was 36 years (range 18-61. There were 21 AO/ASIF type A, 16 type B, and 1 type C fractures. Twenty-four fracture were closed (63.1% and 14 (36.9% were open fractures. According to the Gustilo-Anderson classification, 9 were grade I, 4 patients grade II, and one grade IIIA open fractures. Intramedullary nailing was performed following open reduction in 18 patients, and closed reduction in 20. The mean time to surgery was 9.4 days and the mean follow-up was 29 months. Union was achieved in all patients within a mean of 17.6 weeks. Anterior knee pain developed in 18 patients and infection developed in three patients. Angular deformity less than 10º was developed 12 patients (31.6%. There were screw breakacge and synostosis in four and two patients respectively. According to the Johner-Wrush criteria, functional results were very good in 23 patients (60.5%, good in 12 patients (31.6% and fair in 3 (7.9% patients.Conclusion: Treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing gives satisfactory results. It should be considered as first choice in the treatment of these fractures. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:168-74

  2. A revised 3-column classification approach for the surgical planning of extended lateral tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, H; Kempenaers, K; Nijs, S

    2017-10-01

    Variable angle locking compression plates allow for lateral buttress and support of the posterolateral joint surface of tibial plateau fractures. This gives room for improvement of the surgical 3-column classification approach. Our aim was to revise and validate the 3-column classification approach to better guide the surgical planning of tibial plateau fractures extending into the posterolateral corner. In contrast to the 3-column classification approach, in the revised approach the posterior border of the lateral column in the revised approach lies posterior instead of anterior of the fibula. According to the revised 3-column classification approach, extended lateral column fractures are defined as single lateral column fractures extending posteriorly into the posterolateral corner. CT-images of 36 patients were reviewed and classified twice online according to Schatzker and revised 3-column classification approach by five observers. The intraobserver reliability was calculated using the Cohen's kappa and the interobserver reliability was calculated using the Fleiss' kappa. The intraobserver reliability showed substantial agreement according to Landis and Koch for both Schatzker and the revised 3-column classification approach (0.746 vs. 0.782 p = 0.37, Schatzker vs. revised 3-column, respectively). However, the interobserver reliability of the revised 3-column classification approach was significantly higher as compared to the Schatzker classification (0.531 vs. 0.669 p column, respectively). With the introduction of variable angle locking compression plates, the revised 3-column classification approach is a very helpful tool in the preoperative surgical planning of tibial plateau fractures, in particular, lateral column fractures that extend into the posterolateral corner. The revised 3-column classification approach is rather a practical supplement to the Schatzker classification. It has a significantly higher interobserver reliability as compared to the

  3. Functional outcome of intra-articular tibial plateau fractures: the impact of posterior column fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Juriaan; Reul, Maike; Nunes Cardozo, Menno; Starovoyt, Anastasiya; Geusens, Eric; Nijs, Stefaan; Hoekstra, Harm

    2017-09-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although regularly ignored, there is growing evidence that posterior tibial plateau fractures affect the functional outcome. The goal of this study was to assess the incidence of posterior column fractures and its impact on functional outcome and general health status. We aimed to identify all clinical variables that influence the outcome and improve insights in the treatment strategies. A retrospective cohort study including 218 intra-articular tibial plateau fractures was conducted. All fractures were reclassified and applied treatment was assessed according to the updated three-column concept. Relevant demographic and clinical variables were studied. The patient reported outcome was assessed using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Median follow-up was 45.5 (IQR 24.9-66.2) months. Significant outcome differences between operatively and non-operatively treated patients were found for all KOOS subscales. The incidence of posterior column fractures was 61.9%. Posterior column fractures, sagittal malalignment and an increased complication rate were associated with poor outcome. Patients treated according to the updated three-column concept, showed significantly better outcome scores than those patients who were not. We could not demonstrate the advantage of posterior column fracture fixation, due to a limited patient size. Our data indicates that implementation of the updated three-column classification concept may improve the surgical outcome of tibial plateau fractures. Failure to recognize posterior column fractures may lead to inappropriate utilization of treatment techniques. The current concept allows us to further substantiate the importance of reduction and fixation of posterior column fractures with restoration of the sagittal alignment. 3.

  4. Efficacy and quality of life after transcutaneous posterior tibial neuromodulation for faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Toscano, M; Vega, D; Fernandez-Cebrián, J M; Valle Martín, B; Jiménez-Almonacid, P; Rueda Orgaz, J A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transcutaneous neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve for faecal incontinence and to assess quality of life after the procedure. A prospective non-randomized cohort study was conducted in a tertiary centre from September 2010 to May 2013. All patients with faecal incontinence who met the inclusion criteria were included and were treated as outpatients during a 3-month period by unilateral neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve. The patients were followed 3-monthly for 1 year. Severity scales, a bowel diary and quality of life scales were evaluated prospectively before and after treatment. Twenty-seven patients of median age 67 (interquartile range 60-69) years and a male to female ratio of 1/6 were included. Faecal incontinence was for solid stools in 48.1% of patients with urgency in 55.6%. About one-third (34.6%) had a sphincter defect on ultrasound and reduction of anal canal pressure in 85.2%. There was a significant improvement in episodes of incontinence on the Wexner score and visual analogue scale assessment and a decrease in the number of episodes of incontinence per unit time. The Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life score was improved at the end of the follow-up. No adverse effects were observed. The cost of the treatment was €135 per patient. Transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve neuromodulation provides good treatment for faecal incontinence in terms of efficacy and quality of life. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Effect of tibial plateau fracture on lubrication function and composition of synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Brooke L; Antonacci, Jennifer M; Temple-Wong, Michele M; Hui, Alexander Y; Schumacher, Barbara L; Bugbee, William D; Schwartz, Alexandra K; Girard, Paul J; Sah, Robert L

    2012-05-16

    Intra-articular fractures may hasten posttraumatic arthritis in patients who are typically too active and too young for joint replacement. Current orthopaedic treatment principles, including recreating anatomic alignment and establishing articular congruity, have not eliminated posttraumatic arthritis. Additional biomechanical and biological factors may contribute to the development of arthritis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate human synovial fluid for friction-lowering function and the concentrations of putative lubricant molecules following tibial plateau fractures. Synovial fluid specimens were obtained from the knees of eight patients (twenty-five to fifty-seven years old) with a tibial plateau fracture, with five specimens from the injured knee as plateau fracture synovial fluid and six specimens from the contralateral knee as control synovial fluid. Each specimen was centrifuged to obtain a fluid sample, separated from a cell pellet, for further analysis. For each fluid sample, the start-up (static) and steady-state (kinetic) friction coefficients in the boundary mode of lubrication were determined from a cartilage-on-cartilage biomechanical test of friction. Also, concentrations of the putative lubricants, hyaluronan and proteoglycan-4, as well as total protein, were determined for fluid samples. The group of experimental samples were obtained at a mean (and standard deviation) of 11 ± 9 days after injury from patients with a mean age of 45 ± 13 years. Start-up and kinetic friction coefficients demonstrated similar trends and dependencies. The kinetic friction coefficients for human plateau fracture synovial fluid were approximately 100% higher than those for control human synovial fluid. Hyaluronan concentrations were ninefold lower for plateau fracture synovial fluid compared with the control synovial fluid, whereas proteoglycan-4 concentrations were more than twofold higher in plateau fracture synovial fluid compared with the control

  6. Functional outcome of Schatzker type V and VI tibial plateau fractures treated with dual plates

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    G Thiruvengita Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual plate fixation in comminuted bicondylar tibial plateau fractures remains controversial. Open reduction and internal fixation, specifically through compromised soft tissues, has historically been associated with major wound complications. Alternate methods of treatment have been described, each with its own merits and demerits. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the functional outcome of lateral and medial plate fixation of Schatzker type V and VI fractures through an anterolateral approach, and a medial minimally invasive approach or a posteromedial approach. Materials and Methods: We treated 46 tibial plateau fractures Schatzker type V and VI with lateral and medial plates through an anterolateral approach and a medial minimal invasive approach over an 8 years period. Six patients were lost to followup. Radiographs in two planes were taken in all cases. Immediate postoperative radiographs were assessed for quality of reduction and fixation. The functional outcome was evaluated according to the Oxford Knee Score criteria on followup. Results: Forty patients (33 men and 7 women who completed the followup were included in the study. There were 20 Schatzker type V fractures and 20 Schatzker type VI fractures. The mean duration of followup was 4 years (range 1-8 years. All patients had a satisfactory articular reduction defined as ≤2 mm step-off or gap as assessed on followup. All patients had a good coronal and sagittal plane alignment, and articular width as assessed on supine X-rays of the knee in the anteroposterior (AP and lateral views. The functional outcome, as assessed by the Oxford Knee Score, was excellent in 30 patients and good in 10 patients. All patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity and employment. There were no instances of deep infection. Conclusions: Dual plate fixation of severe bicondylar tibial plateau fractures is an excellent treatment option as it provides rigid fixation and

  7. Evaluation of Fibular Fracture Type vs Location of Tibial Fixation of Pilon Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busel, Gennadiy A; Watson, J Tracy; Israel, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Comminuted fibular fractures can occur with pilon fractures as a result of valgus stress. Transverse fibular fractures can occur with varus deformation. No definitive guide for determining the proper location of tibial fixation exists. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal plate location for fixation of pilon fractures based on the orientation of the fibular fracture. One hundred two patients with 103 pilon fractures were identified who were definitively treated at our institution from 2004 to 2013. Pilon fractures were classified using the AO/OTA classification and included 43-A through 43-C fractures. Inclusion criteria were age of at least 18 years, associated fibular fracture, and definitive tibial plating. Patients were grouped based on the fibular component fracture type (comminuted vs transverse), and the location of plate fixation (medial vs lateral) was noted. Radiographic outcomes were assessed for mechanical failures. Forty fractures were a result of varus force as evidenced by transverse fracture of the fibula and 63 were due to valgus force with a comminuted fibula. For the transverse fibula group, 14.3% mechanical complications were noted for medially placed plate vs 80% for lateral plating ( P = .006). For the comminuted fibular group, 36.4% of medially placed plates demonstrated mechanical complications vs 16.7% for laterally based plates ( P = .156). Time to weight bearing as tolerated was also noted to be significant between groups plated medially and laterally for the comminuted group ( P = .013). Correctly assessing the fibular component for pilon fractures provides valuable information regarding deforming forces. To limit mechanical complications, tibial plates should be applied in such a way as to resist the original deforming forces. Level of Evidence Level III, comparative study.

  8. A Computer Navigation System Analysis of the Accuracy of the Extramedullary (Tibial Alignment Technique in Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EK Chee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In total knee arthroplasty, mechanical alignment guides have improved the accuracy of implant alignment, but errors are not uncommon. In the present study, an image-free computer-assisted navigation system was used to analyse the accuracy of an extramedullary (tibial alignment system, which is based on predetermined, fixed anatomical landmarks. Comparisons were made between two surgeons, with different levels of competency in order to determine if experience affected the accuracy of extramedullary tibial jig placement, in either the coronal and sagittal planes or both planes. The results showed that the accuracy of the extramedullary tibial alignment system, in the coronal plane (in up to 80-87% of cases was much better than for posterior slope, and sagittal plane. Surgeon experience was not a significant factor.

  9. Mycotic aneurysm of the posterior tibial artery – a rare complication of bacterial endocarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel S

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Distal arterial embolisation and subsequent aneurysm formation are rare occurrences and most are secondary to trauma. We have found no case reports that describe posterior tibial aneurysm formation secondary to bacterial endocarditis. Case presentation We report the case of a 47-year-old Caucasian man who, 2 years after an episode of subacute bacterial endocarditis, presented with signs and symptoms consistent with posterior tibial aneurysm formation. Conclusion Posterior tibial aneurysm formation is a rare occurrence, most commonly occurring after trauma and, although other causes have been described, to our knowledge, endocarditis has not been implicated before, and as such should therefore be borne in mind when dealing with cases where no obvious aetiology is evident.

  10. Foot medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait in subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Boysen, Lisbeth; Haugaard, Stine

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate (1) if subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome demonstrate increased navicular drop and medial longitudinal-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait compared with healthy subjects, and (2) the relationship between medial longitudinal......-arch deformation during quiet standing and gait. Thirty subjects aged 20 to 32 years were included (15 with medial tibial stress syndrome and 15 controls). Navicular drop and medial longitudinal-arch deformation were measured during quiet standing with neutral and loaded foot using a ruler and digital photography....... Medial longitudinal-arch deformation was measured during walking gait using 3-dimensional gait analysis. Subjects with medial tibial stress syndrome demonstrated a significantly larger navicular drop (mean +/- 1 SD, 7.7 +/- 3.1 mm) and medial longitudinal-arch deformation (5.9 +/- 3.2 degrees) during...

  11. PCL tibial avulsion with an associated medial meniscal tear in a child: a case report on diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries from tibial avulsions are rare in the paediatric setting. One would need a high index of suspicion as clinical examination may be difficult, especially in the early period. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic modality for this condition and other associated injuries within the knee. We report a rare case in which the patient had a PCL avulsion off the tibial insertion site with an associated posterior horn medial meniscal tear off the posterior capsule. He was treated through open reduction and internal fixation of the avulsed fragment with suture repair of the meniscal tear. We emphasize the importance of diagnosing and managing associated intra-articular injuries when dealing with the rare condition of PCL tibial avulsion in the paediatric setting.

  12. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on osseous healing in dogs undergoing high tibial osteotomy.

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    Samuel P Franklin

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether platelet-rich plasma (PRP enhances osseous healing in conjunction with a high tibial osteotomy in dogs.Randomized controlled trial.Sixty-four client-owned pet dogs with naturally occurring rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament and that were to be treated with a high tibial osteotomy (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy were randomized into the treatment or control group. Dogs in the treatment group received autologous platelet-rich plasma activated with calcium chloride and bovine thrombin to produce a well-formed PRP gel that was placed into the osteotomy at the time of surgery. Dogs in the control group received saline lavage of the osteotomy. All dogs had the osteotomy stabilized with identical titanium alloy implants and all aspects of the surgical procedure and post-operative care were identical among dogs of the two groups. Bone healing was assessed at exactly 28, 49, and 70 days after surgery with radiography and ultrasonography and with MRI at day 28. The effect of PRP on bone healing was assessed using a repeated measures analysis of covariance with radiographic and ultrasonographic data and using a t-test with the MRI data.Sixty dogs completed the study. There were no significant differences in age, weight, or gender distribution between the treatment and control groups. Twenty-seven dogs were treated with PRP and 33 were in the control group. The average platelet concentration of the PRP was 1.37x106 platelets/μL (±489x103 with a leukocyte concentration of 5.45x103/μL (±3.5x103. All dogs demonstrated progressive healing over time and achieved clinically successful outcomes. Time since surgery and patient age were significant predictors of radiographic healing and time since surgery was a significant predictor of ultrasonographic assessment of healing. There was no significant effect of PRP treatment as assessed radiographically, ultrasonographically, or with MRI.The PRP used

  13. [Distal tibial fracture--an indication for osteosynthesis with the unreamed intramedullary nail?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D; Ostermann, P A; Ekkernkamp, A; Hahn, M P; Muhr, G

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective study, 50 fractures of the distal fifth of the tibia with additional involvement of the ankle joint in 18 patients were stabilized by unreamed nailing. In all, 90% of all fractures healed uneventfully without further surgical intervention after unreamed nailing, the highest ratio of complications (22%) being seen in all patients with distal fractures of the fibula without additional plating (of the fibula). Tibial fractures close to the ankle joint can be managed by unreamed nailing; distal fractures of the fibula should be additionally stabilized by fibular plating.

  14. Rupture traumatique du tendon tibial postérieur survenue lors d'une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une rupture post-traumatique du tendon tibial postérieur survenue lors d'une fracture bimalléolaire de la cheville. Le diagnostic a été posé lors de l'intervention chirurgicale. La réparation du tendon, non dégénératif, a été réalisée en même temps que l'ostéosynthèse. Bien que rare, cette possibilité ...

  15. Tibia Bone Microvascular Flow Dynamics as Compared to Anterior Tibial Artery Flow During Body Tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Rachel L; Siamwala, Jamila H; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R

    2018-04-01

    We compared microvascular and macrovascular blood flows of the tibia and anterior tibial artery during graded whole-body tilt. We hypothesized equal responses for bone microvascular and macrovascular blood flows during varying angles of tilt. There were 18 volunteers who were randomly positioned in the following postures: supine, 15° head-up tilt, 6° head-up tilt, 6° head-down tilt, and 15° head-down tilt using an inversion table with reference to seated posture (baseline control). Ultrasonography quantified anterior tibial arterial diameter and peak systolic velocity, enabling calculation of macrovascular blood flow to the tibia. Tibial bone microvascular blood flow was measured noninvasively using photoplethysmography in the same leg. Transitioning from a seated position to a supine position, macrovascular blood flow did not change significantly (1.81 ± 1.18 to 2.80 ± 1.74cm 3 · s-1). However, bone microvascular flow increased significantly (0.36 ± 0.23 to 1.11 ± 0.79 V) from the seated to the supine position. Transitioning from a seated posture to 15° head-down tilt, both arterial macrovascular and bone microvascular flows increased significantly (1.81 ± 1.18 to 3.32 ± 2.08 cm3 · s-1 and 0.36 ± 0.23 V to 2.99 ± 2.71 V, respectively). The normalized flow for microvascular blood flow as a function of body tilt was significantly greater than that for macrovascular blood flow at 6° and 15° head-down tilt. These data do not support our hypothesis that bone microvascular flow and arterial macrovascular flow share equal responses to altered body tilt. Therefore, for a given decrease in local blood pressure in the leg with head-down body tilt, the magnitude of increase in blood flow is greater in the microcirculation as compared to the feeding artery.Becker RL, Siamwala JH, Macias BR, Hargens AR. Tibia bone microvascular flow dynamics as compared to anterior tibial artery flow during body tilt. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(4):357-364.

  16. Tension Band Plating for Chronic Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures in High-Performance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbeda, Robert M; Sculco, Peter K; Urch, Ekaterina Y; Lazaro, Lionel E; Borens, Olivier; Williams, Riley J; Lorich, Dean G; Wellman, David S; Helfet, David L

    2015-07-01

    Anterior tibial stress fractures are associated with high rates of delayed union and nonunion, which can be particularly devastating to a professional athlete who requires rapid return to competition. Current surgical treatment strategies include intramedullary nailing, which has satisfactory rates of fracture union but an associated risk of anterior knee pain. Anterior tension band plating is a biomechanically sound alternative treatment for these fractures. Tension band plating of chronic anterior tibial stress fractures leads to rapid healing and return to physical activity and avoids the anterior knee pain associated with intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 13 chronic anterior tibial stress fractures in 12 professional or collegiate athletes who underwent tension band plating after failing nonoperative management. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, injury history, and surgical details. Radiographs were used to assess time to osseous union. Follow-up notes and phone interviews were used to determine follow-up time, return to training time, and whether the patient was able to return to competition. Cases included 13 stress fractures in 12 patients (9 females, 3 males). Five patients were track-and-field athletes, 4 patients played basketball, 2 patients played volleyball, and 1 was a ballet dancer. Five patients were Division I collegiate athletes and 7 were professional or Olympic athletes. Average age at time of surgery was 23.6 years (range, 20-32 years). Osseous union occurred on average at 9.6 weeks (range, 5.3-16.9 weeks) after surgery. Patients returned to training on average at 11.1 weeks (range, 5.7-20 weeks). Ninety-two percent (12/13) eventually returned to preinjury competition levels. Thirty-eight percent (5/13) underwent removal of hardware for plate prominence. There was no incidence of infection or nonunion. Anterior tension band plating for chronic tibial stress

  17. Sequential tibial and peroneal intraneural ganglia arising from the superior tibiofibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Anatomy, Rochester, MN (United States); Desy, Nicholas M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); McGill University School of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2008-01-15

    We present a patient who developed a peroneal intraneural ganglion and an adventitial cyst following the incomplete treatment of a tibial intraneural ganglion. These separate cysts all originated from the superior tibiofibular joint and dissected along their respective articular branches. A logical mechanistic explanation for these coexisting cysts is provided, which highlights the shared pathogenesis - its joint-related nature - rather than a multifocal de novo process. These observations would not only be consistent with, but would extend previous evidence in support of, the unifying articular (synovial) theory. (orig.)

  18. Co-contraction patterns of trans-tibial amputee ankle and knee musculature during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Myoelectric control of upper extremity powered prostheses has been used clinically for many years, however this approach has not been fully developed for lower extremity prosthetic devices. With the advent of powered lower extremity prosthetic components, the potential role of myoelectric control systems is of increasing importance. An understanding of muscle activation patterns and their relationship to functional ambulation is a vital step in the future development of myoelectric control. Unusual knee muscle co-contractions have been reported in both limbs of trans-tibial amputees. It is currently unknown what differences exist in co-contraction between trans-tibial amputees and controls. This study compares the activation and co-contraction patterns of the ankle and knee musculature of trans-tibial amputees (intact and residual limbs), and able-bodied control subjects during three speeds of gait. It was hypothesized that residual limbs would have greater ankle muscle co-contraction than intact and able-bodied control limbs and that knee muscle co-contraction would be different among all limbs. Lastly it was hypothesized that the extent of muscle co-contraction would increase with walking speed. Methods Nine unilateral traumatic trans-tibial amputees and five matched controls participated. Surface electromyography recorded activation from the Tibialis Anterior, Medial Gastrocnemius, Vastus Lateralis and Biceps Femoris of the residual, intact and control limbs. A series of filters were applied to the signal to obtain a linear envelope of the activation patterns. A co-contraction area (ratio of the integrated agonist and antagonist activity) was calculated during specific phases of gait. Results Co-contraction of the ankle muscles was greater in the residual limb than in the intact and control limbs during all phases of gait. Knee muscle co-contraction was greater in the residual limb than in the control limb during all phases of gait. Conclusion Co

  19. Co-contraction patterns of trans-tibial amputee ankle and knee musculature during gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedali Mahyo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myoelectric control of upper extremity powered prostheses has been used clinically for many years, however this approach has not been fully developed for lower extremity prosthetic devices. With the advent of powered lower extremity prosthetic components, the potential role of myoelectric control systems is of increasing importance. An understanding of muscle activation patterns and their relationship to functional ambulation is a vital step in the future development of myoelectric control. Unusual knee muscle co-contractions have been reported in both limbs of trans-tibial amputees. It is currently unknown what differences exist in co-contraction between trans-tibial amputees and controls. This study compares the activation and co-contraction patterns of the ankle and knee musculature of trans-tibial amputees (intact and residual limbs, and able-bodied control subjects during three speeds of gait. It was hypothesized that residual limbs would have greater ankle muscle co-contraction than intact and able-bodied control limbs and that knee muscle co-contraction would be different among all limbs. Lastly it was hypothesized that the extent of muscle co-contraction would increase with walking speed. Methods Nine unilateral traumatic trans-tibial amputees and five matched controls participated. Surface electromyography recorded activation from the Tibialis Anterior, Medial Gastrocnemius, Vastus Lateralis and Biceps Femoris of the residual, intact and control limbs. A series of filters were applied to the signal to obtain a linear envelope of the activation patterns. A co-contraction area (ratio of the integrated agonist and antagonist activity was calculated during specific phases of gait. Results Co-contraction of the ankle muscles was greater in the residual limb than in the intact and control limbs during all phases of gait. Knee muscle co-contraction was greater in the residual limb than in the control limb during all phases

  20. Intramedullary nailing and functional bracing of tibial shaft fractures: 167 cases followed for minimum 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santos de la Fuente, F J; López Arévalo, R; Tena Carrillo, C; Ramos Salguero, J C; Fernández Medina, J M

    1998-10-01

    We treated 167 diaphyseal tibial fractures without reaming and with intramedullary fixation, using an unlocked Küntscher nail. The patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years. The mean time to union was 16 weeks. There were no serious complications, but 1 case of nonunion, 1 case of deep infection and 2 cases of clinically relevant malalignment. Migration of the nail was observed in 11 cases. We conclude that this treatment is simple and gives satisfactory results in diaphyseal fractures after low- or mid-energy trauma.

  1. A novel posteromedial approach for tibial inlay PCL reconstruction in KDIIIM injuries: avoiding prone patient positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Dustin; Wascher, Daniel C; Schenck, Robert C

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of traumatic knee dislocations remains controversial and challenging. Current techniques for PCL reconstruction utilize either a transtibial approach with potential risk of vascular injury from drilling toward the popliteal artery or a tibial inlay technique with prone patient positioning, which is cumbersome and adds operative time. We therefore developed a surgical technique using a supine posteromedial approach for PCL tibial inlay reconstruction for the treatment of Schenck KDIIIM (ACL/PCL/medial collateral ligament) knee dislocations. In patients undergoing this technique, we evaluated patient-reported outcome scores, ROM, stability, and complications. Tibial inlay PCL reconstructions were performed through a posteromedial approach with the patient supine, knee flexed, and hip externally rotated, thus avoiding prone patient positioning. The inlay approach uses the interval between the medial head of the gastrocnemius and the pes anserinus (gracilis and semitendinosus), with release of the semimembranosus tendon approximately 1 cm from its insertion on the tibia. Retraction of the medial gastrocnemius and semimembranosus allows access to the posteromedial aspect of the proximal tibia while protecting the neurovascular bundle. All 11 patients sustaining a KDIIIM multiligamentous knee injury treated between 2002 and 2011 with a three-ligament reconstruction received this posteromedial approach. Seven patients were available for complete evaluation, and one completed telephone followup only. Mean followup was 6.0 years (range, 2.0-11.2 years). Clinical evaluation included Lysholm and Tegner activity scores and measurements of ROM and knee laxity. We also recorded complications. Mean Lysholm and Tegner activity scores were 81 and 4.9, respectively, with three patients returning to recreational or competitive sports. Mean knee flexion was 120° (range, 106°-137°); however, two patients had stiffness in flexion, lacking greater than 20° of flexion

  2. Posterior Tibial Arterial System Deficiency Mimicking Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Kyle P; Parcells, Bertrand W; Hosea, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old female competitive high school basketball player presented as an outpatient with a 3-month history of bilateral exertional calf pain. Patient history and compartment pressure measurements were consistent with the diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome, and the patient underwent bilateral fasciotomies. Postoperatively, her symptoms recurred and she was found to have a deficient posterior tibial arterial system bilaterally, as confirmed on advanced imaging. We advocate the careful consideration of vascular etiologies in athletes who present with exertional leg pain.

  3. Staged minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures with acute compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Oh, Chang-Wug; Oh, Jong-Keon; Kyung, Hee-Soo; Park, Kyeong-Hyeon; Kim, Hee-June; Jung, Jae-Wook; Jung, Young-Soo

    2017-06-01

    High-energy proximal tibial fractures often accompany compartment syndrome and are usually treated by fasciotomy with external fixation followed by secondary plating. However, the initial soft tissue injury may affect bony union, the fasciotomy incision or external fixator pin sites may lead to postoperative wound infections, and the staged procedure itself may adversely affect lower limb function. We assess the results of staged minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) for proximal tibial fractures with acute compartment syndrome. Twenty-eight patients with proximal tibial fractures accompanied by acute compartment syndrome who underwent staged MIPO and had a minimum of 12 months follow-up were enrolled. According to the AO/OTA classification, 6 were 41-A, 15 were 41-C, 2 were 42-A and 5 were 42-C fractures; this included 6 cases of open fractures. Immediate fasciotomy was performed once compartment syndrome was diagnosed and stabilization of the fracture followed using external fixation. After the soft tissue condition normalized, internal conversion with MIPO was done on an average of 37 days (range, 9-158) after index trauma. At the time of internal conversion, the external fixator pin site grades were 0 in 3 cases, 1 in 12 cases, 2 in 10 cases and 3 in 3 cases, as described by Dahl. Radiographic assessment of bony union and alignment and a functional assessment using the Knee Society Score and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score were carried out. Twenty-six cases achieved primary bony union at an average of 18.5 weeks. Two cases of nonunion healed after autogenous bone grafting. The mean Knee Society Score and the AOFAS score were 95 and 95.3 respectively, at last follow-up. Complications included 1 case of osteomyelitis in a patient with a grade IIIC open fracture and 1 case of malunion caused by delayed MIPO due to poor wound conditions. Duration of external fixation and the external fixator pin site grade were not related to the

  4. Sequential Proximal Tibial Stress Fractures associated with Prolonged usage of Methotrexate and Corticosteroids: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan TJL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress fractures of the proximal tibia metaphysis are rare in the elderly. We present a case of a 65-year old male who developed sequential proximal tibia stress fractures associated with prolonged usage of methotrexate and prednisolone within a span of 18 months. Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed an incomplete stress fracture involving the medial proximal tibial region. The patient was treated with stemmed total knee arthroplasty (TKA bilaterally. Stress fractures should be considered in patients with atypical knee pain who have a history of methotrexate and prednisolone usage. TKA is an effective treatment in stress fractures of the proximal tibia.

  5. Tritiated thymidine uptake in chondrocytes of chickens afflicted with tibial dyschondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, C.V.; Leach, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    3 H-Thymidine was localized in sections of growth-plate cartilage and associated tibial dyschondroplastic lesion by autoradiography. One hour after 3 H-thymidine was injected, radioactivity was found in the proliferating zone; after 48 hr it was also in the hypertrophic zone, and by 96 hr it was present in cells that were 4 to 5 mm into the lesion. This indicates that the lesion develops from the growth plate itself. The life span of the cells in the growth plate appears to be about 48 hr

  6. Osteonecrosis del platillo tibial interno: A propósito de dos casos

    OpenAIRE

    Antolín Suárez, J.; Hernández Vaquero, Daniel; Suárez Vázquez, A.; Olay Gayoso, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Presentamos dos casos de osteonecrosis idiomática del platillo tibial interno que aparecieron en mujeres. En ellas se dieron las características clínicas habituales de la enfermedad (inicio súbito de dolor intenso en rodilla sin traumatismo previo claramente diferenciado y marcada sensibilidad local en la zona interna de la rodilla) junto a radiografías iniciales normales ó con leves cambios degenerativos (gammagrafía ósea y/ó resonancia magnética nuclear.) En las dos pacientes el proceso evo...

  7. [Closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy with a modified Weber technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Philipp; Müller, Markus; Munzinger, Urs

    2008-03-01

    Deceleration of the progression of medial gonarthritis via transfer of the mechanical load axis from the medial to the lateral femorotibial compartment and by reduction of compressive stresses in the medial compartment. Isolated early-stage unicompartmental medial gonarthritis. Symptomatic varus deformity. Adjustment of the mechanical load axis in reconstructive surgery such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Correction of posttraumatic varus deformities. Concomitant patellofemoral arthritis, lateral femorotibial arthritis, or other painful conditions of the knee. Limited range of motion. Knee instabilities, since a rapid development of a tricompartmental gonarthritis is likely to occur. Advanced osteoporosis. Poor peripheral circulation with an absent foot pulse. Lateral meniscectomy. Lateral approach. Subcapital osteotomy of the fibula. Preparation of the lateral tibial head. Partial osteotomy of the proximal one third of the tibial tuberosity. Marking of the joint line. A semitubular plate is placed over a guide wire parallel to the joint line, 1.5 cm distal to it, and is gently hammered into the tibial head with just the last hole seen outside. The lateral end of the plate is bent downward. Ascending osteotomy of the tibial head in an inferolateral to craniomedial direction. The osteotomy starts 2.5 cm distal to the plate and ends directly below the guide wire. The medial cortex remains intact. Excision of a lateral-based bone wedge according to the preoperative planning. The osteotomy is gently closed under valgus stress. A 4.5-mm cortical screw is aimed through the lateral hole of the plate into the distal fragment of the tibia and tightened until the osteotomy is brought under compression. During hospitalization, there is a periodic treatment with continuous passive motion without any limitation of range of motion and isometric training is taken up. Mobilization is permitted with partial load of 15 kg with two crutches during 6 weeks postoperatively

  8. Locking compression plate fixation of radial and tibial fractures in a young dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, C S; Montavon, P M

    2005-01-01

    A six-month-old, male Bernese Mountain Dog in which radius-ulna and tibia-fibula concomitant fractures were treated each with a 3.5 mm Locking Compression Plate (LCP) is presented. Both fractures were approached and plated medially. The tibial fracture had to be revised with a 4.5 mm intramedullary nail and a new 3.5 mm LCP at the second post-operative day because of fixation breakdown. The follow-up radiographs taken at days 14 and 53 revealed uneventful healing of both fractures. Implants were removed 53 days after surgery.

  9. [Establishment of Schatzker classification digital models of tibial plateau fractures and its application on virtual surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-gang; Zuo, Li-xin; Pei, Guo-xian; Dai, Ke; Sang, Jing-wei

    2013-08-20

    To explore the establishment of Schatzker classification digital model of tibial plateau fractures and its application in virtual surgery. Proximal tibial of one healthy male volunteer was examined with 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CT). The data were processed by software Mimics 10.01 and a model of proximal tibia was reconstructed. According to the Schatzker classification criteria of tibial plateau fractures, each type of fracture model was simulated.Screen-captures of fracture model were saved from different directions.Each type of fracture model was exported as video mode.Fracture model was imported into FreeForm modeling system.With a force feedback device, a surgeon could conduct virtual fracture operation simulation.Utilizing the GHOST of FreeForm modeling system, the software of virtual cutting, fracture reduction and fixation was developed.With a force feedback device PHANTOM, a surgeon could manipulate virtual surgical instruments and fracture classification model and simulate surgical actions such as assembly of surgical instruments, drilling, implantation of screw, reduction of fracture, bone grafting and fracture fixation, etc. The digital fracture model was intuitive, three-dimensional and realistic and it had excellent visual effect.Fracture could be observed and charted from optional direction and angle.Fracture model could rotate 360 ° in the corresponding video mode. The virtual surgical environment had a strong sense of reality, immersion and telepresence as well as good interaction and force feedback function in the FreeForm modeling system. The user could make the corresponding decisions about surgical method and choice of internal fixation according to the specific type of tibial plateau fracture as well as repeated operational practice in virtual surgery system. The digital fracture model of Schatzker classification is intuitive, three-dimensional, realistic and dynamic. The virtual surgery systems of Schatzker classifications make

  10. Tibial avulsion fracture of the posterior root of the medial meniscus in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Krogsgaard, Michael Rindom

    2012-01-01

    Few reports have described avulsion fractures of the posterior root of the medial meniscus in skeletally immature patients. This lesion should not be overlooked as it damages the load absorptive (distributive) function of the meniscus, increasing the risk of cartilage degeneration. Two cases...... of displaced avulsion fractures of the posterior root of the medial meniscus in children are presented along with a concise report of the literature regarding avulsion fractures of the posterior root of the medial meniscus. Both avulsions were reattached arthroscopically by trans-tibial pull-out sutures...

  11. Using fibula as a reference can be beneficial for the tibial component alignment after total knee arthroplasty, a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Gulabi, Deniz; Cecen, Gultekin Sitki; Avci, Cem Coskun; Asci, Murat; Saglam, Fevzi

    2015-07-01

    One of the important factors in a successful arthroplasty is component alignment. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the fibular shaft reference technique is beneficial for the tibial component position on the postoperative plain radiograph after total knee arthroplasty. A total of 42 patients between 2009 and 2011 were analysed retrospectively. The surgeon prepared the tibia using an extramedullary cutting guide and set the posterior tibial slope with respect to the fibular reference rod. In the postoperative radiographic measurements, a true anteroposterior and lateral radiograph of the lower leg covering the whole length of the tibia was used. Five patients were excluded as they did not meet the inclusion criteria, four patients were excluded due to improper radiographs and the study group was reduced to 33 patients and 35 knees. The mean preoperative tibiofibular angle was 2.1° ± 0.8°. The mean postoperative tibial sagittal angle measurements were 83.3° ± 1.4° (81°-86°). 33 (94 %) Knees gained the desired tibial sagittal angle within the desired alignment (5° ± 3°). The mean postoperative tibial coronal angle was 89.3° ± 1.5°. The tibial component coronal angle of two knees was more than 3 alignment from the neutral mechanical axis. The major clinical relevance of the technique described in the present study is cost-effectiveness, and it does not require any extra time or surgical equipment. This method can be used as an alternative choice for bulky extremities which is a cause of malalignment of the components. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  12. Tibial coverage, meniscus position, size and damage in knees discordant for joint space narrowing – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, K.; Guermazi, A.; Wirth, W.; Benichou, O.; Kwoh, C.K.; Hunter, D.J.; Englund, M.; Resch, H.; Eckstein, F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction Meniscal extrusion is thought to be associated with less meniscus coverage of the tibial surface, but the association of radiographic disease stage with quantitative measures of tibial plateau coverage is unknown. We therefore compared quantitative and semi-quantitative measures of meniscus position and morphology in individuals with bilateral painful knees discordant on medial joint space narrowing (mJSN). Methods A sample of 60 participants from the first half (2,678 cases) of the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort fulfilled the inclusion criteria: bilateral frequent pain, Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) mJSN grades 1–3 in one, no-JSN in the contra-lateral (CL), and no lateral JSN in either knee (43 unilateral mJSN1; 17 mJSN2/3; 22 men, 38 women, body mass index (BMI) 31.3 ± 3.9 kg/m2). Segmentation and three-dimensional quantitative analysis of the tibial plateau and meniscus, and semi-quantitative evaluation of meniscus damage (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) osteoarthritis knee score – MOAKS) was performed using coronal 3T MR images (MPR DESSwe and intermediate-weighted turbo spin echo (IW-TSE) images). CL knees were compared using paired t-tests (between-knee, within-person design). Results Medial tibial plateau coverage was 36 ± 9% in mJSN1 vs 45 ± 8% in CL no-JSN knees, and was 31 ± 9% in mJSN2/3 vs 46 ± 6% in no-JSN knees (both P meniscus extrusion and damage (MOAKS), but no significant difference in meniscus volume. No significant differences in lateral tibial coverage, lateral meniscus morphology or position were observed. Conclusions Knees with medial JSN showed substantially less medial tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus. We suggest that the less meniscal coverage, i.e., less mechanical protection may be a reason for greater rates of cartilage loss observed in JSN knees. PMID:23220556

  13. Bone Morphogenetic Protein for the Healing of Tibial Fracture: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiezhi Dai

    Full Text Available To review the evidence from RCTs on clinical outcomes and benefit of acute tibial fracture and nonunion treated with and without BMPs.We searched multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMABSE, BIOSIS and Cochrane central as well as reference lists of articles and contacted authors. Evaluated outcomes included union rate, revision rate, hardware failure and infection. The weighted and standard mean difference (WMD and SMD or the relative risk (RR was calculated for continuous or dichotomous data respectively. The quality of the trial was assessed, and meta-analyses were performed with the Cochrane Collaboration's REVMAN 5.0 software.Eight RCTs involving 1113 patients were included. For acute tibial fracture, BMP group was associated with a higher rate of union (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.30 and a lower rate of revision (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.85 compared with control group. No significant differences were found in rate of hardware failure and infection. The pooled RR for achieving union for tibial fracture nonunion was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.86 to 1.13. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the rate of revision (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.13 to 1.85 and infection (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37 to 1.02.Study on acute tibial fractures suggests that BMP is more effective that controls, for bone union and for decreasing the rate of surgical revision to achieve union. For the treatment of tibial fracture nonunion, BMP leads to similar results to as autogenous bone grafting. Finally, well-designed RCTs of BMP for tibial fracture treatment are also needed.

  14. Bifocal osseous avulsion of the patellar tendon from the distal patella and tibial tuberosity in a child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hermansen, Lars; Gade Freund, Knud

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 12-year-old boy, who suffered an injury to the right knee in a skateboard accident. Radiographs and surgery confirmed the extremely rare bifocal avulsion fracture including the distal patellar pole and tibial tuberosity. Open reduction and internal fixation was accomp......This case report describes a 12-year-old boy, who suffered an injury to the right knee in a skateboard accident. Radiographs and surgery confirmed the extremely rare bifocal avulsion fracture including the distal patellar pole and tibial tuberosity. Open reduction and internal fixation...

  15. Tibial shaft fractures treated with functional braces. Experience with 780 fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, A; Gersten, L M; Sobol, P A; Shankwiler, J A; Vangsness, C T

    1989-08-01

    We have reviewed our recent results with functional bracing of tibial shaft fractures in adults in order to define its role in management. We also analysed several parameters of these fractures to discover those which influence healing. A total of 780 tibial fractures treated in prefabricated functional braces were followed to union; shortening of less than 10 mm and angulation of less than 5 degrees in any plane were our parameters for successful treatment. The average time before applying a brace was 3.8 weeks for closed fractures and 5.2 weeks for open ones. Closed fractures healed in an average of 17.4 weeks and open fractures in an average of 21.7 weeks, 90% of them with 10 mm of shortening or less. Varus angulation and posterior angulation were the most common deformities encountered at union. There were 20 nonunions (2.5%) and 46 braces were discontinued during treatment. We found no association between fracture healing and the patient's age, the mechanism of injury or the fracture location. The degree of soft tissue injury appeared to have most influence on the speed of fracture healing. Fracture comminution and initial displacement, the condition of the fibula and the time from injury to bracing also appeared to affect the speed of union.

  16. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Michael A; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (pacceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (pacceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability.

  17. Bicondylar tibial plateau fracture treated by open reduction and fixation with unilateral locked plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Ching Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The management of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures is challenging. A lateral locking plate offers an alternative method to traditional dual plating to avoid further stripping of soft tissue. Nevertheless, the rate of malreduction and fixation loss remains high. From 2007 to 2009, we performed open reduction and fixation with unilateral locked plating to directly reduce the fracture in 15 patients with bicondylar plateau fracture. The average follow-up duration was 16.2 months (range: 12–30 months, and the average age of the patients was 43 years (range: 19–64 years. All fractures were Orthopaedic Trauma Association type 41-C. Postoperative radiographic alignment was evaluated immediately and at 2–4 weeks, 8–12 weeks, 5–7 months, and 11–13 months. Both Oxford knee score and Hospital for Special Surgery knee score were used to evaluate functional outcomes. The average duration within which union was achieved was 4.8 months (range: 2–10 months. One patient incurred wound dehiscence; however, there was no case of deep infection. Malreduction occurred in one patient (6.7% while fixation loss occurred in three patients (20% with subsidence of the posteromedial fragment and varus malalignment. Despite the malreduction rate being lower in our study than in previous studies involving unilateral locked plating, a high rate of fixation loss was recorded. Per our limited experience, we believe that unilateral locked plating may have limitations in patients with selective patterns of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures.

  18. Surgical treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease: ossicle resection with tibial tubercleplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Jordan, Susan S; Andersen, Jason S; Lee, B Minsuk; Kocher, Mininder

    2007-01-01

    The mainstay of treatment of Osgood-Schlatter apophysitis is nonoperative. Surgical treatment has been described for patients who have failed nonoperative management of Osgood-Schlatter disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcome of ossicle excision and tibial tubercleplasty for unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease that has failed nonoperative treatment. A retrospective review was performed on 16 knees in 15 patients who underwent ossicle excision and tibial tubercleplasty for unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease. Functional outcome was assessed using the International Knee Documentation Committee, the Lysholm Knee Scale, and Tegner Activity Score. Twelve patients (75%) returned to preoperative activities and sports, 2 patients (12.5%) partially returned, and 1 patient (6%) did not return. The mean postoperative Lysholm knee score was 76.5. Patients' individual scores ranged from 40 to 100. The mean International Knee Documentation Committee knee score was 75, ranging from 40 to 100. The mean Tegner activity level was 6.8 (range, 3-10). It is our recommendation that when patients fail extensive nonoperative management, surgery to remove the symptomatic ossicle should be offered after skeletal maturity. When this is the case, the addition of tubercleplasty should be performed.

  19. Conservative versus operative treatment of displaced noncomminuted tibial shaft fractures. A retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Outer, A J; Meeuwis, J D; Hermans, J; Zwaveling, A

    1990-03-01

    The results of conservative (mainly, functional bracing) and operative treatment (mainly, plate fixation) have been compared in a retrospective study of 170 displaced noncomminutive tibial shaft fractures. The characteristics of the fractures in both treatment groups showed no significant differences. The follow-up analysis revealed no statistical differences in outcome between the two methods. However, because of the many factors analyzed and the restricted number of patients studied, it is impossible to compare all factors independently. Surgical treatment resulted in a higher rate of complications (such as implant failure, osteitis, and refracture) and a longer total hospitalization time. Conservative treatment showed a longer duration of fracture healing and a higher rate of malalignment. Malalignments of up to 10 degrees with no adverse effects have been seen so far. In conservative treatment, two fracture types were identified with a higher rate of malalignment: short oblique isolated tibial fractures and fully dislocated transverse crural fractures. Conservative therapy is favored, because there is less discomfort for the patient and the treatment is cost contained.

  20. Ingenious method of external fixator use to maintain alignment for nailing a proximal tibial shaft fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Prateek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Kumar, Vishal; Kumar Meena, Umesh; Saibaba, Balaji

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of the tibia are one of the most commonly seen orthopedic injuries. Most of them result from a high velocity trauma. While intramedullary nailing of tibial diaphyseal fractures is considered as the golden standard form of treatment for such cases, many metaphyseal and metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures can also be managed by nailing. Maintenance of alignment of such fractures during surgical procedure is often challenging as the pull of patellar tendon tends to extend the proximal fragment as soon as one flexes the knee for the surgical procedure. Numerous technical modifications have been described in the literature for successfully nailing such fractures including semi extended nailing, use of medial plates and external fixators among others. In this study, it was aimed to report two cases in which we used our ingenious method of applying external fixator for maintaining alignment of the fracture and aiding in the entire process of closed intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal tibial fractures by the conventional method. We were able to get good alignment during and after the closed surgery as observed on post-operative radiographs and believe that further evaluation of this technique may be of help to surgeons who want to avoid other techniques.