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Sample records for meningococcal vaccines

  1. Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines: What You Need to Know (VIS) Page Content ... to help protect against serogroup B . Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines There are two kinds of meningococcal vaccines licensed ...

  2. Meningococcal group B vaccines.

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    Findlow, Jamie

    2013-06-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a devastating and feared infection with a significant morbidity and mortality profile. The successful impact of meningococcal capsular group C glyconconjugate vaccines introduced into the UK infant immunization schedule in 1999, has resulted in >80% of disease now being attributable to meningococcal capsular group B (MenB). MenB glyconconjugate vaccines are not immunogenic and hence, vaccine design has focused on sub-capsular antigens. Recently, a four component vaccine to combat MenB disease (4CMenB) has progressed through clinical development and was approved by the European Medicines Agency at the end of 2012. This vaccine has proven safe and immunogenic and has been predicted to provide protection against ~73% of the MenB disease from England and Wales. Recommendation/implementation of the vaccine into the UK infant schedule is currently being evaluated. 4CMenB has the potential to provide protection against a significant proportion of MenB disease in the UK which is currently unpreventable.

  3. Meningococcal vaccine evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Bona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis worldwide. Although polysaccharide and glycoconjugate vaccines have been developed for serogroups A, C, Y and W-135, currently there are no broadly effective vaccines available for the prevention of meningococcal B disease. A general overview of the burden of the disease and the strains prevalence in the world with the focus in particular on the Italian situation is provided in this article, together with the vaccinations developed and under evaluation.

  4. Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB)

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    What are meningococcal group B vaccines?Two serogroup B meningococcal group B vaccines (Bexsero and Trumenba) have been licensed by the Food and Drug ... Who should not get meningococcal group B vaccine or should wait?Tell the person ... you the vaccine:If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies. ...

  5. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines: optimizing global impact

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    Terranella A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Terranella1,2, Amanda Cohn2, Thomas Clark2 1Epidemic Intelligence Service, Division of Applied Sciences, Scientific Education and Professional Development Program Office, 2Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Meningococcal conjugate vaccines have several advantages over polysaccharide vaccines, including the ability to induce greater antibody persistence, avidity, immunologic memory, and herd immunity. Since 1999, meningococcal conjugate vaccine programs have been established across the globe. Many of these vaccination programs have resulted in significant decline in meningococcal disease in several countries. Recent introduction of serogroup A conjugate vaccine in Africa offers the potential to eliminate meningococcal disease as a public health problem in Africa. However, the duration of immune response and the development of widespread herd immunity in the population remain important questions for meningococcal vaccine programs. Because of the unique epidemiology of meningococcal disease around the world, the optimal vaccination strategy for long-term disease prevention will vary by country. Keywords: conjugate vaccine, meningitis, meningococcal vaccine, meningococcal disease

  6. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

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    Jacqueline M. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles.

  7. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

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    Miller, Jacqueline M.; Mesaros, Narcisa; Van Der Wielen, Marie; Baine, Yaela

    2011-01-01

    Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles. PMID:21991444

  8. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

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    ... More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens What Can I Do to Ease My Child's Fear of Shots? Meningitis How Do I Know Which Vaccines My Kids Need? How Can I Comfort My Baby During Shots? Immunization Schedule Your ... What's a Normal Reaction to a Shot? Immunizations Meningitis ...

  9. Meningococcal Education: More than Just a Vaccine

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    Kuenzi, Lana

    2004-01-01

    The administration of meningitis vaccinations to the college population has recently been the topic of much discussion. Much of the controversy has surrounded the promotion of widespread vaccinations or educational campaigns about the vaccine for incoming freshman students. Recommendations about the use of meningococcal vaccines for college…

  10. Pediatricians' preferences for infant meningococcal vaccination.

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    Poulos, Christine; Reed Johnson, F; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Anonychuk, Andrea; Misurski, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is rare but can cause death or disabilities. Although the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended meningococcal vaccination for at-risk children aged 9 through 23 months, it has not endorsed universal vaccination. Health insurance payments for the vaccination of children who are not at risk are likely to be limited. Use of infant meningococcal vaccines by these families will thus depend on the preferences of physicians who might recommend vaccination to parents, as well as parents' preferences. To quantify pediatricians' preferences for specific features of hypothetical infant meningococcal vaccines. A sample of pediatricians (n = 216) completed a Web-enabled, discrete choice experiment survey in which respondents chose between pairs of hypothetical vaccines in a series of trade-off questions. The questions described vaccines with six attributes. A random-parameters logit regression model was used to estimate the relative importance weights physicians place on vaccine features. These weights were used to calculate the predicted probability that a physician chooses hypothetical vaccines with given characteristics. Pediatricians' choices indicated that increases in vaccine effectiveness were among the most important factors in their vaccine recommendations, followed by increases in the number of injections. The age at which protection begins and the number of additional office visits were less important. Whether a booster was required after 5 years was the least important factor in vaccine recommendations. The results suggest that virtually all (99.9%) physicians in the sample would recommend a vaccine even with the least-preferred features rather than no infant meningococcal vaccine. Physicians' responses indicate a strong preference for infant meningococcal vaccination. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Meningococcal B vaccine. An immunogenic vaccine possibly useful during outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Invasive meningococcal infections can be life-threatening and cause severe sequelae. Antibiotic therapy is only partially effective. Bexsero is the first meningococcal B vaccine to be approved in the European Union. It contains four capsular antigens from various strains of group B meningococci. Clinical trials of this meningococcal B vaccine did not assess clinical protection. Two immunogenicity studies in adults, one in adolescents and six in infants, are available. They established the immunogenicity of the meningococcal B vaccine, determined age-appropriate vaccination schedules, and verified that concomitant administration of other vaccines did not undermine its immunogenicity. In the absence of relevant clinical trials, an in vitro study showed that sera from vaccinated individuals were likely to have bactericidal activity against 85% of 200 invasive meningococcal B strains isolated in France in 2007-2008. The meningococcal B vaccine provoked local adverse effects in most vaccinees, including local erythema, induration and pain. Fever occurred in about half of vaccinated children. Six cases of Kawasaki syndrome have been reported in children who received the vaccine, compared to only one case in control groups. In practice, the harm-benefit balance of this meningococcal B vaccine justify using it during outbreaks, provided the outbreak strain is covered by the vaccine antigens. Vaccinees should be enrolled in studies designed to evaluate clinical efficacy and to better determine the risk of Kawasaki syndrome.

  12. Serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccines in Africa.

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    Kristiansen, Paul A; Jørgensen, Hannah J; Caugant, Dominique A

    2015-01-01

    Serogroup A meningococcal epidemics have been a recurrent public health problem, especially in resource-poor countries of Africa. Recently, the administration in mass vaccination campaigns of a single dose of the monovalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenAfriVac, to the 1-29 year-old population of sub-Saharan Africa has prevented epidemics of meningitis caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. This strategy has also been shown to provide herd protection of the non-vaccinated population. Development of meningococcal conjugate vaccines covering other serogroups and enhanced use of the pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines must be pursued to fully control bacterial meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. New Meningococcal Vaccine Recommendations under Consideration

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    Turner, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will be considering a new vaccination recommendation for the prevention of invasive "N. meningitidis" infection when meningococcal conjugate vaccines are licensed in the United States. The CDC has also updated the Working Group…

  14. Prevention and control of meningococcal outbreaks: The emerging role of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines.

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    Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Ahmed, Sohail; Rappuoli, Rino; Black, Steven

    2015-07-17

    Recently an investigational meningococcal B vaccine has been used in two college outbreaks in the US. This is the first time that a meningococcal B vaccine has been used for outbreak control in the US. However, strain specific vaccines for meningococcal B outbreaks have been developed in Norway, Cuba and to control a large prolonged outbreak in New Zealand. Although meningococcal disease is mostly endemic and baseline rates in the US have fallen over the past decade, outbreaks are not uncommon in the US and globally. In an outbreak, disease risk can rise 1000 fold or more and such outbreaks can last a decade or longer causing significant morbidity and mortality. Here we review the evolution of several serogroup B outbreaks, and, when applicable, the development and impact of meningococcal B vaccines to control these outbreaks. Prior to the availability of "broad spectrum" meningococcal B vaccines, vaccines developed to control meningococcal B outbreaks were strain specific. With the development of two newly licensed meningococcal B vaccines - a four component meningococcal B vaccine (Bexsero, Novartis) and the two component fHBP vaccine (Trumenba, Pfizer) that target a broad array of meningococcal B strains, there is now the potential to prevent outbreaks and as well as to shorten the delay between identification of an outbreak and availability of a vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

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    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining around ...

  16. [Which vaccination strategies for African meningococcal meningitis?].

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    Saliou, P; Debois, H

    2002-12-01

    In 1963, Lapeyssonnie published a masterful description of the epidemiology of cerebrospinal meningococcal meningitis in the Sahel region of Africa (essentially due to the Neisseria meningitidis sero-group A): geographic spread (meningitis belt), seasonal cycle (dry and cool season). When a combined polyosidic AC vaccine became available in the early 1970s, a disease control strategy was defined along the lines of epidemiological surveillance, prophylaxis of lethality by early treatment of cases and reactive vaccination, since the polyosidic vaccine could not be included in the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Despite some success, this strategy has not led to the control of cerebrospinal meningococcal meningitis in Africa. Amongst the obstacles encountered are the difficulty to define at what point an out-break becomes an epidemic, gaps in epidemiological surveillance, unavailable vaccine doses, delayed and complex vaccination campaigns. At the end of the 1990s, controversy ensued: since reactive vaccination was fraught with so many problems, why not consider a strategy of preventive AC vaccination for high risk areas? But this controversy may well die out with the emergence of the present-day W 135 serogroup responsible for the first large scale epidemic in Burkina Faso in 2002. If this is confirmed, a polyosidic vaCcine containing the W 135 antigen would be required, pending the availability for Africa of a conjugate tetravalent ACYW135 vaccine which could be included in the EPI.

  17. Indirect effects by meningococcal vaccines: herd protection versus herd immunity.

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    Bröker, Michael

    2011-08-01

    The term "herd immunity" for the indirect effect of meningococcal conjugate vaccines is inaccurate. A more appropriate term is "herd protection," because this term correctly describes the public effects imparted by vaccination campaigns against the meningococcus.

  18. The Global Evolution of Meningococcal Epidemiology Following the Introduction of Meningococcal Vaccines.

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    Pelton, Stephen I

    2016-08-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) caused by Neisseria meningitidis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although IMD incidence is highest in infants, a second peak occurs in adolescents/young adults. The incidence of IMD and the predominant disease-causing meningococcal serogroups vary worldwide. Epidemiologic data have guided the development of meningococcal vaccines to reduce the IMD burden. In Europe, serogroup C IMD has been substantially reduced since the introduction of a serogroup C conjugate vaccine. Serogroup B predominates in Europe, although cases of serogroup Y IMD have been increasing in recent years. In the United States, declines in serogroup C and Y disease have been observed in association with the introduction of quadrivalent (serogroups ACWY) meningococcal conjugate vaccines; serogroup B persists and is now the most common cause of outbreak associated disease. In the African meningitis belt, a conjugate vaccine for serogroup A has been effective in decreasing meningitis associated with that serogroup. Outbreaks of the previously rare serogroup X disease have been reported in this region since 2006. In recent years, outbreaks of serogroup B IMD, for which vaccines have only recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency, have occurred in Europe and the United States. Targeting meningococcal vaccination to adolescents/young adults may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with IMD and has the potential to impact the larger community through herd benefits. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergency Meningococcal ACWY Vaccination Program for Teenagers to Control Group W Meningococcal Disease, England, 2015-2016.

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    Campbell, Helen; Edelstein, Michael; Andrews, Nick; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary; Ladhani, Shamez

    2017-07-01

    During the first 12 months of an emergency meningococcal ACWY vaccination program for teenagers in England, coverage among persons who left school in 2015, the first cohort to be vaccinated, was 36.6%. There were 69% fewer group W meningococcal cases than predicted by trend analysis and no cases in vaccinated teenagers.

  20. Factors contributing to the immunogenicity of meningococcal conjugate vaccines

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    Bröker, Michael; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Various glycoprotein conjugate vaccines have been developed for the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease, having significant advantages over pure polysaccharide vaccines. One of the most important features of the conjugate vaccines is the induction of a T-cell dependent immune response, which enables both the induction of immune memory and a booster response after repeated immunization. The nature of the carrier protein to which the polysaccharides are chemically linked, is often regarded as the main component of the vaccine in determining its immunogenicity. However, other factors can have a significant impact on the vaccine's profile. In this review, we explore the physico-chemical properties of meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which can significantly contribute to the vaccine's immunogenicity. We demonstrate that the carrier is not the sole determining factor of the vaccine's profile, but, moreover, that the conjugate vaccine's immunogenicity is the result of multiple physico-chemical structures and characteristics. PMID:26934310

  1. The next chapter for group B meningococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N Y; Pollard, A J

    2018-02-01

    The majority of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in the developed world is caused by capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis, however success with vaccination against organisms bearing this capsule has previously been restricted to control of geographically limited clonal outbreaks. As we enter a new era, with the first routine program underway to control endemic group B meningococcal disease for infants in the UK, it is timely to review the key landmarks in group B vaccine development, and discuss the issues determining whether control of endemic group B disease will be achieved. Evidence of a reduction in carriage acquisition of invasive group B meningococcal strains, after vaccination among adolescents, is imperative if routine immunization is to drive population control of disease beyond those who are vaccinated (i.e. through herd immunity). The need for multiple doses to generate a sufficiently protective response and reactogenicity remain significant problems with the new generation of vaccines. Despite these limitations, early data from the UK indicate that new group B meningococcal vaccines have the potential to have a major impact on meningococcal disease, and to provide new insight into how we might do better in the future.

  2. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

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    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunogenicity of meningococcal PorA antigens in OMV vaccines

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    Luijkx, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    For the prevention of meningococcal infection caused by group B meningococci, the Netherlands Vaccine Institute (NVI) has developed a hexavalent Porin A (PorA) based Outer Membrane Vesicle (OMV) vaccine (Hexamen). In various clinical studies with HexaMen, differences in the immune responses to the

  4. Enter B and W: two new meningococcal vaccine programmes launched

    OpenAIRE

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Ramsay, Mary; Borrow, Ray; Riordan, Andrew; Watson, John M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the UK became the first country in the world to have a comprehensive routine meningococcal vaccine programme targeting all of the main capsular groups of N. meningitidis. 1 An infant vaccine programme against meningococcal capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) was launched from 1st September with an aim to reduce endemic MenB disease in early childhood. On 1st August 2015, an adolescent programme against groups A, C, W and Y meningococci (MenACWY) was rolled out to halt a gr...

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of meningococcal A and C polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, E L; Bowers, T; Mink, C M; Kennedy, D J; Belshe, R B; Harakeh, H; Pais, L; Holder, P; Carlone, G M

    1994-01-01

    A meningococcal vaccine containing group A and C polysaccharides conjugated to CRM197 was evaluated in 50 adults. Vaccinees were entered into one of five groups: 30 adults received a single dose of either 22, 11, or 5.5 micrograms of the conjugated A-C vaccine; 10 received an approved meningococcal vaccine; and 10 received saline injections. Local and systemic reactions to vaccines were recorded, and immune responses were determined. The experimental meningococcal vaccine was well tolerated, ...

  6. Pros and cons of vaccination against serogroup B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Rodríguez, Miguel; Domínguez García, Ángela

    2018-02-09

    A vaccine has recently been approved in the EU against meningococcal serogroup B, the main cause of meningococcal disease. There is a fierce debate about the decision regarding a universal vaccination in infants older than 2 months, as recommended by the majority of scientific societies. In western Europe the only country to have included the universal vaccination is the United Kingdom, with a lower incidence of the disease than Ireland. Other countries have also adopted it, such as the Czech Republic, Cuba and certain regions of Italy. Numerous cost-effectiveness studies have been published regarding the vaccination with different assumptions, which have supported the decision not to implant the universal vaccination because it exceeds the will to pay for a health benefit. We discuss the pros and cons of the universal vaccination against meningococcal B, recommended by the Sociedad Española de Pediatría (Spanish Society of Paediatrics), which as yet has not been implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Enter B and W: two new meningococcal vaccine programmes launched.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Ramsay, Mary; Borrow, Ray; Riordan, Andrew; Watson, John M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the UK became the first country in the world to have a comprehensive routine meningococcal vaccine programme targeting all of the main capsular groups of N. meningitidis. 1 An infant vaccine programme against meningococcal capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) was launched from 1st September with an aim to reduce endemic MenB disease in early childhood. On 1st August 2015, an adolescent programme against groups A, C, W and Y meningococci (MenACWY) was rolled out to halt a growing outbreak of capsular group W disease (MenW) caused by a hypervirulent clone of N. meningitidis, in addition to maintaining control against MenC disease provided by the current adolescent programme. 2. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Meningococcal vaccines and herd immunity: lessons learned from serogroup C conjugate vaccination programs.

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    Trotter, Caroline L; Maiden, Martin C J

    2009-07-01

    Effective vaccines provide direct protection to immunized individuals, but may also provide benefits to unvaccinated individuals by reducing transmission and thereby lowering the risk of infection. Such herd immunity effects have been demonstrated following the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines, with reductions in disease attack rates in unimmunized individuals and significantly lower serogroup C carriage attributable to the vaccine introduction. In the UK, targeting teenagers for immunization was crucial in maximizing indirect effects, as most meningococcal transmission occurs in this age group. Questions remain regarding the duration of herd protection and the most appropriate long-term immunization strategies. The magnitude of the herd effects following MCC vaccination was largely unanticipated, and has important consequences for the design and evaluation of new meningococcal vaccines.

  9. Meningococcal vaccines and herd immunity: lessons learned from serogroup C conjugate vaccination programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Caroline L; Maiden, Martin C J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Effective vaccines provide direct protection to immunised individuals, but may also provide benefits to unvaccinated individuals by reducing transmission and hence lowering the risk of infection. Such herd immunity effects have been demonstrated following the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines, with reductions in disease attack rates in unimmunised individuals and significantly lower serogroup C carriage attributable to the vaccine introduction. In the UK targeting teenagers for immunisation was crucial in maximising indirect effects, as most meningococcal transmission occurs in this age group. Questions remain regarding the duration of herd protection and the most appropriate long-term immunisation strategies. The magnitude of the herd effects following MCC vaccination was largely unanticipated, and has important consequences for the design and evaluation of new meningococcal vaccines. PMID:19538112

  10. History of Meningococcal Outbreaks in the United States: Implications for Vaccination and Disease Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Bruce; Gandhi, Ashesh; Balmer, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis presents a significant public health concern. Meningococcal disease is rare but potentially fatal within 24 hours of onset of illness, and survivors may experience permanent sequelae. This review presents the epidemiology, incidence, and outbreak data for invasive meningococcal disease in the United States since 1970, and it highlights recent changes in vaccine recommendations to prevent meningococcal disease. Relevant publications were obtained by database searches for articles published between January 1970 and July 2015. The incidence of meningococcal disease has decreased in the United States since 1970, but serogroup B meningococcal disease is responsible for an increasing proportion of disease burden in young adults. Recent serogroup B outbreaks on college campuses warrant broader age-based recommendations for meningococcal group B vaccines, similar to the currently recommended quadrivalent vaccine that protects against serogroups A, C, W, and Y. After the recent approval of two serogroup B vaccines, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices first updated its recommendations for routine meningococcal vaccination to cover at-risk populations, including those at risk during serogroup B outbreaks, and later it issued a recommendation for those aged 16-23 years. Meningococcal disease outbreaks remain challenging to predict, making the optimal disease management strategy one of prevention through vaccination rather than containment. How the epidemiology of serogroup B disease and prevention of outbreaks will be affected by the new category B recommendation for serogroup B vaccines remains to be seen. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. An evaluation of emerging vaccines for childhood meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Christopher B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal meningitis is a major cause of disease worldwide, with frequent epidemics particularly affecting an area of sub-Saharan Africa known as the “meningitis belt”. Neisseria meningitidis group A (MenA is responsible for major epidemics in Africa. Recently W-135 has emerged as an important pathogen. Currently, the strategy for control of such outbreaks is emergency use of meningococcal (MC polysaccharide vaccines, but these have a limited ability to induce herd immunity and elicit an adequate immune response in infant and young children. In recent times initiatives have been taken to introduce meningococcal conjugate vaccine in these African countries. Currently there are two different types of MC conjugate vaccines at late stages of development covering serogroup A and W-135: a multivalent MC conjugate vaccine against serogroup A,C,Y and W-135; and a monovalent conjugate vaccine against serogroup A. We aimed to perform a structured assessment of these emerging meningococcal vaccines as a means of reducing global meningococal disease burden among children under 5 years of age. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In the first stage we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging MC vaccines relevant to 12 criteria of interest. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their “collective optimism” towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. Results For MenA conjugate vaccine the experts showed very high level of optimism (~ 90% or more for 7 out of the 12 criteria. The experts felt that the likelihood of efficacy on meningitis was very high (~ 90%. Deliverability

  12. An evaluation of emerging vaccines for childhood meningococcal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Meningococcal meningitis is a major cause of disease worldwide, with frequent epidemics particularly affecting an area of sub-Saharan Africa known as the “meningitis belt”. Neisseria meningitidis group A (MenA) is responsible for major epidemics in Africa. Recently W-135 has emerged as an important pathogen. Currently, the strategy for control of such outbreaks is emergency use of meningococcal (MC) polysaccharide vaccines, but these have a limited ability to induce herd immunity and elicit an adequate immune response in infant and young children. In recent times initiatives have been taken to introduce meningococcal conjugate vaccine in these African countries. Currently there are two different types of MC conjugate vaccines at late stages of development covering serogroup A and W-135: a multivalent MC conjugate vaccine against serogroup A,C,Y and W-135; and a monovalent conjugate vaccine against serogroup A. We aimed to perform a structured assessment of these emerging meningococcal vaccines as a means of reducing global meningococal disease burden among children under 5 years of age. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In the first stage we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging MC vaccines relevant to 12 criteria of interest. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies). They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their “collective optimism” towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. Results For MenA conjugate vaccine the experts showed very high level of optimism (~ 90% or more) for 7 out of the 12 criteria. The experts felt that the likelihood of efficacy on meningitis was very high (~ 90%). Deliverability, acceptability to health

  13. The role of economic evaluation in vaccine decision making : Focus on meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R.; Trotter, C.L.; Edmunds, W.J.; Postma, Maarten; Beutels, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several countries have experienced increases in the incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease. It can be controlled with older polysaccharide vaccines and particularly the recently developed conjugate vaccines. For 21 developed countries, we investigated the role that economic

  14. [New vaccines against group B meningococcal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietalahti, Jukka; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    There has been no efficient general vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus (MenB), since its polysialic acid capsule is of low immunogenicity and could potentially induce autoimmunity. Reverse vaccinology has revealed new promising protein candidates for vaccine development. One of them is factor H-binding protein (fHbp), which has the potential to curb the alternative pathway of human complement. As fHbp can elicit antibodies that promote complement-mediated lysis, a vaccine partly based on it has been introduced against MenB infections. FHbp has been the milestone protein for structural vaccinology to create optimal chimeric antigens for vaccine use.

  15. Carriage Rate and Effects of Vaccination after Outbreaks of Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease, Brazil, 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurelio Palazzi; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O.; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

    2014-01-01

    During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated...

  16. The Global Meningococcal Initiative: global epidemiology, the impact of vaccines on meningococcal disease and the importance of herd protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrow, Ray; Alarcón, Pedro; Carlos, Josefina; Caugant, Dominique A; Christensen, Hannah; Debbag, Roberto; De Wals, Philippe; Echániz-Aviles, Gabriela; Findlow, Jamie; Head, Chris; Holt, Daphne; Kamiya, Hajime; Saha, Samir K; Sidorenko, Sergey; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Trotter, Caroline; Vázquez Moreno, Julio A; von Gottberg, Anne; Sáfadi, Marco A P

    2017-04-01

    The 2015 Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) meeting discussed the global importance of meningococcal disease (MD) and its continually changing epidemiology. Areas covered: Although recent vaccination programs have been successful in reducing incidence in many countries (e.g. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup [Men]C in Brazil, MenA in the African meningitis belt), new clones have emerged, causing outbreaks (e.g. MenW in South America, MenC in Nigeria and Niger). The importance of herd protection was highlighted, emphasizing the need for high vaccination uptake among those with the highest carriage rates, as was the need for boosters to maintain individual and herd protection following decline of immune response after primary immunization. Expert commentary: The GMI Global Recommendations for Meningococcal Disease were updated to include a recommendation to enable access to whole-genome sequencing as for surveillance, guidance on strain typing to guide use of subcapsular vaccines, and recognition of the importance of advocacy and awareness campaigns.

  17. Safety of a new conjugate meningococcal C vaccine in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, R; Jones, I; Walker, D; McMurtrie, K; Shaw, L; Race, G; Choo, S; Danzig, L; Oster, P; Finn, A

    2001-11-01

    Group C conjugate meningococcal vaccines (Men C) were introduced into the UK primary immunisation schedule in November 1999. There has been extensive professional and public interest in their efficacy and safety. To determine the occurrence of at least one uncommon adverse event in infants related to the administration of the Chiron Men C vaccine. A total of 2796 infants aged approximately 2 months were recruited into the study from areas in and around Sheffield and from Scotland. They were vaccinated with the Chiron Men C vaccine at 2, 3, and 4 months along with routine immunisations. Data on adverse events occurring one month after each dose were collected actively and prospectively and reviewed for possible relation to the vaccine. There were no deaths. There were no serious adverse events considered definitely or probably caused by the vaccine. Four infants developed serious adverse events (hypotonia, screaming syndrome, maculopapular rash, and agitation, respectively) that were considered possibly related to the vaccine. All recovered completely. Adverse events were seen in 1804 children but were considered possibly related to the vaccine in only 49 (1.8%). On subsequent immunisation there were no recurrences of adverse events considered to be possibly related to the vaccine.

  18. [Study on immunogenicity of group A and group C meningococcal conjugate vaccine with coupling group B meningococcal outer membrane protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fu-Bao; Tao, Hong; Wang, Hong-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the Immunogenicity of Group A and Group C Meningococcal conjugate Vaccine with coupling Group B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Protein (Men B-OMP). 458 healthy children aged 3-5 months, 6-23 months, 2-6 years and 7-24 years were given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP or other vaccine as control group to measure the pre-and post-vaccination Men A and C and B by Serum Bactericidal Assay (SBA) in the double-blind randomized controlled trial. 97.65%-100% were 4 times or greater increase in SBA titer for the healthy children given the Groups A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP, The geometric mean titer of SBA were 1:194-1:420, which significantly higber than controls. The Group A and C conjugate Vaccine with MenB-OMP was safe and well immunogenic.

  19. Meningococcal vaccines and herd immunity: lessons learned from serogroup C conjugate vaccination programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Trotter, Caroline L; Maiden, Martin C J

    2009-01-01

    Effective vaccines provide direct protection to immunised individuals, but may also provide benefits to unvaccinated individuals by reducing transmission and hence lowering the risk of infection. Such herd immunity effects have been demonstrated following the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines, with reductions in disease attack rates in unimmunised individuals and significantly lower serogroup C carriage attributable to the vaccine introduction. In the UK targe...

  20. Group B meningococcal vaccine science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis is one of the leading causes of death in developed countries. A new vaccine (4CMenB) has recently been developed which was found to have an acceptable safety profile in clinical studies and to be immunogenic. This review examines the evidence supporting the licensure of the 4CMenB vaccine and discusses recommendations for its use. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New recombinant vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal B disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha MK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muhamed-Kheir Taha, Ala-Eddine DeghmaneInstitut Pasteur, Unit of Invasive Bacterial Infections and National Reference Center for Meningococci, Paris, FranceAbstract: Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening invasive infection (mainly septicemia and meningitis that occurs as epidemic or sporadic cases. The causative agent, Neisseria meningitidis or meningococcus, is a capsulated Gram-negative bacterium. Current vaccines are prepared from the capsular polysaccharides (that also determine serogroups and are available against strains of serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135 that show variable distribution worldwide. Plain polysaccharide vaccines were first used and subsequently conjugate vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity were introduced. The capsular polysaccharide of meningococcal serogroup B is poorly immunogenic due to similarity to the human neural cells adhesion molecule. Tailor-made, strain-specific vaccines have been developed to control localized and clonal outbreaks due to meningococci of serogroup B but no “universal” vaccine is yet available. This unmet medical need was recently overcome using several subcapsular proteins to allow broad range coverage of strains and to reduce the risk of escape variants due to genetic diversity of the meningococcus. Several vaccines are under development that target major or minor surface proteins. One vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis, under registration, is a multicomponent recombinant vaccine that showed an acceptable safety profile and covers around 80% of the currently circulating serogroup B isolates. However, its reactogenicity in infants seems to be high and the long term persistence of the immune response needs to be determined. Its activity on carriage, and therefore transmission, is under evaluation. Indirect protection is expected through restricting strain circulation and acquisition. This vaccine covers the circulating strains according to the presence of the targeted antigens in the

  2. Meningococcal disease awareness and meningoccocal vaccination among Greek students planning to travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Maltezou, Helena C

    2017-06-09

    Objective Students living in dormitories are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Our aim was to evaluate Greek students planning to study abroad about their level of meningococcal disease awareness and attitudes and practices towards meningococcal vaccination. Methods We studied 231 Greek ERASMUS students using a questionnaire. Results Students had a mean number of 4.1 correct answers out of six questions. In particular 66.5% 79.3%, 72.3% and 82.3% of them answered correctly about the etiology, transmission, epidemiology and treatment of meningococcal disease, respectively. Only 23.4% were vaccinated, whereas 14.7% were planning to do so in the near future. Students who answered correctly ≥5 questions were more likely to be male, vaccinated against meningococcal meningitis and science students. Conclusion We found an overall good level of knowledge about meningococcal disease among Greek students planning to study or already studying abroad. Knowledge about meningococcal disease was associated with vaccine uptake. However, vaccination rate against meningococcal disease was low.

  3. Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Campaign Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis Meningococcal Home About the Disease Risk Factors Age Community Settings Certain Medical Conditions Travel Causes & Transmission Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Prevention Meningococcal Photos ...

  4. New and Improved Vaccines Against Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    is generally lowest with group B and highest with groups A and Y f 10,17]. Group B serotype 15, sulfonamide -resistant strains, however, tend to cause...structures and remain antigenic when detoxified [98] or converted to oligosacharides by mild acid hydrolysis [ 11 ]. There are also several problems...associated with the use of the LPS in a vaccine. The most obvious is its toxicity, but the LPS can b@ readily detoxified by mild acid hydrolysis , which

  5. [Invasive meningococcal disease in Navarra in the era of a meningococcal C vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Desirée; Moreno, Laura; Herranz, Mercedes; Bernaola, Enrique; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Systematic childhood vaccination against meningococcus C has had a considerable impact on meningococcal invasive disease (MID). The aim of this study is to perform an analysis on the epidemiology, the clinical features, and the factors associated with a worse prognosis of MID, in the era of a meningococcal C vaccine. The study included confirmed cases of MID in children less than 15 years of age in Navarra, Spain, between 2008 and 2014. The risk of death or permanent sequelae was evaluated according to the presence of clinical features and analytical parameters at diagnosis. The average annual incidence was 7.9 cases per 100,000 children, with the highest attack rate in children < 1 year. Of 53 cases analysed, 87% were due to meningococcus B. Fever (100%), rash (91%), and elevation of procalcitonin (94%) were the most frequent findings at diagnosis. Some sign of shock was observed in 70% upon arrival at the hospital. The case-fatality rate was 3.8% and 10 % survived with permanent sequelae. Glasgow coma scale < 15 (odds ratio [OR]= 9.2), seizure (OR=8.3), sepsis without meningitis (OR=9.1), thrombocytopenia (OR=30.5), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (OR= 10.9) showed a greater association with a worse prognosis. The MID continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Therefore, new advances are needed in the prevention, early diagnosis, and detection of the factors associated with poor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. A Bivalent Meningococcal B Vaccine in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Vesikari, Timo; Absalon, Judith; Beeslaar, Johannes; Ward, Brian J; Senders, Shelly; Eiden, Joseph J; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S; York, Laura J; Jones, Thomas R; Harris, Shannon L; O'Neill, Robert; Radley, David; Maansson, Roger; Prégaldien, Jean-Louis; Ginis, John; Staerke, Nina B; Perez, John L

    2017-12-14

    MenB-FHbp is a licensed meningococcal B vaccine targeting factor H-binding protein. Two phase 3 studies assessed the safety of the vaccine and its immunogenicity against diverse strains of group B meningococcus. We randomly assigned 3596 adolescents (10 to 18 years of age) to receive MenB-FHbp or hepatitis A virus vaccine and saline and assigned 3304 young adults (18 to 25 years of age) to receive MenB-FHbp or saline at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months. Immunogenicity was assessed in serum bactericidal assays that included human complement (hSBAs). We used 14 meningococcal B test strains that expressed vaccine-heterologous factor H-binding proteins representative of meningococcal B epidemiologic diversity; an hSBA titer of at least 1:4 is the accepted correlate of protection. The five primary end points were the proportion of participants who had an increase in their hSBA titer for each of 4 primary strains by a factor of 4 or more and the proportion of those who had an hSBA titer at least as high as the lower limit of quantitation (1:8 or 1:16) for all 4 strains combined after dose 3. We also assessed the hSBA responses to the primary strains after dose 2; hSBA responses to the 10 additional strains after doses 2 and 3 were assessed in a subgroup of participants only. Safety was assessed in participants who received at least one dose. In the modified intention-to-treat population, the percentage of adolescents who had an increase in the hSBA titer by a factor of 4 or more against each primary strain ranged from 56.0 to 85.3% after dose 2 and from 78.8 to 90.2% after dose 3; the percentages of young adults ranged from 54.6 to 85.6% and 78.9 to 89.7%, after doses 2 and 3, respectively. Composite responses after doses 2 and 3 in adolescents were 53.7% and 82.7%, respectively, and those in young adults were 63.3% and 84.5%, respectively. Responses to the 4 primary strains were predictive of responses to the 10 additional strains. Most of those who received Men

  7. Global practices of meningococcal vaccine use and impact on invasive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asad; Jafri, Rabab Zehra; Messonnier, Nancy; Tevi-Benissan, Carol; Durrheim, David; Eskola, Juhani; Fermon, Florence; Klugman, Keith P; Ramsay, Mary; Sow, Samba; Zhujun, Shao; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Abramson, Jon

    2014-01-01

    A number of countries now include meningococcal vaccines in their routine immunization programs. This review focuses on different approaches to including meningococcal vaccines in country programs across the world and their effect on the burden of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) as reflected by pre and post-vaccine incidence rates in the last 20 years. Mass campaigns using conjugated meningococcal vaccines have lead to control of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the UK, Canada, Australia, Spain, Belgium, Ireland, and Iceland. Serogroup B disease, predominant in New Zealand, has been dramatically decreased, partly due to the introduction of an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine. Polysaccharide vaccines were used in high risk people in Saudi Arabia and Syria and in routine immunization in China and Egypt. The highest incidence region of the meningitis belt initiated vaccination with the serogroup A conjugate vaccine in 2010 and catch-up vaccination is ongoing. Overall results of this vaccine introduction are encouraging especially in countries with a moderate to high level of endemic disease. Continued surveillance is required to monitor effectiveness in countries that recently implemented these programs. PMID:24548156

  8. Meningococcal B Vaccine Failure With a Penicillin-Resistant Strain in a Young Adult on Long-Term Eculizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Lucidarme, Jay; Bingham, Coralie; Warwicker, Paul; Goodship, Tim; Borrow, Ray; Ladhani, Shamez N

    2017-09-01

    We describe a case of invasive meningococcal disease due to a vaccine-preventable and penicillin-resistant strain in a fully immunized young adult on long-term complement inhibitor therapy and daily penicillin chemoprophylaxis. Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human complement C5 protein and inhibits the terminal complement pathway. It is currently recommended for the treatment of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathies. An unwanted complication of inhibiting complement, however, is an increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease. Here, we report the first case of meningococcal group B vaccine failure in a young adult receiving eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. She developed invasive meningococcal disease due to a vaccine-preventable and penicillin-resistant meningococcal group B strain 4 months after receiving 2 doses of meningococcal group B vaccine while on oral penicillin prophylaxis against meningococcal infection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Meningococcal vaccine--do some children experience side effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, D A; Edwards, I R

    1989-02-22

    In order to stop an outbreak of group A meningococcal meningitis, 130,000 Auckland children were immunised. During the month following vaccination there were 546 reports of unusual clinical events reported by parents and practitioners, together with 40 specialist paediatric assessments of children presenting with neurological symptoms. In 25 of these latter there was complete agreement between the history as presented by parents in the initial telephone report and the paediatrician's subsequent summarised history. Of the 546 reports, 217 either had too little detail for an assessment or the symptoms were clearly attributable to other causes. Of the remaining reports, there were 152 cases of fever with or without other symptoms; 85 were of rash and local reactions within 24h of vaccination; 63 reports were of headache, stiff neck and myalgia within 48h of vaccination. There were 92 reports of apparent peripheral nerve involvement, including 80 reports of unexplained weakness and 57 reports of paraesthesia or dysaesthesia. Both motor and sensory symptoms occurred in some children; none were permanent. The effects of adverse publicity during the campaign on the genesis of some symptoms is acknowledged, but the possibility that short term neurological symptoms occur after vaccination seems likely and has not been previously reported.

  10. Long-term persistence of protective antibodies in Dutch adolescents following a meningococcal serogroup C tetanus booster vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B.; Marinovic, Axel Bonacic; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M.; van Maurik, Marjan; Stoof, Susanne P.; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Due to waning immunity, infant vaccination with meningococcal serogroup C conjugated (MenCC) vaccines is insufficient to maintain long-term individual protection. Adolescent booster vaccination is thought to offer direct protection against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) but also

  11. A decade of herd protection after introduction of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Merijn W.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van de Beek, Diederik; van der Ende, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate (MCC) polysaccharide vaccines led to a substantial decline in MenC disease in the vaccinated and the unvaccinated population. The decline in the unvaccinated population can be explained by herd protection by reduced colonization of

  12. Prevention of meningococcal serogroup B infections in children: A protein-based vaccine induces immunologic memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.D. de Kleijn (Ester); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.B. van Gageldonk-Lafeber (Rianne); J. Labadie (J.); C.J.P. van Limpt (C. J P); J. Visser (John); G.A. Berbers; L. van Alphen (Loek); H. Rümke (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractImmunologic memory against meningococci was studied in 177 children (100 children were 10-11 years old and 77 were 5-6 years old) 2.5 years after vaccination with hexavalent meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine or hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine. Children were revaccinated with

  13. Changing epidemiology of Infant Meningococcal Disease after the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C vaccine in Italy, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, P; Fazio, C; Neri, A; Boros, S; Renna, G; Pompa, M G

    2015-07-17

    In Italy, the incidence of Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) was around 0.28 per 100,000 over the last years. Since the risk IMD is usually high among infants aged less than 1 year, we decided to evaluate the trend of IMD cases reported between 2006 and 2014 in this age group. In particular, the study aim was to describe the main characteristics of IMD cases in infants following the introduction of MCC vaccine (2005) and to estimate the number of cases which are potentially preventable through early vaccination. The National Surveillance System of Bacterial Meningitis was established in 1994 and in 2007 was extended to all invasive bacterial diseases. Clinical data and isolates and/or clinical samples are collected from hospitalized patients throughout the country. IMD cases are reported by clinicians to the local health authorities, and samples are sent to the Reference Laboratory at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità for further characterization and storage at -80°C. In particular, serogroup identification is obtained by agglutination with commercial antisera or by multiplex PCR. The annual incidence for infants B was more frequently detected among infants aged B was the most commonly detected over time. The long-term impact of meningococcal C conjugate vaccine and the effect of the introduction of meningococcal B vaccination among infants need to be evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate or a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine on meningococcal carriage: an observer-blind, phase 3 randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Robert C; Baxter, David; Chadwick, David R; Faust, Saul N; Finn, Adam; Gordon, Stephen B; Heath, Paul T; Lewis, David J M; Pollard, Andrew J; Turner, David P J; Bazaz, Rohit; Ganguli, Amitava; Havelock, Tom; Neal, Keith R; Okike, Ifeanyichukwu O; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Patel, Kamlesh; Snape, Matthew D; Williams, John; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Gray, Steve J; Maiden, Martin C J; Toneatto, Daniela; Wang, Huajun; McCarthy, Maggie; Dull, Peter M; Borrow, Ray

    2014-12-13

    Meningococcal conjugate vaccines protect individuals directly, but can also confer herd protection by interrupting carriage transmission. We assessed the effects of meningococcal quadrivalent glycoconjugate (MenACWY-CRM) or serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccination on meningococcal carriage rates in 18-24-year-olds. In this phase 3, observer-blind, randomised controlled trial, university students aged 18-24 years from ten sites in England were randomly assigned (1:1:1, block size of three) to receive two doses 1 month apart of Japanese Encephalitis vaccine (controls), 4CMenB, or one dose of MenACWY-CRM then placebo. Participants were randomised with a validated computer-generated random allocation list. Participants and outcome-assessors were masked to the treatment group. Meningococci were isolated from oropharyngeal swabs collected before vaccination and at five scheduled intervals over 1 year. Primary outcomes were cross-sectional carriage 1 month after each vaccine course. Secondary outcomes included comparisons of carriage at any timepoint after primary analysis until study termination. Reactogenicity and adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Analysis was done on the modified intention-to-treat population, which included all enrolled participants who received a study vaccination and provided at least one assessable swab after baseline. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number NCT01214850. Between Sept 21 and Dec 21, 2010, 2954 participants were randomly assigned (987 assigned to control [984 analysed], 979 assigned to 4CMenB [974 analysed], 988 assigned to MenACWY-CRM [983 analysed]); 33% of the 4CMenB group, 34% of the MenACWY-CRM group, and 31% of the control group were positive for meningococcal carriage at study entry. By 1 month, there was no significant difference in carriage between controls and 4CMenB (odds ratio 1·2, 95% CI 0·8-1·7) or MenACWY-CRM (0·9, [0·6-1·3]) groups. From 3 months after dose two, 4CMen

  15. From tailor-made to ready-to-wear meningococcal B vaccines: longitudinal study of a clonal meningococcal B outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, François; du Châtelet, Isabelle Parent; Leroy, Jean-Philippe; Ruckly, Corinne; Blanchard, Myriam; Bohic, Nicole; Massy, Nathalie; Morer, Isabelle; Floret, Daniel; Delbos, Valérie; Hong, Eva; Révillion, Martin; Berthelot, Gilles; Lemée, Ludovic; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Bénichou, Jacques; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2011-06-01

    Outer-membrane-vesicle vaccines for meningococcal B outbreaks are complex and time consuming to develop. We studied the use of already available vaccine to control an outbreak caused by a genetically close strain. From 2006 to 2009, all individuals younger than 20 years living in the region of Normandy, France, in which an outbreak caused by a B:14:P1.7,16 strain occurred, were eligible to receive MenBvac, a Norwegian vaccine designed 20 years earlier against a strain sharing the same serosubtype (B:15:P1.7,16). The immunogenicity (in a randomly selected cohort of 400 children aged 1-5 years), safety, and epidemiological effect of the vaccination were assessed. 26,014 individuals were eligible to receive the vaccine. Shortage of vaccine production prompted start of the campaign in the highest incidence groups (1-5 years). 16,709 (64%) received a complete vaccination schedule of whom 13,589 (81%) received a 2+1 dose schedule (week 0, week 6, and month 8). At 6 weeks after the third dose, of 235 vaccinees for whom samples were available, 206 (88%) had a seroresponse, and 108 (56 %) of 193 had a seroresponse at 15 months. These results were similar to those described for tailor-made vaccines and their homologous strain. Only previously described adverse effects occurred. The incidence of B:14:P1.7,16 cases decreased significantly in the vaccine targeted population after the primary vaccination period (from 31·6 per 100,000 to 5·9 per 100,000; p=0·001). The ready-to-wear approach is reliable if epidemic and vaccine strains are genetically close. Other meningococcal B clonal outbreaks might benefit from this strategy; and previously described outer-membrane-vesicle vaccines can be effective against various strains. French Ministry of Health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MenACWY-CRM, a novel quadrivalent glycoconjugate vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis for the prevention of meningococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, David

    2009-12-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease remains a major public health concern, with infants, children younger than 4 years and adolescents bearing the majority of the global disease burden. Protecting the vulnerable individuals in these age groups through vaccination remains the most rational strategy for the prevention of meningococcal disease. The formulation of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines has been a major breakthrough in vaccinology, and has extended protection against pathogenic encapsulated bacteria to younger age groups. The dramatic decline in the incidence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C disease, observed following the introduction of glycoconjugate meningococcal C vaccines, demonstrates that vaccination can control disease at a population level. The development of quadrivalent glycoconjugate meningococcal ACWY vaccines has broadened protection against meningococcal disease. A novel meningococcal MenACWY-CRM (Menveo) glycoconjugate vaccine, formulated by selective conjugation chemistry of intermediate-chain-length meningococcal saccharides, was immunogenic in individuals aged 2 months to 65 years. The reactogenicity of MenACWY-CRM was similar to that of other licensed meningococcal glycoconjugates, yet the vaccine has the potential to extend protection against meningococcal serogroups A, Y and W-135 to children younger than 2 years of age - a need that remains unmet.

  17. Adolescent meningococcal serogroup A, W and Y immune responses following immunization with quadrivalent meningococcal A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine : Optimal age for vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B.; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Sanders, Elisabeth A.M.; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently the incidence of meningococcal serogroup Y (MenY) and in particular serogroup W (MenW) invasive disease has risen in several European countries, including the Netherlands. Adolescents are a target group for primary prevention through vaccination to protect against disease and

  18. Adolescent meningococcal serogroup A, W and Y immune responses following immunization with quadrivalent meningococcal A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine: Optimal age for vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-01-01

    Recently the incidence of meningococcal serogroup Y (MenY) and in particular serogroup W (MenW) invasive disease has risen in several European countries, including the Netherlands. Adolescents are a target group for primary prevention through vaccination to protect against disease and reduce

  19. Why are U.S. girls getting meningococcal but not human papilloma virus vaccines? Comparison of factors associated with human papilloma virus and meningococcal vaccination among adolescent girls 2008 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Rebecca B; Lin, Mengyun; Silliman, Rebecca A; Clark, Jack A; Hanchate, Amresh

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rates in the United States remain low, compared with other recommended adolescent vaccines. We compared factors associated with intention to receive and receipt of HPV and meningococcal vaccines and completion of the HPV vaccine series among U.S. adolescent girls. Secondary analysis of data from the National Immunization Survey-Teen for 2008 through 2012 was performed. Multivariable logistic modeling was used to determine factors associated with intent to receive and receipt of HPV and meningococcal vaccination, completion of the HPV vaccine series among girls who started the series, and receipt of HPV vaccination among girls who received meningococcal vaccination. Provider recommendation increased the odds of receipt and intention to receive both HPV and meningococcal vaccines. Provider recommendation was also associated with a three-fold increase in HPV vaccination among girls who received meningococcal vaccination (pvaccine opportunities. However, White girls were 10% more likely to report provider recommendation than Black or Hispanic girls (pvaccination rates, implying a role for parental refusal. No factors predicted consistently the completion of the HPV vaccine series among those who started. Improving provider recommendation for co-administration of HPV and meningococcal vaccines would reduce missed opportunities for initiating the HPV vaccine series. However, different interventions may be necessary to improve series completion. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae Type B Conjugate Vaccine (Meningococcal Protein Conjugate in Canadian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Scheifele

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess adverse effects and immune responses with a three-dose series of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningococcal protein conjugate (PedvaxHIB or Hib.OMP vaccine, including any immunological response alterations from concurrent administration with routine vaccines for infants.

  1. Clinical experience with the meningococcal B vaccine, Bexsero(®): Prospects for reducing the burden of meningococcal serogroup B disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Philip S; Turner, David P J

    2016-02-10

    Although rare, invasive meningococcal disease remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in children and young adults. Vaccines have been successfully introduced to help protect against meningococcal disease caused by serogroups A, C, W and Y, but until recently, a vaccine for serogroup B (MenB) was not available. In many industrialised countries, MenB causes the majority of meningococcal disease. Moreover, MenB outbreaks occur unpredictably, particularly in high-risk populations, such as university students. In 2013, Bexsero(®) became the first broad-coverage vaccine to be licensed for active immunisation against MenB disease. Bexsero is now licensed in more than 35 countries worldwide for varying age groups, including the EU, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Uruguay and the USA. Clinical recommendations for the use of Bexsero have been published in several countries. Recommendations include use in high-risk groups, outbreak control and routine infant immunisation. Since initial licensure, considerable clinical experience has been gained. In Canada, 43,740 individuals received Bexsero during a vaccination programme in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec, where local disease incidence was high. In the USA, Bexsero was administered to >15,000 individuals during two college outbreaks prior to licensure, under an Investigational New Drug protocol. In the UK, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation has recommended the inclusion of Bexsero in the routine immunisation schedule for infants. Publically funded vaccination programmes have been initiated in Italy, and there has been widespread use of the vaccine outside of publically reimbursed programmes. Overall, >1,000,000 doses of Bexsero have been distributed in 19 countries worldwide since 2013. The emerging clinical experience with Bexsero is consistent with findings from pre-licensure clinical studies, and no new safety concerns have been identified. Additional data on length of

  2. [Vaccinal strategies in response to new epidemiological challenges in 2010. Reasonable hope for a "B" meningococcal vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, P

    2010-08-01

    In 2010, vaccines have achieved good effectiveness against invasive meningococcal infection. Development of monovalent and bivalent polysaccharide (PS) vaccines in the 70s and later of tetravalent PS vaccine (ACWY) was followed by development in 2003 of a trivalent ACW vaccine in response to the W135 or mixed A/W135 epidemics that appeared in Africa. More recently PS-conjugated vaccines have shown numerous advantages in comparison with PS vaccines. Mass vaccination campaigns with the C-conjugated vaccine have almost completely eradicated group C meningitis in the UK. It is hoped that introduction of the A-conjugated vaccine MenAfriVac in Africa at the end of year 2010 will end group A meningococcal epidemics in the meningitis belt. The problem of group B meningococcal meningitis has not been completely resolved. For the B strain that has been implicated in hyperendemic waves, a protein vaccine has been produced from outer membrane vesicles (OMV). Use of OMV vaccines achieved good results in Norway and recently in New Zealand. The Norwegian vaccine was also used in Normandy since the strain responsible for the Norman epidemic showed the same PorA as the Norwegian strain. In this regard, a major limitation for OMV vaccines is that they are effective only against the immuno-dominant porin A protein. Current efforts to develop a vaccine against group B meningococci causing sporadic cases are promising. Research is being focused on a blend of surface proteins targeting most of circulating isolates. Field tests will be carried out in the next years, but it is probable that the efficacy of these vaccines will be short-lived since meningococcal antigens vary over time.

  3. Profile of Serogroup Y Meningococcal Infections in Canada: Implications for Vaccine Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Le Saux

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Canada is a leader in establishing routine infant immunization programs against meningococcal C disease. Currently, all provinces have routine programs to provide meningococcal C conjugate vaccines to infants and children. The result of the existing programs has been a decrease in serogroup C incidence. The second most common vaccine-preventable serogroup in Canada is serogroup Y, the incidence of which has been stable. The availability of a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y and W135 focuses attention on serogroup Y disease as it becomes relatively more prominent as a cause of vaccine-preventable invasive meningococcal disease. This vaccine was licensed in November 2006 but is not routinely used except in Nunavut, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. To allow a better understanding of the ‘value added’ by a serogroup Y-containing vaccine, it is necessary to have a contemporary profile of Y disease in Canada. In the present paper, recent surveillance data on invasive meningococcal disease across Canada are summarized.

  4. Commentary: Impact of meningococcal group B OMV vaccines, beyond their brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen

    2017-10-19

    Meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccines have been used widely in Cuba, New Zealand, and Brazil. They are immunogenic and initially assessed largely by their ability to induce serum bactericidal activity. Measures of efficacy indicate good protection against homologous strains in older children and adults. Effectiveness appears broader than predicted by immunogenicity and efficacy studies. The recent discovery that meningococcal group B OMVs may protect against the related Neisseria species N.gonorrhoeae suggests more to these interesting antigen collections than meets the eye. Currently there are two OMV-containing group B vaccines available, the new recombinant protein-based Bexsero® developed by Novartis and VA-MENGOC-BC® developed by the Finlay institute in Cuba. Also, a third group B vaccine based on two recombinant factor H binding proteins (Trumenba®, Pfizer), has recently been licenced but it does not include OMV. This commentary explores the population impact that group B OMV vaccines have had on meningococcal and gonorrhoea diseases. Given the heterologous effect against diverse strains of the meningococcus observed in older children and adults, and recent evidence to suggest moderate protection against gonorrhoea, there may be a role for these vaccines in programmes targeting adolescents and groups high at risk for both meningococcal disease and gonorrhoea.

  5. Economics of an adolescent meningococcal conjugate vaccination catch-up campaign in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Meltzer, Martin I; Shepard, Colin; Zell, Elizabeth; Messonnier, Mark L; Bilukha, Oleg; Zhang, Xinzhi; Stephens, David S; Messonnier, Nancy E

    2008-01-01

    In June 2005, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended the newly licensed quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine for routine use among all US children aged 11 years. A 1-time catch-up vaccination campaign for children and adolescents aged 11-17 years, followed by routine annual immunization of each child aged 11 years, could generate immediate herd immunity benefits. The objective of our study was to analyze the cost-effectiveness of a catch-up vaccination campaign with quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine for children and adolescents aged 11-17 years. We built a probabilistic model of disease burden and economic impacts for a 10-year period with and without a program of adolescent catch-up meningococcal vaccination, followed by 9 years of routine immunization of children aged 11 years. We used US age- and serogroup-specific surveillance data on incidence and mortality. Assumptions related to the impact of herd immunity were drawn from experience with routine meningococcal vaccination in the United Kingdom. We estimated costs per case, deaths prevented, life-years saved, and quality-adjusted life-years saved. With herd immunity, the catch-up and routine vaccination program for adolescents would prevent 8251 cases of meningococcal disease in a 10-year period (a 48% decrease). Excluding program costs, this catch-up and routine vaccination program would save US$551 million in direct costs and $920 million in indirect costs, including costs associated with permanent disability and premature death. At $83 per vaccinee, the catch-up vaccination would cost society approximately $223,000 per case averted, approximately $2.6 million per death prevented, approximately $127,000 per life-year saved, and approximately $88,000 per quality-adjusted life-year saved. Targeting counties with a high incidence of disease decreased the cost per life-year saved by two-thirds. Although costly, catch-up and routine vaccination of adolescents can have a

  6. Introducing vaccination against serogroup B meningococcal disease: an economic and mathematical modelling study of potential impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hannah; Hickman, Matthew; Edmunds, W John; Trotter, Caroline L

    2013-05-28

    Meningococcal disease remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The first broadly effective vaccine against group B disease (which causes considerable meningococcal disease in Europe, the Americas and Australasia) was licensed in the EU in January 2013; our objective was to estimate the potential impact of introducing such a vaccine in England. We developed two models to estimate the impact of introducing a new 'MenB' vaccine. The cohort model assumes the vaccine protects against disease only; the transmission dynamic model also allows the vaccine to protect against carriage (accounting for herd effects). We used these, and economic models, to estimate the case reduction and cost-effectiveness of a number of different vaccine strategies. We estimate 27% of meningococcal disease cases could be prevented over the lifetime of an English birth cohort by vaccinating infants at 2,3,4 and 12 months of age with a vaccine that prevents disease only; this strategy could be cost-effective at £9 per vaccine dose. Substantial reductions in disease (71%) can be produced after 10 years by routinely vaccinating infants in combination with a large-scale catch-up campaign, using a vaccine which protects against carriage as well as disease; this could be cost-effective at £17 per vaccine dose. New 'MenB' vaccines could substantially reduce disease in England and be cost-effective if competitively priced, particularly if the vaccines can prevent carriage as well as disease. These results are relevant to other countries, with a similar epidemiology to England, considering the introduction of a new 'MenB' vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Commonly Administered Vaccines After Coadministration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Tregnaghi, Miguel; Keshavan, Pavitra; Ypma, Ellen; Han, Linda; Smolenov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Given the broad age range across which the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine MenACWY-CRM is used, coadministration with routine vaccines should be evaluated across age groups for possible immunologic interference and impact on vaccine reactogenicity and safety. We summarize data from a large population of infants, adolescents and international travelers from 10 phase 3 or 4 clinical studies to evaluate coadministration of MenACWY-CRM with commonly administered vaccines. Noninferiority analyses of immune responses were performed across studies and age groups for each vaccine. Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed. In infants, MenACWY-CRM coadministered with routine vaccines did not reduce immune responses to diphtheria, tetanus, poliovirus, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcal conjugate, measles-mumps-rubella, varicella or pertussis antigens. Noninferiority criteria were not met for some pneumococcal conjugate serotypes at 7 months of age, but no consistent trends were observed. In adolescents, coadministration did not reduce immune responses to tetanus, diphtheria and human papilloma virus vaccine antigens. Noninferiority criteria for pertussis antigens were not uniformly met in infant and adolescent studies, although the clinical relevance is unclear. In adults, coadministration did not reduce immune responses to hepatitis A/B, typhoid fever, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and rabies antigens. Immune responses to MenACWY-CRM were not impacted by coadministration of commonly administered vaccines. Coadministration did not increase frequencies of postvaccination adverse events in any age group. With no clinically relevant vaccine interactions or impact on vaccine reactogenicity or safety, these results support the coadministration of MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines in all age groups.

  8. [Meningococcal C conjugate vaccine: Impact of a vaccination program and long-term effectiveness in Navarra, Spain, 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Desirée; García-Cenoz, Manuel; Moreno, Laura; Bernaola, Enrique; Barricarte, Aurelio; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    Since 2000, when the meningococcal serogroupC conjugate vaccine (MenCC) was introduced in the childhood immunization schedule in Spain, several changes in the schedule and catch-up campaigns have been performed. We aim to estimate the impact and effectiveness of this vaccine in Navarra up to 2014. The impact of the vaccination program was analysed by comparing incidence, mortality and lethality rates of disease before (1995-1999) and after (2004-2014) the introduction of the MenCC. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated using the screening method (Farrington) and the indirect cohort method (Broome). Data on cases were obtained from the active surveillance of meningococcal disease. During 1995-1999 the mean annual incidence of meningococcalC disease was 1.32 per 100,000, and 7.18 per 100,000 in children younger than 15years. The fall of meningococcalC disease incidence was significant in cohorts targeted for vaccination from the beginning and progressive in the general population. No cases were reported between 2011 and 2014. The estimated vaccine effectiveness was 96% by the screening method, and 99% by the indirect cohort method. The MenCC vaccination program has been successful in decreasing the incidence rate of serogroupC meningococcal disease in Navarra, and schedule changes have maintained high vaccine effectiveness throughout the study period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Persistence of Serogroup C Antibody Responses Following Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccination in United States Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-14

    available at ScienceDirect Vaccine j our na l ho me page: www.elsev ier .com/ locate /vacc ine ersistence of serogroup C antibody responses following...22] Auckland C, Gray S, Borrow R, Andrews N, Goldblatt D, Ramsay M, et al. Clinical and immunologic risk factors for meningococcal C conjugate

  10. Response to the Critique of "New Meningococcal Vaccine Recommendations under Consideration"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The CDC recently published the ACIP recommendations regarding the use of meningococcal conjugate vaccine. The report includes detailed epidemiologic and cost analysis information. At the conclusion of lengthy discussions, the ACIP voted unanimously to approve the recommendation as written. In this article, the author provides his counterreaction…

  11. Developmental strategy fora new Group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVacR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad S; Jadhav, Suresh S; LaForce, F Marc

    2017-10-19

    Until recently, periodic Group A meningococcal meningitis outbreaks were a major public health problem in the sub-Saharan Africa. In 2001, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP), a partnership between the World Health Organization (WHO) and PATH, a Seattle-based NGO, and the Serum Institute of India Pvt Ltd (SIIPL) initiated discussions aimed at establishing a collaboration to develop a Group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine for this unmet medical need. Over the next 8 years the partnership made countless strategic decisions about product characteristics, raw materials, potential target populations, geographic prioritization and affordability of the vaccine to name a few. These decisions evolved into detailed plans for preclinical development, extensive field trials in Africa and India and a focused regulatory strategy specific for the Men A conjugate vaccine. Important characteristics of the process included, flexibility, transparency andeffective partnerships that included public agencies as well as private companies in Africa, Europe, the United States and India.

  12. Safety and immunogenicity of a CRM or TT conjugated meningococcal vaccine in healthy toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Gianni; Castiglia, Paolo; Zoppi, Giorgio; de Martino, Maurizio; Tasciotti, Annaelisa; D'Agostino, Diego; Han, Linda; Smolenov, Igor

    2016-06-17

    MenACWY-CRM (Menveo(®); GlaxoSmithKline) and MenACWY-TT (Nimenrix(®); Pfizer) are two meningococcal vaccines licensed in the European Union for use in both children and adults. While both vaccines target meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y, immunogenicity and reactogenicity of these quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines may differ due to differences in formulation processes and chemical structure. Yet data on the comparability of these two vaccines are limited. The reactogenicity and immunogenicity of one dose of either MenACWY-CRM or MenACWY-TT were evaluated in healthy toddlers aged 12-15 months. Immunogenicity was assessed using serum bactericidal antibody assays (SBA) with human (hSBA) and rabbit (rSBA) complement. A total of 202 children aged 12-15 months were enrolled to receive one dose of MenACWY-CRM or MenACWY-TT. Similar numbers of subjects reported solicited reactions within 7 days following either vaccination. Tenderness at the injection site was the most common local reaction. Systemic reactions reported were similar for both vaccines and mostly mild to moderate in severity: irritability, sleepiness and change in eating habits were most commonly reported. Immunogenicity at 1 month post-vaccination was generally comparable for both vaccines across serogroups. At 6 months post-vaccination antibody persistence against serogroups C, W, and Y was substantial for both vaccines, as measured by both assay methodologies. For serogroup A, hSBA titers declined in both groups, while rSBA titers remained high. Despite differences in composition, the MenACWY-CRM and MenACWY-TT vaccines have comparable reactogenicity and immunogenicity profiles. Immediate immune responses and short-term antibody persistence were largely similar between groups. Both vaccines were well-tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Carriage rate and effects of vaccination after outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal disease, Brazil, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurelio Palazzi; Carvalhanas, Telma Regina Marques Pinto; Paula de Lemos, Ana; Gorla, Maria Cecilia Outeiro; Salgado, Maristela; Fukasawa, Lucila O; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Higa, Fabio; Brandileone, Maria Cristina Cunto; Sacchi, Claudio Tavares; Ribeiro, Ana Freitas; Sato, Helena Keico; Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Cassio de Moraes, José

    2014-05-01

    During 2010, outbreaks of serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease occurred in 2 oil refineries in São Paulo State, Brazil, leading to mass vaccination of employees at 1 refinery with a meningococcal polysaccharide A/C vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of meningococci carriage among workers at both refineries and to investigate the effect of vaccination on and the risk factors for pharyngeal carriage of meningococci. Among the vaccinated and nonvaccinated workers, rates of overall meningococci carriage (21.4% and 21.6%, respectively) and of MenC carriage (6.3% and 4.9%, respectively) were similar. However, a MenC strain belonging to the sequence type103 complex predominated and was responsible for the increased incidence of meningococcal disease in Brazil. A low education level was associated with higher risk of meningococci carriage. Polysaccharide vaccination did not affect carriage or interrupt transmission of the epidemic strain. These findings will help inform future vaccination strategies.

  14. Safety and Immunogenicity Testing of an Intranasal Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine in Healthy Volunteers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drabick, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An intranasal vaccine composed of native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) not exposed to detergent or denaturing agents was prepared from the group B meningococcal strain and tested in 32 healthy adult volunteers...

  15. New versus old meningococcal group B vaccines: how the new ones may benefit infants & toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Cristina, M L; Domnich, A; Gasparini, R

    2013-12-01

    Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is associated with high mortality and high disability rates and mainly affects children under one year of age. Vaccination is the best way to prevent meningococcal disease, especially in infants and toddlers. The introduction of massive meningococcal serogroup C vaccination has drastically reduced the incidence of disease caused by this serogroup, and serogroup B has now become the main causative agent in several industrialized countries. The first serogroup B vaccines, which were used for more than two decades, were based on outer membrane vesicles and proved to be protective only against specific epidemic strains in Cuba, Norway, Brazil and New Zealand. Moreover, these often elicited a scant immune response in young children. Innovative genomics-based reverse vaccinology subsequently enabled researchers to identify genes encoding for surface proteins that are able to elicit a strong immune response against several B strains. This important discovery led to the development and recent approval in Europe of the four-component meningococcal serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccine. Large clinical trials have shown high immunogenicity and tolerability and acceptable safety levels of 4CMenB in infants and toddlers. This vaccine is expected to cover a large number of circulating invasive strains and may also be efficacious against other serogroups. Young children are particularly vulnerable to the devastating consequences of meningococcal disease. Given the high performance of 4CMenB and its non-interference with routine vaccinations, this age-group will be the first to benefit from the introduction of this vaccine.

  16. Meningococcal meningitis: vaccination outbreak response and epidemiological changes in the African meningitis belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2015-07-01

    The main approach to controlling epidemics of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt has been reactive vaccination campaigns with serogroup A polysaccharide vaccine once the outbreak reached an incidence threshold. Early reactive vaccination is effective in reducing morbidity and mortality. A recent paper in International Health has shown that earlier reactive vaccination campaigns may be even more effective than increasing the coverage area of vaccination. Monovalent serogroup A conjugate vaccine programs have recently been launched to prevent transmission in endemic areas in the African meningitis belt. Conjugate vaccines can induce immunological memory and have impact on pharyngeal carriage. However, reactive vaccination still has a role to play taking into account the dynamic changes in the epidemiology of meningitis in this area. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Vaccine Preventability of Meningococcal Clone, Greater Aachen Region, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, Johannes; Schouls, Leo M.; van de Pol, Ingrid; Keijzers, Wendy C.; Martin, Diana R.; Glennie, Anne; Oster, Philipp; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-01-01

    Emergence of serogroup B meningococci of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 41/44 can cause high levels of disease, as exemplified by a recent epidemic in New Zealand. Multiplication of annual incidence rates (3.1 cases/100,000 population) of meningococcal disease in a defined German region, the city

  18. The cost-effectiveness of alternative vaccination strategies for polyvalent meningococcal vaccines in Burkina Faso: A transmission dynamic modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaesoubi, Reza; Trotter, Caroline; Colijn, Caroline; Yaesoubi, Maziar; Colombini, Anaïs; Resch, Stephen; Kristiansen, Paul A; LaForce, F Marc; Cohen, Ted

    2018-01-01

    The introduction of a conjugate vaccine for serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis has dramatically reduced disease in the African meningitis belt. In this context, important questions remain about the performance of different vaccine policies that target remaining serogroups. Here, we estimate the health impact and cost associated with several alternative vaccination policies in Burkina Faso. We developed and calibrated a mathematical model of meningococcal transmission to project the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted and costs associated with the current Base policy (serogroup A conjugate vaccination at 9 months, as part of the Expanded Program on Immunization [EPI], plus district-specific reactive vaccination campaigns using polyvalent meningococcal polysaccharide [PMP] vaccine in response to outbreaks) and three alternative policies: (1) Base Prime: novel polyvalent meningococcal conjugate (PMC) vaccine replaces the serogroup A conjugate in EPI and is also used in reactive campaigns; (2) Prevention 1: PMC used in EPI and in a nationwide catch-up campaign for 1-18-year-olds; and (3) Prevention 2: Prevention 1, except the nationwide campaign includes individuals up to 29 years old. Over a 30-year simulation period, Prevention 2 would avert 78% of the meningococcal cases (95% prediction interval: 63%-90%) expected under the Base policy if serogroup A is not replaced by remaining serogroups after elimination, and would avert 87% (77%-93%) of meningococcal cases if complete strain replacement occurs. Compared to the Base policy and at the PMC vaccine price of US$4 per dose, strategies that use PMC vaccine (i.e., Base Prime and Preventions 1 and 2) are expected to be cost saving if strain replacement occurs, and would cost US$51 (-US$236, US$490), US$188 (-US$97, US$626), and US$246 (-US$53, US$703) per DALY averted, respectively, if strain replacement does not occur. An important potential limitation of our study is the simplifying assumption that all

  19. The cost-effectiveness of alternative vaccination strategies for polyvalent meningococcal vaccines in Burkina Faso: A transmission dynamic modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yaesoubi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of a conjugate vaccine for serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis has dramatically reduced disease in the African meningitis belt. In this context, important questions remain about the performance of different vaccine policies that target remaining serogroups. Here, we estimate the health impact and cost associated with several alternative vaccination policies in Burkina Faso.We developed and calibrated a mathematical model of meningococcal transmission to project the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted and costs associated with the current Base policy (serogroup A conjugate vaccination at 9 months, as part of the Expanded Program on Immunization [EPI], plus district-specific reactive vaccination campaigns using polyvalent meningococcal polysaccharide [PMP] vaccine in response to outbreaks and three alternative policies: (1 Base Prime: novel polyvalent meningococcal conjugate (PMC vaccine replaces the serogroup A conjugate in EPI and is also used in reactive campaigns; (2 Prevention 1: PMC used in EPI and in a nationwide catch-up campaign for 1-18-year-olds; and (3 Prevention 2: Prevention 1, except the nationwide campaign includes individuals up to 29 years old. Over a 30-year simulation period, Prevention 2 would avert 78% of the meningococcal cases (95% prediction interval: 63%-90% expected under the Base policy if serogroup A is not replaced by remaining serogroups after elimination, and would avert 87% (77%-93% of meningococcal cases if complete strain replacement occurs. Compared to the Base policy and at the PMC vaccine price of US$4 per dose, strategies that use PMC vaccine (i.e., Base Prime and Preventions 1 and 2 are expected to be cost saving if strain replacement occurs, and would cost US$51 (-US$236, US$490, US$188 (-US$97, US$626, and US$246 (-US$53, US$703 per DALY averted, respectively, if strain replacement does not occur. An important potential limitation of our study is the simplifying assumption that

  20. Construction of Opa-positive and Opa-negative strains of Neisseria meningitidis to evaluate a novel meningococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadarangani, Manish; Hoe, J Claire; Callaghan, Martin J; Jones, Claire; Chan, Hannah; Makepeace, Katherine; Daniels-Treffandier, Hélène; Deadman, Mary E; Bayliss, Christopher; Feavers, Ian; van der Ley, Peter; Pollard, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major global pathogen causing invasive disease with a mortality of 5-10%. Most disease in developed countries is caused by serogroup B infection, against which there is no universal vaccine. Opacity-associated adhesin (Opa) proteins are major meningococcal outer membrane proteins, which have shown recent promise as a potential novel vaccine. Immunisation of mice with different Opa variants elicited high levels of meningococcal-specific bactericidal antibodies, demonstrating proof in principle for this approach. Opa proteins are critical in meningococcal pathogenesis, mediating bacterial adherence to host cells, and modulating human cellular immunity via interactions with T cells and neutrophils, although there are conflicting data regarding their effects on CD4(+) T cells. We constructed Opa-positive and Opa-negative meningococcal strains to allow further evaluation of Opa as a vaccine component. All four opa genes from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 were sequentially disrupted to construct all possible combinations of N. meningitidis strains deficient in one, two, three, or all four opa genes. The transformations demonstrated that homologous recombination of exogenous DNA into the meningococcal chromosome can occur with as little as 80 bp, and that minor sequence differences are permissible. Anti-Opa bactericidal antibody responses following immunisation of mice with recombinant Opa were specific to the Opa variant used in immunisation. No immunomodulatory effects were observed when Opa was contained within meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), compared to Opa-negative OMVs. These observations support the incorporation of Opa in meningococcal vaccines.

  1. The capsular group B meningococcal vaccine, 4CMenB : clinical experience and potential efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollier, Christine S; Dold, Christina; Marsay, Leanne; Sadarangani, Manish; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Capsular group B meningococcal disease is a leading cause of childhood meningitis and septicaemia. Up to 10% of sufferers die, and sequelae remain in > 30% of survivors. A vaccine, four component meningococcal group B ( 4CMenB ), designed with the aim to induce broad coverage against this highly variable bacterium, has been licensed in countries including in the European Union, Canada and Australia. Immunogenicity and safety data, published in peer-reviewed literature between 2004 and 2014, are presented in the context of the recent recommendation for the use of the vaccine in infants in the UK. 4CMenB induces significant reactogenicity when administered with routine infant vaccines, in particular with respect to fever rates. Fevers can be somewhat reduced using paracetamol. The efficacy of the vaccine is unknown but has been extrapolated from effectiveness data obtained from use of one of its components in New Zealand, immunogenicity data from clinical trials and estimation of coverage from in vitro studies. These data suggest that the vaccine will prevent a proportion of invasive meningococcal disease cases in infants and young children. Implementation and well-planned post-marketing surveillance will address uncertainties over field effectiveness.

  2. Vaccine prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa: Major advances, remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mustapha M; Harrison, Lee H

    2017-12-06

    Africa historically has had the highest incidence of meningococcal disease with high endemic rates and periodic epidemics. The meningitis belt, a region of sub-Saharan Africa extending from Senegal to Ethiopia, has experienced large, devastating epidemics. However, dramatic shifts in the epidemiology of meningococcal disease have occurred recently. For instance, meningococcal capsular group A (NmA) epidemics in the meningitis belt have essentially been eliminated by use of conjugate vaccine. However, NmW epidemics have emerged and spread across the continent since 2000; NmX epidemics have occurred sporadically, and NmC recently emerged in Nigeria and Niger. Outside the meningitis belt, NmB predominates in North Africa, while NmW followed by NmB predominate in South Africa. Improved surveillance is necessary to address the challenges of this changing epidemiologic picture. A low-cost, multivalent conjugate vaccine covering NmA and the emergent and prevalent meningococcal capsular groups C, W, and X in the meningitis belt is a pressing need.

  3. A phase 2 randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prymula, Roman; Esposito, Susanna; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Toneatto, Daniela; Kohl, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The novel meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero(®)), recently approved in Europe and Australia, may soon be included in routine infant immunization schedules, subject to guidance from national or regional recommending bodies. In the development of 4CMenB and consistent with other newly introduced vaccines, clinical studies have shown concomitant administration with routine infant vaccines induces an incremental increase in some reactions, including fever. As this may hinder acceptability, we examined the impact of prophylactic paracetamol on the occurrence of fever and other solicited reactions, as well as the immune responses to study vaccines, in a prospectively designed study. 4CMenB was administered as a 4-dose series at 2, 3, 4, and 12 months of age concomitantly with routine infant vaccines: DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and PCV7, with or without prophylactic paracetamol; a third group received MenC vaccine. Immune responses to 4CMenB were not decreased by the use of paracetamol prophylaxis and there were no clinically relevant effects on immune responses to routine vaccines. Occurrence of fever was higher in infants co-administered with 4CMenB compared with those given MenC vaccine, but was significantly decreased by prophylactic paracetamol, as were other solicited reactions to vaccination, both local and systemic. Co-administration of 4CMenB had an acceptable tolerability profile, with no withdrawals due to vaccination-related adverse events. Inclusion of 4CMenB in routine infant immunization schedules will be a major advance in the control of meningococcal disease, and our study indicates that by using paracetamol prophylaxis, post-vaccination reactions are reduced without clinically relevant negative consequences on vaccine immunogenicity.

  4. Immunogenicity of a combination vaccine containing pneumococcal conjugates and meningococcal PorA OMVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M; van Dijken, Harry H; Pillai, Subramonia; van Alphen, Loek

    2007-03-22

    The pre-clinical immunogenicity of a combination vaccine containing 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate (13vPnC) vaccine (serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F and 23F conjugated to CRM197) and nine-valent meningococcal B PorA vaccine (NonaMen; serosubtypes P1.7,16; P1.5-1,2-2; P1.19,15-1; P1.5-2,10; P1.12-1,13; P1.7-2,4; P1.22,14; P1.7-1,1 and P1.18-1,3,6), and any potential immunological interference between pneumococcal and MenB components of the vaccine were evaluated. NIH mice were immunized twice subcutaneously with the vaccines combined in one syringe, or given individually. Combining 13vPnC vaccine with NonaMen vaccine in one syringe had no negative effect on the induced antibody response against any MenB serosubtypes compared to separate injection of the vaccines, and the anti-pneumococcal antibody responses were enhanced. Furthermore, co-administration of the combination vaccine with a combined diphtheria/tetanus/acellular pertussis/inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine/Haemophilus influenzae type b-TT conjugate (DTaP/IPV-Hib) vaccine to New Zealand white rabbits at a different injection site did not affect the anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide and anti-PorA antibody titres. We conclude that no immunological interference was observed by combined administration of pneumococcal conjugate and meningococcal B vaccines in one syringe.

  5. Outbreaks of meningococcal B infection and the 4CMenB vaccine: historical and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Jane; Bambini, Stefania; Biolchi, Alessia; Brunelli, Brunella; Robert-Du Ry van Beest Holle, Mirna

    2015-05-01

    Strains of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) causing invasive meningococcal disease are genetically diverse; however, only a small number of hyperinvasive lineages (CC32, CC41/44, CC269 and CC162) have dominated during the global spread over the past 50 years. Since the mid-1970s, major outbreaks and hyperendemic disease have been reported in Norway, Cuba, France, Canada, New Zealand (and elsewhere), most recently in the USA. We characterized the epidemiology of these MenB outbreaks and their associated clonal complexes and retrospectively assessed the potential coverage offered by the 4CMenB vaccine, a four-component vaccine developed to help confer protection against a broad range of meningococcal B strains causing disease. Of 21 isolates from four clonal complexes evaluated using both human Serum Bactericidal Assay and the Meningococcal Antigen Testing System, coverage ranged from 67 to 100%. 4CMenB shows good potential as a candidate vaccine to be used in the control of new MenB outbreaks globally.

  6. Meningococcal serogroup C immunogenicity, antibody persistence and memory B-cells induced by the monovalent meningococcal serogroup C versus quadrivalent meningococcal serogroup ACWY conjugate booster vaccine : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Knol, Mirjam J.; Stoof, Susanne P; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescents are considered the key transmitters of meningococci in the population. Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) antibody levels wane rapidly after MenC conjugate vaccination in young children, leaving adolescents with low antibody levels. In this study, we compared MenC immune

  7. Background Paper for the update of meningococcal vaccination recommendations in Germany: use of the serogroup B vaccine in persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenbrand, Wiebke; Koch, Judith; Harder, Thomas; Bogdan, Christian; Heininger, Ulrich; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Terhardt, Martin; Vogel, Ulrich; Wichmann, Ole; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2015-11-01

    In December 2013 Bexsero® became available in Germany for vaccination against serogroup B meningococci (MenB). In August 2015 the German Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) endorsed a recommendation for use of this vaccine in persons at increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). This background paper summarizes the evidence underlying the recommendation. Bexsero® is based on surface protein antigens expressed by about 80% of circulating serogroup B meningococci in Germany. The paper reviews available data on immunogenicity and safety of Bexsero® in healthy children and adolescents; data in persons with underlying illness and on the effectiveness in preventing clinical outcomes are thus far unavailable.STIKO recommends MenB vaccination for the following persons based on an individual risk assessment: (1) Persons with congenital or acquired immune deficiency or suppression. Among these, persons with terminal complement defects and properdin deficiency, including those under eculizumab therapy, are at highest risk with reported invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) incidences up 10,000-fold higher than in the general population. Persons with asplenia were estimated to have a ~ 20-30-fold increased risk of IMD, while the risk in individuals with other immune defects such as HIV infection or hypogammaglobulinaemia was estimated at no more than 5-10-fold higher than the background risk. (2) Laboratory staff with a risk of exposure to N. meningitidis aerosols, for whom an up to 271-fold increased risk for IMD has been reported. (3) Unvaccinated household (-like) contacts of a MenB IMD index case, who have a roughly 100-200-fold increased IMD risk in the year after the contact despite chemoprophylaxis. Because the risk is highest in the first 3 months and full protective immunity requires more than one dose (particularly in infants and toddlers), MenB vaccine should be administered as soon as possible following identification of the serogroup of the

  8. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  9. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against meningococcal B among Dutch infants : Crucial impact of changes in incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen B.; Hak, Eelko; Van Der Ende, Arie; Christensen, Hannah; Van Den Dobbelsteen, Germie P. J. M.; Postma, Maarten J.

    OBJECTIVE: Recently, a vaccine with the capacity to protect against serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) disease received a positive opinion of the European Medicines Agency. Previously, such a vaccine was estimated to be cost-effective. However, since then, the MenB disease incidence has declined

  10. Economic evaluation of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccination programmes in the Netherlands and its impact on decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R; van den Dobbelsteen, G; Bos, JM; de Melker, H; van Alphen, L; Spanjaard, L; Rumke, HC; Postma, MJ

    2004-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of one time vaccination of all persons aged 14 months to 18 years (catch-up programme) and of routine childhood immunisation at either ages 2 + 3 + 4 months, 5 + 6 months, or 14 months with a meningococcal C conjugate vaccine was estimated for The Netherlands, from a societal

  11. Economic evaluation of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccination programmes in The Netherlands and its impact on decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R.; van den Dobbelsteen, G.; Bos, J. M.; de Melker, H.; van Alphen, L.; Spanjaard, L.; Rümke, H. C.; Postma, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of one time vaccination of all persons aged 14 months to 18 years (catch-up programme) and of routine childhood immunisation at either ages 2 + 3 + 4 months, 5 + 6 months, or 14 months with a meningococcal C conjugate vaccine was estimated for The Netherlands, from a societal

  12. Safety of Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Children 2-10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartof, Sara Yee; Sy, Lina S; Ackerson, Bradley K; Hechter, Rulin C; Haag, Mendel; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Luo, Yi; Fischetti, Christine A; Takhar, Harp S; Miao, Yan; Solano, Zendi; Jacobsen, Steven J; Tseng, Hung-Fu

    2017-11-01

    Quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine is recommended for children, adolescents and adults at increased risk of meningococcal disease. In 2011, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, GSK, Siena, Italy) was approved for children 2-10 years of age in the United States. Although no safety concerns arose from clinical trials, it remains important to monitor its safety in routine clinical settings. Kaiser Permanente Southern California members 2-10 years old who received MenACWY-CRM between September 2011 and September 2014 were included. Electronic health records were searched using a validated algorithm to identify 26 prespecified events of interests (EOIs) and serious medically attended events (SMAEs) from inpatient or emergency settings up to 1 year after MenACWY-CRM vaccination. SMAEs were categorized by International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision diagnostic categories. All events were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis and symptom onset date. The study was descriptive (NCT01452438); no statistical tests were performed. Among 387 vaccinated children, 327 with ≥6 months membership before vaccination were analyzed. Among EOIs, 9 asthma cases and 1 myasthenia gravis case underwent chart review which confirmed 1 incident asthma case occurring 237 days after concomitant vaccination with MenACWY-CRM and typhoid vaccine. Thirty-one children experienced SMAEs, most commonly because of unrelated injury and poisoning. The remaining events occurred sporadically after vaccination and most were unlikely related to vaccination based on medical record review. One incident EOI of asthma late in the 1-year observation period and sporadic distribution of SMAEs were observed. These data do not suggest safety concerns associated with MenACWY-CRM vaccination in children 2-10 years old.

  13. Serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccination in Burkina Faso: analysis of national surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Ryan T; Kambou, Jean Ludovic; Diomandé, Fabien Vk; Tarbangdo, Tiga F; Ouédraogo-Traoré, Rasmata; Sangaré, Lassana; Lingani, Clement; Martin, Stacey W; Hatcher, Cynthia; Mayer, Leonard W; Laforce, F Marc; Avokey, Fenella; Djingarey, Mamoudou H; Messonnier, Nancy E; Tiendrébéogo, Sylvestre R; Clark, Thomas A

    2012-10-01

    An affordable, highly immunogenic Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) was licensed for use in sub-Saharan Africa in 2009. In 2010, Burkina Faso became the first country to implement a national prevention campaign, vaccinating 11·4 million people aged 1-29 years. We analysed national surveillance data around PsA-TT introduction to investigate the early effect of the vaccine on meningitis incidence and epidemics. We examined national population-based meningitis surveillance data from Burkina Faso using two sources, one with cases and deaths aggregated at the district level from 1997 to 2011, and the other enhanced with results of cerebrospinal fluid examination and laboratory testing from 2007 to 2011. We compared mortality rates and incidence of suspected meningitis, probable meningococcal meningitis by age, and serogroup-specific meningococcal disease before and during the first year after PsA-TT implementation. We assessed the risk of meningitis disease and death between years. During the 14 year period before PsA-TT introduction, Burkina Faso had 148 603 cases of suspected meningitis with 17 965 deaths, and 174 district-level epidemics. After vaccine introduction, there was a 71% decline in risk of meningitis (hazard ratio 0·29, 95% CI 0·28-0·30, p<0·0001) and a 64% decline in risk of fatal meningitis (0·36, 0·33-0·40, p<0·0001). We identified a statistically significant decline in risk of probable meningococcal meningitis across the age group targeted for vaccination (62%, cumulative incidence ratio [CIR] 0·38, 95% CI 0·31-0·45, p<0·0001), and among children aged less than 1 year (54%, 0·46, 0·24-0·86, p=0·02) and people aged 30 years and older (55%, 0·45, 0·22-0·91, p=0·003) who were ineligible for vaccination. No cases of serogroup A meningococcal meningitis occurred among vaccinated individuals, and epidemics were eliminated. The incidence of laboratory-confirmed serogroup A N meningitidis dropped

  14. UK parents' attitudes towards meningococcal group B (MenB) vaccination: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cath; Yarwood, Joanne; Saliba, Vanessa; Bedford, Helen

    2017-05-04

    (1) To explore existing knowledge of, and attitudes, to group B meningococcal disease and serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine among parents of young children. (2) To seek views on their information needs. Cross-sectional qualitative study using individual and group interviews conducted in February and March 2015, prior to the introduction of MenB vaccine (Bexsero) into the UK childhood immunisation schedule. Community centres, mother and toddler groups, parents' homes and workplaces in London and Yorkshire. 60 parents of children under 2 years of age recruited via mother and baby groups and via an advert posted to a midwife-led Facebook group. Although recognising the severity of meningitis and septicaemia, parents' knowledge of group B meningococcal disease and MenB vaccine was poor. While nervous about fever, most said they would take their child for MenB vaccination despite its link to fever. Most parents had liquid paracetamol at home. Many were willing to administer it after MenB vaccination as a preventive measure, although some had concerns. There were mixed views on the acceptability of four vaccinations at the 12-month booster visit; some preferred one visit, while others favoured spreading the vaccines over two visits. Parents were clear on the information they required before attending the immunisation appointment. The successful implementation of the MenB vaccination programme depends on its acceptance by parents. In view of parents' recognition of the severity of meningitis and septicaemia, and successful introduction of other vaccines to prevent bacterial meningitis and septicaemia, the MenB vaccination programme is likely to be successful. However, the need for additional injections, the likelihood of post-immunisation fever and its management are issues about which parents will need information and reassurance from healthcare professionals. Public Health England has developed written information for parents, informed by these findings.

  15. Emerging clinical experience with vaccines against group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, A L; Snape, M D

    2017-08-01

    The prevention of paediatric bacterial meningitis and septicaemia has recently entered a new era with the availability of two vaccines against capsular group B meningococcus (MenB). Both of these vaccines are based on sub-capsular proteins of the meningococcus, an approach that overcomes the challenges set by the poorly immunogenic MenB polysaccharide capsule but adds complexity to predicting and measuring the impact of their use. This review describes the development and use of MenB vaccines to date, from the use of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines in MenB outbreaks around the world, to emerging evidence on the effectiveness of the newly available vaccines. While recent data from the United Kingdom supports the potential for protein-based vaccines to provide direct protection against MenB disease in immunised children, further research is required to understand the breadth and duration of this protection. A more detailed understanding of the impact of immunisation with these vaccines on nasopharyngeal carriage of the meningococcus is also required, to inform both their potential to induce herd immunity and to preferentially select for carriage of strains not susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. Although a full understanding of the potential impact of these vaccines will only be possible with this additional information, the availability of new tools to prevent the devastating effect of invasive MenB disease is a significant breakthrough in the fight against childhood sepsis and meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine: Knowledge and acceptability among parents in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Teresa; Napolitano, Francesco; Albano, Luciana; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella

    2017-08-03

    This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes about Meningococcal meningitis B and the relative vaccine for children among a sample of parents in Italy. A cross-sectional investigation was conducted from October to December 2015 among a sample of 910 parents in the geographic area of Naples and Salerno (Italy). In total, 543 of 910 parents returned a completed questionnaire for a response rate of 59.7%. Almost all parents had heard about meningitis (95.8%), 79.8% of these knew the mode of transmission (through respiratory droplets) and 62.5% knew the susceptible population (infants, children and adolescents). Moreover, a large percentage (86%) knew that the vaccine is a preventive measure. Parents who were married, those who had one child, those who did not have information about the MenB vaccine by physicians and those who needed additional information about the MenB vaccine were more likely to know the vaccine as a preventive measure of meningitis. Regarding attitudes toward the MenB vaccine, approximately two thirds of parents considered the vaccine useful (67.2%) and said that they would vaccinate their children (64.1%). Parents who had administered at least one recommended vaccination to their children, those who considered the vaccine useful, those with need for additional information about the vaccine and those who knew that the vaccine was a preventive measure of meningitis were more likely to have a positive attitude to vaccinating their children. Considering the results of our study, it looks appropriate that the knowledge of the population about meningitis and its related vaccinations is improved through correct health education and effective vaccine strategies that are implemented by policy makers.

  17. Effectively introducing a new meningococcal A conjugate vaccine in Africa: the Burkina Faso experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djingarey, Mamoudou H; Barry, Rodrigue; Bonkoungou, Mete; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre; Sebgo, Rene; Kandolo, Denis; Lingani, Clement; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Zuber, Patrick L F; Perea, William; Hugonnet, Stéphane; Dellepiane de Rey Tolve, Nora; Tevi-Benissan, Carole; Clark, Thomas A; Mayer, Leonard W; Novak, Ryan; Messonier, Nancy E; Berlier, Monique; Toboe, Desire; Nshimirimana, Deo; Mihigo, Richard; Aguado, Teresa; Diomandé, Fabien; Kristiansen, Paul A; Caugant, Dominique A; Laforce, F Marc

    2012-05-30

    A new Group A meningococcal (Men A) conjugate vaccine, MenAfriVac™, was prequalified by the World Health Organization (WHO) in June 2010. Because Burkina Faso has repeatedly suffered meningitis epidemics due to Group A Neisseria meningitidis special efforts were made to conduct a country-wide campaign with the new vaccine in late 2010 and before the onset of the next epidemic meningococcal disease season beginning in January 2011. In the ensuing five months (July-November 2010) the following challenges were successfully managed: (1) doing a large safety study and registering the new vaccine in Burkina Faso; (2) developing a comprehensive communication plan; (3) strengthening the surveillance system with particular attention to improving the capacity for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of spinal fluid specimens; (4) improving cold chain capacity and waste disposal; (5) developing and funding a sound campaign strategy; and (6) ensuring effective collaboration across all partners. Each of these issues required specific strategies that were managed through a WHO-led consortium that included all major partners (Ministry of Health/Burkina Faso, Serum Institute of India Ltd., UNICEF, Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization, Meningitis Vaccine Project, CDC/Atlanta, and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health/Oslo). Biweekly teleconferences that were led by WHO ensured that problems were identified in a timely fashion. The new meningococcal A conjugate vaccine was introduced on December 6, 2010, in a national ceremony led by His Excellency Blaise Compaore, the President of Burkina Faso. The ensuing 10-day national campaign was hugely successful, and over 11.4 million Burkinabes between the ages of 1 and 29 years (100% of target population) were vaccinated. African national immunization programs are capable of achieving very high coverage for a vaccine desired by the public, introduced in a well-organized campaign, and supported at the highest

  18. Impact of meningococcal C conjugate vaccination four years after introduction of routine childhood immunization in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ana Lucia; Minamisava, Ruth; Tomich, Lisia Moura; Lemos, Ana Paula; Gorla, Maria Cecilia; de Cunto Brandileone, Maria Cristina; Domingues, Carla Madga S; de Moraes, Camile; Policena, Gabriela; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza

    2017-04-11

    Routine infant immunization with meningococcal C conjugate (MCC) vaccination started in Brazil in November 2010, scheduled at three and five months plus a booster at 12-15months of age. No catch-up was implemented. We assessed the impact of vaccination on meningococcal C disease (MenC) four years after vaccination start in the National Immunization Program. We performed an ecological quasi-experimental design from 2008 to 2014 using a deterministic linkage between the National Notification and the National Reference Laboratory databases for meningitis. We conducted an interrupted time-series analysis considering Brazil except for Salvador municipality, because an epidemic of serogroup C disease occurred in this city, which prompted a mass vaccination campaign with catch-up for adolescents in 2010. Observed MenC rates in the post-vaccination period were compared to expected rates calculated from the pre-vaccination years. Results for Salvador were presented as descriptive data. An additional time-series analysis was performed for the state of São Paulo. A total of 18,136 MenC cases were analyzed. The highest incidence rates were observed for infants aged Brazil, MenC rates were reduced by 67.2% (95%CI 43.0-91.4%) for infants Brazil in individuals aged Brazil. After four years of infants and toddlers vaccination start, MenC invasive disease reduced in the target population. This investigation provide a robust baseline to ascertain how much the upcoming catch-up dose in 12-13years of age will accelerate the decrease in MenC incidence rates among youths in Brazil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Impact of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccines on carriage and herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Martin C J; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén; Urwin, Rachel; Gray, Stephen J; Andrews, Nicholas J; Clarke, Stuart C; Walker, A Mark; Evans, Meirion R; Kroll, J Simon; Neal, Keith R; Ala'aldeen, Dlawer A A; Crook, Derrick W; Cann, Kathryn; Harrison, Sarah; Cunningham, Richard; Baxter, David; Kaczmarski, Edward; Maclennan, Jenny; Cameron, J Claire; Stuart, James M

    2008-03-01

    In 1999, meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines were introduced in the United Kingdom for those under 19 years of age. The impact of this intervention on asymptomatic carriage of meningococci was investigated to establish whether serogroup replacement or protection by herd immunity occurred. Multicenter surveys of carriage were conducted during vaccine introduction and on 2 successive years, resulting in a total of 48,309 samples, from which 8599 meningococci were isolated and characterized by genotyping and phenotyping. A reduction in serogroup C carriage (rate ratio, 0.19) was observed that lasted at least 2 years with no evidence of serogroup replacement. Vaccine efficacy against carriage was 75%, and vaccination had a disproportionate impact on the carriage of sequence type (ST)-11 complex serogroup C meningococci that (rate ratio, 0.06); these meningococci also exhibited high rates of capsule expression. The impact of vaccination with MCC vaccine on the prevalence of carriage of group C meningococci was consistent with herd immunity. The high impact on the carriage of ST-11 complex serogroup C could be attributed to high levels of capsule expression. High vaccine efficacy against disease in young children, who were not protected long-term by the schedule initially used, is attributed to the high vaccine efficacy against carriage in older age groups.

  20. Correlation of group C meningococcal conjugate vaccine response with B- and T-lymphocyte activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Wing

    Full Text Available Despite the success of conjugate vaccination against meningococcal group C (MenC disease, post-vaccination, some individuals still exhibit rapid waning of initially protective bactericidal antibody levels. The mechanism of this relative loss of humoral protection remains undetermined. In this report we have investigated the relationship between T- and B-cell activation and co-stimulation and the loss of protective antibody titers. We have found that healthy volunteers who lose protective MenC antibody levels one year after receipt of glycoconjugate vaccine exhibit no detectable cellular defect in polyclonal B- or T-cell activation, proliferation or the B-memory pool. This suggests that the processes underlying the more rapid loss of antibody levels are independent of defects in either initial T- or B-cell activation.

  1. Meningococcal B Vaccination (4CMenB in Infants and Toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a Gram-negative pathogen that actively invades its human host and leads to the development of life-threatening pathologies. One of the leading causes of death in the world, N. meningitidis can be responsible for nearly 1,000 new infections per 100,000 subjects during an epidemic period. The bacterial species are classified into 12 serogroups, five of which (A, B, C, W, and Y cause the majority of meningitides. The three purified protein conjugate vaccines currently available target serogroups A, C, W, and Y. Serogroup B has long been a challenge but the discovery of the complete genome sequence of an MenB strain has allowed the development of a specific four-component vaccine (4CMenB. This review describes the pathogenetic role of N. meningitidis and the recent literature concerning the new meningococcal vaccine.

  2. Health economics of a hexavalent meningococcal outer-membrane vesicle vaccine in children : potential impact of introduction in the Dutch vaccination program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; Rumke, HC; Welte, R; Postma, MJ; Jager, JC

    2001-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination of infants with a new hexavalent meningococcal B outer-membrane vesicle vaccine is projected for The Netherlands by applying decision analysis. The societal perspective is taken and direct and productivity costs (friction costs method) are considered.

  3. Global epidemiology of serogroup B meningococcal disease and opportunities for prevention with novel recombinant protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Rodolfo; Safadi, Marco Aurelio P; Valenzuela, María Teresa; Torres, Juan P; Finn, Adam; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2018-04-18

    Meningococcal disease (MD) is a major cause of meningitis and sepsis worldwide, with a high case fatality rate and frequent sequelae. Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, W, X and Y are responsible for most of these life-threatening infections, and its unpredictable epidemiology can cause outbreaks in communities, with significant health, social and economic impact. Currently, serogroup B is the main cause of MD in Europe and North America and one of the most prevalent serogroups in Latin America. Mass vaccination strategies using polysaccharide vaccines have been deployed since the 1970s and the use of conjugate vaccines has controlled endemic and epidemic disease caused by serogroups A, C, W and Y and more recently serogroup B using geographically-specific outer membrane vesicle based vaccines. Two novel protein-based vaccines are a significant addition to our armamentarium against N. meningitidis as they provide broad coverage against highly diverse strains in serogroup B and other groups. Early safety, effectiveness and impact data of these vaccines are encouraging. These novel serogroup B vaccines should be actively considered for individuals at increased risk of disease and to control serogroup B outbreaks occurring in institutions or specific regions, as they are likely to save lives and prevent severe sequelae. Incorporation into national programs will require thorough country-specific analysis.

  4. Could the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) control Neisseria meningitidis capsular group X outbreaks in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eva; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Comanducci, Maurizio; Brunelli, Brunella; Dull, Peter; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2013-02-04

    A new vaccine, 4CMenB, is composed of surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis and is aimed to target serogroup B (MenB) isolates. The vaccine components are present in meningococcal isolates of other serogroups allowing potential use against meningococcal isolates belonging to non-B serogroups. Isolates of serogroup X (MenX) have been emerged in countries of the African meningitis belt. 4CMenB may offer a vaccine strategy against these isolates as there is no available capsule-based vaccine against MenX. We used the Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) to determine presence, diversity and levels of expression of 4CMenB antigens among 9 MenX isolates from several African countries in order to estimate the potential coverage of MenX by the 4CMenB vaccine. We performed bactericidal assays against these isolates, using pooled sera from 4CMenB-vaccinated infants, adolescents and adults. The African MenX isolates belonged to the same genotype but showed variation in the vaccine antigens. MATS data and bactericidal assays suggest coverage of the 9 African MenX isolates by 4CMenB but not of two unrelated MenX isolates from France. 4CMenB vaccine can be considered for further investigation to control MenX outbreaks in Africa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicted strain coverage of a meningococcal multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB) in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Maria João; Bettencourt, Célia; De Paola, Rosita; Giuliani, Maria; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Moschioni, Monica; Machado, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Although the incidence of meningococcal disease has been declining over the past decade in Portugal MenB meningococci is still an important cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of this study was to estimate the strain coverage of the 4CMenB vaccine in Portugal in order to support health policies for prevention and control of meningococcal disease. Since 2002 the clinical and laboratory notification of meningococcal disease is mandatory in Portugal. National database includes since then all confirmed cases notified to the reference laboratory or to the Directorate of Health. Strains included in this study were all the invasive MenB isolated from the 1st July 2011 to the 30th June 2015, sent to the reference laboratory. To predict the vaccine strain coverage of the 4CMenB the expression and cross-reactivity of the surface antigens fHbp, NadA, NHBA were assessed by the Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) whereas PorA typing was performed by sequencing. The presence of at least one antigen with a Relative Potency (RP) greater than its MATS-positive bactericidal threshold RP value or the presence of PorA VR2 = 4 was considered to be predictive for a strain to be covered by the 4CMenB vaccine. The estimated 4CMenB strain coverage in Portugal was 67.9%. The percentage of strain coverage in each of the four epidemiological years ranged from 63.9% to 73.7%. Strains covered by one antigen represent 32.1% of the total of isolates, 29.2% of strains were covered by two antigens and 6.6% by three antigens. No strain had all the four antigens. Antigens that most contributed for coverage were NHBA and fHbp. Data from Portugal is in accordance with the MATS predicted strain coverage in five European countries (England and Wales, France, Germany, Italy and Norway) that pointed to 78% coverage for strains collected in the epidemiological year 2007-2008.

  6. Comparison of CRM197, diphtheria toxoid and tetanus toxoid as protein carriers for meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Berti, F; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Zambonelli, C; Bottomley, M J; De Gregorio, E; Del Giudice, G; Rappuoli, R; Costantino, P; Brogioni, G; Balocchi, C; Biancucci, M; Malito, E

    2013-10-01

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are among the most effective and safest vaccines ever developed. Diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and CRM197 have been mostly used as protein carriers in licensed vaccines. We evaluated the immunogenicity of serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y meningococcal oligosaccharides conjugated to CRM197, DT and TT in naïve mice. The three carriers were equally efficient in inducing an immune response against the carbohydrate moiety in immunologically naïve mice. The effect of previous exposure to different dosages of the carrier protein on the anti-carbohydrate response was studied using serogroup A meningococcal (MenA) saccharide conjugates as a model. CRM197 showed a strong propensity to positively prime the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by its conjugates or those with the antigenically related carrier DT. Conversely in any of the tested conditions TT priming did not result in enhancement of the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by the corresponding conjugates. Repeated exposure of mice to TT or to CRM197 before immunization with the respective MenA conjugates resulted in a drastic suppression of the anti-carbohydrate response in the case of TT conjugate and only in a slight reduction in the case of CRM197. The effect of carrier priming on the anti-MenA response of DT-based conjugates varied depending on their carbohydrate to protein ratio. These data may have implications for human vaccination since conjugate vaccines are widely used in individuals previously immunized with DT and TT carrier proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial Meningitis in Brazil: Baseline Epidemiologic Assessment of the Decade Prior to the Introduction of Pneumococcal and Meningococcal Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Cesar Pontes Azevedo

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is associated with significant burden in Brazil. In 2010, both 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and meningococcal capsular group C conjugate vaccine were introduced into the routine vaccination schedule. Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine was previously introduced in 1999. This study presents trends in demographics, microbiological characteristics and seasonality patterns of bacterial meningitis cases in Brazil from 2000 to 2010.All meningitis cases confirmed by clinical and/or laboratory criteria notified to the national information system for notifiable diseases between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. Proportions of bacterial meningitis cases by demographic characteristics, criteria used for confirmation and etiology were calculated. We estimated disease rates per 100,000 population and trends for the study period, with emphasis on H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae cases. In the decade, 341,805 cases of meningitis were notified in Brazil. Of the 251,853 cases with defined etiology, 110,264 (43.8% were due to bacterial meningitis (excluding tuberculosis. Of these, 34,997 (31.7% were due to meningococcal disease. The incidence of bacterial meningitis significantly decreased from 3.1/100,000 population in 2000-2002 to 2.14/100,000 in 2009-2010 (p<0.01. Among cases of meningococcal disease, the proportion of those associated with group C increased from 41% in 2007 to 61.7% in 2010, while the proportion of group B disease progressively declined. Throughout the study period, an increased number of cases occurred during winter.Despite the reduction in bacterial meningitis incidence during the last decade, it remains a significant healthcare issue in Brazil. Meningococcal disease is responsible for the majority of the cases with group C the most common capsular type. Our study demonstrates the appropriateness of introduction of meningococcal vaccination in Brazil. Furthermore, this study provides a baseline

  8. Maternal and infant antibody response to meningococcal vaccination in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade Carvalho, A; Giampaglia, C M; Kimura, H; de Pereira, O A; Farhat, C K; Neves, J C; Prandini, R; da Silva Carvalho, E; Zarvos, A M

    1977-10-15

    The antigenic capacity of a mixed vaccine prepared with polysaccharides of meningococcus groups A and C, the placental transfer of antibodies, and the persistence of positive titres in the infant were evaluated in 21 pregnant women and their offspring during an epidemic of meningitis in São Paulo, Brazil; and antibody response was assessed in 29 infants vaccinated at less than 6 months of age. Antibodies were detected by passive haemagglutination; the high titres found and the high frequency of positive results are thought to be due to the use of a more sensitive technique. Increased antibody titres were found in most women, and there was evidence for passive transfer to the newborn, especially with regard to antibody type C. However, passive transfer was irregular, and the presence of antibodies in the mother did not guarantee their presence in the child. Passive transfer lasted for only 2-5 months. Vaccination in children under 6 months of age had poor results; only 1 child seroconverted.

  9. Epidemiology of invasive meningococcal B disease in Australia, 1999-2015: priority populations for vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Brett N; Chiu, Clayton K; Jayasinghe, Sanjay H; Richmond, Peter C; McVernon, Jodie; Lahra, Monica M; Andrews, Ross M; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-11-06

    To describe trends in the age-specific incidence of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Australia, 1999-2015. Analysis in February 2017 of de-identified notification data from the Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System of all notifications of IMD in Australia with a recorded diagnosis date during 1999-2015.Major outcomes: IMD notification rates in Australia, 1999-2015, by age, serogroup, Indigenous status, and region. The incidence of meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) disease declined progressively from 1.52 cases per 100 000 population in 2001 to 0.47 per 100 000 in 2015. During 2006-2015, MenB accounted for 81% of IMD cases with a known serogroup; its highest incidence was among infants under 12 months of age (11.1 [95% CI, 9.81-12.2] per 100 000), children aged 1-4 years (2.82 [95% CI, 2.52-3.15] per 100 000), and adolescents aged 15-19 years (2.40 [95% CI, 2.16-2.67] per 100 000). Among the 473 infants under 2 years of age with MenB, 43% were under 7 months and 69% under 12 months of age. The incidence of meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) disease prior to the introduction of the MenC vaccine in 2003 was much lower in infants than for MenB (2.60 cases per 100 000), the rate peaking in people aged 15-19 years (3.32 per 100 000); the overall case fatality rate was also higher (MenC, 8%; MenB, 4%). The incidence of MenB disease was significantly higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australians during 2006-2015 (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 3.8; 95% CI, 3.3-4.5). Based on disease incidence at its current low endemic levels, priority at risk age/population groups for MenB vaccination include all children between 2 months and 5 years of age, Indigenous children under 10 years of age, and all adolescents aged 15-19 years. Given marked variation in meningococcal disease trends over time, close scrutiny of current epidemiologic data is essential.

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of a novel quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM in healthy Korean adolescents and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoan Jong Lee

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Findings of this first study of a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in Korean adults and adolescents demonstrated that a single dose of MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic, as indicated by the percentages of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 (79%, 99%, 98%, and 94% of subjects and geometric mean titers (48, 231, 147, and 107 against serogroups A, C, W, and Y, respectively, at 1 month post-vaccination.

  11. Using the 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program to increase adolescent human papillomavirus, meningococcal, tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis and influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard K; Raviotta, Jonathan M; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Moehling, Krissy K; Reis, Evelyn Cohen; Humiston, Sharon G; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng

    2017-10-27

    To report the results of an intervention using the 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program (4 Pillars™ Program) to increase adolescent vaccinations including human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) and influenza vaccines, which remain underutilized in this population. Eleven pediatric and family medicine practices, previously control sites from a randomized controlled cluster trial, with ≥50 adolescent patients participated. The 4 Pillars™ Program was the foundation of the intervention. De-identified demographic, office visit and vaccination data were derived from electronic medical record extractions for patients whose date of birth was 4/1/1997 to 4/1/2004 (ages 11-17years at baseline). Vaccination rates for HPV, influenza, tetanus-pertussis-diphtheria (Tdap) and meningococcal (MenACWY) vaccines were determined for all eligible patients pre- and post intervention (i.e., vaccination rates on 4/1/2015 and 4/30/2016). Among 9473 patients ages 11-17years at baseline (4/1/2015), mean pre-intervention vaccination rates for HPV initiation and completion, meningococcal, Tdap and influenza vaccines were below national levels. Rates increased significantly post intervention (P<0.001) for HPV initiation which increased 17.1 percentage points (PP) from 51.4%; HPV completion increased 14.8PP from 30.7%, meningococcal vaccine uptake increased 16.6PP from 79.1%, Tdap vaccine uptake increased 14.6PP from 76.9%. Influenza vaccine uptake did not increase significantly (2.3PP from 40.1%). In the regression using generalized estimating equations, odds of vaccination were higher for younger, non-white adolescents for all vaccines; being in a smaller practice decreased the odds of Tdap vaccination but increased the odds of influenza vaccination. Clinically and statistically significant improvements in HPV series initiation and completion, and meningococcal and Tdap vaccinations were observed in primary care practices implementing the 4 Pillars™ Practice Transformation Program

  12. Optimization of the conjugation method for a serogroup B/C meningococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Lucila O; Schenkman, Rocilda P F; Perciani, Catia T; Carneiro, Sylvia M; Dias, Waldely O; Tanizaki, Martha M

    2006-11-01

    A conjugate meningococcal vaccine against serogroup B/C consisting of capsular PS (polysaccharide) from serogroup C conjugated to OMV (outer membrane vesicle) from serogroup B would be a very useful vaccine in regions where there is a prevalence of both serogroups, for example in Brazil. For this purpose, the conjugation method that uses ADHy (adipic acid dihydrazide) as spacer and a carbodi-imide derivative, EDAC [1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide], as catalyser was optimized looking for synthesis yield and maintenance of the antigenicity of both components. The best synthesis conditions preserving the vaccine immunogenicity resulted in a final yield of approx. 17%. Immunogenicity of the vaccine was highest when 10% of the sialic acid residues of the PS were occupied by the ADHy spacer. Sterilization of the conjugate by filtration through a 0.22-microm-pore-size membrane resulted in a low recovery of protein and PS (approximately 50%), although the vaccine immunogenicity was maintained. Using gamma irradiation on freeze-dried sample, it was possible to maintain the integrity of OMV structure and, consequently, its ability to induce bactericidal antibodies.

  13. Safety of a meningococcal group B vaccine used in response to two university outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Jonathan; Johnsen, Peter; Ferris, Mary; Miller, Mary; Leighton, Kevin; McGilvray, Mark; McNamara, Lucy; Breakwell, Lucy; Yu, Yon; Bhavsar, Tina; Briere, Elizabeth; Patel, Manisha

    2017-03-31

    To assess the safety of meningococcal group B (MenB)-4C vaccine. Undergraduates, dormitory residents, and persons with high-risk medical conditions received the MenB-4C vaccine two-dose series during mass vaccination clinics from 12/2013 through 11/2014. Adverse events (AEs) were identified by 15 minutes of observation postvaccination, spontaneous reports, surveys, and hospital surveillance. Causality was assessed for serious adverse events (SAEs). 16,974 persons received 31,313 MenB-4C doses. The incidence of syncope during the 15-minutes post-dose 1 was 0.88/1000 persons. 2% of participants spontaneously reported an AE (most common were arm pain and fever). 3 SAEs were suspected of being caused by the vaccine, including one case of anaphylaxis. Most AEs reported were nonserious and consistent with previous clinical trial findings. Measures to prevent injury from syncope and to treat anaphylaxis should be available wherever vaccines are administered. Our safety evaluation supports the use of MenB-4C in response to outbreaks.

  14. The meningococcal vaccine candidate neisserial surface protein A (NspA binds to factor H and enhances meningococcal resistance to complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Lewis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH to fH-binding protein (fHbp is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a approximately 17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA, a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS, or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6-7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components.

  15. Antibody persistence following meningococcal C conjugate vaccination in children and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Cisne Frota

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: HIV-infected individuals (HIVI are threatened by meningococcal infection and presented lower response to vaccines. Data are scarce on long-term persistence of human serum bactericidal antibody (hSBA after a meningococcal C conjugate (MCC vaccine in HIVI youth; the authors aimed to describe this persistence in HIVI. Methods: HIVI and HIV uninfected individuals (HIVU, aged 2–18 years, CD4 >15% were recruited. Seroprotection (hSBA ≥1:4 at baseline and at 12–18 months after immunization was evaluated and the association of the different factors with the long-term persistence was calculated using logistic regression. Results: A total of 145 HIVI, 50 HIVU were recruited and immunized, and their median age was 11 years (median age in HIVI group was 12 years, and 10 years in HIVU group, p-value = 0.02. 85 HIVI (44% had undetectable viral load (UVL. Seroprotection rate was 27.2%: 24.1% in HIVI and 36% in HIVU 12–18 months after immunization (p = 0.14. Baseline immunity (odds ratio [OR] = 70.70, 95% CI: 65.2–766.6; UVL at entry (OR: 2.87, 95% CI: 0.96–8.62 and lower family income (OR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01–0.69 were associated with seroprotection among HIVI. Conclusion: Seroprotection at 12–18 months after single dose of MCC was low for both groups, and higher among individuals who presented baseline immunity. Among HIVI, vaccine should be administered after UVL is achieved.

  16. Antibody persistence following meningococcal C conjugate vaccination in children and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frota, Ana Cristina Cisne; Harrison, Lee H; Ferreira, Bianca; Menna-Barreto, Daniela; Castro, Raquel Bernardo Nana de; Silva, Giselle Pereira da; Oliveira, Ricardo Hugo de; Abreu, Thalita F; Milagres, Lucimar G; Hofer, Cristina B

    HIV-infected individuals (HIVI) are threatened by meningococcal infection and presented lower response to vaccines. Data are scarce on long-term persistence of human serum bactericidal antibody (hSBA) after a meningococcal C conjugate (MCC) vaccine in HIVI youth; the authors aimed to describe this persistence in HIVI. HIVI and HIV uninfected individuals (HIVU), aged 2-18 years, CD4 >15% were recruited. Seroprotection (hSBA ≥1:4) at baseline and at 12-18 months after immunization was evaluated and the association of the different factors with the long-term persistence was calculated using logistic regression. A total of 145 HIVI, 50 HIVU were recruited and immunized, and their median age was 11 years (median age in HIVI group was 12 years, and 10 years in HIVU group, p-value=0.02). 85 HIVI (44%) had undetectable viral load (UVL). Seroprotection rate was 27.2%: 24.1% in HIVI and 36% in HIVU 12-18 months after immunization (p=0.14). Baseline immunity (odds ratio [OR]=70.70, 95% CI: 65.2-766.6); UVL at entry (OR: 2.87, 95% CI: 0.96-8.62) and lower family income (OR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.69) were associated with seroprotection among HIVI. Seroprotection at 12-18 months after single dose of MCC was low for both groups, and higher among individuals who presented baseline immunity. Among HIVI, vaccine should be administered after UVL is achieved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  17. Safety and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, compared with licensed vaccines in adults in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamboulian, D; Lopardo, G; Lopez, P; Cortes-Barbosa, C; Valencia, A; Bedell, L; Karsten, A; Dull, P M

    2010-10-01

    This study compared the investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, with licensed quadrivalent polysaccharide (MPSV4) and conjugate (MenACWY-D) meningococcal vaccines. In this phase III multicenter study, 2505 adults (aged 19-55 years) were randomized to receive either MenACWY-CRM or MenACWY-D, and 326 adults (aged 56-65 years) were randomized to receive either MenACWY-CRM or MPSV4. Sera obtained pre-vaccination and at 1-month post-vaccination were tested for serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA) for immunogenicity non-inferiority and superiority analyses. The vaccines in all groups were well tolerated. In the 19-55 years age group, post-vaccination geometric mean titers (GMTs) were consistently higher for MenACWY-CRM than for MenACWY-D for all four serogroups. MenACWY-CRM was non-inferior to MenACWY-D for all serogroups, and superior for serogroup Y. In the 56-65 years age group, post-vaccination GMTs were 1.2- to 5.4-fold higher for MenACWY-CRM than for MPSV4 for the four serogroups. MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated and immunogenic in adults aged 19-65 years, with at least non-inferior immunogenicity compared with the currently licensed meningococcal vaccines. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Meningococcal Serogroup A, C, W135 and Y Conjugated Vaccine: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was licensed for use in subjects of 12 months of age and above. Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal vaccination at 14 months and an additional vaccination at the age of 12 years, both with the MenACWY vaccine. Methods A decision analysis cohort model, with 185,000 Dutch newborns, was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different immunization strategies. For strategies including a vaccination at 12 years of age, an additional cohort with adolescents aged 12 years was followed. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated for the current disease incidence and for a scenario when herd immunity is lost. Results Vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months is cost-saving. Vaccinating with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would prevent 7 additional cases of meningococcal serogroup A,C,W135,Y disease in the birth cohort and adolescent cohort followed for 99 years compared to the current vaccine schedule of a single vaccination with MenC at 14 months. With the current incidence, this strategy resulted in an ICER of €635,334 per quality adjusted life year. When serogroup C disease incidence returns to pre-vaccination levels due to a loss of vaccine-induced herd-immunity, vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would be cost-saving. Conclusions Routine vaccination with MenACWY is cost-saving. With the current epidemiology, a booster-dose with MenACWY is not likely cost-effective. When herd immunity is lost, a booster-dose has the potential of being cost-effective. A dynamic model should be developed for more precise estimation of the cost-effectiveness of the prevention of disappearance of herd immunity. PMID:23741448

  19. Development and Use of a Serum Bactericidal Assay Using Pooled Human Complement To Assess Responses to a Meningococcal Group A Conjugate Vaccine in African Toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Bash, Margaret C.; Lynn, Freyja; Mocca, Brian; Borrow, Ray; Findlow, Helen; Hassan-King, Musa; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Idoko, Olubukola; Sow, Samba; Kulkarni, Prasad; LaForce, F. Marc

    2014-01-01

    A meningococcal group A polysaccharide (PS) conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has been developed for African countries affected by epidemic meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis. Complement-mediated serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assays are used to assess protective immune responses to meningococcal vaccination. Human complement (hC′) was used in early studies demonstrating antibody-mediated protection against disease, but it is difficult to obtain and standardize. We developed and evaluate...

  20. Prospects for eradication of meningococcal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nadel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia remain a serious global health threat. This review focuses on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease following the recent implementation of effective vaccines and the potential utility of a vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus.

  1. Parental and community acceptance of the benefits and risks associated with meningococcal B vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Clarke, Michelle; Sullivan, Thomas

    2014-01-09

    A new meningococcal serogroup B (Men B) vaccine has been licensed in the European Union (EU) and Australia. This study aimed to assess community and parental attitudes to introduction of new Men B vaccines and identify facilitators and barriers to vaccine implementation. Cross-sectional survey including face-to-face interviews with adolescents, parents and adults from randomly selected households in South Australia in 2012. Survey data were weighted to the age, gender and geographical area profile of the population. 3055 interviews were conducted with individuals aged 15-97 years, including 966 parents. Participation rate was 66.4%. 82.5% (95% CI 79.7-85.4) of parents (797/966) wanted their child to receive the Men B vaccine, with 12.2% (9.7-14.7) (118/966) unsure. Main parental concerns included potential side effects (41.3% (26.7-46.0)) and adequate vaccine testing (11.7% (9.4-14.1)). Potential for an extra injection at an immunisation visit resulted in 15.7% (12.8-18.5) of parents (n=152/966) less likely to have their child immunised. Potential redness/swelling at the injection site or mild/moderate fever resulted in only 8.5% (6.3-10.7) and 10.8% (8.5-13.2) of parents, respectively, less likely to have their child immunised. Children being up to date with vaccinations and recommendation from family physician were the strongest independent predictors of parents agreeing their children should be immunised with Men B vaccine (OR=6.58; p=0.006 and OR=4.15; pvaccine, with family physician recommendation the strongest independent predictor of acceptance (OR=3.81; pvaccines, with parental willingness to have children immunised, impacted more by number of injections than potential for adverse events such as local reactions or fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High-dimensional assessment of B-cell responses to quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate and plain polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daniel; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Thompson, Amber J; Snape, Matthew D; Ramasamy, Maheshi N; Kelly, Dominic F; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-01-30

    Neisseria meningitidis is a globally important cause of meningitis and septicaemia. Twelve capsular groups of meningococci are known, and quadrivalent vaccines against four of these (A, C, W and Y) are available as plain-polysaccharide and protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines. Here we apply contemporary methods to describe B-cell responses to meningococcal polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. Twenty adults were randomly assigned to receive either a meningococcal plain-polysaccharide or conjugate vaccine; one month later all received the conjugate vaccine. Blood samples were taken pre-vaccination and 7, 21 and 28 days after vaccination; B-cell responses were assessed by ELISpot, serum bactericidal assay, flow cytometry and gene expression microarray. Seven days after an initial dose of either vaccine, a gene expression signature characteristic of plasmablasts was detectable. The frequency of newly generated plasma cells (CXCR3 + HLA-DR + ) and the expression of transcripts derived from IGKC and IGHG2 correlated with immunogenicity. Notably, using an independent dataset, the expression of glucosamine (N-acetyl)-6-sulfatase was found to reproducibly correlate with the magnitude of immune response. Transcriptomic and flow cytometric data revealed depletion of switched memory B cells following plain-polysaccharide vaccine. These data describe distinct gene signatures associated with the production of high-avidity antibody and a plain-polysaccharide-specific signature, possibly linked to polysaccharide-induced hyporesponsiveness.

  3. Kinetics of antibody responses after primary immunization with meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine or secondary immunization with either conjugate or polysaccharide vaccine in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, Richarda M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Engels, Carla W. A. M.; Schepp, Rutger M.; van de Kassteele, Jan; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Rijkers, Ger T.; Berbers, Guy A. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands the meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MenCC) vaccine is administered as a single dose at 14 months. We evaluated the kinetics of isotype-specific antibodies in adults (n = 21) after primary immunization with MenCC or secondary immunization with MenCC or plain MenC

  4. A phase III observer-blind randomized, controlled study to evaluate the immune response and the correlation with nasopharyngeal carriage after immunization of university students with a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate or serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Robert C; Dull, Peter; Bai, Xilian; Nolan, Kate; Findlow, Jamie; Bazaz, Rohit; Kleinschmidt, Annett; McCarthy, Maggie; Wang, Huajun; Toneatto, Daniela; Borrow, Ray

    2017-01-11

    University students have high rates of pharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Interruption of carriage acquisition is an important mechanism of vaccines for inducing herd protection. 4CMenB and MenACWY-CRM vaccines have been shown to be immunogenic against meningococcal serogroups B and ACWY respectively in younger age groups, and also to elicit a modest impact on meningococcal carriage in vaccinated students. However, vaccine responses in university students and the impact of serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titers on meningococcal carriage are undetermined. Immunogenicity of two 4CMenB doses or one MenACWY-CRM dose was measured in university students at Months 2, 4, 6 and 12 post-first vaccination. Immunogenicity of one MenACWY-CRM dose in students with previous meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccination was also assessed. Immune responses were measured with an SBA assay using human complement (hSBA) against three reference strains for serogroup B and against one strain for each for serogroups C and Y. Correlations between hSBA titers and meningococcal carriage were analyzed. All subjects demonstrated robust functional antibody responses to both vaccines at Month 2 and a high proportion maintained protective hSBA titers up to Month 12. At baseline, carriage of disease-associated serogroup B strains and serogroups C and Y were higher in subjects with already-protective hSBA titers. Post-vaccination, while both 4CMenB and MenACWY-CRM elicited robust immunogenicity in students, significant correlations between post-vaccination hSBA titers and carriage of disease-associated serogroups were not observed. 4CMenB and MenACWY-CRM were both highly immunogenic. There was no correlation between carriage and post-vaccination hSBA titers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Co-administration of a meningococcal glycoconjugate ACWY vaccine with travel vaccines: a randomized, open-label, multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberer, Martin; Burchard, Gerd; Jelinek, Tomas; Reisinger, Emil; Beran, Jiri; Meyer, Seetha; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Gniel, Dieter; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Potential interactions between vaccines may compromise the immunogenicity and/or safety of individual vaccines so must be assessed before concomitant administration is recommended. In this study, the immunogenicity and safety of travel vaccines against Japanese encephalitis (JEV) and rabies (PCECV) administered together with or without a quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate ACWY-CRM vaccine were evaluated (NCT01466387). Healthy adults aged 18 to ≤60 years were randomized to one of four vaccine regimens: JEV + PCECV + MenACWY-CRM, JEV + PCECV, PCECV or MenACWY-CRM. Immunogenicity at baseline and 28 days post-complete vaccination was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement or neutralization tests. Adverse events (AEs) were collected throughout the study period. JEV + PCECV + MenACWY-CRM was non-inferior to JEV + PCECV. Post-vaccination seroprotective neutralizing titers or concentrations were achieved in 98-99% (JE) and 100% (rabies) of subjects across the vaccine groups. Antibody responses to vaccine meningococcal serogroups were in the same range for MenACWY-CRM and JEV + PCECV + MenACWY-CRM. Rates of reporting of AEs were similar for JEV + PCECV and JEV + PCECV + MenACWY-CRM. MenACWY-CRM was administered with an inactivated adjuvanted JE and a purified chick embryo cell-culture rabies vaccine without compromising immunogenicity or safety of the individual vaccines. These data provide evidence that MenACWY-CRM could be effectively incorporated into travel vaccination programs. NCT01466387. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity to an OMV meningococcal B vaccine in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Jackson, Catherine; Stewart, Joanna; Coster, Gregor; Turner, Nikki; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lennon, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Pain on vaccine injection and subsequent site reactions of pain and swelling may influence confidence in vaccines and their uptake. This study aimed to identify factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity following administration of a strain specific meningococcal B outer membrane vesicle vaccine. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted from a phase II single center randomized observer-blind study that evaluated the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of this vaccine in 2 cohorts of healthy 8 to 12 y old children. Vaccine administration technique was observed by an unblinded team member and the vaccine administrator instructed on standardized administration. Participants kept a daily diary to record local reactions (erythema, induration and swelling) and pain for 7 d following receipt of the vaccine. Explanatory variables were cohort, vaccine, age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, atopic history, history of frequent infections, history of drug reactions, pain on injection, vaccinator, school population socioeconomic status, serum bactericidal antibody titer against the vaccine strain NZ98/254, and total IgG. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using ordinal logistic regression for factors relating to pain on injection and reactogenicity. Perceived pain on injection was related to vaccine formulation, vaccine administrator and ethnicity. Reactogenicity outcomes varied with ethnicity and vaccine administrator. Maintaining community and parental confidence in vaccine safety without drawing attention to differences between individuals and groups is likely to become increasingly difficult. Vaccine administration technique alone has the potential to significantly reduce pain experienced on injection and local vaccine reactions.

  7. Safety of Combination of a Tetravalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Against Serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 With Other Vaccine Preparations: a Prospective Study of a Series of Cases Among Healthy Children and Children With Various Health Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal infection is an acute disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which proceeds with a diverse clinical aspect from nasopharyngitis to meningococcal meningitis and meningococcemia. Since 2014, a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine has been registered in Russia. This vaccine creates protection against serogroups A, C, W-135, Y and can be used from the age of nine months to 55 years. The actual issue is a vaccine tolerability, including when combined with other vaccine preparations.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the safety of a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y and W-135 when it is combined with other vaccine preparations.Methods. A prospective full-design study assessed the tolerability of immunization with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with a pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine, measles-mumps-rubella, viral hepatitis A, influenza, and chicken pox vaccines.Results. 97 children aged from 9 months to 18 years were vaccinated, 20 of them were healthy and 77 had medical issues (with allergic pathology, ENT diseases, cardiovascular and nervous system diseases, lung diseases as well as orphan diseases. Among vaccinated children, general reactions were observed in 3/97 (3.1% children, local reactions — in 5 (5.2%. The post-vaccination period passed asymptomatically and uneventfully in the prevailing majority of children vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (in 91, 93.8%.Conclusion. The immunization with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 is well tolerated, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with other vaccine preparations, in healthy children of different age groups and in patients with different health status.

  8. Update on the use of meningococcal serogroup C CRM₁₉₇-conjugate vaccine (Meningitec) against meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badahdah, Al-Mamoon; Rashid, Harunor; Khatami, Ameneh

    2016-01-01

    Meningitec is a CRM197-conjugated meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) vaccine, first licensed in 1999. It has been used as a primary and booster vaccine in infants, toddlers, older children and adults, and has been shown to be immunogenic and well-tolerated in all age groups, including premature infants. Vaccine effectiveness has been demonstrated using combined data on all three licensed MenC conjugate vaccines. Evidence from clinical trials, however, suggests that the different MenC conjugate vaccines behave differently with respect to the induction and persistence of bactericidal antibody and generation of immune memory. It appears that Meningitec has a less favorable immunologic profile compared particularly to tetanus toxoid (TT) MenC conjugate vaccines. Data from comparative trials have raised interesting questions on priming of the immune system by conjugate vaccines, particularly in infants. The results from these and other studies are reviewed here with specific focus on Meningitec.

  9. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide CRM conjugate vaccine in infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregnaghi, Miguel; Lopez, Pio; Stamboulian, Daniel; Graña, Gabriela; Odrljin, Tatjana; Bedell, Lisa; Dull, Peter M

    2014-09-01

    This phase III study assessed the safety and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM, a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, administered with routine vaccines starting at 2 months of age. Healthy infants received MenACWY-CRM in a two- or three-dose primary infant series plus a single toddler dose. In addition, a two-dose toddler catch-up series was evaluated. Immune responses to MenACWY-CRM were assessed for serum bactericidal activity with human complement (hSBA). Reactogenicity and safety results were collected systematically. After a full infant/toddler series or two-dose toddler catch-up series, MenACWY-CRM elicited immune responses against the four serogroups in 94-100% of subjects. Noninferiority of the two- versus three-dose MenACWY-CRM infant dosing regimen was established for geometric mean titers for all serogroups. Following the three-dose infant primary series, 89-98% of subjects achieved an hSBA ≥ 8 across all serogroups. Immune responses to concomitant routine vaccines given with MenACWY-CRM were noninferior to responses to routine vaccines alone, except for pertactin after the two-dose infant series. Noninferiority criteria were met for all concomitant antigens after the three-dose infant series. MenACWY-CRM vaccination regimens in infants and toddlers were immunogenic and well tolerated. No clinically meaningful effects of concomitant administration with routine infant and toddler vaccines were observed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. A Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Incorporating Genetically Attenuated Endotoxin Dissociates Inflammation From Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Dowling

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Group B Neisseria meningitidis, an endotoxin-producing gram-negative bacterium, causes the highest incidence of group B meningococcus (MenB disease in the first year of life. The Bexsero vaccine is indicated in Europe from 8 weeks of age. Endotoxin components of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs or soluble lipopolysaccharide (LPS represent a potential source of inflammation and residual reactogenicity. The purpose of this study was to compare novel candidate MenB vaccine formulations with licensed vaccines, including Bexsero, using age-specific in vitro culture systems.Methods. OMVs from wild type and inactivated lpxL1 gene mutant N. meningitidis strains were characterized in human neonatal and adult in vitro whole blood assays and dendritic cell arrays. OMVs were benchmarked against licensed vaccines, including Bexsero and whole cell pertussis formulations, with respect to Th-polarizing cytokine and PGE2 production, as well as cell surface activation markers (HLA-DR, CD86, CCR7. OMV immunogenicity was assessed in mice.Results. ΔlpxLI native OMVs demonstrated significantly less cytokine induction in human blood and DCs than Bexsero and most of the other pediatric vaccines (e.g., PedvaxHib, EasyFive, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG tested. Despite a much lower inflammatory profile in vitro than Bexsero, ΔlpxLI native OMVs still had moderate DC maturing ability and induced robust anti-N. meningitidis antibody responses after murine immunization.Conclusions. A meningococcal vaccine comprised of attenuated LPS-based OMVs with a limited inflammatory profile in vitro induces robust antigen-specific immunogenicity in vivo.

  11. Impact of the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenAfriVac, on carriage and herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Paul A; Diomandé, Fabien; Ba, Absatou Ky; Sanou, Idrissa; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Sangaré, Lassana; Kandolo, Denis; Aké, Flavien; Saga, Inger Marie; Clark, Thomas A; Misegades, Lara; Martin, Stacey W; Thomas, Jennifer Dolan; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre R; Hassan-King, Musa; Djingarey, Mamoudou H; Messonnier, Nancy E; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre; Laforce, F Marc; Caugant, Dominique A

    2013-02-01

    The conjugate vaccine against serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA), MenAfriVac, was first introduced in mass vaccination campaigns of 1-29-year-olds in Burkina Faso in 2010. It is not known whether MenAfriVac has an impact on NmA carriage. We conducted a repeated cross-sectional meningococcal carriage study in a representative portion of the 1-29-year-old population in 3 districts in Burkina Faso before and up to 13 months after vaccination. One district was vaccinated in September 2010, and the other 2 were vaccinated in December 2010. We analyzed 25 521 oropharyngeal samples, of which 22 093 were obtained after vaccination. In October-November 2010, NmA carriage prevalence in the unvaccinated districts was comparable to the baseline established in 2009, but absent in the vaccinated district. Serogroup X N. meningitidis (NmX) dominated in both vaccinated and unvaccinated districts. With 4 additional sampling campaigns performed throughout 2011 in the 3 districts, overall postvaccination meningococcal carriage prevalence was 6.95%, with NmX dominating but declining for each campaign (from 8.66% to 1.97%). Compared with a baseline NmA carriage prevalence of 0.39%, no NmA was identified after vaccination. Overall vaccination coverage in the population sampled was 89.7%, declining over time in 1-year-olds (from 87.1% to 26.5%), as unvaccinated infants reached 1 year of age. NmA carriage was eliminated in both the vaccinated and unvaccinated population from 3 weeks up to 13 months after mass vaccination (P = .003). The disappearance of NmA carriage among both vaccinated and unvaccinated populations is consistent with a vaccine-induced herd immunity effect.

  12. [Meningococcemia and meningitis due to Neisseria meningitidis W135 developed in two cases vaccinated with bivalent (A/C) meningococcal vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, Vedat; Acar, Ali; Kılıç, Abdullah; Budak, Sinem; Oncül, Oral; Haznedaroğlu, Tunçer; Görenek, Levent

    2010-07-01

    Meningococcal infections may develop as episodic or endemic cases particularly among children attending day-care centers, boarding schools or among military personnel. Bivalent (A/C) meningococcal vaccine is applied to all new military stuff since 1993 in Turkey. In this report two cases of meningococcemia and meningitis, developed in two soldiers vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine, were presented. The first case was a 21 years old male patient who was admitted to the emergency service with the complaints of high fever, headache, fatigue and vomiting. He was conscious, cooperative and oriented with normal neurological findings. Maculopapular exanthems were detected at the lower extremities. The patient was hospitalized with the initial diagnosis of sepsis or meningococcemia and empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and dexamethasone. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination yielded 10 cells/mm3 (lymphocytes) with normal CSF biochemical parameters. A few hours later skin rashes spread over the body rapidly, the symptoms got worse, confusion, disorientation and disorientation developed, and the patient died due to cardiac and respiratory arrest at the seventh hour of his admission. The second case was also a 21 years old male patient who was admitted to the hospital with the complaints of fever, headache, painful urination, confusion and agitation. He was initially diagnosed as acute bacterial meningitis due to clinical (stiff neck, positive Kernig and Brudzinsky signs) and CSF (8000 cells/mm3; 80% polymorphonuclear leukocytes, increased protein and decreased glucose levels) findings. Empirical antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone was initiated and continued for 14 days. The patient was discharged with complete cure and no complication was detected in his follow-up visit after two months. The first case had an history of vaccination with bivalent (A/C) meningococcal vaccine three months ago and the second case had been vaccinated one month ago. The

  13. Comportamento imunológico das vacinas anti-meningocócicas Immunological behavior of the meningococcal vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry I. Z. Requejo

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A doença meningocócica continua sendo um grande problema de saúde pública em todos os continentes, e as vacinas anti-meningocócicas têm sido indicadas na prevenção e controle de epidemias. As vacinas polissacarídicas A e C são relativamente eficazes, com comportamentos imunológicos distintos frente às faixas etárias; no entanto, para o sorogrupo B, embora existam numerosos estudos internacionais até agora já desenvolvidos, ainda não se tem uma vacina altamente segura e eficaz de ampla aceitação. O polissacáride capsular do meningococo B não é imunogênico devido ao seu mimetismo com componentes celulares do hospedeiro. Tentativas de se introduzir carreadores protéicos vêm sendo feitas para se obter uma vacina que seja imunogênica em todas as faixas etárias e de preferência protetora contra todos os meningococos. Foi feita revisão da literatura com o objetivo de estudar o comportamento imunológico de todas as vacinas, até então desenvolvidas, e mostrar os esforços que estão sendo empreendidos no sentido de se buscar um produto seguro e eficaz para o controle da doença meningocócicaMeningococcal disease continues to be a great health problem on all continents and the meningococcal vaccines have been proposed for their prevention and epidemic control. The polysaccharide A and C vaccines are relatively efficacious with distinct immunological behavior with regard to the different age groups, however, up to the present no highly efficacious vaccine for meningococcal B disease exists. The meningococcal B capsular polysaccharide is not immunogenic due to the structural mimicry of mammalian tissues and efforts to produce carrier proteins have been proposed in order to obtain an immunogenic vaccine for all age groups that would if possible, protect against all the meningococci. This review of the literature presents the study of the development of the immunological behavior of all the meningococcal vaccines undergoing

  14. Meningococcal serogroup C immunogenicity, antibody persistence and memory B-cells induced by the monovalent meningococcal serogroup C versus quadrivalent meningococcal serogroup ACWY conjugate booster vaccine: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravenhorst, Mariëtte B; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Knol, Mirjam J; Stoof, Susanne P; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2017-08-24

    Adolescents are considered the key transmitters of meningococci in the population. Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) antibody levels wane rapidly after MenC conjugate vaccination in young children, leaving adolescents with low antibody levels. In this study, we compared MenC immune responses after booster vaccination in adolescence with either tetanus toxoid conjugated MenC (MenC-TT) or MenACWY (MenACWY-TT) vaccine, and aimed to establish an optimal age for this booster. Healthy 10-, 12-, and 15-year-olds, who received a single dose of MenC-TT vaccine in early childhood, were randomized to receive MenC-TT or MenACWY-TT vaccine. MenC serum bactericidal antibody (rSBA) titers, MenC polysaccharide (PS) specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 and MenC-specific IgG and IgA memory B-cells were determined before, one month and one year after the booster. Non-inferiority was tested by comparing geometric mean titers (GMTs) between vaccinees at one year. Of 501 participants, 464 (92.6%) were included in the 'according to protocol' cohort analysis. At one month, all participants developed high MenC rSBA titers (>24,000 in all groups) and MenC-PS-specific IgG levels. Non-inferiority was not demonstrated one year after the booster with higher MenC GMTs after the monovalent vaccine, but 462/464 (99.6%) participants maintained protective MenC rSBA titers. IgG levels mainly consisted of IgG1, but similar levels of increase were observed for IgG1 and IgG2. Both vaccines induced a clear increase in the number of circulating MenC-PS specific IgG and IgA memory B-cells. Between one month and one year, the highest antibody decay rate was observed in the 10-year-olds. Both MenC-TT and MenACWY-TT vaccines induced robust protective MenC immune responses after the booster vaccination, although non-inferiority could not be demonstrated for the MenACWY-TT vaccine after one year. Our results underline the importance of optimal timing of a meningococcal booster vaccination to protect against MenC disease

  15. Is a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine sufficient for protection? experience from the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaaijk Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first meningococcal serogroup C (MenC conjugate vaccine was licensed in 1999 and introduced in the United Kingdom. Countries that have implemented the MenC vaccine since then in their national immunisation programmes use different schedules. Nevertheless, all involved countries seem to experience substantial declines in the incidence of MenC disease. Discussion Since 2001, the MenC conjugate vaccine has been implemented in the Netherlands by offering a single dose to all children aged 14 months. Prior to the introduction of the vaccine into the national immunisation programme, a catch-up vaccination campaign was initiated in which a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine was offered to all children aged from 14 months up to and including 18 years. Since then, there has been no report of any case of MenC disease among immunocompetent vaccinees. Administration of a single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine after infancy could be beneficial considering the already complex immunisation schedules with large numbers of vaccinations in the first year of life. The present paper deals with the advantages and critical aspects of a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine. Summary A single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months in combination with a catch up vaccine campaign appeared to be a successful strategy to prevent MenC disease in the Netherlands, thereby confirming that a single dose of the vaccine could sufficiently protect against disease. Nevertheless, this approach can only be justified in countries with a relatively low incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the first year of life. Furthermore, a good surveillance programme is recommended for timely detection of vaccine breakthroughs and outbreaks among non-vaccinees, since long-term protection after a single dose in the second year of life cannot currently be guaranteed.

  16. Genetic distribution of noncapsular meningococcal group B vaccine antigens in Neisseria lactamica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Newbold, Lynne S; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Richardson, Lynne; Bennett, Julia S; Maiden, Martin C J; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray

    2013-09-01

    The poor immunogenicity of the meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) capsule has led to the development of vaccines targeting subcapsular antigens, in particular the immunodominant and diverse outer membrane porin, PorA. These vaccines are largely strain specific; however, they offer limited protection against the diverse MenB-associated diseases observed in many industrialized nations. To broaden the scope of its protection, the multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB) incorporates a PorA-containing outer membrane vesicle (OMV) alongside relatively conserved recombinant protein components, including factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), and neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA). The expression of PorA is unique to meningococci (Neisseria meningitidis); however, many subcapsular antigens are shared with nonpathogenic members of the genus Neisseria that also inhabit the nasopharynx. These organisms may elicit cross-protective immunity against meningococci and/or occupy a niche that might otherwise accommodate pathogens. The potential for 4CMenB responses to impact such species (and vice versa) was investigated by determining the genetic distribution of the primary 4CMenB antigens among diverse members of the common childhood commensal, Neisseria lactamica. All the isolates possessed nhba but were devoid of fhbp and nadA. The nhba alleles were mainly distinct from but closely related to those observed among a representative panel of invasive MenB isolates from the same broad geographic region. We made similar findings for the immunogenic typing antigen, FetA, which constitutes a major part of the 4CMenB OMV. Thus, 4CMenB vaccine responses may impact or be impacted by nasopharyngeal carriage of commensal neisseriae. This highlights an area for further research and surveillance should the vaccine be routinely implemented.

  17. Vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal capsular group B disease: What have we recently learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a feared and devastating cause of sepsis and meningitis. Disease incidence is highest among infants and children although a significant burden of disease is experienced by adolescents, young adults and those with specific risk-factors. Prevention of disease against capsular groups A, C, W and Y; 4 of the 5 most pathogenic groups is achievable using capsular polysaccharide vaccines. It has only recently been possible to provide protection against capsular group B (MenB) strains following the licensure of a 4 component group B vaccine (4CMenB) in Europe in 2013. Following licensure, 4CMenB has been used in specific at-risk groups and in response to outbreaks of MenB disease. The largest outbreak interventions have been in students at 2 universities in the United States and for all individuals aged 2 months to 20 years of age in Quebec, Canada. The vaccine was recommended in February 2014 for implementation into the UK infant schedule at 2, 4 and 12 months of age, although it has taken over 12 months to resolve procurement discussions to enable implementation. The UK recommendation incorporates prophylactic paracetamol with infant doses when 4CMenB is administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. This is based on recent data demonstrating the ability of paracetamol to reduce fever rates to background levels without impacting immunogenicity. Post-implementation surveillance will be important to provide vaccine efficacy data as this was not possible to determine in pre-licensure studies due to the relative infrequency of MenB cases.

  18. Evolving meningococcal immunization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio; Bettinger, Julie A; Maturana, Gabriela Moreno; Enwere, Godwin; Borrow, Ray

    2015-04-01

    Meningococcal disease is a major public health problem and immunization is considered the best strategy for prevention. The introduction of meningococcal C conjugate immunization schedules that targeted adolescents, with catch-up programs in several European countries, Australia and Canada proved to be highly effective, with dramatic reduction in the incidence of serogroup C disease, not only in vaccinated, but also in unvaccinated individuals. Meningococcal quadrivalent (A, C, W, Y) conjugate vaccines are now licensed and are being used in adolescent programs in North America and to control serogroup W disease in South America. In the African meningitis belt, a mass immunization campaign against serogroup A disease using a meningococcal A conjugate vaccine is now controlling the devastating epidemics of meningococcal disease. After introducing new immunization programs, it is of importance to maintain enhanced surveillance for a better understanding of the changing nature of disease epidemiology. This information is crucial for identifying optimal immunization policies.

  19. Antibody persistence after serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alessandra R; Maruyama, Claudia M; Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio P; Lopes, Marta H; Azevedo, Raymundo S; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Borrow, Ray; Weckx, Lily Y

    2016-08-05

    A decline of protective antibody titers after MCC vaccine has been demonstrated in healthy children, this may be an issue of concern for risk groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the persistence of bactericidal antibodies after MCC vaccine in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The type of vaccine used and booster response were also analyzed. SCD patients (n=141) previously immunized with MCC vaccines had blood drawn 2-8 years after the last priming dose. They were distributed according to age at primary immunization into groups: vaccination (2-3, 4-5 and 6-8). Serum bactericidal antibodies with baby rabbit complement (rSBA) and serogroup C-specific IgG concentrations were measured. The correlate of protection was rSBA titer ⩾8. Subjects with rSBA children primed under 2years of age rSBA titer ⩾8 was demonstrated in 53.3%, 21.7% and 35.0%, 2-3, 4-5, 6-8years, respectively, after vaccination, compared with 70.0%, 45.0% and 53.5%, respectively, for individuals primed at ages 2-13years. rSBA median titers and IgG median levels were higher in the older group. Six to eight years after vaccination the percentage of patients with rSBA titers ⩾8 was significantly higher in the group primed with MCC-TT (78.5%) compared with those primed with MCC-CRM197 [Menjugate® (33.3%) or Meningitec® (35.7%)] (p=0.033). After a booster, 98% achieved rSBA titer ⩾8. Immunity to meningococcal serogroup C in SCD children declines rapidly after vaccination and is dependent on the age at priming. Booster doses are needed to maintain protection in SCD patients. Persistence of antibodies seems to be longer in individuals primed with MCC-TT vaccine comparing to those immunized with MCC-CRM197. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunogenicity, Safety and Antibody Persistence of a Booster Dose of Quadrivalent Meningococcal ACWY-tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine Compared with Monovalent Meningococcal Serogroup C Vaccine Administered Four Years After Primary Vaccination Using the Same Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forsten, Aino; Bianco, Veronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated safety, immunogenicity and antibody persistence of meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) booster vaccination 4 years after priming of toddlers. This phase III, open-label, controlled study in Finland (NCT00955682) enrolled children previously randomized (3:1) at 12-23 months (NCT00474266) to receive 1 dose of MenACWY-TT or MenC conjugate vaccine (MenC-CRM197). Serum bactericidal antibody titers using rabbit (rSBA, cut-off 1:8) and human complement (hSBA, cut-off 1:8) were assessed at year 3 and 4 after priming and 1 month and 1 year after administration of a booster dose of the same vaccine given for primary vaccination. Reactogenicity and safety were assessed, and vaccination-related serious adverse events were recorded from the time of primary vaccination. Before booster (year 4), 74.1%, 40.4%, 49.3% and 58.2% of MenACWY-TT-recipients retained rSBA titers ≥1:8 for serogroups A, C, W and Y, respectively; 28.8%, 73.2%, 80.6% and 65.4% retained hSBA ≥1:8. Percentages for the MenC-CRM group were 35.6% (rSBA-MenC) and 46.9% (hSBA-MenC). After MenACWY-TT booster, ≥99.5% had rSBA ≥1:8 and hSBA ≥1:8 for each serogroup. After MenC-CRM197 booster, all children had rSBA-MenC ≥1:8 and hSBA-MenC ≥1:8. At year 5, percentages above the cut-off were ≥97.4% (rSBA) and ≥95.5% (hSBA) in MenACWY-TT-vaccinees for each serogroup. The MenACWY-TT booster dose had a clinically acceptable safety profile. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. There was evidence of antibody persistence 4 years after toddlers were primed with MenACWY-TT. Booster vaccination induced robust immune responses for all serogroups with an acceptable safety profile.

  1. A single-dose antihelminthic treatment does not influence immunogenicity of a meningococcal and a cholera vaccine in Gabonese school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Sina; Agnandji, Selidji Todagbe; Elias, Johannes; Berberich, Stefan; Bache, Emmanuel; Fernandes, José; Loembe, Marguerite Massinga; Hass, Johanna; Lell, Bertrand; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Kremsner, Peter; Esen, Meral

    2016-10-17

    We recently described the effect of a single-dose antihelminthic treatment on vaccine immunogenicity to a seasonal influenza vaccine. Here we report the effect of antihelminthics on the immunogenicity of a meningococcal vaccine and a cholera vaccine in primary school children living in Lambaréné, Gabon. Since infection with helminths remains a major public health problem and the influence on cognitive and physical development as well as the immunomodulatory effects are well established, we investigated if a single-dose antihelminthic treatment prior to immunization positively influences antibody titers and vaccine-specific memory B-cells. In this placebo-controlled, double-blind trial the effect of a single-dose antihelminthic treatment prior to immunization with a meningococcal as well as with a cholera vaccine was investigated. Anti-meningococcal antibodies were assessed by serum bactericidal assay, cholera vaccine-specific antibody titers by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) at baseline (Day 0; vaccination), four weeks (Day 28) and 12weeks (Day 84) following vaccination. Meningococcal and cholera vaccine-specific memory B-cells were measured at Day 0 and 84 by vaccine-specific Enzyme-linked Immunospot (ELISpot) assay. The helminth burden of the participants was assessed four weeks before vaccination (Day -28) and at Day 84 by the Merthiolate-Iodine-Formaldehyde technique. Out of 280 screened school children, 96 received a meningococcal vaccine and 89 a cholera vaccine following allocation to either the single-dose antihelminthic treatment group or the placebo group. Bactericidal antibody titers increased following immunization with the meningococcal vaccine at Day 28 and Day 84 in 68 participants for serogroup A, and in 80 participants for serogroup C. The cholera vaccine titers increased in all participants with a peak at Day 28. The number of memory B-cells increased following vaccination compared to baseline. There was no statistically significant

  2. Persistence of immunity after vaccination with a capsular group B meningococcal vaccine in 3 different toddler schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadarangani, Manish; Sell, Tim; Iro, Mildred A; Snape, Matthew D; Voysey, Merryn; Finn, Adam; Heath, Paul T; Bona, Gianni; Esposito, Susanna; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Prymula, Roman; Odueyungbo, Adefowope; Toneatto, Daniela; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-10-16

    One schedule for the capsular group B meningococcal vaccine 4CMenB is 2 doses that are administered 2 months apart for children aged 12-23 months, with a booster dose 12-24 months later. Our objective was to provide data on persistence of human serum bactericidal antibody (hSBA) titres in children up to 4 years of age after initial doses at 12-24 months, and immunogenicity of a booster dose at 48 months of age compared with vaccine-naive children. Children previously immunized, as part of a randomized controlled trial, with 2 doses of 4CMenB vaccine at 12-24 months of age received a booster at 4 years of age. Vaccine-naive age-matched toddlers received 2 doses of 4CMenB. Human serum bactericidal antibody titres against reference strains H44/76, 5/99, NZ98/254 and M10713 were evaluated before and after innoculation with 4CMenB vaccine in 4-year-old children. Of 332 children in the study, 123 had previously received 4CMenB and 209 were vaccine-naive controls. Before the booster, the proportions of participants (previously vaccinated groups compared with controls) with hSBA titres of 1:5 or more were as follows: 9%-11% v. 1% (H44/76), 84%-100% v. 4% (5/99), 0%-18% v. 0% (NZ98/254) and 59%-60% v. 60% (M10713). After 1 dose of 4CMenB in previously immunized children, the proportions of participants achieving hSBA titres of 1:5 or more were 100% (H44/76 and 5/99), 70%-100% (NZ98/254) and 90%-100% (M10713). We found that waning of hSBA titres by 4 years of age occurred after 2 doses of 4CMenB vaccine administered at 12-24 months, and doses at 12-24 months have a priming effect on the immune system. A booster may be necessary to maintain hSBA titres of 1:5 or more among those children with increased disease risk. Trial registration : ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01717638. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  3. Rapid Response to a College Outbreak of Meningococcal Serogroup B Disease: Nation's First Widespread Use of Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Theresa M.; Bornschein, Suzanne; Mihalakos, Alysia; Kelleher, Catherine M.; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Kanadanian, Koren V.; Raymond, Patricia; Sicard, Kenneth; Dennehy, Penelope H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To outline the reasoning behind use of bivalent rLP2086 in a Rhode Island college meningococcal B disease outbreak, highlighting the timeline from outbreak declaration to vaccination clinic, emphasizing that these two time points are <3 days apart. Participants: Staff, faculty, and students at College X eligible for vaccination.…

  4. Rapid Response to a College Outbreak of Meningococcal Serogroup B Disease: Nation's First Widespread Use of Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Theresa M.; Bornschein, Suzanne; Mihalakos, Alysia; Kelleher, Catherine M.; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Kanadanian, Koren V.; Raymond, Patricia; Sicard, Kenneth; Dennehy, Penelope H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To outline the reasoning behind use of bivalent rLP2086 in a Rhode Island college meningococcal B disease outbreak, highlighting the timeline from outbreak declaration to vaccination clinic, emphasizing that these two time points are vaccination.…

  5. Nonfunctional variant 3 factor H binding proteins as meningococcal vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Jongerius, Ilse; Malik, Talat; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Staunton, David; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen and leading cause of meningitis and septicemia. Factor H binding protein (fHbp), a virulence factor which protects N. meningitidis from innate immunity by binding the human complement regulator factor H (fH) with high affinity, is also a key antigen in vaccines being developed to prevent meningococcal disease. fHbp can be divided into three variant groups (V1, V2, and V3) that elicit limited immunological cross-reactivity. The interaction of fH with fHbp could impair the immunogenicity of this antigen by hindering access to the antigenic epitopes in fHbp, providing the rationale for the development of nonfunctional fHbps as vaccine candidates. Here, we characterized the two nonfunctional V3 fHbps, fHbp(T286A) and fHbp(E313A), which each contains a single amino acid substitution that leads to a marked reduction in affinity for fH without affecting the folding of the proteins. The immunogenicity of the nonfunctional fHbps was assessed in transgenic mice expressing a single chimeric fH containing domains of human fH involved in binding to fHbp. No differences in anti-V3 fHbp antibody titers were elicited by the wild-type V3 fHbp, V3 fHbp(T286A), and V3 fHbp(E313A), demonstrating that the nonfunctional fHbps retain their immunogenicity. Furthermore, the nonfunctional V3 fHbps elicit serum bactericidal activity that is equivalent to or higher than that observed with the wild-type protein. Our findings provide the basis for the rational design of next-generation vaccines containing nonfunctional V3 fHbps.

  6. Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccination of adults: phase III comparison of an investigational conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, with the licensed vaccine, Menactra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Keith S; Baxter, Roger; Block, Stanley L; Shah, Jina; Bedell, Lisa; Dull, Peter M

    2009-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States, with the highest case fatality rates reported for individuals > or = 15 years of age. This study compares the safety and immunogenicity of the Novartis Vaccines investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, to those of the licensed meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Menactra, when administered to healthy adults. In this phase III multicenter study, 1,359 adults 19 to 55 years of age were randomly assigned to one of four groups (1:1:1:1 ratio) to receive a single dose of one of three lots of MenACWY-CRM or a single dose of Menactra. Serum samples obtained at baseline and 1 month postvaccination were tested for serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA). The hSBA titers following vaccination with MenACWY-CRM and Menactra were compared in noninferiority and prespecified superiority analyses. Reactogenicity was similar in the MenACWY-CRM and Menactra groups, and neither vaccine was associated with a serious adverse event. When compared with Menactra, MenACWY-CRM met the superiority criteria for the proportions of recipients achieving a seroresponse against serogroups C, W-135, and Y and the proportion of subjects achieving postvaccination titers of > or = 1:8 for serogroups C and Y. MenACWY-CRM's immunogenicity was statistically noninferior (the lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval was more than -10%) to that of Menactra for all four serogroups, with the postvaccination hSBA geometric mean titers being consistently higher for MenACWY-CRM than for Menactra. MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated in adults 19 to 55 years of age, with immune responses to each of the serogroups noninferior and, in some cases, statistically superior to those to Menactra.

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of investigational vaccine formulations against meningococcal serogroups A, B, C, W, and Y in healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez-Llorens, Xavier; Aguilera Vaca, Diana Catalina; Abarca, Katia; Maho, Emmanuelle; Graña, Maria Gabriela; Heijnen, Esther; Smolenov, Igor; Dull, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the immunogenicity, safety, and reactogenicity of investigational formulations of meningococcal ABCWY vaccines, consisting of recombinant proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicle (OMV) components of a licensed serogroup B vaccine, combined with components of a licensed quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM). A total of 495 healthy adolescents were randomized to 6 groups to receive 2 doses (Months 0, 2) of one of 4 formulations of rMenB antigens, with or without OMV, combined with MenACWY-CRM, or 2 doses of rMenB alone or one dose of MenACWY-CRM then a placebo. Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay with human complement (hSBA) against serogroups ACWY and serogroup B test strains; solicited reactions and any adverse events (AEs) were assessed. Two MenABCWY vaccinations elicited robust ACWY immune responses, with higher seroresponse rates than one dose of MenACWY-CRM. Bactericidal antibody responses against the rMenB antigens and OMV components were highest in subjects who received 2 doses of OMV-containing MenABCWY formulations, with ≥68% of subjects achieving hSBA titers ≥5 against each of the serogroup B test strains. After the first dose, solicited local reaction rates were higher in the MenABCWY or rMenB groups than the MenACWY-CRM group, but similar across groups after the second dose, consisting mainly of transient injection site pain. Fever (≥38.0°C) was rare and there were no vaccine-related serious AEs. In conclusion, investigational MenABCWY formulations containing OMV components elicited highly immunogenic responses against meningococcal serogroups ACWY, as well as serogroup B test strains, with an acceptable safety profile. [NCT01210885].

  8. Persistence of bactericidal antibodies following early infant vaccination with a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine and immunogenicity of a preschool booster dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, Matthew D; Saroey, Praveen; John, Tessa M; Robinson, Hannah; Kelly, Sarah; Gossger, Nicoletta; Yu, Ly-Mee; Wang, Huajun; Toneatto, Daniela; Dull, Peter M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2013-10-15

    The multicomponent serogroup B meningococcal (4CMenB) vaccine was recently licensed for use in Europe. There are currently no data on the persistence of bactericidal antibodies induced by use of this vaccine in infants. Our objective was to evaluate serogroup B-specific bactericidal antibodies in children aged 40-44 months previously vaccinated at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. Participants given 4 doses of 4CMenB as infants received a fifth dose of the vaccine at 40-44 months of age. Age-matched participants who were MenB vaccine-naive received 4CMenB and formed the control group. We evaluated human complement serum bactericidal activity (hSBA) titres at baseline and 1 month after each dose of 4CMenB. Before a booster dose at enrolment, 41%-76% of 17 participants previously vaccinated with 4CMenB in infancy had hSBA titres of 4 or greater against 4 reference strains. Before vaccination in the control group (n = 40) these proportions were similar for strains 44/76-SL (63%) and M10713 (68%) but low for strains NZ98/254 (0%) and 5/99 (3%). A booster dose in the 4CMenB-primed participants generated greater increases in hSBA titres than in controls. As has been observed with other meningococcal vaccines, bactericidal antibodies waned after vaccination with 4CMenB administered according to an approved infant vaccination schedule of 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age, but there was an anamnestic response to a booster dose at 40-44 months of age. If 4CMenB were introduced into routine vaccination schedules, assessment of the need for a booster dose would require data on the impact of these declining titres on vaccine effectiveness. ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01027351.

  9. The tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine is immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in subjects previously vaccinated with a tetravalent polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Van der Wielen, Marie; Reda, Mariam; Medlej, Fouad; Tabet, Carelle; Boutriau, Dominique; Sumbul, Anne; Anis, Sameh; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2012-08-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of the tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) were evaluated in subjects previously vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and in subjects without previous meningococcal vaccination. In this phase II, open, controlled study (NCT00661557), healthy subjects aged 4.5-34 years received one dose of MenACWY-TT at month 0. Subjects in the MPS group (n=192) had received polysaccharide vaccine in a study conducted 30-42 months earlier; age-matched subjects in the noMPS control group (n=79) had received no meningococcal vaccination within the past 10 years. Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was measured at month 0 and month 1. At month 1, ≥97.0% of subjects had rSBA titers ≥1:128. Post-vaccination rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were ≥3.9-fold higher than pre-vaccination in both treatment groups. Exploratory analyses showed no statistically significant differences between groups in percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128, but significantly lower rSBA GMTs and vaccine response rates for each serogroup in the MPS versus the noMPS group. MenACWY-TT had an acceptable safety profile in both groups. These results suggest that MenACWY-TT could be used in vaccination programs irrespective of the pre-vaccination status with polysaccharide vaccine. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine in healthy adolescents in Korea--A randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoan Jong; Choe, Young June; Hong, Young-Jin; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Park, Su Eun; Kim, Yun-Kyung; Oh, Chi-Eun; Lee, Hyunju; Song, Hyoyoung; Bock, Hans; Casula, Daniela; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-02-24

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is a significant cause of septicaemia and meningitis worldwide. This phase 3 randomised, controlled study assessed the immunogenicity and safety of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB, in healthy Korean adolescents. 264 adolescents (11-17 years old) were randomised to receive two doses, one month apart, of 4CMenB or control vaccines [placebo followed by one dose of a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM)]. Immunogenicity was evaluated by serum bactericidal assay with human complement (hSBA) against three serogroup B test strains specific for individual vaccine antigens (fHbp, NadA or PorA P1.4), and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the NHBA antigen. Solicited reactions and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. One month post-second vaccination, 98%, 97%, and 97% of subjects in the 4CMenB group achieved hSBA titres ≥ 4 against the fHbp, NadA and PorA test strains, respectively, while percentages in the Control group were comparable to baseline (27%, 16%, and 17%, respectively). Geometric mean ELISA concentrations (GMCs) against NHBA increased 52-fold relative to baseline in the 4CMenB group, while there was no substantial increase in GMCs in the Control group (1.05-fold). Frequencies of solicited reactions after any vaccination were higher in the 4CMenB group than in the Control group, although most reactions were of short duration and mild to moderate intensity. There were no vaccine-related serious AEs. Two doses of 4CMenB induced robust immune responses against the vaccine antigens and were well tolerated, with no safety concerns identified, in Korean adolescents (NCT01973218). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Uptake of meningococcal conjugate vaccine among adolescents in large managed care organizations, United States, 2005: Demand, supply and seasonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wortley Pascale M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In February 2005, the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended the new meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4 for routine use among 11- to 12-year-olds (at the preadolescent health-care visit, 14- to 15-year-olds (before high-school entry, and groups at increased risk. Vaccine distribution started in March; however, in July, the manufacturer reported inability to meet demand and widespread MCV4 shortages were reported. Our objectives were to determine early uptake patterns among target (11-12 and 14-15 year olds and non-target (13- plus 16-year-olds age groups. A post hoc analysis was conducted to compare seasonal uptake patterns of MCV4 with polysaccharide meningococcal (MPSV4 and tetanus diphtheria (Td vaccines. Methods We analyzed data for adolescents 11-16 years from five managed care organizations participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD. For MCV4, we estimated monthly and cumulative coverage during 2005 and calculated risk ratios. For MPSV4 and Td, we combined 2003 and 2004 data and compared their seasonal uptake patterns with MCV4. Results Coverage for MCV4 during 2005 among the 623,889 11-16 years olds was 10%. Coverage for 11-12 and 14-15 year olds was 12% and 11%, respectively, compared with 8% for 13- plus 16-year-olds (p Conclusion A surge in vaccine uptake between June and August was observed among adolescents for MCV4, MPSV4 and Td vaccines. The increase in summer-time vaccinations and vaccination of non-targeted adolescents coupled with supply limitations likely contributed to the reported shortages of MCV4 in 2005.

  12. Serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine coverage after the first national mass immunization campaign-Burkina Faso, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    In December 2010, Burkina Faso became the first country to introduce PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), a new serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine developed to eliminate epidemic meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa, via a national mass-immunization campaign. This campaign targeted persons aged 1-29 years, approximately 70% of the 16 million residents of the country. More than 11 million vaccine doses were administered in a 10-day period, for an estimated administrative coverage of 102.6%. Accurate vaccination coverage estimates are critical for programmatic evaluation, identification of undervaccinated subpopulations, and for measurement of the impact of PsA-TT on serogroup A disease and carriage. In December 2011, the Burkina Faso Ministry of Health, in collaboration with CDC, conducted a stratified cluster survey to obtain regional and age-group-specific vaccination coverage estimates among campaign-eligible persons. National coverage was 95.9% (74.3% with vaccination card, 21.6% by recall), and coverage in the 13 regions of Burkina Faso ranged from 90.8% to 98.3%. Coverage was 97.0% in children aged 2-5 years, 97.4% in those aged 6-15 years, and 93.4% in those aged 16-30 years. The results of this survey demonstrate successful introduction of a new vaccine in Burkina Faso through a mass immunization campaign, the first step in a strategy aimed at rapidly interrupting transmission and carriage of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis before introduction of the vaccine into national routine immunization programs. With phased introduction of PsA-TT planned through 2016 in Africa's "meningitis belt," lessons learned from the Burkina Faso experience will help guide successful introduction of serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine elsewhere.

  13. Effect of Tdap when administered before, with or after the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (coadministered with the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine) in adults: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashani, M; Alfelali, M; Barasheed, O; Alqahtani, A S; Heron, L; Wong, M; Rashid, H; Booy, R

    2016-11-21

    Sequential or co-administration of vaccines has potential to alter the immune response to any of the antigens. Existing literature suggests that prior immunisation of tetanus/diphtheria-containing vaccines can either enhance or suppress immune response to conjugate pneumococcal or meningococcal vaccines. We examined this interaction among adult Australian travellers before attending the Hajj pilgrimage 2014. We also investigated tolerability of these vaccines separately and concomitantly. We randomly assigned each participant to one of three vaccination schedules. Group A received adult tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) 3-4weeks before receiving CRM197-conjugated 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) and CRM197-conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine (MCV4). Group B received all three vaccines on one day. Group C received PCV13 and MCV4 3-4weeks before Tdap. Blood samples collected at baseline, each vaccination visit and 3-4weeks after vaccination were tested using the pneumococcal opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and by ELISA for diphtheria and tetanus antibodies. Funding for meningococcal serology was not available. Participants completed symptom diaries after each vaccination. A total of 111 participants aged 18-64 (median 40) years were recruited. No statistically significant difference was detected across the three groups in achieving OPA titre ⩾1:8 post vaccination. However, compared to other groups, Group A had a statistically significant lower number of subjects achieving ⩾4-fold rise in serotype 3, and also significantly lower geometric mean titres (GMTs) to six (of 13) pneumococcal serotypes (3, 5, 18C, 4, 19A and 9V). Group C (given prior PCV13 and MVC4) had statistically significant higher pre-Tdap geometric mean concentration (GMC) of anti-diphtheria IgG; however, there was no difference across the three groups following Tdap. Anti-tetanus IgG GMCs were similar across the groups before and after Tdap. No serious adverse

  14. Use of MenACWY-CRM vaccine in children aged 2 through 23 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Jessica R; Rubin, Lorry; McNamara, Lucy; Briere, Elizabeth C; Clark, Thomas A; Cohn, Amanda C

    2014-06-20

    During its October 2013 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended use of a third meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis), as an additional option for vaccinating infants aged 2 through 23 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease. MenACWY-CRM is the first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine licensed for use in children aged 2 through 8 months. MenACWY-D (Menactra, Sanofi Pasteur) is recommended for use in children aged 9 through 23 months who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease, and Hib-MenCY-TT (MenHibrix, GlaxoSmithKline) is recommended for use in children aged 6 weeks through 18 months at increased risk. This report summarizes information on MenACWY-CRM administration in infants and provides recommendations for vaccine use in infants aged 2 through 23 months who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Because the burden of meningococcal disease in infants is low in the United States and the majority of cases that do occur are caused by serogroup B, which is not included in any vaccine licensed in the United States, only those infants who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease are recommended to receive a meningococcal vaccine.

  15. Meningococcal Disease in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhujun Shao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitides is one of the leading causes of bacterial meningitis. The epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease varies in different countries and regions. This review summarizes the available data from China describing the burden of meningococcal disease, N. meningitidis serogroups, and vaccination programs. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA was predominant for several decades in China. However, since 2000, invasive meningococcal disease caused by MenC, MenW, or MenB has increased. MenC, belonging to a hyperinvasive clonal sequence type ST-4821 (CC4821, emerged in Anhui Province and was subsequently disseminated over two-thirds of all Chinese provinces. Serogroup W (CC11 is endemic and causes death. Serogroup B (CC4821 originated from serogroup C (CC4821 via a capsular switching mechanism. Polysaccharide A and C meningococcal vaccines have been introduced into national routine immunization programs and have effectively reduced invasive meningococcal disease. However, the vaccination strategy must be revised based on the epidemic trends in meningococcal disease in China.

  16. Safety and immunogenicity of typhoid fever and yellow fever vaccines when administered concomitantly with quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate vaccine in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberer, Martin; Burchard, Gerd; Jelinek, Tomas; Reisinger, Emil; Beran, Jiri; Hlavata, Lucie Cerna; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Arora, Ashwani K

    2015-01-01

    Compact and short pre-travel immunization schedules, which include several vaccinations in a single visit, are desirable for many travelers. However, concomitant vaccination could potentially compromise immunogenicity and/or safety of the individual vaccines and, therefore, possible vaccine interferences should be carefully assessed. This article discusses the immunogenicity and safety of travel vaccines for typhoid fever (TF) and yellow fever (YF), when administered with or without a quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate ACWY-CRM vaccine (MenACWY-CRM). Healthy adults (18-≤60 years) were randomized to one of three vaccine regimens: TF + YF + MenACWY-CRM (group I; n = 100), TF + YF (group II; n = 101), or MenACWY-CRM (group III; n = 100). Immunogenicity at baseline and 4 weeks post-vaccination (day 29) was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or a neutralization test. Adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected throughout the study period. Non-inferiority of post-vaccination geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) and geometric mean titers (GMTs) was established for TF and YF vaccines, respectively, when given concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM vaccine versus when given alone. The percentages of subjects with seroprotective neutralizing titers against YF on day 29 were similar in groups I and II. The antibody responses to meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y were within the same range when MenACWY-CRM was given separately or together with TF and YF vaccines. The percentage of subjects reporting AEs was the same for TF and YF vaccines with or without MenACWY-CRM vaccine. There were no reports of SAEs or AEs leading to study withdrawals. These data provide evidence that MenACWY-CRM can be administered with typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine and live attenuated YF vaccine without compromising antibody responses stimulated by the

  17. Cost-effectiveness of alternate strategies for childhood immunization against meningococcal disease with monovalent and quadrivalent conjugate vaccines in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Delea

    Full Text Available Public health programs to prevent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD with monovalent serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV-C and quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MCV-4 in infancy and adolescence vary across Canadian provinces. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of various vaccination strategies against IMD using current and anticipated future pricing and recent epidemiology.A cohort model was developed to estimate the clinical burden and costs (CAN$2014 of IMD in the Canadian population over a 100-year time horizon for three strategies: (1 MCV-C in infants and adolescents (MCV-C/C; (2 MCV-C in infants and MCV-4 in adolescents (MCV-C/4; and (3 MCV-4 in infants (2 doses and adolescents (MCV-4/4. The source for IMD incidence was Canadian surveillance data. The effectiveness of MCV-C was based on published literature. The effectiveness of MCV-4 against all vaccination regimens was assumed to be the same as for MCV-C regimens against serogroup C. Herd effects were estimated by calibration to estimates reported in prior analyses. Costs were from published sources. Vaccines prices were projected to decline over time reflecting historical procurement trends.Over the modeling horizon there are a projected 11,438 IMD cases and 1,195 IMD deaths with MCV-C/C; expected total costs are $597.5 million. MCV-C/4 is projected to reduce cases of IMD by 1,826 (16% and IMD deaths by 161 (13%. Vaccination costs are increased by $32 million but direct and indirect IMD costs are projected to be reduced by $46 million. MCV-C/4 is therefore dominant vs. MCV-C/C in the base case. Cost-effectiveness of MCV-4/4 was $111,286 per QALY gained versus MCV-C/4 (2575/206 IMD cases/deaths prevented; incremental costs $68 million.If historical trends in Canadian vaccines prices continue, use of MCV-4 instead of MCV-C in adolescents may be cost-effective. From an economic perspective, switching to MCV-4 as the adolescent booster should be considered.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of alternate strategies for childhood immunization against meningococcal disease with monovalent and quadrivalent conjugate vaccines in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delea, Thomas E; Weycker, Derek; Atwood, Mark; Neame, Dion; Alvarez, Fabián P; Forget, Evelyn; Langley, Joanne M; Chit, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    Public health programs to prevent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) with monovalent serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV-C) and quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MCV-4) in infancy and adolescence vary across Canadian provinces. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of various vaccination strategies against IMD using current and anticipated future pricing and recent epidemiology. A cohort model was developed to estimate the clinical burden and costs (CAN$2014) of IMD in the Canadian population over a 100-year time horizon for three strategies: (1) MCV-C in infants and adolescents (MCV-C/C); (2) MCV-C in infants and MCV-4 in adolescents (MCV-C/4); and (3) MCV-4 in infants (2 doses) and adolescents (MCV-4/4). The source for IMD incidence was Canadian surveillance data. The effectiveness of MCV-C was based on published literature. The effectiveness of MCV-4 against all vaccination regimens was assumed to be the same as for MCV-C regimens against serogroup C. Herd effects were estimated by calibration to estimates reported in prior analyses. Costs were from published sources. Vaccines prices were projected to decline over time reflecting historical procurement trends. Over the modeling horizon there are a projected 11,438 IMD cases and 1,195 IMD deaths with MCV-C/C; expected total costs are $597.5 million. MCV-C/4 is projected to reduce cases of IMD by 1,826 (16%) and IMD deaths by 161 (13%). Vaccination costs are increased by $32 million but direct and indirect IMD costs are projected to be reduced by $46 million. MCV-C/4 is therefore dominant vs. MCV-C/C in the base case. Cost-effectiveness of MCV-4/4 was $111,286 per QALY gained versus MCV-C/4 (2575/206 IMD cases/deaths prevented; incremental costs $68 million). If historical trends in Canadian vaccines prices continue, use of MCV-4 instead of MCV-C in adolescents may be cost-effective. From an economic perspective, switching to MCV-4 as the adolescent booster should be considered.

  19. Meningitis - meningococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal meningitis; Gram negative - meningococcus ... Meningococcal meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis (also known as meningococcus). Meningococcus is the most common cause ...

  20. Meningococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Meningococcal meningitis Fact sheet Reviewed January 2018 Key facts Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis, a serious ...

  1. Meningococcal Disease in US Military Personnel Before and after Adoption of Conjugate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    authorities should consider and anticipate as much as possible the potential sanitary conse- quences of such a gathering and prepare medical staff for the...Meningococcal Disease Sur- veillance is supported by the Global Emerging Infections System division of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. The...meningococcal disease surveillance in the US military pro- duces a quarterly report, which is available online: http://www. med navy mil/sites/nhrc/geis

  2. The introduction of the meningococcal B (MenB) vaccine (Bexsero®) into the national infant immunisation programme--New challenges for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Campbell, Helen; Parikh, Sydel R; Saliba, Vanessa; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary

    2015-12-01

    The United Kingdom is the first country to introduce Bexsero(®) (GSK Biologicals), a multicomponent, protein-based vaccine against meningococcal group B (MenB), into the national infant immunisation programme. This vaccine is like no other licensed vaccine and poses a number of implementation and surveillance challenges in England. From 01 September 2015, UK infants were offered a reduced two dose primary immunisation schedule at 2 and 4 months followed by a booster at 12 months. Because of high rates of fever post-vaccination, parents were advised to give their infants three doses of prophylactic paracetamol, with the first dose given as soon as possible after the primary MenB vaccination dose. Since the vaccine only protects against 73-88% of MenB strains causing invasive disease in England, clinical isolates and PCR-positive samples will require extensive characterisation by the Meningococcal Reference Unit (MRU) at Public Health England (PHE) in order to monitor vaccine effectiveness and identify potential vaccine failures. PHE is also conducting detailed clinical and epidemiological surveillance to assess the impact of the MenB immunisation programme on the morbidity and mortality associated with invasive meningococcal disease in infants and young children. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a novel quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) in healthy Korean adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoan Jong; Chung, Moon-Hyun; Kim, Woo Joo; Hong, Young Jin; Choi, Kyong Min; Lee, Jina; Oh, Chi Eun; Welsch, Jo Anne; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Hong, Ki Bae; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Bock, Hans; Dull, Peter M; Odrljin, Tatjana

    2014-11-01

    This phase III placebo-controlled study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of MenACWY-CRM vaccination in healthy Korean adolescents and adults. Serum bactericidal activity with human complement (hSBA) was measured before and 1 month after vaccination against all four meningococcal serogroups. The IgG concentration specific for serogroup W capsular polysaccharide was measured in a subset of subjects in a post-hoc analysis. Adverse reactions were monitored throughout the study. Four hundred and fifty subjects were randomized 2:1 to receive MenACWY-CRM (N=297) or a saline placebo (N=153). MenACWY-CRM induced a good immune response against all four serogroups, with seroprotection rates (hSBA titers ≥8) of 79%, 99%, 98%, and 94% for serogroups A, C, W, and Y, respectively. Seroresponse rates were high for serogroups A, C, and Y, i.e. 76%, 86%, and 69%, respectively; the rate for serogroup W was 28%. MenACWY-CRM vaccine induced serum bactericidal antibodies against all four serogroups in a majority of subjects regardless of their baseline hSBA titers. MenACWY-CRM was generally well tolerated with most reactions being transient and mild to moderate in severity. Findings of this first study of a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in Korean adults and adolescents demonstrated that a single dose of MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic, as indicated by the percentages of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 (79%, 99%, 98%, and 94% of subjects) and geometric mean titers (48, 231, 147, and 107) against serogroups A, C, W, and Y, respectively, at 1 month post-vaccination.

  4. Immunogenicity and safety of monovalent RIVM meningococcal B OMP vesicle F91 vaccine administered to children that received hexavalent meningococcal B vaccine 2.5 years ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber AB; Limpt CJP van; Berbers GAM; Labadie J; Kleijn ED de; Groot R de; Rumke HC; Alphen AJW van; Sophia Kinderziekenhuis /; LVO

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the results with respect to immunogenicity as well as reactogenicity of a monovalent P1.7h,4 OMV vaccine (MonoMen) used as booster vaccination in children previously vaccinated with a hexavalent MenB vaccine. The participants in this study were immunised in 1995-1996 with

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of meningococcal carriage and disease isolates in Burkina Faso after mass vaccination with a serogroup a conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Paul A; Ba, Absatou Ky; Sanou, Idrissa; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Sangaré, Lassana; Diomandé, Fabien; Kandolo, Denis; Thomas, Jennifer Dolan; Clark, Thomas A; Laforce, Marc; Caugant, Dominique A

    2013-08-02

    The conjugate vaccine against serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA), MenAfriVac, was first introduced in mass vaccination campaigns of the 1-29-year-olds in Burkina Faso in 2010. The aim of this study was to genetically characterize meningococcal isolates circulating in Burkina Faso before and up to 13 months after MenAfriVac mass vaccination. A total of 1,659 meningococcal carriage isolates were collected in a repeated cross-sectional carriage study of the 1-29-year-olds in three districts of Burkina Faso in 2010 and 2011, before and up to 13 months after mass vaccination. Forty-two invasive isolates were collected through the national surveillance in Burkina Faso in the same period. All the invasive isolates and 817 carriage isolates were characterized by serogroup, multilocus sequence typing and porA-fetA sequencing. Seven serogroup A isolates were identified, six in 2010, before vaccination (4 from carriers and 2 from patients), and one in 2011 from an unvaccinated patient; all were assigned to sequence type (ST)-2859 of the ST-5 clonal complex. No NmA carriage isolate and no ST-2859 isolate with another capsule were identified after vaccination. Serogroup X carriage and disease prevalence increased before vaccine introduction, due to the expansion of ST-181, which comprised 48.5% of all the characterized carriage isolates. The hypervirulent serogroup W ST-11 clone that was responsible for most of meningococcal disease in 2011 and 2012 was not observed in 2010; it appeared during the epidemic season of 2011, when it represented 40.6% of the serogroup W carriage isolates. Successive clonal waves of ST-181 and ST-11 may explain the changing epidemiology in Burkina Faso after the virtual disappearance of NmA disease and carriage. No ST-2859 strain of any serogroup was found after vaccination, suggesting that capsule switching of ST-2859 did not occur, at least not during the first 13 months after vaccination.

  6. Design and evaluation of meningococcal vaccines through structure-based modification of host and pathogen molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Johnson

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitis remains a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis, and vaccines are required to prevent infections by this important human pathogen. Factor H binding protein (fHbp is a key antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and recruits the host complement regulator, fH. As the high affinity interaction between fHbp and fH could impair immune responses, we sought to identify non-functional fHbps that could act as effective immunogens. This was achieved by alanine substitution of fHbps from all three variant groups (V1, V2 and V3 fHbp of the protein; while some residues affected fH binding in each variant group, the distribution of key amino underlying the interaction with fH differed between the V1, V2 and V3 proteins. The atomic structure of V3 fHbp in complex with fH and of the C-terminal barrel of V2 fHbp provide explanations to the differences in the precise nature of their interactions with fH, and the instability of the V2 protein. To develop transgenic models to assess the efficacy of non-functional fHbps, we determined the structural basis of the low level of interaction between fHbp and murine fH; in addition to changes in amino acids in the fHbp binding site, murine fH has a distinct conformation compared with the human protein that would sterically inhibit binding to fHbp. Non-functional V1 fHbps were further characterised by binding and structural studies, and shown in non-transgenic and transgenic mice (expressing chimeric fH that binds fHbp and precisely regulates complement system to retain their immunogenicity. Our findings provide a catalogue of non-functional fHbps from all variant groups that can be included in new generation meningococcal vaccines, and establish proof-in-principle for clinical studies to compare their efficacy with wild-type fHbps.

  7. Design and evaluation of meningococcal vaccines through structure-based modification of host and pathogen molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven; Tan, Lionel; van der Veen, Stijn; Caesar, Joseph; Goicoechea De Jorge, Elena; Harding, Rachel J; Bai, Xilian; Exley, Rachel M; Ward, Philip N; Ruivo, Nicola; Trivedi, Kaushali; Cumber, Elspeth; Jones, Rhian; Newham, Luke; Staunton, David; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael; Borrow, Ray; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitis remains a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis, and vaccines are required to prevent infections by this important human pathogen. Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a key antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and recruits the host complement regulator, fH. As the high affinity interaction between fHbp and fH could impair immune responses, we sought to identify non-functional fHbps that could act as effective immunogens. This was achieved by alanine substitution of fHbps from all three variant groups (V1, V2 and V3 fHbp) of the protein; while some residues affected fH binding in each variant group, the distribution of key amino underlying the interaction with fH differed between the V1, V2 and V3 proteins. The atomic structure of V3 fHbp in complex with fH and of the C-terminal barrel of V2 fHbp provide explanations to the differences in the precise nature of their interactions with fH, and the instability of the V2 protein. To develop transgenic models to assess the efficacy of non-functional fHbps, we determined the structural basis of the low level of interaction between fHbp and murine fH; in addition to changes in amino acids in the fHbp binding site, murine fH has a distinct conformation compared with the human protein that would sterically inhibit binding to fHbp. Non-functional V1 fHbps were further characterised by binding and structural studies, and shown in non-transgenic and transgenic mice (expressing chimeric fH that binds fHbp and precisely regulates complement system) to retain their immunogenicity. Our findings provide a catalogue of non-functional fHbps from all variant groups that can be included in new generation meningococcal vaccines, and establish proof-in-principle for clinical studies to compare their efficacy with wild-type fHbps.

  8. Salivary antibody levels in adolescents in response to a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate booster vaccination nine years after priming : systemically induced local immunity and saliva as potential surveillance tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, Susanne P; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834; Trzcinski, Krzysztof|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323349609; Sanders, Elisabeth A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126771960; Berbers, Guy A M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In several countries large-scale immunization of children and young adults with Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccines has induced long-standing herd protection. Salivary antibodies may play an important role in mucosal protection against meningococcal acquisition and

  9. Immunogenicity and safety of a CRM-conjugated meningococcal ACWY vaccine administered concomitantly with routine vaccines starting at 2 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry M; Nissen, Michael D; Naz, Aftab; Shepard, Julie; Bedell, Lisa; Hohenboken, Matthew; Odrljin, Tatjana; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Infants are at the highest risk for meningococcal disease and a broadly protective and safe vaccine is an unmet need in this youngest population. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a 4-dose infant/toddler regimen of MenACWY-CRM given at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age concomitantly with pentavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-Hemophilus influenzae type b-inactivated poliovirus-combination vaccine (DTaP-IPV/Hib), hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), 7- or 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV), and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR). Four doses of MenACWY-CRM induced hSBA titers ≥8 in 89%, 95%, 97%, and 96% of participants against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y, respectively. hSBA titers ≥8 were present in 76-98% of participants after the first 3 doses. A categorical linear analysis incorporating vaccine group and study center showed responses to routine vaccines administered with MenACWY-CRM were non-inferior to routine vaccines alone, except for seroresponse to the pertussis antigen fimbriae. The reactogenicity profile was not affected when MenACWY-CRM was administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. MenACWY-CRM administered with routine concomitant vaccinations in young infants was well tolerated and induced highly immunogenic responses against each of the serogroups without significant interference with the immune responses to routine infant vaccinations. Healthy 2 month old infants were randomized to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines (n = 258) or routine vaccines alone (n = 271). Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA). Medically attended adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs) and AEs leading to study withdrawal were collected throughout the study period.

  10. Meningococcal Conjugate and Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccination Among HIV-infected Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setse, Rosanna W; Siberry, George K; Moss, William J; Wheeling, John; Bohannon, Beverly A; Dominguez, Kenneth L

    2016-05-01

    The meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) and the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) were first recommended for adolescents in the US in 2005. The goal of our study was to determine MCV4 and Tdap vaccines coverage among perinatally and behaviorally HIV-infected adolescents in 2006 and to compare coverage estimates in our study population to similarly aged healthy youth in 2006. Longitudinal Epidemiologic Study to Gain Insight into HIV/AIDS in Children and Youth (LEGACY) is a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected youth in 22 HIV specialty clinics across the US. Among LEGACY participants ≥11 years of age in 2006, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis to determine MCV4, Tdap and MCV4/Tdap vaccine coverage. We compared vaccine coverage among our study population to coverage among similarly aged youth in the 2006 National Immunization Survey for Teens (NIS-Teen Survey). Multivariable mixed effects logistic regression modeling was used to examine associations between MCV4/Tdap vaccination and mode of HIV transmission. MCV4 and Tdap coverage rates among 326 eligible participants were 31.6% and 28.8%, respectively. Among adolescents 13-17 years of age, MCV4 and Tdap coverage was significantly higher among HIV-infected youth than among youth in the 2006 NIS-Teen Survey (P 400 copies/mL were significantly less likely to have received MCV4/Tdap vaccination (P < 0.05). MCV4 and Tdap coverage among HIV-infected youth was suboptimal but higher than for healthy adolescents in the 2006 NIS-Teen Survey. Perinatal HIV infection was associated with increased likelihood of vaccination. Specific measures are needed to improve vaccine coverage among adolescents in the US.

  11. Challenges and Opportunities While Developing a Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Within a Product Development Partnership: A Manufacturer's Perspective From the Serum Institute of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Socquet, Muriel; Jadhav, Suresh S.; Kapre, Subhash V.; LaForce, F. Marc; Poonawalla, Cyrus S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2002, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) chose the Serum Institute of India, Ltd (SIIL), as its manufacturing partner to establish a product development partnership (PDP) with the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP). MVP was a collaboration between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop meningococcal conjugate vaccines for sub-Saharan Africa. Method. From the outset, SIIL recognized that a partnership with MVP carried some risk but also offered important opportunities for accessing new conjugate vaccine technology and know-how. Over 3 years, SIIL successfully accepted technology transfer for the group A meningococcal polysaccharide from SynCo Bio Partners and a conjugation method from the US Food and Drug Administration. Results. SIIL successfully scaled up production of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine that used SIIL tetanus toxoid as the carrier protein. Phase 1 studies began in India in 2005, followed by phase 2/3 studies in Africa and India. A regulatory dossier was submitted to the Indian authorities in April 2009 and WHO in September 2009. Export license was granted in December 2009, and WHO prequalification was obtained in June 2010. Vaccine was introduced at public scale in Burkina Faso that December. The group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine was named MenAfriVac, and is the first internationally qualified vaccine developed outside of big pharma. Conclusions. The project proved to be a sound investment for SIIL and is a concrete example of the potential for PDPs to provide needed products for resource-poor countries. PMID:26553678

  12. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  13. Adolescent, parent and societal preferences and willingness to pay for meningococcal B vaccine: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H S; Chen, G; Clarke, M; Ratcliffe, J

    2016-01-27

    Meningococcal B (MenB) vaccines have been licensed in many countries with private purchase the only option until recently, when a funded programme was introduced in the UK. The aim of this study was to explore adolescent/parental values for a variety of salient vaccine attributes (cost, effectiveness, side effect profile) to assess preferences and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for a MenB vaccine. A national cross-sectional population study was conducted in Australia using Discrete Choice Experiment methodology to assess adolescent/parent/adult preferences for attributes related to MenB vaccine. 2003 adults and 502 adolescents completed the survey in 2013. The majority of participants were willing to be vaccinated with MenB vaccine with vaccination opt-out chosen by 11.9% of adolescents and parents, and 18.2% of non-parent adults. A mixed logit regression model examining adolescent/adult preferences indicated consistent findings; the higher the effectiveness, the longer the duration of protection, the less chance of adverse events and the lower the cost, the more likely respondents were to agree to vaccination. For an ideal MenB vaccine, including the most favoured level of each attribute summed together (90% effectiveness, 10 year duration, 1 injection, no adverse events) adolescents would pay AU$251.60 and parents AU$295.10. Adolescents and parents would pay AU$90.70 or AU$127.20 for 90% vaccine effectiveness vs AU$18.50 or AU$16.70 for 70% effectiveness and would want to be financially compensated for 50% effectiveness; pay AU$63.30 or AU$76.40 for 10 years protection; and pay AU$48.50 or AU$49.20 for no vaccine related adverse events. A slight fever post vaccination was a preferred choice with parents and adolescents willing to pay AU$9.60 or AU$12.30 for this attribute. Vaccine effectiveness, adverse events and duration of immunity are important drivers for parental and adolescent decisions about WTP for MenB vaccine and should be included in discussions on the

  14. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a combined hepatitis A/B vaccine and a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberer, Martin; Burchard, Gerd; Jelinek, Tomas; Reisinger, Emil C; Meyer, Seetha; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This phase 3b randomized, open-label study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of coadministration of a hepatitis A and/or B vaccine with a quadrivalent oligosaccharide meningococcal CRM197 -conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM), in the context of an accelerated hepatitis A and/or B immunization schedule. A total of 252 healthy adult subjects were randomized to three groups to receive hepatitis A/B only (HepA/B), hepatitis A/B coadministered with MenACWY-CRM (HepA/B+MenACWY-CRM), or MenACWY-CRM only (MenACWY-CRM). Hepatitis A and/or B vaccination was administered in the form of a single booster dose or a primary three-dose series, depending on the hepatitis A and/or B vaccination history of subjects. Antibody responses to hepatitis A/B vaccination were assessed 1 month following the last hepatitis A and/or B dose. Serum bactericidal activity with human complement (hSBA) against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y was assessed 1 month post-MenACWY-CRM vaccination. Safety was monitored throughout the study. At 1 month following the final hepatitis A and/or B vaccination, concomitant administration of hepatitis A/B and MenACWY-CRM was non-inferior to administration of hepatitis A/B alone in terms of geometric mean concentrations of antibodies against the hepatitis A and B antigens. One month post-MenACWY-CRM vaccination, the percentages of subjects achieving hSBA titers ≥8 for serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y in the HepA/B+MenACWY-CRM group (76, 87, 99, and 94%, respectively) were comparable to those in the MenACWY-CRM group (67, 82, 96, and 88%, respectively). The percentages of subjects reporting adverse events (AEs) were similar across study groups and a majority of the reported AEs were mild to moderate in nature. There were no study vaccine-related serious AEs. MenACWY-CRM can be administered concomitantly with a hepatitis A and/or B vaccine in the context of an accelerated hepatitis A and/or B immunization schedule without increasing safety concerns

  15. Effectiveness of a group B outer membrane vesicle meningococcal vaccine against gonorrhoea in New Zealand: a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Paynter, Janine; Morgan, Jane; Saxton, Peter; McArdle, Barbara; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Black, Steven

    2017-09-30

    Gonorrhoea is a major global public health problem that is exacerbated by drug resistance. Effective vaccine development has been unsuccessful, but surveillance data suggest that outer membrane vesicle meningococcal group B vaccines affect the incidence of gonorrhoea. We assessed vaccine effectiveness of the outer membrane vesicle meningococcal B vaccine (MeNZB) against gonorrhoea in young adults aged 15-30 years in New Zealand. We did a retrospective case-control study of patients at sexual health clinics aged 15-30 years who were born between Jan 1, 1984, and Dec 31, 1998, eligible to receive MeNZB, and diagnosed with gonorrhoea or chlamydia, or both. Demographic data, sexual health clinic data, and National Immunisation Register data were linked via patients' unique personal identifier. For primary analysis, cases were confirmed by laboratory isolation or detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae only from a clinical specimen, and controls were individuals with a positive chlamydia test only. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) comparing disease outcomes in vaccinated versus unvaccinated participants via multivariable logistic regression. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as 100×(1-OR). 11 of 24 clinics nationally provided records. There were 14 730 cases and controls for analyses: 1241 incidences of gonorrhoea, 12 487 incidences of chlamydia, and 1002 incidences of co-infection. Vaccinated individuals were significantly less likely to be cases than controls (511 [41%] vs 6424 [51%]; adjusted OR 0·69 [95% CI 0·61-0·79]; pvaccine effectiveness of MeNZB against gonorrhoea after adjustment for ethnicity, deprivation, geographical area, and sex was 31% (95% CI 21-39). Exposure to MeNZB was associated with reduced rates of gonorrhoea diagnosis, the first time a vaccine has shown any protection against gonorrhoea. These results provide a proof of principle that can inform prospective vaccine development not only for gonorrhoea but also for meningococcal vaccines. GSK

  16. Effectiveness and impact of a reduced infant schedule of 4CMenB vaccine against group B meningococcal disease in England: a national observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Andrews, Nick J; Beebeejaun, Kazim; Campbell, Helen; Ribeiro, Sonia; Ward, Charlotte; White, Joanne M; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N

    2016-12-03

    In September, 2015, the UK became the first country to introduce the multicomponent group B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero) into a publicly funded national immunisation programme. A reduced two-dose priming schedule was offered to infants at 2 months and 4 months, alongside an opportunistic catch-up for 3 month and 4 month olds. 4CMenB was predicted to protect against 73-88% of MenB strains. We aimed to assess the effectiveness and impact of 4CMenB in vaccine-eligible infants in England. Public Health England (PHE) undertakes enhanced surveillance of meningococcal disease through a combination of clinical, public health, and laboratory reporting. Laboratory-confirmed cases of meningococcal disease are followed up with PHE local health protection teams, general practitioners, and hospital clinicians to collect demographic data, vaccination history, clinical presentation, and outcome. For cases diagnosed between Sept 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016, vaccine effectiveness was assessed using the screening method. Impact was assessed by comparing numbers of cases of MenB in vaccine-eligible children to equivalent cohorts in the previous 4 years and to cases in vaccine-ineligible children. Coverage of 4CMenB in infants eligible for routine vaccination was high, achieving 95·5% for one dose and 88·6% for two doses by 6 months of age. Two-dose vaccine effectiveness was 82·9% (95% CI 24·1-95·2) against all MenB cases, equivalent to a vaccine effectiveness of 94·2% against the highest predicted MenB strain coverage of 88%. Compared with the prevaccine period, there was a 50% incidence rate ratio (IRR) reduction in MenB cases in the vaccine-eligible cohort (37 cases vs average 74 cases; IRR 0·50 [95% CI 0·36-0·71]; p=0·0001), irrespective of the infants' vaccination status or predicted MenB strain coverage. Similar reductions were observed even after adjustment for disease trends in vaccine-eligible and vaccine-ineligible children. The two-dose 4CMen

  17. Estimating primary care attendance rates for fever in infants after meningococcal B vaccination in England using national syndromic surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Sally; Morbey, Roger A; Bates, Chris; Carter, Helen; Ladhani, Shamez N; de Lusignan, Simon; Smith, Gillian E; Elliot, Alex J

    2018-01-25

    In September 2015, the United Kingdom became the first country to introduce the multicomponent group B meningococcal vaccine (4CMenB) into a national infant immunisation programme. In early clinical trials 51-61% of infants developed a fever when 4CMenB was administered with other routine vaccines. Whilst administration of prophylactic paracetamol is advised, up to 3% of parents may seek medical advice for fever following vaccination. We used research-level general practitioner consultations to identify any increase in attendances for all-cause fever in vaccine-eligible infants following 4CMenB introduction in England. Consultations for infant all-cause fever in the year following the vaccine introduction were identified from The Phoenix Partnership (TPP) ResearchOne general practice database using Read (CTV3) codes. Average daily consultation rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated for vaccine-eligible age groups and compared to the two years preceding vaccine introduction. The difference between pre- and post-vaccine all-cause fever consultations was estimated. All-cause fever consultations in vaccine-eligible 7-10 week olds were 1.6-fold higher (IRR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.22-2.05) compared to the two previous years and 1.5-fold higher (IRR 1.47; 95% CI, 1.17-1.86) in 15-18 week-olds. There were no significant differences in 0-6 or 11-14 week-olds. Applying the difference between pre- and post-vaccine consultation rates to the 4CMenB vaccine-eligible age groups across England estimated 1825 additional fever consultations in the year following 4CMenB introduction. We found a small but significant difference in all-cause fever consultation rates in vaccine-eligible infants who would have received 4CMenB with other vaccines. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Meningococcal C specific immune responses: immunity in an era of immunization with vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate immunization was introduced in the Dutch national immunization schedule at the age of 14 months, together with a large catch-up campaign in 2002. After introduction of this MenC immunization, the incidence of MenC completely disappeared from the immunized

  19. Immunogenicity of a reduced schedule of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine given concomitantly with the Prevenar and Pediacel vaccines in healthy infants in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Jo; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Morris, Rhonwen; Waight, Pauline; Hudson, Michael; Balmer, Paul; Findlow, Helen; Findlow, Jamie; Miller, Elizabeth

    2009-02-01

    This study investigated the use of two doses of three different meningococcal group C conjugate (MCC) vaccines when given for primary immunization with a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and Pediacel, a combination product containing five acellular pertussis components, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate, and inactivated-poliovirus vaccine. The immune response after a single dose of MCC is also presented. Infants were randomized to receive two doses of one of the MCC vaccines and PCV7 at 2 and 3 months or at 2 and 4 months of age. Meningococcal group C serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) geometric mean titers, Hib-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) geometric mean concentrations (GMCs), and diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin GMCs, together with the proportions of infants achieving putative protective levels, were determined. A total of 393 infants were recruited. Following the first dose of NeisVac-C (MCC conjugated to tetanus toxoid), 97% of infants achieved protective levels (SBA titer of >or=8), compared with 80% and 53%, respectively, for Menjugate and Meningitec (both of which are conjugated to CRM(197)). SBA responses to MCC vaccines were not significantly different when administered at 2 and 3 or 2 and 4 months of age. Following two doses of each MCC, 98 to 100% of infants achieved protective levels. Both PRP IgG and tetanus responses were significantly enhanced when Pediacel was coadministered with NeisVac-C. This study demonstrates that NeisVac-C and Menjugate generate good immunogenicity after the first dose at 2 months of age when coadministered with PCV7 and Pediacel and merit further investigation in single-dose priming strategies.

  20. Invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland, 2001-2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, Cilian

    2016-12-01

    In 1999, invasive meningococcal disease was hyperendemic in Ireland at 14.75\\/100 000 population, with 60% group B and 30% group C diseases. National sepsis guidelines and meningococcal C vaccines were introduced in 2000. Despite a spontaneous decline in group B infection, invasive meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of sepsis. This study characterises the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland since the introduction of meningococcal C vaccine and reviews its clinical presentation, hospital course and outcome in anticipation of meningococcal B vaccine introduction.

  1. Preventing secondary cases of invasive meningococcal capsular group B (MenB) disease using a recently-licensed, multi-component, protein-based vaccine (Bexsero(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Cordery, Rebecca; Mandal, Sema; Christensen, Hannah; Campbell, Helen; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary E

    2014-11-01

    To assess the potential use of a protein-based meningococcal group B (MenB) vaccine (Bexsero(®)) in addition to antibiotic chemoprophylaxis for preventing secondary cases. Published studies on the risk of secondary meningococcal infections were used to estimate the numbers needed to vaccinate (NNV) with Bexsero(®) to prevent a secondary case in household and educational settings. Most secondary cases occur within a few days of diagnosis in the index case. Unlike conjugate vaccines, early protection offered after a single dose of Bexsero(®) is likely to be low, particularly in young children, who are at higher risk of secondary infection. NNV was dependent on predicted meningococcal strain coverage, estimated onset of protection after one Bexsero(®) dose and estimated vaccine efficacy. Even in the most favourable scenario where we assume the vaccine is administered within 4 days of the index case and prevents 90% of cases occurring after 14 days, the NNV for household contacts was >1000. NNV in educational settings was much higher. The estimated NNV should be taken into account when deciding policy to recommend Bexsero(®) for close contacts of single cases in household or educational settings. Bexsero(®) may have a protective role in clusters and outbreaks. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of a four-component meningococcal group B vaccine (4CMenB) and a quadrivalent meningococcal group ACWY conjugate vaccine administered concomitantly in healthy laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie; Bai, Xilian; Findlow, Helen; Newton, Emma; Kaczmarski, Ed; Miller, Elizabeth; Borrow, Ray

    2015-06-26

    Safety precautions for laboratory staff working with meningococci should primarily rely on laboratory procedures preventing exposure to aerosols containing viable meningococci. Despite this, vaccination is a key component of protection in the occupational setting. In the UK in 2009, there were no licensed vaccines for meningococcal capsular group B or conjugate vaccines for capsular groups A, C, W and Y. We therefore undertook a Phase II trial in laboratory workers to investigate the safety and immunogenicity of a four component group B vaccine (4CMenB) and a quadrivalent group A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine (ACWY-CRM). Enrolment was open to staff aged 18-65 years at the Public Health Laboratory, Manchester who may have had a potential occupational exposure risk to meningococci. 4CMenB was administered at 0, 2 and 6 months in the non-dominant arm and ACWY-CRM concomitantly at 0 months in the dominant arm. Pre- and post-vaccination blood samples were taken and analysed by the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay against A, C, W and Y strains and a panel of seven diverse group B strains. Diary cards were used to record any local and systemic reactions following each vaccination. In total, 38 staff were enrolled and received initial vaccinations with 31 completing the trial per protocol. Both vaccines were proven safe, with local reactogenicity being more commonly reported following 4CMenB than ACWY-CRM. High proportions of subjects had putative protective SBA titres pre-vaccination, with 61-84 and 61-87% protected against A, C, W and Y strains and diverse MenB strains, respectively. Post-vaccination, SBA titres increased with 95-100 and 90-100% of subjects with protective SBA titres against A, C, W and Y strains and diverse MenB strains, respectively. These data suggest that 4CMenB and ACWY-CRM are safe when administered concomitantly and have the potential to enhance protection for laboratory workers. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00962624. Crown

  3. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo® in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bröker M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Bröker, Brian Cooper, Lisa M DeTora, Jeffrey J StoddardGlobal Medical Affairs, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Marburg, Germany, and Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo® was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.Keywords: invasive meningococcal disease, quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Neisseria meningitidis

  4. Immune Response Induction and New Effector Mechanisms Possibly Involved in Protection Conferred by the Cuban Anti-Meningococcal BC Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Oliver; Lastre, Miriam; Lapinet, José; Bracho, Gustavo; Díaz, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Taboada, Carlos; Sierra, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    This report explores the participation of some afferent mechanisms in the immune response induced by the Cuban anti-meningococcal vaccine VA-MENGOC-BC. The induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity in nursing babies and lymphocyte proliferation after immunization is demonstrated. The presence of gamma interferon IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNAs but absence of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 mRNAs were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from immunized subjects after in vitro challenge with outer membrane vesicles. In addition, some effector functions were also explored. The presence of opsonic activity was demonstrated in sera from vaccinees. The role of neutrophils as essential effector cells was shown. In conclusion, we have shown that, at least in the Cuban adult population, VA-MENGOC-BC induces mechanisms with a T-helper 1 pattern in the afferent and effector branches of the immune response. PMID:11401992

  5. Safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) administered with routine infant vaccinations: results of an open-label, randomized, phase 3b controlled study in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Silas, Peter E; Lamas, Marta Raquel Valdés; Aragón, Carlos Fernándo Grazioso; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Acuña, Teobaldo Herrera; Castrejón, Tirza De León; Izu, Allen; Odrljin, Tatjana; Smolenov, Igor; Hohenboken, Matthew; Dull, Peter M

    2014-02-12

    The highest risk for invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is in infants aged meningococcal conjugate vaccination has the potential to prevent IMD caused by serogroups A, C, W and Y. This phase 3b, multinational, open-label, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study evaluated the safety of a 4-dose series of MenACWY-CRM, a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, concomitantly administered with routine vaccinations to healthy infants. Two-month-old infants were randomized 3:1 to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines or routine vaccines alone at ages 2, 4, 6 and 12 months. Adverse events (AEs) that were medically attended and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected from all subjects from enrollment through 18 months of age. In a subset, detailed safety data (local and systemic solicited reactions and all AEs) were collected for 7 days post vaccination. The primary objective was a non-inferiority comparison of the percentages of subjects with ≥1 severe systemic reaction during Days 1-7 after any vaccination of MenACWY-CRM plus routine vaccinations versus routine vaccinations alone (criterion: upper limit of 95% confidence interval [CI] of group difference vaccines and 13% after routine vaccines alone (group difference 3.0% (95% CI -0.8, 6.4%). Although the non-inferiority criterion was not met, post hoc analysis controlling for significant center and group-by-center differences revealed that MenACWY-CRM plus routine vaccinations was non-inferior to routine vaccinations alone (group difference -0.1% [95% CI -4.9%, 4.7%]). Rates of solicited AEs, medically attended AEs, and SAEs were similar across groups. In a large multinational safety study, a 4-dose series of MenACWY-CRM concomitantly administered with routine vaccines was clinically acceptable with a similar safety profile to routine vaccines given alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of one dose of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, when administered to adolescents concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguedas, A; Soley, C; Loaiza, C; Rincon, G; Guevara, S; Perez, A; Porras, W; Alvarado, O; Aguilar, L; Abdelnour, A; Grunwald, U; Bedell, L; Anemona, A; Dull, P M

    2010-04-19

    This Phase III study evaluates an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Novartis Vaccines), when administered concomitantly or sequentially with two other recommended adolescent vaccines; combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In this single-centre study, 1620 subjects 11-18 years of age, were randomized to three groups (1:1:1) to receive MenACWY-CRM concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV. Meningococcal serogroup-specific serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), and antibodies to Tdap antigens and HPV virus-like particles were determined before and 1 month after study vaccinations. Proportions of subjects with hSBA titres > or =1:8 for all four meningococcal serogroups (A, C, W-135, Y) were non-inferior for both concomitant and sequential administration. Immune responses to Tdap and HPV antigens were comparable when these vaccines were given alone or concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM. All vaccines were well tolerated; concomitant or sequential administration did not increase reactogenicity. MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic in subjects 11-18 years of age, with comparable immune responses to the four serogroups when given alone or concomitantly with Tdap or HPV antigens. This is the first demonstration that these currently recommended adolescent vaccines could be administered concomitantly without causing increased reactogenicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Persistence of Meningococcal Antibodies and Response to a Third Dose After a Two-dose Vaccination Series with Investigational MenABCWY Vaccine Formulations in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez-Llorens, Xavier; Aguilera Vaca, Diana Catalina; Abarca, Katia; Maho, Emmanuelle; Han, Linda; Smolenov, Igor; Dull, Peter

    2015-10-01

    In a primary study, healthy adolescents received 2 doses (months 0/2) of 1 of the 4 investigational meningococcal ABCWY vaccine formulations, containing components of licensed quadrivalent glycoconjugate vaccine MenACWY-CRM, combined with different amounts of recombinant proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from a licensed serogroup B vaccine, or 2 doses of rMenB alone or 1 dose of MenACWY-CRM then a placebo. This phase 2 extension study evaluated antibody persistence up to 10 months after the 2-dose series and the immunogenicity and safety of a third dose (month 6). Immune responses against serogroups ACWY and serogroup B test strains were measured by serum bactericidal assay with human complement. At month 12, antibody persistence against serogroups ACWY in all 2-dose MenABCWY groups was at least comparable with the 1-dose MenACWY-CRM group. Bactericidal antibodies against most serogroup B test strains declined by month 6, then plateaued over the subsequent 6 months, with overall higher antibody persistence associated with OMV-containing formulations. A third MenABCWY vaccine dose induced robust immune responses against vaccine antigens, although antibody levels 6 months later were comparable with those observed 5 months after the 2-dose series. All investigational MenABCWY vaccines were well tolerated. Two or three doses of investigational MenABCWY vaccines elicited immune responses against serogroups ACWY that were at least comparable with those after 1 dose of MenACWY-CRM. After either vaccination series, investigational MenABCWY vaccine formulations containing OMV had the highest immunogenicity against most serogroup B test strains. No safety concerns were identified in this study.

  8. Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campuses Addressing the Challenges of Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Outbreaks on Campuses (May 2014) Addressing the Challenges of Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Outbreaks on Campuses (May 2014) Resources Beyond the Science: ...

  9. Low Uptake of Meningococcal C Vaccination in France: A Cross-sectional Nationwide Survey of General Practitioners' Perceptions, Attitudes and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maréchal, Marion; Agrinier, Nelly; Fressard, Lisa; Verger, Pierre; Pulcini, Céline

    2017-07-01

    Meningococcal C glycoconjugate vaccine (MenCV) has been recommended in France since 2010, but its uptake remains low (64% coverage among 2-year-olds in 2014). Because general practitioners (GPs) are the cornerstone of the French vaccination program, we sought to assess their perceptions, attitudes, practices and recommendations to patients for this vaccine. A cross-sectional survey in 2014 asked a national sample of 1582 GPs if they would recommend MenCV for patients 12 months of age (routine vaccination) and 2-24 years of age (catch-up vaccination) and explored the barriers to vaccination. Overall, 52% of GPs (800/1547) reported they always recommend routine MenCV vaccination and 33% (523/1572), catch-up vaccination. The most frequently reported barriers to vaccination were that parents have never heard of this vaccine (72%, 1094/1523), underestimate the risk of contracting meningococcal disease (69%, 1049/1514) and are unaware of its seriousness (55%, 838/1537). In multivariate analyses, GPs recommended routine and catch-up vaccination significantly more often when they had no doubt about the utility and safety of this vaccine, when they thought that the official MenCV recommendation was clear and when their own children were vaccinated. GPs who reported that their patients either were unaware of the severity of bacterial meningitis (P = 0.012) or had no doubts about the efficacy of MenCV recommended catch-up vaccination more often (P = 0.015). GPs did not appear to recommend MenCV often enough. Our results suggest that clearer recommendations and a better communications campaign directed at patients and healthcare workers could be useful.

  10. Concomitant administration of a fully liquid, ready-to-use DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T hexavalent vaccine with a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Borrow, Ray; Da Costa, Xavier; Richard, Patrick; Eymin, Cécile; Boisnard, Florence; Lockhart, Stephen

    2017-01-11

    DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T or hexavalent vaccines are indicated for primary and booster vaccination of infants and toddlers against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis and invasive diseases caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). The present study evaluates the safety and immunogenicity of a ready-to-use hexavalent vaccine when co-administered with a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MenC) vaccine in infants. This was a phase III, open-label, randomised, multicentre study conducted in Finland. Healthy infants, aged 46-74days (n=350), were randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to receive DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine at two, three and four months, either with a MenC vaccine co-administered at two and four months (Group 1; n=175) or without MenC vaccine (Group 2; n=175). All infants also received routine rotavirus and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The proportion of participants with an anti-HBs concentration ⩾10mIU/mL assessed one month after the third dose of DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine was 97.5% [95%CI: 93.1-99.3] in the coadministration group and 96.1% [95%CI: 91.8-98.6] in the group without MenC vaccine. The proportion of participants with an anti-MenC SBA titre ⩾8 assessed one month after the second dose of MenC vaccine was 100% in the coadministration group. Both primary objectives were achieved. Secondary immunogenicity and safety analyses showed that co-administration of DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T and MenC vaccines did not impact the immune response to the antigens of each of the two vaccines. All vaccines were well tolerated and the safety profile of DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine was similar in both groups. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01839175; EudraCT number: 2012-005547-24. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and concomitant meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine in healthy infants and toddlers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Domingo, Javier; Gurtman, Alejandra; Bernaola, Enrique; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Pineda-Solas, Valentin; Delgado, Alfonso; Infante-Marquez, Pilar; Liang, John Z; Giardina, Peter C; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2013-11-04

    Given the concurrent administration of multiple vaccines during routine pediatric immunizations, efforts to elucidate the potential interference of any vaccine on the immune response to the concomitantly administered antigens are fundamental to prelicensure clinical research. This phase 3 randomized controlled trial of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) versus 7-valent PCV (PCV7) assessed immune responses of concomitantly administered meningococcal group C conjugated to diphtheria toxin cross-reactive material 197 (MnCCV-CRM197) in a 2-dose infant series and 15-month toddler dose. 619 subjects were randomized, 315 to PCV13 and 304 to PCV7. MnCCV-CRM197-induced immune responses were similar between the PCV13 and PCV7 groups, with >97% of the subjects achieving a ≥1:8 meningococcal serum bactericidal assay (SBA) titer after both dose 2 and the toddler dose. Geometric mean titers were lower in the PCV13 group 191.22 (167.72, 218.02) versus 266.19 (234.86, 301.71) following dose 2 and 432.28 (361.22, 517.31) versus 730.84 (642.05, 831.91) following the toddler dose. The geometric mean (GM) meningococcal SBA titer ratios (PCV13/PCV7) were 0.72 after dose 2 and 0.59 after the toddler dose. The criteria for MnCCV-CRM197 non-inferiority for GM titers were satisfied after dose 2. Percent responders was similar up to titers of 1:128. PCV13 elicited substantial antipneumococcal responses against all 13 serotypes, with ≥90% of the subjects achieving an antibody concentration ≥0.35μg/mL after dose 3 in the infant series. Safety and tolerability were similar between the vaccine groups. Immunogenicity results of MnCCV-CRM197 for PCV13 compared with PCV7 included lower GMTs, but the clinical significance of this is unknown as the proportion of infants achieving protective MenC antibody titers was comparable in the two groups. Percent responders were similar up to titers of 1:128. PCV13 has an acceptable safety profile in infants and toddlers, while providing

  12. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM(197) conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; Detora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo(®)) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.

  13. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo®) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; DeTora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need. PMID:21904459

  14. Interchangeability of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines with different carrier proteins in the United Kingdom infant immunisation schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Andrews, Nick J; Waight, Pauline; Hallis, Bassam; Matheson, Mary; England, Anna; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Borrow, Ray; Burbidge, Polly; Pearce, Emma; Goldblatt, David; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-29

    An open, non-randomised study was undertaken in England during 2011-12 to evaluate vaccine antibody responses in infants after completion of the routine primary infant immunisation schedule, which included two doses of meningococcal group C (MenC) conjugate (MCC) vaccine at 3 and 4 months. Any of the three licensed MCC vaccines could be used for either dose, depending on local availability. Healthy term infants registered at participating general practices (GPs) in Hertfordshire and Gloucestershire, UK, were recruited prospectively to provide a single blood sample four weeks after primary immunisation, which was administered by the GP surgery. Vaccination history was obtained at blood sampling. MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) and IgG antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib), pertussis toxin (PT), diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and thirteen pneumococcal serotypes were analysed according to MCC vaccines received. MenC SBA responses differed significantly (Pvaccine schedule as follows: MenC SBA geometric mean titres (GMTs) were significantly lower in infants receiving a diphtheria cross-reacting material-conjugated MCC (MCC-CRM) vaccine followed by TT-conjugated MCC (MCC-TT) vaccine (82.0; 95% CI, 39-173; n=14) compared to those receiving two MCC-CRM (418; 95% CI, 325-537; n=82), two MCC-TT (277; 95% CI, 223-344; n=79) or MCC-TT followed by MCC-CRM (553; 95% CI, 322-949; n=18). The same group also had the lowest Hib geometric mean concentrations (0.60 μg/mL, 0.27-1.34) compared to 1.85 μg/mL (1.23-2.78), 2.86 μg/mL (2.02-4.05) and 4.26 μg/mL (1.94-9.36), respectively. Our results indicate that MCC vaccines with different carrier proteins are not interchangeable. When several MCC vaccines are available, children requiring more than one dose should receive MCC vaccines with the same carrier protein or, alternatively, receive MCC-TT first wherever possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Meningococcal Serogroup B Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine Elicits Broad and Robust Serum Bactericidal Responses in Healthy Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesikari, Timo; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Diez-Domingo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is a leading cause of invasive meningococcal disease in adolescents and young adults. A recombinant factor H binding protein (fHBP) vaccine (Trumenba(®); bivalent rLP2086) was recently approved in the United States in individuals aged 10-25 years...... ≥1:8 after 3 doses ranged from 91.7% to 95.0%, 98.9% to 99.4%, 88.4% to 89.0%, and 86.1% to 88.5% for MnB test strains expressing vaccine--heterologous fHBP variants A22, A56, B24, and B44, respectively. After 2 doses, responses ranged from 90.8% to 93.5%, 98.4% to 100%, 69.1% to 81.1%, and 70...... was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalent rLP2086 was immunogenic and well tolerated when administered in 2 or 3 doses. Three doses yielded the most robust hSBA response rates against MnB strains expressing vaccine-heterologous subfamily B fHBPs....

  16. A Meningococcal NOMV-FHbp Vaccine for Africa Elicits Broader Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses Against Serogroup B and non-B Strains than a Licensed Serogroup B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Lujan, Eduardo; Granoff, Dan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Meningococcal epidemics in Sub-Sahara caused by serogroup A strains are controlled by a group A polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. Strains with serogroups C, W and X continue to cause epidemics. Protein antigens in licensed serogroup B vaccines are shared among serogroup B and non-B strains. Purpose Compare serum bactericidal antibody responses elicited by an investigational native outer membrane vesicle vaccine with over-expressed Factor H binding protein (NOMV-FHbp) and a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) against African serogroup A, B, C, W and X strains. Methods Human Factor H (FH) transgenic mice were immunized with NOMV-FHbp prepared from a mutant African meningococcal strain containing genetically attenuated endotoxin and a mutant sub-family B FHbp antigen with low FH binding, or with MenB-4C, which contains a recombinant sub-family B FHbp antigen that binds human FH, and three other antigens, NHba, NadA and PorA P1.4, capable of eliciting bactericidal antibody. Results The NOMV-FHbp elicited serum bactericidal activity against 12 of 13 serogroup A, B, W or X strains from Africa, and four isogenic serogroup B mutants with subfamily B FHbp sequence variants. There was no activity against a serogroup B mutant with sub-family A FHbp, or two serogroup C isolates from a recent outbreak in Northern Nigeria, which were mismatched for both PorA and sub-family of the FHbp vaccine antigen. For MenB-4C, NHba was expressed by all 16 African isolates tested, FHbp sub-family B in 13, and NadA in five. However, MenB-4C elicited titers ≥1:10 against only one isolate, and against only two of four serogroup B mutant strains with sub-family B FHbp sequence variants. Conclusions NOMV-FHbp has greater potential to confer serogroup-independent protection in Africa than the licensed MenB-4C vaccine. However, the NOMV-FHbp vaccine will require inclusion of sub-family A FHbp for coverage against recent serogroup C strains causing outbreaks in Northern Nigeria. PMID

  17. A meningococcal NOMV-FHbp vaccine for Africa elicits broader serum bactericidal antibody responses against serogroup B and non-B strains than a licensed serogroup B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Lujan, Eduardo; Granoff, Dan M

    2016-01-27

    Meningococcal epidemics in Sub-Sahara caused by serogroup A strains are controlled by a group A polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. Strains with serogroups C, W and X continue to cause epidemics. Protein antigens in licensed serogroup B vaccines are shared among serogroup B and non-B strains. Compare serum bactericidal antibody responses elicited by an investigational native outer membrane vesicle vaccine with over-expressed Factor H binding protein (NOMV-FHbp) and a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) against African serogroup A, B, C, W and X strains. Human Factor H (FH) transgenic mice were immunized with NOMV-FHbp prepared from a mutant African meningococcal strain containing genetically attenuated endotoxin and a mutant sub-family B FHbp antigen with low FH binding, or with MenB-4C, which contains a recombinant sub-family B FHbp antigen that binds human FH, and three other antigens, NHba, NadA and PorA P1.4, capable of eliciting bactericidal antibody. The NOMV-FHbp elicited serum bactericidal activity against 12 of 13 serogroup A, B, W or X strains from Africa, and four isogenic serogroup B mutants with sub-family B FHbp sequence variants. There was no activity against a serogroup B mutant with sub-family A FHbp, or two serogroup C isolates from a recent outbreak in Northern Nigeria, which were mismatched for both PorA and sub-family of the FHbp vaccine antigen. For MenB-4C, NHba was expressed by all 16 African isolates tested, FHbp sub-family B in 13, and NadA in five. However, MenB-4C elicited titers ≥ 1:10 against only one isolate, and against only two of four serogroup B mutant strains with sub-family B FHbp sequence variants. NOMV-FHbp has greater potential to confer serogroup-independent protection in Africa than the licensed MenB-4C vaccine. However, the NOMV-FHbp vaccine will require inclusion of sub-family A FHbp for coverage against recent serogroup C strains causing outbreaks in Northern Nigeria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Introduction and Rollout of a New Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PsA-TT) in African Meningitis Belt Countries, 2010–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Barry, Rodrigue; Kandolo, Denis; Shirehwa, Florence; Lingani, Clement; Novak, Ryan T.; Tevi-Benissan, Carol; Perea, William; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; LaForce, F. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) was developed specifically for the African “meningitis belt” and was prequalified by the World Health Organization (WHO) in June 2010. The vaccine was first used widely in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger in December 2010 with great success. The remaining 23 meningitis belt countries wished to use this new vaccine. Methods. With the help of African countries, WHO developed a prioritization scheme and used or adapted existing immunization guidelines to mount PsA-TT vaccination campaigns. Vaccine requirements were harmonized with the Serum Institute of India, Ltd. Results. Burkina Faso was the first country to fully immunize its 1- to 29-year-old population in December 2010. Over the next 4 years, vaccine coverage was extended to 217 million Africans living in 15 meningitis belt countries. Conclusions. The new group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine was well received, with country coverage rates ranging from 85% to 95%. The rollout proceeded smoothly because countries at highest risk were immunized first while attention was paid to geographic contiguity to maximize herd protection. Community participation was exemplary. PMID:26553672

  19. Safety and immunogenicity of a meningococcal B recombinant vaccine when administered with routine vaccines to healthy infants in Taiwan: A phase 3, open-label, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nan-Chang; Huang, Li-Min; Willemsen, Arnold; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar; Mojares, Zenaida Reynoso; Toneatto, Daniela

    2018-01-16

    Neisseria meningitidis is associated with high mortality and morbidity in infants and children worldwide. This phase 3 study (NCT02173704) evaluated safety and immunogenicity of a 4-component serogroup B recombinant meningococcal vaccine (4CMenB) co-administered with routine vaccines in Taiwanese infants. In total, 225 healthy infants were randomized (2 : 1 ) to receive 4CMenB and routine vaccines (4CMenB+Routine) or routine vaccines only (Routine group) at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. Routine vaccines were diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b, 13-valent pneumococcal, hepatitis B, measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines. Immune responses to 4CMenB components (factor H binding protein [fHbp], Neisserial adhesin A [NadA], porin A [PorA] and Neisseria heparin-binding antigen [NHBA]) were evaluated at 1 month post-primary and post-booster vaccination, using human serum bactericidal assay (hSBA). Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed. A sufficient immune response was demonstrated for fHbp, NadA and PorA, at 1 month post-primary and booster vaccination. In the 4CMenB+Routine group, hSBA titers ≥5 were observed in all infants for fHbp and NadA, in 79% and 59% of infants for PorA and NHBA, respectively, at 1 month post-primary vaccination and in 92-99% of infants for all antigens, at 1 month post-booster vaccination. In the 4CMenB+Routine group, hSBA geometric mean titers for all antigens increased post-primary (8.41-963) and post-booster vaccination (17-2315) compared to baseline (1.01-1.36). Immunogenicity of 4CMenB was not impacted by co-administration with routine pediatric vaccines in infants. Reactogenicity was slightly higher in the 4CMenB+Routine group compared with Routine group, but no safety concerns were identified.

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of an investigational meningococcal ACWY conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) in healthy Indian subjects aged 2 to 75 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Sanjay; Agarkhedkar, Sharad; Gogtay, Nithya; Palkar, Sonali; Agarkhedkar, Shalaka; Thatte, Urmila; Vakil, Hoshang; Jonnalagedda, Rekha; Pedotti, Paola; Hoyle, Margaret; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani

    2015-09-01

    This phase 3, multi-center, open-label study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM, Menveo(®); Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics S.r.l., Siena, Italy) in healthy Indian subjects aged 2-75 years, to provide data for licensure in India. A total of 180 subjects were enrolled (60 subjects 2-10 years, 60 subjects 11-18 years, and 60 subjects 19-75 years) and received one dose of MenACWY-CRM. Serum bactericidal activity with human complement (hSBA) was measured before and 1 month after vaccination. Adverse events were collected throughout the 29-day study period. Percentages of subjects with post-vaccination hSBA ≥8 were 72%, 95%, 94%, and 90% for serogroups A, C, W, and Y, respectively. Geometric mean titers rose 7-fold to 42-fold against the four serogroups. Similar immune responses were observed for the age subgroups 2-10 years, 11-18 years, and 19-75 years. Seroresponse rates at 1 month following vaccination were 72%, 88%, 55%, and 71% for serogroups A, C, W, and Y, respectively. The vaccine was well tolerated with no safety concerns. A single dose of MenACWY-CRM induced a robust immune response against all four meningococcal serogroups and was well tolerated in an Indian population 2-75 years of age. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular characterization of invasive meningococcal isolates from countries in the African meningitis belt before introduction of a serogroup A conjugate vaccine.

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    Dominique A Caugant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The serogroup A conjugate meningococcal vaccine, MenAfriVac, was introduced in mass vaccination campaigns in December 2010 in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In the coming years, vaccination will be extended to other African countries at risk of epidemics. To document the molecular characteristics of disease-causing meningococcal strains circulating in the meningitis belt of Africa before vaccine introduction, the World Health Organization Collaborating Centers on Meningococci in Europe and United States established a common strain collection of 773 isolates from cases of invasive meningococcal disease collected between 2004 and 2010 from 13 sub-Saharan countries. METHODOLOGY: All isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, and 487 (62% were also analyzed for genetic variation in the surface antigens PorA and FetA. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested for part of the collection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Only 19 sequence types (STs belonging to 6 clonal complexes were revealed. ST-5 clonal complex dominated with 578 (74.8% isolates. All ST-5 complex isolates were remarkably homogeneous in their PorA (P1.20,9 and FetA (F3-1 and characterized the serogroup A strains which have been responsible for most epidemics during this time period. Sixty-eight (8.8% of the 773 isolates belonged to the ST-11 clonal complex which was mainly represented by serogroup W135, while an additional 38 (4.9% W135 isolates belonged to the ST-175 complex. Forty-eight (6.2% serogroup X isolates from West Africa belonged to the ST-181 complex, while serogroup X cases in Kenya and Uganda were caused by an unrelated clone, ST-5403. Serogroup X, ST-181, emerged in Burkina Faso before vaccine introduction. CONCLUSIONS: In the seven years preceding introduction of a new serogroup A conjugate vaccine, serogroup A of the ST-5 clonal complex was identified as the predominant disease-causing strain.

  2. Use of a booster dose of capsular group C meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine to demonstrate immunologic memory in children primed with one or two vaccine doses in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, David; Khatami, Ameneh; Attard-Montalto, Simon; Voysey, Merryn; Finn, Adam; Faust, Saul N; Heath, Paul T; Borrow, Ray; Snape, Matthew D; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-12-07

    Use of a polysaccharide vaccine challenge to demonstrate immunologic memory after priming with capsular group C meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MenCC) risks induction of immunologic hyporesponsiveness. For this reason, MenCC vaccines are now used as probes of immunologic memory, however, no studies have demonstrated their ability to distinguish primed from unprimed children. This study was part of a randomised controlled trial investigating the immunogenicity of a booster dose of the combined Haemophilus influenzae type b and MenC-tetanus toxoid vaccine (Hib-MenC-TT) in infants receiving reduced dose MenCC vaccine priming schedules (one MenC-CRM/MenC-TT or two MenC-CRM vaccine doses) compared with an unprimed group. Antibody kinetics were studied in a subset of 269 children by measuring changes in the MenC serum bactericidal antibody, using rabbit complement, (MenC rSBA) titres and MenC specific IgG memory B-cells before and at 6 and 28days following the 12month booster vaccination. At 6days after the 12monthMenCC vaccine, the rise in MenC rSBA titres and MenC specific IgG memory B-cells of the primed groups were significantly higher than the infant MenCC naïve group. Participants primed with one MenC-TT dose had the highest increase in MenC rSBA titres compared with all other groups. The MenC rSBA titres at the 28th compared with the 6th day after boosting was significantly higher in those primed with a single MenC-TT/MenC-CRM vaccine in infancy compared with those who were not primed or who were primed with two doses of the MenC-CRM vaccine. Immunologic memory can be demonstrated by a MenCC booster vaccination but is affected by the type and number of MenCC doses used for infant priming. The MenC rSBA responses can be used to demonstrate successful immunologic priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adverse events following quadrivalent meningococcal CRM-conjugate vaccine (Menveo®) reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting system (VAERS), 2010-2015.

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    Myers, Tanya R; McNeil, Michael M; Ng, Carmen S; Li, Rongxia; Lewis, Paige W; Cano, Maria V

    2017-03-27

    Limited data are available describing the post-licensure safety of meningococcal vaccines, including Menveo®. We reviewed reports of adverse events (AEs) to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) to assess safety in all age groups. VAERS is a national spontaneous vaccine safety surveillance system co-administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration. We searched the VAERS database for US reports of adverse events in persons who received Menveo from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2015. We clinically reviewed reports and available medical records for serious AEs, selected pre-specified outcomes, and vaccination during pregnancy. We used empirical Bayesian data mining to identify AEs that were disproportionately reported after receipt of Menveo. During the study period, VAERS received 2614 US reports after receipt of Menveo. Of these, 67 were classified as serious, including 1 report of death. Adolescents (aged 11-18years) accounted for 74% of reports. Most of the reported AEs were non-serious and described AEs consistent with data from pre-licensure studies. Anaphylaxis and syncope were the two most common events in the serious reports. We did not identify any new safety concerns after review of AEs that exceeded the data mining threshold, although we did observe disproportionate reporting for terms that were not associated with an adverse event (e.g., "incorrect drug dosage form administered", "wrong technique in drug usage process"). Although reports were limited, we did not find any evidence for concern regarding the use of Menveo during pregnancy. In our review of VAERS reports, findings of AEs were consistent with the data from pre-licensure studies. Vaccine providers should continue to emphasize and adhere to proper administration of the vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunogenicity, Tolerability and Safety in Adolescents of Bivalent rLP2086, a Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine, Coadministered with Quadrivalent Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senders, Shelly; Bhuyan, Prakash; Jiang, Qin; Absalon, Judith; Eiden, Joseph J; Jones, Thomas R; York, Laura J; Jansen, Kathrin U; O'Neill, Robert E; Harris, Shannon L; Ginis, John; Perez, John L

    2016-05-01

    This study in healthy adolescents (11 to vaccine (HPV-4), with bivalent rLP2086, a meningococcal serogroup B (MnB) vaccine. Subjects received bivalent rLP2086 + HPV-4, bivalent rLP2086 + saline or saline + HPV-4 at 0, 2 and 6 months. Immune responses to HPV-4 antigens were assessed 1 month after doses 2 and 3. Serum bactericidal assays using human complement (hSBAs) with 4 MnB test strains expressing vaccine-heterologous human complement factor H binding protein (fHBP) variants determined immune responses to bivalent rLP2086. Coprimary objectives were to demonstrate noninferior immune responses with concomitant administration compared with either vaccine alone. Additional endpoints included the proportions of subjects achieving prespecified protective hSBA titers to all 4 MnB test strains (composite response) and ≥4-fold increases in hSBA titer from baseline for each test strain after dose 3; these endpoints served as the basis of licensure of bivalent rLP2086 in the US. The noninferiority criteria were met for all MnB test strains and HPV antigens except HPV-18; ≥99% of subjects seroconverted for all 4 HPV antigens. Bivalent rLP2086 elicited a composite response in >80% of subjects and increased hSBA titers ≥4-fold in ≥77% of subjects for each test strain after dose 3. A substantial bactericidal response was also observed in a large proportion of subjects after dose 2. Local reactions and systemic events did not increase with concomitant administration. Concomitant administration of bivalent rLP2086 and HPV-4 elicits robust immune responses to both vaccines without increasing reactogenicity compared with bivalent rLP2086 alone. Concurrent administration may increase compliance with both vaccine schedules.

  5. Neisseria meningitidis Group A IgG1 and IgG2 Subclass Immune Response in African Children Aged 12–23 Months Following Meningococcal Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Daniel; Findlow, Helen; Sow, Samba O.; Idoko, Olubukola T.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Carlone, George; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT, was licensed in 2010 and was previously studied in a phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate its safety and immunogenicity in African children 12–23 months of age. Methods. Subjects received either PsA-TT; meningococcal group A, C, W, Y polysaccharide vaccine (PsACWY); or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (Hib-TT). Forty weeks following primary vaccination, the 3 groups were further randomized to receive either PsA-TT, one-fifth dose of PsACWY, or Hib-TT. Group A–specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass response was characterized using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. The predominant IgG subclass response, regardless of vaccine, was IgG1. One month following primary vaccination, the geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of IgG1 and IgG2 in the PsA-TT group were 21.73 µg/mL and 6.27 µg/mL, whereas in the PsACWY group the mean GMCs were 2.01 µg/mL and 0.97 µg/mL, respectively (P Group A–specific IgG1 and IgG2 GMCs remained greater in the PsA-TT group than in the PsACWY group 40 weeks following primary vaccination (P vaccines. Conclusions. Vaccination of African children aged 12–24 months with either PsA-TT or PsACWY elicited a predominantly IgG1 response. The IgG1:IgG2 mean ratio decreased following successive vaccination with PsACWY, indicating a shift toward IgG2, suggestive of the T-cell–independent immune response commonly associated with polysaccharide antigens. Clinical Trials Registration. SRCTN78147026. PMID:26553689

  6. Meningococcal groups C and Y and haemophilus B tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT; MenHibrix(®)): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Caroline M

    2013-05-01

    The meningococcal groups C and Y and Haemophilus b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) contains Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C and Y capsular polysaccharide antigens, and Hib capsular polysaccharide [polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP)]. The HibMenCY-TT vaccine is available in the USA for use as active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroups C (MenC) and Y (MenY), and Hib in children 6 weeks-18 months of age. HibMenCY-TT is the first meningococcal vaccine available for use in the USA that can be administered to infants as young as 6 weeks of age. In a randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trial, the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, administered to infants at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months of age, was immunogenic against MenC and MenY, and met the prespecified criteria for immunogenicity. Anti-PRP antibodies, which have been shown to correlate with protection against Hib invasive disease, were also induced in the infants who received the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, with induced levels of this antibody noninferior to those occurring in the control group of infants who received a Hib tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months and a single dose of Hib conjugated to N. meningitidis outer membrane protein at 12-15 months. In several randomized, controlled clinical trials, HibMenCY-TT was coadministered with vaccines that are routinely administered to infants and toddlers in the USA. These vaccines included: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B (recombinant) and inactivated poliovirus vaccine combined; 7-valent Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide conjugate vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella vaccine; and varicella vaccine. Coadministration of these vaccines did not interfere with the immunogenicity of the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. Similarly, immune responses to the coadministered vaccines were not affected by the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. The tolerability profile of the Hib

  7. Epidemiological impact and cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination with Bexsero(®) to reduce meningococcal group B disease in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hannah; Irving, Tom; Koch, Judith; Trotter, Caroline L; Ultsch, Bernhard; Weidemann, Felix; Wichmann, Ole; Hellenbrand, Wiebke

    2016-06-17

    Bexsero, a new vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease (MenB), was licensed in Europe in January 2013. In Germany, Bexsero is recommended for persons at increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease, but not for universal childhood vaccination. To support decision making we adapted the independently developed model for England to the German setting to predict the potential health impact and cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination with Bexsero(®) against MenB disease. We used both cohort and transmission dynamic mathematical models, the latter allowing for herd effects, to consider the impact of vaccination on individuals aged 0-99 years. Vaccination strategies included infant and adolescent vaccination, alone or in combination, and with one-off catch-up programmes. German specific data were used where possible from routine surveillance data and the literature. We assessed the impact of vaccination through cases averted and quality adjusted life years (QALY) gained and calculated costs per QALY gained. Assuming 65% vaccine uptake and 82% strain coverage, infant vaccination was estimated to prevent 15% (34) of MenB cases over the lifetime of one birth cohort. Including herd effects from vaccination increased the cases averted by infant vaccination to 22%, with an estimated 8461 infants requiring vaccination to prevent one case. In the short term the greatest health benefit is achieved through routine infant vaccination with large-scale catch-up, which could reduce cases by 24.9% after 5 years and 27.9% after 10 years. In the long term (20+ years) policies including routine adolescent vaccination are most favourable if herd effects are assumed. Under base case assumptions with a vaccine list price of €96.96 the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was >€500,000 per QALY for all considered strategies. Given the current very low incidence of MenB disease in Germany, universal vaccination with Bexsero(®) would prevent only a small absolute

  8. 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine given with meningococcal C-tetanus toxoid conjugate and other routine pediatric vaccinations: immunogenicity and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Gurtman, Alejandra; Bernaola, Enrique; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Carmona, Alfonso; Sidhu, Mohinder; Sarkozy, Denise A; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    As multiple vaccines are administered concomitantly during routine pediatric immunizations, it is important to ascertain the potential interference of any new vaccine on the immune response to the concomitantly administered vaccines. Immune responses to meningococcal serogroup C-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MnCC-TT) and the diphtheria and tetanus antigens in routine pediatric vaccines (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis-hepatitis B virus-inactivated poliovirus/Haemophilus influenza type b [DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib] and DTaP-IPV+Hib) when given concomitantly with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) were compared with responses when given with PCV7. In addition, the immunogenicity and safety of PCV13 were assessed. Healthy infants were randomized to receive PCV13 or PCV7 (ages 2, 4, 6 and 15 months), concomitant with MnCC-TT (2, 4 and 15 months), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib (2, 4 and 6 months), and DTaP-IPV+Hib (15 months). Immune responses to MnCC-TT and to the diphtheria and tetanus antigens administered with PCV13 were noninferior to the responses observed when the vaccines were administered with PCV7; ≥96.6 (postinfant) and ≥99.4% (posttoddler) subjects achieved prespecified immune response levels to each antigen in each group. After the infant series, ≥93.0% of subjects receiving PCV13 achieved pneumococcal anticapsular immunoglobulin G concentrations ≥0.35 µg/mL for all serotypes except serotype 3 (86.2%), increasing to 98.1-100% for most serotypes (serotype 3: 93.6%) after the toddler dose. Local and systemic reactions were similar between groups. Immune responses to MnCC-TT, and other childhood vaccines (DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib, DTaP-IPV+Hib) were noninferior when concomitantly administered with PCV13 compared with PCV7. PCV13 does not interfere with MnCC-TT. PCV13 is highly immunogenic with a favorable safety profile.

  9. Development and use of a serum bactericidal assay using pooled human complement to assess responses to a meningococcal group A conjugate vaccine in African toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bash, Margaret C; Lynn, Freyja; Mocca, Brian; Borrow, Ray; Findlow, Helen; Hassan-King, Musa; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Idoko, Olubukola; Sow, Samba; Kulkarni, Prasad; Laforce, F Marc

    2014-05-01

    A meningococcal group A polysaccharide (PS) conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has been developed for African countries affected by epidemic meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis. Complement-mediated serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assays are used to assess protective immune responses to meningococcal vaccination. Human complement (hC') was used in early studies demonstrating antibody-mediated protection against disease, but it is difficult to obtain and standardize. We developed and evaluated a method for sourcing hC' and then used the SBA assay with hC' (hSBA) to measure bactericidal responses to PsA-TT vaccination in 12- to 23-month-old African children. Sera with active complement from 100 unvaccinated blood donors were tested for intrinsic bactericidal activity, SBA titer using rabbit complement (rSBA), and anti-group A PS antibody concentration. Performance criteria and pooling strategies were examined and then verified by comparisons of three independently prepared hC' lots in two laboratories. hSBA titers of clinical trial sera were then determined using this complement sourcing method. Two different functional antibody tests were necessary for screening hC'. hSBA titers determined using three independent lots of pooled hC' were within expected assay variation among lots and between laboratories. In African toddlers, PsA-TT elicited higher hSBA titers than meningococcal polysaccharide or Hib vaccines. PsA-TT immunization or PS challenge of PsA-TT-primed subjects resulted in vigorous hSBA memory responses, and titers persisted in boosted groups for over a year. Quantifying SBA using pooled hC' is feasible and showed that PsA-TT was highly immunogenic in African toddlers.

  10. Prevalence and sequence variations of the genes encoding the five antigens included in the novel 5CVMB vaccine covering group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Hedberg, Sara Thulin; Mölling, Paula; Unemo, Magnus; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Olcén, Per

    2009-03-04

    During the recent years, projects are in progress for designing broad-range non-capsular-based meningococcal vaccines, covering also serogroup B isolates. We have examined three genes encoding antigens (NadA, GNA1030 and GNA2091) included in a novel vaccine, i.e. the 5 Component Vaccine against Meningococcus B (5CVMB), in terms of gene prevalence and sequence variations. These data were combined with the results from a similar study, examining the two additional antigens included in the 5CVMB (fHbp and GNA2132). nadA and fHbp v. 1 were present in 38% (n=36), respectively 71% (n=67) of the isolates, whereas gna2132, gna1030 and gna2091 were present in all the Neisseria meningitidis isolates tested (n=95). The level of amino acid conservation was relatively high in GNA1030 (93%), GNA2091 (92%), and within the main variants of NadA and fHbp. GNA2132 (54% of the amino acids conserved) appeared to be the most diversified antigen. Consequently, the theoretical coverage of the 5CVMB antigens and the feasibility to use these in a broad-range meningococcal vaccine is appealing.

  11. Monovalent RIVM meningococcal B OMP vesicle F91 vaccines in toddlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber AB; Limpt CJP van; Labadie J; Berbers GAM; Kleijn ED de; Groot R de; Rumke HC; Alphen AJW; Sophia Kinderziekenhuis /; LVO

    2001-01-01

    This report gives the results of a randomised phase-II clinical study into the safety and immunogenicity of a monovalent MenB OMV vaccine expressing P1.7h,4 PorA (MonoMen) in toddlers. Safety and immunogenicity are compared for two types of vaccine that are differently adjuvated (either

  12. Scale-up for bulk production of vaccine against meningococcal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, G.J.E.; Jong, de G.; Philippi, M.; Riet, van 't K.; Pol, van der L.A.; Beuvery, E.C.; Tramper, J.; Martens, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    At the Netherlands Vaccine Institute (NVI) a vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B organisms based on different porA subtypes contained in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is in advanced stage of development and will be evaluated in clinical trial studies in the near future. In order to

  13. Attitudes and risk perception of parents of different ethnic backgrounds regarding meningococcal C vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, D.R.M.; Henneman, L.; Hirasing, R.A.; Wal, G. van der

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the attitudes of parents toward vaccination as well as their risk perception of disease and vaccination. We interviewed 1763 parents of different ethnic groups (among others, Dutch, Turkish, Moroccan, and Surinamese parents). Results show that there were

  14. Randomized trial on the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Conversano, Michele; Bona, Gianni; Gabutti, Giovanni; Anemona, Alessandra; Dull, Peter M; Ceddia, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, when administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, in subjects aged 11 to 25 years. Subjects received either MenACWY-CRM and Tdap, MenACWY-CRM and saline placebo, or Tdap and saline placebo. No significant increase in reactogenicity and no clinically significant vaccine-related adverse events (AEs) occurred when MenACWY-CRM and Tdap were administered concomitantly. Similar immunogenic responses to diphtheria, tetanus, and meningococcal (serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y) antigens were observed, regardless of concomitant vaccine administration. Antipertussis antibody responses were comparable between vaccine groups for filamentous hemagglutinin and were slightly lower, although not clinically significantly, for pertussis toxoid and pertactin when the two vaccines were administered concomitantly. These results indicate that the investigational MenACWY-CRM vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic and that it can be coadministered with Tdap to adolescents and young adults.

  15. Antibody persistence following meningococcal C conjugate vaccination in children and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus

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    Ana Cristina Cisne Frota

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Seroprotection at 12–18 months after single dose of MCC was low for both groups, and higher among individuals who presented baseline immunity. Among HIVI, vaccine should be administered after UVL is achieved.

  16. Bactericidal antibody against a representative epidemiological meningococcal serogroup B panel confirms that MATS underestimates 4CMenB vaccine strain coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosi, Giacomo; Biolchi, Alessia; Lo Sapio, Morena; Rigat, Fabio; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Lucidarme, Jay; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Medini, Duccio

    2013-10-09

    4CMenB (Bexsero), a vaccine developed against invasive meningococcal disease caused by capsular group B strains (MenB), was recently licensed for use by the European Medicines Agency. Assessment of 4CMenB strain coverage in specific epidemiologic settings is of primary importance to predict vaccination impact on the burden of disease. The Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) was developed to predict 4CMenB strain coverage, using serum bactericidal antibody assay with human complement (hSBA) data from a diverse panel of strains not representative of any specific epidemiology. To experimentally validate the accuracy of MATS-based predictions against strains representative of a specific epidemiologic setting. We used a stratified sampling method to identify a representative sample from all MenB disease isolates collected from England and Wales in 2007-2008, tested the strains in the hSBA assay with pooled sera from infant and adolescent vaccinees, and compared these results with MATS. MATS predictions and hSBA results were significantly associated (P=0.022). MATS predicted coverage of 70% (95% CI, 55-85%) was largely confirmed by 88% killing in the hSBA (95% CI, 72-95%). MATS had 78% accuracy and 96% positive predictive value against hSBA. MATS is a conservative predictor of strain coverage by the 4CMenB vaccine in infants and adolescents. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Meningococcal Carriage in Military Recruits and University Students during the Pre MenB Vaccination Era in Greece (2014-2015.

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    Kyriaki Tryfinopoulou

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to estimate the meningococcal carriage rate and to identify the genotypic characteristics of the strains isolated from healthy military recruits and university students in order to provide data that might increase our understanding on the epidemiology of meningococcus and obtain information which helps to evaluate the potential effects on control programs such as vaccination.A total of 1420 oropharyngeal single swab samples were collected from military recruits and university students on voluntary basis, aged 18-26 years. New York City Medium was used for culture and the suspected N. meningitidis colonies were identified by Gram stain, oxidase and rapid carbohydrate utilization tests. Further characterisation was carried out by molecular methods (multiplex PCR, MLST, WGS.The overall carriage rate was of 12.7%; 15% and 10.4% for recruits and university students respectively. MenB (39.4% was the most prevalent followed by MenY (12.8% and MenW (4.4%. Among the initial 76 Non Groupable (NG isolates, Whole Genome Sequence Analysis (WGS revealed that 8.3% belonged to MenE, 3.3% to MenX and 1.1% to MenZ, while, 53 strains (29.4% were finally identified as capsule null. Genetic diversity was found among the MenB isolates, with 41/44 cc and 35 cc predominating.Meningococcal carriage rate in both groups was lower compared to our previous studies (25% and 18% respectively with predominance of MenB isolates. These findings, help to further our understanding on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Greece. Although the prevalence of carriage seems to have declined compared to our earlier studies, the predominant MenB clonal complexes (including 41/44cc and 35cc are associated with invasive meningococcal disease.

  18. A randomized study to assess the immunogenicity, antibody persistence and safety of a tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in children aged 2–10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forstén, Aino; Boutriau, Dominique; Bianco, Véronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of meningococcal diseases is high in children, and effective vaccines are needed for this age group. In this phase II, open, controlled study, 309 children aged 2–10 y from Finland were randomized (3:1) into two parallel groups to receive one dose of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT group; n = 231) or a licensed meningococcal ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS group; n = 78). Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was evaluated up to three years post-vaccination. Exploratory comparisons suggested that rSBA vaccine response rates and geometric mean titers (GMTs) for each serogroup at one month post-vaccination and rSBA GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y up to three years post-vaccination were higher in the ACWY-TT compared with Men-PS group, but did not detect any difference between groups in terms of rSBA-MenC GMTs at three years post-vaccination; this is explained by the higher proportion of children from the Men-PS group who were excluded because they were re-vaccinated with a monovalent meningococcal serogroup C vaccine due to loss of protective antibody levels against this serogroup. Although there was a higher incidence of local reactogenicity in the ACWY-TT group, general and unsolicited symptoms reporting rates were comparable in both groups. This study showed that MenACWY-TT was immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in children aged 2–10 y. MenACWY-TT induced higher functional antibody titers for all serogroups, which persisted longer for serogroups A, W-135 and Y, than the MenACWY polysaccharide vaccine. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00427908. PMID:23032168

  19. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of Infanrix™ when co-administered with meningococcal MenACWY-TT conjugate vaccine in toddlers primed with MenHibrix™ and Pediarix™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Michael; Latiolais, Thomas; Sarpong, Kwabena; Simon, Michael; Twiggs, Jerry; Lei, Paul; Rinderknecht, Stephen; Blatter, Mark; Bianco, Veronique; Baine, Yaela; Friedland, Leonard R; Baccarini, Carmen; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2015-02-11

    Co-administration of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) with the fourth dose of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) at age 15-18 months was investigated in 3-dose Haemophilus influenzae type b-meningococcal serogroups C/Y conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT)-primed toddlers. Infants were randomized (5:1) and primed at 2, 4 and 6 months of age with HibMenCY-TT and DTaP-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus (DTaP-HBV-IPV) vaccine, or Hib-TT and DTaP-HBV-IPV (Control). HibMenCY-TT+ DTaP-HBV-IPV vaccinees were re-randomized (2:2:1) to receive MenACWY-TT at 12-15 months and DTaP at 15-18 months (MenACWY-TT group); MenACWY-TT co-administered with DTaP at 15-18 months (Coad group); or HibMenCY-TT at 12-15 months and DTaP at 15-18 months (HibMenCY-TT group). Controls received DTaP at 15-18 months. Only children in the HibMenCY-TT group received a fourth dose of Hib conjugate vaccine due to Hib conjugate vaccine shortage at the time of the study. DTaP immunogenicity and reactogenicity were assessed one month post-vaccination. Pre-defined statistical non-inferiority criteria between Coad and Control groups were met for diphtheria, tetanus and filamentous haemagglutinin but not pertussis toxoid and pertactin. Following vaccination ≥99% of children had anti-diphtheria/anti-tetanus concentrations ≥1.0 IU/ml. Pertussis GMCs were lower in all investigational groups versus Control. In post hoc analyses, pertussis antibody concentrations were above those in infants following 3-dose DTaP primary vaccination in whom efficacy against pertussis was demonstrated (Schmitt, von König, et al., 1996; Schmitt, Schuind, et al., 1996). The reactogenicity profile of the Coad group was similar to DTaP administered alone. Routine booster DTaP was immunogenic with an acceptable safety profile when co-administered with MenACWY-TT vaccine in HibMenCY-TT-primed toddlers. These data support the

  20. Implications of differential age distribution of disease-associated meningococcal lineages for vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brehony, Carina; Trotter, Caroline L.; Ramsay, Mary E.; Chandra, Manosree; Jolley, Keith A.; van der Ende, Arie; Carion, Françoise; Berthelsen, Lene; Hoffmann, Steen; Harðardóttir, Hjördís; Vazquez, Julio A.; Murphy, Karen; Toropainen, Maija; Caniça, Manuela; Ferreira, Eugenia; Diggle, Mathew; Edwards, Giles F.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Stefanelli, Paola; Kriz, Paula; Gray, Steve J.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jacobsson, Susanne; Claus, Heike; Vogel, Ulrich; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Heuberger, Sigrid; Caugant, Dominique A.; Frosch, Matthias; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    New vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account

  1. Incidence and types of adverse events during mass vaccination campaign with the meningococcal a conjugate vaccine (MENAFRIVAC™) in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateudjieu, Jerome; Stoll, Beat; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Yakum, Martin Ndinakie; Mengouo, Marcellin Nimpa; Genton, Blaise

    2016-10-01

    A new vaccine against meningitis A was introduced in Africa meningitis belt in 2010. This study was planned to describe the incidence and types of adverse events following immunization (AEFIs) with a new conjugate vaccine against meningitis A (MenAfrivac™) in a Cameroonian vaccination campaign. The campaign was conducted in Adamawa and North West regions in December 2012 and the AEFIs enhanced surveillance from December 2012 to January 2013. Incidence rates (IR) of overall and serious AEFIs were estimated as well as AEFI incidence rates by type, age group and region. AEFI symptoms were aggregated in System Organ Class (SOC). Of 2 093 381 persons vaccinated, 1352 AEFIs were reported. Of these, 228 (16.9%) were excluded because of not meeting inclusion criteria and 1124 (83.1%) included (IR: 53.7/100 000 doses administered/8 weeks). Of the 82 serious AEFIs reported, 52 (63.2%) met the case definition. 23 (28.1%) were investigated, of which 4 (17.4%) were probably vaccine product-related reactions (IR: 0.2/100 000 doses administered/8 weeks). Fever was the most common reported AEFI with 626 cases (IR: 31.4/100 000 doses administered/8 weeks). The proportion of people with the SOC "Gastrointestinal disorders" was significantly lower in ages 5-15 and 16-29 years than 1-4 years [aRR = 0.63(0.42-0.93) and 0.54(0.36-0.81) respectively]. Incidence and types of AEFI reported during MenAfriVac TM vaccination campaign organized in Cameroon in 2012 did not suggest concern regarding the vaccine safety. Differences in frequency of AEFIs types per age group could guide the monitoring of AEFIs frequency in future campaigns. Efforts are needed to improve the investigation rate of serious AEFIs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of tetravalent a/c/y/w135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine: results from a randomized non-inferiority controlled trial in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe J Guerin

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A is the main causative pathogen of meningitis epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. In recent years, serogroup W135 has also been the cause of epidemics. Mass vaccination campaigns with polysaccharide vaccines are key elements in controlling these epidemics. Facing global vaccine shortage, we explored the use of fractional doses of a licensed A/C/Y/W135 polysaccharide meningococcal vaccine.We conducted a randomized, non-inferiority trial in 750 healthy volunteers 2-19 years old in Mbarara, Uganda, to compare the immune response of the full dose of the vaccine versus fractional doses (1/5 or 1/10. Safety and tolerability data were collected for all subjects during the 4 weeks following the injection. Pre- and post-vaccination sera were analyzed by measuring serum bactericidal activity (SBA with baby rabbit complement. A responder was defined as a subject with a > or =4-fold increase in SBA against a target strain from each serogroup and SBA titer > or =128. For serogroup W135, 94% and 97% of the vaccinees in the 1/5- and 1/10-dose arms, respectively, were responders, versus 94% in the full-dose arm; for serogroup A, 92% and 88% were responders, respectively, versus 95%. Non-inferiority was demonstrated between the full dose and both fractional doses in SBA seroresponse against serogroups W135 and Y, in total population analysis. Non-inferiority was shown between the full and 1/5 doses for serogroup A in the population non-immune prior to vaccination. Non-inferiority was not shown for any of the fractionate doses for serogroup C. Safety and tolerability data were favourable, as observed in other studies.While the advent of conjugate A vaccine is anticipated to largely contribute to control serogroup A outbreaks in Africa, the scale-up of its production will not cover the entire "Meningitis Belt" target population for at least the next 3 to 5 years. In view of the current shortage of meningococcal vaccines for Africa

  3. Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis vaccine may suppress the immune response to subsequent immunization with pneumococcal CRM197-conjugate vaccine (coadministered with quadrivalent meningococcal TT-conjugate vaccine): a randomized, controlled trial⋆.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashani, Mohamed; Heron, Leon; Wong, Melanie; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2017-07-01

    : Due to their antigenic similarities, there is a potential for immunological interaction between tetanus/diphtheria-containing vaccines and carrier proteins presented on conjugate vaccines. The interaction could, unpredictably, result in either enhancement or suppression of the immune response to conjugate vaccines if they are injected soon after or concurrently with diphtheria or tetanus toxoid. We examined this interaction among adult Australian travellers before attending the Hajj pilgrimage of 2015. We randomly assigned each participant to one of three vaccination schedules. Group A received tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) 3-4 weeks before receiving CRM197-conjugated 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) coadministered with TT-conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine (MCV4). Group B received all three vaccines concurrently. Group C received PCV13 and MCV4 3-4 weeks before Tdap. Blood samples collected at baseline, at each vaccination visit and 3-4 weeks after vaccination were tested for the pneumococcal opsonophagocytic assay (OPA). A total of 166 participants aged 18-64 (median 42) years were recruited, 159 completed the study. Compared with the other groups, Group A had significantly ( P  vaccination in seven serotypes of PCV13 (1, 3, 4, 5, 14, 18C and 9V). Additionally, Group A had lower frequency of serorises (≥ 4-fold rise in OPA titres) in serotype5 (79%, p = 0.01) and 18C (73.5%, p = 0.06); whereas Groups B and C had significantly lower frequencies of serorises in Serotype 4 (82%) and 6A (73.5%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was detected across the three groups in frequencies achieving OPA titre ≥ 1:8 post-vaccination. Tdap vaccination 3-4 weeks before administration of PCV13 and MCV4 significantly reduced the GMTs to seven of the 13 pneumococcal serotypes in adults. If multiple vaccination is required before travel, deferring tetanus/diphtheria until after administering the

  4. Safety Monitoring in Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Trials: Description, Challenges, and Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Godwin C; Paranjape, Gandhali; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Ginde, Manisha; Hartmann, Katharina; Viviani, Simonetta; Chaumont, Julie; Martellet, Lionel; Makadi, Marie-Francoise; Ivinson, Karen; Marchetti, Elisa; Herve, Jacques; Kertson, Kim; LaForce, F Marc; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-15

    The determination of the safety profile of any vaccine is critical to its widespread use in any population. In addition, the application of international guidelines to fit local context could be a challenging but important step toward obtaining quality safety data. In clinical studies of PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), safety was monitored immediately after vaccination, at 4-7 days for postimmunization local and systemic reactions, within 28 days for adverse events, and throughout the duration of study for serious adverse events. Initial and ongoing training of sites' staff were undertaken during the studies, and a data and safety monitoring board reviewed all the data during and after the studies. The safety of PsA-TT was evaluated according to international standards despite obvious challenges in remote areas where these studies were conducted. These challenges included the need for uniformity of methods, timely reporting in the context of frequent communication problems, occurrence of seasonal diseases such as malaria and rotavirus diarrhea, and healthcare systems that required improvement. The trials of PsA-TT highlighted the value of a robust vaccine development plan and design so that lessons learned in initial studies were incorporated into the subsequent ones, initial training and periodic retraining, strict monitoring of all procedures, and continuous channel of communication with all stakeholders that enabled the application of international requirements to local settings, with high quality of data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  5. Meningococcal factor H-binding protein vaccines with decreased binding to human complement factor H have enhanced immunogenicity in human factor H transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Raffaella; Granoff, Dan M; Beernink, Peter T

    2013-11-04

    Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a component of a meningococcal vaccine recently licensed in Europe for prevention of serogroup B disease, and a second vaccine in clinical development. The protein specifically binds human factor H (fH), which down-regulates complement activation and enhances resistance to bactericidal activity. There are conflicting data from studies in human fH transgenic mice on whether binding of human fH to fHbp vaccines decreases immunogenicity, and whether mutant fHbp vaccines with decreased fH binding have enhanced immunogenicity. fHbp can be classified into two sub-families based on sequence divergence and immunologic cross-reactivity. Previous studies of mutant fHbp vaccines with low fH binding were from sub-family B, which account for approximately 60% of serogroup B case isolates. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of two mutant sub-family A fHbp vaccines containing single substitutions, T221A or D211A, which resulted in 15- or 30-fold lower affinity for human fH, respectively, than the corresponding control wild-type fHbp vaccine. In transgenic mice with high serum concentrations of human fH, both mutant vaccines elicited significantly higher IgG titers and higher serum bactericidal antibody responses than the control fHbp vaccine that bound human fH. Thus, mutations introduced into a sub-family A fHbp antigen to decrease fH binding can increase protective antibody responses in human fH transgenic mice. Collectively the data suggest that mutant fHbp antigens with decreased fH binding will result in superior vaccines in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel quadrivalent meningococcal CRM-conjugate vaccine given concomitantly with routine vaccinations in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nicola P; Reisinger, Keith S; Johnston, William; Odrljin, Tatjana; Gill, Christopher J; Bedell, Lisa; Dull, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In phase II studies, MenACWY-CRM elicited robust immunologic responses in young infants. We now present results from our pivotal phase III infant immunogenicity/safety study. In this open-label phase III study, we randomized full-term 2-month-old infants to 4 doses of MenACWY-CRM coadministered with routine vaccines at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age or with routine vaccines alone. We monitored for local and systemic reactions and serious adverse events among all study participants and evaluated for sufficiency of the immune responses to MenACWY-CRM through serum bactericidal activity assay with human complement. Bactericidal antibodies were present in 94% to 100% of subjects against each of the serogroups in MenACWY-CRM after the 4-dose series and were 67% to 97% after the first 3 doses. Geometric mean titers were higher after the fourth dose of MenACWY-CRM compared with a single dose of MenACWY-CRM at 12 months of age for all serogroups (range of ratios, 4.5-38). Responses to 3 doses of routine vaccines coadministered with MenACWY-CRM were noninferior to routine vaccinations alone, except for small differences in pneumococcal serotype 6B responses after dose 3 but not dose 4 and pertactin after dose 3. Inclusion of MenACWY-CRM did not affect the safety or reactogenicity profiles of the routine infant vaccine series. A 4-dose series of MenACWY-CRM was highly immunogenic and well tolerated in young infants, and it can be coadministered with routine infant vaccines. Substantial immunity was conferred after the first 3 doses administered at 2, 4, and 6 months of age.

  7. Meningococcal disease: changes in epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Q

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiuzhi Chang,1 Yih-Ling Tzeng,2 David S Stephens1–31Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 2Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 3Laboratories of Microbial Pathogenesis, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, GAAbstract: The human bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis remains a serious worldwide health threat, but progress is being made toward the control of meningococcal infections. This review summarizes current knowledge of the global epidemiology and the pathophysiology of meningococcal disease, as well as recent advances in prevention by new vaccines. Meningococcal disease patterns and incidence can vary dramatically, both geographically and over time in populations, influenced by differences in invasive meningococcal capsular serogroups and specific genotypes designated as ST clonal complexes. Serogroup A (ST-5, ST-7, B (ST-41/44, ST-32, ST-18, ST-269, ST-8, ST-35, C (ST-11, Y (ST-23, ST-167, W-135 (ST-11 and X (ST-181 meningococci currently cause almost all invasive disease. Serogroups B, C, and Y are responsible for the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas, and Oceania; serogroup A has been associated with the highest incidence (up to 1000 per 100,000 cases and large outbreaks of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa and previously Asia; and serogroups W-135 and X have emerged to cause major disease outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. Significant declines in meningococcal disease have occurred in the last decade in many developed countries. In part, the decline is related to the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines. Serogroup C polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines were introduced over a decade ago, first in the UK in a mass vaccination campaign, and are now widely used; multivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines containing serogroups A, C, W-135, and/or Y were first used for adolescents in the US in 2005 and have now expanded

  8. Vacinas meningocócicas conjugadas: eficácia e novas combinações Meningococcal conjugate vaccines: efficacy and new combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Palazzi Sáfadi

    2006-07-01

    quadrivalente meningocócica conjugada representa, enfim, a real possibilidade de uma proteção mais abrangente contra a doença meningocócica, restando ainda a necessidade de se desenvolver uma vacina eficaz contra o meningococo B.OBJECTIVE: Meningococcal disease continues to be a serious public health concern, being associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide, particularly in Brazil. In addition to discussing recent changes in the global epidemiology of meningococcal disease, we also analyze the development and impact of new conjugate vaccines on the prevention of meningococcal disease, with emphasis on the different immunization strategies implemented with these vaccines. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE databases were searched from 1996 to 2006, with emphasis on review articles, clinical trials and epidemiological studies. Information was also sought on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Brazilian Ministry of Health and Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo websites. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Five serogroups (A, B, C, W135 and Y are responsible for virtually all cases of the disease worldwide, with marked regional and temporal differences. The new meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccines (MCC offer unmistakable advantages over polysaccharide vaccines. MCC vaccines generate a more efficient and long-lasting antibody response, inducing immunologic memory and reduction of nasopharyngeal carriage. The immediate results of introducing these vaccines into immunization programs have been encouraging, with a dramatic reduction in the incidence of serogroup C disease, not only in vaccinated, but also in unvaccinated individuals (herd immunity. However, concerns have arisen regarding the long-term effectiveness of these vaccines, especially for infants vaccinated in the routine schedule. CONCLUSIONS: The reported waning of efficacy more than 1 year after routine infant immunization supports alternative schedules incorporating a

  9. Predicted Strain Coverage of a New Meningococcal Multicomponent Vaccine (4CMenB in Spain: Analysis of the Differences with Other European Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Abad

    Full Text Available A novel meningococcal multicomponent vaccine, 4CMenB (Bexsero®, has been approved in Europe, Canada, Australia and US. The potential impact of 4CMenB on strain coverage is being estimated by using Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS, an ELISA assay which measures vaccine antigen expression and diversity in each strain. Here we show the genetic characterization and the 4CMenB potential coverage of Spanish invasive strains (collected during one epidemiological year compared to other European countries and discuss the potential reasons for the lower estimate of coverage in Spain.A panel of 300 strains, a representative sample of all serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis notified cases in Spain from 2009 to 2010, was characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST and FetA variable region determination. 4CMenB vaccine antigens, PorA, factor H binding protein (fHbp, Neisseria Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA and Neisserial adhesin A (NadA were molecularly typed by sequencing. PorA coverage was assigned to strain with VR2 = 4. The levels of expression and cross-reactivity of fHbp, NHBA and NadA were analyzed using MATS ELISA.Global estimated strain coverage by MATS was 68.67% (95% CI: 47.77-84.59%, with 51.33%, 15.33% and 2% of strains covered by one, two and three vaccine antigens, respectively. The predicted strain coverage by individual antigens was: 42% NHBA, 36.33% fHbp, 8.33% PorA and 1.33% NadA. Coverage within the most prevalent clonal complexes (cc was 70.37% for cc 269, 30.19% for cc 213 and 95.83% for cc 32.Clonal complexes (cc distribution accounts for variations in strain coverage, so that country-by-country investigations of strain coverage and cc prevalence are important. Because the cc distribution could also vary over time, which in turn could lead to changes in strain coverage, continuous detailed surveillance and monitoring of vaccine antigens expression is needed in those countries where the multicomponent vaccine is introduced

  10. Uncommon mixed outbreak of pneumococcal and meningococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mainly serotype STN1 and H. influenza (3.4%). The index case had travel history to dollar power, close ... Active surveillance and mass vaccination with multivalent vaccines is required to protect the population. Funding: Ghana Field ... new meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Men A which was introduced in 2010 with mass ...

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine in hypothetic epidemic situation in a middle-income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Giannina; Torres, Juan Pablo; Santolaya, M Elena; Valenzuela, M Teresa; Vega, Jeannette; Chomali, May

    2015-01-01

    NmenB vaccine (4CMenB) is now available, but studies on the cost-effectiveness of vaccine introduction in a country outbreak situation are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of 4CMenB in the context of a hypothetical epidemic outbreak in Chile. We analyzed the direct and indirect costs of acute disease, sequelae and death for each case of meningococcal disease (MD) based on information obtained during the latest NmenB outbreak in Santiago, Chile, occurring between 1993-1999, with an incidence of 5.9/100,000 inhabitants and a mortality of 7.3%. We analyzed the cost of a mass vaccination campaign, considering one dose of 4CMenB for population between 12 months and 25 y of age and 3 doses for infants. Cost-effectiveness analysis was based on 80% and 92% 4CMenB immunogenicity for individual's bellow and over 12 months respectively. Sensitivity analysis was applied to different vaccine costs. The total cost of the epidemic was USD $59,967,351, considering individual cost of each acute case (USD$2,685), sequelae (USD$2,374) and death (USD $408,086). In Chile, the 4CMenB mass vaccination strategy would avoid 215 cases, 61 sequelae, and 16 deaths per year. The strategy would be cost-effective at a vaccine dose cost ≤ of USD$18. Implementation of a mass vaccination campaign to control a hypothetical NmenB outbreak in Chile would be cost-effective at a vaccine cost per dose ≤ of USD$18. This is the first report of a cost-effectiveness analysis for use of 4CMenB as a single intervention strategy to control an epidemic outbreak of NmenB.

  12. Meningococcal polysaccharide A O-acetylation levels do not impact the immunogenicity of the quadrivalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: results from a randomized, controlled phase III study of healthy adults aged 18 to 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisan, Socorro; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Sosa, Nestor; Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Bianco, Véronique; Baine, Yaela; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we compared the immunogenicities of two lots of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) that differed in serogroup A polysaccharide (PS) O-acetylation levels and evaluated their immunogenicities and safety in comparison to a licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS). In this phase III, partially blinded, controlled study, 1,170 healthy subjects aged 18 to 25 years were randomized (1:1:1) to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT lot A (ACWY-A) (68% O-acetylation), MenACWY-TT lot B (ACWY-B) (92% O-acetylation), or Men-PS (82% O-acetylation). Immunogenicity was evaluated in terms of serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit serum bactericidal activity [rSBA]). Solicited symptoms, unsolicited adverse events (AEs), and serious AEs (SAEs) were recorded. The immunogenicities, in terms of rSBA geometric mean titers, were comparable for both lots of MenACWY-TT. The vaccine response rates across the serogroups were 79.1 to 97.0% in the two ACWY groups and 73.7 to 94.1% in the Men-PS group. All subjects achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:8 for all serogroups. All subjects in the two ACWY groups and 99.5 to 100% in the Men-PS group achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:128. Pain was the most common solicited local symptom and was reported more frequently in the ACWY group (53.9 to 54.7%) than in the Men-PS group (36.8%). The most common solicited general symptoms were fatigue and headache, which were reported by 28.6 to 30.3% and 26.9 to 31.0% of subjects, respectively. Two subjects reported SAEs; one SAE was considered to be related to vaccination (blighted ovum; ACWY-B group). The level of serogroup A PS O-acetylation did not affect vaccine immunogenicity. MenACWY-TT (lot A) was not inferior to Men-PS in terms of vaccine response and was well tolerated.

  13. Bactericidal activity of sera from adolescents vaccinated with bivalent rLP2086 against meningococcal serogroup B outbreak strains from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Hawkins, Julio Cesar; Liberator, Paul; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Andrew, Lubomira; Hao, Li; Jones, Thomas R; McNeil, Lisa K; O'Neill, Robert E; Perez, John L; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2017-03-13

    Bivalent rLP2086 (Trumenba®; MenB-FHbp), composed of two factor H binding proteins (FHbps), is a vaccine approved in the United States for prevention of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Bactericidal activity of sera from subjects vaccinated with bivalent rLP2086 was assessed against MnB isolates from recent disease outbreaks in France. MnB isolates from IMD cases were characterized by whole genome sequencing and FHbp expression was assessed using a flow cytometry-based assay. Sera from subjects (11-Bactericidal activity was measured in serum bactericidal assays using human complement (hSBAs). The response rate (RR) represents the percentage of subjects with an hSBA titer ⩾1:4. The six MnB outbreak isolates expressed diverse FHbp variants: A22, B03, B24 (two isolates), B44, and B228. FHbp expression levels ranged from 1309 to 8305 (mean fluorescence intensity units). The RR of preimmune sera from subjects was 7% to 27%. RRs increased for all isolates after each vaccine dose. After two doses, RRs ranged from 40% to 93%. After dose 3, RRs were ⩾73% for all isolates (range, 73%-100%). Each of the representative French outbreak isolates was killed by sera from subjects vaccinated with bivalent rLP2086. Vaccination elicited an immune response with bactericidal activity against these diverse isolates in a large proportion of subjects at risk. These results provide additional support for the licensure strategy of testing MnB strains expressing vaccine-heterologous FHbp variants in hSBAs and further illustrate the breadth of efficacy of this protein-based MnB vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine (Trumenba(®)): A Review in Active Immunization Against Invasive Meningococcal Group B Disease in Individuals Aged 10-25 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Dhillon, Sohita

    2015-10-01

    Bivalent rLP2086 vaccine (Trumenba(®)) [hereafter referred to as rLP2086] is a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) vaccine recently licensed in the USA for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by MenB in individuals 10-25 years of age. rLP2086, which contains two variants of the meningococcal surface protein factor H-binding protein (fHBP), was approved by the FDA under the accelerated approval pathway after the immunogenicity of the vaccine was demonstrated in several phase II trials. This article reviews the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of rLP2086 as demonstrated in the trials with a focus on the US setting and on use of the vaccine as per FDA-approved labeling. rLP2086 is approved in the USA as a three-dose series administered in a 0-, 2-, and 6-month schedule. In the phase II trials, rLP2086 elicited a robust immune response against a panel of MenB test strains. A strong immune response was evident in a marked proportion of subjects after two vaccine doses, with a further increase after a third dose. The four primary test strains used were selected to be representative of MenB strains prevalent in the USA, with each expressing an fHBP variant heterologous to the vaccine antigens. rLP2086 was generally well tolerated in the trials, with most adverse reactions being mild to moderate in severity. Although some questions remain, including the duration of the protective response, rLP2086 vaccine has the potential to be a valuable tool for the prevention of invasive MenB disease.

  15. The immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine when co-administered with conjugated meningococcal C vaccine to healthy children: A phase IIIb, randomized, multi-center study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, Paolo; Esposito, Susanna; Bona, Gianni; Cuccia, Mario; Desole, Maria Giuseppina; Ferrera, Giuseppe; Gabutti, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Angelo; Salvini, Filippo; Henry, Ouzama; Povey, Michael; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-08-05

    Multiple vaccination visits and administrations can be stressful for infants, parents and healthcare providers. Multivalent combination vaccines can deliver the required number of antigens in fewer injections and clinic visits, while vaccine co-administration can also reduce the number of visits. This non-inferiority study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of co-administering a combined measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine with conjugated meningococcal C (MenC) vaccine in a large cohort of healthy Italian toddlers. Healthy subjects aged 13-15months were randomized (2:1:1) to receive single doses of either: co-administered MMRV+MenC at the same visit (MMRV+MenC group); or MMRV followed 42days later by MenC (MMRV group); or MenC followed 42days later by MMRV (MenC group). Blood samples were collected before and 43days after vaccination. Antibody titers against MMRV were measured using ELISA. Functional-anti-meningococcal-serogroup activity (rSBAMenC) was assessed using a serum bactericidal test. Solicited local and general reactions were recorded for up to 4 and 42days post-vaccination, respectively. Non-inferiority of MMRV+MenC to MMRV (post-dose-1 seroconversion rates) and MMRV+MenC to MenC (post-dose-1 seroprotection rates) was achieved if the lower limit (LL) of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the group difference was ⩾-10% for each antigen. 716 subjects were enrolled in the study. At 42days post-vaccination, the MMRV seroconversion rates were 99.3% (measles), 94.5% (mumps), 100% (rubella) and 99.7% (varicella) in the MMRV+MenC group, and 99.4%, 93.2%, 100% and 100%, respectively, in the MMRV group. The seroprotection rates against rSBA-MenC were 98.3% in the MMRV+MenC group and 99.3% in the MenC group. Non-inferiority was reached for all the vaccine antigens. The safety profiles were as expected for these vaccines. The immune responses elicited by co-administered MMRV+MenC were non-inferior to those elicited by MMRV or MenC alone and

  16. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Beernink

    Full Text Available The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH, is fH-binding protein (fHbp, which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001 and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003. By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002, and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001. Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  17. Rapid surveillance for health events following a mass meningococcal B vaccine program in a university setting: A Canadian Immunization Research Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, J M; MacDougall, D M; Halperin, B A; Swain, A; Halperin, S A; Top, K A; McNeil, S A; MacKinnon-Cameron, D; Marty, K; De Serres, G; Dubé, E; Bettinger, J A

    2016-07-25

    An outbreak of Neisseria meningitidis serotype B infection occurred at a small residential university; public health announced an organizational vaccination program with the 4-component Meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine (Bexsero(TM), Novartis/GlaxoSmithKline Inc.) several days later. Since there were limited published data on reactogenicity of 4CMenB in persons over 17years of age, this study sought to conduct rapid surveillance of health events in vaccinees and controls using an online survey. Vaccine uptake was 84.7% for dose 1 (2967/3500) and 70% (2456/3500) for dose 2; the survey response rates were 33.0% (987/2967) and 18.7% (459/2456) in dose 1 and dose 1 recipients respectively, and 12% in unvaccinated individuals (63/533). Most students were 20-29years of age (vaccinees, 64.0%; controls, 74.0). A new health problem or worsening of an existing health problem was reported by 30.0% and 30.3% of vaccine recipients after doses 1 and 2 respectively; and by 15.9% of controls. These health problems interfered with the ability to perform normal activities in most vaccinees reporting these events (74.7% post dose 1; 62.6% post dose 2), and in 60% of controls. The health problems led to a health care provider visit (including emergency room) in 12.8% and 14.4% of vaccinees post doses 1 and 2, respectively and in 40% of controls. The most common reactions in vaccinees were injection site reactions (20.6% post dose 1, 16.1% post dose 20 and non-specific systemic complaints (22.6% post dose 1, 17.6% post dose 2). No hospitalizations were reported. An online surveillance program during an emergency meningococcal B vaccine program was successfully implemented, and detected higher rates of health events in vaccinees compared to controls, and high rates of both vaccinees and controls seeking medical attention. The types of adverse events reported by young adult vaccinees were consistent with those previously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Complement Factor H on anti-FHbp Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses of Infant Rhesus Macaques Boosted with a Licensed Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FHhigh), and six with FHlow baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FHhigh phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pbactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FHhigh, the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. PMID:26562320

  19. Effect of complement Factor H on anti-FHbp serum bactericidal antibody responses of infant rhesus macaques boosted with a licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-12-16

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FH(high)), and six with FH(low) baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FH(high) phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pb deposition and bactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FH(high), the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Three doses of an experimental detoxified L3-derived lipooligosaccharide meningococcal vaccine offer good safety but low immunogenicity in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvehí, Pablo; Boutriau, Dominique; Casellas, Javier; Weynants, Vincent; Feron, Christiane; Poolman, Jan

    2010-09-01

    This open, randomized phase I study evaluated the safety and reactogenicity of an experimental meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) vaccine obtained from outer membrane vesicle detoxified L3-derived lipooligosaccharide. Healthy young adults (n = 150) were randomized to receive either experimental vaccine (provided in five formulations, n = 25 in each group) or VA-Mengoc-BC (control, n = 25) administered on a 0- to 6-week/6-month schedule. Serum bactericidal assays performed against three MenB wild-type strains assessed the immune response, defined as a 4-fold increase from pre- to postvaccination. No serious adverse events related to vaccination were reported. Pain at the injection site, fatigue, and headache were the most commonly reported adverse events. Solicited adverse events graded level 3 (i.e., preventing daily activity) were pain (up to 17% of the test subjects versus 32% of the controls), fatigue (up to 12% of the test subjects versus 8% of the controls), and headache (up to 4% of any group). Swelling graded level 3 (greater than 50 mm) occurred in up to 4% of the test subjects versus 8% of the controls. The immune responses ranged from 5% to 36% across experimental vaccines for the L3 H44-76 strain (versus 27% for the control), from 0% to 11% for the L3 NZ98/124 strain (versus 23% for the control), and from 0% to 13% for the L2 760676 strain (versus 59% for the control). All geometric mean titers were below those measured with the control vaccine. The five experimental formulations were safe and well tolerated but tended to be less immunogenic than the control vaccine.

  1. Meningococcal disease serogroup C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas IE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Félix O Dickinson1, Antonio E Pérez1, Iván E Cuevas21Department of Epidemiology, “Pedro Kourí” Institute, Havana, Cuba; 2Pharmacovigilance Group, Finlay Institute, Havana, CubaAbstract: Despite current advances in antibiotic therapy and vaccines, meningococcal disease serogroup C (MDC remains a serious threat to global health, particularly in countries in North and Latin America, Europe, and Asia. MDC is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and neurological sequelae and it is a heavy economic burden. At the individual level, despite advances in antibiotics and supportive therapies, case fatality rate remains nearly 10% and severe neurological sequelae are frequent. At the population level, prevention and control of infection is more challenging. The main approaches include health education, providing information to the public, specific treatment, chemoprophylaxis, and the use of vaccines. Plain and conjugate meningococcal C polysaccharide vaccines are considered safe, are well tolerated, and have been used successfully for over 30 years. Most high-income countries use vaccination as a part of public health strategies, and different meningococcal C vaccination schedules have proven to be effective in reducing incidence. This is particularly so with conjugate vaccines, which have been found to induce immunogenicity in infants (the age group with the highest incidence rates of disease, stimulate immunologic memory, have longer effects, not lead to hyporesponsiveness with repeated dosing, and decrease acquisition of nasopharyngeal carriage, inducing herd immunity. Antibiotics are considered a cornerstone of MDC treatment and must be administered empirically as soon as possible. The choice of which antibiotic to use should be made based on local antibiotic resistance, availability, and circulating strains. Excellent options for a 7-day course are penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone and

  2. The role of anti-NHba antibody in bactericidal activity elicited by the meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, MenB-4C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Elizabeth; Lujan, Eduardo; Giuntini, Serena; Vu, David M; Granoff, Dan M

    2017-07-24

    MenB-4C (Bexsero®) is a multicomponent serogroup B meningococcal vaccine. For vaccine licensure, efficacy was inferred from serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) against three antigen-specific indicator strains. The bactericidal role of antibody to the fourth vaccine antigen, Neisserial Heparin binding antigen (NHba), is incompletely understood. We identified nine adults immunized with two or three doses of MenB-4C who had sufficient volumes of sera and >3-fold increases in SBA titer against a strain with high NHba expression, which was mismatched with the other three MenB-4C antigens that elicit SBA. Using 1month-post-immunization sera we measured the effect of depletion of anti-NHba and/or anti-Factor H binding protein (FHbp) antibodies on SBA. Against three strains matched with the vaccine only for NHba, depletion of anti-NHba decreased SBA titers by an average of 43-79% compared to mock-adsorbed sera (Pvaccine antigen), depletion of anti-FHbp antibodies also decreased SBA by 45-64% (Pvaccine antigen, depletion of anti-NHba decreased SBA by an average of 26%, compared to mock-adsorbed sera (Panti-FHbp antibody decreased SBA by 92% (PAnti-NHba antibody can contribute to SBA elicited by MenB-4C, particularly in concert with anti-FHbp antibody. However, some high NHba-expressing strains are resistant, even with an exact match between the amino acid sequence of the vaccine and strain antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A randomized, phase 1/2 trial of the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of bivalent rLP2086 meningococcal B vaccine in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinon-Torres, Federico; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Bernaola-Iturbe, Enrique; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Jiang, Qin; Perez, John L

    2014-09-08

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease in infants. A conserved, surface-exposed lipoprotein, LP2086 (a factor H-binding protein [fHBP]), is a promising MnB vaccine target. A bivalent, recombinant vaccine targeting the fHBP (rLP2086) of MnB was developed. This phase 1/2 clinical study was designed to assess the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of a 4-dose series of the rLP2086 vaccine at 20-, 60-, 120-, or 200-μg dose levels in vaccine-naive infants when given with routine childhood vaccines. The study was to consist of two phases: a single-blind sentinel phase and an open-label full enrollment phase. During the sentinel phase, randomization of subjects to the next higher dose was delayed pending a 14-day safety review of dose 1 of the preceding dose cohort. The full enrollment phase was to occur after completion of the sentinel phase. Local reactions were generally mild and adverse events infrequent; however, after only 46 infants were randomized into the study, fever rates were 64% and 90% in subjects receiving one 20- or 60-μg rLP2086 dose, respectively. Most fevers were group and 1 subject in the 60-μg group experienced fevers >39.0°C; no fevers were >40.0°C. Due to these high fever rates, the study was terminated early. No immunogenicity data were collected. This report discusses the safety and acceptability of rLP2086 in infants after one 20- or 60-μg dose. Due to the high fever rate experienced in the 20- and 60-μg groups, rLP2086 in the current formulation may not be acceptable for infants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The Changing Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Amanda; MacNeil, Jessica

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of meningococcal disease is at an historic low in the United States, but prevention remains a priority because of the devastating outcomes and risk for outbreaks. Available vaccines are recommended routinely for persons at increased risk for disease to protect against all major serogroups of Neisseria meningitidis circulating in the United States. Although vaccination has virtually eliminated serogroup A meningococcal outbreaks from the Meningitis Belt of Africa and reduced the incidence of serogroup C disease worldwide, eradication of N meningitidis will unlikely be achieved by currently available vaccines because of the continued carriage and transmission of nonencapsulated organisms. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Meningococcal Immunizations for Preteens and Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-11

    This podcast provides information about vaccine recommendations to help prevent meningococcal disease in preteens and teens.  Created: 8/11/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 8/11/2015.

  6. Randomized Trial to Compare the Immunogenicity and Safety of a CRM or TT Conjugated Quadrivalent Meningococcal Vaccine in Teenagers who Received a CRM or TT Conjugated Serogroup C Vaccine at Preschool Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, David A; Andrews, Nick; Waight, Pauline; Yung, Chee-Fu; Southern, Jo; Bai, Xilian; Findlow, Helen; Matheson, Mary; England, Anna; Hallis, Bassam; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Protection after meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate (MCC) vaccination in early childhood is short-lived. Boosting with a quadrivalent vaccine in teenage years, a high-risk period for MenC disease, should protect against additional serogroups but might compromise MenC response. The carrier protein in the primary MCC vaccine determines the response to MCC booster in toddlers, but the relationship between primary vaccine and booster given later is unclear. This study compared responses to a CRM-conjugated or tetanus toxoid (TT)-conjugated MenACWY vaccine in teenagers primed with different MCC vaccines at preschool age. Ninety-three teenagers (16-19 years), who were previously randomized at age 3-6 years to receive single-dose MCC-CRM or MCC-TT, were randomized to receive either MenACWY-CRM or MenACWY-TT booster. Serum bactericidal antibodies (SBA, protective titer ≥ 8) were measured before, 1 month and 6 or 9 months after boosting. Preboosting, MCC-TT-primed teenagers had significantly higher MenC SBA titers than those MCC-CRM-primed (P = 0.02). Postboosting, both MenACWY vaccines induced protective SBA titers to all 4 serogroups in most participants (≥ 98% at 1 month and ≥ 90% by 9 months postboost). The highest MenC SBA titers were seen in those MCC-TT-primed and MenACWY-TT-boosted [geometric mean titer (GMT) ~ 22,000] followed by those boosted with MenACWY-CRM irrespective of priming (GMT ~ 12,000) and then those MCC-CRM-primed and MenACWY-TT-boosted (GMT ~ 5500). The estimated postbooster MenC SBA decline beyond 1 month was ~40% as time since booster doubles. Both vaccines were well tolerated with no attributable serious adverse events. Both MenACWY vaccines safely induced protective sustained antibody responses against all targeted serogroups in MCC-primed teenagers.

  7. Encefalomielite disseminada aguda e vacinação antimeningocócica A e C: relato de caso Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: association with meningococcal A and C vaccine: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco O. Py

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso clínico de paciente do sexo feminino, de 25 anos, que desenvolveu encefalomielite aguda disseminada (EDA iniciando-se cinco dias após vacinação para meningococcus A e C (Pasteur-Meríeux na campanha de vacinação realizada em dezembro de 1995 na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Houve excelente resposta clínica e neurorradiológica após tratamento com corticosteróides em altas doses (pulsoterapia. Não foram encontrados relatos sobre a associação entre a vacina antimeningocócica e a EDA. A associação entre EDA e leptospirose ou infecções por Mycoplasma sugerem porém que a síndrome pode ser precipitada não só por viroses ou vacinação antiviral como também pela exposição do organismo a proteínas e polissacarídeos de bactérias.A 25-year-old woman developed acute disseminated post-vaccinal encephalomyelitis (ADEM following vaccination with A plus C meningococcal vaccine (Pasteur-Merieux. Fast disappearance of symptoms and gradual resolution of MR1 demyelinating lesions occurred after steroid treatment with high doses of intravenous methylprednisolone. To our knowledge, ADEM has not been previously described in association with meningococcal vaccine. Although most cases of ADEM occur following viral infections and vaccination, the syndrome has previously been related to leptospirosis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections. This suggests that it may also be related to exposure to polysaccharide-protein vaccines such as the Group A plus Group C meningococcal vaccine.

  8. Invasive meningococcal disease

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    Vanessa L. Strelow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD is a major public health and continues to cause substantial mortality and morbidity. Serotype C is the most frequent in Brazil. The clinical spectrum of IMD is broad (meningitis, meningococcemia or both and the clinical evolution may be unpredictable. Main features associated with mortality are: age higher than 50 years old, seizures, shock, and meningococcemia without meningitis. Blood cultures should be obtained immediately. Lumbar puncture can be performed without previous computed tomography scan (CT in most cases. Clinical features can be useful to predic patients where an abnormal CT scan is likely. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture and Gram stain should always be required. Latex agglutination sensitivity is highly variable. Polymerase chain reaction is specially useful when other methods are negative or delayed. Usually ceftriaxone should not be delayed while awaiting CSF study or CT. Dexamethasone can be used in meningococcal meningitis. Early suspicion of IMD and antibiotic in primary care before hospitalization, rapid transportation to a hospital, and stabilization in an intensive-care unit has substantially reduced the case-fatality rate. Vaccines against serotypes A, C, W-135, and Y are available while vaccines against serotype B are expected.

  9. Meningococcal serogroup B strain coverage of the multicomponent 4CMenB vaccine with corresponding regional distribution and clinical characteristics in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2007-08 and 2014-15: a qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Newbold, Lynne; Slater, Stephanie; Stella, Maria; Moschioni, Monica; Lucidarme, Jay; De Paola, Rosita; Giuliani, Maria; Serino, Laura; Gray, Stephen J; Clark, Stephen A; Findlow, Jamie; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N; Borrow, Ray

    2017-07-01

    The UK introduced 4CMenB-a multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease-into the national infant immunisation programme in September, 2015. The Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) was used to estimate coverage by 4CMenB of invasive meningococcal group B isolates obtained during 2007-08 in England and Wales (MATS coverage). We aimed to repeat the MATS survey for invasive meningococcal group B isolates obtained during 2014-15, before 4CMenB introduction; compare strain coverage between 2007-08 and 2014-15; and investigate associations between MATS coverage, age, region, and disease outcomes. Invasive serogroup B meningococcal isolates from cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2014-15 were assayed using MATS and compared with 2007-08 data. MATS coverage was assessed by geographical region and age group. Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes were assessed according to MATS coverage for 2014-15 English cases. In 2014-15, 165 of 251 (66%; 95% CI 52-80) meningococcal group B isolates were estimated by MATS to be covered by 4CMenB, compared with 391 of 535 (73%; 95% CI 57-87) in 2007-08. The proportion of MATS-positive isolates with one vaccine antigen increased from 23% (122 of 535) in 2007-08 to 31% (78 of 251) in 2014-15, whereas the proportion with more than one antigen fell from 50% (269 of 535) to 35% (87 of 251). This effect reflected changes in circulating strains, particularly ST-269 clonal complex strains. MATS coverage increased with age, varied by geographical region, and was associated with more severe disease. In 2014-15, two-thirds of meningococcal group B isolates were predicted to be covered by 4CMenB. Temporal changes in MATS coverage underscore the need for continued monitoring of antigen expression and diversity, particularly in countries with 4CMenB programmes. Public Health England, GlaxoSmithKline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical presentation of meningococcal disease in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, C; Bosis, S; Semino, M; Senatore, L; Principi, N; Esposito, S

    2012-06-01

    Although relatively rare, meningococcal disease represents a global health problem being still the leading infectious cause of death in childhood with an overall mortality around 8%. Meningococcal meningitis is the most commonly recognized presentation, accounting for 80% to 85% of all reported cases of meningococcal disease (in half of these cases sepsis is also present concomitantly). The remaining 15-20% of cases are most commonly bloodstream infections only. Meningococcal serogroups A, B, and C account for most cases of meningococcal disease throughout the world. Recently, serogroups W-135 and X (predominantly in Africa) and group Y (in the United States and European countries) have emerged as important disease-causing isolates. Despite recent advances in medical management, the mortality rate of fulminant meningococcemia ranges from 15% to 30%. However, among survivors, 10-30% could have long term sequelae (i.e. sensoneural hearing loss, seizure, motor problems, hydrocephalus, mental retardation, and cognitive and behavioral problems). Considering the clinical severity of meningococcal disease, prevention represents the first approach for avoiding serious complications and possible deaths. The availability of new vaccines able to cover the emerging serotypes including A and Y as well as the availability on the market of new products that could prevent meningococcal B infection represent a great opportunity for the decrease of the burden of this complicated disease.

  11. Phase 1 testing of detoxified LPS/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine with and without synthetic CPG 7909 adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Greenberg, Nancy; Billington, Melissa; Zhang, Lei; DeFilippi, Christopher; May, Ryan C; Bajwa, Kanwaldeep K

    2015-11-27

    Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) are a leading cause of nosocomial infection and sepsis. Increasing multi-antibiotic resistance has left clinicians with fewer therapeutic options. Antibodies to GNB lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin) have reduced morbidity and mortality as a result of infection and are not subject to the resistance mechanisms deployed by bacteria against antibiotics. In this phase 1 study, we administered a vaccine that elicits antibodies against a highly conserved portion of LPS with and without a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist as adjuvant. A vaccine composed of the detoxified LPS (dLPS) from E. coli O111:B4 (J5 mutant) non-covalently complexed to group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP). Twenty healthy adult subjects received three doses at 0, 29 and 59 days of antigen (10 μg dLPS) with or without CPG 7909 (250 or 500 μg). Subjects were evaluated for local and systemic adverse effects and laboratory findings. Anti-J5 LPS IgG and IgM antibody levels were measured by electrochemiluminesence. Due to premature study termination, not all subjects received all three doses. All vaccine formulations were well-tolerated with no local or systemic events of greater than moderate severity. The vaccine alone group achieved a ≥ 4-fold "responder" response in IgG and IgM antibody in only one of 6 subjects. In contrast, the vaccine plus CPG 7909 groups appeared to have earlier and more sustained (to 180 days) responses, greater mean-fold increases, and a higher proportion of "responders" achieving ≥ 4-fold increases over baseline. Although the study was halted before all enrolled subjects received all three doses, the J5dLPS/OMP vaccine, with or without CpG adjuvant, was safe and well-tolerated. The inclusion of CpG increased the number of subjects with a ≥ 4-fold antibody response, evident even after the second of three planned doses. A vaccine comprising J5dLPS/OMP antigen with CpG adjuvant merits further investigation. Clinical

  12. Safety and Immunogenicity of the Quadrivalent Meningococcal Serogroups A, C, W and Y Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Vaccine Coadministered With Routine Childhood Vaccines in European Infants: An Open, Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino Arribas, Jose Manuel; Carmona Martínez, Alfonso; Horn, Michael; Perez Porcuna, Xavier Maria; Otero Reigada, Maria Del Carmen; Marès Bermúdez, Josep; Centeno Malfaz, Fernando; Miranda, Mariano; Mendez, Maria; Garcia Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Wittermann, Christoph; Bleckmann, Gerhard; Fischbach, Thomas; Kolhe, Devayani; van der Wielen, Marie; Baine, Yaela

    2017-04-01

    This was the first study evaluating the immunogenicity and safety of the quadrivalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) coadministered with routine childhood vaccines in young infants. In this open, randomized, controlled, phase III study (NCT01144663), 2095 infants (ages 6-12 weeks) were randomized (1:1:1:1) into 4 groups to receive MenACWY-TT at 2, 3, 4 and 12 months of age, or MenACWY-TT, MenC-cross-reactive material (CRM197) or MenC-TT at 2, 4 and 12 months of age. All participants received PHiD-CV and DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib at 2, 3, 4 and 12 months of age. Immune responses were measured by serum bactericidal activity assays using rabbit (rSBA) and human (hSBA) complement. Solicited and unsolicited symptoms were recorded during 8 and 31 days post-vaccination, respectively, and serious adverse events throughout the study. Noninferiority of immune responses to MenC induced by 2 or 3 doses of MenACWY-TT versus 2 doses of MenC-TT or MenC-CRM197 was demonstrated. Predefined criteria for the immunogenicity of MenACWY-TT to MenA, MenW and MenY were met. One month after 2 or 3 primary MenACWY-TT doses, ≥93.1% and ≥88.5% of infants had rSBA and hSBA titers ≥1:8 for all serogroups. The robust increases in rSBA and hSBA titers observed for all vaccine serogroups postbooster vaccination suggested that MenACWY-TT induced immune memory. MenACWY-TT coadministered with childhood vaccines had a clinically acceptable safety profile. This study supports the coadministration of MenACWY-TT with routine childhood vaccines as 2 or 3 primary doses during infancy followed by a booster dose in the second year of life.

  13. Susceptibility of Meningococcal Strains Responsible for Two Serogroup B Outbreaks on U.S. University Campuses to Serum Bactericidal Activity Elicited by the MenB-4C Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Raffaella; Beernink, Peter T; Giuntini, Serena; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-12-01

    In 2013 and 2014, two U.S. universities had meningococcal serogroup B outbreaks (a total of 14 cases) caused by strains from two different clonal complexes. To control the outbreaks, students were immunized with a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (Novartis) that was not yet licensed in the United States. The vaccine (referred to as MenB-4C) contains four components capable of eliciting bactericidal activity. Both outbreak strains had high expression levels of two of the vaccine antigens (subfamily B factor H binding protein [FHbp] and neisserial heparin binding antigen [NHba]); the university B outbreak strain also had moderate expression of a third antigen, NadA. We investigated the bactericidal activity of sera from mice immunized with FHbp, NHba, or NadA and sera from MenB-4C-immunized infant macaques and an adult human. The postimmunization bactericidal activity of the macaque or human serum against isolates from university B with FHbp identification (ID) 1 that exactly matched the vaccine FHbp sequence variant was 8- to 21-fold higher than that against isolates from university A with FHbp ID 276 (96% identity to the vaccine antigen). Based on the bactericidal activity of mouse antisera to FHbp, NadA, or NHba and macaque or human postimmunization serum that had been depleted of anti-FHbp antibody, the bactericidal activity against both outbreak strains largely or entirely resulted from antibodies to FHbp. Thus, despite the high level of strain expression of FHbp from a subfamily that matched the vaccine antigen, there can be large differences in anti-FHbp bactericidal activity induced by MenB-4C vaccination. Further, strains with moderate to high NadA and/or NHba expression can be resistant to anti-NadA or anti-NHba bactericidal activity elicited by MenB-4C vaccination. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Characterization of fHbp, nhba (gna2132), nadA, porA, and sequence type in group B meningococcal case isolates collected in England and Wales during January 2008 and potential coverage of an investigational group B meningococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Comanducci, Maurizio; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Guiver, Malcolm; Vallely, Pamela J; Oster, Philipp; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Borrow, Ray

    2010-06-01

    Invasive disease caused by meningococcal capsular groups A, C, W-135, and Y is now preventable by means of glycoconjugate vaccines that target their respective polysaccharide capsules. The capsule of group B meningococci (MenB) is poorly immunogenic and may induce autoimmunity. Vaccines based on the major immunodominant surface porin, PorA, are effective against clonal epidemics but, thus far, have a limited scope of coverage against the wider MenB population at large. In an alternative approach, the first-generation, investigational, recombinant MenB (rMenB) plus outer membrane vesicle (OMV) (rMenB-OMV) vaccine contains a number of relatively conserved surface proteins, fHBP, NHBA (previously GNA2132), and NadA, alongside PorA P1.4-containing OMVs from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccine. MenB currently accounts for approximately 90% of cases of meningococcal disease in England and Wales. To assess potential rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage of pathogenic MenB isolates within this region, all English and Welsh MenB case isolates from January 2008 (n = 87) were genetically characterized with respect to fHBP, NHBA, NadA, and PorA. Alleles for fHbp, nhba, and porA were identified in all of the isolates, of which 22% were also found to harbor nadA alleles. On the basis of genotypic data and predicted immunological cross-reactivity, the potential level of rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage in England and Wales ranges from 66% to 100%.

  15. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) administered to adults aged 56 Years and older: results of an open-label, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; El-Ayoubi, Nabil; Ghanem, Soha; Hajar, Farah; Bianco, Veronique; Miller, Jacqueline M; Mesaros, Narcisa

    2013-05-01

    The burden of invasive meningococcal disease is substantial in older adults in whom the case fatality rate is high. Travelers to regions with high rates of meningococcal disease, such as Hajj pilgrims, are at increased risk of meningococcal infection, and disease transmission from travelers to their close contacts has been documented. In younger individuals, meningococcal conjugate vaccines offer advantages over polysaccharide vaccines in terms of duration of protection and boostability, and induction of herd immune effects through reductions in nasopharyngeal carriage of meningococci. To date, few data are available evaluating meningococcal conjugate vaccine use in adults >55 years of age. To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y vaccine with all serogroups conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MenACWY-TT, Nimenrix™, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) and a licensed quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS, Mencevax™ GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) in adults >55 years of age. This was a phase IIIb, open-label, randomized (3:1), controlled study conducted at one study center in Lebanon. A total of 400 healthy adults between 56 and 103 years of age without previous MenPS or tetanus toxoid vaccination within the previous 5 years or meningococcal conjugate vaccination at any time previously were included. They received a single-dose vaccination with MenACWY-TT or MenPS with blood sampling before and 1 month after vaccination. The main outcome measures were serum bactericidal activity (rabbit complement source: rSBA) vaccine response (VR) rate [rSBA titer of ≥1:32 in initially seronegative subjects (rSBA titer <1:8); ≥4-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers between 1:8 and 1:128, and ≥2-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers ≥1:128]. The percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128 and rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were assessed. Solicited adverse events

  16. Safety, immunogenicity, and tolerability of meningococcal serogroup B bivalent recombinant lipoprotein 2086 vaccine in healthy adolescents: a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter C; Marshall, Helen S; Nissen, Michael D; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Garcés-Sánchez, Maria; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Beeslaar, Johannes; Szenborn, Leszek; Wysocki, Jacek; Eiden, Joseph; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Perez, John L

    2012-08-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease, but a broadly protective vaccine is not currently licensed. A bivalent recombinant factor H-binding protein vaccine (recombinant lipoprotein 2086) has been developed to provide broad coverage against diverse invasive meningococcus serogroup B strains. Our aim was to test the immune response of this vaccine. This randomised, placebo-controlled trial enrolled healthy adolescents from 25 sites in Australia, Poland, and Spain. Exclusion criteria were previous invasive meningococcal disease or serogroup B vaccination, previous adverse reaction or known hypersensitivity to the vaccine, any significant comorbidities, and immunosuppressive therapy or receipt of blood products in the past 6 months. Participants were randomly assigned with a computerised block randomisation scheme to receive ascending doses of vaccine (60, 120, or 200 μg) or placebo at 0, 2, and 6 months. Principal investigators, participants and their guardians, and laboratory personnel were masked to the allocation; dispensing staff were not. Immunogenicity was measured by serum bactericidal assays using human complement (hSBA) against eight diverse meningococcus serogroup B strains. The co-primary endpoints were seroconversion for the two indicator strains (PMB1745 and PMB17) analysed by the Clopper-Pearson method. Local and systemic reactions and adverse events were recorded. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00808028. 539 participants were enrolled and 511 received all three study vaccinations--116 in the placebo group, 21 in the 60 μg group, 191 in the 120 μg group, and 183 in the 200 μg group. The proportion of participants responding with an hSBA titre equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantitation of the hSBA assays (reciprcocal titres of 7 to 18, depending on test strain) was similar for the two largest doses and ranged from 75·6 to 100·0% for the 120 μg dose and 67·9 to

  17. Immunogenicity and tolerability of recombinant serogroup B meningococcal vaccine administered with or without routine infant vaccinations according to different immunization schedules: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossger, Nicoletta; Snape, Matthew D; Yu, Ly-Mee; Finn, Adam; Bona, Gianni; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Sokal, Etienne; Becker, Birgitta; Kieninger, Dorothee; Prymula, Roman; Dull, Peter; Ypma, Ellen; Toneatto, Daniela; Kimura, Alan; Pollard, Andrew J

    2012-02-08

    In the absence of an effective vaccine, serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) remains a major cause of invasive disease in early childhood in developed countries. To determine the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of a multicomponent MenB vaccine (4CMenB) and routine infant vaccines when given either concomitantly or separately. Phase 2b, multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, randomized controlled study of 1885 infants enrolled at age 2 months from August 2008 to July 2010 in Europe. Participants were randomized 2:2:1:1 to receive (1) 4CMenB at 2, 4, and 6 months with routine vaccines (7-valent pneumococcal and combined diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, inactivated polio, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines); (2) 4CMenB at 2, 4, and 6 months and routine vaccines at 3, 5, and 7 months; (3) 4CMenB with routine vaccines at 2, 3, and 4 months; or (4) routine vaccines alone at 2, 3, and 4 months. Percentage of participants with human complement serum bactericidal activity (hSBA) titer of 1:5 or greater against 3 MenB strains specific for vaccine antigens (NZ98/254, 44/76-SL, and 5/99). After three 4CMenB vaccinations, 99% or more of infants developed hSBA titers of 1:5 or greater against strains 44/76-SL and 5/99. For NZ98/254, this proportion was 79% (95% CI, 75.2%-82.4%) for vaccination at 2, 4, and 6 months with routine vaccines, 86.1% (95% CI, 82.9%-89.0%) for vaccination at 2, 4, and 6 months without routine vaccines, and 81.7% (95% CI, 76.6%-86.2%) for vaccination at 2, 3, and 4 months with routine vaccines. Responses to routine vaccines given with 4CMenB were noninferior to routine vaccines alone for all antigens, except for the responses to pertactin and serotype 6B pneumococcal polysaccharide. Fever was seen following 26% (158/602) to 41% (247/607) of 4CMenB doses when administered alone, compared with 23% (69/304) to 36% (109/306) after routine vaccines given alone and 51% (306/605) to 61% (380/624) after 4CMenB and routine

  18. Immunogenicity and safety of a new meningococcal A conjugate vaccine in Indian children aged 2-10 years: a phase II/III double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Bavdekar, Ashish; Pandit, Anand; Juvekar, Sanjay; Patil, Malini; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Tang, Yuxiao; Marchetti, Elisa; Martellet, Lionel; Findlow, Helen; Elie, Cheryl; Parulekar, Varsha; Plikaytis, Brian; Borrow, Ray; Carlone, George; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Goel, Akshay; Suresh, Karupothula; Beri, Suresh; Kapre, Subhash; Jadhav, Suresh; Preaud, Jean-Marie; Viviani, Simonetta; LaForce, F Marc

    2012-10-05

    This study compares the immunogenicity and safety of a single dose of a new meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, MenAfriVac™, Serum Institute of India Ltd., Pune) against the meningococcal group A component of a licensed quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PsACWY, Mencevax ACWY(®), GSK, Belgium) 28 days after vaccination in Indian children. This double-blind, randomized, controlled study included 340 Indian children aged 2-10 years enrolled from August to October 2007; 169 children received a dose of PsA-TT while 171 children received a dose of PsACWY. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 95.2% of children in PsA-TT group had a ≥4-fold response in serum bactericidal titers (rSBA) 28 days post vaccination as compared to 78.2% in the PsACWY group. A significantly higher rSBA GMT (11,209, 95%CI 9708-12,942) was noted in the PsA-TT group when compared to PsACWY group (2838, 95%CI 2368-3401). Almost all children in both vaccine groups had a ≥4-fold response in group A-specific IgG concentration but the IgG GMC was significantly greater in the PsA-TT group (89.1 μg/ml, 95%CI 75.5-105.0) when compared to the PsACWY group (15.3 μg/ml, 95%CI 12.3-19.2). Local and systemic reactions during the 4 days after immunization were similar for both vaccine groups except for tenderness (30.2% in PsA-TT group vs 12.3% in PsACWY group). None of the adverse events or serious adverse events was related to the study vaccines. We conclude that MenAfriVac™ is well tolerated and significantly more immunogenic when compared to a licensed polysaccharide vaccine, in 2-to-10-year-old Indian children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after vaccination of toddlers and children between 12 months and 10 years of age with a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forsten, Aino; Bianco, Veronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    We studied the persistence of serum bactericidal antibody using rabbit and human complement (rSBA/hSBA, cut-offs 1:8) 5 y after a single dose of meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) compared with age-appropriate control vaccines in toddlers and children (NCT00427908). Children were previously randomized (3:1) to receive either MenACWY-TT or control vaccine (MenC-CRM197 in 1-<2 y olds; MenACWY-polysaccharide vaccine [Men-PS] in 2-<11 y olds). Subjects with rSBA-MenC titers <1:8 at any time point were revaccinated with MenC conjugate vaccine and discontinued from the study. A repeated measurement statistical model assessed potential selection effects due to drop-outs. At year 5 in MenACWY-TT-vaccinated-toddlers for serogroups A, C, W, and Y respectively, percentages with rSBA titers ≥1:8 were 73.5%, 77.6%, 34.7%, and 42.9%, hSBA ≥1:8 were 35.6%, 91.7%, 82.6% and 80.0%. For MenC-CRM197 recipients, 63.6% had persisting rSBA-MenC titers ≥1:8 and 90.9% had hSBA-MenC ≥1:8 (not significantly different versus MenACWY-TT for either assay: exploratory analyses). In 2-<11 y olds rSBA titers ≥1:8 in MenACWY-TT-vaccinees were 90.8%, 90.8%, 78.6%, and 78.6% and 15.4%, 100%, 0.0%, 7.7% in Men-PS-vaccinees (significantly different for serogroups A, W and Y, exploratory analyses). Serogroups A, W and Y rSBA GMTs were ≥ 26-fold higher in MenACWY-TT-vaccinees. As expected, GMTs modeled at year 5 to assess the impact of subject drop out (mainly for revaccination), appeared lower for serogroup C. No vaccine-related SAEs were reported. Antibody persistence was observed for all serogroups up to 5 y after MenACWY-TT vaccination.

  20. Parents’ and Adolescents’ Willingness to be Vaccinated Against Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease during a Mass Vaccination in Saguenay–Lac-St-Jean (Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Dubé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93% and adolescents (75%. Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated.

  1. Immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine coadministered with tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine and/or meningococcal conjugate vaccine to healthy girls 11 to 18 years of age: results from a randomized open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Cosette M; Harvey, Bryan M; Pichichero, Michael E; Simon, Michael W; Combs, Stephen P; Blatter, Mark M; Marshall, Gary S; Catteau, Grégory; Dobbelaere, Kurt; Descamps, Dominique; Dubin, Gary; Schuind, Anne

    2011-12-01

    A combined immunization strategy for administration of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with other routine vaccines may lead to better compliance. Reactions and immunologic interference with concomitantly administered vaccines are unpredictable, necessitating clinical evaluation. This was a randomized, open study conducted at 48 centers in the United States (NCT00369824). Healthy girls 11 to 18 years of age were randomized equally to 1 of 6 groups to receive 3 doses of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered at 0, 1, and 6 or 1, 2, and 7 months, with or without 1 dose of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) and/or 1 dose of meningococcal polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MCV4) in different coadministration regimens (1283 girls vaccinated). Coadministered vaccines were injected at separate sites. Antibodies were measured for all vaccine components. Reactogenicity and safety were monitored. The prespecified criteria for noninferiority were met for all primary and secondary immunogenicity end points, demonstrating similar immunogenicity of Tdap and MCV4 when given alone or coadministered with the HPV vaccine. Immunogenicity of the HPV vaccine (in terms of seroconversion rates and geometric mean antibody titers to HPV antigens) was similar, regardless of whether it was given alone or coadministered with Tdap and/or MCV4. No differences were observed in the reactogenicity profile of the HPV vaccine administered alone or coadministered with either Tdap and/or MCV4 in different regimens. Concomitant administration of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine with Tdap and/or MCV4 in different regimens did not interfere with the immune response to any of the vaccines and had an acceptable safety profile.

  2. Immunogenicity and safety of a single dose of a CRM-conjugated meningococcal ACWY vaccine in children and adolescents aged 2-18 years in Taiwan: results of an open label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Min; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Yeh, Shu-Jen; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-09-08

    MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®, Novartis Vaccines, Siena, Italy) is a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine developed to help prevent invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W, and Y. It is approved within the European Union in persons >2 years of age and in persons from 2 months to 55 years of age in the United States, among other countries. Little is known about the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine in Taiwanese children >2 years and adolescents. This study assessed the immunogenicity and safety of a single injection of MenACWY-CRM vaccine in Taiwanese subjects aged 2-18 years old. In this phase III, multicentre, open-label study 341 subjects received one dose of MenACWY-CRM. Immunogenicity measures were rates of seroresponse (defined as the proportion of subjects with a postvaccination hSBA ≥1:8 if the prevaccination (baseline) titre was CRM vaccination at Day 29 for the serogroups A, C, W, and Y were 83%, 93%, 50%, and 65%, respectively. At Day 29 the percentages of subjects with hSBA ≥1:8 against all four serogroups A, C, W and Y were: 83%, 96%, 96% and 82%, respectively. GMTs against all serogroups rose by ≥7-fold from baseline to Day 29. The vaccine was well tolerated. A single dose of MenACWY-CRM demonstrated a robust immune response, and an acceptable safety profile in Taiwanese children and adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MenB-FHbp Meningococcal Group B Vaccine (Trumenba®): A Review in Active Immunization in Individuals Aged ≥ 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-02-01

    MenB-FHbp (bivalent rLP2086; Trumenba ® ) is a recombinant protein-based vaccine targeting Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB), which has recently been licensed in the EU for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by MenB in individuals ≥ 10 years of age. The vaccine, which contains a variant from each of the two identified subfamilies of the meningococcal surface protein factor H-binding protein (fHBP), has been licensed in the USA for active immunization in individuals 10-25 years of age since 2014. This article reviews the immunogenicity, reactogenicity and tolerability of MenB-FHbp, with a focus on the EU label and the European setting. As demonstrated in an extensive program of clinical trials in adolescents and young adults, a two-dose or three-dose series of MenB-FHbp elicits a strong immune response against a range of MenB test strains selected to be representative of strains prevalent in Europe and the USA. Follow-up studies investigating the persistence of the MenB-FHbp immune response and the effect of a booster dose of the vaccine indicate that a booster dose should be considered (following a primary vaccine series) in individuals at continued risk of invasive meningococcal disease. MenB-FHbp vaccine appears to be moderately reactogenic but, overall, is generally well tolerated, with most adverse reactions being mild to moderate in severity. Although post-marketing, population-based data will be required to establish the true effectiveness of the vaccine, currently available data indicate that MenB-FHbp, in a two-dose or three-dose series, is likely to provide broad protection against MenB strains circulating in Europe.

  4. A randomized study to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of a heptavalent diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, haemophilus influenzae b, and meningococcal serogroup C combination vaccine administered to infants at 2, 4 and 12 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thollot, Franck; Scheifele, David; Pankow-Culot, Heidemarie; Cheuvart, Brigitte; Leyssen, Maarten; Ulianov, Liliana; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2014-12-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of the investigational diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) heptavalent combination vaccine were compared with those of licensed control vaccines. In this open, phase II, randomized study (NCT01090453), 480 infants from Germany, France and Canada received the heptavalent vaccine (Hepta group) or hexavalent and monovalent MenC control vaccines (HexaMenC group) co-administered with a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2, 4 and 12 months of age. Immunogenicity was measured 1 month after the second primary dose, and before and 1 month after the booster dose. Safety and reactogenicity were also evaluated. Non-inferiority of immune responses to MenC and Hib induced by 2-dose primary vaccination with the heptavalent vaccine versus control vaccines was demonstrated. In exploratory analyses, postprimary and postbooster functional antibody geometric mean titers against MenC tended to be lower (1119.5 vs. 3200.5; 2653.8 vs. 6028.4) and antibody geometric mean concentrations against Hib higher (1.594 vs. 0.671 μg/mL; 17.678 vs. 13.737 μg/mL) in the Hepta versus the HexaMenC group. The heptavalent and control vaccines were immunogenic to all other antigens, although immune responses to poliovirus were lower than expected in both groups. No differences in safety and reactogenicity profiles were detected between groups. The heptavalent vaccine induced non-inferior MenC and Hib responses compared with control vaccines. Both vaccination regimens, when administered at 2, 4 and 12 months of age, had comparable safety profiles and were immunogenic to all antigens, with lower-than-expected responses to poliomyelitis.

  5. Updated postlicensure surveillance of the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine in England and Wales: effectiveness, validation of serological correlates of protection, and modeling predictions of the duration of herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Helen; Andrews, Nick; Borrow, Ray; Trotter, Caroline; Miller, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines were licensed in the United Kingdom more than 10 years ago based on correlates of protection that had previously been established for serogroup C-containing polysaccharide vaccines by using the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay. These correlates of protection were subsequently validated against postlicensure estimates of observed vaccine effectiveness up to 7 to 9 months after the administration of the MCC vaccine. Vaccine effectiveness was, however, shown to fall significantly more than 1 year after the administration of a 3-dose course in infancy. Despite this finding, the marked impact on serogroup C disease has been sustained, with the lowest recorded incidence (0.02 case per 100,000 population) in the 2008-2009 epidemiological year, mainly due to the indirect herd immunity effect of the vaccine in reducing carriage. Updated estimates of vaccine effectiveness through 30 June 2009 confirmed high short-term protection after vaccination in infancy, at 97% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91% to 99%), falling to 68% (95% CI, -63% to 90%) more than a year after vaccination. The observed vaccine effectiveness more than 12 months postvaccination was consistent with measured declining SBA levels, but confidence intervals were imprecise; vaccine effectiveness estimates were consistent with SBA titers of 1:4 or 1:8 as correlates of long-term protection after a primary course in infants. Modeling suggested that protection against carriage persists for at least 3 years and predicted the stabilization of serogroup C disease at low levels (fewer than 50 cases per year) up to 2015-2016.

  6. [Meningococcal disease: frequently asked questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofré, José

    2012-12-01

    On account of an increase of serogroup W135 meningococcal disease (M.D.) observed in Santiago, Chile, during last two years the medical community has experienced an avidity to update their knowledge about M.D. treatment and its prevention. In a queries and answers mode, the following topics on M.D. are presented: nasopharyngeal carriage and its importance, immunity and protection against the disease, reasons to choice ceftriaxone as the first line antibiotic in treatment, rationality and indications of chemoprophylaxis, fundamentals and advantages of conjugate vaccines, its indications, schedules, contraindications and decisions making in public health.

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of meningococcal serogroup B (4CMenB) and serogroup C (MenC-CRM) vaccines in infants: A phase 3b, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Safadi, Marco Aurelio; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Weckx, Lily Yin; Moreira, Edson Duarte; da Fonseca Lima, Eduardo Jorge; Mensi, Ilhem; Calabresi, Marco; Toneatto, Daniela

    2017-04-11

    After implementation of routine infant MenC vaccination, MenB remains a serious cause of meningococcal disease, yet to be targeted by vaccination programs in several countries. This study (NCT01339923) investigated the immunogenicity and safety of MenC CRM-conjugated vaccine (MenC-CRM) concomitantly administered with MenB vaccine (4CMenB). Infants (N=251) were randomised 1:1 to receive 4CMenB and MenC-CRM (Group 1) or MenC-CRM alone (Group 2) at 3 and 5months (M3, M5) and a booster at 12months of age (M12), and pneumococcal vaccine at M3, M5, M7, M12. Antibody responses to meningococcal vaccines were measured at M3, M6, M12, and M13. Non-inferiority of MenC-CRM response in Group 1 vs Group 2 was demonstrated at M6 and M13, if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (LL95%CI) of the difference in percentage of infants with hSBA titres ≥1:8 was >-10%. Sufficiency of MenB response was achieved if LL95%CI of the percentage of infants with hSBA titres ≥1:4 against fHbp, NadA and PorA strains was ≥70% at M6 or ≥75% at M13. Adverse events (AEs) were collected for 7days post-vaccination, and serious AEs (SAEs) and medically attended AEs throughout the study. Non-inferiority of MenC response in Group 1 vs Group 2 (LL95%CI -6.4% [M6]; -5.2% [M13]) and sufficiency of MenB response in Group 1 (LL95%CI 92%, 90%, 89% [M6]; 97%, 92%, 93% [M13] against fHbp, NadA, PorA, respectively) were demonstrated. Higher rates of mild to moderate solicited AEs were reported in Group 1. Unsolicited AEs and SAEs incidences were similar across groups. Concomitant administration of MenC-CRM and 4CMenB in infants was immunogenic, resulting in non-inferior responses against MenC compared to MenC-CRM alone and demonstration of sufficient immune response to MenB, after primary and booster vaccination. Reactogenicity was higher for concomitant vaccines administration, but no safety concerns were identified. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Emergence and control of epidemic meningococcal meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Idris; Iliyasu, Garba; Habib, Abdulrazaq Garba

    2017-02-01

    For more than a century, meningitis epidemics have regularly recurred across sub-Saharan Africa, involving 19 contiguous countries that constitute a 'meningitis belt' where historically the causative agent has been serogroup A meningococcus. Attempts to control epidemic meningococcal meningitis in Africa by vaccination with meningococcal polysaccharide (PS) vaccines have not been successful. This is largely because PS vaccines are poorly immunogenic in young children, do not induce immunological memory, and have little or no effect on the pharyngeal carriage. Meningococcal PS-protein conjugate vaccines overcome these deficiencies. Conjugate meningococcal vaccine against serotype A (MenAfriVac) was developed between 2001 and 2009 and deployed in 2010. So far, 262 million individuals have been immunized across the meningitis belt. The public health benefits of MenAfriVac have already been demonstrated by a sharp decline in reported cases of meningococcal disease in the countries where it has been introduced. However, serogroup replacement following mass meningitis vaccination has been noted, and in 2015 an epidemic with a novel strain of serogroup C was recorded in Niger and Nigeria for the first time since 1975. This has posed a serious challenge toward elimination of meningococcal meningitis epidemics in the African. For an effective control of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt, there is a need for an effective surveillance system, provision of rapid antigen detection kits as well as affordable vaccine that provides protection against the main serogroups causing meningitis in the sub-region.

  9. Immunogenicity and safety of an investigational multicomponent, recombinant, meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) administered concomitantly with routine infant and child vaccinations: results of two randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Esposito, Susanna; Prymula, Roman; Ypma, Ellen; Kohl, Igor; Toneatto, Daniela; Dull, Peter; Kimura, Alan

    2013-03-09

    Meningococcal serogroup B disease disproportionately affects infants. We assessed lot-to-lot consistency, safety and immunogenicity, and the effect of concomitant vaccination on responses to routine vaccines of an investigational multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB) in this population. We did primary and booster phase 3 studies between March 31, 2008, and Aug 16, 2010, in 70 sites in Europe. We used two series of sponsor-supplied, computer-generated randomisation envelopes to allocate healthy 2 month-old infants to receive routine vaccinations (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis, inactivated poliovirus, hepatitis B plus Haemophilus influenzae type b, and seven-valent pneumococcal vaccine) at 2, 4, and 6 months of age alone, or concomitantly with 4CMenB or serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MenC) in: 1) an open-label, lot-to-lot immunogenicity and safety substudy of three 4CMenB lots compared with routine vaccines alone (1:1:1:1, block size eight); or 2) an observer-blind, lot-to-lot safety substudy of three 4CMenB lots compared with MenC (1:1:1:3, block size six). At 12 months, 4CMenB-primed children from either substudy were randomised (1:1, block size two) to receive 4CMenB booster, with or without measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine. Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay with human complement (hSBA) against serogroup B test strains, and on randomly selected subsets of serum samples for routine vaccines; laboratory personnel were masked to assignment. The first coprimary outcome was lot-to-lot consistency (hSBA geometric mean ratio of all lots between 0·5 and 2·0), and the second was an immune response (hSBA titre ≥5) for each of the three strains. The primary outcome for the booster study was immune response to booster dose. Immunogenicity data for 4CMenB were for the modified intention-to-treat population, including all infants from the open-label substudy who provided serum samples. The safety population included all participants

  10. Meningococcal disease in the Netherlands. Background information for the Health Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol MJ; de Melker HE; Berbers GAM; Ravenhorst MB; Ruijs WLM; van Vliet JA; Kemmeren JM; Suijkerbuijk A; van Lier EA; Sanders EAM; van der Ende A; RVP; I&V

    2017-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is a very serious infectious disease caused by a bacterium, the meningococcus. There are different types of meningococcus; people become ill mainly from the B, C, W and Y serogroups. Since 2002, vaccination against serogroup C meningococcal disease has been included in the

  11. Meningococcal serogroup B-specific responses after vaccination with bivalent rLP2086: 4 year follow-up of a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen S; Richmond, Peter C; Beeslaar, Johannes; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Garcés-Sánchez, Maria; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Szenborn, Leszek; Wysocki, Jacek; Eiden, Joseph; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Lee, Su-San; Perez, John L

    2017-01-01

    Bivalent rLP2086 is a recombinant factor H binding protein-based vaccine approved in the USA for prevention of meningococcal serogroup B disease in 10-25-year-olds. We aimed to assess the persistence of bactericidal antibodies up to 4 years after a three-dose schedule of bivalent rLP2086. We did this randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial at 25 sites in Australia, Poland, and Spain. In stage 1 of the study (February, 2009-May, 2010), healthy adolescents (aged 11-18 years) were randomly assigned, via an interactive voice and web-response system with computer-generated sequential random numbers, to receive either ascending doses of vaccine (60 μg, 120 μg, and 200 μg) or placebo at months 0, 2, and 6. Dispensing staff were not masked to group allocation, but allocation was concealed from principal investigators, participants and their guardians, and laboratory personnel. In stage 2 of the study (reported here), we enrolled healthy adolescents who had received three doses of 120 μg bivalent rLP2086 (the optimum dose level identified in stage 1) or saline. Immunogenicity was determined in serum bactericidal antibody assay using human complement (hSBA) by use of four meningococcal serogroup B test strains expressing vaccine-heterologous factor H binding protein variants: PMB80 (A22), PMB2001 (A56), PMB2948 (B24), and PMB2707 (B44). Immunogenicity in stage 2 was assessed at months 6, 12, 24, and 48 post-vaccination. We did analysis by intention to treat. This trial is registered as ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00808028. Between March 17, 2010, and Feb 8, 2011, 170 participants who received 120 μg of bivalent rLP2086 and 80 participants who received placebo in stage 1 of the study were entered into stage 2; 210 participants completed stage 2 up to 48 months. 1 month after the third vaccination, 93% (n=139/149) to 100% (n=48/48) of vaccine recipients achieved protective hSBA titres equal to or greater than the lower limit of quantification to each

  12. Invasive Meningococcal Disease. Cuba, 1983- 2006

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    Antonio E. Pérez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD is a worldwide health problem. In Cuba, vaccination against meningococcal B-C has been carried out since 1989. The study aimed at describing the epidemiology of IMD in Cuba from 1983 to 2006 and at contributing to the immunization strategy. A descriptive and analytical study was carried out. Epidemiological data was obtained from the National Surveillance System at the Institute "Pedro Kourí". More than 1 000 cases were reported in 1986 and the overall incidence was above 10/100 000 inhabitants. Since 1989 a remarkable and continuous decline in the incidence was observed. In the last nine years a strong association of IMD to boarding school students (OR=9.4; confidence interval 95%: 5.1-17.4, recluses (OR=5.9; CI 95%: 1.5 -24.3 and day students (OR=3.9; CI 95%: 2.8-5.6 was observed. Housewife (OR=4.9; CI 95%: 1.9-12.4 and pensioned (OR=4.5; CI 95%: 1.2-16.8 showed association with mortality. Previous vaccination was a protective factor against morbidity (OR=0.6; CI 95%: 0.4-1.0 and mortality (OR=0.4; CI 95%: 0.2-0.9 by IMD. Neisseria meningitidis B4:P1.15 was the main circulating strain. Incidence of IMD declined markedly in Cuba by using group BC strain-specific meningococcal vaccine.

  13. Characterization of vaccine antigens of meningococcal serogroup W isolates from Ghana and Burkina Faso from 2003 to 2009 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/37h

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    Emma Ispasanie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis and a considerable health problem in the 25 countries of the ‘African Meningitis Belt’ that extends from Senegal in West Africa to Ethiopia in the East. Approximately 80% of cases of meningococcal meningitis in Africa have been caused by strains belonging to capsular serogroup A. After the introduction of a serogroup A conjugate polysaccharide vaccine, MenAfriVac™, that began in December 2010, the incidence of meningitis due to serogroup A has markedly declined in this region. Currently, serogroup W of N. meningitidis accounts for the majority of cases. Vaccines based on sub-capsular antigens, such as Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA, are under investigation for use in Africa. To analyse the antigenic properties of a serogroup W wave of colonisation and disease, we investigated the molecular diversity of the protein vaccine antigens PorA, Neisserial Adhesin A (NadA, Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA and factor H binding protein (fHbp of 31 invasive and carriage serogroup W isolates collected as part of a longitudinal study from Ghana and Burkina Faso between 2003 and 2009. We found that the isolates all expressed fHbp variant 2 ID 22 or 23, differing from each other by only one amino acid, and a single PorA subtype of P1.5,2. Of the isolates, 49% had a functional nhbA gene and 100% had the nadA allele 3, which contained the insertion sequence IS1301 in five isolates. Of the W isolates tested, 41% had high fHbp expression when compared with a reference serogroup B strain, known to be a high expresser of fHbp variant 2. Our results indicate that in this collection of serogroup W isolates, there is limited antigenic diversification over time of vaccine candidate outer membrane proteins (OMP, thus making them promising candidates for inclusion in a protein-based vaccine against meningococcal meningitis for Africa.

  14. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Meningococcal meningitis is characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied ...

  15. A phase 3, randomized, active-controlled study to assess the safety and tolerability of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine bivalent rLP2086 in healthy adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Lucksinger, Gregg H; Absalon, Judith; Beeslaar, Johannes; Eiden, Joseph; Jansen, Kathrin U; York, Laura J; Quinn, Angela; Graversen, Mette E; Perez, John L

    2016-03-14

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is an important cause of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). A MnB vaccine (bivalent rLP2086, Trumenba(®)) consisting of 2 factor H binding protein variants received accelerated approval in the United States for the prevention of IMD caused by MnB in individuals 10-25 years of age. This randomized, active-controlled, observer-blind study further assessed the safety and tolerability of bivalent rLP2086. Eligible subjects ≥ 10 to vaccine (HAV, Havrix(®)) at months 0 and 6, and saline at month 2. The primary endpoints were serious adverse events (SAEs) throughout the study and medically-attended adverse events (MAEs) within 30 days after vaccination. Additional safety assessments included SAEs at other study intervals and adverse events (AEs) during the vaccination phase. Of 5712 subjects randomized, 84.6% (n = 3219) of bivalent rLP2086 recipients and 87.2% (n = 1663) of HAV/saline recipients completed the study. Throughout the study, SAEs were reported for 1.6% and 2.5% of bivalent rLP2086 and HAV/saline recipients, respectively. SAEs related to either vaccine were rare. MAEs occurred in 7.0% and 6.1% of subjects after vaccination 1; 5.5% and 6.1% after vaccination 2; and 5.3% and 5.5% after vaccination 3 in the bivalent rLP2086 and HAV/saline groups, respectively. A greater proportion of subjects reported AEs during the vaccination phase after bivalent rLP2086 compared with HAV/saline recipients; however, when reactogenicity events were excluded, the proportion between groups was similar. This safety study, the largest randomized, active-controlled trial evaluating a recombinant MnB vaccine, demonstrated that bivalent rLP2086 is safe and tolerable in healthy individuals ≥ 10 to < 26 years of age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle composition-dependent activation of the innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen associated molecular patterns including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an

  17. Comparative Assessment of a Single Dose and a 2-dose Vaccination Series of a Quadrivalent Meningococcal CRM-conjugate Vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) in Children 2-10 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William; Essink, Brandon; Kirstein, Judith; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Percell, Sandra; Han, Linda; Keshavan, Pavitra; Smolenov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We compared the immunogenicity, safety and 1-year antibody persistence of a single-dose and a 2-dose series of a licensed meningococcal ACWY-CRM conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) in 2- to 10-year-old children. In this phase III, multicenter, observer-blind study, children aged 2-5 years (n = 359) and 6-10 years (n = 356) were randomized 1:1 to receive 2 doses of MenACWY-CRM (ACWY2) or 1 dose of placebo followed by 1 dose of MenACWY-CRM (ACWY1), 2 months apart. Immunogenicity was measured using serum bactericidal activity with human complement (hSBA). Primary outcomes were to assess the immunologic noninferiority and superiority of ACWY2 versus ACWY1. One-month after the second dose, the hSBA seroresponse in ACWY2 was noninferior to ACWY1 for all 4 serogroups, in both age cohorts, and was superior for serogroups C and Y in the 2- to 5-year-old age cohort and for serogroup Y in the 6- to 10-year-old age cohort. Overall, 90%-99% of subjects in ACWY2 and 65%-96% in ACWY1 had hSBA titers ≥ 8; geometric mean titers were 1.8- to 6.4-fold higher in ACWY2 than ACWY1 across serogroups. At 1 year postvaccination, geometric mean titers declined, and the differences between ACWY2 and ACWY1 remained significant for serogroups A and C in the 2- to 5-year-old age cohort and for serogroups C and Y in the 6- to 10-year-old age cohort. The safety profile of MenACWY-CRM was similar in both groups. The single dose and 2-dose MenACWY-CRM series were immunogenic and well tolerated. Although antibody responses were greater after 2 doses, especially in the 2- to 5-year-old age cohort, this difference was less pronounced at 1 year postvaccination.

  18. Influenza and meningococcal disease: lessons for travellers and government from 2 epidemic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, Robert; El Bashir, Haitham; Rashid, Harunor; Shingadia, Delane; Haworth, Elizabeth

    2009-07-01

    Influenza and meningococcal disease are two serious diseases that are especially linked. Outbreaks of influenza have been frequently associated with secondary outbreaks of meningococcal disease. Travellers such as Hajj pilgrims are at particular risk, the most recent meningococcal outbreaks being in 2000 and 2001, while concern is rising that the annual pilgrimage, centred as it presently is on winter, may even become the epicentre of an avian influenza pandemic. Routine vaccination of pilgrims against meningococcal disease using a 4-valent product has been in place since 2002 with good effect, but influenza vaccine is not yet routinely required for all pilgrims despite the high proportion afflicted. Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccines are effective in older children and adults and this cheaper product can play a role in the short term management of meningococcal outbreaks due to serogroups A, C, W135 or Y. The impressively fast development of a C conjugate vaccine in the late 1990s was a credit to the close collaboration of pharma, academia and the executive. A similar alignment could accelerate the production of an efficacious and cost-effective H5N1 influenza vaccine through direct transparent competition with head-to-head randomised, double-blinded controlled trials. Both organisms have a propensity to mutate and adapt to immune pressure. There are lessons to be learnt from how we manage each for the control of the other.

  19. Immunogenicity and tolerability of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccine in healthy adolescents in Chile: a phase 2b/3 randomised, observer-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaya, María Elena; O'Ryan, Miguel L; Valenzuela, María Teresa; Prado, Valeria; Vergara, Rodrigo; Muñoz, Alma; Toneatto, Daniela; Graña, Gabriela; Wang, Huajun; Clemens, Ralf; Dull, Peter M

    2012-02-18

    Effective glycoconjugate vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y have been developed, but serogroup B remains a major cause of severe invasive disease in infants and adolescents worldwide. We assessed immunogenicity and tolerability of a four-component vaccine (4CMenB) in adolescents. We did a randomised, observer-blind, placebo-controlled, study at 12 sites in Santiago and Valparaíso, Chile. Adolescents aged 11-17 years received one, two, or three doses of 4CMenB at 1 month, 2 month, or 6 month intervals. Immunogenicity was assessed as serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA) against three reference strains for individual vaccine antigens, and assessed by ELISA against the fourth strain. Local and systemic reactions were recorded 7 days after each vaccination, and adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Participants were initially randomised to five groups (3:3:3:3:1) during the primary phase to receive either one dose, two doses 1 or 2 months apart, or three doses of 4CMenB, or three doses of placebo, with an additional three groups generated for the booster phase. All subjects received at least one dose of 4CMenB. Geometric mean titres, proportions of participants with serum bactericidal antibody titres of 4 or more, and Clopper-Pearson 95% CIs were calculated. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00661713. Overall, 1631 adolescents (mean age 13·8 [SD 1·9] years) received at least one dose of 4CMenB. After two or three doses, 99-100% of recipients had hSBA titres of 4 or more against test strains, compared with 92-97% after one dose (pvaccine-related serious adverse events were reported and no significant safety signals were identified. On the basis of immunogenicity responses this study provides evidence for an adolescent 4CMenB vaccine schedule of two doses, 1-6 months apart, to provide protection against meningococcal B infection. The extent of this protection against

  20. Different Dynamics for IgG and IgA Memory B Cells in Adolescents following a Meningococcal Serogroup C Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate Booster Vaccination Nine Years after Priming: A Role for Priming Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Susanne P; Buisman, Anne-Marie; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Boonacker, Rianne; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2015-01-01

    Antibody levels wane rapidly after Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MenCC) vaccination in young children, rendering the need for an adolescent booster dose. It is not clear whether circulating memory B cells are associated with persistence of MenC-specific antibody levels. Measurement of MenC-specific IgG and IgA memory B cells and levels of serum and salivary MenC-specific IgG and IgA in healthy 10-, 12- and 15-year-olds prior to and one month and one year after a MenCC booster vaccination. All participants had received a primary MenCC vaccination nine years earlier. The number of circulating MenC-specific IgG memory B cells prior to booster was low and not predictive for MenC-specific IgG responses in serum or saliva post-booster, whereas the number of MenC-specific IgA memory B cells pre-booster positively correlated with MenC-specific IgA levels in saliva post-booster (R = 0.5, Pmemory B cells. The number of MenC-PS-specific IgG memory B cells at 1 month post-booster was highest in the 12-year-olds. The number of MenC-specific memory B cells at one month post-booster showed no correlation with the rate of MenC-specific antibody decay throughout the first year post-booster. Circulating MenC-specific IgA memory B cells correlate with IgA responses in saliva, whereas circulating MenC-specific IgG memory B cells are not predictive for MenC-specific IgG responses in serum or saliva. Our results are suggestive for age-dependent differences in pre-existing memory against MenC.

  1. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

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    Olivier Manigart

    Full Text Available The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97] and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57] on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028. Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics.

  2. Novel Intervention in the Aging Population : A Primary Meningococcal Vaccine Inducing Protective IgM Responses in Middle-Aged Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heiden, Marieke; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Marinovic, Axe A. Bonacic; de Rond, Lia G. H.; van Maurik, Marian; Tcherniaeva, Irina; Berbers, Guy A. M.; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccine responses are often reduced in the elderly, leaving part of the elderly population vulnerable to infectious diseases. Timely vaccination may offer a solution for strengthening memory immunity before reaching old age, which classifies middle-aged persons as a target age group

  3. Intention to vaccinate universally against varicella, rotavirus gastroenteritis, meningococcal B disease and seasonal influenza among parents in the Netherlands : An internet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, Alies; Ferreira, José A.; Mollema, Liesbeth; Sanders, Elisabeth A.M.; de Melker, Hester E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: For the decision-making process regarding introduction of new vaccines into the National Immunisation Programme (NIP), advance insight into the potential acceptance among the population is relevant. We studied the intention of parents to have their child vaccinated against four diseases

  4. Intention to vaccinate universally against varicella, rotavirus gastroenteritis, meningococcal B disease and seasonal influenza among parents in the Netherlands: an internet survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, Alies; Ferreira, José A; Mollema, Liesbeth; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; de Melker, Hester E

    2017-01-01

    For the decision-making process regarding introduction of new vaccines into the National Immunisation Programme (NIP), advance insight into the potential acceptance among the population is relevant. We studied the intention of parents to have their child vaccinated against four diseases not

  5. Recent Outbreaks of Meningococcal Disease among Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danila, Richard N; Bahta, Lynn

    2015-09-01

    Meningococcal disease outbreaks recently have occurred in several U.S. cities among men who are HIV-infected and who have had sex with other men. This article describes the first similar case of meningococcal meningitis serogroup C in Minnesota, which was confirmed this summer. It also offers vaccination guidance for physicians who care for patients who may be at high risk for the disease.

  6. Quadrivalent meningococcal (MenACWY-TT) conjugate vaccine or a fourth dose of H. influenzae-N. meningitidis C/Y conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) is immunogenic in toddlers who previously received three doses of HibMenCY-TT in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Michael; Latiolais, Thomas; Sarpong, Kwabena; Simon, Michael; Twiggs, Jerry; Lei, Paul; Rinderknecht, Stephen; Blatter, Mark; Bianco, Veronique; Baine, Yaela; Friedland, Leonard R; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2015-02-11

    Immunogenicity and safety of a single dose of MenACWY-TT or a fourth dose of HibMenCY-TT were evaluated in the second year of life in HibMenCY-TT-primed toddlers. Healthy infants were randomized (5:1) and primed at 2, 4 and 6 months of age with HibMenCY-TT and diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus (DTaP-HBV-IPV) vaccine; or Hib-TT and DTaP-HBV-IPV (control). Recipients of HibMenCY-TT+DTaP-HBV-IPV were re-randomized (2:2:1) to receive MenACWY-TT at 12-15 months and DTaP at 15-18 months; MenACWY-TT co-administered with DTaP at 15-18 months; or HibMenCY-TT at 12-15 months and DTaP at 15-18 months. Controls received DTaP only at 15-18 months due to Hib conjugate vaccine shortage. Serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA) and safety were assessed one month after meningococcal vaccination. After vaccination with MenACWY-TT at 12-15 months or MenACWY-TT+DTaP at 15-18 months, all subjects previously primed for serogroups C/Y had hSBA ≥1:8 for these serogroups. At least 96.1% also had hSBA ≥1:8 for serogroups A/W. All subjects in the HibMenCY-TT group had hSBA ≥1:8 for serogroups C/Y. All pre-defined statistical criteria for meningococcal immunogenicity were satisfied. All vaccination regimens had acceptable safety profiles. Children primed with three doses of HibMenCY-TT who then received a single dose of MenACWY-TT or a fourth dose of HibMenCY-TT had robust increases in hSBA titers for serogroups C/Y. These data provide support that MenACWY-TT, given with or without the fourth scheduled dose of DTaP could be administered as an alternative to a fourth dose of HibMenCY-TT in the second year of life. This study (110870/110871) is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00614614. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. [Unsuspected meningococcal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Raquel; Brito, Maria João

    2006-01-01

    Meningococcal disease has a wide spectrum of clinical presentation. Occult bacteremia is not easily diagnosed and may have good prognostic. Three year-old African boy with fever, gonalgia and gait disorder with 24 hours of evolution. Observation was unremarkable. He presented leukocytosis (27,300/mL) with neutrophilia (21,000/mL) and elevated reactive C protein (10.8 mg/dl) with normal osteo-articular imagiologic exams. A blood culture was obtained and he was discharged with the probable diagnosis of hip synovitis. Two days later, he was asymptomatic without fever or blood infectious parameters although Neisseria meningitidis was identified in the blood culture. Ceftriaxone was given for seven days. Before starting this treatment a second blood culture was negative. There were no complications. Meningococcal disease may present with fever without toxic appearance--unsuspected meningococcal disease--causing difficulty in the diagnosis and delaying the treatment. Spontaneous resolution is rare and severe complications may occur.

  8. Progressive decrease in the potential usefulness of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero® in Gipuzkoa, Northern Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Pérez-Trallero

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a vaccine is determined not only by the immunogenicity of its components, but especially by how widely it covers the disease-causing strains circulating in a given region. Because vaccine coverage varies over time, this study aimed to detect possible changes that could affect vaccine protection during a specific period in a southern European region. The 4CMenB vaccine is licensed for use in Europe, Canada, and Australia and is mainly directed against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. This vaccine contains four main immunogenic components: three recombinant proteins, FHbp, Nhba and NadA, and an outer membrane vesicle [PorA P1.4]. The allelic distribution of FHbp, Nhba, NadA, and PorA antigens in 82 invasive isolates (B and non-B serogroups isolated from January 2008 to December 2013 were analyzed. 4CMenB was likely protective against 61.8% and 50% of serogroup B and non-B meningococci, respectively, in the entire period, but between 2012 and 2013, the predicted protection fell below 45% (42.1% for serogroup B isolates.The observed decreasing trend in the predicted protection during the 6 years of the study (Χ2 for trend  = 4.68, p = 0.03 coincided with a progressive decrease of several clonal complexes (e.g., cc11, cc32 and cc41/44, which had one or more antigens against which the vaccine would offer protection.

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of the RIVM hexavalent meningococcal B vesicle vaccine for Rotterdam children aged 2-3 and 7-8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labadie J; Kleijn ED de; Lafeber AB; Mees MMM; Booy K; Groot R de; Omme GW van; Dijken H van; Kuipers AJ; Dobbelsteen G van den; Juttmann RE; Wala M; Alphen AJW van; Rumke HC; Sophia Kinderziekenhuis /; LVO

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the results of a randomised controlled phase-II clinical study into the safety and immunogenicity of the RIVM hexavalent MenB vesicle vaccine among 189 children aged 2-3 and 168 children aged 7-8 in the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Two concentrations of the MenB vesicle

  10. Can we control all-cause meningococcal disease in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadarangani, M; Pollard, A J

    2016-12-01

    Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially devastating, with a case fatality rate of 5-15% and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Capsular group C (MenC) conjugate vaccines have been highly successful in achieving control of MenC disease across Europe, and some countries have also introduced quadrivalent MenACWY conjugate vaccines to reduce disease caused by groups A, W and Y in addition to C. These vaccines putatively elicit protective levels of bactericidal antibodies in all age groups, induce immunologic memory and reduce nasopharyngeal carriage, thereby leading to herd protection. Protein-based meningococcal vaccines based on subcapsular components, and designed primarily to target capsular group B (MenB) disease, have recently been licensed. These vaccines are highly immunogenic in infants and adolescents, inducing bactericidal antibodies against strains expressing high levels of vaccine antigens which are identical to the variants present in the vaccines. Effectiveness of these vaccines at a population level will be determined by whether vaccine-induced antibodies provide cross-protection against variants of the vaccine antigens present on the surface of the diverse collection of circulating invasive strains. The level of serum bactericidal activity induced against strains also seems to depend on the level of expression of the vaccine antigens. The duration of protection and the impact on carriage of meningococci will have a major bearing on the overall effectiveness of the programme. In September 2015 the UK became the first country to introduce the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) into a national routine immunization schedule, and data on the effectiveness of this programme are anticipated in the next few years. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Meningococcal Disease: Causes and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patient Anyone with direct contact with the patient’s oral secretions, such as a boyfriend or girlfriend Close contacts of someone with meningococcal disease should receive antibiotics to help prevent them from getting the disease. This is known ...

  12. Invasive Meningococcal Men Y Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-18

    Dr. Leonard Mayer, a public health microbiologist at CDC, discusses invasive meningococcal disease.  Created: 4/18/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/23/2012.

  13. Plasma and memory B-cell kinetics in infants following a primary schedule of CRM 197-conjugated serogroup C meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Dominic F; Snape, Matthew D; Perrett, Kirsten P; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Lewis, Susan; Blanchard Rohner, Geraldine; Jones, Meryl; Yu, Ly-Mee; Pollard, Andrew J

    2009-05-01

    The induction of persistent protective levels of pathogen-specific antibody is an important goal of immunization against childhood infections. However, antibody persistence is poor after immunization in infancy versus later in life. Serogroup C meningococci (MenC) are an important cause of bacteraemia and meningitis in children. The use of protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines against MenC has been associated with a significant decline in the incidence of invasive disease. However, vaccine effectiveness is negligible by more than 1 year after a three-dose priming series in infancy and corresponds to a rapid decline in antibody following an initial immune response. The cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of persistent antibody in this age group are unclear. An essential prelude to larger studies of peripheral blood B cells is an understanding of B-cell kinetics following immunization. We measured MenC- and diphtheria-specific plasma and memory B-cell kinetics in infants receiving a CRM(197) (cross-reactive material; mutant diphtheria toxoid)-conjugated MenC vaccine at 2, 3 and 4 months of age. Plasma cell responses were more delayed after the first dose when compared with the rapid appearance of plasma cells after the third dose. Memory B cells were detectable at all time-points following the third dose as opposed to the low frequency seen following a first dose. This study provides data on B-cell kinetics following a primary schedule of immunization in young infants upon which to base further studies of the underlying cellular mechanism of humoral immunity.

  14. Patterns of binding of aluminum-containing adjuvants to Haemophilus influenzae type b and meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Robert B D; Burkin, Karena; Amir, Saba Erum; Crane, Dennis T; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    The basis of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC) glycoconjugates binding to aluminum-containing adjuvants was studied. By measuring the amount of polysaccharide and protein in the non-adsorbed supernatant, the adjuvant, aluminum phosphate, AlPO4, was found to be less efficient than aluminum hydroxide, Al(OH)3 at binding to the conjugates, at concentrations relevant to licensed vaccine formulations and when equimolar. At neutral pH, binding of TT conjugates to AlPO4 was facilitated through the carrier protein, with only weak binding of AlPO4 to CRM197 being observed. There was slightly higher binding of either adjuvant to tetanus toxoid conjugates, than to CRM197 conjugates. This was verified in AlPO4 formulations containing DTwP-Hib, where the adsorption of TT-conjugated Hib was higher than CRM197-conjugated Hib. At neutral pH, the anionic Hib and MenC polysaccharides did not appreciably bind to AlPO4, but did bind to Al(OH)3, due to electrostatic interactions. Phosphate ions reduced the binding of the conjugates to the adjuvants. These patterns of adjuvant adsorption can form the basis for future formulation studies with individual and combination vaccines containing saccharide-protein conjugates. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of binding of aluminum-containing adjuvants to Haemophilus influenzae type b and meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Robert B.D.; Burkin, Karena; Amir, Saba Erum; Crane, Dennis T.; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The basis of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC) glycoconjugates binding to aluminum-containing adjuvants was studied. By measuring the amount of polysaccharide and protein in the non-adsorbed supernatant, the adjuvant, aluminum phosphate, AlPO4, was found to be less efficient than aluminum hydroxide, Al(OH)3 at binding to the conjugates, at concentrations relevant to licensed vaccine formulations and when equimolar. At neutral pH, binding of TT conjugates to AlPO4 was facilitated through the carrier protein, with only weak binding of AlPO4 to CRM197 being observed. There was slightly higher binding of either adjuvant to tetanus toxoid conjugates, than to CRM197 conjugates. This was verified in AlPO4 formulations containing DTwP–Hib, where the adsorption of TT-conjugated Hib was higher than CRM197-conjugated Hib. At neutral pH, the anionic Hib and MenC polysaccharides did not appreciably bind to AlPO4, but did bind to Al(OH)3, due to electrostatic interactions. Phosphate ions reduced the binding of the conjugates to the adjuvants. These patterns of adjuvant adsorption can form the basis for future formulation studies with individual and combination vaccines containing saccharide-protein conjugates. PMID:26194164

  16. Meningococcal disease during the Hajj and Umrah mass gatherings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezli, Saber; Assiri, Abdullah M; Alhakeem, Rafat F; Turkistani, Abdulhafiz M; Alotaibi, Badriah

    2016-06-01

    The Hajj and Umrah religious mass gatherings hosted by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia can facilitate the transmission of infectious diseases. The pilgrimages have been associated with a number of local and international outbreaks of meningococcal disease. These include serogroup A disease outbreaks in 1987 and throughout the 1990s and two international serogroup W135 outbreaks in 2000 and 2001. The implementation of strict preventative measures including mandatory quadrivalent meningococcal vaccination and antibiotic chemoprophylaxis for pilgrims from the African meningitis belt has prevented pilgrimage-associated meningococcal outbreaks since 2001. However, the fluid epidemiology of the disease and the possibility of outbreaks caused by serogroups not covered by the vaccine or emerging hyper-virulent strains, mean that the disease remains a serious public health threat during these events. Continuous surveillance of carriage state and the epidemiology of the disease in the Kingdom and globally and the introduction of preventative measures that provide broad and long-lasting immunity and impact carriage are warranted. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Radioimmunoassay for the quantitative determination of human anti-meningococcal antibodies. Annual report 1 Feb 78-30 Apr 79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotschlich, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    During the last year of contract support, we have performed a large number of antibody determinations on sera of children vaccinated with Group A or Group C meningococcal polysaccharide. In addition, a number of sera from monkeys vaccinated with different preparations of Group C were also studied. These sera were provided through the efforts of the staff of NIAID and also from other sources

  18. Immunogenicity, Safety, and Tolerability of Bivalent rLP2086 Meningococcal Group B Vaccine Administered Concomitantly With Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Acellular Pertussis and Inactivated Poliomyelitis Vaccines to Healthy Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Wysocki, Jacek; Beeslaar, Johannes; Eiden, Joseph; Jiang, Qin; Jansen, Kathrin U; Jones, Thomas R; Harris, Shannon L; O'Neill, Robert E; York, Laura J; Perez, John L

    2016-06-01

    Concomitant administration of bivalent rLP2086 (Trumenba [Pfizer, Inc] and diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis and inactivated poliovirus vaccine (DTaP/IPV) was immunologically noninferior to DTaP/IPV and saline and was safe and well tolerated. Bivalent rLP2086 elicited robust and broad bactericidal antibody responses to diverse Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strains expressing antigens heterologous to vaccine antigens after 2 and 3 vaccinations. Bivalent rLP2086, a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) vaccine (Trumenba [Pfizer, Inc]) recently approved in the United States to prevent invasive MnB disease in individuals aged 10-25 years, contains recombinant subfamily A and B factor H binding proteins (fHBPs). This study evaluated the coadministration of Repevax (diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis and inactivated poliovirus vaccine [DTaP/IPV]) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD, Ltd) and bivalent rLP2086. Healthy adolescents aged ≥11 to B proteins different from the vaccine antigens. Participants were randomly assigned to receive bivalent rLP2086 + DTaP/IPV (n = 373) or saline + DTaP/IPV (n = 376). Immune responses to DTaP/IPV in participants who received bivalent rLP2086 + DTaP/IPV were noninferior to those in participants who received saline + DTaP/IPV.The proportions of bivalent rLP2086 + DTaP/IPV recipients with prespecified seroprotective hSBA titers to the 4 MnB test strains were 55.5%-97.3% after vaccination 2 and 81.5%-100% after vaccination 3. The administration of bivalent rLP2086 was well tolerated and resulted in few serious adverse events. Immune responses to DTaP/IPV administered with bivalent rLP2086 to adolescents were noninferior to DTaP/IPV administered alone. Bivalent rLP2086 was well tolerated and elicited substantial and broad bactericidal responses to diverse MnB strains in a high proportion of recipients after 2 vaccinations, and these responses were further enhanced after 3 vaccinations.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01323270

  19. Invasive meningococcal disease epidemiology and control measures: a framework for evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, J Jaime; Möller, Jörgen; Getsios, Denis; Coudeville, L; El-Hadi, Wissam; Chevat, Catherine; Nguyen, Van Hung; Caro, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Background Meningococcal disease can have devastating consequences. As new vaccines emerge, it is necessary to assess their impact on public health. In the absence of long-term real world data, modeling the effects of different vaccination strategies is required. Discrete event simulation provides a flexible platform with which to conduct such evaluations. Methods A discrete event simulation of the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease was developed to quantify the potential impact of implementing routine vaccination of adolescents in the United States with a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine protecting against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135. The impact of vaccination is assessed including both the direct effects on individuals vaccinated and the indirect effects resulting from herd immunity. The simulation integrates a variety of epidemiologic and demographic data, with core information on the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and outbreak frequency derived from data available through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Simulation of the potential indirect benefits of vaccination resulting from herd immunity draw on data from the United Kingdom, where routine vaccination with a conjugate vaccine has been in place for a number of years. Cases of disease are modeled along with their health consequences, as are the occurrence of disease outbreaks. Results When run without a strategy of routine immunization, the simulation accurately predicts the age-specific incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and the site-specific frequency of outbreaks in the Unite States. 2,807 cases are predicted annually, resulting in over 14,000 potential life years lost due to invasive disease. In base case analyses of routine vaccination, life years lost due to infection are reduced by over 45% (to 7,600) when routinely vaccinating adolescents 12 years of age at 70% coverage. Sensitivity analyses indicate that herd immunity plays an important role when this

  20. Invasive meningococcal disease epidemiology and control measures: a framework for evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coudeville L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal disease can have devastating consequences. As new vaccines emerge, it is necessary to assess their impact on public health. In the absence of long-term real world data, modeling the effects of different vaccination strategies is required. Discrete event simulation provides a flexible platform with which to conduct such evaluations. Methods A discrete event simulation of the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease was developed to quantify the potential impact of implementing routine vaccination of adolescents in the United States with a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine protecting against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135. The impact of vaccination is assessed including both the direct effects on individuals vaccinated and the indirect effects resulting from herd immunity. The simulation integrates a variety of epidemiologic and demographic data, with core information on the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and outbreak frequency derived from data available through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Simulation of the potential indirect benefits of vaccination resulting from herd immunity draw on data from the United Kingdom, where routine vaccination with a conjugate vaccine has been in place for a number of years. Cases of disease are modeled along with their health consequences, as are the occurrence of disease outbreaks. Results When run without a strategy of routine immunization, the simulation accurately predicts the age-specific incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and the site-specific frequency of outbreaks in the Unite States. 2,807 cases are predicted annually, resulting in over 14,000 potential life years lost due to invasive disease. In base case analyses of routine vaccination, life years lost due to infection are reduced by over 45% (to 7,600 when routinely vaccinating adolescents 12 years of age at 70% coverage. Sensitivity analyses indicate that herd immunity plays

  1. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac#x2122;) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage as well as invasive meningococcal disease and whether PsA-TT can prevent pharyngeal carriage needs to be determined. To address this issue, a consortium (the African Meningococcal Carriage (MenAfriCar) consortium) was established in 2009 to investigate the pattern of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt prior to and after the introduction of PsA-TT. This article describes how the consortium was established, its objectives and the standardised field and laboratory methods that were used to achieve these objectives. The experience of the MenAfriCar consortium will help in planning future studies on the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt and elsewhere. Un vaccin conjugué contenant un polysaccharide du sérogroupe A méningococcique et une anatoxine du tétanos (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac™) est en cours de déploiement dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite. L’ expérience avec d’ autres vaccins conjugués polysaccharide/protéine a montré qu’ une partie importante de leur succès a été leur capacité à empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé et donc à arrêter la transmission et à induire une immunité de group. Si PsA-TT doit d’ atteindre l’ objectif de prévenir les épidémies, il devrait être en mesure d’ empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé ainsi que la méningococcie invasive et le fait que PsA-TT puisse emp

  2. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for example, lack of a functioning spleen, need vac- influenzae type b) cination with Hib. Talk to ... of developing severe complications because of your HIV infection. Meningococcal ACWY (Men- ACWY, MCV4) Yes! MenACWY vaccine ...

  3. Critical analysis of old and new vaccines against N. meningitidis serogroup C, considering the meningococcal disease epidemiology in Brazil Análise crítica das antigas e novas vacinas contra a N. meningitidis do sorogrupo C, considerando a epidemiologia da doença meningocócica no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the impact of meningococcal disease is substantial, and the potential for the introduction and spread of more virulent strains of N. meningitidis or strains with increased resistance to current antibiotics causes concern, making prevention essential. OBJECTIVES: Review the indications for meningococcal disease vaccines, considering the epidemiological status in Brazil. METHODS: A critical literature review on this issue using the Medline and Lilacs databases. RESULTS: In Brazil, MenB and MenC were the most important serogroups identified in the 1990s. Polysaccharide vaccines available against those serogroups can offer only limited protection for infants, the group at highest risk for meningococcal disease. Additionally, polysaccharide vaccines may induce a hypo-responsive state to MenC. New meningococcal C conjugate vaccines could partially solve these problems, but it is unlikely that in the next few years a vaccine against MenB that can promote good protection against multiple strains of MenB responsible for endemic and epidemic diseases will become available. CONCLUSIONS: In order to make the best decision about recommendations on immunization practices, better quality surveillance data are required. In Brazil, MenC was responsible for about 2,000 cases per year during the last 10 years. New conjugate vaccines against MenC are very effective and immunogenic, and they should be recommended, especially for children less than 5 years old. Polysaccharide vaccines should be indicated only in epidemic situations and for high-risk groups. Until new vaccines against MenC and MenB are available for routine immunization programs, the most important measure for controlling meningococcal disease is early diagnosis of these infections in order to treat patients and to offer chemoprophylaxis to contacts.Em todo o mundo, o impacto das doenças meningocócicas é enorme e o potencial para a introdução e disseminação de cepas da N

  4. The meningococcal antibody test: how useful in the diagnosis of meningococcal disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, N; Berthelsen, L; Wachmann, H

    2005-01-01

    Based on 9257 [correction] blood samples received from 7365 patients with a request for a meningococcal antibody test (MAT) during a 10-year period (1986-1995), the usefulness of the test in the diagnosis of meningococcal disease was assessed. Of 635 patients with culture-confirmed meningococcal ...

  5. Meningococcal Disease (Infectio Meningococciea. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Koloskova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The lecture deals with the diagnosis and treatment of meningococcal disease. Attention is given to laboratory diagnosis, differential diagnosis. There are provided the algorithms of medical care for children with meningococcemia in the prehospital and hospital stages, as well as the issues of treatment of meningococcal meningitis, meningococcal carriage and nasopharyngitis, measures in relation to exposed person, the conditions of discharge of patients after treatment, and their admission into the team.

  6. Epidemiology of serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease in Ontario, Canada, 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Vica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD caused by serogroup B is the last major serogroup in Canada to become vaccine-preventable. The anticipated availability of vaccines targeting this serogroup prompted an assessment of the epidemiology of serogroup B disease in Ontario, Canada. Methods We retrieved information on confirmed IMD cases reported to Ontario’s reportable disease database between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 and probabilistically-linked these cases to Public Health Ontario Laboratory records. Rates were calculated with denominator data obtained from Statistics Canada. We calculated a crude number needed to vaccinate using the inverse of the infant ( Results A total of 259 serogroup B IMD cases were identified in Ontario over the 11-year period. Serogroup B was the most common cause of IMD. Incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.27/100,000/year, and fluctuated over time. Cases ranged in age from 13 days to 101 years; 21.4% occurred in infants, of which 72.7% were Conclusions Although rare, the proportion of IMD caused by serogroup B has increased and currently causes most IMD in Ontario, with infants having the highest risk of disease. Although serogroup B meningococcal vaccines are highly anticipated, our findings suggest that decisions regarding publicly funding serogroup B meningococcal vaccines will be difficult and may not be based on disease burden alone.

  7. School Entry Requirements and Coverage of Nontargeted Adolescent Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jennifer L; Reiter, Paul L; Truong, Young K; Rimer, Barbara K; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-12-01

    Low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage is an urgent public health problem requiring action. To identify policy remedies to suboptimal HPV vaccination, we assessed the relationship between states' school entry requirements and adolescent vaccination. We gathered data on states' school entry requirements for adolescent vaccination (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis [Tdap] booster; meningococcal; and HPV) from 2007 to 2012 from Immunization Action Coalition. The National Immunization Survey-Teen provided medical record-verified vaccination data for 99 921 adolescents. We calculated coverage (among 13- to 17-year-olds) for individual vaccinations and concomitant vaccination. HPV vaccination outcomes were among female adolescents. Analyses used weighted longitudinal multivariable models. States with requirements for Tdap booster and meningococcal vaccination had 22 and 24 percentage point increases in coverage for these vaccines, respectively, compared with other states (both P vaccination requirements had vaccine (P vaccination requirements, respectively, were associated with 8 and 4 percentage point spillover increases for HPV vaccination coverage (both P vaccination (all P vaccination requirements could improve the nation's HPV vaccination coverage, given that many states already require Tdap booster but not meningococcal vaccination for school entry. Vaccination programs and clinicians should capitalize on changes in adolescent vaccination, including concomitant vaccination, that may arise after states adopt vaccination requirements. Additional studies are needed on the effects of HPV vaccination requirements and opt-out provisions. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. A large portion of meningococcal antigen typing system-negative meningococcal strains from spain is killed by sera from adolescents and infants immunized with 4CMenB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, R; Biolchi, A; Moschioni, M; Giuliani, M M; Pizza, M; Vázquez, J A

    2015-04-01

    A new vaccine (the 4CMenB 4-component protein vaccine [Bexsero], which includes PorA, factor H-binding protein [fHbp], neisserial heparin-binding antigen [NHBA], and Neisseria adhesin A [NadA]) against serogroup B meningococci has recently been approved for use in people older than age 2 months in Europe, Australia, and Canada. Preapproval clinical efficacy studies are not feasible for invasive meningococcal disease because its incidence is low/very low, and the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer (or the human SBA [hSBA] titer when human complement is used in the assay) has been used as a surrogate marker of protection. However, the hSBA assay cannot be used on a large scale, and therefore, a meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) was developed. MATS combines conventional PorA genotyping with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that quantifies both the expression and the cross-reactivity of antigenic variants. The assay has been used to evaluate the potential of the 4CMenB meningococcal group B vaccine to cover group B strains in several countries. Some recent data suggest that MATS is a conservative predictor of strain coverage. We used pooled sera from adolescents and infants to test by the hSBA assay 10 meningococcal group B strains isolated in Spain that were negative for the 3 antigens (n = 9) or that had very low levels of the 3 antigens (n = 1) by MATS. We found that all strains were killed by sera from adolescents and that 5 of the 10 strains were also killed, although at a low titer, by sera from infants. Our data confirm that MATS underestimates vaccine coverage. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Acute meningococcal disease in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ulrikka; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Steensen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rapidly progressing infection, which continues to cause deaths among children and adolescents. In this review, clinical signs and initial treatment of acute childhood meningococcal disease is described. Operational flow charts have been developed for assessment of non...

  10. Meningococcal disease, a clinical and epidemiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rodrigo Siqueira; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Dutra Gazineo, Jorge Luiz; Balbino Miguel, Paulo Sérgio; Santana, Luiz Alberto; Oliveira, Lisa; Geller, Mauro

    2017-11-01

    Meningococcal disease is the acute infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which has humans as the only natural host. The disease is widespread around the globe and is known for its epidemical potential and high rates of lethality and morbidity. The highest number of cases of the disease is registered in the semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa. In Brazil, it is endemic with occasional outbreaks, epidemics and sporadic cases occurring throughout the year, especially in the winter. The major epidemics of the disease occurred in Brazil in the 70's caused by serogroups A and C. Serogroups B, C and Y represent the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas and Australia. However, there has been a growing increase in serogroup W in some areas. The pathogen transmission happens for respiratory route (droplets) and clinically can lead to meningitis and sepsis (meningococcemia). The treatment is made with antimicrobial and supportive care. For successful prevention, we have some measures like vaccination, chemoprophylaxis and droplets' precautions. In this review, we have described and clarify clinical features of the disease caused by N. meningitidis regarding its relevance for healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, A.; Dijken, H. van; Hamstra, H.J.; Flier, M. van der; Vidarsson, G.; Putten, J.P. van; Boog, C.J.; Dobbelsteen, G. van den; Ley, P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent

  12. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; van Dijken, Harry; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; van der Flier, Michiel; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Boog, Claire J. P.; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie; van der Ley, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent

  13. Familial epidemic of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilović, V; Vrbanec-Megla, L; Payerl-Pal, M; Puntarić, D; Baklaić, Z

    1998-03-01

    Two closely related boys from the same house hold (Home 1), aged two and three, were affected with fulminant meningococcal sepsis known as Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Neisseria meningitidis serogorup B was isolated from their blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The two-year-old boy died one day after the onset of the disease. Epidemiological examination of contacts and pharyngeal swabs were performed in 14 persons from the household, all of them relatives of the affected children, as well as in a number of other contacts. Chemoprophylaxis with cotrimoxazole was simultaneously administered to all contacts. Family histories revealed that two contacts from the household where the patients did not live (Home 2) were inadvertently omitted. Subsequent examinations, following a report of another contagious disease (salmonelosis), revealed that these two persons were Neisseria meningitidis carriers, together with another one in the same household. The carriers most probably caused the infection of a third, five-year-old boy, the deceased boy's brother (Home 1) who also developed fulminant meningococcal sepsis. The failure to take the appropriate prophylaxis led to a prolonged carrier state in the carrier from the second household. Repeated pharyngeal swab sampling revealed two more carriers from both households that had previously been negative. Control of the epidemic was achieved after 5 weeks by repeated and controlled chemoprophylaxis with ciprofloxacin, and by repeated epidemiological examinations, disinfection, and daily health surveillance by the Sanitary Inspectorate. This extremely rare instance of a familial epidemic with three infected persons emphasizes the need for consistent chemoprophylaxis in meningococcal disease contacts.

  14. [Shared surveillance: meningococcal disease vs influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Civantos, A; Díaz-Jiménez, J; Domínguez-Berjón, M F

    2000-01-01

    To analyse the association between the behavior of meningococcal disease and influenza, using for this purpose population statistics for Spain for the period of 1964 to 1997. Ecological study of the incidence of meningococcal disease and influenza in Spain from 1964 to 1997, inclusive. The study used weekly statistical data for these diseases supplied by the Compulsory Disease Reporting System (Enfermedades de Declaración Obligatoria, EDO). The deterministic component of the meningococcal disease and influenza series was studied by means of spectral analysis based on the Fast Fourier Transformation, and the non-deterministic component was studied using the ARIMA model. The Box-Jenkins method was used for pre-bleaching the series, and a cross-correlation was subsequently established between the residuals in order to detect the presence of any significant correlations between the meningococcal disease and influenza series. During the period from 1964 to 1997, the week that showed, on average, the greatest number of cases for the season was week 7 in the case of meningococcal disease and week 6 in the case of influenza. Spectral analysis of the meningococcal disease and influenza series clearly demonstrated the annual periodicity of both series, and periodicity of nearly 11 years for meningococcal disease and slightly over 10 years for influenza. When cross-correlation is established after prebleaching the series, positive correlations are obtained in the results of lags 0, 1, 2, and 3. Introducing influenza as an exogenous variable in the multivariate model of meningococcal disease corroborates these results. There was a statistically significant relationship between the two processes during the same week and with a three-week lapse. By means of a methodology not previously applied to this subject, and by the use of prolonged time-span, country-comprehensive population statistics (which includes several epidemics waves), an association was shown to exist between

  15. Invasive Meningococcal Disease on the Workplaces: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccò, Matteo; Vezzosi, Luigi; Odone, Anna; Signorelli, Carlo

    2017-10-23

    Background and aims of the work: Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) represents a global health threat, and occupational settings have the potential to contribute to its spreading. Therefore, here we present the available evidences on the epidemiology of IMD on the workplaces. The following key words were used to explore PubMed: Neisseria meningitidis, meningococcus, meningococcal, invasive meningococcal disease, epidemiology, outbreaks, profession(al), occupation(al). We identified a total of 12 IMD cases among healthcare workers (HCW), 44 involving biological laboratory workers (BLW), 8 among school personnel, and eventually 27 from other settings, including 3 large industrial working populations. Eventual prognosis of BLW, particularly the case/fatality ratio, was dismal. As clustered in time and space, data about school cases as well as industrial cases seem to reflect community rather than occupational outbreaks. In general, we identified a common pattern for HCW and BLW, i.e. the exposure to droplets or aerosol containing N meningitidis in absence of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and/or microbiological safety devices (MSD) (e.g. cabinets). Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PEC) was rarely reported by HCW (16.7%) workers, and never by BLW. Data regarding vaccination status were available only for a case, who had failed requested boosters. The risk for occupational transmission of IMD appears relatively low, possibly as a consequence of significant reporting bias, with the exception of HCW and BLW. Improved preventive measures should be implemented in these occupational groups, in order to improve the strict use of PPE and MSD, and the appropriate implementation of PEC.

  16. Immunology Update: New Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, S Paul

    2016-11-01

    A new 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against more cancer-causing HPV types than previous vaccines. HPV vaccine series started with previous vaccines can be completed with the 9-valent vaccine. Two new influenza vaccines are available for adults 65 years and older: a high-dose vaccine and an enhanced adjuvant vaccine. These elicit stronger antibody responses than standard-dose vaccines. Current guidelines specify no preference for the new versus standard-dose vaccines. Two new group B meningococcal vaccines are intended for use during outbreaks and for patients with asplenia, complement deficiencies, frequent occupational meningococcus exposure, or for patients who desire protection from type B meningococcus. These are not substitutes for the quadrivalent vaccine already in use. For pneumococcus, new recommendations state that 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) should be administered to patients 65 years and older, followed at least 1 year later by the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For patients ages 19 to 64 years with immunocompromise and not previously vaccinated against pneumococcus, administration of these two vaccines should be separated by at least 8 weeks. Rotavirus vaccine is standard for infants at age 2 months. Also, there is a new cholera vaccine approved for use in the United States. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  17. Three decades of meningococcal disease in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puricelli, Rubens C B; Kupek, Emil; Westrupp, Maria Helena Bittencourt

    2004-06-01

    Consolidation of data on meningococcal disease surveillance for the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, has provided new insight about the evolution of this disease during the period of 1971-2000. A descriptive epidemiological study, based on retrospective analysis of all cases of meningococcal disease notified in the state of Santa Catarina, linked the surveillance data from the Secretary of the State of Health, magnetic tape records and the data from the national surveillance of diseases of obligatory notification. Following World Health Organization guidelines, cumulative incidence exceeding five cases per 100,000 inhabitants was considered indicative of an epidemic. Official population data from the Fundação Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística were used for the incidence denominator. During the 1971-2000 period, 7,893 cases and 1,354 deaths caused by meningococcal disease were reported. This corresponds to a mean of 263 cases and 45 deaths per year, with a mean incidence of 6.4 cases per 100,000 inhabitants and a fatality rate of 17.2%. Three distinct epidemiological periods were identified, two of which can be considered epidemic. Two of three distinct epidemiological periods were characterized by an epidemic of meningococcal disease, covering 20 of the 30 years analyzed. Identification of the epidemics and preventive actions, such as vaccination and health education, contributed to the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to this disease.

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2014In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  2. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, L K; Colding, H; Hartzen, S H

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) causes sepsis, epidemic meningitis, and sometimes also meningoencephalitis. Despite early antibiotic treatment, mortality and morbidity remain significant. We present recent studies on meningococcal disease with focus on the pathophysiology caused...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal to Pertussis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  6. CLINICAL-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND OUTCOME OF GENERALIZED FORMS OF MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Martynova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study clinical and epidemiological features and outcomes of generalized forms of meningococcal infection in children from Krasnoyarsk and Krasnoyarsk Territory during the period from 2012 to 2016. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis of 57 medical records of hospital patients with generalized forms of meningococcal infection was carried out in the infectious and resuscitative departments of the Krasnoyarsk Clinical Hospital No. 1 from 2012 to 2016, including 12 protocols of pathologoanatomical studies of the deceased patients and 45 medical cards of ambulatory patients – convalescents of the disease from 2012 to 2016. Results. The epidemic situation for meningococcal infection in Krasnoyarsk Territory from 2012 to 2016 is characterized by signs of inter-epidemic period. Children of the first 3 years of life are in the group of high risk for the development of GFMI, which accounts for 74% of the total number of cases of children aged 14. There are signs of meningococcal infection «aging» – in the age structure the number of children in the first year of life decreased, while the proportion of children aged 4–7 and 7–14 increased compared to previous decades. There is a tendency to a decrease in the proportion of the combined forms with an increase in the frequency of «pure» meningococcemia. In recent years there has been an «atypical» course of generalized forms of the disease, when classical hemorrhagic necrotic rashes appear only on the 3rd – 4th day of the disease. In convalescents who underwent a combined form of MI and «pure» meningitis severe residual effects leading patients to disability are possible to develop. Conclusion. The use of polyvalent conjugated vaccines in potential risk groups will allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality from generalized forms of meningococcal infection, including younger children.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of a meningococcal B bivalent rLP2086 vaccine in healthy toddlers aged 18-36 months: a phase 1 randomized-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen S; Richmond, Peter C; Nissen, Michael D; Jiang, Qin; Anderson, Annaliesa S; Jansen, Kathrin U; Reynolds, Graham; Ziegler, John B; Harris, Shannon L; Jones, Thomas R; Perez, John L

    2012-10-01

    A bivalent, recombinant, factor H-binding protein (rLP2086) vaccine was developed to protect against invasive Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) in children and adolescents. Healthy toddlers (N = 99) were enrolled to 3 ascending dose-level cohorts (20, 60 or 200 μg). Within each cohort (n = 33), subjects were randomized to receive an initial formulation of the bivalent rLP2086 vaccine at 0, 1 and 6 months or hepatitis A vaccine/placebo control (2:1 ratio). Reactogenicity was assessed by parental reporting of local and systemic reactions using electronic diaries and reports of unsolicited adverse events. Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal activity assay using human complement and rLP2086-specific IgG binding. The vaccine was considered to be well tolerated. Tenderness was the most frequently reported local reaction. Upper respiratory tract infection was the most commonly reported adverse event and occurred more frequently in the control group. Three cases (200 μg dose) of severe erythema that did not interfere with limb movement were reported. Four toddlers developed fever >40.0°C, 3 in the 200 μg group and 1 in the 60 μg group. Postdose 3, seroconversion (serum bactericidal activity assay using human complement ≥4-fold rise from baseline) was observed in 61.1-88.9% of participants against MnB strains expressing LP2086 variants homologous or nearly homologous to vaccine antigens and 11.1-44.4% against MnB strains expressing heterologous LP2086 variants. Seroconversion was observed in 77.8-100% of participants against additional, exploratory MnB strains expressing vaccine-homologous or heterologous LP2086 variants. This study shows that the bivalent rLP2086 vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic in toddlers.

  8. A phase 1 study of a group B meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine made from a strain with deleted lpxL2 and synX and stable expression of opcA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Paul B; Gibbs, Barnett T; Coster, Trinka S; Moran, E Ellen; Stoddard, Mark B; Labrie, Joseph E; Schmiel, Deborah H; Pinto, Valerian; Chen, Ping; Zollinger, Wendell D

    2010-10-08

    This phase 1 clinical trial assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine prepared from a lpxL2(-) synX(-) mutant of strain 44/76 with opcA expression stabilized. Thirty-four volunteers were assigned to one of the three dose groups (25 mcg, 25 mcg with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant, and 50 mcg) to receive three intramuscular injections at 0, 6 and 24 weeks. Specific local and systemic adverse events (AEs) were solicited by diary and at visits on days 1, 2, 7 and 14 after each vaccination and at the end of the study at 30 weeks. Blood chemistries, complete blood count, and coagulation studies were measured on each vaccination day and again two days later. Blood for antibody measurements and bactericidal assays were drawn 0, 14, and 42 days after each vaccination. The proportion of volunteers who developed a fourfold or greater increase in serum bactericidal activity (SBA) to the wild-type parent of the vaccine strain with high opcA expression at 6 weeks after the third dose was 12/26 (0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.65). Antibody levels to OpcA were significantly higher in vaccine responders than in non-responders (p=0.008), and there was a trend for higher antibody levels to the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) (p=0.059). Bactericidal depletion assays on sera from volunteers with high-titer responses also indicate a major contribution of anti-OpcA and anti-LOS antibodies to the bactericidal response.These results suggest that genetically modified NOMV vaccines can induce protection against group B meningococcus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Carriage of Neisseria Species in Communities with Different Rates of Meningococcal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Le Saux

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A single clone, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (C:2a:P1.2, was isolated from seven patients during a cluster of cases of meningococcal disease in Ontario in 1989. To determine whether the clone was present in asymptomatic individuals in the same population, pharyngeal swabs were taken from 7% (644 of 9125 of residents who were vaccinated during the outbreak. Rates of isolation of Neisseria species were also compared to those in two other geographical areas which did not have an elevated incidence of meningococcal disease. The rate of carriage of N meningitidis in the asymptomatic individuals sampled was between 1.9% and 5.4%. The clone isolated from patients was not present among the carrier strains as determined by sero- and subtyping and electrophoretic analysis of metabolic enzymes. Age greater than six years was the only factor associated with colonization with N meningitidis.

  10. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  11. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not work well for all pets. Your veterinarian will determine a vaccination schedule most appropriate for ... programs, but in some instances may help your veterinarian determine if your pet has a reasonable expectation ...

  12. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, L K; Colding, H; Hartzen, S H

    2011-01-01

    -host interactions are key determinants of the clinical course and risk of fatal outcome. Accordingly, successful treatment of severe meningococcal disease requires not only antibiotics but also adjuvants targeting the released endotoxins and the host immune/inflammatory responses. This review highlights the most...... recent data and current knowledge on molecular mechanisms of meningococcal disease and explains how host immune responses ultimately may aggravate neuropathology and the clinical prognosis. Within this context, particular importance is paid to the endotoxic components that provide potential drug targets...

  13. Primary Meningococcal Polyarthritis in an Adult Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Celso Giordan Cavalcanti Sarinho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary joint infection caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Neisseria meningitidis is rare. Normally, joint involvement comes secondary to meningitis or severe sepsis caused by this agent. When primary arthritis is seen, monoarthritis is the most common presentation. A meningococcal polyarthritis is described in less than 10 case reports according to current literature. This case report aims to briefly review this rare clinical event in an adult woman with no previous history of rheumatological disease. Early diagnosis of polyarthritis caused by meningococcal bacteria usually present a good prognosis when properly treated.

  14. Vaccinations in asplenic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerquist, Rhonda J; Messerschmidt, Kimberly A; Pottebaum, April A; Hellwig, Thaddaus R

    2016-05-01

    The recommended immunizations for adult asplenic patients are reviewed. Patients without a spleen are at risk of developing overwhelming postsplenectomy infections due to encapsulated organisms, mainly pneumococcal, meningococcal, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Due to the high mortality rates associated with these infections, vaccinations are recommended as a preventive measure. It is challenging to ensure optimal immunizations in these high-risk patients due to the number of recommended vaccines, the availability of multiple formulations, and the inability to administer specific formulations at the same time, as well as differences in subsequent vaccine administration schedules. Pharmacists play a key role in recommending specific vaccines and timing for these patients in order to achieve the most robust immune response. This article reviews the specific recommendations for pneumococcal, meningococcal, Hib, and influenza vaccinations in asplenic patients. In order to prevent potentially life-threatening infections, asplenic individuals should be vaccinated against S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, Hib, and influenza. The optimal timing of vaccination in relation to splenectomy depends on the nature of the splenectomy. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune responses to a recombinant, four-component, meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) in adolescents: a phase III, randomized, multicentre, lot-to-lot consistency study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrett, Kirsten P; McVernon, Jodie; Richmond, Peter C; Marshall, Helen; Nissen, Michael; August, Allison; Percell, Sandra; Toneatto, Daniela; Nolan, Terry

    2015-09-22

    For decades, a broadly effective vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) has remained elusive. Recently, a four-component recombinant vaccine (4CMenB) has been developed and is now approved in Europe, Canada, Australia and some Latin American countries. This phase III, randomized study evaluated the lot consistency, early immune responses and the safety profile of 4CMenB in 11 to 17-year-old adolescents in Australia and Canada (NCT01423084). In total, 344 adolescents received two doses of one of 2 lots of 4CMenB, 1-month apart. Immunogenicity was assessed before, 2-weeks and 1-month following the second vaccination. Serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA) was measured against three reference strains 44/76-SL, 5/99 and NZ98/254, selected to express one of the vaccine antigens; Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), factor H binding protein (fHbp) and porin A (PorA) containing outer membrane vesicle (OMV), respectively. Responses to the Neisseria heparin binding antigen (NHBA) were assessed with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Local and systemic reactions were recorded for 7 days following each vaccination; unsolicited adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Immunological equivalence of the two lots of 4CMenB was established at 1-month. At baseline, ≤7% of participants had hSBA titers ≥5 to all three reference strains. Two weeks following the second dose of 4CMenB, all participants had hSBA titers ≥5 against fHbp and NadA compared with 84-96% against the PorA reference strains. At 1-month, corresponding proportions were 99%, 100% and 70-79%, respectively. Both lots were generally well tolerated and had similar adverse event profiles. Two doses of 4CMenB had an acceptable safety profile and induced a robust immune response in adolescents. Peak antibody responses were observed at 14 days following vaccination. While a substantial non-uniform antigen-dependent early decline in antibody titers was seen thereafter, a

  16. The impact of meningococcal polymerase chain reaction testing on laboratory confirmation of invasive meningococcal disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Drew, Richard J

    2012-03-01

    Laboratory methods of diagnosis were examined for 266 children with invasive meningococcal disease. Seventy-five (36%) of 207 cases with bloodstream infection had both positive blood culture and blood meningococcal polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 130 (63%) negative blood culture and positive blood PCR, and 2 (1%) had positive blood culture and negative blood PCR. Sixty-three percent of cases were diagnosed by PCR alone.

  17. Persistence of immune responses after a single dose of Novartis meningococcal serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y CRM-197 conjugate vaccine (Menveo®) or Menactra® among healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher J; Baxter, Roger; Anemona, Alessandra; Ciavarro, Giuseppe; Dull, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The persistence of human bactericidal activity (hSBA) responses in adolescents was assessed 22 months after vaccination with one dose of Menveo® (MenACWY-CRM; Novartis) or Menactra® (MCV4) (sanofi pasteur). The proportion of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 was significantly higher among recipients of MenACWY-CRM than MCV4 for serogroups A, W-135 and Y.

  18. Differential effects of two different routes of immunization on protection against gram-negative sepsis by a detoxified Escherichia coli J5 lipopolysaccharide group B meningococcal outer membrane protein complex vaccine in a burned mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Alice N; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Babcock, George F; Holder, Ian A; Cross, Alan S

    2002-01-01

    Gram-negative sepsis causes morbidity and mortality in burned patients. To determine whether immunization with core endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) via one of two routes could protect burned mice from septic death, mice were immunized either three times subcutaneously (SC) or one time intramuscularly (IM) then two times intraperitoneally (IP) with a core-lipopolysaccharide vaccine. Control mice were immunized with either saline or an irrelevant antigen. Postimmunization, mice were immunocompromised with a 15% TBSA flame burn and challenged subeschar with Klebsiella pneumoniae or Escherichia coli. Vaccine immunization improved the survival of both E. coli- and K. pneumoniae-challenged mice when given SC but not when given IM, IP. Postimmunization, total immunoglobulin titers were elevated over preimmune titers, but titers in IM, IP-immunized mice were higher than those in SC-immunized mice. Both isotyping and flow cytometry studies indicated that sera from mice immunized via IM, IP opsonized better than sera from mice immunized via SC. Hence, this vaccine provided route-specific protection of burned mice against gram-negative sepsis; its mechanism of action was not solely dependent upon increased immunoglobulin titers or phagocytosis.

  19. Progress towards meningitis prevention in the conjugate vaccines era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aparecida Borges Laval

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children less than five years old. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most important agents of bacterial meningitis in developing countries. The development of the conjugate vaccines in the beginning of the 90's, especially type b H. influenzae (Hib, and more recently the heptavalent pneumococcal and the serogroup C meningococcal vaccines, have contributed directly to changes in the epidemiological profile of these invasive diseases (direct effect and of their carriage status (indirect effect. We review the impact of the Hib conjugate vaccine in Latin American countries, where this vaccine has been implemented, and the potential of pneumococcal and meningococcal conjugate vaccines for the reduction of meningitis worldwide. We also address constraints for the development and delivery of these vaccines and review new candidate state-of-the-art vaccines. The greatest challenge, undoubtedly, is to implement these vaccines worldwide, especially in the developing regions.

  20. Does Dexamethasone Helps in Meningococcal Sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolaj, Ilir; Ramadani, Hamdi; Mehmeti, Murat; Gashi, Hatixhe; Kasumi, Arbana; Gashi, Visar; Jashari, Haki

    2017-06-01

    Prompt recognition and aggressive early treatment are the only effective measures against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Anti-inflammatory adjunctive treatment remains controversial and difficult to assess in patients with IMD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DXM) as adjunctive treatment in different clinical forms of IMD, and attempt to answer if DXM should be routinely used in the treatment of IMD. In this non-interventional clinical study (NIS), 39 patients with meningococcal septicaemia with or without of meningitis were included, and compared regarding the impact of dexamethasone (DXM), as an adjunctive treatment, on the outcome of IMD. SPSS statistics is used for statistical processing of data. Thirty (76.9%) patients with IMD had sepsis and meningitis, and 9 (23.1%) of them had sepsis alone. Dexamethasone was used in 24 (61.5%) cases, in both clinical groups. The overall mortality rate was 10.3%. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 6 patients (15.4%), arthritis in 3 of them (7.7%), and subdural effusion in one patient (2.6%). The data showed a significant statistical difference on the length of hospitalization, and WBC normalization in groups of patients treated with DXM. The use of DXM as adjunctive therapy in invasive meningococcal disease has a degree of proven benefits and no harmful effects. In fighting this very dangerous and complex infection, even a limited benefit is sufficient to recommend the use of DXM as adjunctive treatment in invasive meningococcal disease.

  1. Advances with vaccination against Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrow, Ray

    2012-12-01

    In the last decade, meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccination programs have been demonstrated to be hugely successful with a truly impressive public health impact. In sub-Saharan Africa, with the implementation of an affordable serogroup A conjugate vaccine, it is hoped that a similar public health impact will be demonstrated. Challenges still remain in the quest to develop and implement broadly protective vaccines against serogroup B disease. New, broad coverage vaccines against serogroup B are for the first time becoming available although little is known about their antibody persistence, effectiveness or effect on nasopharyngeal carriage. Enhanced surveillance following any potential vaccine introduction against serogroup B needs to be thoroughly implemented. The future now holds a distinct possibility, globally, for substantially decreasing meningococcal disease, regardless of infecting serogroup. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Vaccines against poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  3. The development of global vaccine stockpiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Catherine; Hyde, Terri B; Costa, Alejandro J; Fernandez, Katya; Tam, John S; Hugonnet, Stéphane; Huvos, Anne M; Duclos, Philippe; Dietz, Vance J; Burkholder, Brenton T

    2016-01-01

    Global vaccine stockpiles, in which vaccines are reserved for use when needed for emergencies or supply shortages, have effectively provided countries with the capacity for rapid response to emergency situations, such as outbreaks of yellow fever and meningococcal meningitis. The high cost and insufficient supply of many vaccines, including oral cholera vaccine and pandemic influenza vaccine, have prompted discussion on expansion of the use of vaccine stockpiles to address a wider range of emerging and re-emerging diseases. However, the decision to establish and maintain a vaccine stockpile is complex and must take account of disease and vaccine characteristics, stockpile management, funding, and ethical concerns, such as equity. Past experience with global vaccine stockpiles provide valuable information about the processes for their establishment and maintenance. In this Review we explored existing literature and stockpile data to discuss the lessons learned and to inform the development of future vaccine stockpiles. PMID:25661473

  4. Epidemiology of Meningococcal Disease in Northeastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    major public health problem in the Nile Valley from Alexandria, Egypt to the southern regions of the Sudan. Like the disease in the sub-Saharan region...and the Sudan is unique in that it occurs in the large urban areas of Cairo and Khartoum with relatively minor variations in disease incidence...r LIE) DTIC , . [iE LE CTE ili D PUBLICATION REPORT 1514 33/88 EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE IN NORTHEASTERN AFRICA BY John E. Sippel, and

  5. The prevalence, serogroup distribution and risk factors of meningococcal carriage in adolescents and young adults in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Rahmi Tuna; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Karbuz, Adem; Salman, Nuran; Sutçu, Murat; Kurugol, Zafer; Balliel, Yasemin; Celik, Melda; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa; Kuyucu, Necdet; Kondolot, Meda; Sensoy, Gülnar; Metin, Ozge; Kara, Soner Sertan; Dinleyici, Meltem; Kılıç, Omer; Bayhan, Cihangul; Gurbuz, Venhar; Aycan, Emre; Memedova, Aygun; Karli, Arzu; Bozlu, Gulçin; Celebi, Solmaz

    2017-05-04

    The serogroup epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD), which varies considerably by geographic region and immunization schedule, changes continuously. Meningococcal carriage data are crucial for assessing IMD epidemiology and designing f potential vaccination strategies. Meningococcal seroepidemiology in Turkey differs from that in other countries: serogroups W and B are the predominant strains for IMD during childhood, whereas no serogroup C cases were identified over the last 10 y and no adolescent peak for IMD was found. There is a lack of data on meningococcal carriage that represents the whole population. The aims of this multicenter study (12 cities in Turkey) were to evaluate the prevalence of Neisseria meningitidis carriage, the serogroup distribution and the related risk factors (educational status, living in a dormitory or student house, being a household contact with Hajj pilgrims, smoking, completion of military service, attending bars/clubs) in 1518 adolescents and young adults aged 10-24 y. The presence of N. meningitidis DNA was tested, and a serogroup analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction. The overall meningococcal carriage rate was 6.3% (n = 96) in the study population. A serogroup distribution of the 96 N. meningitidis strains isolated from the nasopharyngeal specimens revealed serogroup A in 5 specimens (5.2%), serogroup B in 9 specimens (9.4%), serogroup W in 64 specimens (66.6%), and serogroup Y in 4 specimens (4.2%); 14 were classified as non-grouped (14.4%). No serogroup C cases were detected. The nasopharyngeal meningococcal carriage rate was 5% in the 10-14 age group, 6.4% in the 15-17 age-group, and 4.7% in the 18-20 age group; the highest carriage rate was found in the 21-24 age group (9.1%), which was significantly higher than those of the other age groups (p Turkey and was similar to the recent rates observed in the same age groups in other countries. The most prevalent serogroup was W, and no serogroup C

  6. An Outbreak of Meningococcal Meningitis Among Children in Azare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningococcal meningitis is a serious disease with high morbidity and mortality among children. It occurs in epidemics in the African meningitic belt. This study reports the epidemiology, clinical features and outcome of an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in children. From January to December 2003, twenty two ...

  7. Psychiatric Adjustment in the Year after Meningococcal Disease in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shears, Daniel; Nadel, Simon; Gledhill, Julia; Gordon, Fabiana; Garralda, M. Elena

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychiatric status after meningococcal disease. Method: Cohort study of 66 children (34 boys, 32 girls) ages 4 to 17 years admitted to pediatric hospitals with meningococcal disease. The main outcome measure was psychiatric disorder (1-year period and point prevalence on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia…

  8. Receipt of Recommended Adolescent Vaccines Among Youth With Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Maslow, Gary R; Reiter, Paul L

    2017-05-01

    We examined vaccination coverage among youth with special health care needs (YSHCN) using data from parents of adolescents (11-17 years) who responded to a statewide survey in 2010-2012 (n = 2156). Using a validated screening tool, we identified 29% of adolescents as YSHCN. Weighted multivariable logistic regression assessed associations between special health care needs and receipt of tetanus booster, meningococcal, and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Only 12% of youth had received all 3 vaccines, with greater coverage for individual vaccines (tetanus booster, 91%; meningococcal, 32%; HPV, 26%). YSHCN had greater odds of HPV vaccination than other youth (33% vs 23%, OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.16-2.50) but vaccination coverage was similar ( P ≥ .05) for other outcomes. In subgroup analyses, HPV vaccination also differed depending on the number and type of special health care needs identified. Findings highlight low levels of vaccination overall and missed opportunities to administer recommended vaccines among all youth, including YSHCN.

  9. Vaccination and herd immunity: what more do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Harunor; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert

    2012-06-01

    This review summarizes herd immunity, focusing on conceptual developments with application to vaccination programs. The conventional idea of herd immunity is based on the relationship between the transmission dynamics of infectious agents and population immunity. However, there have been some recent conceptual developments in vaccine 'herd immunity' or 'herd protection' that address the complexities of imperfect immunity, heterogeneous populations, nonrandom vaccine uptake and 'freeloaders'. Some vaccines may provide better protection than others; for instance, meningococcal conjugate vaccines are superior to polysaccharide vaccines, as is true of pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines. Achieving a very high uptake rate should be the target for certain vaccines, for example, measles vaccine, in order to prevent the disease effectively. Emerging issues, for example, waning of immunity after pertussis vaccination, are fresh challenges. Herd immunity is a complex issue inherent to a vaccine and the population receiving the vaccine. We have more to learn and apply.

  10. Cooperative Serum Bactericidal Activity Between Human Antibodies to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein and Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, David M.; Wong, Tracy T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    A meningococcal group B vaccine containing multiple protein antigens including factor H binding protein (fHbp) and Neisserial heparin binding antigen (NHba) is in clinical development. The ability of antibodies against individual antigens to interact and augment protective immunity is unknown. We assayed human complement-mediated bactericidal activity (SBA) in stored sera from six immunized adults before and after depletion of antibodies to fHbp and/or NHba. All six subjects developed ≥4-fold increases in SBA titer against a test strain with fHbp in the variant 1 group with an amino acid sequence that matched the vaccine antigen (GMT 95 percent of the SBA was directed against fHbp. Four subjects developed ≥4-fold increases in SBA titer against a test strain with a heterologous fHbp variant 2 antigen and a homologous NHba amino acid sequence that matched the vaccine antigen (GMT bactericidal anti-fHbp variant 1 antiserum with a mouse anti-NHba antiserum also augmented the anti-NHba SBA titer against this test strain. For meningococcal vaccines that target relatively sparsely-exposed antigens such fHbp or NHba, non-bactericidal antibodies against individual antigens can cooperate and elicit SBA. PMID:21241734

  11. An analysis of the sequence variability of meningococcal fHbp, NadA and NHBA over a 50-year period in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bambini

    Full Text Available Studies of meningococcal evolution and genetic population structure, including the long-term stability of non-random associations between variants of surface proteins, are essential for vaccine development. We analyzed the sequence variability of factor H-binding protein (fHbp, Neisserial Heparin-Binding Antigen (NHBA and Neisseria adhesin A (NadA, three major antigens in the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine 4CMenB. A panel of invasive isolates collected in the Netherlands over a period of 50 years was used. To our knowledge, this strain collection covers the longest time period of any collection available worldwide. Long-term persistence of several antigen sub/variants and of non-overlapping antigen sub/variant combinations was observed. Our data suggest that certain antigen sub/variants including those used in 4CMenB are conserved over time and promoted by selection.

  12. Physician communication about adolescent vaccination: How is human papillomavirus vaccine different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, Melissa B; Moss, Jennifer L; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Hall, Megan E; Shah, Parth D; Brewer, Noel T

    2015-08-01

    Low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage stands in stark contrast to our success in delivering other adolescent vaccines. To identify opportunities for improving physicians' recommendations for HPV vaccination, we sought to understand how the communication context surrounding adolescent vaccination varies by vaccine type. A national sample of 776 U.S. physicians (53% pediatricians, 47% family medicine physicians) completed our online survey in 2014. We assessed physicians' perceptions and communication practices related to recommending adolescent vaccines for 11- and 12-year-old patients. About three-quarters of physicians (73%) reported recommending HPV vaccine as highly important for patients, ages 11-12. More physicians recommended tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) (95%) and meningococcal vaccines (87%, both pCommunication strategies are needed to support physicians in recommending HPV vaccine with greater confidence and efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Circumvention of herd immunity during an outbreak of meningococcal disease could be correlated to escape mutation in the porA gene of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, M K; Bichier, E; Perrocheau, A; Alonso, J M

    2001-03-01

    Meningococcal strains isolated during an outbreak were shown to belong to the ET-5 complex and to harbor a mutation in the VR2 region of the porA gene. They were less susceptible to the bactericidal effect of normal human serum than was the ET-5 wild-type strain. These results are of concern, as PorA is a potential target in vaccine design.

  14. Meningococcal disease in children in Merseyside, England: a 31 year descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C Stanton

    Full Text Available Meningococcal disease (MCD is the leading infectious cause of death in early childhood in the United Kingdom, making it a public health priority. MCD most commonly presents as meningococcal meningitis (MM, septicaemia (MS, or as a combination of the two syndromes (MM/MS. We describe the changing epidemiology and clinical presentation of MCD, and explore associations with socioeconomic status and other risk factors. A hospital-based study of children admitted to a tertiary children's centre, Alder Hey Children's Foundation Trust, with MCD, was undertaken between 1977 to 2007 (n = 1157. Demographics, clinical presentations, microbiological confirmation and measures of deprivation were described. The majority of cases occurred in the 1-4 year age group and there was a dramatic fall in serogroup C cases observed with the introduction of the meningococcal C conjugate (MCC vaccine. The proportion of MS cases increased over the study period, from 11% in the first quarter to 35% in the final quarter. Presentation with MS (compared to MM and serogroup C disease (compared to serogroup B were demonstrated to be independent risk factors for mortality, with odds ratios of 3.5 (95% CI 1.18 to 10.08 and 2.18 (95% CI 1.26 to 3.80 respectively. Cases admitted to Alder Hey were from a relatively more deprived population (mean Townsend score 1.25, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.41 than the Merseyside reference population. Our findings represent one of the largest single-centre studies of MCD. The presentation of MS is confirmed to be a risk factor of mortality from MCD. Our study supports the association between social deprivation and MCD.

  15. Towards an improved Neisseria meningitidis B vaccine: vesicular PorA formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arigita Maza, C. (Carmen)

    2003-01-01

    There is a great need for vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. This is especially important in Western European countries, were approximately two thirds of the cases of meningococcal disease can be attributed to serogroup B strains. Against this serogroup, traditional vaccines based

  16. Twenty-first century vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappuoli, Rino

    2011-01-01

    In the twentieth century, vaccination has been possibly the greatest revolution in health. Together with hygiene and antibiotics, vaccination led to the elimination of many childhood infectious diseases and contributed to the increase in disability-free life expectancy that in Western societies rose from 50 to 78–85 years (Crimmins, E. M. & Finch, C. E. 2006 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 103, 498–503; Kirkwood, T. B. 2008 Nat. Med 10, 1177–1185). In the twenty-first century, vaccination will be expected to eliminate the remaining childhood infectious diseases, such as meningococcal meningitis, respiratory syncytial virus, group A streptococcus, and will address the health challenges of this century such as those associated with ageing, antibiotic resistance, emerging infectious diseases and poverty. However, for this to happen, we need to increase the public trust in vaccination so that vaccines can be perceived as the best insurance against most diseases across all ages. PMID:21893537

  17. Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meningococcal disease, such as the northern areas of sub-Saharan Africa, or are participants in the Hajj. Anyone 2 ... student about to start college, here are some health tips: Reduce your risk of getting meningitis by ...

  18. Prevention of meningococcal disease during the Hajj and Umrah mass gatherings: past and current measures and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezli, Saber; Bin Saeed, Abdulaziz A; Assiri, Abdullah M; Alhakeem, Rafat F; Yunus, Muslim A; Turkistani, Abdulhafiz M; Booy, Robert; Alotaibi, Badriah M

    2016-06-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has a long history of instituting preventative measures against meningococcal disease (MD). KSA is at risk of outbreaks of MD due to its geographic location, demography, and especially because it hosts the annual Hajj and Umrah mass gatherings. Preventative measures for Hajj and Umrah include vaccination, targeted chemoprophylaxis, health awareness and educational campaigns, as well as an active disease surveillance and response system. Preventative measures have been introduced and updated in accordance with changes in the epidemiology of MD and available preventative tools. The mandatory meningococcal vaccination policy for pilgrims has possibly been the major factor in preventing outbreaks during the pilgrimages. The policy of chemoprophylaxis for all pilgrims arriving from the African meningitis belt has also probably been important in reducing the carriage and transmission of Neisseria meningitidis in KSA and beyond. The preventative measures for Hajj and Umrah are likely to continue to focus on vaccination, but to favour the conjugate vaccine for its extra benefits over the polysaccharide vaccines. Additionally, the surveillance system will continue to be strengthened to ensure early detection and response to cases and outbreaks; ongoing disease awareness campaigns for pilgrims will continue, as will chemoprophylaxis for target groups. Local and worldwide surveillance of the disease and drug-resistant N. meningitidis are crucial in informing future recommendations for vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, and treatment. Preventative measures should be reviewed regularly and updated accordingly, and compliance with these measures should be monitored and enhanced to prevent MD during Hajj and Umrah, as well as local and international outbreaks. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention of meningococcal disease during the Hajj and Umrah mass gatherings: past and current measures and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Yezli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA has a long history of instituting preventative measures against meningococcal disease (MD. KSA is at risk of outbreaks of MD due to its geographic location, demography, and especially because it hosts the annual Hajj and Umrah mass gatherings. Preventative measures for Hajj and Umrah include vaccination, targeted chemoprophylaxis, health awareness and educational campaigns, as well as an active disease surveillance and response system. Preventative measures have been introduced and updated in accordance with changes in the epidemiology of MD and available preventative tools. The mandatory meningococcal vaccination policy for pilgrims has possibly been the major factor in preventing outbreaks during the pilgrimages. The policy of chemoprophylaxis for all pilgrims arriving from the African meningitis belt has also probably been important in reducing the carriage and transmission of Neisseria meningitidis in KSA and beyond. The preventative measures for Hajj and Umrah are likely to continue to focus on vaccination, but to favour the conjugate vaccine for its extra benefits over the polysaccharide vaccines. Additionally, the surveillance system will continue to be strengthened to ensure early detection and response to cases and outbreaks; ongoing disease awareness campaigns for pilgrims will continue, as will chemoprophylaxis for target groups. Local and worldwide surveillance of the disease and drug-resistant N. meningitidis are crucial in informing future recommendations for vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, and treatment. Preventative measures should be reviewed regularly and updated accordingly, and compliance with these measures should be monitored and enhanced to prevent MD during Hajj and Umrah, as well as local and international outbreaks.

  20. Glycoconjugate vaccines: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Mairi; Pace, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, the three main pathogens causing serious infections are Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. Over the last 5 years, new vaccines protecting against these bacteria have been developed and introduced in various countries. This review describes the recently licensed glycoconjugates being used to protect against these encapsulated bacteria. Immunogenicity and safety data that led to licensure or licensure expansion of these glycoconjugates are discussed in addition to the resultant impact on the disease burden. The maintenance of robust immunisation programmes with high uptake rates is important in maintaining low rates of disease. Epidemiological surveillance systems are essential in monitoring any changes in infectious disease trends and in identifying emerging infections such as from non-typeable H. influenzae, pneumococcal serotype replacement disease and changes in the epidemiology of meningococcal serogroups. This is important to guide future vaccine development. Accessibility of these glycoconjugate vaccines in resource poor regions, which bear the highest disease burden from these pathogens, remains challenging largely due to high vaccine pricing. Recent aids from public and private funding, tiered vaccine pricing and the transfer of vaccine technology have helped in introducing these vaccines where they are most needed.

  1. Complement pathways and meningococcal disease : diagnostic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, A G; Truedsson, L; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2001-01-01

    Complement is an immunological effector system that bridges innate and acquired immunity in several ways. There is a striking association between susceptibility to meningococcal disease and various forms of complement deficiency (1,2). In defense against bacterial infection, the most important...... activation on the bacterial surface (6,7). The newly discovered mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation appears to be protective against many types of infection (8) and adds previously unsuspected aspects of innate immunity to complement-mediated defense. Interestingly, immune responses...... function of complement is probably to serve as a mediator of antibody-dependent immunity. Specific antibodies can trigger activation of the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation (3-5). It is well known that antibody-independent mechanisms interfere with alternative pathway...

  2. Middle school vaccination requirements and adolescent vaccination coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugenske, Erin; Stokley, Shannon; Kennedy, Allison; Dorell, Christina

    2012-06-01

    To determine if middle school vaccination requirements are associated with higher coverage for adolescent vaccines. School entry requirements for receipt of vaccination for school entry or education of parents for 3 vaccines recommended for adolescents: tetanus/diphtheria-containing (Td) or tetanus/diphtheria/acellular pertussis (TdaP), meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in place for the 2008-2009 school year were reviewed for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Vaccination coverage levels for adolescents 13 to 17 years of age by state requirement status and change in coverage from 2008 to 2009 were assessed by using the 2008-2009 National Immunization Survey-Teen. For the 2008-2009 school year, 32 states had requirements for Td/TdaP (14 specifically requiring TdaP) and none required education; 3 states required MenACWY vaccine and 10 others required education; and 1 state required HPV vaccine and 5 required education. Compared with states with no requirements, vaccination requirements were associated with significantly higher coverage for MenACWY (71% vs 53%, P vaccines. No association was found between education-only requirements and coverage levels for MenACWY and HPV vaccines. States with new 2008-2009 vaccination requirements (n = 6, P = .04) and states with preexisting vaccination requirements (n = 26, P = .02) for Td/TdaP experienced a significant increase in TdaP coverage over states with no requirements. Middle school vaccination requirements are associated with higher coverage for Td/TdaP and MenACWY vaccines, whereas education-only requirements do not appear to increase coverage levels for MenACWY or HPV vaccines. The impact on coverage should continue to be monitored as more states adopt requirements.

  3. Vaccination in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Barbara C; Meyer, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Public health vaccination guidelines cannot be easily transferred to elite athletes. An enhanced benefit from preventing even mild diseases is obvious but stronger interference from otherwise minor side effects has to be considered as well. Thus, special vaccination guidelines for adult elite athletes are required. In most of them, protection should be strived for against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, measles, mumps and varicella. When living or traveling to endemic areas, the athletes should be immune against tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, poliomyelitis, typhoid fever, and meningococcal disease. Vaccination against pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type b is only relevant in athletes with certain underlying disorders. Rubella and papillomavirus vaccination might be considered after an individual risk-benefit analysis. Other vaccinations such as cholera, rabies, herpes zoster, and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) cannot be universally recommended for athletes at present. Only for a very few diseases, a determination of antibody titers is reasonable to avoid unnecessary vaccinations or to control efficacy of an individual's vaccination (especially for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis B and, partly, hepatitis A). Vaccinations should be scheduled in a way that possible side effects are least likely to occur in periods of competition. Typically, vaccinations are well tolerated by elite athletes, and resulting antibody titers are not different from the general population. Side effects might be reduced by an optimal selection of vaccines and an appropriate technique of administration. Very few discipline-specific considerations apply to an athlete's vaccination schedule mainly from the competition and training pattern as well as from the typical geographical distribution of competitive sites.

  4. [Prospects for reducing the incidence of military air-borne infections which are not controllable by means of vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A B; Ogarkov, P I

    2011-05-01

    Examines the state of immunization by means of uncontrolled disease vaccine (influenza, SARS, pneumonia, streptococcal and meningococcal infections). They cause disease in both children and adolescents, as well as in organized collectives of adults, especially among conscripts. Calendars vaccination of the population and soldiers regulate immunization risk of epidemic indications against influenza, and partly against meningococcal infection; gradually introduced to the troops Immunoprophylaxis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Not solved the problem of immunization of adenovirus and streptococcal infections in military personnel. Discussed ways to improve your calendar vaccination of military personnel on extended epidemic indications against the mentioned diseases.

  5. Meningococcal Carriage among College Freshmen in Kashmir, North India- A Single Centre Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargis K Bali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Data on the community carriage of meningococci in developing countries are sparse. Knowledge about the same would help identify demographic and socio-behavioural risk factors, the need for infection control strategies and the composition of the relevant serogroup for locally effective meningococcal vaccine. Aim: To assess the meningococcal carriage and the major serotypes among fresh college hostellers. Materials and Methods: Charcoal-impregnated nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 274 consenting fresh college recruits (first year students residing in the college hostel and plated on to Thayer-Martin medium. Oxidase-positive diplococci were taken as presumptive Neisseria species. DNA was extracted from the isolates and Sanger sequencing was performed on the amplified PCR product. Blast analysis of all sequenced samples was performed against the retrieved Neisseria meningitidis sequences from whole NCBI-nr/nt database and within the dataset. Phylogentic analysis was done by Mega-6 professional package comparing published sequences of serogroups against the detected Neisseria meningitidis. Results: Ten (3.6% samples grew oxidase-positive diplococci suggestive of Neisseria. On molecular testing and sequence analysis, 4 samples were found to be N.meningitidis, one (Neisseria spp had close similarity to N.meningitidis and the others included N.perflava (n= 3, N.pharyngis (n=1 and N. flavescens (n=1. N.meningitidis isolates on blast and phylogenetic analysis bore molecular homology to serogroup B. Conclusion: Nasal carriage of N. meningitis (serogroup B was found in about 1.5% (n=4 of the fresh college recruits in the present study. Close proximity amongst the hostellers is likely to result in transmission and such preventive strategies for infection control are desirable. Further, studies of similar kind are mandated to determine the appropriate serogroups required for inclusion in the vaccine.

  6. Community cluster of meningococcal disease by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in Andalusia, Spain, March to May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral Cortés, J M; Torres Butrón, E; García Fernández, M; Herrador Ortiz, Z; Huarte Osakar, S; Santos Luque, R; Pérez Morilla, E; Guillén Enriquez, J

    2012-09-06

    Between March and May of 2011, a cluster of three fatal cases of meningococcal sepsis occurred in Andalusia, Spain, in a municipality with a population of around 20,000 inhabitants. The cases were in their mid-teens to early thirties and were notified to the epidemiological surveillance system of Andalusia (Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica de Andalucía, SVEA) during a 68-day period from March through May 2011. All three were infected with the same strain of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C genosubtype VR1:5-1;VR2:10-8. None of the cases had been previously vaccinated against N. meningitidis serogroup C. Antibiotic post-exposure chemoprophylaxis was administered to close contacts of every diagnosed case. Once the cluster was confirmed, the local population was informed through the media about the control measures taken by the health authorities. The vaccination history against N. meningitidis serogroup C of the population under 25 years-old in the municipality was checked. Vaccination was offered to unimmunised individuals younger than 25 years of age and an additional dose of vaccine was offered to those who had been vaccinated between 2000 and 2006 with a vaccination schedule of three doses before the first year of age. No further cases occurred since the beginning of these actions.

  7. Active offer of vaccinations during hospitalization improves coverage among splenectomized patients: An Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallone, Maria Serena; Martino, Carmen; Quarto, Michele; Tafuri, Silvio

    2017-08-01

    In 2014, an Italian hospital implemented a protocol for pneumococcal, meningococcal, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines offer to splenectomized patients during their hospitalization. After 1 year, coverage for recommended vaccinations increased from 5.7%-66.7% and the average time between splenectomy and vaccines administration decreased from 84.7-7.5 days. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Meningococcal disease in the Asia-Pacific region: Findings and recommendations from the Global Meningococcal Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrow, Ray; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vázquez, Julio A; Enwere, Godwin; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Kamiya, Hajime; Kim, Hwang Min; Jo, Dae Sun

    2016-11-21

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) is a global expert group that includes scientists, clinicians, and public health officials with a wide range of specialties. The purpose of the Initiative is to promote the global prevention of meningococcal disease (MD) through education, research, and cooperation. The first Asia-Pacific regional meeting was held in November 2014. The GMI reviewed the epidemiology of MD, surveillance, and prevention strategies, and outbreak control practices from participating countries in the Asia-Pacific region.Although, in general, MD is underreported in this region, serogroup A disease is most prominent in low-income countries such as India and the Philippines, while Taiwan, Japan, and Korea reported disease from serogroups C, W, and Y. China has a mixed epidemiology of serogroups A, B, C, and W. Perspectives from countries outside of the region were also provided to provide insight into lessons learnt. Based on the available data and meeting discussions, a number of challenges and data gaps were identified and, as a consequence, several recommendations were formulated: strengthen surveillance; improve diagnosis, typing and case reporting; standardize case definitions; develop guidelines for outbreak management; and promote awareness of MD among healthcare professionals, public health officials, and the general public. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. [Results of a computerized vaccination database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ramos, R; Ortiz Requena, M; Garrido Villoldo, A; Vera Chilet, M J

    2002-06-01

    To analyze vaccine coverage in children from Picassent in Valencia (Spain) and to evaluate the effectiveness of a new computerized vaccine registration program. A computer equipped with our self-made Babyvac-2000 program, based on Microsoft Access was used. The 2,514 entries on children in our database were examined. The results were compared with those in other population groups. Uptake was high: 100 % in 12 of the 15 age groups (according to year of birth). Coverage was as follows: diptheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)-oral polio vaccine was 100 % for 9 groups; the first dose of the triple virus vaccine was 100 % in 7 groups; full vaccination was between 96.2 % and 100 % for all age groups; vaccination at 6 years was between 91.6 % and 98.7 %, the second dose of the triple virus vaccine was between 72.2 % and 96.3 %; vaccination at 14 years was between 82.9 % and 87.7 %; hepatitis B vaccination in young children (from 1994 to 2000) was 100 % in 5 groups and was between 90 % and 98 % in teenagers; the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination rate was 100 % for children born between 1998 and 2001 and was between 74.3 % and 93.5 % for those born between 1994 and 1997; meningococcal group C conjugated vaccination was between 86.8 % and 100 % for children born between 1994 and 2001. This computer program considerably increases uptake and vaccine coverage among children.

  10. The First World War years of Sydney Domville Rowland: an early case of possible laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Peter C; Hodges, A J

    2016-08-01

    Sydney Domville Rowland was a bacteriologist and staff member at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine when the First World War broke out in 1914. Following a request to the Director of the Lister Institute to staff and equip a mobile field laboratory as quickly as possible, Rowland was appointed to take charge of No. 1 Mobile Laboratory and took up a temporary commission at the rank of Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps. On 9 October 1914, Rowland set out for the European mainland and was subsequently attached to General Headquarters in Saint-Omer, France (October 1914-June 1915), No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station in Lijssenthoek, Belgium (June 1915-February 1916, during which period he was promoted Major), and No. 26 General Hospital in Étaples, France (February 1916-March 1917). His research focused on gas gangrene, typhoid fever, trench fever, wound infection and cerebrospinal fever. In February of 1917, while engaged in identifying meningococcal carriers, Rowland contracted cerebrospinal meningitis to which he succumbed at age 44 on 6 March 1917. His untimely death might have been caused by laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease, especially since Rowland's work with Neisseria meningitidis isolates had extended beyond routine laboratory techniques and included risk procedures like immunisation of rabbits with pathogenic strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, microbiology laboratory workers who are routinely exposed to N. meningitidis isolates are recognised as a population at increased risk for meningococcal disease, for which reason recommended preventive measures include vaccination and handling of isolates within a class II biosafety cabinet. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Effects of meteorological factors on the incidence of meningococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Substantial climate changes have led to the emergence and re-emergence of various infectious diseases worldwide, presenting an imperative need to explore the effects of meteorological factors on serious contagious disease incidences such as that of meningococcal meningitis (MCM).

  12. Trends in Meningococcal Meningitis Over the Past Twelve Years at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the trends in the occurrence of meningococcal meningitis at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria, as well as the antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Materials and Methods: The results of all cerebrospinal fluid samples received by the microbiology laboratory (UNTH), Enugu ...

  13. An outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in Gauteng, Spring 1996 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe a Neisseri.a meningitidis outbreak in Gauteng during the period 1 July to 31 December 1996. Design. A descriptive study. Setting. Patients with meningococcal meningitis in Gauteng who had been diagnosed by laboratory means, or notified during the period 1 July to 31 December 1996.

  14. Risk factors for meningococcal disease in Cape Town | Moodley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the risk factors associated with meningococcal disease among children living in Cape Town. Design. A case-control study was conducted from October 1993 to January 1995. Setting. The study population consisted of all children tmder the age of 14 years who were resident in the Cape Town ...

  15. Platelet function in patients with meningococcal meningitis at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following platelet functions tests were performed; platelet counts, platelet adhesiveness, platelet aggregation and clot retraction. Results: Fifty seven patients (41 males and 16 females) with meningococcal meningitis were studied. Their mean age was 25.5 ± 8.32 years with a range of 15 to 45 years. Five patients had ...

  16. Immunological properties of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide from serogroups A, B & C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T J; Kharazmi, A; Shand, G

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and compare the oxidative burst, chemotaxis and cytokine production of human white blood cells, stimulated with meningococcal lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from three different serogroups (A, B and C) of Neisseria meningitidis, and to evaluate whether...

  17. Clinical manifestations and course of meningococcal disease in 562 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schildkamp, R. L.; Lodder, M. C.; Bijlmer, H. A.; Dankert, J.; Scholten, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations and course of meningococcal disease (MD) data were collected on patients with culture-proven MD, reported in the Netherlands between April 1, 1989 and April 30, 1990 by means of a questionnaire completed by the specialist in attendance. During the study

  18. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis. Case 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeerleder, S.; Zürcher Zenklusen, R.; Hack, C. E.; Wuillemin, W. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a man (age: 49 years), who died from severe meningococcal sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and extended skin necrosis. We discuss in detail the pathophysiology of the activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during sepsis.

  19. Immunogenicity of meningococcal B polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid or CRM197 via adipic acid dihydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoloni, A; Norelli, F; Ceccarini, C; Rappuoli, R; Costantino, P

    1995-04-01

    Vaccine development against Group B Neisseria meningitidis is complicated by the nature of the capsular polysaccharide, which is alpha 2-8-linked poly-sialic acid, identical in structure to the poly-sialic acid found in many mammalian tissues during development. To test the feasibility of a vaccine based on this polysaccharide, we synthesized several conjugates of meningococcal B polysaccharide linked to a carrier protein (tetanus toxoid or diphtheria CRM197), via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer. All conjugates induced a strong immune response. However, most of the antibodies were not directed against the Meningococcus B polysaccharide and could not be inhibited by the purified polysaccharide alone. Further investigations showed that the antibodies recognized an epitope composed by the junction between the spacer and the polysaccharide and protein, that is not present in the native polysaccharide and is generated during the coupling reaction. This epitope becomes immunodominant with respect to the poorly immunogenic polysaccharide. While the majority of the immune response is directed against the above epitope, the conjugates induced also an immune response against the Meningococcus B polysaccharide. The anti-Meningococcus B antibodies elicited are of the IgM and IgG class and are inhibitable by the polysaccharide. Moreover, they are bactericidal, thus suggesting that they would induce protection against disease.

  20. The influence of IS1301 in the capsule biosynthesis locus on meningococcal carriage and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Kugelberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that insertion of IS1301 in the sia/ctr intergenic region (IGR of serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis (MenC isolates from Spain confers increased resistance against complement-mediated killing. Here we investigate the significance of IS1301 in the same location in N. meningitidis isolates from the UK. PCR and sequencing was used to screen a collection of more than 1500 meningococcal carriage and disease isolates from the UK for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR. IS1301 was not identified in the IGR among vaccine failure strains but was frequently found in serogroup B isolates (MenB from clonal complex 269 (cc269. Almost all IS1301 insertions in cc269 were associated with novel polymorphisms, and did not change capsule expression or resistance to human complement. After excluding sequence types (STs distant from the central genotype within cc269, there was no significant difference for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR of carriage isolates compared to disease isolates. Isolates with insertion of IS1301 in the IGR are not responsible for MenC disease in UK vaccine failures. Novel polymorphisms associated with IS1301 in the IGR of UK MenB isolates do not lead to the resistance phenotype seen for IS1301 in the IGR of MenC isolates.

  1. The changing epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Quebec, Canada, 1991-2011: potential implications of emergence of new strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Gilca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to inform meningococcal disease prevention strategies, we analysed the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD in the province of Quebec, Canada, 10 years before and 10 years after the introduction of serogroup C conjugate vaccination. METHODOLOGY: IMD cases reported to the provincial notifiable disease registry in 1991-2011 and isolates submitted for laboratory surveillance in 1997-2011 were analysed. Serogrouping, PCR testing and assignment of isolates to sequence types (ST by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST were performed. RESULTS: Yearly overall IMD incidence rates ranged from 2.2-2.3/100,000 in 1991-1992 to 0.49/100,000 in 1999-2000, increasing to 1.04/100,000 in 2011. Among the 945 IMD cases identified by laboratory surveillance in 1997-2011, 68%, 20%, 8%, and 3% were due to serogroups B, C, Y, and W135, respectively. Serogroup C IMD almost disappeared following the implementation of universal childhood immunization with monovalent C conjugate vaccines in 2002. Serogroup B has been responsible for 88% of all IMD cases and 61% of all IMD deaths over the last 3 years. The number and proportion of ST-269 clonal complex has been steadily increasing among the identified clonal complexes of serogroup B IMD since its first identification in 2003, representing 65% of serogroup B IMD in 2011. This clonal complex was first introduced in adolescent and young adults, then spread to other age groups. CONCLUSION: Important changes in the epidemiology of IMD have been observed in Quebec during the last two decades. Serogroup C has been virtually eliminated. In recent years, most cases have been caused by the serogroup B ST-269 clonal complex. Although overall burden of IMD is low, the use of a vaccine with potential broad-spectrum coverage could further reduce the burden of disease. Acceptability, feasibility and cost-effectiveness studies coupled with ongoing clinical and molecular surveillance are necessary in

  2. Impact of an Immunization Campaign to Control an Increased Incidence of Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease in One Region of Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wals, Philippe; Deceuninck, Geneviève; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Tsang, Raymond; Law, Dennis; De Serres, Gaston; Gilca, Vladimir; Gilca, Rodica; Boulianne, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) incidence increased in Quebec, starting in 2003, and was caused by a serogroup B sequence type 269 clone. The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) region was particularly affected with a rate of 3.4 per 100000 person-years in 2006-2013. In May 2014, an immunization campaign was launched in SLSJ, using the 4-component protein-based meningococcal vaccine (MenB-4C). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the campaign 2 years after its initiation. Immunization registry data and serogroup B invasive meningococcal disease (B-IMD) cases notified to public health authorities and confirmed by culture or polymerase chain reaction from July 1996 to December 2016 were analyzed, including a multivariate Poisson regression model of incidence rates. By the end of the campaign, 82% of the 59000 targeted SLSJ residents between 2 months and 20 years of age had been immunized. Following the initiation of the campaign, no B-IMD case occurred among vaccinees, whereas 2 cases were reported among unvaccinated adult SLSJ residents, and a third case in an unvaccinated child who had stayed in the region during the week prior to disease onset, in 2015. B-IMD incidence decreased in all other regions in the years 2015-2016 but sporadic cases continued to occur. A multivariate analysis showed a significant effect of the campaign in the SLSJ region (relative B-IMD risk: 0.22; P = .04). Results suggest a high level of protection provided by MenB-4C following mass vaccination at regional level. This, along with reassuring safety data, supports the current recommendations for MenB-4C use for controlling outbreaks caused by clones covered by the vaccine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Vaccine hesitancy among parents of adolescents and its association with vaccine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R; Thompson, David; Rogacki, Brianna; Hale, Jessica J; Jacobson, Robert M; Opel, Douglas J; Darden, Paul M

    2015-03-30

    Addressing parental vaccine hesitancy may increase adolescent vaccination acceptance. However, no validated measure exists to identify parents hesitant toward adolescent vaccines. To determine if a modified version of the Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey, a previously validated tool to identify parental hesitancy toward vaccines in infants, predicts adolescent vaccine uptake at office visits. We modified the PACV for use in the adolescent setting and distributed it to a convenience sample of parents of adolescents aged 11 to 17 presenting for care at a diverse group of six pediatric practices in Oklahoma and South Carolina. We determined the vaccination status of the parents' adolescents for 3 vaccines (Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis [Tdap], meningococcal conjugate [MCV4], and human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccines). We used Fisher's exact tests to compare vaccination status with each survey item and with an overall general hesitancy scale that we constructed. We analyzed 363 surveys. At the time of the visit, vaccination coverage was 84% for Tdap, 73% for MCV, and 45% for any dose of HPV. Thirty-nine percent of parents expressed concern about vaccine efficacy and 41% expressed concern about side effects. Forty-five percent of parents disagreed with the statement that "teens can get all of the vaccines that are due at a single visit." Two individual items were associated with not receiving a dose of HPV vaccine that was due. The overall modified PACV score failed to predict adolescent vaccine uptake at an office visit. Several individual items were associated with vaccine uptake. The cumulative modified PACV, a general measure of vaccine hesitancy, was not associated with vaccination status despite illuminating parental hesitancy. We need to better understand vaccine-specific concerns for the adolescent population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. European public health policies for managing contacts of invasive meningococcal disease cases better harmonised in 2013 than in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vygen, Sabine; Hellenbrand, Wiebke; Stefanoff, Pawel; Hanquet, Germaine; Heuberger, Sigrid; Stuart, James

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, a European survey identified variation in country policies on public health management of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). In 2009-10, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) published evidence-based guidance on IMD. We therefore surveyed again European countries to describe policies for managing IMD cases and contacts in 2013. We asked national IMD public health experts from 32 European countries to complete a questionnaire focusing on post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for IMD contacts and meningococcal vaccination. Proportions in 2007 and 2013 were compared using the chi-squared test. All 32 countries responded, with responses from two regions for Belgium and Italy; half stated having used ECDC guidance to update national recommendations. PEP was recommended to close contacts in 33 of 34 countries/regions, mainly ciprofloxacin for adults (29/32 countries) and rifampicin for children (29/32 countries). ECDC guidance for managing IMD contacts in airplanes was strictly followed by five countries/regions. Twenty-three countries/regions participated in both surveys. Compared with 2007, in 2013, more countries/regions recommended i) ceftriaxone for children (15/23 vs 6/20; p = 0.03), ii) PEP for all children in the same preschool group (8/23 vs 17/23; p = 0.02). More countries/regions recommended evidence-based measures for IMD public health management in 2013 than 2007. However, some discrepancies remain and they call for further harmonisation.

  5. A cluster of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W among university students, France, February to May 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Clément; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Merle, Christian; Hong, Eva; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel; Barret, Anne-Sophie; Mounchetrou Njoya, Ibrahim

    2017-07-13

    Between February and May 2017, two cases of invasive meningococcal disease caused by a new, rapidly expanding serogroup W meningococci variant were reported among students of an international university in Paris. Bacteriological investigations showed that isolates shared identical genotypic formula (W:P1.5,2:F1-1:cc11) and belonged to the South American/UK lineage. A vaccination campaign was organised that aimed at preventing new cases linked to potential persistence of the circulation of the bacteria in the students. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  6. Meningococcal Disease Caused by Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B Serotype 4 in São Paulo, Brazil, 1990 to 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi Claudio Tavares

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A large epidemic of serogroup B meningococcal disease (MD, has been occurring in greater São Paulo, Brazil, since 1988.21 A Cuban-produced vaccine, based on outer-membrane-protein (OMP from serogroup B: serotype 4: serosubtype P1.15 (B:4:P1.15 Neisseria meningitidis, was given to about 2.4 million children aged from 3 months to 6 years during 1989 and 1990. The administration of vaccine had little or no measurable effects on this outbreak. In order to detect clonal changes that could explain the continued increase in the incidence of disease after the vaccination, we serotyped isolates recovered between 1990 and 1996 from 834 patients with systemic disease. Strains B:4:P1.15, which was detected in the area as early as 1977, has been the most prevalent phenotype since 1988. These strains are still prevalent in the area and were responsible for about 68% of 834 serogroup B cases in the last 7 years. We analyzed 438 (52% of these strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs of rRNA genes (ribotyping. The most frequent pattern obtained was referred to as Rb1 (68%. We concluded that the same clone of B:4:P1.15-Rb1 strains was the most prevalent strain and responsible for the continued increase of incidence of serogroup B MD cases in greater São Paulo during the last 7 years in spite of the vaccination trial.

  7. Preclinical studies on new proteins as carrier for glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Balducci, E; Micoli, F; Balocchi, C; Santini, L; Masignani, V; Berti, F; Costantino, P

    2016-07-29

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are made of carbohydrate antigens covalently bound to a carrier protein to enhance their immunogenicity. Among the different carrier proteins tested in preclinical and clinical studies, five have been used so far for licensed vaccines: Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoids, the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM197, the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B and the Protein D derived from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Availability of novel carriers might help to overcome immune interference in multi-valent vaccines containing several polysaccharide-conjugate antigens, and also to develop vaccines which target both protein as well saccharide epitopes of the same pathogen. Accordingly we have conducted a study to identify new potential carrier proteins. Twenty-eight proteins, derived from different bacteria, were conjugated to the model polysaccharide Laminarin and tested in mice for their ability in inducing antibodies against the carbohydrate antigen and eight of them were subsequently tested as carrier for serogroup meningococcal C oligosaccharides. Four out of these eight were able to elicit in mice satisfactory anti meningococcal serogroup C titers. Based on immunological evaluation, the Streptococcus pneumoniae protein spr96/2021 was successfully evaluated as carrier for serogroups A, C, W, Y and X meningococcal capsular saccharides. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. How often do children receive their vaccinations late, and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjari, Maysaa A; Alamri, Ahmed A; Algarni, Ahmad Y; Abualjadayel, Meral H; Alshardi, Yahya S; Alahmadi, Turki S

    2018-04-01

    To assess vaccination timeliness, risk factors associated with delays and the reasons for delayed vaccinations among children below the age of 3 years in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia during the period of May 2016 to August 2017. Data were obtained from parents of children under the age of 3 years using a structured questionnaire comprised of questions about sociodemographics, physical well-being of the child and the reasons that are used to justify delayed vaccinations. Vaccinations were considered delayed if they occurred more than 30 days after the time designated on the primary vaccination schedule. Logistic regression was used to assess the risk factors for vaccination delays. The study included 351 children. Delayed vaccinations were observed in 85/351 (24.2%) of the sample. Delays were noted to occur most frequently for Measles, Mumps, Rubella vaccine (MMR), seconddose of meningococcal conjugate quadrivalent vaccine (MCV4), second  dose of oral polio vaccine (OPV) and fourth  dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in 19/125 (15.2%) of the sample. Traveling at the time of vaccination was the most common delay reason and was reported in 31/142 (21.3%) of the sample. Adherence to vaccination is fairly common in this part of the country. However, vaccination delays are still present and should be addressed to improve health care.

  9. A complicated simple fall--an atypical case of serogroup Y meningococcal pneumonia with secondary septicaemia and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, B K Y; Kudsk-Iversen, S; Balaguruswamy, S; Purewal, T S

    2012-04-04

    An elderly lady was admitted for pain management and rehabilitation following a fall. During her stay she developed a new heart murmur and sepsis. Subacute bacterial endocarditits was excluded, empirical ciprofloxacin was initiated and later converted to aztreonam with gentamicin for clinical deterioration. Subsequent investigations revealed meningococcal Y septicaemia secondary to pneumonia, with a possible oropharynx focus. Upon discharge she had returned to baseline state. The case reflects an unusual and increasing cause of pneumonia. A steady increase of infective serogroup Y isolates over the past 12-years in England, with tendency towards elderly makes it a significant differential among the general medical population. This trend corresponds with the US, but is yet unknown whether to be a periodic cycle or true change in dominance and, or, virulence among serogroups. If the latter were true, it would support the inclusion of serogroups beyond menigitides C in the vaccination program.

  10. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  11. Vaccination with Attenuated Neisseria meningitidis Strains Protects against Challenge with Live Meningococci

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yanwen; Sun, Yao-hui; Ison, Cathy; Levine, Myron M.; Tang, Christoph M.

    2004-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis. Currently, there are no vaccines to prevent infection with serogroup B N. meningitidis strains, the leading cause of meningococcal meningitis in Europe and North America. Here we describe the construction and characterization of two attenuated serogroup B N. meningitidis strains, YH102 (MC58Δsia ΔrfaF) and YH103 (MC58Δsia ΔmetH). Both strains are markedly attenuated in their capacity to cause bacteremia in...

  12. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew J; Ninis, Nelly; Perera, Rafael; Mayon-White, Richard; Phillips, Claire; Bailey, Linda; Harnden, Anthony; Mant, David; Levin, Michael

    2006-02-04

    Meningococcal disease is a rapidly progressive childhood infection of global importance. To our knowledge, no systematic quantitative research exists into the occurrence of symptoms before admission to hospital. Data were obtained from questionnaires answered by parents and from primary-care records for the course of illness before admission to hospital in 448 children (103 fatal, 345 non-fatal), aged 16 years or younger, with meningococcal disease. In 373 cases, diagnosis was confirmed with microbiological techniques. The rest of the children were included because they had a purpuric rash, and either meningitis or evidence of septicaemic shock. Results were standardised to UK case-fatality rates. The time-window for clinical diagnosis was narrow. Most children had only non-specific symptoms in the first 4-6 h, but were close to death by 24 h. Only 165 (51%) children were sent to hospital after the first consultation. The classic features of haemorrhagic rash, meningism, and impaired consciousness developed late (median onset 13-22 h). By contrast, 72% of children had early symptoms of sepsis (leg pains, cold hands and feet, abnormal skin colour) that first developed at a median time of 8 h, much earlier than the median time to hospital admission of 19 h. Classic clinical features of meningococcal disease appear late in the illness. Recognising early symptoms of sepsis could increase the proportion of children identified by primary-care clinicians and shorten the time to hospital admission. The framework within which meningococcal disease is diagnosed should be changed to emphasise identification of these early symptoms by parents and clinicians.

  13. MICROBIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTICS OF THE MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION AND PURULENT BACTERIAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kraeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In the review modern data on taxonomy, biological features and clinical significance of agent of meningococcal infection and bacterial purulent meningitis are presented. Methods of laboratory diagnostics as well as recommendations about use of high-quality culture media and diagnostic kits for isolation and identification of microorganisms are described. Modern techniques to detect sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics are proposed.

  14. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariri, Afshin; van Dijken, Harry; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; van der Flier, Michiel; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Putten, Jos P M; Boog, Claire J P; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie; van der Ley, Peter

    2013-11-12

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent interactions are mediated through the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family of receptors. Importantly, binding of Opa to CEACAM1 has been reported to suppress human CD4 T cell proliferation in vitro in response to OMV preparations. This raises the question whether OMV vaccines should contain Opa proteins at all. Until now it has been difficult to answer this question, as the proposed immunosuppressive effect was only demonstrated with human cells in vitro, while immunization experiments in mice are not informative because the Opa interaction is specific for human CEACAM1. In the present study we have used Opa+ and Opa- OMVs for immunization experiments in a human CEACAM1 transgenic mouse model. OMVs were prepared from a meningococcal strain H44/76 variant expressing the CEACAM1-binding OpaJ protein, and from an isogenic variant in which all opa genes have been inactivated. Both the CEACAM1 expressing transgenic mice and their congenic littermates lacking it were immunized twice with the OMV preparations, and the sera were analyzed for bactericidal activity and ELISA antibody titres. Total IgG antibodies against the OMVs were similar in both mouse strains. Yet the titres for IgG antibodies specific for purified OpaJ protein were significantly lower in the mice expressing human CEACAM1 than in the nontransgenic mice. No significant differences were found in bactericidal titres among the four groups. Overall, these data indicate that expression of human CEACAM1 confers a reduced Opa-specific antibody response in vivo without affecting the overall immune response against other OMV antigens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dismantling the Taboo against Vaccines in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio de Martino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinating pregnant women in order to protect them, the fetus, and the child has become universal in no way at all. Prejudice in health professionals add to fears of women and their families. Both these feelings are not supported by even the smallest scientific data. Harmlessness for the mother and the child has been observed for seasonal, pandemic, or quadrivalent influenza, mono, combined polysaccharide or conjugated meningococcal or pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid, acellular pertussis, human papillomavirus, cholera, hepatitis A, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, anthrax, smallpox, yellow fever, mumps, measles and rubella combined, typhoid fever, inactivated or attenuated polio vaccines, and Bacillus Calmétte Guerin vaccines. Instead, the beneficial effects of influenza vaccine for the mother and the child as well as of pertussis vaccine for the child have been demonstrated. Obstetrician-gynecologists, general practitioners, and midwives must incorporate vaccination into their standard clinical care. Strong communication strategies effective at reducing parental vaccine hesitancy and approval of regulatory agencies for use of vaccines during pregnancy are needed. It must be clear that the lack of pre-licensure studies in pregnant women and, consequently, the lack of a statement about the use of the vaccine in pregnant women does not preclude its use in pregnancy.

  16. Semantic network analysis of vaccine sentiment in online social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gloria J; Ewing-Nelson, Sinclair R; Mackey, Lauren; Schlitt, James T; Marathe, Achla; Abbas, Kaja M; Swarup, Samarth

    2017-06-22

    To examine current vaccine sentiment on social media by constructing and analyzing semantic networks of vaccine information from highly shared websites of Twitter users in the United States; and to assist public health communication of vaccines. Vaccine hesitancy continues to contribute to suboptimal vaccination coverage in the United States, posing significant risk of disease outbreaks, yet remains poorly understood. We constructed semantic networks of vaccine information from internet articles shared by Twitter users in the United States. We analyzed resulting network topology, compared semantic differences, and identified the most salient concepts within networks expressing positive, negative, and neutral vaccine sentiment. The semantic network of positive vaccine sentiment demonstrated greater cohesiveness in discourse compared to the larger, less-connected network of negative vaccine sentiment. The positive sentiment network centered around parents and focused on communicating health risks and benefits, highlighting medical concepts such as measles, autism, HPV vaccine, vaccine-autism link, meningococcal disease, and MMR vaccine. In contrast, the negative network centered around children and focused on organizational bodies such as CDC, vaccine industry, doctors, mainstream media, pharmaceutical companies, and United States. The prevalence of negative vaccine sentiment was demonstrated through diverse messaging, framed around skepticism and distrust of government organizations that communicate scientific evidence supporting positive vaccine benefits. Semantic network analysis of vaccine sentiment in online social media can enhance understanding of the scope and variability of current attitudes and beliefs toward vaccines. Our study synthesizes quantitative and qualitative evidence from an interdisciplinary approach to better understand complex drivers of vaccine hesitancy for public health communication, to improve vaccine confidence and vaccination coverage

  17. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Claire; Sadarangani, Manish; Lewis, Susan; Payne, Isabelle; Saleem, Muhammad; Derrick, Jeremy P; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins.

  18. Validation of the Vaccination Confidence Scale: A Brief Measure to Identify Parents at Risk for Refusing Adolescent Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, Melissa B; Reiter, Paul L; Magnus, Brooke E; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Dempsey, Amanda F; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-01-01

    To validate a brief measure of vaccination confidence using a large, nationally representative sample of parents. We analyzed weighted data from 9018 parents who completed the 2010 National Immunization Survey-Teen, an annual, population-based telephone survey. Parents reported on the immunization history of a 13- to 17-year-old child in their households for vaccines including tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap), meningococcal, and human papillomavirus vaccines. For each vaccine, separate logistic regression models assessed associations between parents' mean scores on the 8-item Vaccination Confidence Scale and vaccine refusal, vaccine delay, and vaccination status. We repeated analyses for the scale's 4-item short form. One quarter of parents (24%) reported refusal of any vaccine, with refusal of specific vaccines ranging from 21% for human papillomavirus to 2% for Tdap. Using the full 8-item scale, vaccination confidence was negatively associated with measures of vaccine refusal and positively associated with measures of vaccination status. For example, refusal of any vaccine was more common among parents whose scale scores were medium (odds ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.75-2.47) or low (odds ratio, 4.61; 95% confidence interval, 3.51-6.05) versus high. For the 4-item short form, scores were also consistently associated with vaccine refusal and vaccination status. Vaccination confidence was inconsistently associated with vaccine delay. The Vaccination Confidence Scale shows promise as a tool for identifying parents at risk for refusing adolescent vaccines. The scale's short form appears to offer comparable performance. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A phase 1 study of a meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine made from a group B strain with deleted lpxL1 and synX, over-expressed factor H binding protein, two PorAs and stabilized OpcA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, P B; Biggs-Cicatelli, S; Moran, E E; Schmiel, D H; Pinto, V B; Burden, R E; Miller, L B; Moon, J E; Bowden, R A; Cummings, J F; Zollinger, W D

    2011-02-04

    This phase I clinical trial assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine prepared from an lpxL1(-) synX(-) mutant of strain 8570(B:4:P1.19,15:L8-5) of Neisseria meningitidis. Additional mutations enhance the expression of factor H binding protein variant 1 (fHbp v.1), stabilize expression of OpcA and introduce a second PorA (P1.22,14). Thirty-six volunteers were assigned to one of four dose groups (10, 25, 50 and 75 mcg, based on protein content) to receive three intramuscular injections at six week intervals with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Specific local and systemic adverse events were solicited by diary and at visits on days 2, 7, and 14 after each vaccination. Blood chemistries, complete blood count, and coagulation studies were measured on each vaccination day and again 2 and 14 days later. Blood for ELISA and serum bactericidal assays was drawn two and six weeks after each vaccination. The proportion of volunteers who developed a fourfold or greater increase in bactericidal activity to the wild type parent of the vaccine strain at two weeks after the third dose was 27 out of 34 (0.79, 95% C.I. 0.65-0.93). Against four other group B strains the response rate ranged from 41% to 82% indicating a good cross reactive antibody response. Depletion assays show contributions to bactericidal activity from antibodies to lipooligosaccharide (LOS), fHbp v.1 and OpcA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The cost and public health burden of invasive meningococcal disease outbreaks: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anonychuk, Andrea; Woo, Gloria; Vyse, Andrew; Demarteau, Nadia; Tricco, Andrea C

    2013-07-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a serious disease with a rapid onset, high mortality rate, and risk of long-term complications. Numerous reports in the literature conclude that IMD outbreaks are associated with substantial costs to society and significant burden on communities due to the cost associated with the prevention of secondary cases. To systematically review the literature on the costs and public health burden associated with IMD outbreaks. Studies were primarily identified through searching MEDLINE and EMBASE. Reports were included if they provided cost data related to the containment of an IMD outbreak after 1990 and were written in English, French, or Spanish. Costs were converted to 2010 United States dollars. Outbreaks were categorized by low-income countries (LIC) and high-income countries (HIC) based on gross domestic product per capita. Outbreak containment strategies were classified as small (e.g., targeting members of the school/institution where the outbreak occurred) or large (e.g., targeting everyone in the community). Sixteen articles reporting data on 93 IMD outbreaks fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were included. The majority of outbreaks occurred in HIC. Five studies reported the use of small containment strategies including targeted vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, all occurring in HIC. The average cost per small containment strategy was $299,641 and the average cost per IMD case was $41,857. Eight studies reported large containment strategies involving widespread vaccination targeting a specific age group or community. For HIC, the average cost per large containment strategy was $579,851 and the average cost per IMD case was $55,755. In LIC, the average cost per large containment strategy was $3,407,590 and the average cost per IMD case was $2,222. IMD outbreaks were associated with substantial costs. We found that although there were numerous reports on IMD outbreaks, data on containment costs were very limited. More

  1. More vaccines for children? Parents' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Helen; Lansley, Marilyn

    2007-11-07

    To investigate parents' views regarding potential new vaccines. We examined attitudes towards severity of specific infections, acceptability of potential vaccines and preferences for the number of injections they would want their child to receive on any one occasion. Cross sectional survey. Parents of children aged 18-24 months in three Primary Care Trusts in England were asked to complete a questionnaire. Of the 859 parents who responded (38%), over 90% believed that the vaccines currently on offer prevent disease always or almost always. Of those who rated meningitis as serious or very serious, 84% would accept a vaccine against meningococcal group B infection and 69% against pneumococcal infection. Only 34% of those who said their child would make a full recovery from chicken pox would accept a vaccine. Over half the respondents preferred new vaccines to be given separately. Fifty seven percent of parents would not want their child to have more than two injections per clinic visit. Parents' views on the severity of illness influence their acceptance of a new vaccine. Their preference for as few injections as possible at a single clinic visit needs to be reconciled with their concerns over the use of combination vaccines.

  2. Meningococcal Seroepidemiology 1 Year After the PsA-TT Mass Immunization Campaign in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, Haoua; Yaro, Seydou; Kpoda, Hervé B N; Ouangraoua, Soumeya; Trotter, Caroline L; Njanpop Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Martin, Catherine; Nwakamma, Ikenna; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco; Gessner, Bradford D; Borrow, Ray; Mueller, Judith E

    2015-11-15

    A group A meningococcal (MenA) conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), was introduced in Burkina Faso via mass campaigns between September and December 2010, targeting the 1- to 29-year-old population. This study describes specific antibody titers in the general population 11 months later and compares them to preintroduction data obtained during 2008 using the same protocol. During October-November 2011, we recruited a representative sample of the population of urban Bobo-Dioulasso aged 6 months to 29 years, who underwent standardized interviews and blood draws. We assessed anti-MenA immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations (n = 200) and, using rabbit complement, serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titers against 2 group A strains: reference strain F8238 (SBAref) (n = 562) and strain 3125 (SBA3125) (n = 200). Among the 562 participants, 481 (86%) were aged ≥23 months and had been eligible for the PsA-TT campaign. Among them, vaccine coverage was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.7%-89.9%). Prevalence of putatively protective antibodies among vaccine-eligible age groups was 97.3% (95% CI, 95.9%-98.7%) for SBAref titers ≥128, 83.6% (95% CI, 77.6%-89.7%) for SBA3125 ≥128, and 84.2% (95% CI, 78.7%-89.7%) for anti-MenA IgG ≥2 µg/mL. Compared to the population aged 23 months to 29 years during 2008, geometric mean titers of SBAref were 7.59-fold higher during 2011, 51.88-fold for SBA3125, and 10.56-fold for IgG. This study shows high seroprevalence against group A meningococci in Burkina Faso following MenAfriVac introduction. Follow-up surveys will provide evidence on the persistence of population-level immunity and the optimal vaccination strategy for long-term control of MenA meningitis in the African meningitis belt. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Protecting the Herd: The Remarkable Effectiveness of the Bacterial Meningitis Polysaccharide-Protein Conjugate Vaccines in Altering Transmission Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vacc...

  4. Invasive meningococcal disease without meningitis: a forgotten diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walayat S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Saqib Walayat,1 Nooreen Hussain,1 Abdullah H Malik,1 Elsa Vazquez-Melendez,1 Bhagat S Aulakh,2 Teresa Lynch1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA; 2Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA Abstract: Neisseria meningitidis, a Gram-negative diplococcus, is an uncommon cause of pneumonia. There have been only about 344 cases reported worldwide from 1906 to 2015. To our knowledge, there have been only 3 cases reported in the USA in the past 2 decades. We present a case of a 72-year-old male with a past medical history of severe COPD, obstructive sleep apnea, and stage I lung cancer status post-stereotactic body radiation therapy 1 year ago, who was admitted with a 6-day history of productive cough with yellowish sputum, shortness of breath, extreme myalgias, and fatigue. Chest X-ray revealed an infiltrative process in the left lower lung field and left-sided pleural effusion. Blood cultures grew beta-lactamase-negative N. meningitidis after 24 hours. Our patient was initially treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, which were later switched to amoxicillin to complete a total of 14 days of antibiotics. Diagnosing meningococcal pneumonia requires a high level of suspicion, as sputum cultures may be falsely positive due to asymptomatic carriage of the organism in the upper respiratory tract in up to 10% of outpatient population. We highlight this case as early recognition and treatment is critical. The case fatality rate for N. meningitidis pneumonia has been reported to be higher compared with meningococcal meningitis. Keywords: Neisseria meningitidis, pneumonia, invasive meningococcal pneumonia, sepsis

  5. Teen Scene Vaccines (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-07-30

    Vaccination of infants and toddlers is a common and well-accepted practice in the U.S. However, parents need to be aware that children age 11 to 12 need immunizations against meningococcal disease, human papillomavirus-, or HPV-related cancers, and pertussis, or whooping cough. This podcast discusses the importance of preteens and teens being up-to-date with their vaccination schedules.  Created: 7/30/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 7/30/2015.

  6. Intervention effects from a social marketing campaign to promote HPV vaccination in preteen boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joan R; Diehl, Sandra J; Crandell, Jamie L; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera

    2014-07-16

    Adoption of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the US has been slow. In 2011, HPV vaccination of boys was recommended by CDC for routine use at ages 11-12. We conducted and evaluated a social marketing intervention with parents and providers to stimulate HPV vaccination among preteen boys. We targeted parents and providers of 9-13 year old boys in a 13 county NC region. The 3-month intervention included distribution of HPV vaccination posters and brochures to all county health departments plus 194 enrolled providers; two radio PSAs; and an online CME training. A Cox proportional hazards model was fit using NC immunization registry data to examine whether vaccination rates in 9-13 year old boys increased during the intervention period in targeted counties compared to control counties (n=15) with similar demographics. To compare with other adolescent vaccines, similar models were fit for HPV vaccination in girls and meningococcal and Tdap vaccination of boys in the same age range. Moderating effects of age, race, and Vaccines for Children (VFC) eligibility on the intervention were considered. The Cox model showed an intervention effect (β=0.29, HR=1.34, p=.0024), indicating that during the intervention the probability of vaccination increased by 34% in the intervention counties relative to the control counties. Comparisons with HPV vaccination in girls and Tdap and meningococcal vaccination in boys suggest a unique boost for HPV vaccination in boys during the intervention. Model covariates of age, race and VFC eligibility were all significantly associated with vaccination rates (pSocial marketing techniques can encourage parents and health care providers to vaccinate preteen boys against HPV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of administration of conjugate vaccines containing cross reacting material on Haemophilus influenzae type b antibody responses in infants: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voysey, Merryn; Sadarangani, Manish; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth; Bolgiano, Barbara; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-07-25

    Protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), meningococcal, and pneumococcal vaccine, induce immunological memory and longer lasting protection than plain polysaccharide vaccines. The most common proteins used as carriers are tetanus toxoid (TT) and cross reacting material-197 (CRM), a mutant form of diphtheria toxoid. CRM conjugate vaccines have been reported to suppress antibody responses to co-administered Hib-TT vaccine. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials in which infants were randomised to receive meningococcal or pneumococcal conjugate vaccines along with Hib-TT. Trials of licensed vaccines with different carrier proteins were included for group C meningococcal (MenC), quadrivalent ACWY meningococcal (MenACWY), and pneumococcal vaccines. Twenty-three trials were included in the meta-analyses. Overall, administration of MenC-CRM in a 2 or 3 dose schedule resulted in a 45% reduction in Hib antibody concentrations (GMR 0.55, 95% CI 0.49-0.62). MenACWY-CRM boosted Hib antibody responses by 22% (GMR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06-1.41) whilst pneumococcal CRM conjugate vaccines had no impact on Hib antibody responses (GMR 0.91, 95% CI 0.68-1.22). The effect of CRM protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines on Hib antibody responses varies greatly between vaccines. Co-administration of a CRM conjugate vaccine can produce either positive or negative effects on Hib antibody responses. These inconsistencies suggest that CRM itself may not be the main driver of variability in Hib responses, and challenge current perspectives on this issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationships Between Clinico-Epidemiological Patterns of Invasive Meningococcal Infections and Complement Deficiencies in French South Pacific Islands (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daures, Maguy; John, Michele; Balter, Cécile Veysseyre; Simon, Olivier; Barguil, Yann; Missotte, Isabelle; Grangeon, Jean-Paul; Laumond-Barny, Sylvie; Noel, Martine; Besson-Leaud, Laurent; Spasic, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Suremain, Aurélie; Gourinat, Ann-Claire; Descloux, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) is three fold more common in New Caledonia (NC) than in metropolitan France and many IMD cases (35.7%) are due to Y and W135 serogroups. The purpose of our study was to identify IMD risk factors in NC. A retrospective study of all IMD cases that occurred in NC between 2005 and 2011 was conducted. Socio-environmental, clinical and biological data were collected. A search for immune deficiency was proposed to all cases. IMD presentation and outcome were compared according to meningoccal serogroups and the complement deficiency status (C-deficiency). Sixty-six sporadic IMD cases (29 B serogroup, 20 Y or W135, 6 C, 1 A, 10 unknown) occurred in 64 patients often <24 years-old and of Melanesian origin. Five patients died (7.8%). No socio-environmental risk factors were identified. No asplenia, HIV infection or immunoglobulin deficiencies were found. Two patients had diabetes and 28 of 53 (52.8%) patients had C-deficiency including 20 (71.4%) cases of late complement component deficiency. Patients with C-deficiency were mainly Melanesian (92.8%) originating from the Loyalty Islands (62.1%). They were mostly infected with Y/W135 (42.9%) or B serogroups (32.1%). They often developed later and more severe disease than patients without C-deficiency (need for intensive cares in 60% versus 28.0% of cases, p = 0.01). A high prevalence of C-deficiency in the Melanesian population may explain epidemiological and clinical features of IMD in NC. Our results imply an adaptation of meningococcal vaccine strategies in NC.

  9. A Rare Case of Primary Meningococcal Myopericarditis in a 71-Year-Old Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odilia I. Woudstra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of primary meningococcal C pericarditis with myocardial involvement in a 71-year-old male that is thus far the oldest patient with isolated meningococcal pericardial disease and only the third patient with primary meningococcal myopericarditis described in English literature. Our patient was successfully treated by full sternotomy and surgical drainage combined with intravenous ceftriaxone. Mild symptoms unresponsive to anti-inflammatory treatment and leukocytosis may guide clinicians towards the correct diagnosis. It is important to recognize this cause of pericarditis as the relatively mild clinical presentation may rapidly progress into tamponade and right-sided heart failure.

  10. The role of pediatricians as key stakeholders in influencing immunization policy decisions for the introduction of meningitis B vaccine in Canada: The Ontario perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Hirotaka; Cutcliffe, Nora; Dobson, Simon; Fisman, David; Gold, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    As key stakeholders in immunization policy decisions, the Pediatricians of Ontario held an accredited conference on January 18, 2014, to discuss prevention of invasive meningococcal disease. Five key recommendations were put forth regarding immunization strategies to protect children from meningococcal serogroup B disease. The recently approved four-component meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine should be recommended and funded as part of Ontario’s routine immunization schedule and should also be mandated for school attendance. Public funding for 4CMenB immunization is justified based on current MenB epidemiology, vaccine coverage, cost effectiveness and acceptability, as well as legal, political and ethical considerations related to 4CMenB immunization, particularly because routine recommendations and funding are currently in place for vaccination against meningococcal serogroups that cause significantly less disease in Canada than MenB. Broadly, the goals are to assist individual practitioners in advocating the benefits of 4CMenB vaccination to parents, and to counterbalance recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Canadian Paediatric Society. PMID:26361485

  11. Pre-admission antibiotics for suspected cases of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Rupali, Priscilla; Tharyan, Prathap; Abraham, Ooriapadickal Cherian; Thomas, Kurien

    2017-06-14

    Meningococcal disease can lead to death or disability within hours after onset. Pre-admission antibiotics aim to reduce the risk of serious disease and death by preventing delays in starting therapy before confirmation of the diagnosis. To study the effectiveness and safety of pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo, and different pre-admission antibiotic regimens in decreasing mortality, clinical failure, and morbidity in people suspected of meningococcal disease. We searched CENTRAL (6 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to 6 January 2017), Embase (1980 to 6 January 2017), Web of Science (1985 to 6 January 2017), LILACS (1982 to 6 January 2017), and prospective trial registries to January 2017. We previously searched CAB Abstracts from 1985 to June 2015, but did not update this search in January 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing antibiotics versus placebo or no intervention, in people with suspected meningococcal infection, or different antibiotics administered before admission to hospital or confirmation of the diagnosis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from the search results. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous data. We included only one trial and so did not perform data synthesis. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found no RCTs comparing pre-admission antibiotics versus no pre-admission antibiotics or placebo. We included one open-label, non-inferiority RCT with 510 participants, conducted during an epidemic in Niger, evaluating a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone versus a single dose of intramuscular long-acting (oily) chloramphenicol. Ceftriaxone was not inferior to chloramphenicol in reducing mortality (RR 1.21, 95% CI 0.57 to 2.56; N = 503; 308 confirmed meningococcal meningitis; 26 deaths; moderate-quality evidence), clinical failures (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.32 to

  12. Effectiveness of antibiotics given before admission in reducing mortality from meningococcal disease: systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahné, Susan J M; Charlett, André; Purcell, Bernadette; Samuelsson, Susanne; Camaroni, Ivonne; Ehrhard, Ingrid; Heuberger, Sigrid; Santamaria, Maria; Stuart, James M

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence for effectiveness of treatment with antibiotics before admission in reducing case fatality from meningococcal disease. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane register of trials and systematic reviews, database of abstracts of reviews of effectiveness,

  13. Decreased expression of serum and microvascular vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in meningococcal sepsis*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flier, M. van der; Baerveldt, E.M.; Miedema, A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hazelzet, J.A.; Emonts, M.; Groot, R. de; Prens, E.P.; Vught, A.J. van; Jansen, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skin microvessel expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and serum-soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 levels in children with meningococcal sepsis. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Two tertiary academic children hospital PICUs.

  14. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  15. Estimates of the burden of meningococcal disease in Italy: implications for prevention and control

    OpenAIRE

    MARTINELLI, D.; FORTUNATO, F.; PRATO, R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Meningococcal disease is an acute, severe bacterial infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis. The most common presentations of invasive meningococcal infection (IMD) are meningitis and sepsis, less common pathologic presentations include focal infections. IMD can develop from initial symptoms to death within 24 hours. As many as 20% of survivors have permanent sequelae. Infants < 1 year of age have the highest incidence and adolescents the highest carriage prevalence. In Italy, the ...

  16. Invasive meningococcal disease in the Veneto region of Italy: a capture-recapture analysis for assessing the effectiveness of an integrated surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, Tatjana; Lazzari, Roberta; Cocchio, Silvia; Furlan, Patrizia; Bertoncello, Chiara; Saia, Mario; Russo, Francesca; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2017-05-02

    Epidemiology of Neisseria meningitidis has been changing since the introduction of universal vaccination programmes against meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) and meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) has now become dominant. This study aimed to analyse the cases reported in institutional data recording systems to estimate the burden of invasive meningococcal diseases (IMDs) and assess the effectiveness of surveillance in Veneto region (Italy). Analysis was performed from 2007 to 2014 on data recorded in different systems: Mandatory Notification System, National Surveillance of Invasive Bacterial Diseases System and Laboratories Surveillance System (LSS), which were pooled into a combined surveillance system (CSS) and hospital discharge records (HDRs). A capture-recapture method was used and completeness of each source estimated. Number of cases with IMD by source of information and year, incidence of IMD by age group, case fatality rate (CFR) and distribution of meningococcal serogroups by year were also analysed. Combining the four data systems enabled the identification of 179 confirmed cases with IMD, achieving an overall sensitivity of 94.7% (95% CI: 90.8% to 98.8%), while it was 76.7% (95% CI: 73.6% to 80.1%) for CSS and 77.2% (95% CI: 74.1% to 80.6%) for HDRs. Typing of isolates was done in 80% of cases, and 95.2% of the typed cases were provided by LSS. Serogroup B was confirmed in 50.3% of cases. The estimated IMD notification rate (cases with IMD diagnosed and reported to the surveillance systems) was 0.48/100 000 population, and incidence peaked at 6.2/100 000 in children aged surveillance systems relies on case ascertainment based on serological characterisation of the circulating strains by microbiology laboratories. All available sources should be routinely combined to improve the epidemiology of IMD and the information used by public health departments to conduct timely preventive measures. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  17. Arthritis secondary to meningococcal disease: A case series of 7 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Behar, Vanina; Jacquier, Hervé; Richette, Pascal; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Zeller, Valérie; Rioux, Christophe; Coustet, Baptiste; Dieudé, Philippe; Ottaviani, Sébastien

    2017-07-01

    Arthritis secondary to invasive meningococcemia is rare and has been described as a direct result of bacteremia or as immunoallergic-type arthritis, related to the immune complex. Only a few case series have been reported.This multicenter study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of arthritis secondary to meningococcal infection.We performed a 5-year retrospective study. We included all patients with inflammatory joint symptoms and proven meningococcal disease defined by the identification of Neisseria meningitidis in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or synovial fluid. Septic arthritis was defined by the identification of N meningitidis in joint fluid. Immune-mediated arthritis was considered to be arthritis occurring after at least 1 day of invasive meningococcal disease without positive joint fluid culture.A total of 7 patients (5 males) with joint symptoms and meningococcal disease were identified. The clinical presentation was mainly oligoarticular and the knee was the most frequent joint site. Five patients had septic arthritis and 4 had immune-mediated arthritis; 2 had septic arthritis followed by immune-mediated arthritis. Immune-mediated arthritis occurred 3 to 7 days after meningococcal meningitis, and treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) led to improvement without complications.Physicians must be vigilant to the different clinical presentations in patients with arthritis associated with invasive meningococcal disease. If immune-mediated arthritis is suspected, NSAIDs are usually efficient.

  18. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  19. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C; Perea, William A

    2015-11-15

    An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years' experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100,000 in 2004-2010 to 0.02 per 100,000 in 2011-2013 (P meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. © 2015 World Health Organization; licensee Oxford Journals.

  20. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M.; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C.; Perea, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years’ experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. Methods. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). Results. The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100 000 in 2004–2010 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2011–2013 (P meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. PMID:26553668

  1. Expansion of Vaccination Services and Strengthening Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Surveillance in Haiti, 2010-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Rania A; Francois, Jeannot; Cavallaro, Kathleen F; Paluku, Gilson; Yalcouye, Idrissa; Jackson, Ernsley; Wright, Tracie; Adrien, Paul; Katz, Mark A; Hyde, Terri B; Faye, Pape; Kimanuka, Francine; Dietz, Vance; Vertefeuille, John; Lowrance, David; Dahl, Benjamin; Patel, Roopal

    2017-10-01

    Following the 2010 earthquake, Haiti was at heightened risk for vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) outbreaks due to the exacerbation of long-standing gaps in the vaccination program and subsequent risk of VPD importation from other countries. Therefore, partners supported the Haitian Ministry of Health and Population to improve vaccination services and VPD surveillance. During 2010-2016, three polio, measles, and rubella vaccination campaigns were implemented, achieving a coverage > 90% among children and maintaining Haiti free of those VPDs. Furthermore, Haiti is on course to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus, with 70% of communes achieving tetanus vaccine two-dose coverage > 80% among women of childbearing age. In addition, the vaccine cold chain storage capacity increased by 91% at the central level and 285% at the department level, enabling the introduction of three new vaccines (pentavalent, rotavirus, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines) that could prevent an estimated 5,227 deaths annually. Haiti moved from the fourth worst performing country in the Americas in 2012 to the sixth best performing country in 2015 for adequate investigation of suspected measles/rubella cases. Sentinel surveillance sites for rotavirus diarrhea and meningococcal meningitis were established to estimate baseline rates of those diseases prior to vaccine introduction and to evaluate the impact of vaccination in the future. In conclusion, Haiti significantly improved vaccination services and VPD surveillance. However, high dependence on external funding and competing vaccination program priorities are potential threats to sustaining the improvements achieved thus far. Political commitment and favorable economic and legal environments are needed to maintain these gains.

  2. New South Wales annual vaccine-preventable disease report, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewell, Alexander; Spokes, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the epidemiology of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales, Australia for 2013. Methods Data from the New South Wales Notifiable Conditions Information Management System were analysed by local health district of residence, age, Aboriginality, vaccination status and organism. Risk factor and vaccination status data were collected by public health units. Results Pertussis notification rates in infants were low, and no infant pertussis deaths were reported. Despite a high number of imported measles cases, there was limited secondary transmission. The invasive meningococcal disease notification rate declined, and disease due to serogroup C remained low and stable. Conclusion Vaccine-preventable diseases were relatively well controlled in New South Wales in 2013, with declining or stable notification rates in most diseases compared with the previous year. PMID:26306215

  3. A clinical trial examining the effect of increased total CRM(197) carrier protein dose on the antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b CRM(197) conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usonis, Vytautas; Bakasenas, Vytautas; Lockhart, Stephen; Baker, Sherryl; Gruber, William; Laudat, France

    2008-08-18

    CRM(197) is a carrier protein in certain conjugate vaccines. When multiple conjugate vaccines with the same carrier protein are administered simultaneously, reduced response to vaccines and/or antigens related to the carrier protein may occur. This study examined responses of infants who, in addition to diphtheria toxoid/tetanus toxoid/acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) received either diphtheria CRM(197)-based Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (HbOC) or HbOC and a diphtheria CRM(197)-based combination 9-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine/meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine. Administration of conjugate vaccines with CRM(197) carrier protein load >50 microg did not reduce response to CRM(197) conjugate vaccines or immunogenicity to immunologically cross-reactive diphtheria toxoid.

  4. Vaccines and future global health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, G J V

    2011-10-12

    Increased international support for both research into new vaccines and their deployment in developing countries has been evident over the past decade. In particular, the GAVI Alliance has had a major impact in increasing uptake of the six common infant vaccines as well as those against hepatitis B and yellow fever. It further aims to introduce pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines in the near future and several others, including those against human papillomavirus, meningococcal disease, rubella and typhoid not long after that. In addition, there is advanced research into vaccines against malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. By 2030, we may have about 20 vaccines that need to be used in the developing world. Finding the requisite funds to achieve this will pose a major problem. A second and urgent question is how to complete the job of global polio eradication. The new strategic plan calls for completion by 2013, but both pre-eradication and post-eradication challenges remain. Vaccines will eventually become available beyond the field of infectious diseases. Much interesting work is being done in both autoimmunity and cancer. Cutting across disease groupings, there are issues in methods of delivery and new adjuvant formulations.

  5. A Decade of Invasive Meningococcal Disease Surveillance in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczyńska, Anna; Waśko, Izabela; Kuch, Alicja; Kadłubowski, Marcin; Gołębiewska, Agnieszka; Foryś, Małgorzata; Markowska, Marlena; Ronkiewicz, Patrycja; Wasiak, Katarzyna; Kozińska, Aleksandra; Matynia, Bożena; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2013-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis is a leading etiologic agent of severe invasive disease. The objective of the study was to characterise invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) epidemiology in Poland during the last decade, based on laboratory confirmed cases. Methods The study encompassed all invasive meningococci collected between 2002 and 2011 in the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. The isolates were re-identified and characterised by susceptibility testing, MLST analysis, porA and fetA sequencing. A PCR technique was used for meningococcal identification directly from clinical materials. Results In the period studied, 1936 cases of IMD were confirmed, including 75.6% identified by culture. Seven IMD outbreaks, affecting mostly adolescents, were reported; all were caused by serogroup C meningococci of ST-11. The highest incidence was observed among children under one year of age (15.71/100,000 in 2011). The general case fatality rate in the years 2010–2011 was 10.0%. Meningococci of serogroup B, C, Y and W-135 were responsible for 48.8%, 36.6%, 1.2% and 1.2% of cases, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to third generation cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and 84.2% were susceptible to penicillin. MLST analysis (2009–2011) revealed that among serogroup B isolates the most represented were clonal complexes (CC) ST-32CC, ST-18CC, ST-41/44CC, ST-213CC and ST-269CC, and among serogroup C: ST-103CC, ST-41/44CC and ST-11CC. Conclusions The detection of IMD in Poland has changed over time, but observed increase in the incidence of the disease was mostly attributed to changes in the surveillance system including an expanded case definition and inclusion of data from non-culture diagnostics. PMID:23977184

  6. A decade of invasive meningococcal disease surveillance in Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skoczyńska

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading etiologic agent of severe invasive disease. The objective of the study was to characterise invasive meningococcal disease (IMD epidemiology in Poland during the last decade, based on laboratory confirmed cases.The study encompassed all invasive meningococci collected between 2002 and 2011 in the National Reference Centre for Bacterial Meningitis. The isolates were re-identified and characterised by susceptibility testing, MLST analysis, porA and fetA sequencing. A PCR technique was used for meningococcal identification directly from clinical materials.In the period studied, 1936 cases of IMD were confirmed, including 75.6% identified by culture. Seven IMD outbreaks, affecting mostly adolescents, were reported; all were caused by serogroup C meningococci of ST-11. The highest incidence was observed among children under one year of age (15.71/100,000 in 2011. The general case fatality rate in the years 2010-2011 was 10.0%. Meningococci of serogroup B, C, Y and W-135 were responsible for 48.8%, 36.6%, 1.2% and 1.2% of cases, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to third generation cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and 84.2% were susceptible to penicillin. MLST analysis (2009-2011 revealed that among serogroup B isolates the most represented were clonal complexes (CC ST-32CC, ST-18CC, ST-41/44CC, ST-213CC and ST-269CC, and among serogroup C: ST-103CC, ST-41/44CC and ST-11CC.The detection of IMD in Poland has changed over time, but observed increase in the incidence of the disease was mostly attributed to changes in the surveillance system including an expanded case definition and inclusion of data from non-culture diagnostics.

  7. Unusual initial abdominal presentations of invasive meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiddir, Tamazoust; Gros, Marion; Hong, Eva; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-03-28

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is recognized as septicemia and/or meningitis. However, early symptoms may vary and are frequently nonspecific. Early abdominal presentations have been increasingly described. We aimed to explore a large cohort of patients with initial abdominal presentations for association with particular meningococcal strains. Confirmed IMD cases in France between 1991-2016 were screened for the presence within the 24 hours before diagnosis of at least one of the following criteria (1) abdominal pain, (2) gastro-enteritis with diarrhea and vomiting, (3) diarrhea only. Whole genome sequencing was performed on all cultured isolates. We identified 105 cases (median age 19 years) of early abdominal presentations with a sharp increase since 2014. Early abdominal pain alone was the most frequent symptom (n=67, 64%), followed by gastro-enteritis (n=26, 25%) and diarrhea alone (n=12, 11%). Twenty patients (20%) had abdominal surgery. A higher case fatality rate (24%) was observed in these cases compared to 10.4% in all IMD in France (p=0.007) with high levels of inflammation markers in the blood. Isolates of group W were significantly more predominant in these cases compared to all IMD. Most of these isolates belonged to clonal complex ST-11 (cc11) of the sublineages of the South American-UK strain. Abdominal presentations are frequently provoked by hyperinvasive isolates of meningococci. Delay in the management of these cases and the virulence of the isolates may explain the high fatality rate. Rapid recognition is a key element to improve their management.

  8. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... component) of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by ...

  9. Vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  10. Costs of surviving meningococcal disease in Spain: evaluation for two cases of severe meningitis and septicaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbà, Josep; Kaskens, Lisette; Hark, Mareile; Wright, Claire

    2014-09-03

    The aim of this study was to count the lifelong rehabilitation costs associated with surviving meningococcal disease with major sequelae from the perspective of the Spanish National Healthcare System (NHS) and the national government. Two severe scenarios describing meningococcal disease were developed, one case that represented meningococcal septicaemia and another case for meningococcal meningitis. The scenarios were developed based on a literature review on severe sequelae of meningococcal disease, and discussions with paediatricians who have been responsible for the treatment of children with this disease in Spain. Second, a detailed list of all health, educational and social care resources used by survivors during their acute illness and during the rest of their lives and by family members was obtained by interviewing survivors and their families. Professionals in health and social care were also interviewed to complete the list of resources and ensure the scenario's were accurate. The costs attributed to these resources were obtained from tariff lists, catalogues and published information by the national authorities. All costs were based on a life expectancy of a survivor of 70 years and expressed in EUR 2012. In this study it was estimated that the lifelong discounted rehabilitation costs associated with the treatment of long-term sequelae due to meningococcal disease are approximately €1180,000-€1400,000. Medical care and social care were the main cost drivers for both septicaemia and meningitis. Annual costs showed to be the largest in the first year after diagnosis of the disease for both cases, due to high hospital admission and medical care costs during this period and decreased significantly over the years. This study shows that the lifelong rehabilitation costs associated with the survival of meningococcal disease with severe sequelae place an important burden on the NHS budget and governmental resources in Spain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  11. Reactive vaccination as a control strategy for pneumococcal meningitis outbreaks in the African meningitis belt: Analysis of outbreak data from Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Laura V; Stuart, James M; Okot, Charles; Asiedu-Bekoe, Franklin; Afreh, Osei Kuffour; Fernandez, Katya; Ronveaux, Olivier; Trotter, Caroline L

    2018-01-20

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasingly recognised as an important cause of bacterial meningitis in the African meningitis belt. The World Health Organization sets guidelines for response to outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis, but there are no current guidelines for outbreaks where S. pneumoniae is implicated. We aimed to evaluate the impact of using a similar response to target outbreaks of vaccine-preventable pneumococcal meningitis in the meningitis belt. Here, we adapt a previous model of reactive vaccination for meningococcal outbreaks to estimate the potential impact of reactive vaccination in a recent pneumococcal meningitis outbreak in the Brong-Ahafo region of central Ghana using weekly line list data on all suspected cases over a period of five months. We determine the sensitivity and specificity of various epidemic thresholds and model the cases and deaths averted by reactive vaccination. An epidemic threshold of 10 suspected cases per 100,000 population per week performed the best, predicting large outbreaks with 100% sensitivity and more than 85% specificity. In this outbreak, reactive vaccination would have prevented a lower number of cases per individual vaccinated (approximately 15,300 doses per case averted) than previously estimated for meningococcal outbreaks. Since the burden of death and disability from pneumococcal meningitis is higher than that from meningococcal meningitis, there may still be merit in considering reactive vaccination for outbreaks of pneumococcal meningitis. More outbreak data are needed to refine our model estimates. Whatever policy is followed, we emphasize the importance of timely laboratory confirmation of suspected cases to enable appropriate decisions about outbreak response. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, M Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W

    2015-11-15

    Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996-1997 (250,000 cases and 25,000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public-private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the "cost of goods" to develop a group A - containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35-$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. In June 2001, BMGF awarded a grant of US$70 million to create the Meningitis

  13. Pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia in children with meningococcal sepsis and septic shock: A prospective, observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Verhoeven (Jennifer)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of hyperglycemia and insulin response in critically ill children with meningococcal disease in the intensive care unit of an academic children's hospital.Methods: Seventy-eight children with meningococcal disease

  14. Overcoming the Odds: Long-term psychosocial outcomes in survivors of meningococcal septic shock in childhood, and in their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.A.C. Vermunt (Lindy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSeptic shock, caused by Neisseria meningitidis with petechiae and/or purpura, also called Meningococcal Septic Shock (MSS), is the most serious form of meningococcal infection in early childhood. MSS is a life-threatening illness in mostly previously healthy children, with an unexpected

  15. Decreased immune response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine after 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig Th; Center, Kimberly J; Davidsdottir, Katrin; Arason, Vilhjalmur A; Hjalmarsson, Bjorn; Elisdottir, Ragnheidur; Ingolfsdottir, Gunnhildur; Northington, Robert; Scott, Daniel A; Jonsdottir, Ingileif

    2014-01-09

    Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) is used in children at high risk of IPD. PPV is generally not considered to induce immunologic memory, whereas pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) elicit protective antibody responses in infants and induce immunologic memory. Little is known about the characteristics of immune responses to PCV in children who previously received PCV and PPV in series. To characterize immune responses to 13-valent pneumococcal CRM197 conjugate vaccine (PCV13; serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F) in children vaccinated in infancy with 9-valent pneumococcal-meningococcal C-CRM197 conjugate combination vaccine (PCV9-MnCC), followed by a toddler dose of PCV9-MnCC or 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23). Children (n=89) who received PCV9-MnCC in infancy and PPV23 or PCV9-MnCC at age 12 months in a previous (2002-2003) study were vaccinated at age 7.5 years with PCV13; groups PPV23/PCV13 (n=50) and PCV9/PCV13 (n=39). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies, avidity, and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) were measured before and at 1 and 4 weeks postvaccination. One week postvaccination, IgG levels increased significantly for all serotypes in both groups, and >97% of vaccinees achieved IgG ≥0.35μg/ml 4 weeks after PCV13 vaccination. The PCV9/PCV13 group had higher IgG responses compared with the PPV23/PCV13 group. The upper limits of the 95% confidence intervals of the PPV23/PCV13:PCV9/PCV13 IgG geometric mean concentration ratios were vaccination of toddlers may compromise subsequent responses to pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The clinical relevance of this finding is unclear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of Sequence Type 4821 Clonal Complex Meningococcal Strains in China from Prequinolone to Quinolone Era, 1972–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinglan; Mustapha, Mustapha M.; Chen, Mingliang; Qu, Di; Zhang, Xi; Harrison, Lee H.

    2018-01-01

    The expansion of hypervirulent sequence type 4821 clonal complex (CC4821) lineage Neisseria meningitidis bacteria has led to a shift in meningococcal disease epidemiology in China, from serogroup A (MenA) to MenC. Knowledge of the evolution and genetic origin of the emergent MenC strains is limited. In this study, we subjected 76 CC4821 isolates collected across China during 1972–1977 and 2005–2013 to phylogenetic analysis, traditional genotyping, or both. We show that successive recombination events within genes encoding surface antigens and acquisition of quinolone resistance mutations possibly played a role in the emergence of CC4821 as an epidemic clone in China. MenC and MenB CC4821 strains have spread across China and have been detected in several countries in different continents. Capsular switches involving serogroups B and C occurred among epidemic strains, raising concerns regarding possible increases in MenB disease, given that vaccines in use in China do not protect against MenB. PMID:29553310

  17. Do correlates of HPV vaccine initiation differ between adolescent boys and girls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, Melissa B; Moss, Jennifer L; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Brewer, Noel T

    2012-09-07

    Guidelines now recommend that adolescents routinely receive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Because little is known about uptake among boys, we assessed HPV vaccine initiation in a population-based sample of adolescent boys and girls. We analyzed weighted data from 751 parents who reported on an 11- to 17-year-old son or daughter for the 2010 North Carolina Child Health Assessment and Monitoring Program survey. Stratified multivariate logistic regression analyses identified correlates of HPV vaccine initiation separately for boys and girls. Only 14% of sons had received one or more doses of HPV vaccine compared to 44% of daughters (pvaccine initiation correlated with age and having received meningococcal vaccine. Among sons, initiation of HPV vaccine was lower for those living in high income households (odds ratio [OR]=0.22, 95% CI, 0.09-0.53) and higher for those whose race was neither white nor black (OR=3.26, 95% CI, 1.06-10.04). When asked to give the main reason for not vaccinating their child against HPV, parents of unvaccinated sons were more likely than those of daughters to report not getting a provider's recommendation or not being aware that the vaccine was available for their child, but less likely to report concern about safety (pHPV vaccine. HPV vaccine correlates and concerns varied for parents of boys and girls. To improve very low levels of uptake among boys, providers should recommend HPV vaccine concomitant with other adolescent vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How the Knowledge of Interactions between Meningococcus and the Human Immune System Has Been Used to Prepare Effective Neisseria meningitidis Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, tremendous advancement in dissecting the mechanisms of pathogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis at a molecular level has been achieved, exploiting converging approaches of different disciplines, ranging from pathology to microbiology, immunology, and omics sciences (such as genomics and proteomics. Here, we review the molecular biology of the infectious agent and, in particular, its interactions with the immune system, focusing on both the innate and the adaptive responses. Meningococci exploit different mechanisms and complex machineries in order to subvert the immune system and to avoid being killed. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition, in particular, play a major role in circumventing immune response. The understanding of these mechanisms has opened new horizons in the field of vaccinology. Nowadays different licensed meningococcal vaccines are available and used: conjugate meningococcal C vaccines, tetravalent conjugate vaccines, an affordable conjugate vaccine against the N. menigitidis serogroup A, and universal vaccines based on multiple antigens each one with a different and peculiar function against meningococcal group B strains.

  19. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Diabetes. Key words: Edible vaccines, oral vaccines, antigen expression, food vaccines. INTRODUCTION. Vaccination involves the stimulation of the immune system to prepare it for the event of an invasion from a particular pathogen for which the immune system has been primed (Arntzen, 1997). The release of vaccine is.

  20. Leptospirosis vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the recent advancements of recombinant outer membrane protein (OMP vaccines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS vaccines, inactivated vaccines, attenuated vaccines and DNA vaccines against leptospirosis are reviewed. A comparison of these vaccines may lead to development of new potential methods to combat leptospirosis and facilitate the leptospirosis vaccine research. Moreover, a vaccine ontology database was built for the scientists working on the leptospirosis vaccines as a starting tool.

  1. Polio Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS) Home Family Health Infants and Toddlers Polio Vaccine Polio Vaccine Share Print What is polio? Poliomyelitis (polio) is ... each year. Fortunately, the use of the polio vaccine has made the disease very rare in most ...

  2. Measles Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Measles Vaccination Pronounced (MEE-zills) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... also be up to date on their MMR vaccination. The MMR vaccine is very safe and effective. ...

  3. Proteliposome-derived Cochleate as an immunomodulator for nasal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Oliver; Bracho, Gustavo; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; González, Domingo; Gil, Danay; del Campo, Judith; Acevedo, Reinaldo; Taboada, Carlos; Rodríguez, Tamara; Fajardo, María E; Sierra, Gustavo; Campa, Concepción; Mora, Nestor; Barberá, Ramón; Solís, Rosa L

    2006-04-12

    Proteoliposome (PL) has been recently used as a protective intramuscular (i.m.) anti-meningococcal BC vaccine. It induces a preferential Th 1 type of immune response. Nevertheless, mucosal protection is mainly mediated by IgA antibody response, which is not usually induced by i.m. vaccination route. IgA antibody production needs the stimulation of Th3 subpopulation, which is also related to the induction of small dose tolerance. We hypothesized that PL-derived Cochleate can induce a specific mucosal IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses. We could show that mice immunized with two or three intranasal doses of PL-derived Cochleate developed significantly increased levels of local anti PL IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses. Thus, our results suggest that PL-derived Cochleate can be used as a promising immunomodulator and delivery system for the development of mucosal, particularly nasal vaccines.

  4. HPV vaccination initiation after the routine-recommended ages of 11–12 in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C. Beachler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 2006, routine HPV vaccination has been recommended for females aged 11–12 in the US. However not much is known about the extent of and factors associated with HPV vaccination after the ages of 11–12. Methods: Provider-verified data on 8710 females aged 13–17 were analyzed from the 2013 NIS-Teen survey. 2013 Data was utilized since it was the first year one can fully evaluate the age at vaccination through age 17 for females who could receive the HPV vaccine at age 11. Results: Among HPV vaccinated females who were 17 in 2013, 47% (95% CI=43–50% received their first dose after age 12, and 24% (95% CI=21–26% received their first dose after age 14. The HPV vaccine was more likely to be initiated later than the meningococcal and Tdap vaccines (p<0.05, and later HPV vaccine initiation was more common among those having a more highly educated mother and those not receiving a check-up/well visit between the ages of 11 and 12 in adjusted analyses (p-values<0.05. Females initiating the HPV vaccine late were more likely to not receive three doses (RR=1.90, 95% CI=1.76–2.04. Conclusions: HPV vaccination is commonly initiated after the age of 12 in the US, which could limit the vaccine׳s population-level effectiveness. Keywords: HPV vaccines, Late initiation, Vaccination, NIS-Teen

  5. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  6. AFCo1, a meningococcal B-derived cochleate adjuvant, strongly enhances antibody and T-cell immunity against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 4 and 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst a large number of malaria antigens are being tested as candidate malaria vaccines, a major barrier to the development of an effective vaccine is the lack of a suitable human adjuvant capable of inducing a strong and long lasting immune response. In this study, the ability of AFCo1, a potent T and B cell adjuvant based on cochleate structures derived from meningococcal B outer membrane proteoliposomes (MBOMP, to boost the immune response against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4 and 5 (MSP5, was evaluated. Methods Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, which is able to confer protection against malaria in animal MSP4/5 vaccine challenge models, was used as positive control adjuvant. MSP4 and 5-specific IgG, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, T-cell proliferation, and cytokine production were evaluated in parallel in mice immunized three times intramuscularly with MSP4 or MSP5 incorporated into AFCo1, synthetic cochleate structures, CFA or phosphate buffered saline. Results AFCo1 significantly enhanced the IgG and T-cell response against MSP4 and MSP5, with a potency equivalent to CFA, with the response being characterized by both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, increased interferon gamma production and a strong DTH response, consistent with the ability of AFCo1 to induce Th1-like immune responses. Conclusion Given the proven safety of MBOMP, which is already in use in a licensed human vaccine, AFCo1 could assist the development of human malaria vaccines that require a potent and safe adjuvant.

  7. AFCo1, a meningococcal B-derived cochleate adjuvant, strongly enhances antibody and T-cell immunity against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 4 and 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Gustavo; Zayas, Caridad; Wang, Lina; Coppel, Ross; Pérez, Oliver; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2009-02-27

    Whilst a large number of malaria antigens are being tested as candidate malaria vaccines, a major barrier to the development of an effective vaccine is the lack of a suitable human adjuvant capable of inducing a strong and long lasting immune response. In this study, the ability of AFCo1, a potent T and B cell adjuvant based on cochleate structures derived from meningococcal B outer membrane proteoliposomes (MBOMP), to boost the immune response against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4) and 5 (MSP5), was evaluated. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), which is able to confer protection against malaria in animal MSP4/5 vaccine challenge models, was used as positive control adjuvant. MSP4 and 5-specific IgG, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), T-cell proliferation, and cytokine production were evaluated in parallel in mice immunized three times intramuscularly with MSP4 or MSP5 incorporated into AFCo1, synthetic cochleate structures, CFA or phosphate buffered saline. AFCo1 significantly enhanced the IgG and T-cell response against MSP4 and MSP5, with a potency equivalent to CFA, with the response being characterized by both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, increased interferon gamma production and a strong DTH response, consistent with the ability of AFCo1 to induce Th1-like immune responses. Given the proven safety of MBOMP, which is already in use in a licensed human vaccine, AFCo1 could assist the development of human malaria vaccines that require a potent and safe adjuvant.

  8. An OMV Vaccine Derived from a Capsular Group B Meningococcus with Constitutive FetA Expression: Preclinical Evaluation of Immunogenicity and Toxicity.

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    Gunnstein Norheim

    Full Text Available Following the introduction of effective protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines against capsular group C meningococcal disease in Europe, meningococci of capsular group B remain a major cause of death and can result in debilitating sequelae. The outer membrane proteins PorA and FetA have previously been shown to induce bactericidal antibodies in humans. Despite considerable antigenic variation among PorA and FetA OMPs in meningococci, systematic molecular epidemiological studies revealed this variation is highly structured so that a limited repertoire of antigenic types is congruent with the hyperinvasive meningococcal lineages that have caused most of the meningococcal disease in Europe in recent decades. Here we describe the development of a prototype vaccine against capsular group B meningococcal infection based on a N. meningitidis isolate genetically engineered to have constitutive expression of the outer membrane protein FetA. Deoxycholate outer membrane vesicles (dOMVs extracted from cells cultivated in modified Frantz medium contained 21.8% PorA protein, 7.7% FetA protein and 0.03 μg LPS per μg protein (3%. The antibody response to the vaccine was tested in three mouse strains and the toxicological profile of the vaccine was tested in New Zealand white rabbits. Administration of the vaccine, MenPF-1, when given by intramuscular injection on 4 occasions over a 9 week period, was well tolerated in rabbits up to 50 μg/dose, with no evidence of systemic toxicity. These data indicated that the MenPF-1 vaccine had a toxicological profile suitable for testing in a phase I clinical trial.

  9. Chronic meningococcemia: a rare presentation of meningococcal disease: case report

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    Antonio Adolfo Guerra Soares Brandão

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic meningococcemia is a rare clinical presentation within the spectrumof infections due to Neisseria meningitidis, which was first described in 1902.It is defined as a chronic and benign meningococcal bacteremia withoutmeningeal signs or symptoms with at least one week’s duration, characterizedby intermittent or continuous fever, polymorphic cutaneous rash, and migratoryarthropathy. The incidence is believed to be around 1:200,000 inhabitants. Itaffects predominantly young people and adults, and it is equally distributedbetween genders. Diagnosis may be challenging in the early stages of thedisease because of the difficulty in isolating Neisseria meningitidis (it reaches74% of positivity in advanced stages. Recently, the use of PCR for detectingNeisseria sp antigen in skin biopsies specimens has been considered for thoseculture-negative cases. The authors report a case of a 54-year-old femalepatient who sought medical attention for a five-day fever followed by arthralgiaand skin lesions predominantly in the lower limbs. The patient progressed toa toxemic clinical status that improved after the administration of antibiotictherapy, which consisted of oxacillin and ceftriaxone. The diagnosis of chronicmeningococcemia was performed after the isolation of Neisseria meningitidisin two different blood sample cultures. This is, to our knowledge, the firstcase of chronic meningococcemia described in Brazil (up to the writing of thisreport.

  10. A comparison of meningococcal carriage by pregnancy status

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    Knudtson Eric J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neisseria meningitidis is the second leading cause of invasive meningitis. A prerequisite for infection is colonization of the nasopharynx, and asymptomatic carrier rates are widely reported in the range of 10-15%. Recent reports have indicated an increased likelihood that a pediatric admission for Neisseria meningitidis will have a mother who is pregnant in the home. We hypothesized that this association may relate to immunologic changes in pregnancy leading to higher carrier rates. We compared the carrier status by performing nasopharyngeal swabs for Neisseria meningitidis in 100 pregnant and 99 non-pregnant women. Average age of the participants was 28.9 +/- 6.7 years. The average gestational age at specimen collection was 27.5 +/- 9.4 weeks. Non pregnant women were significantly more likely to use tobacco (38% vs 24%, p The meningococcal carrier rate in our population is well below what is widely reported in the literature. Assuming a 1% carrier rate in the pregnant group and a 0.5% carrier rate in the non pregnant group, 4,763 patients would be required to detect a difference of this magnitude, given 80% power and an alpha of 0.05.

  11. Pattern of the meningococcal meningitis outbreak in Northern Nigeria, 2009

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    Bassey Enya Bassey

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: The testing of CSF samples during meningitis outbreaks is recommended in order to monitor the occurrence of the multiple meningitis serotypes during these outbreaks and to direct serotype-specific vaccination response activities.

  12. Which early 'red flag' symptoms identify children with meningococcal disease in primary care?

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    Haj-Hassan, Tanya Ali; Thompson, Matthew J; Mayon-White, Richard T; Ninis, Nelly; Harnden, Anthony; Smith, Lindsay F P; Perera, Rafael; Mant, David C

    2011-03-01

    Symptoms are part of the initial evaluation of children with acute illness, and are often used to help identify those who may have serious infections. Meningococcal disease is a rapidly progressive infection that needs to be recognised early among children presenting to primary care. To determine the diagnostic value of presenting symptoms in primary care for meningococcal disease. Data on a series of presenting symptoms were collected using a parental symptoms checklist at point of care for children presenting to a GP with acute infection. Symptom frequencies were compared with existing data on the pre-hospital features of 345 children with meningococcal disease. UK primary care. The study recruited a total of 1212 children aged under 16 years presenting to their GP with an acute illness, of whom 924 had an acute self-limiting infection, including 407 who were reported by parents to be febrile. Symptom frequencies were compared with those reported by parents of 345 children with meningococcal disease. Main outcome measures were diagnostic characteristics of individual symptoms for meningococcal disease. Five symptoms have clinically useful positive likelihood ratios (LR+) for meningococcal disease: confusion (LR+ = 24.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 11.5 to 51.3), leg pain (LR+ = 7.6, 95% CI = 4.9 to 11.9), photophobia (LR+ = 6.5, 95% CI = 3.8 to 11.0), rash (LR+ = 5.5, 95% CI = 4.3 to 7.1), and neck pain/stiffness (LR+ = 5.3, 95% CI = 3.5 to 8.3). Cold hands and feet had limited diagnostic value (LR+ = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.9 to 3.0), while headache (LR+ = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.8 to 1.3), and pale colour (LR+ = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.2 to 0.5) did not discriminate meningococcal disease in children. This study confirms the diagnostic value of classic 'red flag' symptoms of neck stiffness, rash, and photophobia, but also suggests that the presence of confusion or leg pain in a child with an unexplained acute febrile illness should also usually prompt a face-to-face assessment to

  13. Which early ‘red flag’ symptoms identify children with meningococcal disease in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hassan, Tanya Ali; Thompson, Matthew J; Mayon-White, Richard T; Ninis, Nelly; Harnden, Anthony; Smith, Lindsay FP; Perera, Rafael; Mant, David C

    2011-01-01

    Background Symptoms are part of the initial evaluation of