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Sample records for meningococcal vaccine candidate

  1. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines ... or her parents, and the doctor. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Meningococcal disease is caused by a ...

  2. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... vaccines are a good idea. Caring for Your Child After Immunization Your child might have a fever, soreness, and ...

  3. The meningococcal vaccine candidate neisserial surface protein A (NspA binds to factor H and enhances meningococcal resistance to complement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Lewis

    Full Text Available Complement forms an important arm of innate immunity against invasive meningococcal infections. Binding of the alternative complement pathway inhibitor factor H (fH to fH-binding protein (fHbp is one mechanism meningococci employ to limit complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a leading vaccine candidate against group B Neisseria meningitidis. Novel mechanisms that meningococci employ to bind fH could undermine the efficacy of fHbp-based vaccines. We observed that fHbp deletion mutants of some meningococcal strains showed residual fH binding suggesting the presence of a second receptor for fH. Ligand overlay immunoblotting using membrane fractions from one such strain showed that fH bound to a approximately 17 kD protein, identified by MALDI-TOF analysis as Neisserial surface protein A (NspA, a meningococcal vaccine candidate whose function has not been defined. Deleting nspA, in the background of fHbp deletion mutants, abrogated fH binding and mAbs against NspA blocked fH binding, confirming NspA as a fH binding molecule on intact bacteria. NspA expression levels vary among strains and expression correlated with the level of fH binding; over-expressing NspA enhanced fH binding to bacteria. Progressive truncation of the heptose (Hep I chain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS, or sialylation of lacto-N-neotetraose LOS both increased fH binding to NspA-expressing meningococci, while expression of capsule reduced fH binding to the strains tested. Similar to fHbp, binding of NspA to fH was human-specific and occurred through fH domains 6-7. Consistent with its ability to bind fH, deleting NspA increased C3 deposition and resulted in increased complement-dependent killing. Collectively, these data identify a key complement evasion mechanism with important implications for ongoing efforts to develop meningococcal vaccines that employ fHbp as one of its components.

  4. Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines: What You Need to Know (VIS) Page Content ... to help protect against serogroup B . Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines There are two kinds of meningococcal vaccines licensed ...

  5. Meningococcal vaccine evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Bona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis worldwide. Although polysaccharide and glycoconjugate vaccines have been developed for serogroups A, C, Y and W-135, currently there are no broadly effective vaccines available for the prevention of meningococcal B disease. A general overview of the burden of the disease and the strains prevalence in the world with the focus in particular on the Italian situation is provided in this article, together with the vaccinations developed and under evaluation.

  6. Phase I Safety and Immunogenicity Study of a Candidate Meningococcal Disease Vaccine Based on Neisseria lactamica Outer Membrane Vesicles▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Andrew R.; Taylor, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Matheson, Mary; Finney, Michelle; Kerr, Moyra; Hudson, Michael; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Kafatos, George; Evans, Cariad M.; Read, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Natural immunity to meningococcal disease in young children is associated epidemiologically with carriage of commensal Neisseria species, including Neisseria lactamica. We have previously demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from N. lactamica provide protection against lethal challenge in a mouse model of meningococcal septicemia. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an N. lactamica OMV vaccine in a phase I placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Ninety-seven healthy young adult male volunteers were randomized to receive three doses of either an OMV vaccine or an Alhydrogel control. Subsequently, some subjects who had received the OMV vaccine also received a fourth dose of OMV vaccine, 6 months after the third dose. Injection site reactions were more frequent in the OMV-receiving group, but all reactions were mild or moderate in intensity. The OMV vaccine was immunogenic, eliciting rises in titers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) against the vaccine OMVs, together with a significant booster response, as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the vaccine induced modest cross-reactive immunity to six diverse strains of serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis, including IgG against meningococcal OMVs, serum bactericidal antibodies, and opsonophagocytic activity. The percentages of subjects showing ≥4-fold rises in bactericidal antibody titer obtained were similar to those previously reported for the Norwegian meningococcal OMV vaccine against the same heterologous meningococcal strain panel. In conclusion, this N. lactamica OMV vaccine is safe and induces a weak but broad humoral immune response to N. meningitidis. PMID:19553555

  7. Phase I safety and immunogenicity study of a candidate meningococcal disease vaccine based on Neisseria lactamica outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Andrew R; Taylor, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Matheson, Mary; Finney, Michelle; Kerr, Moyra; Hudson, Michael; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Kafatos, George; Evans, Cariad M; Read, Robert C

    2009-08-01

    Natural immunity to meningococcal disease in young children is associated epidemiologically with carriage of commensal Neisseria species, including Neisseria lactamica. We have previously demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from N. lactamica provide protection against lethal challenge in a mouse model of meningococcal septicemia. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an N. lactamica OMV vaccine in a phase I placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Ninety-seven healthy young adult male volunteers were randomized to receive three doses of either an OMV vaccine or an Alhydrogel control. Subsequently, some subjects who had received the OMV vaccine also received a fourth dose of OMV vaccine, 6 months after the third dose. Injection site reactions were more frequent in the OMV-receiving group, but all reactions were mild or moderate in intensity. The OMV vaccine was immunogenic, eliciting rises in titers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) against the vaccine OMVs, together with a significant booster response, as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, the vaccine induced modest cross-reactive immunity to six diverse strains of serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis, including IgG against meningococcal OMVs, serum bactericidal antibodies, and opsonophagocytic activity. The percentages of subjects showing > or =4-fold rises in bactericidal antibody titer obtained were similar to those previously reported for the Norwegian meningococcal OMV vaccine against the same heterologous meningococcal strain panel. In conclusion, this N. lactamica OMV vaccine is safe and induces a weak but broad humoral immune response to N. meningitidis.

  8. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines: optimizing global impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terranella A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Terranella1,2, Amanda Cohn2, Thomas Clark2 1Epidemic Intelligence Service, Division of Applied Sciences, Scientific Education and Professional Development Program Office, 2Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Meningococcal conjugate vaccines have several advantages over polysaccharide vaccines, including the ability to induce greater antibody persistence, avidity, immunologic memory, and herd immunity. Since 1999, meningococcal conjugate vaccine programs have been established across the globe. Many of these vaccination programs have resulted in significant decline in meningococcal disease in several countries. Recent introduction of serogroup A conjugate vaccine in Africa offers the potential to eliminate meningococcal disease as a public health problem in Africa. However, the duration of immune response and the development of widespread herd immunity in the population remain important questions for meningococcal vaccine programs. Because of the unique epidemiology of meningococcal disease around the world, the optimal vaccination strategy for long-term disease prevention will vary by country. Keywords: conjugate vaccine, meningitis, meningococcal vaccine, meningococcal disease

  9. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles.

  10. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining that ...

  11. New and Improved Vaccines Against Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Frasch CE, Coetzee G, Zabradnik JM , Feldman HA, Koornhof HJ. Development and evaluation of group B protein vaccines: report of a group B field trial...14. Baker CJ, Griffiss JM . Influence of age on serogroup distribution of endemic meningococcal disease. Pediatrics 1983; 71:923. 15. Poolman JT...148:754. 18. Broud DD, Griffiss JM , Baker CJ. Heterogeneity of serotypes of Neisseria meningitis causing endemic disease. J Infect Dis 1979; 140:465

  12. Indirect effects by meningococcal vaccines: herd protection versus herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael

    2011-08-01

    The term "herd immunity" for the indirect effect of meningococcal conjugate vaccines is inaccurate. A more appropriate term is "herd protection," because this term correctly describes the public effects imparted by vaccination campaigns against the meningococcus.

  13. Updated recommendations on the use of meningococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Since the last policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) concerning meningococcal vaccine was published in 2011, 2 meningococcal conjugate vaccines have been licensed for use in infants (Hib-MenCY-TT and MenACWY-CRM). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published new recommendations, "Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices," which have been endorsed by the AAP. However, the CDC recommendations were published before licensure of MenACWY-CRM for infant use. This policy statement updates the AAP recommendations for use of meningococcal vaccines in children and adolescents. A more comprehensive review of background and technical information can be found in the CDC publication. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Vaccines for Prevention of Group B Meningococcal Disease: Not Your Father's Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-12-01

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review.

  15. Immunogenicity of meningococcal PorA antigens in OMV vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    For the prevention of meningococcal infection caused by group B meningococci, the Netherlands Vaccine Institute (NVI) has developed a hexavalent Porin A (PorA) based Outer Membrane Vesicle (OMV) vaccine (Hexamen). In various clinical studies with HexaMen, differences in the immune responses to the

  16. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines policy update: booster dose recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics approved updated recommendations for the use of quadravalent (serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y) meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menactra [Sanofi Pasteur, Swiftwater, PA] and Menveo [Novartis, Basel, Switzerland]) in adolescents and in people at persistent high risk of meningococcal disease. The recommendations supplement previous Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for meningococcal vaccinations. Data were reviewed pertaining to immunogenicity in high-risk groups, bactericidal antibody persistence after immunization, current epidemiology of meningococcal disease, meningococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of different strategies for vaccination of adolescents. This review prompted the following recommendations: (1) adolescents should be routinely immunized at 11 through 12 years of age and given a booster dose at 16 years of age; (2) adolescents who received their first dose at age 13 through 15 years should receive a booster at age 16 through 18 years or up to 5 years after their first dose; (3) adolescents who receive their first dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine at or after 16 years of age do not need a booster dose; (4) a 2-dose primary series should be administered 2 months apart for those who are at increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease because of persistent complement component (eg, C5-C9, properdin, factor H, or factor D) deficiency (9 months through 54 years of age) or functional or anatomic asplenia (2-54 years of age) and for adolescents with HIV infection; and (5) a booster dose should be given 3 years after the primary series if the primary 2-dose series was given from 2 through 6 years of age and every 5 years for persons whose 2-dose primary series or booster dose was given at 7 years of age or older who are at

  17. Safety and immunogenicity of New Zealand strain meningococcal serogroup B OMV vaccine in healthy adults: beginning of epidemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, V; Lennon, D; Rasanathan, K; O'Hallahan, J; Oster, P; Stewart, J; Tilman, S; Aaberge, I; Feiring, B; Nokleby, H; Rosenqvist, E; White, K; Reid, S; Mulholland, K; Wakefield, M J; Martin, D

    2006-02-27

    As the first step towards control of a strain specific epidemic of meningococcal disease in New Zealand (NZ), this study, an observer-blind, randomised controlled trial in 75 healthy adults, evaluated safety and immunogenicity of two different dosages of a meningococcal group B vaccine administered in a three dose regime. The "tailor-made" outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine (candidate vaccine) developed using a New Zealand meningococcal group B strain (B:4:P1.7b,4) was well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Similar local and systemic reactions were observed in those receiving the New Zealand candidate vaccine and the control parent Norwegian vaccine (MenBvac). A four-fold rise in serum bactericidal antibodies (SBAb) against the vaccine strain 4-6 weeks after the third vaccination was achieved in 100% of New Zealand candidate vaccine 2,519 microg participants and in 87% of 50 microg participants. The safety and immunogenicity profile observed in this study of healthy adults enabled studies in children to be initiated using 25 microg dosage.

  18. Facts about Meningococcal Disease for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meningococcal Disease Facts about Meningococcal Disease for Adults Facts about Meningococcal Disease for Adults What is meningococcal ... risks associated with the vaccines. Disease and vaccine facts FACT: Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine (A, C, W, and ...

  19. Meningococcal vaccine A,C,W135,Y: conjugated to tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A meningococcal vaccine conjugated to protein CRM 197 (Menveo) is the standard vaccine for immunisation against invasive meningococcal infections caused by serogroups A, C, W135 andY, beginning at age 2 years. Nimenrix, another vaccine against meningococcal groups A, C,W135 and Y, conjugated to tetanus toxoid, was authorised for use in the European Union, starting at age 1 year. The two tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines have not been compared in head-to-head trials. Four immunogenicity studies compared the tetravalent conjugate vaccine Nimenrix with an unconjugated tetravalent meningococcal vaccine in children and adults aged 2 to 55 years. The results showed that Nimenrix was more immunogenic than the unconjugated vaccine. Two immunogenicity studies showed that Nimenrix was at least as immunogenic as monovalent (group C) meningococcal conjugate vaccines in children aged from 1 to 2 years and from 2 to 10 years. In one study, prior vaccination with an unconjugated tetravalent meningococcal vaccine had little impact on the immunogenicity of a booster dose of the conjugate vaccine Nimenrix. Concomitant administration with other vaccines does not affect the immunogenicity of Nimenrix. Nimenrix causes more frequent local and systemic adverse reactions than the unconjugated tetravalent meningococcal vaccine and monovalent group C meningococcal conjugate vaccines. In children over 2 years of age, Nimenrix has no advantages over Menveo for vaccination against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W135 andY. In contrast, between the ages of 1 and 2 years, Nimenrix is the only vaccine with established immunogenicity. In addition, it has an acceptable harm-benefit balance.

  20. Meningococcal vaccines and herd immunity: lessons learned from serogroup C conjugate vaccination programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Caroline L; Maiden, Martin C J

    2009-07-01

    Effective vaccines provide direct protection to immunized individuals, but may also provide benefits to unvaccinated individuals by reducing transmission and thereby lowering the risk of infection. Such herd immunity effects have been demonstrated following the introduction of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines, with reductions in disease attack rates in unimmunized individuals and significantly lower serogroup C carriage attributable to the vaccine introduction. In the UK, targeting teenagers for immunization was crucial in maximizing indirect effects, as most meningococcal transmission occurs in this age group. Questions remain regarding the duration of herd protection and the most appropriate long-term immunization strategies. The magnitude of the herd effects following MCC vaccination was largely unanticipated, and has important consequences for the design and evaluation of new meningococcal vaccines.

  1. Vaccine preventability of meningococcal clone, Greater Aachen Region, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Johannes; Schouls, Leo M; van de Pol, Ingrid; Keijzers, Wendy C; Martin, Diana R; Glennie, Anne; Oster, Philipp; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-03-01

    Emergence of serogroup B meningococci of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 41/44 can cause high levels of disease, as exemplified by a recent epidemic in New Zealand. Multiplication of annual incidence rates (3.1 cases/100,000 population) of meningococcal disease in a defined German region, the city of Aachen and 3 neighboring countries (Greater Aachen) prompted us to investigate and determine the source and nature of this outbreak. Using molecular typing and geographic mapping, we analyzed 1,143 strains belonging to ST41/44 complex, isolated from persons with invasive meningococcal disease over 6 years (2001-2006) from 2 German federal states (total population 26 million) and the Netherlands. A spatially slowly moving clone with multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis type 19, ST42, and antigenic profile B:P1.7-2,4:F1-5 was responsible for the outbreak. Bactericidal activity in serum samples from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccination campaign confirmed vaccine preventability. Because this globally distributed epidemic strain spreads slowly, vaccination efforts could possibly eliminate meningococcal disease in this area.

  2. Meningococcal B vaccination strategies and their practical application in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2015-08-31

    Immunisation against meningococcal meningitis has a long history, which has passed through several phases: the studies by Flexner, extraction of the polysaccharide capsule, the development of monovalent and multivalent conjugate vaccines, the outer membrane vesicle vaccines up to the development of effective and safe vaccines for meningococcal B invasive disease through the application of the techniques of molecular biology and reverse vaccinology. The new available vaccines are Bexsero® and Trumenba®. Bexsero ® has been approved and is available in Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia and Chile, and is currently under review in Brazil for the prevention of MenB invasive disease in subjects ≥ 2 months. Trumemba® is currently approved only in the USA, for use in adolescents and young adults. At present, the greatest obstacle to the extensive use of these vaccines in industrialised countries is the high cost and the need administer multiple doses in infants. However, in some European countries and in some Italian Regions, strategies (free and active call) to fight the disease through vaccination (Bexsero®) are already in place.

  3. Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Vaccine Recommendations at a University, New Jersey, USA, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeters, Heidi M; Dinitz-Sklar, Jill; Kulkarni, Prathit A; MacNeil, Jessica R; McNamara, Lucy A; Zaremski, Elizabeth; Chang, How-Yi; Lujan, Eduardo; Granoff, Dan; Lasky, Melodee; Montana, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    In response to a university-based serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreak, the serogroup B meningococcal vaccine Trumenba was recommended for students, a rare instance in which a specific vaccine brand was recommended. This outbreak highlights the challenges of using molecular and immunologic data to inform real-time response.

  4. The role of economic evaluation in vaccine decision making : Focus on meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R.; Trotter, C.L.; Edmunds, W.J.; Postma, Maarten; Beutels, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several countries have experienced increases in the incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease. It can be controlled with older polysaccharide vaccines and particularly the recently developed conjugate vaccines. For 21 developed countries, we investigated the role that economic

  5. Meningococcal Vaccine: A Guide for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1998-2017 | Center for Young Women's Health, Boston Children's Hospital. All rights reserved. × Additional Resources: Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Meningitis FAQs The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)

  6. Meningococcal disease awareness and meningoccocal vaccination among Greek students planning to travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Maltezou, Helena C

    2017-06-09

    Objective Students living in dormitories are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Our aim was to evaluate Greek students planning to study abroad about their level of meningococcal disease awareness and attitudes and practices towards meningococcal vaccination. Methods We studied 231 Greek ERASMUS students using a questionnaire. Results Students had a mean number of 4.1 correct answers out of six questions. In particular 66.5% 79.3%, 72.3% and 82.3% of them answered correctly about the etiology, transmission, epidemiology and treatment of meningococcal disease, respectively. Only 23.4% were vaccinated, whereas 14.7% were planning to do so in the near future. Students who answered correctly ≥5 questions were more likely to be male, vaccinated against meningococcal meningitis and science students. Conclusion We found an overall good level of knowledge about meningococcal disease among Greek students planning to study or already studying abroad. Knowledge about meningococcal disease was associated with vaccine uptake. However, vaccination rate against meningococcal disease was low.

  7. New recombinant vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal B disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha MK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muhamed-Kheir Taha, Ala-Eddine DeghmaneInstitut Pasteur, Unit of Invasive Bacterial Infections and National Reference Center for Meningococci, Paris, FranceAbstract: Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening invasive infection (mainly septicemia and meningitis that occurs as epidemic or sporadic cases. The causative agent, Neisseria meningitidis or meningococcus, is a capsulated Gram-negative bacterium. Current vaccines are prepared from the capsular polysaccharides (that also determine serogroups and are available against strains of serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135 that show variable distribution worldwide. Plain polysaccharide vaccines were first used and subsequently conjugate vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity were introduced. The capsular polysaccharide of meningococcal serogroup B is poorly immunogenic due to similarity to the human neural cells adhesion molecule. Tailor-made, strain-specific vaccines have been developed to control localized and clonal outbreaks due to meningococci of serogroup B but no “universal” vaccine is yet available. This unmet medical need was recently overcome using several subcapsular proteins to allow broad range coverage of strains and to reduce the risk of escape variants due to genetic diversity of the meningococcus. Several vaccines are under development that target major or minor surface proteins. One vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis, under registration, is a multicomponent recombinant vaccine that showed an acceptable safety profile and covers around 80% of the currently circulating serogroup B isolates. However, its reactogenicity in infants seems to be high and the long term persistence of the immune response needs to be determined. Its activity on carriage, and therefore transmission, is under evaluation. Indirect protection is expected through restricting strain circulation and acquisition. This vaccine covers the circulating strains according to the presence of the targeted antigens in the

  8. 脑膜炎球菌疫苗的研究和开发现状%Current status of research and development of meningococcal vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江元翔; 朱为

    2009-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a major public health problem throughout the world,with associated high levels of morbidity and mortality.In this review,research and development of meningococcal vaccines and group B meningococcal vaccine in particular are discussed in the following aspects,including bacterial genetics,epidemic of meningococcal disease,vaccine supply,new candidate vaccines and new methods to identify meningococcal vaccine candidates.%流行性脑脊髓膜炎(流脑)是一个世界性公共卫生问题,发病率和死亡率都较高.此文从细菌遗传学特征、流脑的流行趋势、疫苗供应现状、可供选择的候选疫苗及其筛选方法等方面讨论了脑膜炎球菌疫苗(特别是B群脑膜炎球菌疫苗)的研究和开发现状.

  9. Bexsero: a multicomponent vaccine for prevention of meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Andrew R; Pajón, Rolando

    2012-02-01

    Serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) disease remains a serious public health problem for which a cross-protective vaccine effective against a wide range of MenB isolates has not been available. Novartis Vaccines has developed a vaccine for the prevention of MenB disease that contains four antigenic components: factor H binding protein (fHbp), neisserial adhesin A (NadA), Neisseria heparin binding antigen (NHBA) and outer membrane vesicles from a New Zealand epidemic strain (which provides PorA). This vaccine has been submitted for regulatory review in Europe so it is timely to review the design of the vaccine, results to date in clinical studies and the potential strain coverage provided by the vaccine. It is also critical to discuss the key issues for the long-term success of the vaccine which include strain coverage, potential persistence of protection, potential effects on carriage of MenB strains, potential for escape mutants and cost effectiveness.

  10. [Invasive meningococcal disease in Navarra in the era of a meningococcal C vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Desirée; Moreno, Laura; Herranz, Mercedes; Bernaola, Enrique; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Systematic childhood vaccination against meningococcus C has had a considerable impact on meningococcal invasive disease (MID). The aim of this study is to perform an analysis on the epidemiology, the clinical features, and the factors associated with a worse prognosis of MID, in the era of a meningococcal C vaccine. The study included confirmed cases of MID in children less than 15 years of age in Navarra, Spain, between 2008 and 2014. The risk of death or permanent sequelae was evaluated according to the presence of clinical features and analytical parameters at diagnosis. The average annual incidence was 7.9 cases per 100,000 children, with the highest attack rate in children < 1 year. Of 53 cases analysed, 87% were due to meningococcus B. Fever (100%), rash (91%), and elevation of procalcitonin (94%) were the most frequent findings at diagnosis. Some sign of shock was observed in 70% upon arrival at the hospital. The case-fatality rate was 3.8% and 10 % survived with permanent sequelae. Glasgow coma scale < 15 (odds ratio [OR]= 9.2), seizure (OR=8.3), sepsis without meningitis (OR=9.1), thrombocytopenia (OR=30.5), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (OR= 10.9) showed a greater association with a worse prognosis. The MID continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Therefore, new advances are needed in the prevention, early diagnosis, and detection of the factors associated with poor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Meningococcal Serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y Conjugated Vaccine : A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepkema, Hiltsje; Pouwels, Koen B.; van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W-135, Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was licens

  12. Prevention of meningococcal serogroup B infections in children: A protein-based vaccine induces immunologic memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.D. de Kleijn (Ester); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.B. van Gageldonk-Lafeber (Rianne); J. Labadie (J.); C.J.P. van Limpt (C. J P); J. Visser (John); G.A. Berbers; L. van Alphen (Loek); H. Rümke (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractImmunologic memory against meningococci was studied in 177 children (100 children were 10-11 years old and 77 were 5-6 years old) 2.5 years after vaccination with hexavalent meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine or hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine. Children were revaccinated with

  13. [Polyvalent meningococcal vaccines: within or outside our agenda?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, R; Vázquez, J A

    2014-11-01

    The development of tetravalent vaccines against Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) has been driven mainly due to the increase of the prevalence and geographic expansion of several serogroups considered unusual, but also because of the need for vaccines that offer broad spectrum protection in a devastating disease such as IMD. These changes in serogroups considered usual (B and C) have been detected for both serogroup Y and W, which has led to the multivalent vaccines being used by a number of countries with different strategies that will be discussed in the article. Epidemiological data in Spain, currently do not justify its use in immunization schedules, but there is a potential risk for the introduction of virulent clones of those uncommon serogroups (Y and W), and this would lead us to open a discussion of their potential use, particularly in the adolescent/pre-teen population as a target group for intervention. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. IgG antibody subclass responses determined by immunoblot in infants' sera following vaccination with a meningococcal recombinant hexavalent PorA OMV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S; Sadler, F; Borrow, R; Dawson, M; Fox, A; Cartwright, K

    2001-08-14

    The introduction of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccines into the UK immunisation schedule has led to the decline of serogroup C disease in those vaccinated but there is no imminent vaccine solution for serogroup B disease. The PorA outer membrane protein (OMP) is a potential serogroup B vaccine candidate and an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine containing six different PorA OMPs (each representing a different serosubtype) has been evaluated in phase II trials with encouraging results. Little is known about the IgG subclass response to the various antigens contained within this vaccine. These responses are important due to the different half-lives and complement fixing abilities of these antibodies. In this study, immunoblotting was undertaken with infants' sera following either three or four doses of vaccine, and OMVs from six isogenic meningococcal strains differing only in their PorA serosubtype. Following either three or four doses of the vaccine, IgG(3) and IgG(1) subclass antibodies were induced to all six of the isogenic strains, although sera collected after four doses of vaccine showed stronger antibody levels. IgG(3) was found in more sera than IgG(1). For both sets of sera, the two isogenic strains expressing P1.5,2 and P1.5(c),10 induced stronger IgG subclass antibody responses than the other four meningococcal strains. The recombinant hexavalent PorA OMV vaccine stimulates both IgG(1) and IgG(3) subclass antibodies, the subclasses that are most effective in activating the complement system.

  15. Persistence of serogroup C antibody responses following quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccination in United States military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manisha; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Broderick, Michael P; Thomas, Cynthia G; Plikaytis, Brian D; Schmidt, Daniel S; Johnson, Scott E; Milton, Andrea S; Carlone, George M; Clark, Thomas A; Messonnier, Nancy E; Cohn, Amanda C; Faix, Dennis J

    2014-06-24

    Serogroup C meningococcal (MenC) disease accounts for one-third of all meningococcal cases and causes meningococcal outbreaks in the U.S. Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (MenACYWD) was recommended in 2005 for adolescents and high risk groups such as military recruits. We evaluated anti-MenC antibody persistence in U.S. military personnel vaccinated with either MenACYWD or meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4). Twelve hundred subjects vaccinated with MenACYWD from 2006 to 2008 or MPSV4 from 2002 to 2004 were randomly selected from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Baseline serologic responses to MenC were assessed in all subjects; 100 subjects per vaccine group were tested during one of the following six post-vaccination time-points: 5-7, 11-13, 17-19, 23-25, 29-31, or 35-37 months. Anti-MenC geometric mean titers (GMT) were measured by rabbit complement serum bactericidal assay (rSBA) and geometric mean concentrations (GMC) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Continuous variables were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test and the proportion of subjects with an rSBA titer ≥ 8 by chi-square. Pre-vaccination rSBA GMT was antibody.

  16. MenACWY-CRM, a novel quadrivalent glycoconjugate vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis for the prevention of meningococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, David

    2009-12-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease remains a major public health concern, with infants, children younger than 4 years and adolescents bearing the majority of the global disease burden. Protecting the vulnerable individuals in these age groups through vaccination remains the most rational strategy for the prevention of meningococcal disease. The formulation of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines has been a major breakthrough in vaccinology, and has extended protection against pathogenic encapsulated bacteria to younger age groups. The dramatic decline in the incidence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C disease, observed following the introduction of glycoconjugate meningococcal C vaccines, demonstrates that vaccination can control disease at a population level. The development of quadrivalent glycoconjugate meningococcal ACWY vaccines has broadened protection against meningococcal disease. A novel meningococcal MenACWY-CRM (Menveo) glycoconjugate vaccine, formulated by selective conjugation chemistry of intermediate-chain-length meningococcal saccharides, was immunogenic in individuals aged 2 months to 65 years. The reactogenicity of MenACWY-CRM was similar to that of other licensed meningococcal glycoconjugates, yet the vaccine has the potential to extend protection against meningococcal serogroups A, Y and W-135 to children younger than 2 years of age - a need that remains unmet.

  17. Recommendations for Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine for Persons 10 Years and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This policy statement provides recommendations for the prevention of serogroup B meningococcal disease through the use of 2 newly licensed serogroup B meningococcal vaccines: MenB-FHbp (Trumenba; Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Pfizer, Philadelphia, PA) and MenB-4C (Bexsero; Novartis Vaccines, Siena, Italy). Both vaccines are approved for use in persons 10 through 25 years of age. MenB-FHbp is licensed as a 2- or 3-dose series, and MenB-4C is licensed as a 2-dose series for all groups. Either vaccine is recommended for routine use in persons 10 years and older who are at increased risk of serogroup B meningococcal disease (category A recommendation). Persons at increased risk of meningococcal serogroup B disease include the following: (1) persons with persistent complement component diseases, including inherited or chronic deficiencies in C3, C5-C9, properdin, factor D, or factor H or persons receiving eculizumab (Soliris; Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Cheshire, CT), a monoclonal antibody that acts as a terminal complement inhibitor by binding C5 and inhibiting cleavage of C5 to C5A; (2) persons with anatomic or functional asplenia, including sickle cell disease; and (3) healthy persons at increased risk because of a serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreak. Both serogroup B meningococcal vaccines have been shown to be safe and immunogenic and are licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration for individuals between the ages of 10 and 25 years. On the basis of epidemiologic and antibody persistence data, the American Academy of Pediatrics agrees with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that either vaccine may be administered to healthy adolescents and young adults 16 through 23 years of age (preferred ages are 16 through 18 years) to provide short-term protection against most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease (category B recommendation).

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PREVENTION OF MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF VACCINE POLICIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco AP Safadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal disease is characterized by a marked variation in incidence and serogroup distribution by region and over time. In several European countries, Canada and Australia, immunization programs, including universal vaccination of infants or toddlers with catch-up campaigns in children and adolescents, aimed at controlling disease caused by meningococcal serogroup С have been successful in reducing disease incidence through direct and indirect protection. More recently, meningococcal conjugate vaccines targeting disease caused by serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y have been licensed and are being used in adolescent programs in the USA and Canada while a mass immunization campaign against serogroup A disease has been implemented in Africa. Positive results from clinical trials using vaccines against serogroup В disease in various age groups suggest the possibility of providing broader protection against serogroup В disease than is provided by the currently used outer membrane vesicle vaccines. The purpose of our review of meningococcal epidemiology and assessment of existing policies is to set the stage for future policy decisions. Vaccination policies to prevent meningococcal disease in different regions of the world should be based on quality information from enhanced surveillance systems.  

  19. Evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae Type B Conjugate Vaccine (Meningococcal Protein Conjugate in Canadian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Scheifele

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess adverse effects and immune responses with a three-dose series of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningococcal protein conjugate (PedvaxHIB or Hib.OMP vaccine, including any immunological response alterations from concurrent administration with routine vaccines for infants.

  20. Effectiveness of Meningococcal B Vaccine against Endemic Hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis W Strain, England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Biolchi, Alessia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Beebeejaun, Kazim; Lucidarme, Jay; Findlow, Jamie; Ramsay, Mary E; Borrow, Ray

    2016-02-01

    Serum samples from children immunized with a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine demonstrated potent serum bactericidal antibody activity against the hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W strain circulating in England. The recent introduction of this vaccine into the United Kingdom national immunization program should also help protect infants against this endemic strain.

  1. Lipoprotein NMB0928 from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B as a novel vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Maité; Yero, Daniel; Niebla, Olivia; González, Sonia; Climent, Yanet; Pérez, Yusleydis; Cobas, Karem; Caballero, Evelín; García, Darien; Pajón, Rolando

    2007-12-01

    Polysaccharide-based vaccines for serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis have failed to induce protective immunity. As a result, efforts to develop vaccines for serogroup B meningococcal disease have mostly focused on outer membrane proteins (OMP). Vaccine candidates based on meningococcal OMP have emerged in the form of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) or, more recently, purified recombinant proteins, as alternative strategies for serogroup B vaccine development. In our group, the protein composition of the Cuban OMVs-based vaccine VA-MENGOC-BC was elucidated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The proteomic map of this product allowed the identification of new putative protective proteins not previously reported as components of an antimeningococcal vaccine. In the present study, we have determined the immunogenicity and protective capacity of NMB0928, one of those proteins present in the OMVs. The antigen was obtained as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, purified and used to immunize mice. The antiserum produced against the protein was capable to recognize the natural protein in different meningococcal strains by whole-cell ELISA and Western blotting. After immunization, recombinant NMB0928 induced bactericidal antibodies, and when the protein was administered inserted into liposomes, the elicited antibodies were protective in the infant rat model. These results suggest that NMB0928 is a novel antigen worth to be included in a broadly protective meningococcal vaccine.

  2. A Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Incorporating Genetically Attenuated Endotoxin Dissociates Inflammation From Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Dowling

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Group B Neisseria meningitidis, an endotoxin-producing gram-negative bacterium, causes the highest incidence of group B meningococcus (MenB disease in the first year of life. The Bexsero vaccine is indicated in Europe from 8 weeks of age. Endotoxin components of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs or soluble lipopolysaccharide (LPS represent a potential source of inflammation and residual reactogenicity. The purpose of this study was to compare novel candidate MenB vaccine formulations with licensed vaccines, including Bexsero, using age-specific in vitro culture systems.Methods. OMVs from wild type and inactivated lpxL1 gene mutant N. meningitidis strains were characterized in human neonatal and adult in vitro whole blood assays and dendritic cell arrays. OMVs were benchmarked against licensed vaccines, including Bexsero and whole cell pertussis formulations, with respect to Th-polarizing cytokine and PGE2 production, as well as cell surface activation markers (HLA-DR, CD86, CCR7. OMV immunogenicity was assessed in mice.Results. ΔlpxLI native OMVs demonstrated significantly less cytokine induction in human blood and DCs than Bexsero and most of the other pediatric vaccines (e.g., PedvaxHib, EasyFive, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG tested. Despite a much lower inflammatory profile in vitro than Bexsero, ΔlpxLI native OMVs still had moderate DC maturing ability and induced robust anti-N. meningitidis antibody responses after murine immunization.Conclusions. A meningococcal vaccine comprised of attenuated LPS-based OMVs with a limited inflammatory profile in vitro induces robust antigen-specific immunogenicity in vivo.

  3. A Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Incorporating Genetically Attenuated Endotoxin Dissociates Inflammation from Immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, David J; Sanders, Holly; Cheng, Wing Ki; Joshi, Sweta; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Pietrasanta, Carlo; van Haren, Simon D; van Amsterdam, Sandra; Fernandez, Jeffrey; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Group B Neisseria meningitidis, an endotoxin-producing Gram-negative bacterium, causes the highest incidence of group B meningococcus (MenB) disease in the first year of life. The Bexsero vaccine is indicated in Europe from 8 weeks of age. Endotoxin components of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) or soluble lipopolysaccharide (LPS) represent a potential source of inflammation and residual reactogenicity. The purpose of this study was to compare novel candidate MenB vaccine formulations with licensed vaccines, including Bexsero, using age-specific human in vitro culture systems. OMVs from wild type- and inactivated lpxL1 gene mutant-N. meningitidis strains were characterized in human neonatal and adult in vitro whole blood assays and dendritic cell (DC) arrays. OMVs were benchmarked against licensed vaccines, including Bexsero and whole cell pertussis formulations, with respect to Th-polarizing cytokine and prostaglandin E2 production, as well as cell surface activation markers (HLA-DR, CD86, and CCR7). OMV immunogenicity was assessed in mice. ΔlpxLI native OMVs (nOMVs) demonstrated significantly less cytokine induction in human blood and DCs than Bexsero and most of the other pediatric vaccines (e.g., PedvaxHib, EasyFive, and bacillus Calmette-Guérin) tested. Despite a much lower inflammatory profile in vitro than Bexsero, ΔlpxLI nOMVs still had moderate DC maturing ability and induced robust anti-N. meningitidis antibody responses after murine immunization. A meningococcal vaccine comprised of attenuated LPS-based OMVs with a limited inflammatory profile in vitro induces robust antigen-specific immunogenicity in vivo.

  4. [Meningococcal C conjugate vaccine: Impact of a vaccination program and long-term effectiveness in Navarra, Spain, 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Desirée; García-Cenoz, Manuel; Moreno, Laura; Bernaola, Enrique; Barricarte, Aurelio; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    Since 2000, when the meningococcal serogroupC conjugate vaccine (MenCC) was introduced in the childhood immunization schedule in Spain, several changes in the schedule and catch-up campaigns have been performed. We aim to estimate the impact and effectiveness of this vaccine in Navarra up to 2014. The impact of the vaccination program was analysed by comparing incidence, mortality and lethality rates of disease before (1995-1999) and after (2004-2014) the introduction of the MenCC. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated using the screening method (Farrington) and the indirect cohort method (Broome). Data on cases were obtained from the active surveillance of meningococcal disease. During 1995-1999 the mean annual incidence of meningococcalC disease was 1.32 per 100,000, and 7.18 per 100,000 in children younger than 15years. The fall of meningococcalC disease incidence was significant in cohorts targeted for vaccination from the beginning and progressive in the general population. No cases were reported between 2011 and 2014. The estimated vaccine effectiveness was 96% by the screening method, and 99% by the indirect cohort method. The MenCC vaccination program has been successful in decreasing the incidence rate of serogroupC meningococcal disease in Navarra, and schedule changes have maintained high vaccine effectiveness throughout the study period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Leishmaniasis: vaccine candidates and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawana; Sundar, Shyam

    2012-06-06

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite and a causative agent of the various clinical forms of leishmaniasis. High cost, resistance and toxic side effects of traditional drugs entail identification and development of therapeutic alternatives. The sound understanding of parasite biology is key for identifying novel drug targets, that can induce the cell mediated immunity (mainly CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-gamma mediated responses) polarized towards a Th1 response. These aspects are important in designing a new vaccine along with the consideration of the candidates with respect to their ability to raise memory response in order to improve the vaccine performance. This review is an effort to identify molecules according to their homology with the host and their ability to be used as potent vaccine candidates.

  6. Preclinical immunogenicity and functional activity studies of an A+W meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine and comparisons with existing meningococcal conjugate- and polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunheim, G; Arnemo, M; Næss, L M; Fjeldheim, Å K; Nome, L; Bolstad, K; Aase, A; Mandiarote, A; González, H; González, D; García, L; Cardoso, D; Norheim, G; Rosenqvist, E

    2013-12-09

    Meningococci of serogroups A and W (MenA and MenW) are the main causes of epidemic bacterial meningitis outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we prepared a detergent extracted outer membrane vesicle (dOMV) vaccine from representative African MenA and MenW strains, and compared the immunogenicity of this vaccine with existing meningococcal conjugate and polysaccharide (PS) vaccines in mice. NMRI mice were immunized with preclinical batches of the A+W dOMV vaccine, or with commercially available vaccines; a MenA conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVac(®), Serum Institute of India), ACYW conjugate vaccine (Menveo(®), Novartis) or ACYW PS vaccine (Mencevax(®), GlaxoSmithKline). The mice received 2 doses of 1/10 or 1/50 of a human dose with a three week interval. Immune responses were tested in ELISA, serum bactericidal activity (SBA) and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) assays. High levels of IgG antibodies against both A and W dOMV were detected in mice receiving the A+W dOMV vaccine. High SBA titers against both MenA and MenW vaccine strains were detected after only one dose of the A+W dOMV vaccine, and the titers were further increased after the second dose. The SBA and OPA titers in mice immunized with dOMV vaccine were significantly higher than in mice immunized with the ACYW-conjugate vaccine or the PS vaccine. Furthermore, the A+W dOMV vaccine was shown to induce SBA and OPA titers against MenA of the same magnitude as the titers induced by the A-conjugate vaccine. In conclusion, the A+W dOMV vaccine induced high levels of functional antibodies to both MenA and MenW strains, levels that were shown to be higher or equal to the levels induced by licensed meningococcal vaccines. Thus, an A+W dOMV vaccine could potentially serve as an alternative or a supplement to existing conjugate and PS vaccines in the African meningitis belt. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Meningococcal, influenza virus, and hepatitis B virus vaccination coverage level among health care workers in Hajj

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    Ghabrah Tawfik M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the compliance of health care workers (HCWs employed in Hajj in receiving the meningococcal, influenza, and hepatitis B vaccines. Methods A cross-sectional survey of doctors and nurses working in all Mena and Arafat hospitals and primary health care centers who attended Hajj-medicine training programs immediately before the beginning of Hajj of the lunar Islamic year 1423 (2003 using self-administered structured questionnaire which included demographic data and data on vaccination history. Results A total of 392 HCWs were studied including 215 (54.8% nurses and 177 (45.2% doctors. One hundred and sixty four (41.8% HCWs were from Makkah and the rest were recruited from other regions in Saudi Arabia. Three hundred and twenty three (82.4% HCWs received the quadrivalent (ACYW135 meningococcal meningitis vaccine with 271 (83.9% HCWs receiving it at least 2 weeks before coming to Hajj, whereas the remaining 52 (16.1% HCWs received it within Conclusion The meningococcal and hepatitis B vaccination coverage level among HCWs in Hajj was suboptimal and the influenza vaccination level was notably low. Strategies to improve vaccination coverage among HCWs should be adopted by all health care facilities in Saudi Arabia.

  8. Meningococcal B vaccine and the vision of a meningitis free world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Fantoni, S; Prugnola, A

    2015-08-31

    A century of traditional vaccinology lost the fight against meningococcus serogroup B (MenB). However, thanks to an innovative genome-based approach, the first broadly effective MenB vaccine, Bexsero® (GSK Vaccines), was developed and has been licensed for use in various age groups by the European Commission and other regulatory authorities. Genes encoding for the main meningococcus B antigens were identified and screened in order to achieve a broadly protective vaccine, taking into account the fact that meningococcus B has many different subtypes whose membrane proteins may be different. Since the antigens selected for Bexsero® are also harbored by meningococci belonging to other serogroups there may be the potential for Bexsero® to offer a certain level of protection against non-B serogroups. Therefore preliminary studies were carried out to investigate the potential of the vaccine to also provide a degree of cross protection against non-B serogroups. Here we review the potential for Bexsero® to offer a certain level of protection against the diversity of meningococcus type B subtypes and its potential ability to offer some cross protection from non-B serogroups. Lastly, we describe the future perspectives in pentavalent meningococcal vaccine (ABCWY) development which hopefully will result in a vaccine able to help prevent Invasive Meningococcal Diseases (IMD) from the majority of currently circulating meningococcal strains.

  9. Impact of MenBvac, an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine, on the meningococcal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbos, Valérie; Lemée, Ludovic; Bénichou, Jacques; Berthelot, Gilles; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Leroy, Jean-Philippe; Houivet, Estelle; Hong, Eva; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Caron, François

    2013-09-13

    The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of MenBvac, an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine against P1.7,16 strains, on meningococcal carriage. During a B:14:P1.7,16/ST-32 outbreak in Normandy (France), children aged 1-7 years were randomly selected to participate in the study. Among the 1082 volunteers, there were 17 Neisseria meningitidis carriers (carriage rate of 1.57%). MenBvac vaccination appeared associated with lower carriage rate, i.e., 0.31% among the vaccinated children versus 2.10% among the non-vaccinated (p=0.03). The beneficial effect on carriage was observed regardless of the strain serogroup. OMV-vaccinated mice also showed reduction of bacterial acquisition of OMV-homolog and hererolog strains in respiratory pathways after intranasal challenge. These results suggest that meningococcal OMV-based vaccines reduce meningococcal carriage and may hence confer herd immunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New versus old meningococcal group B vaccines: how the new ones may benefit infants & toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Cristina, M L; Domnich, A; Gasparini, R

    2013-12-01

    Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is associated with high mortality and high disability rates and mainly affects children under one year of age. Vaccination is the best way to prevent meningococcal disease, especially in infants and toddlers. The introduction of massive meningococcal serogroup C vaccination has drastically reduced the incidence of disease caused by this serogroup, and serogroup B has now become the main causative agent in several industrialized countries. The first serogroup B vaccines, which were used for more than two decades, were based on outer membrane vesicles and proved to be protective only against specific epidemic strains in Cuba, Norway, Brazil and New Zealand. Moreover, these often elicited a scant immune response in young children. Innovative genomics-based reverse vaccinology subsequently enabled researchers to identify genes encoding for surface proteins that are able to elicit a strong immune response against several B strains. This important discovery led to the development and recent approval in Europe of the four-component meningococcal serogroup B (4CMenB) vaccine. Large clinical trials have shown high immunogenicity and tolerability and acceptable safety levels of 4CMenB in infants and toddlers. This vaccine is expected to cover a large number of circulating invasive strains and may also be efficacious against other serogroups. Young children are particularly vulnerable to the devastating consequences of meningococcal disease. Given the high performance of 4CMenB and its non-interference with routine vaccinations, this age-group will be the first to benefit from the introduction of this vaccine.

  11. Meningococcal quadrivalent (serogroups A, C, W135 and Y) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (Nimenrix™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxtall, Jamie D; Dhillon, Sohita

    2012-12-24

    Nimenrix™ (MenACWY-TT) is a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, comprising the polysaccharide serogroups A, C, W135 and Y, and tetanus toxoid (TT) as carrier protein. It is the first quadrivalent vaccine (administered as a single dose) to be approved in Europe for active immunization of individuals aged ≥ 12 months against invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W135 and Y. Administration of a single dose of Nimenrix™ elicited a strong immune response against all four vaccine serogroups in healthy toddlers aged 12-23 months, children and adolescents aged 2-17 years and adults aged 18-55 years in randomized, multicentre, phase III trials. In toddlers, Nimenrix™ was noninferior to Meningitec® in terms of seroresponse rates against meningococcal serogroup C 42 days post-vaccination. In children, adolescents and adults, Nimenrix™ was noninferior to Mencevax™ in terms of vaccination response rates against all four serogroups 1 month post-vaccination. Furthermore, several phase II studies and a phase III trial showed that the immune response elicited by Nimenrix™ in all age groups persisted for 7-42 months after the primary vaccination (when evaluated by rabbit serum bactericidal activity), with the vaccine also inducing immune memory in toddlers. In addition, several randomized, multicentre, phase III, noninferiority trials showed that when coadministered with other childhood vaccines or a seasonal flu vaccine, the immunogenicity of Nimenrix™ or that of the coadministered vaccine was generally not altered. Nimenrix® was generally well tolerated in all age groups whether administered as a single vaccine or coadministered with other routine vaccines. The incidence of grade 3 local or systemic solicited adverse events during the first 4 days following vaccination and of serious adverse events over an extended follow-up period of up to 6 months was low (<4.5%). Although protective effectiveness and longer

  12. Vaccine Preventability of Meningococcal Clone, Greater Aachen Region, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, J.; Schouls, L.M.; van de Pol, I.; Keijzers, W.C.; Martin, D.R.; Glennie, A.; Oster, P.; Frosch, M.; Vogel, U.; van den Ende, A.

    2010-01-01

    Emergence of serogroup B meningococci of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 41/44 can cause high levels of disease, as exemplified by a recent epidemic in New Zealand. Multiplication of annual incidence rates (3.1 cases/100,000 population) of meningococcal disease in a defined German region, the city

  13. [Prevention of serogroup B meningococcal disease using a four-component vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A; Barranco, D; Batalla, J; Bayas, J M; Campins, M; Gorrotxategi Gorrotxategi, P; Lluch, J; Martinón-Torres, F; Mellado, M J; Moreno-Pérez, D; Uriel, B; Vázquez, J A

    2014-04-01

    Meningococcal disease is an infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, and those of serogroup B are currently the most predominant. It has been difficult to create effective vaccines for this serogroup in order to modify or reduce its morbidity. The aim of this study was to review existing data on the new vaccine 4CMenB and its potential contribution to the prevention of this infection. A panel of 12 experts (from Pediatrics, Public Health and Vaccinology) conducted a literature search and prioritized 74 publications. A review of the vaccine was then prepared, which was discussed in a meeting and subsequently validated by e-mail. 4CMenB vaccine, based on four components (NadA, fHbp, NHBA and OMVnz), was designed by reverse vaccinology. The Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) shows a potential of 70-80% coverage of the strains in Europe. Clinical trials show that the vaccine is safe and immunogenic in infants, children, adolescents, and adults, and induces an anamnestic response. The incidence of fever is similar to systemic vaccines administered alone, but higher when co-administered with them, although the fever pattern is predictable and self-limited. It is compatible with the Spanish routine vaccines, and can be administered simultaneously with the currently available hexavalent and pentavalent vaccines, as well as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. The 4CMenB vaccine is the only strategy currently available to prevent meningococcal disease caused by serogroup B. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Safety of Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine in 11- to 21-Year-Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hung-Fu; Sy, Lina S; Ackerson, Bradley K; Hechter, Rulin C; Tartof, Sara Y; Haag, Mendel; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Luo, Yi; Fischetti, Christine A; Takhar, Harp S; Miao, Yan; Cunnington, Marianne; Solano, Zendi; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Meningococcal conjugate vaccination is recommended in the United States. This study evaluates the safety of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine in a cohort aged 11 to 21 years. This cohort study with self-controlled case-series analysis was conducted at Kaiser Permanente Southern California. Individuals receiving MenACWY-CRM, a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, during September 30, 2011 to June 30, 2013, were included. Twenty-six prespecified events of interest (EOIs), including neurologic, rheumatologic, hematologic, endocrine, renal, pediatric, and pediatric infectious disease EOIs, were identified through electronic health records 1 year after vaccination. Of these, 16 were reviewed by case review committees. Specific risk and comparison windows after vaccination were predefined for each EOI. The relative incidence (RI) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated through conditional Poisson regression models, adjusted for seasonality. This study included 48 899 vaccinated individuals. No cases were observed in the risk window for 14 of 26 EOIs. The RI for Bell's palsy, a case review committee-reviewed EOI, was statistically significant (adjusted RI: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.1-7.5). Stratified analyses demonstrated an increased risk for Bell's palsy in subjects receiving concomitant vaccines (RI = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.4-17.8), and no increased risk for those without concomitant vaccine (RI = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.2-5.5). We observed a temporal association between occurrence of Bell's palsy and receipt of MenACWY-CRM concomitantly with other vaccines. The association needs further investigation as it could be due to chance, concomitant vaccination, or underlying medical history predisposing to Bell's palsy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. "Love's labours lost": failure to implement mass vaccination against group A meningococcal meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, J B; Towne, D W; Gotschlich, E C; Schneerson, R

    1997-09-20

    Despite the availability of a safe, effective polysaccharide vaccine, group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics persist in sub-Saharan Africa. In October 1996, there were almost 150,000 reported cases and 15,000 deaths, the majority of which involved children. At 3 months of age, induction of protective group A meningococcal antibody levels requires 2 injections at least 1 month apart. Reinjection of 5-year-old children increases group A antibodies to long-term protective levels. During meningitis epidemics in Nigeria, Mali, and Rwanda, fatality was significantly reduced in areas where scarce vaccine was administered selectively. Although effective on an individual basis, selective vaccination is unable to control meningitis epidemics. In Chad, mass vaccination of the entire population (excluding infants under 12 months) eliminated the disease. Successful mass vaccination against group A meningococcal epidemics also has been reported in Saudi Arabia, China, and refugee camps in Africa. Although cost is cited as an obstacle to routine mass vaccination to prevent meningococcal meningitis in South Africa, prevention is the least expensive approach to disease control. It is recommended that the entire population of Africa's meningitis belt receive group A meningococcal vaccine in accordance with the recommended age schedule in a mass vaccination program.

  16. Over-expression of fHbp in Arabdopsis for development of meningococcal serogroup B subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nuo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jisheng; Jin, Libo; Xing, Shaochen; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2016-07-01

    Due to lack of commercial vaccine against the serogroup B (MenB) of Neisseria meningitides, the incidence of meningococcal disease remains high. To solve the issue, transgenic plants are used as bioreactors to produce a plant-derived fHbp subunit vaccine. In this study, the fHbp gene was optimized according to the codon usage bias of Arabidopsis thaliana, synthesized artificially, cloned into an expression vector, driven by a seed-specific promoter, and introduced into A. thaliana by Agrobacterium-mediated floral-dip transformation. Transgenic plants were identified by glufosinate selection, quickstix strips for PAT/bar tests and PCR analysis. The five plants showing higher expression of recombinant fHbp were screened through indirect ELISA. Southern blot analysis showed that the transgenic line rHF-22 had a single-copy integration and the highest expression of fHbp. Recombinant fHbp was purified from seeds of rHF-22 by nitrilotriacetic acid-mediated affinity chromatography, and the purity was 82.5%. BALB/c mice were tested for fHbp vaccine protection from lethal MenB infection, and the relative percent survival was found to be 80%. This study indicates that the recombinant fHbp produced from seeds of rHF-22 is a potential candidate for commercial MenB vaccine. It also provides a reference for safe, cheap and large-scale production of other plant-made vaccines.

  17. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  18. Serogroup quantitation of multivalent polysaccharide and polysaccharide-conjugate meningococcal vaccines from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew C; Gibeault, Sabrina; Filippenko, Vasilisa; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Junzhi; Kunkel, Jeremy P

    2013-07-01

    The active components of most meningococcal vaccines are four antigenic serogroup capsular polysaccharides (A, C, Y, W135). The vaccines, monovalent or multivalent mixtures of either free polysaccharides or polysaccharides conjugated to antigenic carrier proteins, may be in liquid or lyophilised formulations, with or without excipients. Acid hydrolysis and chromatographic methods for serogroup quantitation, which were previously optimised and qualified using polysaccharide-based standards and a narrow range of real vaccines, are here challenged with multiple lots of a broad assortment of additional multivalent polysaccharide-based meningococcal vaccine products. Centrifugal filtration successfully removed all interfering lactose excipient without loss of polysaccharides to allow for the determination of Y and W135 serogroups. Replicate operations by three different analysts indicated high method reproducibility. Results indicated some lot-to-lot and product-to-product variations. However, all vaccines were within general specifications for each serogroup polysaccharide, with the exception of all lots of one polysaccharide vaccine - which by these methods were found to be deficient in the serogroup A component only. These robust techniques are very useful for the evaluation of antigen content and consistency of manufacture. The deformulation, hydrolysis and chromatographic methods may be adaptable for the evaluation of other types of polysaccharide-based vaccines.

  19. New Zika Vaccine Candidate Provides Powerful Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163384.html New Zika Vaccine Candidate Provides Powerful Protection Made without live ... HealthDay News) -- A single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine protected mice and monkeys from the virus, ...

  20. Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students Page Content ​ Meningococcal disease is ... receive the vaccine. Which vaccines are recommended for teens and young adults? Meningococcal conjugate vaccines (MCV4) Preteens ...

  1. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  2. Meningococcal Antigen Typing System Development and Application to the Evaluation of Effectiveness of Meningococcal B Vaccine and Possible Use for Other Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Domnich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of the 4-component meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB has required new assays for the reliable evaluation of the expression and cross-reactivity of those specific antigen variants that are predicted to be targeted by bactericidal antibodies elicited by the vaccine in different isolates. Existing laboratory techniques, such as multilocus sequence typing, are poorly suited to this purpose, since they do not provide information on the contribution of single vaccine components and therefore cannot be applied to estimate the potential coverage of the multicomponent vaccine. The hSBA, the only correlate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease accepted thus far, cannot conveniently be used to test large number of strains. To overcome these issues, the meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS has been specifically developed in order to predict 4CMenB coverage of individual meningococcus serogroup B strains. To date, MATS has proved advantageous for several reasons, including its ability to assess both qualitative and quantitative aspects of surface antigens of single strains in a highly reproducible, rapid, and resource-saving manner, while its shortcomings include a possible underestimation of 4CMenB coverage and the use of pooled sera to calculate the positive bactericidal threshold. This paper provides an overview of MATS development and its field application.

  3. Meningococcal Antigen Typing System Development and Application to the Evaluation of Effectiveness of Meningococcal B Vaccine and Possible Use for Other Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Panatto, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Development of the 4-component meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) has required new assays for the reliable evaluation of the expression and cross-reactivity of those specific antigen variants that are predicted to be targeted by bactericidal antibodies elicited by the vaccine in different isolates. Existing laboratory techniques, such as multilocus sequence typing, are poorly suited to this purpose, since they do not provide information on the contribution of single vaccine components and therefore cannot be applied to estimate the potential coverage of the multicomponent vaccine. The hSBA, the only correlate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease accepted thus far, cannot conveniently be used to test large number of strains. To overcome these issues, the meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) has been specifically developed in order to predict 4CMenB coverage of individual meningococcus serogroup B strains. To date, MATS has proved advantageous for several reasons, including its ability to assess both qualitative and quantitative aspects of surface antigens of single strains in a highly reproducible, rapid, and resource-saving manner, while its shortcomings include a possible underestimation of 4CMenB coverage and the use of pooled sera to calculate the positive bactericidal threshold. This paper provides an overview of MATS development and its field application.

  4. Economic evaluation of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccination programmes in the Netherlands and its impact on decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welte, R; van den Dobbelsteen, G; Bos, JM; de Melker, H; van Alphen, L; Spanjaard, L; Rumke, HC; Postma, MJ

    2004-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of one time vaccination of all persons aged 14 months to 18 years (catch-up programme) and of routine childhood immunisation at either ages 2 + 3 + 4 months, 5 + 6 months, or 14 months with a meningococcal C conjugate vaccine was estimated for The Netherlands, from a societal

  5. Safety of Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Children 2-10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartof, Sara Y; Sy, Lina S; Ackerson, Bradley K; Hechter, Rulin C; Haag, Mendel; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Luo, Yi; Fischetti, Christine A; Takhar, Harp S; Miao, Yan; Solano, Zendi; Jacobsen, Steven J; Tseng, Hung-Fu

    2017-07-14

    Quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine is recommended for children, adolescents, and adults at increased risk of meningococcal disease. In 2011, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, GSK) was approved for children aged 2-10 years in the U.S. Although no safety concerns arose from clinical trials, it remains important to monitor its safety in routine clinical settings. Kaiser Permanente Southern California members 2-10 years old who received MenACWY-CRM between September 2011 and September 2014 were included. Electronic health records were searched using a validated algorithm to identify 26 pre-specified events of interest (EOIs) and serious medically attended events (SMAEs) from inpatient or emergency settings up to one year following MenACWY-CRM vaccination. SMAEs were categorized by ICD-9 diagnostic categories. All events were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis and symptom onset date. The study was descriptive (NCT01452438); no statistical tests were performed. Among 387 vaccinated children, 327 with ≥6 months membership before vaccination were analyzed. Among EOIs, 9 asthma cases and one myasthenia gravis case underwent chart review which confirmed one incident asthma case occurring 237 days after concomitant vaccination with MenACWY-CRM and typhoid vaccine. Thirty-one children experienced SMAEs, most commonly due to unrelated injury and poisoning. The remaining events occurred sporadically after vaccination and most were unlikely related to vaccination based on medical record review. One incident EOI of asthma late in the 1-year observation period and sporadic distribution of SMAEs were observed. These data do not suggest safety concerns associated with MenACWY-CRM vaccination in children 2-10 years old.

  6. Meningococcal ACWY vaccine uptake and awareness among student freshers enrolled at Northern Ireland universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Peter J A; Millar, B Cherie; Moore, John E

    2017-01-18

    A new MenACWY conjugate meningococcal vaccination programme was introduced in Northern Ireland (NI) in August 2015, for 13-18 year olds, as well as for first-time university entrants up to 25 years. This reflected the response made by Public Health England, due to the recent rapid increase of meningococcal group W (MenW) disease and on advice of the UK Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). The aims of this study were to evaluate (i) the uptake of the MenACWY vaccine among first-time university students, (ii) vaccine and meningitis awareness, (iii) optimal communication modalities via a multidisciplinary team (MDT) model and (iv) current international vaccination policies relating to non-UK students. A survey was completed by 1210 students, 868 first-time freshers and 342 non-freshers, from healthcare-related, non-healthcare-related and engineering/computing faculties. The survey included an anonymous questionnaire and consented students were aged 17-50 years with a 2:3 ratio of male:female. Vaccine uptake amongst 18-year-old students was 90.7% and 87.3% in female and male cohorts, respectively, falling to 72.1% and 67.7% (19-year cohort) and 32.7% and 39.6% (20- to 25-year cohort) in males and females, respectively. Students reported that posters, clinics and talks were the preferred methods of communication and not social media. There was general lack of awareness of the signs/symptoms of meningitis and approximately 30% of students falsely believed that administration of the MenACWY vaccine excluded the risk of contracting meningitis. Overall, there was a successful vaccination campaign; however, there was a lack of meningitis awareness. Due to differing international meningococcal vaccination schedules, international students enrolling at UK universities need to be informed about current UK policies. For the successful introduction of any vaccination programme amongst university students, it is fundamental that a MDT is established to inform

  7. UK parents' attitudes towards meningococcal group B (MenB) vaccination: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cath; Yarwood, Joanne; Saliba, Vanessa; Bedford, Helen

    2017-05-04

    (1) To explore existing knowledge of, and attitudes, to group B meningococcal disease and serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine among parents of young children. (2) To seek views on their information needs. Cross-sectional qualitative study using individual and group interviews conducted in February and March 2015, prior to the introduction of MenB vaccine (Bexsero) into the UK childhood immunisation schedule. Community centres, mother and toddler groups, parents' homes and workplaces in London and Yorkshire. 60 parents of children under 2 years of age recruited via mother and baby groups and via an advert posted to a midwife-led Facebook group. Although recognising the severity of meningitis and septicaemia, parents' knowledge of group B meningococcal disease and MenB vaccine was poor. While nervous about fever, most said they would take their child for MenB vaccination despite its link to fever. Most parents had liquid paracetamol at home. Many were willing to administer it after MenB vaccination as a preventive measure, although some had concerns. There were mixed views on the acceptability of four vaccinations at the 12-month booster visit; some preferred one visit, while others favoured spreading the vaccines over two visits. Parents were clear on the information they required before attending the immunisation appointment. The successful implementation of the MenB vaccination programme depends on its acceptance by parents. In view of parents' recognition of the severity of meningitis and septicaemia, and successful introduction of other vaccines to prevent bacterial meningitis and septicaemia, the MenB vaccination programme is likely to be successful. However, the need for additional injections, the likelihood of post-immunisation fever and its management are issues about which parents will need information and reassurance from healthcare professionals. Public Health England has developed written information for parents, informed by these findings.

  8. Avidity maturation following vaccination with a meningococcal recombinant hexavalent PorA OMV vaccine in UK infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longworth, Emma; Borrow, Ray; Goldblatt, David; Balmer, Paul; Dawson, Maureen; Andrews, Nick; Miller, Elizabeth; Cartwright, Keith

    2002-06-07

    To date, there are no data assessing the utility of avidity indices as a surrogate marker for the induction of immunological memory following meningococcal serogroup B outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccination. We studied infants who had been immunized with three doses of a recombinant hexavalent PorA OMV vaccine at ages 2-4 months, together with a fourth dose at age 12-18 months. A control group had received a single dose of the same vaccine at age 12-18 months. As previously reported, serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titres increased after each of the first three doses, with a significant increase observed from 6 months post third dose to 1 month post fourth dose. The geometric mean avidity indices (GMAI), against strain H44/76 OMVs, increased from 1 month post first dose to 1 month post third dose. Significant increases in GMAI were observed at 6 months post third dose and again following the fourth dose. At 32-42 months of age, though the SBA titres had returned to post first dose levels, the GMAI remained elevated. No increase in avidity was observed in the control group. Antibody avidity indices are useful laboratory markers for the priming of immunological memory following vaccination with meningococcal serogroup B OMV vaccines.

  9. 16th International Pathogenic Neisseria Conference: recent progress towards effective meningococcal disease vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Andrew R; van Alphen, Loek

    2009-02-01

    The report describes developments in meningococcal disease vaccines presented at the 16th International Pathogenic Neisseria Conference, Rotterdam, 7-12 September 2008. Great progress has been made by the Meningitis Vaccine Project to provide an affordable and effective serogroup A conjugate vaccine for use in the meningitis belt of Sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccine has been shown to be safe and to produce excellent immune response in phase 2 clinical trials in India and Africa in the target populations and will be rolled out to the worst affected countries from 2009. This vaccine has the potential to make a huge impact on public health in this region. This conference heard that the use of an epidemic strain-specific outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine in New Zealand has been discontinued. Views for and against this decision were presented. Several MenB vaccines have progressed to clinical evaluation. The most advanced are the Novartis five recombinant protein variants and the Wyeth vaccine based on two factor H binding protein variants. Promising results from both vaccines with genetically-detoxified lipooligosaccharide and overexpressed heterologous antigens, OMV's from Neisseria lactamica and recombinant Opa proteins.

  10. Meningococcal ACWY Vaccines (MenACWY and MPSV4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as hearing loss, brain damage, kidney damage, amputations, nervous system problems, or severe scars from skin ... old, have received MenACWY previously, or anticipate requiring multiple doses. MPSV4 vaccine is recommended for adults older ...

  11. Meningococcal B Vaccination (4CMenB in Infants and Toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a Gram-negative pathogen that actively invades its human host and leads to the development of life-threatening pathologies. One of the leading causes of death in the world, N. meningitidis can be responsible for nearly 1,000 new infections per 100,000 subjects during an epidemic period. The bacterial species are classified into 12 serogroups, five of which (A, B, C, W, and Y cause the majority of meningitides. The three purified protein conjugate vaccines currently available target serogroups A, C, W, and Y. Serogroup B has long been a challenge but the discovery of the complete genome sequence of an MenB strain has allowed the development of a specific four-component vaccine (4CMenB. This review describes the pathogenetic role of N. meningitidis and the recent literature concerning the new meningococcal vaccine.

  12. Health economics of a hexavalent meningococcal outer-membrane vesicle vaccine in children : potential impact of introduction in the Dutch vaccination program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; Rumke, HC; Welte, R; Postma, MJ; Jager, JC

    2001-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination of infants with a new hexavalent meningococcal B outer-membrane vesicle vaccine is projected for The Netherlands by applying decision analysis. The societal perspective is taken and direct and productivity costs (friction costs method) are considered.

  13. Health economics of a hexavalent meningococcal outer-membrane vesicle vaccine in children : potential impact of introduction in the Dutch vaccination program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, JM; Rumke, HC; Welte, R; Postma, MJ; Jager, JC

    2001-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination of infants with a new hexavalent meningococcal B outer-membrane vesicle vaccine is projected for The Netherlands by applying decision analysis. The societal perspective is taken and direct and productivity costs (friction costs method) are considered.

  14. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  15. Preclinical immunogenicity study of trivalent meningococcal AWX-OMV vaccines for the African meningitis belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunheim, G; Naess, L M; Acevedo, R; Fjeldheim, Å K; Bolstad, K; García, L; Cardoso, D; Aase, A; Zayas, C; González, H; Rosenqvist, E; Norheim, G

    2014-11-20

    In the recent decade, epidemic meningitis in the African meningitis belt has mostly been caused by Neisseria meningitidis of serogroups A, W and X (MenA, MenW and MenX, respectively). There is at present no licensed vaccine available to prevent MenX meningococcal disease. To explore a trivalent MenAWX vaccine concept, we have studied the immunogenicity in mice of MenX outer membrane vesicles (X-OMV) or MenX polysaccharide (X-PS) when combined with a bivalent A-OMV and W-OMV (AW-OMV) vaccine previously shown to be highly immunogenic in mice. The vaccine antigens were produced from three representative wild type strains of MenA (ST-7), MenW (ST-11) and MenX (ST-751) isolated from patients in the African meningitis belt. Groups of mice were immunized with two doses of X-OMV or X-PS combined with the AW-OMV vaccine or as individual components. All vaccine preparations were adsorbed to Al(OH)3. Sera from immunized mice were tested by ELISA and immunoblotting. Functional antibody responses were measured as serum bactericidal activity (SBA) and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA). Immunization of mice with X-OMV, alone or in combination with AW-OMV induced high levels of anti-X OMV IgG. Moreover, X-OMV alone or in combination with the AW-OMV vaccine induced high SBA and OPA titers against the MenX target strain. X-PS alone was not immunogenic in mice; however, addition of the AW-OMV vaccine to X-PS increased the immunogenicity of X-PS. Both AWX vaccine formulations induced high levels of IgG against A- and W-OMV and high SBA titers against the MenA and MenW vaccine strains. These results suggest that a trivalent AWX vaccine, either as a combination of OMV or OMV with X-PS, could potentially prevent the majority of meningococcal disease in the meningitis belt.

  16. An outer membrane vesicle vaccine for prevention of serogroup A and W-135 meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, G; Tunheim, G; Næss, L M; Kristiansen, P A; Caugant, D A; Rosenqvist, E

    2012-08-01

    The bacterium Neisseria meningitidis of serogroups A and W-135 has in the recent decade caused most of the cases of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt, and there is currently no efficient and affordable vaccine available demonstrated to protect against both these serogroups. Previously, deoxycholate-extracted outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against serogroup B meningococci have been shown to be safe and induce protection in humans in clonal outbreaks. The serogroup A and W-135 strains isolated from meningitis belt epidemics demonstrate strikingly limited variation in major surface-exposed protein structures. We have here investigated whether the OMV vaccine strategy also can be applied to prevent both serogroups A and W-135 meningococcal disease. A novel vaccine combining OMV extracted from recent African serogroup A and W-135 strains and adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide was developed and its antigenic characteristics and immunogenicity were studied in mice. The specificity of the antibody responses was analysed by immunoblotting and serum bactericidal activity (SBA) assays. Moreover, the bivalent A+W-135 vaccine was compared with monovalent A and W-135 OMV vaccines. The bivalent OMV vaccine was able to induce similar SBA titres as the monovalent A or W-135 OMV towards both serogroups. High SBA titres were also observed against a meningococcal serogroup C strain. These results show that subcapsular antigens may be of importance when developing broadly protective and affordable vaccines for the meningitis belt. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A native outer membrane vesicle vaccine confers protection against meningococcal colonization in human CEACAM1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Johswich, Kay O; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-03-10

    The effect of protein-based meningococcal vaccines on prevention of nasopharyngeal colonization has been difficult to investigate experimentally because a reliable animal colonization model did not exist. Human CEACAM1 transgenic mice, which can be colonized by meningococci, were immunized IP with one of two meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccines prepared from mutants with attenuated endotoxin (lpxL1 knockout) and over-expressed sub-family B Factor H-binding proteins (FHbp). Animals were challenged intranasally two weeks after the third dose with wild-type strain H44/76, or were treated IP with anti-NOMV serum before and during the bacterial challenge. The NOMV-1 vaccine, prepared from the serogroup B H44/76 mutant, elicited ∼40-fold higher serum bactericidal antibody titers against the wild-type H44/76 challenge strain than the NOMV-2 vaccine prepared from a heterologous serogroup W mutant strain with different PorA and FHbp amino acid sequence variants. Compared to aluminum hydroxide-immunized control mice, the efficacy for prevention of any H44/76 colonization was 93% (95% confidence interval, 52-99, P<0.0001) for the NOMV-1 vaccine, and 19% (-3-36, P=0.23) for NOMV-2. NOMV-2-vaccinated mice had a 5.6-fold decrease in geometric mean CFU of bacteria per animal in tracheal washes compared to control mice (P=0.007). The efficacy of passive administration of serum from NOMV-1-vaccinated mice to immunologically naïve mice against colonization was 44% (17-61; P=0.002). Both NOMV vaccines protected against meningococcal colonization but there was greater protection by the NOMV-1 vaccine with antigens matched with the challenge strain. Meningococcal vaccines that target protein antigens have potential to decrease colonization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of meningococcal C conjugate vaccination campaign in Emilia-Romagna, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, Maria Grazia; Di Gregori, Valentina; Frasca, Gabriella; Rucci, Paola; Finarelli, Alba Carola; Moschella, Laura; Borrini, Bianca Maria; Cavrini, Francesca; Liguori, Giovanna; Sambri, Vittorio; Bonanni, Paolo; Fantini, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of reported meningococcal disease in Italy is among the lowest in Europe. The trend of the disease was increasing up to 2005 and then declined after the gradual introduction of a universal Men C vaccination program in 17/21 Italian regions. Since 2006, in Emilia-Romagna region vaccination against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C was actively offered free of charge in a single dose to the age groups 12-15 months and 14-15 years, in addition to people with defined epidemiological risk. Our aim was to measure the impact of vaccination on the incidence of meningococcal disease caused by different serogroups among the population of Emilia Romagna Region, Northern Italy (approximately 4.5 million inhabitants) subdivided by age. Using surveillance data, we computed the incidence rates of Neisseria meninigitidis related invasive disease per 100.000 inhabitants for the years 2000 to 2012. In addition, the percentage change in incidence and the mortality rates were calculated. Results indicate a 70.1% decrease in the incidence of meningococcus C-related invasive disease after the introduction of MenC universal vaccination. No case of serogroup C related infection was observed since 2006 in children aged 1-4 years. These findings suggest that the single-dose vaccination strategy against serogroup C N.meningitidis targeted to the age groups 12-15 months and 14-15 years was effective in the Emilia-Romagna population. However, the occurrence of two cases of meningiditis in a 5-month child and in a 9-years child suggests caution and careful consideration in surveillance for the next years.

  19. Meningococcal meningitis group A: a successful control of an outbreak by mass vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushra, H E; Mawlawi, M Y; Fontaine, R E; Afif, H

    1995-11-01

    Jeddah is the main point of entry to the holy places in Saudi Arabia. An outbreak of meningococcal disease (MCD) occurred during the fasting lunar month for Muslims, Ramadan (March-April) of 1992. To assess the threat of local spread of MCD within Jeddah, the effects of previous and a mass vaccination programme against MCD during the outbreak, we reviewed the medical records of confirmed cases (CC) of MCD (defined as a bacteriologically confirmed case or a case diagnosed by latex test) and their vaccination status in the last five years before the outbreak. There were 41 CC of meningitis due to Neisseria meningitidis (group A). The ratio of males to females was 4.1:1. Thirty two percent of the cases were religious visitors. About one fourth (22%) of the cases were Pakistani. More than half (57%) of the cases, who were residents of Jeddah, lived in the north-eastern part of the city, as did half of the Pakistani cases. The case-fatality rate among CC was 19.5%. Persons who visited the Makkah (Mecca) during Ramadan were more likely to get the disease than those who did not (odds ratio [OR] = 6.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-40.7). Unvaccinated persons were more likely to get the disease than those who were vaccinated against MCD (OR = 13.9; 95% CI 1.8-296). Meningococcal vaccine (MCV) against MCD was effective in preventing the disease. However, MCV was of no protective value if it had been administered more than five years before the outbreak. The reason mentioned most frequently for not being vaccinated by both cases (84%) and controls (57%) was lack of knowledge about the disease. Health education programmes should be strengthened and promoted. A good collaborative surveillance system between Jeddah and other holy cities, especially Makkah, is needed to abort outbreaks among religious visitors and to prevent the spread of MCD outbreaks.

  20. Comparison of CRM197, diphtheria toxoid and tetanus toxoid as protein carriers for meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Berti, F; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Zambonelli, C; Bottomley, M J; De Gregorio, E; Del Giudice, G; Rappuoli, R; Costantino, P; Brogioni, G; Balocchi, C; Biancucci, M; Malito, E

    2013-10-01

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are among the most effective and safest vaccines ever developed. Diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and CRM197 have been mostly used as protein carriers in licensed vaccines. We evaluated the immunogenicity of serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y meningococcal oligosaccharides conjugated to CRM197, DT and TT in naïve mice. The three carriers were equally efficient in inducing an immune response against the carbohydrate moiety in immunologically naïve mice. The effect of previous exposure to different dosages of the carrier protein on the anti-carbohydrate response was studied using serogroup A meningococcal (MenA) saccharide conjugates as a model. CRM197 showed a strong propensity to positively prime the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by its conjugates or those with the antigenically related carrier DT. Conversely in any of the tested conditions TT priming did not result in enhancement of the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by the corresponding conjugates. Repeated exposure of mice to TT or to CRM197 before immunization with the respective MenA conjugates resulted in a drastic suppression of the anti-carbohydrate response in the case of TT conjugate and only in a slight reduction in the case of CRM197. The effect of carrier priming on the anti-MenA response of DT-based conjugates varied depending on their carbohydrate to protein ratio. These data may have implications for human vaccination since conjugate vaccines are widely used in individuals previously immunized with DT and TT carrier proteins.

  1. Long-term thermal stability of group C meningococcal polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shwu-Maan; Petermann, Robert; Porte, Quallyna; Berezuk, Greg; Crowe, Brian; Shirtz, John

    2007-01-01

    The stability of vaccines during storage and handling is a prerequisite for optimal potency at the time of immunization. Meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines have been successfully incorporated in mass immunization programs, however, thus far no long-term real-time stability studies of these vaccines have been reported. Stability of de-O-acetylated group C meningococcal polysaccharide coupled to tetanus toxoid (GCMP-TT) was evaluated in real time on the basis of immunogenicity and physiochemical properties. The vaccine is formulated as a 0.5 mL suspension containing 10 mug GCMP conjugated to 10-20 mug of TT adsorbed on 0.5 mg aluminum in saline. The single dose syringes were stored under refrigeration (5 +/- 3 degrees C) and at room temperature (25 +/- 2 degrees C) for up to 42 months and at elevated temperature (40 +/- 2 degrees C) for up to 6 months. At both refrigerated and room temperatures, no time-dependent change in animal potency was detectable through 42 months. After the nine months maximum recommended storage period at room temperature, 96% of the baseline serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer was maintained. Time-dependent decreases in SBA level and anti-GCMP-TT IgG level were observed at 40 +/- 2 degrees C. No changes in GCMP-TT adsorption and pH occurred in all the studies. Loss of integrity increased over six months at 40 +/- 2 degrees C (p = 0.004). Free sugar content did not change over 36 months under refrigeration. GCMP-TT retained immunogenicity and physicochemical properties under refrigeration and at room temperature (25 +/- 2 degrees C) for up to 42 months.

  2. Parents' perceived vulnerability and perceived control in preventing Meningococcal C infection: a large-scale interview study about vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Wal Gerrit; Hirasing Remy A; Henneman Lidewij; Timmermans Danielle RM

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Parents' reported ambivalence toward large-scale vaccination programs for childhood diseases may be related to their perception of the risks of side-effects or safety of vaccination and the risk of contracting the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate parents' perceptions of their child's risk contracting a Meningococcal C infection and parents' perceived control in preventing infection in relation to their evaluation of the safety, effectiveness and usefulness of ...

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a novel quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM in healthy Korean adolescents and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoan Jong Lee

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Findings of this first study of a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in Korean adults and adolescents demonstrated that a single dose of MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic, as indicated by the percentages of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 (79%, 99%, 98%, and 94% of subjects and geometric mean titers (48, 231, 147, and 107 against serogroups A, C, W, and Y, respectively, at 1 month post-vaccination.

  4. Meningococcal serogroup A, C, W₁₃₅ and Y conjugated vaccine: a cost-effectiveness analysis in the Netherlands.

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    Hiltsje Hepkema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY was licensed for use in subjects of 12 months of age and above. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal vaccination at 14 months and an additional vaccination at the age of 12 years, both with the MenACWY vaccine. METHODS: A decision analysis cohort model, with 185,000 Dutch newborns, was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different immunization strategies. For strategies including a vaccination at 12 years of age, an additional cohort with adolescents aged 12 years was followed. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was estimated for the current disease incidence and for a scenario when herd immunity is lost. RESULTS: Vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months is cost-saving. Vaccinating with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would prevent 7 additional cases of meningococcal serogroup A,C,W135,Y disease in the birth cohort and adolescent cohort followed for 99 years compared to the current vaccine schedule of a single vaccination with MenC at 14 months. With the current incidence, this strategy resulted in an ICER of €635,334 per quality adjusted life year. When serogroup C disease incidence returns to pre-vaccination levels due to a loss of vaccine-induced herd-immunity, vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would be cost-saving. CONCLUSIONS: Routine vaccination with MenACWY is cost-saving. With the current epidemiology, a booster-dose with MenACWY is not likely cost-effective. When herd immunity is lost, a booster-dose has the potential of being cost-effective. A dynamic model should be developed for more precise estimation of the cost-effectiveness of the prevention of disappearance of herd immunity.

  5. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates

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    Bernd Eisele

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines.

  6. Kinetics of antibody responses after primary immunization with meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine or secondary immunization with either conjugate or polysaccharide vaccine in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, Richarda M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Engels, Carla W. A. M.; Schepp, Rutger M.; van de Kassteele, Jan; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Rijkers, Ger T.; Berbers, Guy A. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands the meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MenCC) vaccine is administered as a single dose at 14 months. We evaluated the kinetics of isotype-specific antibodies in adults (n = 21) after primary immunization with MenCC or secondary immunization with MenCC or plain MenC polysaccharid

  7. Immune responses of a meningococcal A + W outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine with and without aluminium hydroxide adjuvant in two different mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunheim, Gro; Arnemo, Marianne; Naess, Lisbeth M; Norheim, Gunnstein; Garcia, Luis; Cardoso, Daniel; Mandiarote, Aleida; Gonzalez, Domingo; Sinnadurai, Kalpana; Fjeldheim, Åse-Karine; Bolstad, Karin; Rosenqvist, Einar

    2016-11-01

    Meningococci (Neisseria meningiditis) of serogroups A and W have caused large epidemics of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa for decades, and affordable and multivalent vaccines, effective in all age groups, are needed. A bivalent serogroup A and W (A + W) meningococcal vaccine candidate consisting of deoxycholate-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from representative African disease isolates was previously found to be highly immunogenic in outbred mice when formulated with the adjuvant aluminium hydroxide (AH). OMV has been shown to have inherent adjuvant properties. In order to study the importance of AH and genetical differences between mice strains on immune responses, we compared the immunogenicity of the A + W OMV vaccine when formulated with or without AH in inbred C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice (Th1 and Th2 dominant strains, respectively). The immunogenicity of the vaccine was found to be comparable in the two mice strains despite their different immune profiles. Adsorption to AH increased anti-OMV IgG levels and serum bactericidal activity (SBA). The immune responses were increased by each dose for the adsorbed vaccine, but the third dose did not significantly improve the immunogenicity further. Thus, a vaccine formulation with the A and W OMV will likely benefit from including AH as adjuvant. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effect of vaccination with carrier protein on response to meningococcal C conjugate vaccines and value of different immunoassays as predictors of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, Moya; Robinson, Andrew; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Southern, Joanna; Findlow, Jamie; Martin, Sarah; Thornton, Carol; Goldblatt, David; Corbel, Michael; Sesardic, Dorothea; Cartwight, Keith; Richmond, Peter; Miller, Elizabeth

    2002-09-01

    In order to plan for the wide-scale introduction of meningococcal C conjugate (MCC) vaccine for United Kingdom children up to 18 years old, phase II trials were undertaken to investigate whether there was any interaction between MCC vaccines conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or a derivative of diphtheria toxin (CRM(197)) and diphtheria-tetanus vaccines given for boosting at school entry or leaving. Children (n = 1,766) received a diphtheria-tetanus booster either 1 month before, 1 month after, or concurrently with one of three MCC vaccines conjugated to CRM(197) or TT. All of the MCC vaccines induced high antibody responses to the serogroup C polysaccharide that were indicative of protection. The immune response to the MCC-TT vaccine was reduced as a result of prior immunization with a tetanus-containing vaccine, but antibody levels were still well above the lower threshold for protection. Prior or simultaneous administration of a diphtheria-containing vaccine did not affect the response to MCC-CRM(197) vaccines. The immune responses to the carrier proteins were similar to those induced by a comparable dose of diphtheria or tetanus vaccine. The results also demonstrate that, for these conjugate vaccines in these age groups, both standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and those that measure high-avidity antibodies to meningococcal C polysaccharide correlated equally well with assays that measure serum bactericidal antibodies, the established serological correlate of protection for MCC vaccines.

  9. Factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity to an OMV meningococcal B vaccine in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Jackson, Catherine; Stewart, Joanna; Coster, Gregor; Turner, Nikki; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lennon, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Pain on vaccine injection and subsequent site reactions of pain and swelling may influence confidence in vaccines and their uptake. This study aimed to identify factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity following administration of a strain specific meningococcal B outer membrane vesicle vaccine. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted from a phase II single center randomized observer-blind study that evaluated the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of this vaccine in 2 cohorts of healthy 8 to 12 y old children. Vaccine administration technique was observed by an unblinded team member and the vaccine administrator instructed on standardized administration. Participants kept a daily diary to record local reactions (erythema, induration and swelling) and pain for 7 d following receipt of the vaccine. Explanatory variables were cohort, vaccine, age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, atopic history, history of frequent infections, history of drug reactions, pain on injection, vaccinator, school population socioeconomic status, serum bactericidal antibody titer against the vaccine strain NZ98/254, and total IgG. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using ordinal logistic regression for factors relating to pain on injection and reactogenicity. Perceived pain on injection was related to vaccine formulation, vaccine administrator and ethnicity. Reactogenicity outcomes varied with ethnicity and vaccine administrator. Maintaining community and parental confidence in vaccine safety without drawing attention to differences between individuals and groups is likely to become increasingly difficult. Vaccine administration technique alone has the potential to significantly reduce pain experienced on injection and local vaccine reactions.

  10. Update on the use of meningococcal serogroup C CRM₁₉₇-conjugate vaccine (Meningitec) against meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badahdah, Al-Mamoon; Rashid, Harunor; Khatami, Ameneh

    2016-01-01

    Meningitec is a CRM197-conjugated meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) vaccine, first licensed in 1999. It has been used as a primary and booster vaccine in infants, toddlers, older children and adults, and has been shown to be immunogenic and well-tolerated in all age groups, including premature infants. Vaccine effectiveness has been demonstrated using combined data on all three licensed MenC conjugate vaccines. Evidence from clinical trials, however, suggests that the different MenC conjugate vaccines behave differently with respect to the induction and persistence of bactericidal antibody and generation of immune memory. It appears that Meningitec has a less favorable immunologic profile compared particularly to tetanus toxoid (TT) MenC conjugate vaccines. Data from comparative trials have raised interesting questions on priming of the immune system by conjugate vaccines, particularly in infants. The results from these and other studies are reviewed here with specific focus on Meningitec.

  11. [Meningococcal vaccines. Global epidemiological situation and strategies for prevention by vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Calle, Irene; Rodriguez-Tenreiro Sánchez, Carmen; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-04-01

    N. meningitidis is a major cause of meningitis and septicemia and a major public health problem in many countries. The disease, that can be fulminant, has a high mortality and may cause serious sequelae, even in cases of apparently optimal medical treatment. Chemoprophylaxis may prevent secondary cases among those in close contact with the ill, but, since secondary cases represent only 1%-2% of all meningococcal disease, chemoprophylaxis has a small impact when fighting most of endemic and epidemic forms. Given that al least 5% -15% of children and young adults are carriers, the fight against meningococcal disease based on chemotherapeutic elimination of nasopharyngeal colonization is virtually impossible. Therefore, immunization is the only rational way to combat this disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Comportamento imunológico das vacinas anti-meningocócicas Immunological behavior of the meningococcal vaccines

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    Henry I. Z. Requejo

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A doença meningocócica continua sendo um grande problema de saúde pública em todos os continentes, e as vacinas anti-meningocócicas têm sido indicadas na prevenção e controle de epidemias. As vacinas polissacarídicas A e C são relativamente eficazes, com comportamentos imunológicos distintos frente às faixas etárias; no entanto, para o sorogrupo B, embora existam numerosos estudos internacionais até agora já desenvolvidos, ainda não se tem uma vacina altamente segura e eficaz de ampla aceitação. O polissacáride capsular do meningococo B não é imunogênico devido ao seu mimetismo com componentes celulares do hospedeiro. Tentativas de se introduzir carreadores protéicos vêm sendo feitas para se obter uma vacina que seja imunogênica em todas as faixas etárias e de preferência protetora contra todos os meningococos. Foi feita revisão da literatura com o objetivo de estudar o comportamento imunológico de todas as vacinas, até então desenvolvidas, e mostrar os esforços que estão sendo empreendidos no sentido de se buscar um produto seguro e eficaz para o controle da doença meningocócicaMeningococcal disease continues to be a great health problem on all continents and the meningococcal vaccines have been proposed for their prevention and epidemic control. The polysaccharide A and C vaccines are relatively efficacious with distinct immunological behavior with regard to the different age groups, however, up to the present no highly efficacious vaccine for meningococcal B disease exists. The meningococcal B capsular polysaccharide is not immunogenic due to the structural mimicry of mammalian tissues and efforts to produce carrier proteins have been proposed in order to obtain an immunogenic vaccine for all age groups that would if possible, protect against all the meningococci. This review of the literature presents the study of the development of the immunological behavior of all the meningococcal vaccines undergoing

  13. Communication Challenges During the Development and Introduction of a New Meningococcal Vaccine in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlier, Monique; Barry, Rodrigue; Shadid, John; Sirica, Coimbra; Brunier, Alison; Hasan, Hayatee; Bouma, Enricke

    2015-11-15

    A new group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine was developed to eliminate deadly meningitis epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. From the outset of the project, advocacy and communication strategies were developed and adjusted as the project evolved in Europe, Africa, India, and the United States. Communications efforts were evidence-based, and involved partnerships with the media and various stakeholders including African ministries of health, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, Gavi, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Médecins Sans Frontières. The implementation of an integrated communication strategy ensured the active cooperation of stakeholders while providing an organized and defined format for the dissemination of project-related developmental activities and the successful introduction of the vaccine. Early in the project, a communications strategy that engaged stakeholders and potential supporters was developed. The strategy was implemented and adapted as the project matured. Linked communication proved to be key to the successful wide-scale introduction of the PsA-TT (MenAfriVac) vaccine in Africa. © 2015 World Health Organization; licensee Oxford Journals.

  14. Structure of the meningococcal vaccine antigen NadA and epitope mapping of a bactericidal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malito, Enrico; Biancucci, Marco; Faleri, Agnese; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Scarselli, Maria; Maruggi, Giulietta; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Liguori, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Bertoldi, Isabella; Petracca, Roberto; Marchi, Sara; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Cartocci, Elena; Vercellino, Irene; Savino, Silvana; Spraggon, Glen; Norais, Nathalie; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Masignani, Vega; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2014-12-02

    Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) is a major cause of severe sepsis and invasive meningococcal disease, which is associated with 5-15% mortality and devastating long-term sequelae. Neisserial adhesin A (NadA), a trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) that acts in adhesion to and invasion of host epithelial cells, is one of the three antigens discovered by genome mining that are part of the MenB vaccine that recently was approved by the European Medicines Agency. Here we present the crystal structure of NadA variant 5 at 2 Å resolution and transmission electron microscopy data for NadA variant 3 that is present in the vaccine. The two variants show similar overall topology with a novel TAA fold predominantly composed of trimeric coiled-coils with three protruding wing-like structures that create an unusual N-terminal head domain. Detailed mapping of the binding site of a bactericidal antibody by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS shows that a protective conformational epitope is located in the head of NadA. These results provide information that is important for elucidating the biological function and vaccine efficacy of NadA.

  15. Meningococcal omp85 in detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicle vaccines induces high levels of non-functional antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, E; Lie, K; Bolstad, K; Weynants, V E; Halstensen, A; Herstad, T K; Kreutzberger, J; Nome, L; Naess, L M; Aase, A

    2013-06-01

    The vaccine potential of meningococcal Omp85 was studied by comparing the immune responses of genetically modified deoxycholate-extracted outer membrane vesicles, expressing five-fold higher levels of Omp85, with wild-type vesicles. Groups (n = 6-12) of inbred and outbred mouse strains (Balb/c, C57BL/6, OFI and NMRI) were immunized with the two vaccines, and the induced antibody levels and bactericidal and opsonic activities measured. Except for Balb/c mice, which were low responders, the genetically modified vaccine raised high Omp85 antibody levels in all mouse strains. In comparison, the wild-type vaccine gave lower antibody levels, but NMRI mice responded to this vaccine with the same high levels as the modified vaccine in the other strains. Although the vaccines induced strain-dependent Omp85 antibody responses, the mouse strains showed high and similar serum bactericidal titres. Titres were negligible with heterologous or PorA-negative meningococcal target strains, demonstrating the presence of the dominant bactericidal PorA antibodies. The two vaccines induced the same opsonic titres. Thus, the genetically modified vaccine with high Omp85 antibody levels and the wild-type vaccine induced the same levels of functional activities related to protection against meningococcal disease, suggesting that meningococcal Omp85 is a less attractive vaccine antigen. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Is a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine sufficient for protection? experience from the Netherlands

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    Kaaijk Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first meningococcal serogroup C (MenC conjugate vaccine was licensed in 1999 and introduced in the United Kingdom. Countries that have implemented the MenC vaccine since then in their national immunisation programmes use different schedules. Nevertheless, all involved countries seem to experience substantial declines in the incidence of MenC disease. Discussion Since 2001, the MenC conjugate vaccine has been implemented in the Netherlands by offering a single dose to all children aged 14 months. Prior to the introduction of the vaccine into the national immunisation programme, a catch-up vaccination campaign was initiated in which a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine was offered to all children aged from 14 months up to and including 18 years. Since then, there has been no report of any case of MenC disease among immunocompetent vaccinees. Administration of a single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine after infancy could be beneficial considering the already complex immunisation schedules with large numbers of vaccinations in the first year of life. The present paper deals with the advantages and critical aspects of a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine. Summary A single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months in combination with a catch up vaccine campaign appeared to be a successful strategy to prevent MenC disease in the Netherlands, thereby confirming that a single dose of the vaccine could sufficiently protect against disease. Nevertheless, this approach can only be justified in countries with a relatively low incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the first year of life. Furthermore, a good surveillance programme is recommended for timely detection of vaccine breakthroughs and outbreaks among non-vaccinees, since long-term protection after a single dose in the second year of life cannot currently be guaranteed.

  17. Vaccines for leishmaniasis: from proteome to vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Juliane; Aebischer, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania spp. cause a wide spectrum of tropical diseases which are threatening an estimated 350 million people around the globe. While in most cases non-fatal, the disease is associated with high morbidity, social stigmata and poverty. However, the most severe form visceral leishmaniasis can be fatal if left untreated. Chemotherapeutics are available but show high toxicity, costs and are prone to resistance development due to prolonged treatment periods. Healing is associated with a life-long resistance to re-infection and this argues for the feasibility of vaccination. However, despite much effort, no such vaccine has become available yet. Here, the status of vaccine development in this field is briefly summarized before the focus is set on the promise of reverse vaccinology for anti-Leishmania vaccine development in the post-genomic era. We report on our own experience with this approach using an instructive example of successful candidate vaccine antigen identification.

  18. Top Zika Vaccine Candidate Moves Closer to Field Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161274.html Top Zika Vaccine Candidate Moves Closer to Field Testing DNA- ... MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The leading Zika vaccine candidate should be ready for field testing ...

  19. Immunogenicity of meningococcal quadrivalent (serogroup A, C, W135 and Y) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Perrone, Valentina; Radice, Sonia; Capuano, Annalisa; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-02-01

    Meningococcal meningitis represents one of the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in developed countries. Among the thirteen described serogroups, only five are usually responsible of invasive infections making immunisation against multiple serogroups the best strategy to protect individuals from this disease. Herein we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis, in accordance with the PRISMA statement, of the recently EU-licensed meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT). We included 15 randomised clinical trials, comparing MenACWY-TT and Men-PS (ten studies), MenACWY-TT and MenC-CRM197 (four studies) and MenACWY-TT and MenACWY-DT (one study). All studies included in the meta-analysis showed high immunogenicity for MenACWY-TT vaccines in all tested serogroups. Our results suggest that the MenACWY-TT vaccine is as immunogenic as the other commercial available meningococcal vaccines.

  20. Parents' perceived vulnerability and perceived control in preventing Meningococcal C infection: a large-scale interview study about vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Danielle RM; Henneman, Lidewij; Hirasing, Remy A; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    Background Parents' reported ambivalence toward large-scale vaccination programs for childhood diseases may be related to their perception of the risks of side-effects or safety of vaccination and the risk of contracting the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate parents' perceptions of their child's risk contracting a Meningococcal C infection and parents' perceived control in preventing infection in relation to their evaluation of the safety, effectiveness and usefulness of vaccination. Methods In a large-scale interview study, a random sample of parents was interviewed after their children had received vaccination against Meningococcal C in a catch-up campaign. Questions were asked about the perceived relative vulnerability of their child contracting an infection, perceived control in preventing an infection, and parents' evaluation of the safety, usefulness and effectiveness of vaccination. Results 61% of 2910 (N = 1763) parents who were approached participated. A higher perceived relative vulnerability of their own child contracting the disease was related to a more positive evaluation of the vaccination campaign, while a lower perceived vulnerability did not result in a more negative evaluation. A higher perceived control in being able to prevent an infection was, however, related to a more critical attitude toward the safety, usefulness and effectiveness of vaccination. Conclusion Perceived relative vulnerability contracting an infection and parents' perceived control in preventing an infection seem to influence parents' evaluation of the vaccination programme. Future studies should determine if, and under which circumstances, these perceptions also affect parents' vaccination behaviour and would be relevant to be taken into account when educating parents about vaccination. PMID:18241345

  1. Parents' perceived vulnerability and perceived control in preventing Meningococcal C infection: a large-scale interview study about vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents' reported ambivalence toward large-scale vaccination programs for childhood diseases may be related to their perception of the risks of side-effects or safety of vaccination and the risk of contracting the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate parents' perceptions of their child's risk contracting a Meningococcal C infection and parents' perceived control in preventing infection in relation to their evaluation of the safety, effectiveness and usefulness of vaccination. Methods In a large-scale interview study, a random sample of parents was interviewed after their children had received vaccination against Meningococcal C in a catch-up campaign. Questions were asked about the perceived relative vulnerability of their child contracting an infection, perceived control in preventing an infection, and parents' evaluation of the safety, usefulness and effectiveness of vaccination. Results 61% of 2910 (N = 1763 parents who were approached participated. A higher perceived relative vulnerability of their own child contracting the disease was related to a more positive evaluation of the vaccination campaign, while a lower perceived vulnerability did not result in a more negative evaluation. A higher perceived control in being able to prevent an infection was, however, related to a more critical attitude toward the safety, usefulness and effectiveness of vaccination. Conclusion Perceived relative vulnerability contracting an infection and parents' perceived control in preventing an infection seem to influence parents' evaluation of the vaccination programme. Future studies should determine if, and under which circumstances, these perceptions also affect parents' vaccination behaviour and would be relevant to be taken into account when educating parents about vaccination.

  2. Effect of Vaccination with Carrier Protein on Response to Meningococcal C Conjugate Vaccines and Value of Different Immunoassays as Predictors of Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Burrage, Moya; Robinson, Andrew; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Southern, Joanna; Findlow, Jamie; Martin, Sarah; Thornton, Carol; Goldblatt, David; Corbel, Michael; Sesardic, Dorothea; Cartwight, Keith; Richmond, Peter; Miller, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    In order to plan for the wide-scale introduction of meningococcal C conjugate (MCC) vaccine for United Kingdom children up to 18 years old, phase II trials were undertaken to investigate whether there was any interaction between MCC vaccines conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or a derivative of diphtheria toxin (CRM197) and diphtheria-tetanus vaccines given for boosting at school entry or leaving. Children (n = 1,766) received a diphtheria-tetanus booster either 1 month before, 1 month after, ...

  3. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor S. Lukashevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF. LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  4. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-10-29

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  5. Vaccine candidates for leishmaniasis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagill, Rajeev; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2011-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a diverse group of clinical syndromes caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. The clinical manifestation of the disease varies from self-limiting cutaneous lesions to progressive visceral disease. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk in 88 countries, with a global incidence of 1-1.5 million cases of cutaneous and 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The key control measures mainly rely on early case detection and chemotherapy which has been hampered by the toxicity of drugs, side-effects and by the emergence of drug resistance in parasites. Control of reservoir host and vector is difficult due to operational difficulties and frequent relapses in the host. Therefore, the development of effective and affordable vaccine against leishmaniasis is highly desirable. Although considerable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding immune mechanisms underlying potential candidate antigens, including killed, live attenuated parasites, crude parasites, pure or recombinant Leishmania proteins or DNA encoding leishmanial proteins, as well as immunomodulators from sand fly saliva, very few candidate vaccines have progressed beyond the experimental stage. As such there is no vaccine against any form of human leishmaniasis. In recent years, however, much interest has been stimulated towards vaccination against leishmaniasis focused mainly on cutaneous leishmaniasis with fewer attempts against visceral leishmaniasis.

  6. Rapid Response to a College Outbreak of Meningococcal Serogroup B Disease: Nation's First Widespread Use of Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Theresa M.; Bornschein, Suzanne; Mihalakos, Alysia; Kelleher, Catherine M.; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Kanadanian, Koren V.; Raymond, Patricia; Sicard, Kenneth; Dennehy, Penelope H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To outline the reasoning behind use of bivalent rLP2086 in a Rhode Island college meningococcal B disease outbreak, highlighting the timeline from outbreak declaration to vaccination clinic, emphasizing that these two time points are vaccination.…

  7. A novel monoclonal antibody to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X capsular polysaccharide and its potential use in quantitation of meningococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Fátima; Otero, Oscar; Camacho, Frank; Amin, Nevis; Ramírez, Fidel; Valdés, Yolanda; Acevedo, Reynaldo; García, Luis; Cardoso, Daniel; Cuello, Maribel

    2014-11-01

    A novel murine hybridoma monoclonal antibody (MAb) was produced against the capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X (MenX) in order to develop a sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantitation of the meningococcal polysaccharide. The MAb only reacted with the CP from MenX and did not react with CPs from N. meningitidis serogroups A, C, Y and W (MenA, MenC, MenY, MenW). The affinity constant (Ka) of the MAb measured by non-competitive ELISA was 7.25 × 10(7) M(-1). The application of this MAb in a sandwich ELISA was demonstrated by its ability to properly quantitate three lots of an experimental meningococcal CP-based vaccine. The MAb obtained in this work could be a valuable reagent for the detection and quantitation of future meningococcal vaccines containing MenX CP. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brazilian meningococcal C conjugate vaccine: physicochemical, immunological, and thermal stability characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Renata Chagas; Corrêa, Marilza Batista; de Souza, Iaralice Medeiros; da Silva, Milton Neto; da Silva Gomes Pereira, Denise; Martins, Fernanda Otaviano; da Silva Faria, Camila; Ano Bom, Ana Paula Dinis; de Lourdes Leal, Maria; Jessouroun, Ellen; da Silva, José Godinho; de Andrade Medronho, Ricardo; da Silveira, Ivna Alana Freitas Brasileiro

    2017-09-19

    High temperature is known to cause some instability in polysaccharide-protein conjugated vaccines and studies under stress conditions may be useful in determining whether short-term accidental exposure to undesired conditions can compromise product quality. In this study, we examined the structural stability of three industrial batches of Brazilian Meningococcal C conjugate bulk (MPCT) incubated at 4, 37, and 55 °C for 5 weeks. The effect of exposure to the storage temperatures was monitored by HPLC-SEC, CZE, CD and NMR techniques. The immunological significance of any physicochemical changes observed in MPCT was determined by SBA and ELISA assays of serum from immunized mice. Fluorescence emission spectra at 4 and 37 °C were similar among all samples and compatible with the native fold of the carrier protein. Fluorescence spectra of MPCT stored at 55 °C decreased in intensity and had a significant red-shift, indicating conformational changes. Far-UV CD spectra revealed a trend toward loss of structural conformation as storage temperature was increased to 55 °C. The NMR data showed modified signal intensity of the aromatic and aliphatic residues, mainly for samples incubated at 55 °C, suggesting a partial loss of tertiary structure. About 50% free saccharide content was found in bulks stored at 55 °C, but no difference was observed in the IgG or SBA titers. The present study showed physicochemical methods alone are insufficient to predict the biological activity of a MPCT conjugate vaccine without extensive validation against immunological data. However, they provide a sensitive means of detecting changes induced in a vaccine exposed to adverse environmental condition.

  9. Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccination of adults: phase III comparison of an investigational conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, with the licensed vaccine, Menactra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Keith S; Baxter, Roger; Block, Stanley L; Shah, Jina; Bedell, Lisa; Dull, Peter M

    2009-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States, with the highest case fatality rates reported for individuals > or = 15 years of age. This study compares the safety and immunogenicity of the Novartis Vaccines investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, to those of the licensed meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Menactra, when administered to healthy adults. In this phase III multicenter study, 1,359 adults 19 to 55 years of age were randomly assigned to one of four groups (1:1:1:1 ratio) to receive a single dose of one of three lots of MenACWY-CRM or a single dose of Menactra. Serum samples obtained at baseline and 1 month postvaccination were tested for serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA). The hSBA titers following vaccination with MenACWY-CRM and Menactra were compared in noninferiority and prespecified superiority analyses. Reactogenicity was similar in the MenACWY-CRM and Menactra groups, and neither vaccine was associated with a serious adverse event. When compared with Menactra, MenACWY-CRM met the superiority criteria for the proportions of recipients achieving a seroresponse against serogroups C, W-135, and Y and the proportion of subjects achieving postvaccination titers of > or = 1:8 for serogroups C and Y. MenACWY-CRM's immunogenicity was statistically noninferior (the lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval was more than -10%) to that of Menactra for all four serogroups, with the postvaccination hSBA geometric mean titers being consistently higher for MenACWY-CRM than for Menactra. MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated in adults 19 to 55 years of age, with immune responses to each of the serogroups noninferior and, in some cases, statistically superior to those to Menactra.

  10. Production of EV71 vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pele; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Wu, Suh-Chin; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen; Klein, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and with Coxsackie virus (CV) it is the other major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD). Effective medications and/or prophylactic vaccines against HFMD are urgently needed. From a scientific (the feasibility of bioprocess, immunological responses and potency in animal challenge model) and business development (cost of goods) points of view, we in this review address and discuss the pros and cons of different EV71 vaccine candidates that have been produced and evaluated in animal models. Epitope-based synthetic peptide vaccine candidates containing residues 211-225 of VP1 formulated with Freund's adjuvant (CFA/IFA) elicited low EV71 virus neutralizing antibody responses, but were protective in the suckling mouse challenge model. Among recombinant EV71 subunits (rVP1, rVP2 and rVP3) expressed in E. coli, purified and formulated with CFA/IFA, only VP1 elicited mouse antibody responses with measurable EV71-specific virus neutralization titers. Immunization of mice with either a DNA plasmid containing VP1 gene or VP1 expressed in Salmonella typhimurium also generated neutralizing antibody responses and protected animals against a live EV71 challenge. Recombinant EV71 virus-like particles (rVLP) produced from baculovirus formulated either with CFA/IFA or alum elicited good virus neutralization titers in both mice and non-human primates, and were found to be protective in the suckling mouse EV71 challenge model. Synthetic peptides or recombinant EV71 subunit vaccines (rVP1 and rVLP) formulated in alum were found to be poorly immunogenic in rabbits. Only formalin-inactivated (FI) EV71 virions formulated in alum elicited cross-neutralizing antibodies against different EV71 genotypes in mice, rabbits and non-human primates but induced weak neutralizing responses against CAV16. From a regulatory, economic and market acceptability standpoint, FI-EV71 virion vaccines are the most

  11. The tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine is immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in subjects previously vaccinated with a tetravalent polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Van der Wielen, Marie; Reda, Mariam; Medlej, Fouad; Tabet, Carelle; Boutriau, Dominique; Sumbul, Anne; Anis, Sameh; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2012-08-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of the tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) were evaluated in subjects previously vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and in subjects without previous meningococcal vaccination. In this phase II, open, controlled study (NCT00661557), healthy subjects aged 4.5-34 years received one dose of MenACWY-TT at month 0. Subjects in the MPS group (n=192) had received polysaccharide vaccine in a study conducted 30-42 months earlier; age-matched subjects in the noMPS control group (n=79) had received no meningococcal vaccination within the past 10 years. Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was measured at month 0 and month 1. At month 1, ≥97.0% of subjects had rSBA titers ≥1:128. Post-vaccination rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were ≥3.9-fold higher than pre-vaccination in both treatment groups. Exploratory analyses showed no statistically significant differences between groups in percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128, but significantly lower rSBA GMTs and vaccine response rates for each serogroup in the MPS versus the noMPS group. MenACWY-TT had an acceptable safety profile in both groups. These results suggest that MenACWY-TT could be used in vaccination programs irrespective of the pre-vaccination status with polysaccharide vaccine. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Uptake of meningococcal conjugate vaccine among adolescents in large managed care organizations, United States, 2005: Demand, supply and seasonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wortley Pascale M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In February 2005, the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended the new meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4 for routine use among 11- to 12-year-olds (at the preadolescent health-care visit, 14- to 15-year-olds (before high-school entry, and groups at increased risk. Vaccine distribution started in March; however, in July, the manufacturer reported inability to meet demand and widespread MCV4 shortages were reported. Our objectives were to determine early uptake patterns among target (11-12 and 14-15 year olds and non-target (13- plus 16-year-olds age groups. A post hoc analysis was conducted to compare seasonal uptake patterns of MCV4 with polysaccharide meningococcal (MPSV4 and tetanus diphtheria (Td vaccines. Methods We analyzed data for adolescents 11-16 years from five managed care organizations participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD. For MCV4, we estimated monthly and cumulative coverage during 2005 and calculated risk ratios. For MPSV4 and Td, we combined 2003 and 2004 data and compared their seasonal uptake patterns with MCV4. Results Coverage for MCV4 during 2005 among the 623,889 11-16 years olds was 10%. Coverage for 11-12 and 14-15 year olds was 12% and 11%, respectively, compared with 8% for 13- plus 16-year-olds (p Conclusion A surge in vaccine uptake between June and August was observed among adolescents for MCV4, MPSV4 and Td vaccines. The increase in summer-time vaccinations and vaccination of non-targeted adolescents coupled with supply limitations likely contributed to the reported shortages of MCV4 in 2005.

  13. Predicted vs observed effectiveness of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Thomas; Koch, Judith; Wichmann, Ole; Hellenbrand, Wiebke

    2017-08-01

    Human serum bactericidal antibody levels (hSBA) are commonly used as an immune correlate of protection after vaccination against meningococcal disease. We performed a systematic review of how well this marker correlates with protection induced by outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against meningococcal B (MenB) disease. To compare vaccine effectiveness (VE) of OMV vaccines against MenB predicted by hSBA (predicted protection) to VE from clinical studies (observed protection). Studies identified by searching Medline, Embase, Global Health, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Studies reporting hSBA after vaccination with OMV vaccines and subsequent efficacy/effectiveness in a MenB outbreak were included. Data extraction and risk of bias assessments were performed by two independent investigators. Predicted VE and observed VE measured during MenB outbreaks. We included 19 studies (eleven randomized controlled trials, six cohort studies, two case-control studies). Four different OMV vaccines were applied during nine different outbreaks (six countries, 1987-2009). A comparison between predicted and observed VE was possible using results from studies performed during five outbreaks. Predicted VE differed from observed VE by 2-59%, with greater differences observed in younger age groups. In general, predicted VE tended to be lower than observed VE. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: hSBA induced by OMV vaccines correlates moderately well with protection against MenB in older children and adults. The correlation was poor at very young ages, for which low VE was observed. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Meningococcal Disease in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhujun Shao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitides is one of the leading causes of bacterial meningitis. The epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease varies in different countries and regions. This review summarizes the available data from China describing the burden of meningococcal disease, N. meningitidis serogroups, and vaccination programs. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA was predominant for several decades in China. However, since 2000, invasive meningococcal disease caused by MenC, MenW, or MenB has increased. MenC, belonging to a hyperinvasive clonal sequence type ST-4821 (CC4821, emerged in Anhui Province and was subsequently disseminated over two-thirds of all Chinese provinces. Serogroup W (CC11 is endemic and causes death. Serogroup B (CC4821 originated from serogroup C (CC4821 via a capsular switching mechanism. Polysaccharide A and C meningococcal vaccines have been introduced into national routine immunization programs and have effectively reduced invasive meningococcal disease. However, the vaccination strategy must be revised based on the epidemic trends in meningococcal disease in China.

  15. Coadministration of a 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine With Meningococcal and Tdap Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Andrea; Parra, Mercedes Macias; Gutierrez, Maricruz; Restrepo, Jaime; Ucros, Santiago; Herrera, Teobaldo; Engel, Eli; Huicho, Luis; Shew, Marcia; Maansson, Roger; Caldwell, Nicole; Luxembourg, Alain; Ter Meulen, Ajoke Sobanjo

    2015-09-01

    This study in 11- to 15-year-old boys and girls compared the immunogenicity and safety of GARDASIL 9 (9-valent human papillomavirus [9vHPV] vaccine) administered either concomitantly or nonconcomitantly with 2 vaccines routinely administered in this age group (Menactra [MCV4; Neisseria meningitidis serotypes A/C/Y/W-135] or Adacel [Tdap; diphtheria/tetanus/acellular pertussis]). Participants received 9vHPV vaccine at day 1 and months 2 and 6; the concomitant group (n = 621) received MCV4/Tdap concomitantly with 9vHPV vaccine at day 1; the nonconcomitant group (n = 620) received MCV4/Tdap at month 1. Antibodies to HPV-, MCV4-, and Tdap-relevant antigens were determined. Injection-site and systemic adverse events (AEs) were monitored for 15 days after any vaccination; serious AEs were monitored throughout the study. The geometric mean titers for all HPV types in 9vHPV vaccine 4 weeks after dose 3, proportion of subjects with a fourfold rise or greater in titers for 4 N meningitidis serotypes 4 weeks after injection with MCV4, proportion of subjects with antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus ≥0.1 IU/mL, and geometric mean titers for pertussis antigens 4 weeks after injection with Tdap were all noninferior in the concomitant group compared with the nonconcomitant group. Injection-site swelling occurred more frequently in the concomitant group. There were no vaccine-related serious AEs. Concomitant administration of 9vHPV vaccine with MCV4/Tdap was generally well tolerated and did not interfere with the antibody response to any of these vaccines. This strategy would minimize the number of visits required to deliver each vaccine individually. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV): lessons from past programs and implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Johan; Oster, Philipp; Arnold, Richard; Tatley, Michael V; Næss, Lisbeth M; Aaberge, Ingeborg S; Galloway, Yvonne; McNicholas, Anne; O'Hallahan, Jane; Rosenqvist, Einar; Black, Steven

    2013-06-01

    The utility of wild-type outer membrane vesicle (wtOMV) vaccines against serogroup B (MenB) meningococcal disease has been explored since the 1970s. Public health interventions in Cuba, Norway and New Zealand have demonstrated that these protein-based vaccines can prevent MenB disease. Data from large clinical studies and retrospective statistical analyses in New Zealand give effectiveness estimates of at least 70%. A consistent pattern of moderately reactogenic and safe vaccines has been seen with the use of approximately 60 million doses of three different wtOMV vaccine formulations. The key limitation of conventional wtOMV vaccines is their lack of broad protective activity against the large diversity of MenB strains circulating globally. The public health intervention in New Zealand (between 2004-2008) when MeNZB was used to control a clonal MenB epidemic, provided a number of new insights regarding international and public-private collaboration, vaccine safety surveillance, vaccine effectiveness estimates and communication to the public. The experience with wtOMV vaccines also provide important information for the next generation of MenB vaccines designed to give more comprehensive protection against multiple strains.

  17. Use of MenACWY-CRM vaccine in children aged 2 through 23 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Jessica R; Rubin, Lorry; McNamara, Lucy; Briere, Elizabeth C; Clark, Thomas A; Cohn, Amanda C

    2014-06-20

    During its October 2013 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended use of a third meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis), as an additional option for vaccinating infants aged 2 through 23 months at increased risk for meningococcal disease. MenACWY-CRM is the first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine licensed for use in children aged 2 through 8 months. MenACWY-D (Menactra, Sanofi Pasteur) is recommended for use in children aged 9 through 23 months who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease, and Hib-MenCY-TT (MenHibrix, GlaxoSmithKline) is recommended for use in children aged 6 weeks through 18 months at increased risk. This report summarizes information on MenACWY-CRM administration in infants and provides recommendations for vaccine use in infants aged 2 through 23 months who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Because the burden of meningococcal disease in infants is low in the United States and the majority of cases that do occur are caused by serogroup B, which is not included in any vaccine licensed in the United States, only those infants who are at increased risk for meningococcal disease are recommended to receive a meningococcal vaccine.

  18. Meningococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Meningococcal meningitis Fact sheet N°141 Updated November 2015 Key facts Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis, a serious ...

  19. Meningitis - meningococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal meningitis; Gram negative - meningococcus ... Meningococcal meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis (also known as meningococcus). Meningococcus is the most common cause ...

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of typhoid fever and yellow fever vaccines when administered concomitantly with quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY glycoconjugate vaccine in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberer, Martin; Burchard, Gerd; Jelinek, Tomas; Reisinger, Emil; Beran, Jiri; Hlavata, Lucie Cerna; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Arora, Ashwani K

    2015-01-01

    Compact and short pre-travel immunization schedules, which include several vaccinations in a single visit, are desirable for many travelers. However, concomitant vaccination could potentially compromise immunogenicity and/or safety of the individual vaccines and, therefore, possible vaccine interferences should be carefully assessed. This article discusses the immunogenicity and safety of travel vaccines for typhoid fever (TF) and yellow fever (YF), when administered with or without a quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate ACWY-CRM vaccine (MenACWY-CRM). Healthy adults (18-≤60 years) were randomized to one of three vaccine regimens: TF + YF + MenACWY-CRM (group I; n = 100), TF + YF (group II; n = 101), or MenACWY-CRM (group III; n = 100). Immunogenicity at baseline and 4 weeks post-vaccination (day 29) was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or a neutralization test. Adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected throughout the study period. Non-inferiority of post-vaccination geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) and geometric mean titers (GMTs) was established for TF and YF vaccines, respectively, when given concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM vaccine versus when given alone. The percentages of subjects with seroprotective neutralizing titers against YF on day 29 were similar in groups I and II. The antibody responses to meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y were within the same range when MenACWY-CRM was given separately or together with TF and YF vaccines. The percentage of subjects reporting AEs was the same for TF and YF vaccines with or without MenACWY-CRM vaccine. There were no reports of SAEs or AEs leading to study withdrawals. These data provide evidence that MenACWY-CRM can be administered with typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine and live attenuated YF vaccine without compromising antibody responses stimulated by the

  1. FetA Antibodies Induced by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Derived from a Serogroup B Meningococcal Isolate with Constitutive FetA Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Sanders

    Full Text Available Invasive meningococcal disease causes over 3500 cases each year in Europe, with particularly high incidence among young children. Among serogroup B meningococci, which cause most of the cases, high diversity in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs is observed in endemic situations; however, comprehensive molecular epidemiological data are available for the diversity and distribution of the OMPs PorA and FetA and these can be used to rationally design a vaccine with high coverage of the case isolates. The aim of this study was to determine whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs derived from an isolate with constitutive FetA expression (MenPF-1 vaccine could be used to induce antibodies against both the PorA and FetA antigens. The immunogenicity of various dose levels and number of doses was evaluated in mice and rabbits, and IgG antibody responses tested against OMVs and recombinant PorA and FetA proteins. A panel of four isogenic mutants was generated and used to evaluate the relative ability of the vaccine to induce serum bactericidal activity (SBA against FetA and PorA. Sera from mice were tested in SBA against the four target strains. Results demonstrated that the MenPF-1 OMVs were immunogenic against PorA and FetA in both animal models. Furthermore, the murine antibodies induced were bactericidal against isogenic mutant strains, suggesting that antibodies to both PorA and FetA were functional. The data presented indicate that the MenPF-1 vaccine is a suitable formulation for presenting PorA and FetA OMPs in order to induce bactericidal antibodies, and that proceeding to a Phase I clinical trial with this vaccine candidate is justified.

  2. FetA Antibodies Induced by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Derived from a Serogroup B Meningococcal Isolate with Constitutive FetA Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Holly; Norheim, Gunnstein; Chan, Hannah; Dold, Christina; Vipond, Caroline; Derrick, Jeremy P; Pollard, Andrew J; Maiden, Martin C J; Feavers, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease causes over 3500 cases each year in Europe, with particularly high incidence among young children. Among serogroup B meningococci, which cause most of the cases, high diversity in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is observed in endemic situations; however, comprehensive molecular epidemiological data are available for the diversity and distribution of the OMPs PorA and FetA and these can be used to rationally design a vaccine with high coverage of the case isolates. The aim of this study was to determine whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from an isolate with constitutive FetA expression (MenPF-1 vaccine) could be used to induce antibodies against both the PorA and FetA antigens. The immunogenicity of various dose levels and number of doses was evaluated in mice and rabbits, and IgG antibody responses tested against OMVs and recombinant PorA and FetA proteins. A panel of four isogenic mutants was generated and used to evaluate the relative ability of the vaccine to induce serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against FetA and PorA. Sera from mice were tested in SBA against the four target strains. Results demonstrated that the MenPF-1 OMVs were immunogenic against PorA and FetA in both animal models. Furthermore, the murine antibodies induced were bactericidal against isogenic mutant strains, suggesting that antibodies to both PorA and FetA were functional. The data presented indicate that the MenPF-1 vaccine is a suitable formulation for presenting PorA and FetA OMPs in order to induce bactericidal antibodies, and that proceeding to a Phase I clinical trial with this vaccine candidate is justified.

  3. The introduction of the meningococcal B (MenB) vaccine (Bexsero®) into the national infant immunisation programme--New challenges for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Campbell, Helen; Parikh, Sydel R; Saliba, Vanessa; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary

    2015-12-01

    The United Kingdom is the first country to introduce Bexsero(®) (GSK Biologicals), a multicomponent, protein-based vaccine against meningococcal group B (MenB), into the national infant immunisation programme. This vaccine is like no other licensed vaccine and poses a number of implementation and surveillance challenges in England. From 01 September 2015, UK infants were offered a reduced two dose primary immunisation schedule at 2 and 4 months followed by a booster at 12 months. Because of high rates of fever post-vaccination, parents were advised to give their infants three doses of prophylactic paracetamol, with the first dose given as soon as possible after the primary MenB vaccination dose. Since the vaccine only protects against 73-88% of MenB strains causing invasive disease in England, clinical isolates and PCR-positive samples will require extensive characterisation by the Meningococcal Reference Unit (MRU) at Public Health England (PHE) in order to monitor vaccine effectiveness and identify potential vaccine failures. PHE is also conducting detailed clinical and epidemiological surveillance to assess the impact of the MenB immunisation programme on the morbidity and mortality associated with invasive meningococcal disease in infants and young children.

  4. Characterization of the key antigenic components and pre-clinical immune responses to a meningococcal disease vaccine based on Neisseria lactamica outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Michelle; Vaughan, Thomas; Taylor, Stephen; Hudson, Michael J; Pratt, Catherine; Wheeler, Jun X; Vipond, Caroline; Feavers, Ian; Jones, Christopher; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Gorringe, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Serogroup B strains are now responsible for over 80% of meningococcal disease in the UK and no suitable vaccine is available that confers universal protection against all serogroup B strains. Neisseria lactamica shares many antigens with the meningococcus, except capsule and the surface protein PorA. Many of these antigens are thought to be responsible for providing cross-protective immunity to meningococcal disease. We have developed an N. lactamica vaccine using methods developed for meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines. The major antigenic components were identified by excision of 11 major protein bands from an SDS-PAGE gel, followed by mass spectrometric identification. These bands contained at least 22 proteins identified from an unassembled N. lactamica genome, 15 of which having orthologues in published pathogenic Neisseria genomes. Western blotting revealed that most of these bands were immunogenic, and antibodies to these proteins generally cross-reacted with N. meningitidis proteins. Sera from mice and rabbits immunized with either N. lactamica or N. meningitidis OMVs produced comparable cross-reactive ELISA titres against OMVs prepared from a panel of diverse meningococcal strains. Mice immunized with either N. meningitidis or N. lactamica OMVs showed no detectable serum bactericidal activity against the panel of target strains except N. meningitidis OMV sera against the homologous strain. Similarly, rabbit antisera to N. lactamica OMVs elicited little or no bactericidal antibodies against the panel of serogroup B meningococcal strains. However, such antisera did mediate opsonophagocytosis, suggestingthat this may did mediate opsonophagocytosis, suggesting that this may be a mechanism by which this vaccine protects in a mouse model of meningococcal bacteraemia.

  5. Immunogenicity and safety of monovalent RIVM meningococcal B OMP vesicle F91 vaccine administered to children that received hexavalent meningococcal B vaccine 2.5 years ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber AB; Limpt CJP van; Berbers GAM; Labadie J; Kleijn ED de; Groot R de; Rumke HC; Alphen AJW van; Sophia Kinderziekenhuis /; LVO

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the results with respect to immunogenicity as well as reactogenicity of a monovalent P1.7h,4 OMV vaccine (MonoMen) used as booster vaccination in children previously vaccinated with a hexavalent MenB vaccine. The participants in this study were immunised in 1995-1996 with hexav

  6. Cellular Immune Responses in Humans Induced by Two Serogroup B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines Given Separately and in Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftung, Fredrik; Korsvold, Gro Ellen; Aase, Audun; Næss, Lisbeth M

    2016-04-01

    MenBvac and MeNZB are safe and efficacious outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against serogroup B meningococcal disease. Antibody responses have previously been investigated in a clinical trial with these two OMV vaccines given separately (25 μg/dose) or in combination (12.5 and 12.5 μg/dose) in three doses administered at 6-week intervals. Here, we report the results from analyzing cellular immune responses against MenBvac and MeNZB OMVs in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+)T cell proliferation and secretion of cytokines. The proliferative CD4(+)T cell responses to the combined vaccine were of the same magnitude as the homologous responses observed for each individual vaccine. The results also showed cross-reactivity in the sense that both vaccine groups receiving separate vaccines responded to both homologous and heterologous OMV antigen when assayed for antigen-specific cellular proliferation. In addition, a multiplex bead array assay was used to analyze the presence of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in cell culture supernatants. The results showed that gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-10 responses could be detected as a result of vaccination with both the MenBvac and the MeNZB vaccines given separately, as well as when given in combination. With respect to cross-reactivity, the cytokine results paralleled the observations made for proliferation. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that cross-reactive cellular immune responses involving both Th1 and Th2 cytokines can be induced to the same extent by different tailor-made OMV vaccines given either separately or in combination with half the dose of each vaccine. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Moderate PEGylation of the carrier protein improves the polysaccharide-specific immunogenicity of meningococcal group A polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Yu, Weili; Wang, Yanfei; Hu, Tao

    2015-06-22

    Neisseria meningitidis can cause severe and fulminant diseases such as meningitis. Meningococcal capsular polysaccharide (PS) is a key virulence determinant that is not able to induce immunological memory. Conjugation of PS to a carrier protein can significantly increase the immunogenicity of PS and induce immunological memory. Due to the classically described carrier-induced epitopic suppression (CIES) mechanisms, a strong immune response against the carrier protein could suppress the immune response to PS after coadministration of free carrier protein with the conjugate vaccine. However, it was not clear whether suppressing or enhancing the protein-specific immunogenicity could improve the PS-specific immunogenicity of the conjugate vaccine. Thus, moderate PEGylation, extensive PEGylation and oligomerization were used to regulate the immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid (TT) in the conjugate vaccine (PS-TT). Moderate PEGylation led to a 2.7-fold increase in the PS-specific IgG titers elicited by PS-TT. In contrast, extensive PEGylation and oligomerization of TT led to 1.4-fold and 1.6-fold decrease in the PS-specific IgG titers elicited by PS-TT, respectively. The PS-specific immunogenicity of PS-TT can be increased by moderate PEGylation through mild suppression of the TT-specific immunogenicity. The PS-specific immunogenicity of PS-TT was decreased through significant suppression or enhancement of the TT-specific immunogenicity. Thus, our study contributes to understand the CIES mechanisms and improve the PS-specific immunogenicity of a meningococcal PS conjugate vaccine.

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of a CRM-conjugated meningococcal ACWY vaccine administered concomitantly with routine vaccines starting at 2 months of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry M; Nissen, Michael D; Naz, Aftab; Shepard, Julie; Bedell, Lisa; Hohenboken, Matthew; Odrljin, Tatjana; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infants are at the highest risk for meningococcal disease and a broadly protective and safe vaccine is an unmet need in this youngest population. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a 4-dose infant/toddler regimen of MenACWY-CRM given at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age concomitantly with pentavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-Hemophilus influenzae type b-inactivated poliovirus-combination vaccine (DTaP-IPV/Hib), hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), 7- or 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV), and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR). Results: Four doses of MenACWY-CRM induced hSBA titers ≥8 in 89%, 95%, 97%, and 96% of participants against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y, respectively. hSBA titers ≥8 were present in 76–98% of participants after the first 3 doses. A categorical linear analysis incorporating vaccine group and study center showed responses to routine vaccines administered with MenACWY-CRM were non-inferior to routine vaccines alone, except for seroresponse to the pertussis antigen fimbriae. The reactogenicity profile was not affected when MenACWY-CRM was administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. Conclusion: MenACWY-CRM administered with routine concomitant vaccinations in young infants was well tolerated and induced highly immunogenic responses against each of the serogroups without significant interference with the immune responses to routine infant vaccinations. Methods: Healthy 2 month old infants were randomized to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines (n = 258) or routine vaccines alone (n = 271). Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA). Medically attended adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs) and AEs leading to study withdrawal were collected throughout the study period. PMID:24220326

  9. Effectiveness of a group B outer membrane vesicle meningococcal vaccine against gonorrhoea in New Zealand: a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Paynter, Janine; Morgan, Jane; Saxton, Peter; McArdle, Barbara; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Black, Steven

    2017-09-30

    Gonorrhoea is a major global public health problem that is exacerbated by drug resistance. Effective vaccine development has been unsuccessful, but surveillance data suggest that outer membrane vesicle meningococcal group B vaccines affect the incidence of gonorrhoea. We assessed vaccine effectiveness of the outer membrane vesicle meningococcal B vaccine (MeNZB) against gonorrhoea in young adults aged 15-30 years in New Zealand. We did a retrospective case-control study of patients at sexual health clinics aged 15-30 years who were born between Jan 1, 1984, and Dec 31, 1998, eligible to receive MeNZB, and diagnosed with gonorrhoea or chlamydia, or both. Demographic data, sexual health clinic data, and National Immunisation Register data were linked via patients' unique personal identifier. For primary analysis, cases were confirmed by laboratory isolation or detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae only from a clinical specimen, and controls were individuals with a positive chlamydia test only. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) comparing disease outcomes in vaccinated versus unvaccinated participants via multivariable logistic regression. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as 100×(1-OR). 11 of 24 clinics nationally provided records. There were 14 730 cases and controls for analyses: 1241 incidences of gonorrhoea, 12 487 incidences of chlamydia, and 1002 incidences of co-infection. Vaccinated individuals were significantly less likely to be cases than controls (511 [41%] vs 6424 [51%]; adjusted OR 0·69 [95% CI 0·61-0·79]; p<0·0001). Estimate vaccine effectiveness of MeNZB against gonorrhoea after adjustment for ethnicity, deprivation, geographical area, and sex was 31% (95% CI 21-39). Exposure to MeNZB was associated with reduced rates of gonorrhoea diagnosis, the first time a vaccine has shown any protection against gonorrhoea. These results provide a proof of principle that can inform prospective vaccine development not only for gonorrhoea but also for

  10. Evaluation of the impact of serogroup C meningococcal disease vaccination program in Brazil and its regions: a population-based study, 2001-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Camile; de Moraes, José Cássio; da Silva, Gabriela Drummond Marques; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Meningococcal C conjugate (MenC) vaccine was introduced as part of the Brazilian National Immunisation Program in 2010 for children < 1 year of age. OBJECTIVES The study objective was to evaluate the impact of this vaccination strategy. METHODS An observational, mixed ecological and analytical study was conducted, based on time series panel data from surveillance records (2001-2013). FINDINGS A total of 37,538 of meningococcal disease cases were recorded during the study period. Of these, 19,997 were attributed to serogroup C. A decrease in meningococcal disease serogroup C (MDC) incidence among children aged < 1 year [65.2%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 20.5-84.7%] and 1-4 years (46.9%; 95%CI: 14.6-79.1%) were found in the three years following vaccination introduction. Vaccination impact on the reduction of MDC incidence varied from 83.7% (95%CI: 51.1-100.0%) in the Midwest region to 56.7% (95%CI: 37.4-76.0%) in the Northeast region. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Vaccination against MDC in Brazil had a positive impact on the population of children aged < 1 year, across all regions, and on the 1-4 year-old cohort. Nevertheless, in our view there is scope for improving the vaccination strategy adopted in Brazil. PMID:28327788

  11. Invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland, 2001-2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó Maoldomhnaigh, Cilian

    2016-12-01

    In 1999, invasive meningococcal disease was hyperendemic in Ireland at 14.75\\/100 000 population, with 60% group B and 30% group C diseases. National sepsis guidelines and meningococcal C vaccines were introduced in 2000. Despite a spontaneous decline in group B infection, invasive meningococcal disease remains a leading cause of sepsis. This study characterises the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease in children in Ireland since the introduction of meningococcal C vaccine and reviews its clinical presentation, hospital course and outcome in anticipation of meningococcal B vaccine introduction.

  12. Meningococcal C specific immune responses: immunity in an era of immunization with vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate immunization was introduced in the Dutch national immunization schedule at the age of 14 months, together with a large catch-up campaign in 2002. After introduction of this MenC immunization, the incidence of MenC completely disappeared from the immunized populati

  13. [Vaccination against meningococcal B disease. Public statement of the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2015-03-01

    Meningococcal invasive disease, including the main clinical presentation forms (sepsis and meningitis), is a severe and potentially lethal infection caused by different serogroups of Neisseria meningitidis. Meningococcal serogroup B is the most prevalent in Europe. Most cases occur in children, with a mortality rate of 10% and a risk of permanent sequelae of 20-30% among survivors. The highest incidence and case fatality rates are observed in healthy children under 2-3 years old, followed by adolescents, although it can occur at any age. With the arrival in Spain of the only available vaccine against meningococcus B, the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics has analysed its preventive potential in detail, as well as its peculiar administrative situation in Spain. The purpose of this document is to publish the statement of the Committee as regards this vaccination and the access to it by the Spanish population, taking into account that it has been only authorized for people at risk. The vaccine is available free in the rest of Europe for those who want to acquire it, and in some countries and regions it has been introduced into the systematic immunisation schedules. The Committee considers that Bexsero® has a profile of a vaccine to be included in the official schedules of all the Spanish autonomous communities and insists on the need for it to be available in pharmacies for its administration in all children older than 2 months. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunogenicity and safety of monovalent RIVM meningococcal B OMP vesicle F91 vaccine administered to children that received hexavalent meningococcal B vaccine 2.5 years ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber AB; van Limpt CJP; Berbers GAM; Labadie J; de Kleijn ED; de Groot R; Rumke HC; van Alphen AJW; LVO

    2000-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft een follow-up studie naar veiligheid en immunogeniciteit van monovalent P1.7h,4 OMV vaccin (MonoMen) gebruikt als boostervaccinatie in kinderen eerder gevaccineerd met hexavalent MenB vaccin. De deelnemers aan deze studie zijn in het kader van een eerdere studie gevaccineerd

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of one dose of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, when administered to adolescents concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguedas, A; Soley, C; Loaiza, C; Rincon, G; Guevara, S; Perez, A; Porras, W; Alvarado, O; Aguilar, L; Abdelnour, A; Grunwald, U; Bedell, L; Anemona, A; Dull, P M

    2010-04-19

    This Phase III study evaluates an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Novartis Vaccines), when administered concomitantly or sequentially with two other recommended adolescent vaccines; combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In this single-centre study, 1620 subjects 11-18 years of age, were randomized to three groups (1:1:1) to receive MenACWY-CRM concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV. Meningococcal serogroup-specific serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), and antibodies to Tdap antigens and HPV virus-like particles were determined before and 1 month after study vaccinations. Proportions of subjects with hSBA titres > or =1:8 for all four meningococcal serogroups (A, C, W-135, Y) were non-inferior for both concomitant and sequential administration. Immune responses to Tdap and HPV antigens were comparable when these vaccines were given alone or concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM. All vaccines were well tolerated; concomitant or sequential administration did not increase reactogenicity. MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic in subjects 11-18 years of age, with comparable immune responses to the four serogroups when given alone or concomitantly with Tdap or HPV antigens. This is the first demonstration that these currently recommended adolescent vaccines could be administered concomitantly without causing increased reactogenicity.

  16. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM(197) conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; Detora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo(®)) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.

  17. Meningococcal Serogroup B Bivalent rLP2086 Vaccine Elicits Broad and Robust Serum Bactericidal Responses in Healthy Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesikari, Timo; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Diez-Domingo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is a leading cause of invasive meningococcal disease in adolescents and young adults. A recombinant factor H binding protein (fHBP) vaccine (Trumenba(®); bivalent rLP2086) was recently approved in the United States in individuals aged 10-25 years...... ≥1:8 after 3 doses ranged from 91.7% to 95.0%, 98.9% to 99.4%, 88.4% to 89.0%, and 86.1% to 88.5% for MnB test strains expressing vaccine--heterologous fHBP variants A22, A56, B24, and B44, respectively. After 2 doses, responses ranged from 90.8% to 93.5%, 98.4% to 100%, 69.1% to 81.1%, and 70...... was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalent rLP2086 was immunogenic and well tolerated when administered in 2 or 3 doses. Three doses yielded the most robust hSBA response rates against MnB strains expressing vaccine-heterologous subfamily B fHBPs....

  18. Identification by genomic immunization of a pool of DNA vaccine candidates that confer protective immunity in mice against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yero, Daniel; Pajón, Rolando; Pérez, Yusleydis; Fariñas, Mildrey; Cobas, Karem; Diaz, Daiyana; Solis, Rosa L; Acosta, Armando; Brookes, Charlotte; Taylor, Stephen; Gorringe, Andrew

    2007-07-09

    We have shown previously that expression library immunization is viable alternative approach to induce protective immunity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. In this study we report that few rounds of library screening allow identification of protective pools of defined antigens. A previously reported protective meningococcal library (L8, with 600 clones) was screened and two sub-libraries of 95 clones each were selected based on the induction of bactericidal and protective antibodies in BALB/c mice. After sequence analysis of each clone within these sub-libraries, we identified a pool of 20 individual antigens that induced protective immune responses in mice against N. meningitidis infection, and the observed protection was associated with the induction of bactericidal antibodies. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that ELI combined with sequence analysis is a powerful and efficient tool for identification of candidate antigens for use in a meningococcal vaccine.

  19. A phase 2 randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB, in infants (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Prymula, Roman; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Barone, Michelangelo; Dull, Peter M; Toneatto, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB (Bexsero(®)), contains recombinant membrane proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) of the New Zealand serogroup B strain. We investigated whether reducing the OMV and/or protein content influences 4CMenB immunogenicity and reactogenicity in healthy two month-old infants. Six formulations were studied: 4CMenB, rMenB with 0, ¼ or ½ the OMV dose in 4CMenB, a half-dose of 4CMenB or a prelicensure formulation of 4CMenB, as a 4-dose primary/booster series, concomitantly with routine vaccines (DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate) at 2, 3, 4 and 12 months of age. Immunogenicity was assessed as serum bactericidal activity measured with human complement (hSBA) against indicator strains for Men B vaccine antigens before and after the 2,3,4-month series and 12-month dose. Parents recorded solicited reactions for 7 days after each vaccination, and any adverse events throughout the study period. All formulations elicited robust immune response against rMenB components at 5 months, there was some evidence of OMV and protein dose-dependence for Men B indicator strains tested. Titers waned up to the 12-month dose, which elicited further strong responses, which were still OMV and protein dose-dependent. Groups with no, or low-dose OMV displayed slightly lower reactogenicity profiles, but all formulations were generally well-tolerated, high fever was rare and transient, and only three transient SAEs were considered possibly vaccine-related. Decreasing or removing the OMV content reduced reactogenicity of 4CMenB to a certain extent, but had an unacceptable negative impact on the immunogenicity profile. Trial: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00937521.

  20. A phase II randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB, in infants (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Prymula, Roman; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Xie, Fang; Barone, Michelangelo; Dull, Peter M; Toneatto, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine, 4CMenB (Bexsero®), contains recombinant membrane proteins (rMenB) and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) of the New Zealand serogroup B strain. We investigated whether reducing the OMV and/or protein content influences 4CMenB immunogenicity and reactogenicity in healthy two month-old infants. Six formulations were studied: 4CMenB, rMenB with 0, ¼ or ½ the OMV dose in 4CMenB, a half-dose of 4CMenB or a prelicensure formulation of 4CMenB, as a 4-dose primary/booster series, concomitantly with routine vaccines (DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate) at 2, 3, 4 and 12 months of age. Immunogenicity was assessed as serum bactericidal activity measured with human complement (hSBA) against indicator strains for Men B vaccine antigens before and after the 2,3,4-month series and 12-month dose. Parents recorded solicited reactions for 7 days after each vaccination, and any adverse events throughout the study period. All formulations elicited robust immune response against rMenB components at 5 months, there was some evidence of OMV and protein dose-dependence for Men B indicator strains tested. Titers waned up to the 12-month dose, which elicited further strong responses, which were still OMV and protein dose-dependent. Groups with no, or low-dose OMV displayed slightly lower reactogenicity profiles, but all formulations were generally well-tolerated, high fever was rare and transient, and only three transient SAEs were considered possibly vaccine-related. Decreasing or removing the OMV content reduced reactogenicity of 4CMenB to a certain extent, but had an unacceptable negative impact on the immunogenicity profile. Trial: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00937521 PMID:25424810

  1. A novel live-attenuated vaccine candidate for mayaro Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, William J; Hermance, Meghan E; Forrester, Naomi; Adams, A Paige; Langsjoen, Rose; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Alcorn, Maria D H; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Weaver, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease.

  2. A novel live-attenuated vaccine candidate for mayaro Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Weise

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus (MAYV is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease.

  3. ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗的研制%Development of groups ACYW135 meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明华; 任涛; 曹欣; 唐秀丽; 韩菲; 王婷婷; 胡鹏; 张美香; 郝倩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prepare a safe and effective quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.Methods Groups A,C,Y and W135 meningococcal polysaccharide were activated by cyanogen bromide,respectively.With 1,6-adipic acid dihydrazide as linking agent,monovalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines were prepared by carbodiimide-mediated coupling of meningococcal polysaccharide with carrier protein diphtheria toxoid (DT),then groups ACYW135 meningococcal polysaccharide-DT conjugate vaccine (ACYW135-DT) was prepared by mixing each monovalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in a certain proportion.Mice were immunized with ACYW135-DT,and antibodies to each polysaccharide were detected by indirect ELISA.The statistical analysis of the results were made by t test.Results Each index of the prepared ACYW135-DT achieved quality control standard.ACYW135-DT had a good safety and immunogenicity.The levels of IgG antibodies to group A (t =24.487,P<0.01),group C (t =17.056,P <0.01),group Y (t =26.213,P <0.01) and group W135 (t =17.392,P <0.01) polysaccharides in mice immunized with ACYW135-DT were significantly higher than those in mice immunized quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine.Conclusion ACYW135-DT is successfully prepared with this technology.%目的 制备安全有效的四价脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗.方法 用溴化氰分别将A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖活化,以己二酸二酰肼作为连接剂,碳化二亚胺作为偶联剂,先制备单价A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖-白喉类毒素(diphtheria toxoid,DT)结合疫苗,再配比制成ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗(groups ACYW135 meningococcal polysaccharide-DT conjugate vaccine,ACYW135-DT).以ACYW135-DT免疫小鼠,用间接ELISA检测小鼠血清抗各多糖抗体,采用t检验对检测结果进行统计学分析.结果 制备的ACYW135-DT的各项指标均达到质控标准,而且ACYW 135-DT具有良好

  4. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Meningococcal Isolates from Countries in the African Meningitis Belt before Introduction of a Serogroup A Conjugate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caugant, Dominique A.; Kristiansen, Paul A.; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Kandolo, Denis; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Sow, Samba; Bonte, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background The serogroup A conjugate meningococcal vaccine, MenAfriVac, was introduced in mass vaccination campaigns in December 2010 in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In the coming years, vaccination will be extended to other African countries at risk of epidemics. To document the molecular characteristics of disease-causing meningococcal strains circulating in the meningitis belt of Africa before vaccine introduction, the World Health Organization Collaborating Centers on Meningococci in Europe and United States established a common strain collection of 773 isolates from cases of invasive meningococcal disease collected between 2004 and 2010 from 13 sub-Saharan countries. Methodology All isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, and 487 (62%) were also analyzed for genetic variation in the surface antigens PorA and FetA. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested for part of the collection. Principal Findings Only 19 sequence types (STs) belonging to 6 clonal complexes were revealed. ST-5 clonal complex dominated with 578 (74.8%) isolates. All ST-5 complex isolates were remarkably homogeneous in their PorA (P1.20,9) and FetA (F3-1) and characterized the serogroup A strains which have been responsible for most epidemics during this time period. Sixty-eight (8.8%) of the 773 isolates belonged to the ST-11 clonal complex which was mainly represented by serogroup W135, while an additional 38 (4.9%) W135 isolates belonged to the ST-175 complex. Forty-eight (6.2%) serogroup X isolates from West Africa belonged to the ST-181 complex, while serogroup X cases in Kenya and Uganda were caused by an unrelated clone, ST-5403. Serogroup X, ST-181, emerged in Burkina Faso before vaccine introduction. Conclusions In the seven years preceding introduction of a new serogroup A conjugate vaccine, serogroup A of the ST-5 clonal complex was identified as the predominant disease-causing strain. PMID:23029368

  5. Shigella sonnei Vaccine Candidates WRSs2 and WRSs3 Are as Immunogenic as WRSS1, a Clinically Tested Vaccine Candidate, in a Primate Model of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: Barnoy S, et al. Shigella sonnei vaccine candidates WRSs2 and WRSs3 are as immunogenic as WRSS1, a clinically... Shigella sonnei vaccine candidates WRSs2 and WRSs3 are as immunogenic as WRSS1, a clinically tested vaccine candidate, in a primate...o Article history: Received 15 October 2010 Accepted 28 April 2011 Available online Keywords: Shigella sonnei Live vaccine candidates WRSs2

  6. Immunogenicity of a meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine with attenuated endotoxin and over-expressed factor H binding protein in infant rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberling, Oliver; Seubert, Anja; Santos, George; Colaprico, Annalisa; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Donnelly, John; Granoff, Dan M

    2011-06-24

    We previously investigated immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccines prepared from recombinant strains with attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1) and over-expressed factor H binding protein (fHbp) in a mouse model. The vaccines elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses. While human toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is mainly stimulated by wildtype meningococcal endotoxin, mouse TLR-4 is stimulated by both the wildtype and mutant endotoxin. An adjuvant effect in mice of the mutant endotoxin would be expected to be much less in humans, and may have contributed to the broad mouse bactericidal responses. Here we show that as previously reported for humans, rhesus primate peripheral blood mononuclear cells incubated with a NOMV vaccine from ΔLpxL1 recombinant strains had lower proinflammatory cytokine responses than with a control wildtype NOMV vaccine. The cytokine responses to the mutant vaccine were similar to those elicited by a detergent-treated, wildtype outer membrane vesicle vaccine that had been safely administered to humans. Monkeys (N=4) were immunized beginning at ages 2-3 months with three doses of a NOMV vaccine prepared from ΔLpxL1 recombinant strains with over-expressed fHbp in the variant 1 and 2 groups. The mutant NOMV vaccine elicited serum bactericidal titers≥1:4 against all 10 genetically diverse strains tested, including 9 with heterologous PorA to those in the vaccine. Negative-control animals had serum bactericidal titers<1:4. Thus, the mutant NOMV vaccine elicited broadly protective serum antibodies in a non-human infant primate model that is more relevant for predicting human antibody responses than mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide CRM conjugate vaccine in infants and toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Tregnaghi

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: MenACWY-CRM vaccination regimens in infants and toddlers were immunogenic and well tolerated. No clinically meaningful effects of concomitant administration with routine infant and toddler vaccines were observed.

  8. Meningococcal groups C and Y and haemophilus B tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT; MenHibrix(®)): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Caroline M

    2013-05-01

    The meningococcal groups C and Y and Haemophilus b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) contains Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C and Y capsular polysaccharide antigens, and Hib capsular polysaccharide [polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP)]. The HibMenCY-TT vaccine is available in the USA for use as active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroups C (MenC) and Y (MenY), and Hib in children 6 weeks-18 months of age. HibMenCY-TT is the first meningococcal vaccine available for use in the USA that can be administered to infants as young as 6 weeks of age. In a randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trial, the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, administered to infants at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months of age, was immunogenic against MenC and MenY, and met the prespecified criteria for immunogenicity. Anti-PRP antibodies, which have been shown to correlate with protection against Hib invasive disease, were also induced in the infants who received the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, with induced levels of this antibody noninferior to those occurring in the control group of infants who received a Hib tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months and a single dose of Hib conjugated to N. meningitidis outer membrane protein at 12-15 months. In several randomized, controlled clinical trials, HibMenCY-TT was coadministered with vaccines that are routinely administered to infants and toddlers in the USA. These vaccines included: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B (recombinant) and inactivated poliovirus vaccine combined; 7-valent Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide conjugate vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella vaccine; and varicella vaccine. Coadministration of these vaccines did not interfere with the immunogenicity of the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. Similarly, immune responses to the coadministered vaccines were not affected by the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. The tolerability profile of the Hib

  9. Is a single infant priming dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine in the United Kingdom sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Helen; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    In 1999, the UK introduced meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccination at 2, 3, 4 months of age with a single dose for children 1-18 y In 2006, the schedule was refined to a 2 dose priming schedule with a booster in the second year of life. In 2013, the number of priming doses was reduced to a single priming dose, the booster maintained at 12 months of age and an adolescent booster dose introduced. The paper presents the evidence supporting the reduction in the number of priming doses. A UK study provided evidence for reducing the priming doses of MCC-TT together with the positive correlation of lower quantity of antigen and serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) levels post-primary but a higher magnitude of the booster response. Another UK study, demonstrated one dose of MCC-TT or MCC-CRM197 at 3 months gave comparable responses to 2 doses (SBA titres ≥8) both post-primary vaccination and post-booster Hib/MCC-TT at 12 months. However, the magnitude of the SBA GMT was higher in the MCC-TT primed post-booster. A single priming dose of MCC-TT (at 4 or 6 months) compared to 2 doses (2 and 4 months) gave higher SBA titres in all groups, post-primary and post-booster at 12-13 months, with the highest SBA responses observed in the 4 month single dose group. A study in Malta, comparing one dose of MCC-TT or MCC-CRM197 at (3 months) versus 2 doses of MCC-CRM197 (3 and 4 months), showed a high proportion (>84.72%) of subjects achieving SBA titres ≥8 following a single dose. These studies show that a single-dose priming MCC vaccination in infancy is sufficient.

  10. Antibody persistence and immune memory 15 months after priming with an investigational tetravalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) in toddlers and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Markus; Baine, Yaela; Bianco, Veronique; Boutriau, Dominique; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2012-07-01

    The present extension study, conducted in children originally vaccinated at 12-14 mo or 3-5 y of age, assessed antibody persistence and immune memory induced by an investigational tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT). In the original study, participants were randomized to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT or licensed age-appropriate meningococcal control vaccines. Fifteen months post-vaccination, all participants underwent serum sampling to evaluate antibody persistence and participants previously vaccinated as toddlers received a polysaccharide challenge to assess immune memory development. Exploratory comparisons showed that (1) All children and ≥ 92.3% of the toddlers maintained serum bactericidal (rSBA) titers ≥ 1:8 at 15 mo post MenACWY-TT vaccination; statistically significantly higher rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were observed compared with control vaccines. (2) At one month after polysaccharide challenge, all toddlers primed with MenACWY-TT or with the monovalent serogroup C conjugate vaccine had rSBA titers ≥ 1:8 and ≥ 1:128 for serogroup C and similar rSBA-GMTs; rSBA-GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y were statistically significantly higher in toddlers primed with MenACWY-TT compared with the control vaccine. Thus, a single dose of MenACWY-TT induced persisting antibodies in toddlers and children and immune memory in toddlers. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00126984.

  11. Characterization of vaccine antigens of meningococcal serogroup W isolates from Ghana and Burkina Faso from 2003 to 2009 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/37h

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Ispasanie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis and a considerable health problem in the 25 countries of the ‘African Meningitis Belt’ that extends from Senegal in West Africa to Ethiopia in the East. Approximately 80% of cases of meningococcal meningitis in Africa have been caused by strains belonging to capsular serogroup A. After the introduction of a serogroup A conjugate polysaccharide vaccine, MenAfriVac™, that began in December 2010, the incidence of meningitis due to serogroup A has markedly declined in this region. Currently, serogroup W of N. meningitidis accounts for the majority of cases. Vaccines based on sub-capsular antigens, such as Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA, are under investigation for use in Africa. To analyse the antigenic properties of a serogroup W wave of colonisation and disease, we investigated the molecular diversity of the protein vaccine antigens PorA, Neisserial Adhesin A (NadA, Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA and factor H binding protein (fHbp of 31 invasive and carriage serogroup W isolates collected as part of a longitudinal study from Ghana and Burkina Faso between 2003 and 2009. We found that the isolates all expressed fHbp variant 2 ID 22 or 23, differing from each other by only one amino acid, and a single PorA subtype of P1.5,2. Of the isolates, 49% had a functional nhbA gene and 100% had the nadA allele 3, which contained the insertion sequence IS1301 in five isolates. Of the W isolates tested, 41% had high fHbp expression when compared with a reference serogroup B strain, known to be a high expresser of fHbp variant 2. Our results indicate that in this collection of serogroup W isolates, there is limited antigenic diversification over time of vaccine candidate outer membrane proteins (OMP, thus making them promising candidates for inclusion in a protein-based vaccine against meningococcal meningitis for Africa.

  12. Hepatitis C virus vaccine candidates inducing protective neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvelle, Catherine; Colpitts, Che C; Keck, Zhen-Yong; Pierce, Brian G; Foung, Steven K H; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-12-01

    With more than 150 million chronically infected people, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a substantial global health burden. Direct-acting antivirals have dramatically improved viral cure. However, limited access to therapy, late stage detection of infection and re-infection following cure illustrate the need for a vaccine for global control of infection. Vaccines with induction of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) have been shown to protect successfully against infections by multiple viruses and are currently developed for HCV. Areas covered: Here we review the progress towards the development of vaccines aiming to confer protection against chronic HCV infection by inducing broadly nAbs. The understanding or viral immune evasion in infected patients, the development of novel model systems and the recent structural characterization of viral envelope glycoprotein E2 has markedly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus neutralization with the concomitant development of several vaccine candidates. Expert commentary: While HCV vaccine development remains challenged by the high viral diversity and immune evasion, marked progress in HCV research has advanced vaccine design. Several vaccine candidates have shown robust induction of nAbs in animal models and humans. Randomized clinical trials are the next step to assess their clinical efficacy for protection against chronic infection.

  13. Novel approaches to identify protective malaria vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ni eChia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to develop vaccines against malaria have been the focus of substantial research activities for decades. Several categories of candidate vaccines are currently being developed for protection against malaria, based on antigens corresponding to the pre-erythrocytic, blood-stage or sexual stages of the parasite. Long lasting sterile protection from Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge has been observed in human following vaccination with whole parasite formulations, clearly demonstrating that a protective immune response targeting predominantly the pre-erythrocytic stages can develop against malaria. However, most of vaccine candidates currently being investigated, which are mostly subunits vaccines, have not been able to induce substantial (>50% protection thus far. This is due to the fact that the antigens responsible for protection against the different parasite stages are still yet to be known and relevant correlates of protection have remained elusive. For a vaccine to be developed in a timely manner, novel approaches are required. In this article, we review the novel approaches that have been developed to identify the antigens for the development of an effective malaria vaccine.

  14. Moving candidate vaccines into development from research: lessons from HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mark

    2009-07-01

    There is a logarithmic increase in the cost and complexity of the research and development process when transitioning a promising candidate vaccine from the laboratory into the clinic. Managing complex development programs involving people from diverse technical, cultural and geographical backgrounds is a specialised skill. It is essential that the group is clear on their objectives and how their activities affect others, that communication is open, inclusive and effective, and that the most rigorous, scientific approach based on statistical principles in compliance with regulatory requirements is used. Applying these standards to all vaccine development programs will filter out inappropriate candidates more readily and enhance the efficiency of vaccine development. The challenges of developing a new vaccine are illustrated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccinology. Selecting vaccine candidates for HIV requires the ability to evaluate the large number of potential antigens in imperfect and non-standardised animal models. Further, using these models to evaluate questions such as dose scaling to humans, optimal route of administration, the use of adjuvants and potential formulation improvements adds variable to variable, making the interpretation of results particularly challenging. This may lead to the promotion of a poor candidate or the elimination of a good one. The absence of precise immunological correlates of protection and the prohibitive cost of confirmatory clinical trials are further significant barriers. However, there are practical steps that can be taken to standardise early vaccine evaluation, which would result in more efficient development of new vaccines for HIV and other disease areas with similarly challenging development issues (such as hepatitis C virus, influenza, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and malaria).

  15. Informing Reactive Vaccination Strategies for Meningococcal Meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa using Dust and Climate Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Thomson, M. C.; Stanton, M. C.; Diggle, P. J.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Ceccato, P.

    2014-12-01

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis occur in sub-Saharan Africa during the dry season, a period when the region is affected by the Harmattan, a dry and dusty northeasterly trade wind blowing from the Sahara into the Gulf of Guinea. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, the location and seasonality of meningitis epidemics suggest that environmental factors, such as low absolute or relative humidity, high temperatures, and dusty atmospheric conditions play an important role. Using a 20-year time series of meningitis incidence in Niger we examined the potential of statistical models to predict seasonal incidence based on data that would be operationally available, such as climate and dust, population and previous incidence. We used surface dust concentration estimates from a model given the paucity of direct in situ measurements especially at district level. The soil dust aerosol component of the model was thoroughly evaluated with existing satellite and in situ data over the region of interest showing daily aerosol optical depth correlations around 0.6 (p vaccination.

  16. Expression of human CEACAM1 in transgenic mice limits the Opa-specific immune response against meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, A.; Dijken, H. van; Hamstra, H.J.; Flier, M. van der; Vidarsson, G.; Putten, J.P. van; Boog, C.J.; Dobbelsteen, G. van den; Ley, P. van der

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated as meningococcal vaccine candidates. Among their major components are the opacity (Opa) proteins, a family of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins important for bacterial adherence and entry into host cells. Many Opa-dependent

  17. 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine given with meningococcal C-tetanus toxoid conjugate and other routine pediatric vaccinations: immunogenicity and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Gurtman, Alejandra; Bernaola, Enrique; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Carmona, Alfonso; Sidhu, Mohinder; Sarkozy, Denise A; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    As multiple vaccines are administered concomitantly during routine pediatric immunizations, it is important to ascertain the potential interference of any new vaccine on the immune response to the concomitantly administered vaccines. Immune responses to meningococcal serogroup C-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MnCC-TT) and the diphtheria and tetanus antigens in routine pediatric vaccines (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis-hepatitis B virus-inactivated poliovirus/Haemophilus influenza type b [DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib] and DTaP-IPV+Hib) when given concomitantly with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) were compared with responses when given with PCV7. In addition, the immunogenicity and safety of PCV13 were assessed. Healthy infants were randomized to receive PCV13 or PCV7 (ages 2, 4, 6 and 15 months), concomitant with MnCC-TT (2, 4 and 15 months), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib (2, 4 and 6 months), and DTaP-IPV+Hib (15 months). Immune responses to MnCC-TT and to the diphtheria and tetanus antigens administered with PCV13 were noninferior to the responses observed when the vaccines were administered with PCV7; ≥96.6 (postinfant) and ≥99.4% (posttoddler) subjects achieved prespecified immune response levels to each antigen in each group. After the infant series, ≥93.0% of subjects receiving PCV13 achieved pneumococcal anticapsular immunoglobulin G concentrations ≥0.35 µg/mL for all serotypes except serotype 3 (86.2%), increasing to 98.1-100% for most serotypes (serotype 3: 93.6%) after the toddler dose. Local and systemic reactions were similar between groups. Immune responses to MnCC-TT, and other childhood vaccines (DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib, DTaP-IPV+Hib) were noninferior when concomitantly administered with PCV13 compared with PCV7. PCV13 does not interfere with MnCC-TT. PCV13 is highly immunogenic with a favorable safety profile.

  18. Attitudes and risk perception of parents of different ethnic backgrounds regarding meningococcal C vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, D.R.M.; Henneman, L.; Hirasing, R.A.; Wal, G. van der

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the attitudes of parents toward vaccination as well as their risk perception of disease and vaccination. We interviewed 1763 parents of different ethnic groups (among others, Dutch, Turkish, Moroccan, and Surinamese parents). Results show that there were lar

  19. Monovalent RIVM meningococcal B OMP vesicle F91 vaccines in toddlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber AB; Limpt CJP van; Labadie J; Berbers GAM; Kleijn ED de; Groot R de; Rumke HC; Alphen AJW; Sophia Kinderziekenhuis /; LVO

    2001-01-01

    This report gives the results of a randomised phase-II clinical study into the safety and immunogenicity of a monovalent MenB OMV vaccine expressing P1.7h,4 PorA (MonoMen) in toddlers. Safety and immunogenicity are compared for two types of vaccine that are differently adjuvated (either aluminium ph

  20. Attitudes and risk perception of parents of different ethnic backgrounds regarding meningococcal C vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Danielle R M; Henneman, Lidewij; Hirasing, Remy A; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2005-05-09

    The aim of the present study is to assess the attitudes of parents toward vaccination as well as their risk perception of disease and vaccination. We interviewed 1763 parents of different ethnic groups (among others, Dutch, Turkish, Moroccan, and Surinamese parents). Results show that there were large differences in knowledge about disease and risk perception of disease and vaccination among parents of different ethnic backgrounds. Generally, people largely overestimated the risk of contracting the disease and the risk of dying after contracting the disease. Dutch parents were best informed, least worried, had the most critical attitude toward the campaign, and the lowest vaccination level compared to other parents. The differences in knowledge about vaccination and the more critical attitude of Dutch parents emphasize the need to take more into account parents' perspectives when designing information leaflets or other information media.

  1. Bactericidal antibody responses elicited by a meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine with overexpressed factor H-binding protein and genetically attenuated endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberling, Oliver; Seubert, Anja; Granoff, Dan M

    2008-07-15

    Outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines from mutant Neisseria meningitidis strains engineered to overexpress factor H-binding protein (fHbp) have elicited broadly protective serum antibody responses in mice. The vaccines investigated were not treated with detergents to avoid extracting fHbp, which is a lipoprotein. Because of their high endotoxin content, the vaccines would not be safe to administer to humans. We prepared a native OMV vaccine from a strain engineered to overexpress fHbp and in which the gene encoding LpxL1 was inactivated, which reportedly decreases endotoxin activity. The OMV vaccine from the mutant had a similar or lower ability to induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared with a detergent-extracted wild-type OMV, and 1000-10,000-fold lower activity than a native wild-type OMV. In mice, the OMV vaccine from the mutant elicited higher serum bactericidal antibody responses to a panel of heterologous N. meningitidis strains than did a control multicomponent recombinant protein vaccine or a detergent-extracted OMV vaccine that has been demonstrated to confer protection against meningococcal disease in humans. The data illustrate the potential to develop a broadly immunogenic native OMV vaccine that has decreased endotoxin activity and is potentially suitable for testing in humans.

  2. Vaccine Candidates against Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzi, Ava; Vaziri, Farzam; Rahimi-Jamnani, Fatemeh; Afrough, Parviz; Rahbar, Mohammad; Satarian, Fereshteh; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-01-01

    Nonencapsulated, nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains an important cause of acute otitis and respiratory diseases in children and adults. NTHi bacteria are one of the major causes of respiratory tract infections, including acute otitis media, cystic fibrosis, and community-acquired pneumonia among children, especially in developing countries. The bacteria can also cause chronic diseases such as chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the lower respiratory tract of adults. Such bacteria express several outer membrane proteins, some of which have been studied as candidates for vaccine development. Due to the lack of effective vaccines as well as the spread and prevalence of NTHi worldwide, there is an urgent need to design and develop effective vaccine candidates against these strains. PMID:28088130

  3. Randomized trial on the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Conversano, Michele; Bona, Gianni; Gabutti, Giovanni; Anemona, Alessandra; Dull, Peter M; Ceddia, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, when administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, in subjects aged 11 to 25 years. Subjects received either MenACWY-CRM and Tdap, MenACWY-CRM and saline placebo, or Tdap and saline placebo. No significant increase in reactogenicity and no clinically significant vaccine-related adverse events (AEs) occurred when MenACWY-CRM and Tdap were administered concomitantly. Similar immunogenic responses to diphtheria, tetanus, and meningococcal (serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y) antigens were observed, regardless of concomitant vaccine administration. Antipertussis antibody responses were comparable between vaccine groups for filamentous hemagglutinin and were slightly lower, although not clinically significantly, for pertussis toxoid and pertactin when the two vaccines were administered concomitantly. These results indicate that the investigational MenACWY-CRM vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic and that it can be coadministered with Tdap to adolescents and young adults.

  4. Immune subdominant antigens as vaccine candidates against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark T; Ireton, Gregory C; Beebe, Elyse A; Huang, Po-Wei D; Reese, Valerie A; Argilla, David; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2014-09-15

    Unlike most pathogens, many of the immunodominant epitopes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are under purifying selection. This startling finding suggests that M. tuberculosis may gain an evolutionary advantage by focusing the human immune response against selected proteins. Although the implications of this to vaccine development are incompletely understood, it has been suggested that inducing strong Th1 responses against Ags that are only weakly recognized during natural infection may circumvent this evasion strategy and increase vaccine efficacy. To test the hypothesis that subdominant and/or weak M. tuberculosis Ags are viable vaccine candidates and to avoid complications because of differential immunodominance hierarchies in humans and experimental animals, we defined the immunodominance hierarchy of 84 recombinant M. tuberculosis proteins in experimentally infected mice. We then combined a subset of these dominant or subdominant Ags with a Th1 augmenting adjuvant, glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in stable emulsion, to assess their immunogenicity in M. tuberculosis-naive animals and protective efficacy as measured by a reduction in lung M. tuberculosis burden of infected animals after prophylactic vaccination. We observed little correlation between immunodominance during primary M. tuberculosis infection and vaccine efficacy, confirming the hypothesis that subdominant and weakly antigenic M. tuberculosis proteins are viable vaccine candidates. Finally, we developed two fusion proteins based on strongly protective subdominant fusion proteins. When paired with the glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in stable emulsion, these fusion proteins elicited robust Th1 responses and limited pulmonary M. tuberculosis for at least 6 wk postinfection with a single immunization. These findings expand the potential pool of M. tuberculosis proteins that can be considered as vaccine Ag candidates. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Depressive symptoms and immune response to meningococcal conjugate vaccine in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Moynihan, Jan A; Wyman, Peter A; Carnahan, Jennifer; Lofthus, Gerry; Quataert, Sally A; Bowman, Melissa; Caserta, Mary T

    2014-11-01

    Research findings in psychoneuroimmunology document reliable, bidirectional linkages among psychological processes, the nervous system, and the immune system. However, available data are based almost entirely on animal and adult human studies; the application to children and adolescents is uncertain. We capitalized on the experimental leverage provided by a routine vaccination to examine the link between mood symptoms and the immune response to a vaccine challenge in early adolescence. One hundred twenty-six 11-year-olds for whom vaccine response data were available were assessed at prevaccination and 4 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months following vaccination; self-report ratings of depression and anxiety as well as measures of psychosocial and somatic risk were assessed prior to vaccine response. Analyses indicated that children's internalizing mood symptoms were associated with elevated and persistently higher antibody responses, with evidence extending to two of the four serogroups. The associations remained after controlling for multiple possible confounders (social class, body mass index, sleep, psychosocial risk, and pubertal status). The observed enhanced vaccine response associated with depressive and anxious symptoms in early adolescence may reflect an important developmental difference in immune system-brain interplay between adults and children, and it underscores the need for further developmental studies of psychoneuroimmunology.

  6. Quantification of lipopolysaccharides in outer membrane vesicle vaccines against meningococcal disease. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of the constituent 3-hydroxy-lauric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngby, Janne; Olsen, Linda H; Eidem, Tove; Lundanes, Elsa; Jantzen, Erik

    2002-03-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay for quantification of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, endotoxins) in outer membrane vesicle vaccines against meningococcal disease has been developed. The LPS constituent, 3-hydroxy-lauric acid, served as marker substance for the quantification. LPS from the vaccine was precipitated by ethanol and the fatty acid constituents, including 3-hydroxy-lauric acid, were released by acidic hydrolysis, collected and purified by solid phase extraction on C18 disc-cartridges and converted into phenacyl esters for UV detection at 240 nm. Quantification of the derivatized 3-hydroxy-lauric acid was achieved by HPLC using a Brownlee RP-18 reversed phase column with acetonitrile/water (68:32, v/v) as mobile phase. The method was found to be linear over the range 3-49 microg LPS/ml with a sensitivity of 1.6 (microg/ml)(-1). The repeatability (within-day precision) of the method at three levels (3-49 microg LPS/ml) was 6-14% relative standard deviation and the intermediate (between-day) precision was 7% relative standard deviation (at level 15 microg LPS/ml). The method has been successfully used in the quality control of a meningococcal B outer membrane vesicle vaccine, containing 4-8% LPS relative to protein (w/w), in our laboratory for three years.

  7. Heterogeneity in rhesus macaque complement factor H binding to meningococcal factor H binding protein (FHbp) informs selection of primates to assess immunogenicity of FHbp-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Stefek, Heather; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2014-11-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp. Similar to human FH, binding of macaque FH to the meningococcal cell surface inhibited the complement alternative pathway by decreasing deposition of C3b. FH contains 20 domains (or short consensus repeats), with domains 6 and 7 being responsible for binding of human FH to FHbp. DNA sequence analyses of FH domains 6 and 7 from macaques with high or low FH binding showed a polymorphism at residue 352 in domain 6, with Tyr being associated with high binding and His with low binding. A recombinant macaque FH 6,7/Fc fragment with Tyr352 showed higher binding to FHbp than the corresponding fragment with His352. In previous studies in human FH transgenic mice, binding of FH to FHbp vaccines decreased protective antibody responses, and mutant FHbp vaccines with decreased FH binding elicited serum antibodies with greater protective activity. Thus, macaques with high FH binding to FHbp represent an attractive nonhuman primate model to investigate further the effects of FH binding on the immunogenicity of FHbp vaccines.

  8. 贵州省2006-2010年脑膜炎球菌疫苗接种情况分析%Analysis on Meningococcal vaccine's inoculation in Guizhou Province (2008-2010)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋凤

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析贵州省2006-2010年脑膜炎球菌疫苗(MenV)接种情况,为预防控制流行性脑脊髓膜炎制定策略和措施提供依据.方法 分析评估报告数据,对病例开展回顾性调查.结果 贵州省2006-2010年共报告接种A群MenV第1针227.2万剂次,第2针144.8万剂次,第1针与第2针的估算接种率分为41.3%~130.1%和23.1%~107.4%.全省报告接种A+C群MenV第1针119.6万剂次,第2针42.7万剂次,第1针与第2针的估算接种率分为47.5%~101.2%和11.2% ~34.9%.2008-2010年流脑病例107例,有A群MenV免疫史的12例,有A+C群MenV免疫史的仅1例.结论 贵州省MenV接种率不断提高,但是A+C群MenV接种情况不理想,应加强A+C群MenV的接种,提高接种率.%Objective To analyze e the Meningococcal vaccine's inoculation in Guizhou province during the period of 2006-2010,so as to e improve the strategies and measures to control e epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis. Methods The reported data were nalyzed,and a retrospective investigation was carried out. Results During the year from 2006 to 2010,the reported number of the first injection was 2 272 thousands (group A Meningococcal vaccine) ,The reported number of the second injection was 1 448 thousands. The estimated coverage rate of the first injection of the group A Meningococcal vaccine was 41.3% -130. 1% , and the s estimated coverage rate of the second injection was 23.1% - 107.4 %. From 2008 to 2010,the reported number of the first injection was 1 196 000 (group A and C Meningococcal vaccine) The reported number of the second injection was 427 000. The estimated rate of the first injection ( group A and C Meningococcal vaccine ) was 47.5% -101. 2% , and the estimated coverage rate of the second injection was 11.2% - 34.9%. There were 107 cases of eEpidemic cerebrospinal meningitis reported in Guizhou province during the year from 2008-2010,in which 12 cases had the group A Meningococcal vaccines vaccination history,and only

  9. Anti-Lyme Subunit Vaccines: Design and Development of Peptide-Based Vaccine Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Christina M; Mwangi, Waithaka; Esteve-Gassent, Maria D

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinology today has been presented with several avenues to improve protection against infectious disease. The recent employment of the reverse vaccinology technique has changed the face of vaccine development against many pathogens, including Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Using this technique, genomics and in silico analyses come together to identify potentially antigenic epitopes in a high-throughput fashion. The forward methodology of vaccine development was used previously to generate the only licensed human vaccine for Lyme disease, which is no longer on the market. Using reverse vaccinology to identify new antigens and isolate specific epitopes to protect against B. burgdorferi, subunit vaccines will be generated that lack reactogenic and nonspecific epitopes, yielding more effective vaccine candidates. Additionally, novel epitopes are being utilized and are presently in the commercialization pipeline both for B. burgdorferi and other spirochaetal pathogens. The versatility and methodology of the subunit protein vaccine are described as it pertains to Lyme disease from conception to performance evaluation.

  10. Concomitant administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine to neonatal mice enhances antibody response and protective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjolfsson, Siggeir F; Bjarnarson, Stefania P; Mori, Elena; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Jonsdottir, Ingileif

    2011-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is administered to human neonates in many countries worldwide. The objective of the study was to assess if BCG could act as an adjuvant for polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in newborns and thereby induce protective immunity against encapsulated bacteria in early infancy when susceptibility is high. We assessed whether BCG could enhance immune responses to a meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate vaccine, MenC-CRM(197), in mice primed as neonates, broaden the antibody response from a dominant IgG1 toward a mixed IgG1 and IgG2a/IgG2b response, and increase protective efficacy, as measured by serum bactericidal activity (SBA). Two-week-old mice were primed subcutaneously (s.c.) with MenC-CRM(197). BCG was administered concomitantly, a day or a week before MenC-CRM(197). An adjuvant effect of BCG was observed only when it was given concomitantly with MenC-CRM(197), with increased IgG response (P = 0.002) and SBA (8-fold) after a second immunization with MenC-CRM(197) without BCG, indicating increased T-cell help. In neonatal mice (1 week old) primed s.c. with MenC-CRM(197) together with BCG, MenC-polysaccharide (PS)-specific IgG was enhanced compared to MenC-CRM(197) alone (P = 0.0015). Sixteen days after the second immunization with MenC-CRM(197), increased IgG (P CRM(197) plus BCG showed affinity maturation and detectable SBA (SBA > 128). Thus, vaccination with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine (and possibly with other conjugates) may benefit from concomitant administration of BCG in the neonatal period to accelerate and enhance production of protective antibodies, compared to the current infant administration of conjugate which follows BCG vaccination at birth.

  11. Meningococcal disease: changes in epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Q

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiuzhi Chang,1 Yih-Ling Tzeng,2 David S Stephens1–31Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 2Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 3Laboratories of Microbial Pathogenesis, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, GAAbstract: The human bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis remains a serious worldwide health threat, but progress is being made toward the control of meningococcal infections. This review summarizes current knowledge of the global epidemiology and the pathophysiology of meningococcal disease, as well as recent advances in prevention by new vaccines. Meningococcal disease patterns and incidence can vary dramatically, both geographically and over time in populations, influenced by differences in invasive meningococcal capsular serogroups and specific genotypes designated as ST clonal complexes. Serogroup A (ST-5, ST-7, B (ST-41/44, ST-32, ST-18, ST-269, ST-8, ST-35, C (ST-11, Y (ST-23, ST-167, W-135 (ST-11 and X (ST-181 meningococci currently cause almost all invasive disease. Serogroups B, C, and Y are responsible for the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas, and Oceania; serogroup A has been associated with the highest incidence (up to 1000 per 100,000 cases and large outbreaks of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa and previously Asia; and serogroups W-135 and X have emerged to cause major disease outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. Significant declines in meningococcal disease have occurred in the last decade in many developed countries. In part, the decline is related to the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines. Serogroup C polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines were introduced over a decade ago, first in the UK in a mass vaccination campaign, and are now widely used; multivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines containing serogroups A, C, W-135, and/or Y were first used for adolescents in the US in 2005 and have now expanded

  12. Meningococcal Disease in US Military Personnel Before and after Adoption of Conjugate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Serogroup B accounted for 5 of the 8 cases during 2012–September 2014), and prevention of disease caused by this serotype remains a challenge...Acknowledgment We thank CDC’s Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch for providing the US disease data. The Naval Health Research Center...A226V mutation of the E1 protein (2), the transmission of which is reported to be facilitated by Aedes albopictus mosquitoes (3). The ECSA

  13. Limitations of the rabbit pyrogen test for assessing meningococcal OMV based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipond, Caroline; Findlay, Lucy; Feavers, Ian; Care, Rory

    2016-01-01

    The rabbit pyrogen test was developed in the early 1900's to detect contaminating pyrogens in parenteral medicines. Since its conception alternative methods with improved sensitivity, relevancy and which are ethically more acceptable have been developed. However, the test is a current Pharmacopeial method and is used to evaluate the pyrogen content of some vaccines. In this article the limitations and pitfalls of using the test to measure pyrogenicity of vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles are described. The method is unsuitable as a safety test for these products due to the high levels of endotoxin present in the vaccine which generate a pyrogenic response in rabbits when delivered intravenously without any dilution. Its use as a consistency test is also ambiguous as the test gives a qualitative rather than quantitative response and the rabbit models are highly variable. In addition there is evidence that measuring the temperature rise of the animals over three hours does not capture the maximum fever response. Finally the article considers the use of alternative methods and the validity of animal models when applying a consistency based approach for assessing the quality of licensed products.

  14. Characterization nanoparticles-based vaccines and vaccine candidates: a Transmission Electron Microscopy study

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    I. Menéndez I

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is a valuable tool for the biotech industry. This paper summarizes some of the contributions of MET in the characterization of the recombinant antigens are part of vaccines or vaccine candidates obtained in the CIGB. It mentions the use of complementary techniques MET (Negative staining, and immunoelectron that enhance visualization and ultrastructural characterization of the recombinant proteins obtained by Genetic Engineering.

  15. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology

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    Marine Meunier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria’s main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for this purpose. However, despite many studies, there is currently no vaccine available on the market to reduce the intestinal Campylobacter load in chickens. It is essential to identify and characterize new vaccine antigens. This study applied the reverse vaccinology approach to detect new vaccine candidates. The main criteria used to select immune proteins were localization, antigenicity, and number of B-epitopes. Fourteen proteins were identified as potential vaccine antigens. In vitro and in vivo experiments now need to be performed to validate the immune and protective power of these newly identified antigens.

  16. Vacinas meningocócicas conjugadas: eficácia e novas combinações Meningococcal conjugate vaccines: efficacy and new combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Palazzi Sáfadi

    2006-07-01

    quadrivalente meningocócica conjugada representa, enfim, a real possibilidade de uma proteção mais abrangente contra a doença meningocócica, restando ainda a necessidade de se desenvolver uma vacina eficaz contra o meningococo B.OBJECTIVE: Meningococcal disease continues to be a serious public health concern, being associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide, particularly in Brazil. In addition to discussing recent changes in the global epidemiology of meningococcal disease, we also analyze the development and impact of new conjugate vaccines on the prevention of meningococcal disease, with emphasis on the different immunization strategies implemented with these vaccines. SOURCES OF DATA: MEDLINE databases were searched from 1996 to 2006, with emphasis on review articles, clinical trials and epidemiological studies. Information was also sought on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Brazilian Ministry of Health and Centro de Vigilância Epidemiológica do Estado de São Paulo websites. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Five serogroups (A, B, C, W135 and Y are responsible for virtually all cases of the disease worldwide, with marked regional and temporal differences. The new meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccines (MCC offer unmistakable advantages over polysaccharide vaccines. MCC vaccines generate a more efficient and long-lasting antibody response, inducing immunologic memory and reduction of nasopharyngeal carriage. The immediate results of introducing these vaccines into immunization programs have been encouraging, with a dramatic reduction in the incidence of serogroup C disease, not only in vaccinated, but also in unvaccinated individuals (herd immunity. However, concerns have arisen regarding the long-term effectiveness of these vaccines, especially for infants vaccinated in the routine schedule. CONCLUSIONS: The reported waning of efficacy more than 1 year after routine infant immunization supports alternative schedules incorporating a

  17. The adjuvant effect of TLR7 agonist conjugated to a meningococcal serogroup C glycoconjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadei, Agnese; Balocchi, Cristiana; Mancini, Francesca; Proietti, Daniela; Gallorini, Simona; O'Hagan, Derek T; D'Oro, Ugo; Berti, Francesco; Baudner, Barbara C; Adamo, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Conjugation of a small molecule immunopotentiator to antigens has been proposed to deliver the ligand to the receptor, localize its action and minimize systemic inflammation. However, the effect of conjugation of Toll like receptor 7 agonists (TLR7a) on the immunogenicity of carbohydrate-based vaccines is unknown. In this study we synthesized an anti-Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC) glycoconjugate vaccine composed of MenC oligosaccharide antigens covalently linked to the carrier protein CRM197, to which a TLR7a was in turn conjugated. This vaccine was able to activate in vitro the TLR7 comparably to the unconjugated ligand. The magnitude and the quality of the immune response against MenC capsular polysaccharide were evaluated in mice, comparing the MenC-CRM-TLR7a construct to a MenC-CRM197 vaccine, prepared through the same conjugation chemistry and co-administered with the unconjugated TLR7a. A commercially licensed anti-MenC glycoconjugate was used as further control to determine the influence of the coupling approach and the level of carbohydrate incorporation on the anti-MenC immune response. The possible additive effect of co-administration with Alum hydroxide (AlumOH) was also examined. The bactericidal titers against N. meningitidis were in agreement with the elicited anti-carbohydrate IgGs, and unequivocally showed that TLR7a conjugation to CRM197 enhanced the anti-MenC immune response. TLR7a conjugation induced a shift to a Th1 type response, as assessed by the increased IgG2a subclass production, both in the absence and in the presence of AlumOH. The increased immune response was clearly present only in the absence of AlumOH and was less pronounced than the co-administration of a licensed glycoconjugate with a standard dose of TLR7a-phosphonate adsorbed on the inorganic salt. The amount of MenC saccharide that was covalently linked to CRM197 after previous CRM197-TLR7a conjugation resulted in lower responses than achieved with conventional Men

  18. Predicted Strain Coverage of a New Meningococcal Multicomponent Vaccine (4CMenB in Spain: Analysis of the Differences with Other European Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Abad

    Full Text Available A novel meningococcal multicomponent vaccine, 4CMenB (Bexsero®, has been approved in Europe, Canada, Australia and US. The potential impact of 4CMenB on strain coverage is being estimated by using Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS, an ELISA assay which measures vaccine antigen expression and diversity in each strain. Here we show the genetic characterization and the 4CMenB potential coverage of Spanish invasive strains (collected during one epidemiological year compared to other European countries and discuss the potential reasons for the lower estimate of coverage in Spain.A panel of 300 strains, a representative sample of all serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis notified cases in Spain from 2009 to 2010, was characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST and FetA variable region determination. 4CMenB vaccine antigens, PorA, factor H binding protein (fHbp, Neisseria Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA and Neisserial adhesin A (NadA were molecularly typed by sequencing. PorA coverage was assigned to strain with VR2 = 4. The levels of expression and cross-reactivity of fHbp, NHBA and NadA were analyzed using MATS ELISA.Global estimated strain coverage by MATS was 68.67% (95% CI: 47.77-84.59%, with 51.33%, 15.33% and 2% of strains covered by one, two and three vaccine antigens, respectively. The predicted strain coverage by individual antigens was: 42% NHBA, 36.33% fHbp, 8.33% PorA and 1.33% NadA. Coverage within the most prevalent clonal complexes (cc was 70.37% for cc 269, 30.19% for cc 213 and 95.83% for cc 32.Clonal complexes (cc distribution accounts for variations in strain coverage, so that country-by-country investigations of strain coverage and cc prevalence are important. Because the cc distribution could also vary over time, which in turn could lead to changes in strain coverage, continuous detailed surveillance and monitoring of vaccine antigens expression is needed in those countries where the multicomponent vaccine is introduced

  19. Influence of serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigens on growth and survival of the meningococcus in vitro and in ex vivo and in vivo models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, Kate L; Oriente, Francesca; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Montanari, Paolo; Ferlicca, Francesca; Giuliani, Marzia M; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel

    2010-03-11

    A novel vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease - containing a combination of protein antigens identified by reverse vaccinology: fHBP fused to GNA2091, GNA2132 fused to GNA1030, and NadA - is currently in Phase III clinical trials. In order to determine the role of these antigens in the growth, survival and fitness of the meningococcus, we generated a mutant lacking the expression of all five protein antigens (5KO), a mutant lacking the three main antigens (fHBP, GNA2132 and NadA; 3KO), as well as strains lacking the single antigens. Our results show that abrogation of expression of these antigens in Neisseria meningitidis results in reduced growth in vitro, increased sensitivity of the bacterium to stresses it may encounter in the host, as well as reduced fitness in ex vivo models of infection and in an in vivo infant rat competitive index assay. These results support a multivalent vaccine approach, which was undertaken to strengthen the protective activity of the vaccine antigens, increase the breadth of MenB strains targeted by the vaccine, and limit the potential for selection of vaccine escape mutants.

  20. Preclinical safety and immunogenicity evaluation of a nonavalent PorA native outer membrane vesicle vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaijk, Patricia; van Straaten, Ineke; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Boot, Elmieke P J; Levels, Lonneke M A R; van Dijken, Harry H; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M

    2013-02-04

    An improved nonavalent PorA native outer membrane vesicle vaccine was developed with intrinsic adjuvating activity due to presence of less-toxic (lpxL1) LPS. In the present study, the safety and immunogenicity of this next-generation NonaMen vaccine were evaluated following repeated vaccination in rabbits and mice. A repeated-dose toxicology study was performed in rabbits. Immunogenicity of next-generation NonaMen was evaluated by determining the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titers against meningococcal serogroup B strains containing several PorA subtypes. Release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), by the human monocytic cell line (MM6) was measured to estimate pyrogenic activity. No toxicologically relevant findings were noted in vaccinated rabbits receiving plain next-generation NonaMen. In agreement, next-generation NonaMen induced reduced amounts of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6, released by human monocyte cell line. In both rabbits and mice, next-generation NonaMen induced high SBA titers against all tested MenB strains regardless of whether or not aluminium phosphate adjuvant is used. The data suggest that next-generation NonaMen is a safe vaccine with the potential to develop a broadly protective immune response and encourage the start of the first clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yufan; Qiao, Hongbin; Shi, Yanli; Han, Yu; Liu, Jinming; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl) has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials. PMID:27957496

  2. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials.

  3. Development of a recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a significant threat to public health worldwide. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for dengue. Takeda Vaccines Inc. is developing a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) that consists of an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the prM and E protein genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome backbone (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). TDV has been shown to be immunogenic and efficacious in nonclinical animal models. In interferon-receptor deficient mice, the vaccine induces humoral neutralizing antibody responses and cellular immune responses that are sufficient to protect from lethal challenge with DENV-1, DENV-2 or DENV-4. In non-human primates, administration of TDV induces innate immune responses as well as long lasting antibody and cellular immunity. In Phase 1 clinical trials, the safety and immunogenicity of two different formulations were assessed after intradermal or subcutaneous administration to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. TDV administration was generally well-tolerated independent of dose and route. The vaccine induced neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes: after a single administration of the higher formulation, 24-67%% of the subjects seroconverted to all four DENV and >80% seroconverted to three or more viruses. In addition, TDV induced CD8(+) T cell responses to the non-structural NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV. TDV has been also shown to be generally well tolerated and immunogenic in a Phase 2 clinical trial in dengue endemic countries in adults and children as young as 18 months. Additional clinical studies are ongoing in preparation for a Phase 3 safety and efficacy study.

  4. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (pleishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  5. Durability of immunogenicity and strain coverage of MenBvac, a meningococcal vaccine based on outer membrane vesicles: Lessons of the Normandy campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevestre, Julien; Hong, Eva; Delbos, Valérie; Terrade, Aude; Mallet, Eric; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Lemée, Ludovic; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Caron, François

    2017-07-13

    MenBvac® is an outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based meningococcal vaccine. From 2006 to 2012, it was used to control a clonal B outbreak in Normandy (France). We aimed to analyse the durability of the response against the epidemic strain and coverage beyond the vaccine strain. These data should help to optimize the use of OMV-containing vaccines, such as the new 4CMenB/Bexsero® recombinant vaccine. Serum bactericidal activity (SBA) was measured in two cohorts of children who received their first dose of MenBvac® at 1-5years of age and accepted to provide a blood sample either one or four years after a 2+1+1 schedule. All sera were tested against the outbreak strain. Sera from responder subjects were also tested against 12 additional B or C strains which were chosen to entirely, partially, or not at all match the two variable regions (VR1 and VR2) of the PorA vaccine strain. Only 47.9% and 31.3% of subjects showed an SBA titre consistent with protection one and four years, respectively, after the last boost. Protective SBA titres were observed in all sera against B or C strains that entirely matched P1.7,16, and was high (75-100%) for all but one strain that partially matched VR1 or VR2. Extrapolating our data to the OMV component of 4CMenB/Bexsero® suggests that 14.5% of the current B strains would be covered based on PorA matching to the OMV component of 4CMenB/Bexsero® (regardless of the coverage of the three other vaccine components). Our data confirm that OMV-based vaccines elicit short-lasting SBA titres and may require repeated booster injections. However, strain coverage may be greater than expected. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Meningococcal disease serogroup C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas IE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Félix O Dickinson1, Antonio E Pérez1, Iván E Cuevas21Department of Epidemiology, “Pedro Kourí” Institute, Havana, Cuba; 2Pharmacovigilance Group, Finlay Institute, Havana, CubaAbstract: Despite current advances in antibiotic therapy and vaccines, meningococcal disease serogroup C (MDC remains a serious threat to global health, particularly in countries in North and Latin America, Europe, and Asia. MDC is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and neurological sequelae and it is a heavy economic burden. At the individual level, despite advances in antibiotics and supportive therapies, case fatality rate remains nearly 10% and severe neurological sequelae are frequent. At the population level, prevention and control of infection is more challenging. The main approaches include health education, providing information to the public, specific treatment, chemoprophylaxis, and the use of vaccines. Plain and conjugate meningococcal C polysaccharide vaccines are considered safe, are well tolerated, and have been used successfully for over 30 years. Most high-income countries use vaccination as a part of public health strategies, and different meningococcal C vaccination schedules have proven to be effective in reducing incidence. This is particularly so with conjugate vaccines, which have been found to induce immunogenicity in infants (the age group with the highest incidence rates of disease, stimulate immunologic memory, have longer effects, not lead to hyporesponsiveness with repeated dosing, and decrease acquisition of nasopharyngeal carriage, inducing herd immunity. Antibiotics are considered a cornerstone of MDC treatment and must be administered empirically as soon as possible. The choice of which antibiotic to use should be made based on local antibiotic resistance, availability, and circulating strains. Excellent options for a 7-day course are penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone and

  7. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Pajon, Rolando; Braga, Emily M; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-01-01

    The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH), is fH-binding protein (fHbp), which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001) and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003). By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002), and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001). Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  8. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Beernink

    Full Text Available The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH, is fH-binding protein (fHbp, which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001 and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003. By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002, and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001. Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  9. Meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Koyfman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The first cases of meningococcal meningitis were described in Geneva in 1805 and in New England in 1806, the causative agent finally being identified by Anton Weichselbaum in 1887. The first meningococcal epidemics occurred in sub-Saharan Africa in the early 1900s and periodic outbreaks continue to occur worldwide today. Neisseria meningitidis colonizes the naso-oropharyngeal mucosa in approximately 10–20% of healthy individuals. When it invades the bloodstream, meningococcus has the potential to cause devastating disease. It can affect people of any age, but primarily infects children and adolescents. Meningococcemia classically follows an upper respiratory illness consisting of myalgias, fever, headache, and nausea. It can present as an indolent infection with rapid recovery or progress within a few hours into a fulminant illness affecting multiple organ systems. As such, meningococcemia is one of the important causes of sepsis. Prior to antibiotic therapy, the disease carried a 70% mortality rate. Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment, 10–15% of affected patients die from the disease and another 10–20% are left with severe morbidities (neurologic disability, hearing loss, loss of a limb. Meningococcal disease remains a significant global health threat.

  10. Progress towards meningitis prevention in the conjugate vaccines era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aparecida Borges Laval

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children less than five years old. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most important agents of bacterial meningitis in developing countries. The development of the conjugate vaccines in the beginning of the 90's, especially type b H. influenzae (Hib, and more recently the heptavalent pneumococcal and the serogroup C meningococcal vaccines, have contributed directly to changes in the epidemiological profile of these invasive diseases (direct effect and of their carriage status (indirect effect. We review the impact of the Hib conjugate vaccine in Latin American countries, where this vaccine has been implemented, and the potential of pneumococcal and meningococcal conjugate vaccines for the reduction of meningitis worldwide. We also address constraints for the development and delivery of these vaccines and review new candidate state-of-the-art vaccines. The greatest challenge, undoubtedly, is to implement these vaccines worldwide, especially in the developing regions.

  11. Progress towards meningitis prevention in the conjugate vaccines era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aparecida Borges Laval

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children less than five years old. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most important agents of bacterial meningitis in developing countries. The development of the conjugate vaccines in the beginning of the 90's, especially type b H. influenzae (Hib, and more recently the heptavalent pneumococcal and the serogroup C meningococcal vaccines, have contributed directly to changes in the epidemiological profile of these invasive diseases (direct effect and of their carriage status (indirect effect. We review the impact of the Hib conjugate vaccine in Latin American countries, where this vaccine has been implemented, and the potential of pneumococcal and meningococcal conjugate vaccines for the reduction of meningitis worldwide. We also address constraints for the development and delivery of these vaccines and review new candidate state-of-the-art vaccines. The greatest challenge, undoubtedly, is to implement these vaccines worldwide, especially in the developing regions.

  12. Reverse immunogenetics: from HLA-disease associations to vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, M P; Hill, A V

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) in patients with either infectious or autoimmune diseases has led to the identification of several HLA alleles associated with either resistance or susceptibility to disease. Understanding the role of HLA molecules in the presentation of peptide antigens to T cells has led to the use of 'reverse immunogenetics': a novel approach to analysing the key antigenic peptides that are presented by the relevant HLA molecules. Recent advances in the analysis of naturally occurring peptides bound to HLA molecules has allowed the direct identification of antigenic peptides from living cells and has supported the development of vaccine candidates, such as the liver-stage antigen 1 in malaria.

  13. Proteins of Bartonella bacilliformis: Candidates for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Henriquez-Camacho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiologic agent of Carrión’s disease or Oroya fever. B. bacilliformis infection represents an interesting model of human host specificity. The notable differences in clinical presentations of Carrión’s disease suggest complex adaptations by the bacterium to the human host, with the overall objectives of persistence, maintenance of a reservoir state for vectorial transmission, and immune evasion. These events include a multitude of biochemical and genetic mechanisms involving both bacterial and host proteins. This review focuses on proteins involved in interactions between B. bacilliformis and the human host. Some of them (e.g., flagellin, Brps, IalB, FtsZ, Hbp/Pap31, and other outer membrane proteins are potential protein antigen candidates for a synthetic vaccine.

  14. Ascaris suum enolase is a potential vaccine candidate against ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiu-Xiang; Zhang, Yan-Zhong; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Chao; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-05-14

    Ascariasis caused by Ascaris is the most common parasite problem in humans and pigs worldwide. No vaccines are available for the prevention of Ascaris infections. In the present study, the gene encoding Ascaris suum enolase (As-enol-1) was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid sequence alignment indicated that As-enol-1 was highly conserved between different nematodes and shared the highest identity (87%) with enolase from Anisakis simplex s.l. The recombinant pVAX-Enol was successfully expressed in Marc-145 cells. The ability of the pVAX-Enol for inducing immune protective responses against challenge infection with A. suum L3 was evaluated in Kunming mice. The immune response was evaluated by lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, and the reduction rate of recovery larvae. The results showed that the mice immunized with pVAX-Enol developed a high level of specific antibody responses against A. suum, a strong lymphoproliferative response, and significant levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 production, compared with the other groups immunized with empty plasmid or blank controls, respectively. There was a 61.13% reduction (P<0.05) in larvae recovery compared with that in the blank control group. Our data indicated that A. suum enolase is a potential vaccine candidate against A. suum infection.

  15. Meta-analysis of variables affecting mouse protection efficacy of whole organism Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Thomas E; Tibi, Omar; Lin, Yu; Sayers, Samantha; Bronner, Denise N; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine protection investigation includes three processes: vaccination, pathogen challenge, and vaccine protection efficacy assessment. Many variables can affect the results of vaccine protection. Brucella, a genus of facultative intracellular bacteria, is the etiologic agent of brucellosis in humans and multiple animal species. Extensive research has been conducted in developing effective live attenuated Brucella vaccines. We hypothesized that some variables play a more important role than others in determining vaccine protective efficacy. Using Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates as study models, this hypothesis was tested by meta-analysis of Brucella vaccine studies reported in the literature. Nineteen variables related to vaccine-induced protection of mice against infection with virulent brucellae were selected based on modeling investigation of the vaccine protection processes. The variable "vaccine protection efficacy" was set as a dependent variable while the other eighteen were set as independent variables. Discrete or continuous values were collected from papers for each variable of each data set. In total, 401 experimental groups were manually annotated from 74 peer-reviewed publications containing mouse protection data for live attenuated Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates. Our ANOVA analysis indicated that nine variables contributed significantly (P-value Brucella vaccine protection efficacy: vaccine strain, vaccination host (mouse) strain, vaccination dose, vaccination route, challenge pathogen strain, challenge route, challenge-killing interval, colony forming units (CFUs) in mouse spleen, and CFU reduction compared to control group. The other 10 variables (e.g., mouse age, vaccination-challenge interval, and challenge dose) were not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The protection level of RB51 was sacrificed when the values of several variables (e.g., vaccination route, vaccine viability, and challenge pathogen strain

  16. Meningococcal Immunizations for Preteens and Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-11

    This podcast provides information about vaccine recommendations to help prevent meningococcal disease in preteens and teens.  Created: 8/11/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 8/11/2015.

  17. Invasive meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD is a major public health and continues to cause substantial mortality and morbidity. Serotype C is the most frequent in Brazil. The clinical spectrum of IMD is broad (meningitis, meningococcemia or both and the clinical evolution may be unpredictable. Main features associated with mortality are: age higher than 50 years old, seizures, shock, and meningococcemia without meningitis. Blood cultures should be obtained immediately. Lumbar puncture can be performed without previous computed tomography scan (CT in most cases. Clinical features can be useful to predic patients where an abnormal CT scan is likely. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture and Gram stain should always be required. Latex agglutination sensitivity is highly variable. Polymerase chain reaction is specially useful when other methods are negative or delayed. Usually ceftriaxone should not be delayed while awaiting CSF study or CT. Dexamethasone can be used in meningococcal meningitis. Early suspicion of IMD and antibiotic in primary care before hospitalization, rapid transportation to a hospital, and stabilization in an intensive-care unit has substantially reduced the case-fatality rate. Vaccines against serotypes A, C, W-135, and Y are available while vaccines against serotype B are expected.

  18. Meningococcal serogroup B strain coverage of the multicomponent 4CMenB vaccine with corresponding regional distribution and clinical characteristics in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2007-08 and 2014-15: a qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sydel R; Newbold, Lynne; Slater, Stephanie; Stella, Maria; Moschioni, Monica; Lucidarme, Jay; De Paola, Rosita; Giuliani, Maria; Serino, Laura; Gray, Stephen J; Clark, Stephen A; Findlow, Jamie; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Ramsay, Mary E; Ladhani, Shamez N; Borrow, Ray

    2017-07-01

    The UK introduced 4CMenB-a multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease-into the national infant immunisation programme in September, 2015. The Meningococcal Antigen Typing System (MATS) was used to estimate coverage by 4CMenB of invasive meningococcal group B isolates obtained during 2007-08 in England and Wales (MATS coverage). We aimed to repeat the MATS survey for invasive meningococcal group B isolates obtained during 2014-15, before 4CMenB introduction; compare strain coverage between 2007-08 and 2014-15; and investigate associations between MATS coverage, age, region, and disease outcomes. Invasive serogroup B meningococcal isolates from cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2014-15 were assayed using MATS and compared with 2007-08 data. MATS coverage was assessed by geographical region and age group. Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes were assessed according to MATS coverage for 2014-15 English cases. In 2014-15, 165 of 251 (66%; 95% CI 52-80) meningococcal group B isolates were estimated by MATS to be covered by 4CMenB, compared with 391 of 535 (73%; 95% CI 57-87) in 2007-08. The proportion of MATS-positive isolates with one vaccine antigen increased from 23% (122 of 535) in 2007-08 to 31% (78 of 251) in 2014-15, whereas the proportion with more than one antigen fell from 50% (269 of 535) to 35% (87 of 251). This effect reflected changes in circulating strains, particularly ST-269 clonal complex strains. MATS coverage increased with age, varied by geographical region, and was associated with more severe disease. In 2014-15, two-thirds of meningococcal group B isolates were predicted to be covered by 4CMenB. Temporal changes in MATS coverage underscore the need for continued monitoring of antigen expression and diversity, particularly in countries with 4CMenB programmes. Public Health England, GlaxoSmithKline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced antibody responses against Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens in the presence of Trichuris trichiura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esen, Meral; Mordmüller, Benjamin; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helminth infections are highly prevalent in the tropics and may have an effect on immune responses to vaccines due to their immunomodulatory effect. The prevalence of helminth infections in young children, the target group for malaria and most other vaccines, is high. Therefore we...... assessed the influence of helminth infection on vaccine-induced immune responses in a phase I clinical trial of the malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2. METHODS: Twenty Gabonese preschool-age children were vaccinated with GMZ2, a blood stage malaria vaccine candidate. Humoral immune response against the vaccine...... antigens and parasitological status were assessed. Vaccine-specific antibody concentrations and memory B-cell numbers were compared in worm infected and non-infected participants. RESULTS: Antibody response to GMZ2 was 3.4-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.6, 7.4) higher in Trichuris trichiura negative...

  20. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C.; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes...... of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design....

  1. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after vaccination of toddlers and children between 12 months and 10 years of age with a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forsten, Aino; Bianco, Veronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    We studied the persistence of serum bactericidal antibody using rabbit and human complement (rSBA/hSBA, cut-offs 1:8) 5 y after a single dose of meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) compared with age-appropriate control vaccines in toddlers and children (NCT00427908). Children were previously randomized (3:1) to receive either MenACWY-TT or control vaccine (MenC-CRM197 in 1-vaccine [Men-PS] in 2-vaccine and discontinued from the study. A repeated measurement statistical model assessed potential selection effects due to drop-outs. At year 5 in MenACWY-TT-vaccinated-toddlers for serogroups A, C, W, and Y respectively, percentages with rSBA titers ≥1:8 were 73.5%, 77.6%, 34.7%, and 42.9%, hSBA ≥1:8 were 35.6%, 91.7%, 82.6% and 80.0%. For MenC-CRM197 recipients, 63.6% had persisting rSBA-MenC titers ≥1:8 and 90.9% had hSBA-MenC ≥1:8 (not significantly different versus MenACWY-TT for either assay: exploratory analyses). In 2-vaccinees were 90.8%, 90.8%, 78.6%, and 78.6% and 15.4%, 100%, 0.0%, 7.7% in Men-PS-vaccinees (significantly different for serogroups A, W and Y, exploratory analyses). Serogroups A, W and Y rSBA GMTs were ≥ 26-fold higher in MenACWY-TT-vaccinees. As expected, GMTs modeled at year 5 to assess the impact of subject drop out (mainly for revaccination), appeared lower for serogroup C. No vaccine-related SAEs were reported. Antibody persistence was observed for all serogroups up to 5 y after MenACWY-TT vaccination.

  2. Evaluation of Novel Oral Vaccine Candidates and Validation of a Caprine Model of Johne's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray E. Hines

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease (JD caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is a major threat to the dairy industry and possibly some cases of Crohn’s disease in humans. A MAP vaccine that reduced of clinical disease and/or reduced fecal shedding would aid in the control of JD. The objectives of this study were 1 to evaluate the efficacy of 5 attenuated strains of MAP as vaccine candidates compared to a commercial control vaccine using the protocol proposed by the Johne’s Disease Integrated Program (JDIP Animal Model Standardization Committee (AMSC, and 2 to validate the AMSC Johne’s disease goat challenge model. Eighty goat kids were vaccinated orally twice at 8 and 10 weeks of age with an experimental vaccine or once subcutaneously at 8 weeks with Silirum® (Zoetis, or a sham control oral vaccine at 8 and 10 weeks. Kids were challenged orally with a total of approximately 1.44 X 10^9 CFU divided in 2 consecutive daily doses using MAP ATCC-700535 (K10-like bovine isolate. All kids were necropsied at 13 months post challenge. Results indicated that the AMSC goat challenge model is a highly efficient and valid model for JD challenge studies. None of the experimental or control vaccines evaluated prevented MAP infection or eliminated fecal shedding, although the 329 vaccine lowered the incidence of infection, fecal shedding, tissue colonization and reduced lesion scores, but less than the control vaccine. Based on our results the relative performance ranking of the experimental live-attenuated vaccines evaluated, the 329 vaccine was the best performer, followed by the 318 vaccine, then 316 vaccine, 315 vaccine and finally the 319 vaccine was the worst performer. The subcutaneously injected control vaccine outperformed the orally-delivered mutant vaccine candidates. Two vaccines (329 and 318 do reduce presence of JD gross and microscopic lesions, slow progression of disease, and one vaccine (329 reduced fecal shedding and tissue

  3. Evaluation of novel oral vaccine candidates and validation of a caprine model of Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Murray E; Turnquist, Sue E; Ilha, Marcia R S; Rajeev, Sreekumari; Jones, Arthur L; Whittington, Lisa; Bannantine, John P; Barletta, Raúl G; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Katani, Robab; Talaat, Adel M; Li, Lingling; Kapur, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is a major threat to the dairy industry and possibly some cases of Crohn's disease in humans. A MAP vaccine that reduced of clinical disease and/or reduced fecal shedding would aid in the control of JD. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the efficacy of 5 attenuated strains of MAP as vaccine candidates compared to a commercial control vaccine using the protocol proposed by the Johne's Disease Integrated Program (JDIP) Animal Model Standardization Committee (AMSC), and (2) to validate the AMSC Johne's disease goat challenge model. Eighty goat kids were vaccinated orally twice at 8 and 10 weeks of age with an experimental vaccine or once subcutaneously at 8 weeks with Silirum® (Zoetis), or a sham control oral vaccine at 8 and 10 weeks. Kids were challenged orally with a total of approximately 1.44 × 10(9) CFU divided in two consecutive daily doses using MAP ATCC-700535 (K10-like bovine isolate). All kids were necropsied at 13 months post-challenge. Results indicated that the AMSC goat challenge model is a highly efficient and valid model for JD challenge studies. None of the experimental or control vaccines evaluated prevented MAP infection or eliminated fecal shedding, although the 329 vaccine lowered the incidence of infection, fecal shedding, tissue colonization and reduced lesion scores, but less than the control vaccine. Based on our results the relative performance ranking of the experimental live-attenuated vaccines evaluated, the 329 vaccine was the best performer, followed by the 318 vaccine, then 316 vaccine, 315 vaccine and finally the 319 vaccine was the worst performer. The subcutaneously injected control vaccine outperformed the orally-delivered mutant vaccine candidates. Two vaccines (329 and 318) do reduce presence of JD gross and microscopic lesions, slow progression of disease, and one vaccine (329) reduced fecal shedding and tissue colonization.

  4. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  5. The next generation recombinant human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates-beyond gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Anders E; Mason, Peter W

    2012-11-19

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects the majority of the global population and persists within the infected host for life; infection of healthy adults rarely leads to severe acute clinical symptoms. In contrast, HCMV is a leading infectious cause of congenital disease and a common cause of complications in transplant recipients. A vaccine to prevent HCMV disease in these populations is a widely recognized medical need. We review recent advances in our understanding of the candidate vaccine antigens and published clinical trial data for the four most recent HCMV vaccine candidates: a gB subunit adjuvanted with MF59, a DNA vaccine expressing gB and pp65, alphavirus replicon particles (VRPs) expressing gB and a pp65-IE1 fusion protein, and a pp65 peptide vaccine. The candidates are safe, although some adverse events were reported for an adjuvanted variant of the pp65 peptide vaccine. The gB/MF59 vaccine elicited strong humoral responses with limited durability. The gB/pp65 DNA vaccine elicited cellular immunity, and the pp65 peptide vaccine elicited modest cellular immunity, but only when formulated with an adjuvant. Only the VRP vaccine expressing gB and pp65-IE1 elicited both humoral and cellular immunity. The gB/MF59 vaccine showed a short-term 50% efficacy at preventing infection of seronegative women and significantly reduced viremia and need for antivirals in solid organ transplant recipients, and the gB/pp65 DNA vaccine showed signs of clinical benefit in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Importantly, the partial efficacy of the subunit and DNA vaccines is new evidence that both humoral and cellular immunity contribute to controlling HCMV-related disease. These data show the clinical feasibility of a recombinant HCMV vaccine. We discuss areas for potential improvements in the next generation of vaccine candidates.

  6. Attenuated strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Erik W; Kink, John A; Talaat, Adel

    2014-04-11

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Johne's disease has a severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. In an effort to combat this disease, we screened several transposon mutants that were attenuated in the murine model of paratuberculosis for the potential use as live attenuated vaccines. Using the murine model, two vaccine candidates (pgs1360, pgs3965 with mutations of fabG2_2 and umaA1, respectively) were at or below the limit of detection for tissue colonization suggesting their low level persistence and hence safety. Prior to challenge, both candidates induced a M. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ, an indication of eliciting cell-mediated immunity. Following challenge with a virulent strain of M. paratuberculosis, the two vaccine candidates significantly reduced bacterial colonization in organs with reduced histological scores compared to control animals. In addition, one of the vaccine candidates (pgs3965) also induced IL-17a, a cytokine associated with protective immunity in mycobacterial infection. Our analysis suggested that the pgs3965 vaccine candidate is a potential live-attenuated vaccine that could be tested further in ruminant models of paratuberculosis. The analysis also validated our screening strategy to identify effective vaccine candidates against intracellular pathogens.

  7. Parents' and adolescents' willingness to be vaccinated against serogroup B meningococcal disease during a mass vaccination in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (Quebec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Hamel, Denis; Belley, Sylvie; Gagné, Hélène; Boulianne, Nicole; Landry, Monique; Bettinger, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc) was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93%) and adolescents (75%). Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated.

  8. [Candid#1 vaccine against Argentine hemorrhagic fever produced in Argentina. Immunogenicity and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enria, Delia A; Ambrosio, Ana M; Briggiler, Ana M; Feuillade, María Rosa; Crivelli, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    A clinical study in 946 human volunteers was done to compare Candid #1 vaccine manufactured in Argentina with the vaccine produced in USA that had been previously used. The efficacy was evaluated using immunogenicity measured by the detection of neutralizing antibodies as a subrogate marker. Safety was evaluated comparing the rate of adverse events. Both vaccines showed a comparable rate of seroconversion, slightly higher than the efficacy estimated from previous studies (95.5%). There were no severe adverse events related to the vaccines. The general events considered related to the vaccines were not clinically relevant and disappeared either spontaneously or with symptomatic treatment. Similar rates of adverse events (29.9% for the Argentine vaccine and 35.0% for the USA vaccine) were found for both vaccines. These included: headache, weakness, myalgias, mild low blood cell (ANMAT).

  9. Characterization of fHbp, nhba (gna2132), nadA, porA, and sequence type in group B meningococcal case isolates collected in England and Wales during January 2008 and potential coverage of an investigational group B meningococcal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Comanducci, Maurizio; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Guiver, Malcolm; Vallely, Pamela J; Oster, Philipp; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Borrow, Ray

    2010-06-01

    Invasive disease caused by meningococcal capsular groups A, C, W-135, and Y is now preventable by means of glycoconjugate vaccines that target their respective polysaccharide capsules. The capsule of group B meningococci (MenB) is poorly immunogenic and may induce autoimmunity. Vaccines based on the major immunodominant surface porin, PorA, are effective against clonal epidemics but, thus far, have a limited scope of coverage against the wider MenB population at large. In an alternative approach, the first-generation, investigational, recombinant MenB (rMenB) plus outer membrane vesicle (OMV) (rMenB-OMV) vaccine contains a number of relatively conserved surface proteins, fHBP, NHBA (previously GNA2132), and NadA, alongside PorA P1.4-containing OMVs from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccine. MenB currently accounts for approximately 90% of cases of meningococcal disease in England and Wales. To assess potential rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage of pathogenic MenB isolates within this region, all English and Welsh MenB case isolates from January 2008 (n = 87) were genetically characterized with respect to fHBP, NHBA, NadA, and PorA. Alleles for fHbp, nhba, and porA were identified in all of the isolates, of which 22% were also found to harbor nadA alleles. On the basis of genotypic data and predicted immunological cross-reactivity, the potential level of rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage in England and Wales ranges from 66% to 100%.

  10. Molecular Diversity of Vaccine Candidates in Leptospira spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández-Rodríguez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the molecular diversity of OmpL1, LipL32, LipL41, LigA and LigB proteins and that of the genes that encode them using bioinformatic analysis in different pathogenic strains of Leptospira spp. based on the information available in databases. The amino acid sequences of OmpL1, LipL32, LipL41, LigA and LigB proteins were used, as well as the genes encoding them in strains of Leptospira spp. reported at The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. The analysis of proteins and genes were performed using the Protein, Nucleotide and Gene resources from the NCBI. The alignment of the consensus sequences was performed using the PSI-BLAST and BLASTn tools. The coverage percentage of the selected sequences of the ompL1, lipL32, lipL41, ligA and ligB genes in pathogenic strains of Leptospira spp. is 100% for ompL1, lipL32 and lipL41, 75% for ligA and 99% for ligB with identity percentages of 85, 98, 88, 90 and 80% respectively; the coverage percentage of the selected protein sequences is 100, 77, 99, 100 and 100% with identity percentages of 90, 99, 92, 63 and 60% respectively, indicating that genes and proteins, except LigA and LigB proteins, are highly conserved in various pathogenic serovars of Leptospira spp. According to these results, it is recommended that further analysis of these proteins be made in order to determine the feasibility of its use as vaccine candidates.

  11. Contribution of factor H-Binding protein sequence to the cross-reactivity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed fHbp variant group 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Arianna; Rossi, Omar; Aruta, Maria Grazia; Micoli, Francesca; Rondini, Simona; Guadagnuolo, Serafina; Delany, Isabel; Henderson, Ian R; Cunningham, Adam F; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A; Koeberling, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is an important meningococcal vaccine antigen. Native outer membrane vesicles with over-expressed fHbp (NOMV OE fHbp) have been shown to induce antibodies with broader functional activity than recombinant fHbp (rfHbp). Improved understanding of this broad coverage would facilitate rational vaccine design. We performed a pair-wise analysis of 48 surface-exposed amino acids involved in interacting with factor H, among 383 fHbp variant group 1 sequences. We generated isogenic NOMV-producing meningococcal strains from an African serogroup W isolate, each over-expressing one of four fHbp variant group 1 sequences (ID 1, 5, 9, or 74), including those most common among invasive African meningococcal isolates. Mice were immunised with each NOMV, and sera tested for IgG levels against each of the rfHbp ID and for ability to kill a panel of heterologous meningococcal isolates. At the fH-binding site, ID pairs differed by a maximum of 13 (27%) amino acids. ID 9 shared an amino acid sequence common to 83 ID types. The selected ID types differed by up to 6 amino acids, in the fH-binding site. All NOMV and rfHbp induced high IgG levels against each rfHbp. Serum killing from mice immunised with rfHbp was generally less efficient and more restricted compared to NOMV, which induced antibodies that killed most meningococci tested, with decreased stringency for ID type differences. Breadth of killing was mostly due to anti-fHbp antibodies, with some restriction according to ID type sequence differences. Nevertheless, under our experimental conditions, no relationship between antibody cross-reactivity and variation fH-binding site sequence was identified. NOMV over-expressing different fHbp IDs belonging to variant group 1 induce antibodies with fine specificities against fHbp, and ability to kill broadly meningococci expressing heterologous fHbp IDs. The work reinforces that meningococcal NOMV with OE fHbp is a promising vaccine strategy, and provides

  12. The immunogenicity and safety of an investigational meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT) compared with a licensed meningococcal tetravalent polysaccharide vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Macalalad, Noel; Reyes, Mari Rose Aplasca-De Los; Dimaano, Efren; Bianco, Véronique; Baine, Yaela; Miller, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Immunogenicity and safety of ACWY-TT compared with licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS) in healthy adults, and lot-to-lot consistency of three ACWY-TT lots were evaluated in a phase 3, open, controlled study. Adults aged 18–55 y were randomized to receive ACWY-TT (one of three lots) or MenPS. Serum bactericidal antibodies (rSBA) were measured pre- and 1 mo post-vaccination. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed 4 d (solicited symptoms) and 31 d (unsolicited symptoms) post-vaccination. Se...

  13. Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    could be inserted into the viral backbone. The utility of insertion was impacted by the number and position of insertions and by whether the resulting...a vector in the development of vaccines against many diseases, including malaria, hepatitis C, influenza, and, of course, filovirus diseases...vaccines elicit strong T-cell responses and are potentially effective for protection from viral infections. Two research groups have EBOV DNA vaccines

  14. A 52 Kilodalton Protein Vaccine Candidate for Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    du vaccin vivant F. tularensis (LVS). Soixante pourcent (60%) des souris vaccindes ont survdcu la dose ltale multiple alors que toutes les souris non...le lysat des cellules de cultures vivantes du vaccin vivant F. tularensis. Plusieurs composants de Francisella tularensis ont dt6 identifids par cet...antiserum. Le s6rum de souris provenant de souris vaccin6es avec F. tularensis non- vivant n’a pas identifid ces composants. A partir de ces prot6ines

  15. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) administered to adults aged 56 Years and older: results of an open-label, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; El-Ayoubi, Nabil; Ghanem, Soha; Hajar, Farah; Bianco, Veronique; Miller, Jacqueline M; Mesaros, Narcisa

    2013-05-01

    The burden of invasive meningococcal disease is substantial in older adults in whom the case fatality rate is high. Travelers to regions with high rates of meningococcal disease, such as Hajj pilgrims, are at increased risk of meningococcal infection, and disease transmission from travelers to their close contacts has been documented. In younger individuals, meningococcal conjugate vaccines offer advantages over polysaccharide vaccines in terms of duration of protection and boostability, and induction of herd immune effects through reductions in nasopharyngeal carriage of meningococci. To date, few data are available evaluating meningococcal conjugate vaccine use in adults >55 years of age. To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y vaccine with all serogroups conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MenACWY-TT, Nimenrix™, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) and a licensed quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS, Mencevax™ GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) in adults >55 years of age. This was a phase IIIb, open-label, randomized (3:1), controlled study conducted at one study center in Lebanon. A total of 400 healthy adults between 56 and 103 years of age without previous MenPS or tetanus toxoid vaccination within the previous 5 years or meningococcal conjugate vaccination at any time previously were included. They received a single-dose vaccination with MenACWY-TT or MenPS with blood sampling before and 1 month after vaccination. The main outcome measures were serum bactericidal activity (rabbit complement source: rSBA) vaccine response (VR) rate [rSBA titer of ≥1:32 in initially seronegative subjects (rSBA titer <1:8); ≥4-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers between 1:8 and 1:128, and ≥2-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers ≥1:128]. The percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128 and rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were assessed. Solicited adverse events

  16. An Approach to Identify and Characterize a Subunit Candidate Shigella Vaccine Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pore, Debasis; Chakrabarti, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis remains a serious issue throughout the developing countries, particularly in children under the age of 5. Numerous strategies have been tested to develop vaccines targeting shigellosis; unfortunately despite several years of extensive research, no safe, effective, and inexpensive vaccine against shigellosis is available so far. Here, we illustrate in detail an approach to identify and establish immunogenic outer membrane proteins from Shigella flexneri 2a as subunit vaccine candidates.

  17. Comparative evaluation of phenol and thimerosal as preservatives for a candidate vaccine against American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Mayrink

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For decades thimerosal has been used as a preservative in the candidate vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis, which was developed by Mayrink et al. The use of thimerosal in humans has been banned due to its mercury content. This study addresses the standardization of phenol as a new candidate vaccine preservative. We have found that the proteolytic activity was abolished when the test was conducted using the candidate vaccine added to merthiolate (MtVac as well as to phenol (PhVac. The Montenegro's skin test conversion rates induced by MtVac and by PhVac was 68.06% and 85.9%, respectively, and these values were statistically significant (p < 0.05. The proliferative response of peripheral mononuclear blood cells shows that the stimulation index of mice immunized with both candidate vaccines was higher than the one in control animals (p < 0.05. The ability of the candidate vaccines to induce protection in C57BL/10 mice against a challenge with infective Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes was tested and the mice immunized with PhVac developed smaller lesions than the mice immunized with MtVac. Electrophoresis of phenol-preserved antigen revealed a number of proteins, which were better preserved in PhVac. These results do in fact encourage the use of phenol for preserving the immunogenic and biochemical properties of the candidate vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  18. The new multicomponent vaccine against meningococcal serogroup B, 4CMenB: immunological, functional and structural characterization of the antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Davide, Serruto; Bottomley Matthew, J; Sanjay, Ram; Giuliani Marzia, M; Rino, Rappuoli

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of endemic cases and epidemics of meningitis and devastating septicemia. Although effective vaccines exist for several serogroups of pathogenic N. meningitidis, conventional vaccinology approaches have failed to provide a universal solution for serogroup B (MenB) which consequently remains an important burden of disease worldwide. The advent of whole-genome sequencing changed the approach to vaccine development, enabling the identification of potential ...

  19. An investigational tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine co-administered with Infanrix™ hexa is immunogenic, with an acceptable safety profile in 12-23-month-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Markus; Pantazi-Chatzikonstantinou, Anna; Pfletschinger, Ulrich; Tichmann-Schumann, Irmingard; Maurer, Hartwig; Maurer, Lothar; Fischbach, Thomas; Zinke, Henrike; Pankow-Culot, Heidemarie; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Bianco, Veronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2011-06-06

    Tetravalent meningococcal serogroups ACWY conjugate vaccines will provide an advantage to those at most risk of invasive meningococcal disease; namely young children. Co-administration of ACWY-TT with DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib was assessed in a randomized trial in 793 children aged 12-23 months. Pre-specified criteria for non-inferiority of immunogenicity following co-administration versus separate ACWY-TT and DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib administration were reached. One month post-vaccination, ≥ 97.3% of ACWY-TT vaccinees had rSBA titres ≥ 1:8 (all serogroups). Seroprotection/seropositivity rates against DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib antigens were ≥ 98.2%. The safety profile of co-administration was similar to that of DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib alone. ACWY-TT and DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib co-administration during the second year would facilitate introduction of ACWY-TT into routine toddler vaccination schedules.

  20. 脑膜炎球菌疫苗研究与疾病防控策略初探%Preliminary survey of meningococcal vaccine research and disease prevention and control strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘殊男

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the characteristics,transmission route,epidemic trends and harmfulness of Neisseria meningitidis,discusses control strategies for epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis outbreak,and evaluates current domestic and international research status of meningococcal vaccines.%此文介绍了脑膜炎球菌的特点、传播途径、流行趋势及危害性,讨论了防控流行性脑脊髓膜炎暴发的相关策略,并对目前国内外脑膜炎球菌疫苗的研究现状进行了阐述和评价.

  1. A novel meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine with constitutive expression of FetA: A phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsay, L; Dold, C; Green, C A; Rollier, C S; Norheim, G; Sadarangani, M; Shanyinde, M; Brehony, C; Thompson, A J; Sanders, H; Chan, H; Haworth, K; Derrick, J P; Feavers, I M; Maiden, M C; Pollard, A J

    2015-09-01

    Outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines are used against outbreaks of capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) caused by strains expressing particular PorA outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Ferric enterobactin receptor (FetA) is another variable OMP that induces type-specific bactericidal antibodies, and the combination of judiciously chosen PorA and FetA variants in vaccine formulations is a potential approach to broaden protection of such vaccines. The OMV vaccine MenPF-1 was generated by genetically modifying N. meningitidis strain 44/76 to constitutively express FetA. Three doses of 25 μg or 50 μg of MenPF-1 were delivered intra-muscularly to 52 healthy adults. MenPF-1 was safe and well tolerated. Immunogenicity was measured by serum bactericidal assay (SBA) against wild-type and isogenic mutant strains. After 3 doses, the proportion of volunteers with SBA titres ≥1:4 (the putative protective titre) was 98% for the wild-type strain, and 77% for the strain 44/76 FetA(on)PorA(off) compared to 51% in the strain 44/76 FetA(off)PorA(off), demonstrating that vaccination with MenPF-1 simultaneously induced FetA and PorA bactericidal antibodies. This study provides a proof-of-concept for generating bactericidal antibodies against FetA after OMV vaccination in humans. Prevalence-based choice of PorA and FetA types can be used to formulate a vaccine for broad protection against MenB disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Parents’ and Adolescents’ Willingness to be Vaccinated Against Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease during a Mass Vaccination in Saguenay–Lac-St-Jean (Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Dubé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93% and adolescents (75%. Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated.

  3. Parents’ and adolescents’ willingness to be vaccinated against serogroup B meningococcal disease during a mass vaccination in Saguenay–Lac-St-Jean (Quebec)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Hamel, Denis; Belley, Sylvie; Gagné, Hélène; Boulianne, Nicole; Landry, Monique; Bettinger, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc) was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93%) and adolescents (75%). Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated. PMID:26236359

  4. An assessment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella vaccine candidates for infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard I

    2015-02-18

    Despite improvements to water quality, sanitation, and the implementation of current prevention and treatment interventions, diarrhea remains a major cause of illness and death, especially among children less than five years of age in the developing world. Rotavirus vaccines have already begun making a real impact on diarrhea, but several more enteric vaccines will be necessary to achieve broader reductions of illness and death. Among the many causes of diarrheal disease, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shigella are the two most important bacterial pathogens for which there are no currently licensed vaccines. Vaccines against these two pathogens could greatly reduce the impact of disease caused by these infections. This review describes the approaches to ETEC and Shigella vaccines that are currently under development, including a range of both cellular and subunit approaches for each pathogen. In addition, the review discusses strategies for maximizing the potential benefit of these vaccines, which includes the feasibility of co-administration, consolidation, and combination of vaccine candidates, as well as issues related to effective administration of enteric vaccines to infants. Recent impact studies indicate that ETEC and Shigella vaccines could significantly benefit global public health. Either vaccine, particularly if they could be combined together or with another enteric vaccine, would be an extremely valuable tool for saving lives and promoting the health of infants and children in the developing world, as well as potentially providing protection to travelers and military personnel visiting endemic areas.

  5. Reverse Vaccinology: An Approach for Identifying Leptospiral Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odir A. Dellagostin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a major public health problem with an incidence of over one million human cases each year. It is a globally distributed, zoonotic disease and is associated with significant economic losses in farm animals. Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. that can infect a wide range of domestic and wild animals. Given the inability to control the cycle of transmission among animals and humans, there is an urgent demand for a new vaccine. Inactivated whole-cell vaccines (bacterins are routinely used in livestock and domestic animals, however, protection is serovar-restricted and short-term only. To overcome these limitations, efforts have focused on the development of recombinant vaccines, with partial success. Reverse vaccinology (RV has been successfully applied to many infectious diseases. A growing number of leptospiral genome sequences are now available in public databases, providing an opportunity to search for prospective vaccine antigens using RV. Several promising leptospiral antigens were identified using this approach, although only a few have been characterized and evaluated in animal models. In this review, we summarize the use of RV for leptospirosis and discuss the need for potential improvements for the successful development of a new vaccine towards reducing the burden of human and animal leptospirosis.

  6. Reverse Vaccinology: An Approach for Identifying Leptospiral Vaccine Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellagostin, Odir A.; Grassmann, André A.; Rizzi, Caroline; Schuch, Rodrigo A.; Jorge, Sérgio; Oliveira, Thais L.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Hartwig, Daiane D.

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a major public health problem with an incidence of over one million human cases each year. It is a globally distributed, zoonotic disease and is associated with significant economic losses in farm animals. Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. that can infect a wide range of domestic and wild animals. Given the inability to control the cycle of transmission among animals and humans, there is an urgent demand for a new vaccine. Inactivated whole-cell vaccines (bacterins) are routinely used in livestock and domestic animals, however, protection is serovar-restricted and short-term only. To overcome these limitations, efforts have focused on the development of recombinant vaccines, with partial success. Reverse vaccinology (RV) has been successfully applied to many infectious diseases. A growing number of leptospiral genome sequences are now available in public databases, providing an opportunity to search for prospective vaccine antigens using RV. Several promising leptospiral antigens were identified using this approach, although only a few have been characterized and evaluated in animal models. In this review, we summarize the use of RV for leptospirosis and discuss the need for potential improvements for the successful development of a new vaccine towards reducing the burden of human and animal leptospirosis. PMID:28098813

  7. Updated postlicensure surveillance of the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine in England and Wales: effectiveness, validation of serological correlates of protection, and modeling predictions of the duration of herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Helen; Andrews, Nick; Borrow, Ray; Trotter, Caroline; Miller, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines were licensed in the United Kingdom more than 10 years ago based on correlates of protection that had previously been established for serogroup C-containing polysaccharide vaccines by using the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay. These correlates of protection were subsequently validated against postlicensure estimates of observed vaccine effectiveness up to 7 to 9 months after the administration of the MCC vaccine. Vaccine effectiveness was, however, shown to fall significantly more than 1 year after the administration of a 3-dose course in infancy. Despite this finding, the marked impact on serogroup C disease has been sustained, with the lowest recorded incidence (0.02 case per 100,000 population) in the 2008-2009 epidemiological year, mainly due to the indirect herd immunity effect of the vaccine in reducing carriage. Updated estimates of vaccine effectiveness through 30 June 2009 confirmed high short-term protection after vaccination in infancy, at 97% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91% to 99%), falling to 68% (95% CI, -63% to 90%) more than a year after vaccination. The observed vaccine effectiveness more than 12 months postvaccination was consistent with measured declining SBA levels, but confidence intervals were imprecise; vaccine effectiveness estimates were consistent with SBA titers of 1:4 or 1:8 as correlates of long-term protection after a primary course in infants. Modeling suggested that protection against carriage persists for at least 3 years and predicted the stabilization of serogroup C disease at low levels (fewer than 50 cases per year) up to 2015-2016.

  8. Preclinical testing of a vaccine candidate against tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Ragavan Varadharajan; Ma, Zhuo; Sunagar, Raju; Bhatty, Vivek; Banik, Sukalyani; Catlett, Sally V; Gosselin, Edmund J; Malik, Meenakshi; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Tularemia is caused by a gram-negative, intracellular bacterial pathogen, Francisella tularensis (Ft). The history weaponization of Ft in the past has elevated concerns that it could be used as a bioweapon or an agent of bioterrorism. Since the discovery of Ft, three broad approaches adopted for tularemia vaccine development have included inactivated, live attenuated, or subunit vaccines. Shortcomings in each of these approaches have hampered the development of a suitable vaccine for prevention of tularemia. Recently, we reported an oxidant sensitive mutant of Ft LVS in putative EmrA1 (FTL_0687) secretion protein. The emrA1 mutant is highly sensitive to oxidants, attenuated for intramacrophage growth and virulence in mice. We reported that EmrA1 contributes to oxidant resistance by affecting the secretion of antioxidant enzymes SodB and KatG. This study investigated the vaccine potential of the emrA1 mutant in prevention of respiratory tularemia caused by Ft LVS and the virulent SchuS4 strain in C57BL/6 mice. We report that emrA1 mutant is safe and can be used at an intranasal (i. n.) immunization dose as high as 1x106 CFU without causing any adverse effects in immunized mice. The emrA1 mutant is cleared by vaccinated mice by day 14-21 post-immunization, induces minimal histopathological lesions in lungs, liver and spleen and a strong humoral immune response. The emrA1 mutant vaccinated mice are protected against 1000-10,000LD100 doses of i.n. Ft LVS challenge. Such a high degree of protection has not been reported earlier against respiratory challenge with Ft LVS using a single immunization dose with an attenuated mutant generated on Ft LVS background. The emrA1 mutant also provides partial protection against i.n. challenge with virulent Ft SchuS4 strain in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Collectively, our results further support the notion that antioxidants of Ft may serve as potential targets for development of effective vaccines for prevention of tularemia.

  9. Defined neoglycoproteins as candidate vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefeber, Dirk Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Several bacteria that are surrounded by a polysaccharide coat can cause severe diseases like meningitis, pneumonia and otitis media, especially in young children. Against the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, a polysaccharide vaccine exists. However, it does not effectively protect high-risk group

  10. Hsp70 as a candidate subunit vaccine for paratuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santema, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on vaccination-based control of bovine paratuberculosis, a chronic mycobacterial infection of the small intestine. Bovine paratuberculosis is a highly prevalent disease affecting ruminants worldwide, leading to substantial economic losses. There are concerns that the causative ag

  11. A+C群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗在C群流脑暴发中应急接种效果的研究%Effectiveness of an immunization campaign with group A and C meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in controlling an outbreak of group C meningococcal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚健; 方锦嵩; 崔萱林; 谢贵林; 吴兴华; 蓝荣伟; 李翠云; 董柏青; 黄景枝; 权怡; 陆万专; 罗成慧; 毛伟成; 廖和壮

    2008-01-01

    目的 报告A+C群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗(A+C群MPV)在C群流行性脑脊髓膜炎(流脑)暴发疫情中应急接种的安全性、免疫原性和保护效果.方法 在2002年广西来宾市发生C群流脑局部暴发接种A群MPV人群中约6周后应急接种A+C群MPV,观察接种对象局部和全身反应.选择疫点人群71人和非疫点人群43人于应急接种前和接种后1个月采血,用ELISA检测脑膜炎球菌C群和A群多糖抗体IgG.随访接种人群流脑发病情况至免疫后5年.结果 A+C群MPV应急接种率为97%,接种后未观察到严重不良反应.疫点人群、非疫点人群、应急接种前C群抗体阴性者和阳性者的C群流脑抗体阳性率为97.67%~100%,几何平均浓度(GMC)为30.81~37.44 μg/ml,各组人群抗体水平差异无统计学意义.流脑罹患率在及时接种学校(218.58/10万)比不及时接种学校(705.72/10万)减少69.02%.接种人群随访15 760人年未发现流脑临床确诊病例.结论 国产A+C群MPV应急接种可成功扑灭C群流脑暴发疫情,与A群MPV仅间隔6周接种仍然安全,对易感人群可诱导产生高水平的特异性抗体,对已有抗体者可显著提高抗体水平,保护效果至少持续5年.%Objective To assess the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of group A and C meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (A/C MPV) in response to an outbreak of group C meningococcal disease. Methods A vaccination campaign with A/C MPV was prompted 6 weeks after the use of group A MPV in Laibin city, Guangxi, where an outbreak of group C meningococcal meningitis occurred in 2002.Vaccinees were observed for local and systemic reactions after the vaccination and followed up for the meningococcal disease for 5 years. Blood samples were collected from 71 people in the epidemic and 43 in the non-epidemic areas before and 1 month after the vaccination and examined by ELISA to detect IgG antibodies to group A and C polysaccharides. Results The vaccination coverage was 97

  12. Comparative evaluation of phenol and thimerosal as preservatives for a candidate vaccine against American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrink, Wilson; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Deus, Rosangela Barbosa de; Pinheiro, Melina Barros; Guimarães, Tânia Mara Pinto Dabés; Andrade, Hélida Monteiro de; Costa, Carlos Alberto da; Toledo, Vicente de Paulo Coelho Peixoto da

    2010-02-01

    For decades thimerosal has been used as a preservative in the candidate vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis, which was developed by Mayrink et al. The use of thimerosal in humans has been banned due to its mercury content. This study addresses the standardization of phenol as a new candidate vaccine preservative. We have found that the proteolytic activity was abolished when the test was conducted using the candidate vaccine added to merthiolate (MtVac) as well as to phenol (PhVac). The Montenegro's skin test conversion rates induced by MtVac and by PhVac was 68.06% and 85.9%, respectively, and these values were statistically significant (p leishmaniasis.

  13. From pertussis to meningococcal disease and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    From pertussis to meningococcal disease and back represents nearly 30 years of research at Porton, first at the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research and latterly as part of the Health Protection Agency. I joined the group lead by Andy Robinson developing an acellular pertussis vaccine and was part of an exciting period that encompassed basic antigen characterisation and pathogenesis studies with the development of an acellular vaccine containing fimbriae. Research then changed to focus on serogroup B meningococcal disease, studying the vaccine potential of iron-regulated proteins and then Neisseria lactamica. The resurgence of pertussis seen in some countries alerted me to the lack of understanding of protective immune responses to Bordetella pertussis infection and disease and this is now an active area of research.

  14. Identification of Novel Potential Vaccine Candidates against Tuberculosis Based on Reverse Vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria P. Monterrubio-López

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a chronic infectious disease, considered as the second leading cause of death worldwide, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The limited efficacy of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine against pulmonary TB and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB warrants the need for more efficacious vaccines. Reverse vaccinology uses the entire proteome of a pathogen to select the best vaccine antigens by in silico approaches. M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteome was analyzed with NERVE (New Enhanced Reverse Vaccinology Environment prediction software to identify potential vaccine targets; these 331 proteins were further analyzed with VaxiJen for the determination of their antigenicity value. Only candidates with values ≥0.5 of antigenicity and 50% of adhesin probability and without homology with human proteins or transmembrane regions were selected, resulting in 73 antigens. These proteins were grouped by families in seven groups and analyzed by amino acid sequence alignments, selecting 16 representative proteins. For each candidate, a search of the literature and protein analysis with different bioinformatics tools, as well as a simulation of the immune response, was conducted. Finally, we selected six novel vaccine candidates, EsxL, PE26, PPE65, PE_PGRS49, PBP1, and Erp, from M. tuberculosis that can be used to improve or design new TB vaccines.

  15. Identification of Novel Potential Vaccine Candidates against Tuberculosis Based on Reverse Vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrubio-López, Gloria P; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease, considered as the second leading cause of death worldwide, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The limited efficacy of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against pulmonary TB and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB warrants the need for more efficacious vaccines. Reverse vaccinology uses the entire proteome of a pathogen to select the best vaccine antigens by in silico approaches. M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteome was analyzed with NERVE (New Enhanced Reverse Vaccinology Environment) prediction software to identify potential vaccine targets; these 331 proteins were further analyzed with VaxiJen for the determination of their antigenicity value. Only candidates with values ≥0.5 of antigenicity and 50% of adhesin probability and without homology with human proteins or transmembrane regions were selected, resulting in 73 antigens. These proteins were grouped by families in seven groups and analyzed by amino acid sequence alignments, selecting 16 representative proteins. For each candidate, a search of the literature and protein analysis with different bioinformatics tools, as well as a simulation of the immune response, was conducted. Finally, we selected six novel vaccine candidates, EsxL, PE26, PPE65, PE_PGRS49, PBP1, and Erp, from M. tuberculosis that can be used to improve or design new TB vaccines.

  16. A Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 vaccine candidate against CTX ET Phi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meiying; Liu, Guangwen; Diao, Baowei; Qiu, Haiyan; Zhang, Lijuan; Liang, Weili; Gao, Shouyi; Kan, Biao

    2007-05-16

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease that may spread rapidly. Vaccination is considered a valid measure against it. We developed a new vaccine candidate, IEM109, against Vibrio cholerae. To generate this candidate, a chromosomal fragment containing the TLC element, attB of the CTX Phi integration site, and RTX cluster responsible for the cytotoxic activity for mammalian cells was deleted through homologous recombination from the previously described El Tor biotype, IEM101. The protective genes ctxB and rstR, which establish resistance to CTX Phi infections, were inserted into that same location on the chromosome of IEM109 to enhance the safety and genetic stability of the vaccine candidate and to prevent horizontal gene transfer. In in vivo tests, cell cultures showed that the cytotoxic effect of IEM109 on Hep-2 was negative. Furthermore, the infection rate of El Tor biotype CTX Phi to that of IEM109 in the rabbit intestine is 3000-fold lower than that of IEM101. Intraintestinal vaccination of rabbits with a single dose of IEM109 elicits high titers of anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies. When challenged with 0.5-2 microg CT and 10(5) to 10(8)CFU of four wild toxigenic strains of different biotypes and serogroups, IEM109 conferred full protection. Thus, IEM109 is a stable vaccine candidate that evokes not only antitoxic and vibriocidal immunities, but also resistance to the El Tor biotype CTX Phi infection.

  17. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology

    OpenAIRE

    Meunier, Marine; Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Hirchaud, Edouard; Parra, Alberto; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria’s main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for thi...

  18. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71, both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD, are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024 isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine.

  19. Algorithmic Assessment of Vaccine-Induced Selective Pressure and Its Implications on Future Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mones S. Abu-Asab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttrial assessment of a vaccine's selective pressure on infecting strains may be realized through a bioinformatic tool such as parsimony phylogenetic analysis. Following a failed gonococcal pilus vaccine trial of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of pilin DNA and predicted peptide sequences from clinical isolates to assess the extent of the vaccine's effect on the type of field strains that the volunteers contracted. Amplified pilin DNA sequences from infected vaccinees, placebo recipients, and vaccine specimens were phylogenetically analyzed. Cladograms show that the vaccine peptides have diverged substantially from their paternal isolate by clustering distantly from each other. Pilin genes of the field clinical isolates were heterogeneous, and their peptides produced clades comprised of vaccinated and placebo recipients' strains indicating that the pilus vaccine did not exert any significant selective pressure on gonorrhea field strains. Furthermore, sequences of the semivariable and hypervariable regions pointed out heterotachous rates of mutation and substitution.

  20. Evaluation of Three Live Attenuated H2 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Mice and Ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Grace L.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Cheng, Xing; Torres-Velez, Fernando; Orandle, Marlene; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT H2 influenza viruses have not circulated in humans since 1968, and therefore a significant portion of the population would be susceptible to infection should H2 influenza viruses reemerge. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in avian reservoirs worldwide, and these reservoirs are a potential source from which these viruses could emerge. Three reassortant cold-adapted (ca) H2 pandemic influenza vaccine candidates with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from the wild-type A/Japan/305/1957 (H2N2) (Jap/57), A/mallard/6750/1978 (H2N2) (mal/78), or A/swine/MO/4296424/2006 (H2N3) (sw/06) viruses and the internal protein gene segments from the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca virus were generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics (Jap/57 ca, mal/78 ca, and sw/06 ca, respectively). The vaccine candidates exhibited the in vitro phenotypes of temperature sensitivity and cold adaptation and were restricted in replication in the respiratory tract of ferrets. In mice and ferrets, the vaccines elicited neutralizing antibodies and conferred protection against homologous wild-type virus challenge. Of the three candidates, the sw/06 ca vaccine elicited cross-reactive antibodies and provided significant protection against the greatest number of heterologous viruses. These observations suggest that the sw/06 ca vaccine should be further evaluated in a clinical trial as an H2 pandemic influenza vaccine candidate. IMPORTANCE Influenza pandemics arise when novel influenza viruses are introduced into a population with little prior immunity to the new virus and often result in higher rates of illness and death than annual seasonal influenza epidemics. An influenza H2 subtype virus caused a pandemic in 1957, and H2 viruses circulated in humans till 1968. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds, and the development of an H2 influenza vaccine candidate is therefore considered a priority in preparing for future pandemics. However, we cannot predict whether a

  1. Cellular immune responses to nine Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates following intranasal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj B Sable

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines that elicit a protective immune response in the lungs is important for the development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, a comparison of intranasal (i.n. and subcutaneous (s.c. vaccination with the BCG vaccine demonstrated that a single moderate dose delivered intranasally induced a stronger and sustained M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell response in lung parenchyma and cervical lymph nodes of BALB/c mice than vaccine delivered subcutaneously. Both BCG and a multicomponent subunit vaccine composed of nine M. tuberculosis recombinant proteins induced strong antigen-specific T-cell responses in various local and peripheral immune compartments. Among the nine recombinant proteins evaluated, the alanine proline rich antigen (Apa, Rv1860 was highly antigenic following i.n. BCG and immunogenic after vaccination with a combination of the nine recombinant antigens. The Apa-induced responses included induction of both type 1 and type 2 cytokines in the lungs as evaluated by ELISPOT and a multiplexed microsphere-based cytokine immunoassay. Of importance, i.n. subunit vaccination with Apa imparted significant protection in the lungs and spleen of mice against M. tuberculosis challenge. Despite observed differences in the frequencies and location of specific cytokine secreting T cells both BCG vaccination routes afforded comparable levels of protection in our study. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our findings support consideration and further evaluation of an intranasally targeted Apa-based vaccine to prevent tuberculosis.

  2. A candidate H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Steitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2009 a new pandemic disease appeared and spread globally. The recent emergence of the pandemic influenza virus H1N1 first isolated in Mexico and USA raised concerns about vaccine availability. We here report our development of an adenovirus-based influenza H1N1 vaccine tested for immunogenicity and efficacy to confer protection in animal model. METHODS: We generated two adenovirus(Ad5-based influenza vaccine candidates encoding the wildtype or a codon-optimized hemagglutinin antigen (HA from the recently emerged swine influenza isolate A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm. After verification of antigen expression, immunogenicity of the vaccine candidates were tested in a mouse model using dose escalations for subcutaneous immunization. Sera of immunized animals were tested in microneutalization and hemagglutination inhibition assays for the presence of HA-specific antibodies. HA-specific T-cells were measured in IFNgamma Elispot assays. The efficiency of the influenza vaccine candidates were evaluated in a challenge model by measuring viral titer in lung and nasal turbinate 3 days after inoculation of a homologous H1N1 virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A single immunization resulted in robust cellular and humoral immune response. Remarkably, the intensity of the immune response was substantially enhanced with codon-optimized antigen, indicating the benefit of manipulating the genetic code of HA antigens in the context of recombinant influenza vaccine design. These results highlight the value of advanced technologies in vaccine development and deployment in response to infections with pandemic potential. Our study emphasizes the potential of an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine platform with the benefits of speed of manufacture and efficacy of a single dose immunization.

  3. Development and characterization of candidate rotavirus vaccine strains derived from children with diarrhoea in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Le T; Trang, Nguyen V; Phuong, Nguyen M; Nguyen, Huong T; Ngo, Huong T; Nguyen, Huong T M; Tran, Hanh B; Dang, Ha N; Dang, Anh D; Gentsch, Jon R; Wang, Yuhuan; Esona, Mathew D; Glass, Roger I; Steele, A Duncan; Kilgore, Paul E; Nguyen, Man V; Jiang, Baoming; Nguyen, Hien D

    2009-11-20

    In Vietnam, rotavirus infection accounts for more than one-half of all hospitalizations for diarrhoea among children less than 5 years of age. While new vaccines to prevent rotavirus diarrhoea have been developed and introduced into some countries by multinational manufacturers, the ability for developing countries such as Vietnam to introduce several new and important vaccines into the routine infant immunization schedule may be challenging. In order to be partially self-sufficient in vaccine production, Vietnam has pursued the development of several rotavirus strains as candidate vaccines using isolates obtained from Vietnamese children with diarrhoea. This paper describes the origin, isolation and characterization of 3 human rotavirus strains being considered for further vaccine development in Vietnam. The goal is to prepare a monovalent G1P [8] rotavirus vaccine using one of these strains obtained in Vietnam and naturally attenuated by multiple passages in cell culture. While this is an ambitious project that will require several years' work, we are using the lessons learned to improve the overall quality of vaccine production including the use of Vero cell techniques for the manufacture of other vaccines in Vietnam.

  4. Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidates generated by chimerization with dengue virus type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2014-05-23

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide and vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent disease. A suitable live-attenuated JEV vaccine could be formulated with a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine for the control of these viruses in endemic areas. Toward this goal, we generated chimeric virus vaccine candidates by replacing the precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein structural genes of recombinant dengue virus type 4 (rDEN4) or attenuated vaccine candidate rDEN4Δ30 with those of wild-type JEV strain India/78. Mutations were engineered in E, NS3 and NS4B protein genes to improve replication in Vero cells. The chimeric viruses were attenuated in mice and some elicited modest but protective levels of immunity after a single dose. One particular chimeric virus, bearing E protein mutation Q264H, replicated to higher titer in tissue culture and was significantly more immunogenic in mice. The results are compared with live-attenuated JEV vaccine strain SA14-14-2. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Immunological Evaluation and Comparison of Different EV71 Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Hsiang Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 are major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth diseases (HFMDs, and EV71 is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia. Effective medications and/or prophylactic vaccines against HFMD are not available. The current results from mouse immunogenicity studies using in-house standardized RD cell virus neutralization assays indicate that (1 VP1 peptide (residues 211–225 formulated with Freund’s adjuvant (CFA/IFA elicited low virus neutralizing antibody response (1/32 titer; (2 recombinant virus-like particles produced from baculovirus formulated with CFA/IFA could elicit good virus neutralization titer (1/160; (3 individual recombinant EV71 antigens (VP1, VP2, and VP3 formulated with CFA/IFA, only VP1 elicited antibody response with 1/128 virus neutralization titer; and (4 the formalin-inactivated EV71 formulated in alum elicited antibodies that cross-neutralized different EV71 genotypes (1/640, but failed to neutralize CVA16. In contrast, rabbits antisera could cross-neutralize strongly against different genotypes of EV71 but weakly against CVA16, with average titers 1/6400 and 1/32, respectively. The VP1 amino acid sequence dissimilarity between CVA16 and EV71 could partially explain why mouse antibodies failed to cross-neutralize CVA16. Therefore, the best formulation for producing cost-effective HFMD vaccine is a combination of formalin-inactivated EV71 and CAV16 virions.

  6. Immune subdominant antigens as vaccine candidates against Mycobacterium tuberculosis§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark T.; Ireton, Gregory C.; Beebe, Elyse A.; Huang, Po-Wei D.; Reese, Valerie A.; Argilla, David; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike most pathogens many of the immunodominant epitopes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are under purifying selection. This startling finding suggests that Mtb may gain an evolutionary advantage by focusing the human immune response against selected proteins. Although the implications of this to vaccine development are incompletely understood, it has been suggested that inducing strong TH1 responses against antigens that are only weakly recognized during natural infection may circumvent this evasion strategy and increase vaccine efficacy. To test the hypothesis that subdominant and/or weak Mtb antigens are viable vaccine candidates and to avoid complications due to differential immunodominance hierarchies in humans and experimental animals we defined the immunodominance hierarchy of 84 recombinant Mtb proteins in experimentally infected mice. We then combined a subset of these dominant or subdominant antigens with a TH1 augmenting adjuvant, GLA-SE to assess their immunogenicity in Mtb-naïve animals and protective efficacy as measured by a reduction in lung Mtb burden of infected animals following prophylactic vaccination. We observed little correlation between immunodominance during primary Mtb infection and vaccine efficacy, confirming the hypothesis that subdominant and weakly antigenic Mtb proteins are viable vaccine candidates. Finally we developed two fusion proteins based on strongly protective subdominant fusion proteins. When paired with the GLA-SE adjuvant these fusion proteins elicited robust TH1 responses and limited pulmonary Mtb for at least six weeks after infection with a single immunization. These finding expand the potential pool of Mtb proteins that can be considered as vaccine antigen candidates. PMID:25086172

  7. Three Candidate Peptide-Vaccines in Combination To Induce High Levels of Multiantibodies Against HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 田海军; 秦莉; 朱梅; 陈应华

    2001-01-01

    N-and C-domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 are demonstrated to play an important role in HIV-entry and prevention. In addition, the V3 loop on gp120 was identified as the principal neutralizing determinant (PND). Based on the fact that a combination of several monoclonal antibodies to different neutralizing epitopes showed great protection against intravenous challenge and vaginal transmission of pathogenic HIV-1/Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) chimeric virus on macaques, three candidate peptide-vaccines were prepared and used in combination to induce high levels of multiantibodies against HIV-1. The three peptides contained important functional regions on HIV-1 gp160. The N-domain peptide (P1: aa550-579) and C-domain peptide (P2: aa633-662) of gp41 and V3 peptide (P3: aa301-328) of gp120 were conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using the glutaraldehyde method. After the vaccination course, each of the three candidate peptide-vaccines induced strong antibody response in rabbits. The three vaccines used in combination induced high levels of multiantibodies against the peptides of the N-and C-domains and the V3 Ioop, with the titer of antibodies up to 1: 6400-1: 25 600 in rabbit sera in comparison with the titer of 1: 800-1:3200 induced by rgp41 or rgp160. Our results indicate that immunogenicities of the N-and C-domains and the V3 loop in these three candidate peptide-vaccines were clearly stronger than those induced by rgp41 or rgp160, and these peptide-vaccines used in combination synchronously induced high levels of multiantibodies against HIV-1, suggesting that used in combination they may provide a new vaccine-strategy to induce strong multi-antiviral activity.

  8. Evaluation of Mdh1 protein as an antigenic candidate for a vaccine against candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Aoki, Wataru; Nomura, Takashi; Karasaki, Miki; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans malate dehydrogenase (Mdh1p) has been screened by previous proteome studies as a candidate for a vaccine against candidiasis. In this study, recombinant Mdh1 protein with a His-tag was produced in Escherichia coli and evaluated as an immunogenic protein against candidiasis. Mdh1p was administrated to mice by two methods subcutaneous injection and intranasal administration before challenging them with a lethal dose of C. albicans. After vaccination of Mdh1p, antibody responses were observed. To evaluate the vaccination effect of Mdh1p, survival tests were performed after 35 d. Although all control mice died within 24 d or 25 d, 100% and 80% of mice survived with subcutaneous and intranasal administration, respectively. Therefore, our results indicate that, among C. albicans antigens examined thus far, Mdh1p is currently the most effective antigen for use as a vaccine for C. albicans.

  9. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Nielsen, M; Lamberth, K;

    2004-01-01

    of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design.......An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes......-CoV) was isolated and full-length sequenced (Marra et al., Science 2003: 300: 1399-404). Here, we have combined advanced bioinformatics and high-throughput immunology to perform an HLA supertype-, genome-wide scan for SARS-specific CTL epitopes. The scan includes all nine human HLA supertypes in total covering >99...

  10. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C.; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.;

    2004-01-01

    of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design.......An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes......-CoV) was isolated and full-length sequenced (Marra et al., Science 2003: 300: 1399404). Here, we have combined advanced bioinformatics and high-throughput immunology to perform an HLA supertype-, genome-wide scan for SARS-specific CTL epitopes. The scan includes all nine human HLA supertypes in total covering >99...

  11. Neisseria meningitidis B vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Gasparini, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Invasive infections caused by Neisseria meningitidis are a serious public health problem worldwide and have a heavy economic impact. The incidence of invasive disease due to Neisseria meningitidis is highly variable according to geographical area and serogroup distribution. Since the introduction of vaccination programs with conjugated vaccine C in children and adolescents, most cases of invasive meningococcal disease in developed countries have been caused by meningococcus B. It is important to underline that invasive meningococcal disease will not be controlled until safe and effective vaccines for meningococcal B are available and widely used. The aims of this article are to describe the most recent developments in meningococcal B vaccines and to discuss how these vaccines can contribute to containing meningococcal disease.

  12. Identification of new meningococcal serogroup B surface antigens through a systematic analysis of neisserial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Yero, Daniel; Niebla, Olivia; Climent, Yanet; Sardiñas, Gretel; García, Darién; Perera, Yasser; Llanes, Alejandro; Delgado, Maité; Cobas, Karem; Caballero, Evelin; Taylor, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Gorringe, Andrew

    2009-12-11

    The difficulty of inducing an effective immune response against the Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B capsular polysaccharide has lead to the search for vaccines for this serogroup based on outer membrane proteins. The availability of the first meningococcal genome (MC58 strain) allowed the expansion of high-throughput methods to explore the protein profile displayed by N. meningitidis. By combining a pan-genome analysis with an extensive experimental validation to identify new potential vaccine candidates, genes coding for antigens likely to be exposed on the surface of the meningococcus were selected after a multistep comparative analysis of entire Neisseria genomes. Eleven novel putative ORF annotations were reported for serogroup B strain MC58. Furthermore, a total of 20 new predicted potential pan-neisserial vaccine candidates were produced as recombinant proteins and evaluated using immunological assays. Potential vaccine candidate coding genes were PCR-amplified from a panel of representative strains and their variability analyzed using maximum likelihood approaches for detecting positive selection. Finally, five proteins all capable of inducing a functional antibody response vs N. meningitidis strain CU385 were identified as new attractive vaccine candidates: NMB0606 a potential YajC orthologue, NMB0928 the neisserial NlpB (BamC), NMB0873 a LolB orthologue, NMB1163 a protein belonging to a curli-like assembly machinery, and NMB0938 (a neisserial specific antigen) with evidence of positive selection appreciated for NMB0928. The new set of vaccine candidates and the novel proposed functions will open a new wave of research in the search for the elusive neisserial vaccine.

  13. Assessment of vaccine potential of the Neisseria-specific protein NMB0938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiñas, Gretel; Climent, Yanet; Rodríguez, Yaindrys; González, Sonia; García, Darién; Cobas, Karem; Caballero, Evelin; Pérez, Yusleydis; Brookes, Charlotte; Taylor, Stephen; Gorringe, Andrew; Delgado, Maité; Pajón, Rolando; Yero, Daniel

    2009-11-16

    The availability of complete genome sequence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 and reverse vaccinology has allowed the discovery of several novel antigens. Here, we have explored the potential of N. meningitidis lipoprotein NMB0938 as a vaccine candidate, based on investigation of gene sequence conservation and the antibody response elicited after immunization in mice. This antigen was previously identified by a genome-based approach as an outer membrane lipoprotein unique to the Neisseria genus. The nmb0938 gene was present in all 37 Neisseria isolates analyzed in this study. Based on amino acid sequence identity, 16 unique sequences were identified which clustered into three variants with identities ranging from 92 to 99%, with one cluster represented by the Neisseria lactamica strains. Recombinant protein NMB0938 (rNMB0938) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified after solubilization of the insoluble fraction. Antisera produced in mice against purified rNMB0938 reacted with a range of meningococcal strains in whole-cell ELISA and western blotting. Using flow cytometry, it was also shown that anti-rNMB0938 antibodies bound to the surface of the homologous meningococcal strain and activated complement deposition. Moreover, antibodies against rNMB0938 elicited complement-mediated killing of meningococcal strains from both sequence variants and conferred passive protection against meningococcal bacteremia in infant rats. According to our results, NMB0938 represents a promising candidate to be included in a vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease.

  14. Strategic evaluation of vaccine candidate antigens for the prevention of Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Favila, Michelle; Hofmeyer, Kimberley A; Tutterrow, Yeung L; Reed, Steven J; Laurance, John D; Picone, Alessandro; Guderian, Jeffrey; Bailor, H Remy; Vallur, Aarthy C; Liang, Hong; Mohamath, Raodoh; Vergara, Julie; Howard, Randall F; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-05-27

    Infection with Leishmania parasites results in a range of clinical manifestations and outcomes, the most severe of which is visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Vaccination will likely provide the most effective long-term control strategy, as the large number of vectors and potential infectious reservoirs renders sustained interruption of Leishmania parasite transmission extremely difficult. Selection of the best vaccine is complicated because, although several vaccine antigen candidates have been proposed, they have emerged following production in different platforms. To consolidate the information that has been generated into a single vaccine platform, we expressed seven candidates as recombinant proteins in E. coli. After verifying that each recombinant protein could be recognized by VL patients, we evaluated their protective efficacy against experimental L. donovani infection of mice. Administration in formulation with the Th1-potentiating adjuvant GLA-SE indicated that each antigen could elicit antigen-specific Th1 responses that were protective. Considering the ability to reduce parasite burden along with additional factors such as sequence identity across Leishmania species, we then generated a chimeric fusion protein comprising a combination of the 8E, p21 and SMT proteins. This E. coli -expressed fusion protein was also demonstrated to protect against L. donovani infection. These data indicate a novel recombinant vaccine antigen with the potential for use in VL control programs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo electroporation enhances the immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA-based vaccines have been safe but weakly immunogenic in humans to date. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sought to determine the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of ADVAX, a multigenic HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate, injected intramuscularly by in vivo electroporation (EP in a Phase-1, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in healthy volunteers. Eight volunteers each received 0.2 mg, 1 mg, or 4 mg ADVAX or saline placebo via EP, or 4 mg ADVAX via standard intramuscular injection at weeks 0 and 8. A third vaccination was administered to eleven volunteers at week 36. EP was safe, well-tolerated and considered acceptable for a prophylactic vaccine. EP delivery of ADVAX increased the magnitude of HIV-1-specific cell mediated immunity by up to 70-fold over IM injection, as measured by gamma interferon ELISpot. The number of antigens to which the response was detected improved with EP and increasing dosage. Intracellular cytokine staining analysis of ELISpot responders revealed both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with co-secretion of multiple cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first demonstration in healthy volunteers that EP is safe, tolerable, and effective in improving the magnitude, breadth and durability of cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine candidate. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00545987.

  16. Recombinant feline coronaviruses as vaccine candidates confer protection in SPF but not in conventional cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Ádám; Farsang, Attila; Szeredi, Levente; Zádori, Zoltán; Belák, Sándor

    2014-03-14

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) is a major pathogen of Felidae. Despite the extensive efforts taken in the past decades, development of the "ideal" live attenuated FIPV vaccine was not successful yet. In the present study, we provide data of immunisation experiments with a recombinant FCoV pair differing only in the truncation (PBFIPV-DF-2) or completion (PBFIPV-DF-2-R3i) of their ORF3abc regions. In our previous in vivo studies, these viruses proved to show the characters of low virulent or avirulent FCoV phenotypes, respectively. Therefore, we hypothesised the ability of these viruses, as possible vaccine candidates, in conferring protection in specific pathogen free (SPF) Domestic Shorthair as well as in conventional purebred British Shorthair cats. In SPF cats, after two oronasal and two intramuscular vaccinations with two weeks intervals, both vaccine candidates provided 100% protection against lethal homologous challenge with the highly virulent FIPV DF-2 strain. In contrast, the conventional purebred British Shorthair cats did not develop protection when they were immunised with the same vaccination regimes. In these groups 100% of the PBFIPV-DF-2-R3i immunised animals developed antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Prolonged survival was observed in 40% of the animals, while 60% showed fulminant disease course. Genetic and more probably immunological differences between the SPF and non-SPF purebred kittens can explain the different outcome of the vaccination experiment. Our data highlight the diverse immune responses between SPF and conventional cats and suggest a decisive role of previous infection by heterologous causative agents in the outcome of the vaccination against FIP.

  17. Liposome-based intranasal delivery of lipopeptide vaccine candidates against group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; Marasini, Nirmal; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-09-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), an exclusively human pathogen, causes a wide range of diseases ranging from trivial to life threatening. Treatment of infection is often ineffective following entry of bacteria into the bloodstream. To date, there is no vaccine available against GAS. In this study, cationic liposomes encapsulating lipopeptide-based vaccine candidates against GAS have been employed for intranasal vaccine delivery. Cationic liposomes were prepared with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) using the film hydration method. Female Swiss mice were immunized intranasally with the liposomes. In contrast to unmodified peptides, lipopeptides entrapped by liposomes induced both mucosal and systemic immunity, IgA and IgG (IgG1 and IgG2a) production in mice, respectively. High levels of antibody (IgA and IgG) titres were detected even five months post immunization. Thus, the combination of lipopeptides and liposomes generates a very promising delivery system for intranasal vaccines. Group A streptococcus, causing rheumatic heart diseases, kills approximately half a million people annually. There is no vaccine available against the infection. Mucosal immunity is vital in ensuring an individual is protected as this gram positive bacteria initially colonizes at the throat. Herein, we demonstrated that lipopeptides entrapped by liposomes induced both mucosal and systemic immunity. High levels of antibody (IgA and IgG) titres were detected even five months post immunization and lead vaccine candidate was able to induce humoral immune responses even after single immunization. Thus, the combination of lipopeptides and liposomes generates a very promising delivery system for intranasal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A candidate DNA vaccine elicits HCV specific humoral and cellular immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xin Zhu; Jing Liu; Ye Ye; You-Hua Xie; Yu-Ying Kong; Guang-Di Li; Yuan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the immunogenicity of candidate DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) delivered by two plasmids expressing HCV envelope protein 1 (E1) and envelope protein 2 (E2) antigens respectively and to study the effect of CpG adjuvant on this candidate vaccine.METHODS: Recombinant plasmids expressing HCV E1 and E2 antigens respectively were used to simultaneously inoculate mice with or without CpG adjuvant. Antisera were then collected and titers of anti-HCV antibodies were analyzed by ELISA. One month after the last injection, animals were sacrificed to prepare single-cell suspension of splenocytes.These cells were subjected to HCVantigen specific proliferation assays and cytokine secretion assays to evaluate the cellular immune responses of the vaccinated animals.RESULTS: Antibody responses to HCV E1 and E2 antigens were detected in vaccinated animals. Animals receiving CpG adjuvant had slightly lower titers of anti-HCV antibodies in the sera, while the splenocytes from these animals showed higher HCV-antigen specific proliferation. Analysis of cytokine secretion from the splenocytes was consistent with the above results. While no antigen-specific IL-4 secretion was detected for all vaccinated animals, HCV antigen-specific INF-γ secretion was detected for the splenocytes of vaccinated animals. CpG adjuvant enhanced the secretion of INF-γ but did not change the profile of IL-4 secretion.CONCLUSION: Vaccination of mice with plasmids encoding HCV E1 and E2 antigens induces humoral and cellular immune responses. CpG adjuvant significantly enhances the cellular immune response.

  19. The current situation of meningococcal disease in Latin America and updated Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio P; O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela Bravo, Maria Teresa; Brandileone, Maria Cristina C; Gorla, Maria Cecília O; de Lemos, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Gabriela; Vazquez, Julio A; López, Eduardo L; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Borrow, Ray

    2015-11-27

    The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) was established in 2009 and comprises an international team of scientists, clinicians, and public health officials with expertise in meningococcal disease (MD). Its primary goal is to promote global prevention of MD through education, research, international cooperation, and developing recommendations that include decreasing the burden of severe disease. The group held its first roundtable meeting with experts from Latin American countries in 2011, and subsequently proposed several recommendations to reduce the regional burden of MD. A second roundtable meeting was convened with Latin American representatives in June 2013 to reassess MD epidemiology, vaccination strategies, and unmet needs in the region, as well as to update the earlier recommendations. Special emphasis was placed on the emergence and spread of serogroup W disease in Argentina and Chile, and the control measures put in place in Chile were a particular focus of discussions. The impact of routine meningococcal vaccination programs, notably in Brazil, was also evaluated. There have been considerable improvements in MD surveillance systems and diagnostic techniques in some countries (e.g., Brazil and Chile), but the lack of adequate infrastructure, trained personnel, and equipment/reagents remains a major barrier to progress in resource-poor countries. The Pan American Health Organization's Revolving Fund is likely to play an important role in improving access to meningococcal vaccines in Latin America. Additional innovative approaches are needed to redress the imbalance in expertise and resources between countries, and thereby improve the control of MD. In Latin America, the GMI recommends establishment of a detailed and comprehensive national/regional surveillance system, standardization of laboratory procedures, adoption of a uniform MD case definition, maintaining laboratory-based surveillance, replacement of polysaccharide vaccines with conjugate

  20. A Defined Tuberculosis Vaccine Candidate Boosts BCG and Protects Against Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C.; Ordway, Diane J.; Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Pine, Samuel O.; Kahn, Maria; Phan, Tony; Orme, Ian M.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) childhood vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global health problem. A successful vaccine against TB that replaces or boosts BCG will include antigens that induce or recall appropriate T cell responses. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens, including members of the virulence factor families PE/PPE and EsX, or antigens associated with latency were produced as a single recombinant fusion protein. When administered with the adjuvant GLA-SE, a stable oil-in-water nanoemulsion, the fusion protein ID93 was immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. In mice, ID93/GLA-SE combination induced polyfunctional CD4 TH1-cell responses characterized by antigen-specific IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2, as well as a reduction in the number of bacteria in the lungs of animals subsequently infected with virulent or multidrug resistant Mtb strains. Furthermore, boosting BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs with ID93/GLA-SE resulted in reduced pathology and fewer bacilli, and prevented the death of animals challenged with virulent Mtb. Finally, ID93 elicited polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in BCG-vaccinated or Mtb-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study establishes that the protein subunit vaccine ID93/GLA-SE protects against TB and MDR-TB in animals, and is a candidate for boosting the protective efficacy of the childhood BCG vaccine. PMID:20944089

  1. Preliminary Evaluation of a Candidate Multi-Epitope-Vaccine Against the Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Jian; DONG Xiaonan; CHEN Yinghua

    2008-01-01

    A multi-epitope-vaccine MEVABC consisting of two linear neutralizing determinants (BC1: aa693-716; A6: aa844-865) located on antigenic unit B/C and unit A of glycoprotein E2 was prepared to evaluate whether a combination strategy is effective in the design of peptide vaccines.After immunization,pig sera collected every one to two weeks were evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.C-strain- induced anti-sera and hyper-immune sera cannot recognize overlapping peptides that cover the E2 N-terminus,while MEVABC is able to elicit high levels of peptide-specific antibody response.When compared with previously studied peptide vaccines PV-BC1 and PV-A6,the same dose of either component in the MEVABC increases the BC1- or A6-specific antibodies (to 1/3-1/2 of the levels of the separate vaccines).However,the synergy between the antibodies may make MEVABC much more potent.Moreover,anti-C-strain immunity pre-existing in pigs does not disturb the sequent MEVABC vaccination.Thus,MEVABC can be ad- ministrated to pigs which already possess anti-classical swine fever virus immunity.MEVABC is a promising candidate marker vaccine.

  2. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  3. Heterogeneity in Rhesus Macaque Complement Factor H Binding to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein (FHbp) Informs Selection of Primates To Assess Immunogenicity of FHbp-Based Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp....

  4. Discovery of Novel Leptospirosis Vaccine Candidates Using Reverse and Structural Vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan John Alexander McBride

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira spp. are diderm (two membranes bacteria that infect mammals causing leptospirosis, a public health problem with global implications. Thousands of people die every year due to leptospirosis, especially in developing countries with tropical climates. Prophylaxis is difficult due to multiple factors, including the large number of asymptomatic hosts that transmit the bacteria, poor sanitation, increasing numbers of slum dwellers, and the lack of an effective vaccine. Several leptospiral recombinant antigens were evaluated as a replacement for the inactivated (bacterin vaccine; however, success has been limited. A prospective vaccine candidate is likely to be a surface-related protein that can stimulate the host immune response to clear leptospires from blood and organs. In this study, a comprehensive bioinformatics approach based on reverse and structural vaccinology was applied toward the discovery of novel leptospiral vaccine candidates. The Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain L1-130 genome was mined in silico for the enhanced identification of conserved β-barrel (βb transmembrane proteins and outer membrane (OM lipoproteins. Orthologs of the prospective vaccine candidates were screened in the genomes of 20 additional Leptospira spp. Three-dimensional structural models, with a high degree of confidence, were created for each of the surface-exposed proteins. Major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II epitopes were identified, and their locations were mapped on the structural models. A total of 18 βb transmembrane proteins and 8 OM lipoproteins were identified. These proteins were conserved among the pathogenic Leptospira spp. and were predicted to have epitopes for several variants of MHC-II receptors. A structural and functional analysis of the sequence of these surface proteins demonstrated that most βb transmembrane proteins seem to be TonB-dependent receptors associated with transportation. Other proteins

  5. Three Candidate Epitope-Vaccines in Combination Inducing High Levels of Multiantibodies Against HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祖强; 田海军; 王颖; 陈应华

    2003-01-01

    HIV-1 mutation results in immune evasion, which presents a serious challenge for conventional strategies for developing effective vaccines.So far, much experimental evidence indicates that HIV-1 particles in the blood of patients can be cleaned principally by neutralizing antibodies.Based on these facts, we prepared triple combination of epitope-vaccines with the objective of inducing antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity against HIV-1.According to the sequences of three neutralizing epitopes (RILAVERYLKD, ELDKWA and GPGRAFY, designated E1, E2, and E3, respectively) on HIV-1 envelope proteins, three epitope-peptides ((E1)2: C-(RILAVERYLKDG)2; (E2)4: C-(ELDKWAG)4; and (E3)2: C-(GPGRAFY)2) were synthesized and then conjugated with carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or bovine serum albumin (BSA), and used for immunizing rabbits.After the vaccine course, the triple combination of epitope-vaccines induced high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies.An immunoblotting-analysis demonstrated that the antibodies could recognize the native epitopes on both gp41 protein and V3 loop peptide.Furthermore, we compared the immune responses of three doses of epitope-peptides in the candidate epitope-vaccine.Strong antibody responses to three epitopes were observed in a dose dependent manner, with increasing dose raising the immune response.This result indicated that immunotolerance did not occur using an epitope vaccine dose of 80 μg.Thus, our results demonstrate that epitope-vaccines in combination can synchronously induce high levels of antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity against HIV-1, and may be used to develop effective vaccines against HIV as a new strategy.

  6. Nucleoprotein nanostructures combined with adjuvants adapted to the neonatal immune context: a candidate mucosal RSV vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Remot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV is the leading cause of severe bronchiolitis in infants worldwide. The most severe RSV diseases occur between 2 and 6 months-of-age, so pediatric vaccination will have to be started within the first weeks after birth, when the immune system is prone to Th2 responses that may turn deleterious upon exposure to the virus. So far, the high risk to prime for immunopathological responses in infants has hampered the development of vaccine. In the present study we investigated the safety and efficacy of ring-nanostructures formed by the recombinant nucleoprotein N of hRSV (N(SRS as a mucosal vaccine candidate against RSV in BALB/c neonates, which are highly sensitive to immunopathological Th2 imprinting. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single intranasal administration of N(SRS with detoxified E. coli enterotoxin LT(R192G to 5-7 day old neonates provided a significant reduction of the viral load after an RSV challenge at five weeks of age. However, neonatal vaccination also generated an enhanced lung infiltration by neutrophils and eosinophils following the RSV challenge. Analysis of antibody subclasses and cytokines produced after an RSV challenge or a boost administration of the vaccine suggested that neonatal vaccination induced a Th2 biased local immune memory. This Th2 bias and the eosinophilic reaction could be prevented by adding CpG to the vaccine formulation, which, however did not prevent pulmonary inflammation and neutrophil infiltration upon viral challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, protective vaccination against RSV can be achieved in neonates but requires an appropriate combination of adjuvants to prevent harmful Th2 imprinting.

  7. In silico and microarray-based genomic approaches to identifying potential vaccine candidates against Leptospira interrogans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xu-Cheng

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently available vaccines against leptospirosis are of low efficacy, have an unacceptable side-effect profile, do not induce long-term protection, and provide no cross-protection against the different serovars of pathogenic leptospira. The current major focus in leptospirosis research is to discover conserved protective antigens that may elicit longer-term protection against a broad range of Leptospira. There is a need to screen vaccine candidate genes in the genome of Leptospira interrogans. Results Bioinformatics, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis and transcriptional analysis were used to identify vaccine candidates in the genome of L. interrogans serovar Lai strain #56601. Of a total of 4727 open reading frames (ORFs, 616 genes were predicted to encode surface-exposed proteins by P-CLASSIFIER combined with signal peptide prediction, α-helix transmembrane topology prediction, integral β-barrel outer membrane protein and lipoprotein prediction, as well as by retaining the genes shared by the two sequenced L. interrogans genomes and by subtracting genes with human homologues. A DNA microarray of L. interrogans strain #56601 was constructed for CGH analysis and transcriptome analysis in vitro. Three hundred and seven differential genes were identified in ten pathogenic serovars by CGH; 1427 genes had high transcriptional levels (Cy3 signal ≥ 342 and Cy5 signal ≥ 363.5, respectively. There were 565 genes in the intersection between the set encoding surface-exposed proteins and the set of 307 differential genes. The number of genes in the intersection between this set of 565 and the set of 1427 highly transcriptionally active genes was 226. These 226 genes were thus identified as putative vaccine candidates. The proteins encoded by these genes are not only potentially surface-exposed in the bacterium, but also conserved in two sequenced L. interrogans. Moreover, these genes are conserved among ten epidemic

  8. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle composition-dependent activation of the innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069916527; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen associated molecular patterns including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an

  9. A defined syphilis vaccine candidate inhibits dissemination of Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Phillips, Drew; Houston, Simon; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis is a prominent disease in low- and middle-income countries, and a re-emerging public health threat in high-income countries. Syphilis elimination will require development of an effective vaccine that has thus far remained elusive. Here we assess the vaccine potential of Tp0751, a vascular adhesin from the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Tp0751-immunized animals exhibit a significantly reduced bacterial organ burden upon T. pallidum challenge compared with unimmunized animals. Introduction of lymph nodes from Tp0751-immunized, T. pallidum-challenged animals to naive animals fails to induce infection, confirming sterile protection. These findings provide evidence that Tp0751 is a promising syphilis vaccine candidate. PMID:28145405

  10. Peru-15, an improved live attenuated oral vaccine candidate for Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, J R; Coster, T S; Taylor, D N; Trofa, A F; Barrera-Oro, M; Hyman, T; Adams, J M; Beattie, D T; Killeen, K P; Spriggs, D R

    1995-10-01

    Cholera vaccine candidate Peru-15 was derived from a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba strain by deleting the cholera toxin genetic element, introducing the gene encoding cholera toxin B subunit into recA, and screening for nonmotility. In a controlled study, Peru-15 (2 x 10(8) cfu) was administered to 11 volunteers. No vaccinee developed diarrhea, and 10 of 11 had > 4-fold rises in vibriocidal antibody titers. One month later, 5 vaccinees and 5 control volunteers were challenged with wild type V. cholerae O1. Four of 5 controls developed diarrhea (mean, 1.9 L). Two Peru-15 vaccinees developed diarrhea, 1 with volunteer had not developed a significant vibriocidal immune response to vaccination. Peru-15 shows promise as a single-dose, oral cholera vaccine that is safe, immunogenic, and protective.

  11. Rotavirus VP6 preparations as a non-replicating vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilvand, Somayeh; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi; Shoja, Zabihollah

    2015-06-26

    Rotavirus (RV) structural proteins VP4 and VP7, located on the surface of viral particles, elicit neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and are therefore considered to be important components of RV vaccines. However, despite inducing neutralizing Abs, limits of cross-neutralizing activity and lack of full correlation with protection limit the usefulness of these proteins as protective agents against RV disease. VP6 protein, which forms the middle layer of RV particles, is discussed as an alternative vaccine candidate since it can induce cross-protective immune responses against different RV strains although the Ab raised is not neutralizing. This report reviews different functions of VP6 that can lead to considering it as an alternative vaccine against RV disease.

  12. Pilot scale production of highly efficacious and stable enterovirus 71 vaccine candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Hsiang Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration, a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7-10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30-43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37 °C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4 °C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice

  13. Pilot scale production of highly efficacious and stable enterovirus 71 vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chang, Cheng-Peng; Guo, Meng-Shin; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Yang, Wen-Hsueh; Chao, Hsin-Ju; Wu, Chien-Long; Huang, Ju-Lan; Lee, Min-Shi; Hu, Alan Yung-Chi; Lin, Sue-Chen; Huang, Yu-Yun; Hu, Mei-Hua; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Chong, Pele

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration), a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7-10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30-43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37 °C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4 °C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice, rats, rabbits, and non-human primates. These

  14. Scrub Typhus Vaccine Candidate Kp r56 Induces Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-28

    binding of 100 l/well of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat antibodies directed to monkey immu- noglobulin G (IgG) or IgM (Kirkegaard & Perry...candidates. Vaccine 21:4550–4554. 8. Cheers, C., H. Pavlov, C. Riglar, and E. Madraso. 1980. Macrophage acti- vation during experimental murine brucellosis ...III. Do macrophages exert feedback control during brucellosis ? Cell. Immunol. 49:168–177. 9. Ching, W. M., H. Wang, C. Eamsila, D. J. Kelly, and G. A

  15. Rapid strategy for screening by pyrosequencing of influenza virus reassortants--candidates for live attenuated vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Shcherbik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Live attenuated influenza vaccine viruses (LAIVs can be generated by classical reassortment of gene segments between a cold adapted, temperature sensitive and attenuated Master Donor Virus (MDV and a seasonal wild-type (wt virus. The vaccine candidates contain hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes derived from the circulating wt viruses and the remaining six genes derived from the MDV strains. Rapid, efficient selection of the viruses with 6∶2 genome compositions from the large number of genetically different viruses generated during reassortment is essential for the biannual production schedule of vaccine viruses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This manuscript describes a new approach for the genotypic analysis of LAIV reassortant virus clones based on pyrosequencing. LAIV candidate viruses were created by classical reassortment of seasonal influenza A (H3N2 (A/Victoria/361/2011, A/Ohio/02/2012, A/Texas/50/2012 or influenza A (H7N9 (A/Anhui/1/2013 wt viruses with the MDV A/Leningrad/134/17/57(H2N2. Using strain-specific pyrosequencing assays, mixed gene variations were detected in the allantoic progenies during the cloning procedure. The pyrosequencing analysis also allowed for estimation of the relative abundance of segment variants in mixed populations. This semi-quantitative approach was used for selecting specific clones for the subsequent cloning procedures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study demonstrates that pyrosequencing analysis is a useful technique for rapid and reliable genotyping of reassortants and intermediate clones during the preparation of LAIV candidates, and can expedite the selection of vaccine virus candidates.

  16. Evaluation of Three Live Attenuated H2 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Mice and Ferrets

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    H2 influenza viruses have not circulated in humans since 1968, and therefore a significant portion of the population would be susceptible to infection should H2 influenza viruses reemerge. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in avian reservoirs worldwide, and these reservoirs are a potential source from which these viruses could emerge. Three reassortant cold-adapted (ca) H2 pandemic influenza vaccine candidates with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from the wild...

  17. Chemically induced Salmonella enteritidis ghosts as a novel vaccine candidate against virulent challenge in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, Nagarajan; Oh, Sung; Kim, Seongdae; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Sei Chang; Jung, Cheong-Hwan

    2014-05-30

    Salmonella enteritidis ghosts (SEGs), non-living empty bacterial cell envelopes were generated by using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and investigated as a vaccine candidate in rats. To determine the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SEG vaccine, rats were divided into four groups: group A (non-vaccinated control), group B (orally vaccinated), group C (intramuscularly vaccinated) and group D (intramuscularly vaccinated with complete Freund's adjuvant). Vaccination of rats with SEGs induced significant immune responses before and after virulent challenge. Rats vaccinated with SEGs showed significant increases in serum IgG antibodies after challenging with virulent S. enteritidis on week 8 and week 10 (P<0.01). During the vaccination period, groups B, C and D showed significantly higher serum bactericidal activity (SBA) compared to group A (P<0.01). Most importantly, bacterial loads in vaccinated groups were significantly lower than in the non-vaccinated group (P<0.01). In conclusion, these results show that the chemically induced SEGs as a vaccine candidate against virulent challenge.

  18. Genetic diversity of vaccine candidate antigens in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from the Amazon basin of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Carmen M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several of the intended Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens are highly polymorphic and could render a vaccine ineffective if their antigenic sites were not represented in the vaccine. In this study, characterization of genetic variability was performed in major B and T-cell epitopes within vaccine candidate antigens in isolates of P. falciparum from Peru. Methods DNA sequencing analysis was completed on 139 isolates of P. falciparum collected from endemic areas of the Amazon basin in Loreto, Peru from years 1998 to 2006. Genetic diversity was determined in immunological important regions in circumsporozoite protein (CSP, merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1, apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1, liver stage antigen-1 (LSA-1 and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP. Alleles identified by DNA sequencing were aligned with the vaccine strain 3D7 and DNA polymorphism analysis and FST study-year pairwise comparisons were done using the DnaSP software. Multilocus analysis (MLA was performed and average of expected heterozygosity was calculated for each loci and haplotype over time. Results Three different alleles for CSP, seven for MSP-1 Block 2, one for MSP-1 Block 17, three for AMA-1 and for LSA-1 each and one for TRAP were identified. There were 24 different haplotypes in 125 infections with complete locus typing for each gene. Conclusion Characterization of the genetic diversity in Plasmodium isolates from the Amazon Region of Peru showed that P. falciparum T and B cell epitopes in these antigens have polymorphisms more similar to India than to Africa. These findings are helpful in the formulation of a vaccine considering restricted repertoire populations.

  19. Differing Patterns of Selection and Geospatial Genetic Diversity within Two Leading Plasmodium vivax Candidate Vaccine Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Christian M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Hathaway, Nicholas J.; Socheat, Duong; Rogers, William O.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Although Plasmodium vivax is a leading cause of malaria around the world, only a handful of vivax antigens are being studied for vaccine development. Here, we investigated genetic signatures of selection and geospatial genetic diversity of two leading vivax vaccine antigens – Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (pvmsp-1) and Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (pvcsp). Using scalable next-generation sequencing, we deep-sequenced amplicons of the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1 (n = 44) and the complete gene of pvcsp (n = 47) from Cambodian isolates. These sequences were then compared with global parasite populations obtained from GenBank. Using a combination of statistical and phylogenetic methods to assess for selection and population structure, we found strong evidence of balancing selection in the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1, which varied significantly over the length of the gene, consistent with immune-mediated selection. In pvcsp, the highly variable central repeat region also showed patterns consistent with immune selection, which were lacking outside the repeat. The patterns of selection seen in both genes differed from their P. falciparum orthologs. In addition, we found that, similar to merozoite antigens from P. falciparum malaria, genetic diversity of pvmsp-1 sequences showed no geographic clustering, while the non-merozoite antigen, pvcsp, showed strong geographic clustering. These findings suggest that while immune selection may act on both vivax vaccine candidate antigens, the geographic distribution of genetic variability differs greatly between these two genes. The selective forces driving this diversification could lead to antigen escape and vaccine failure. Better understanding the geographic distribution of genetic variability in vaccine candidate antigens will be key to designing and implementing efficacious vaccines. PMID:24743266

  20. Differing patterns of selection and geospatial genetic diversity within two leading Plasmodium vivax candidate vaccine antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Parobek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although Plasmodium vivax is a leading cause of malaria around the world, only a handful of vivax antigens are being studied for vaccine development. Here, we investigated genetic signatures of selection and geospatial genetic diversity of two leading vivax vaccine antigens--Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (pvmsp-1 and Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (pvcsp. Using scalable next-generation sequencing, we deep-sequenced amplicons of the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1 (n = 44 and the complete gene of pvcsp (n = 47 from Cambodian isolates. These sequences were then compared with global parasite populations obtained from GenBank. Using a combination of statistical and phylogenetic methods to assess for selection and population structure, we found strong evidence of balancing selection in the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1, which varied significantly over the length of the gene, consistent with immune-mediated selection. In pvcsp, the highly variable central repeat region also showed patterns consistent with immune selection, which were lacking outside the repeat. The patterns of selection seen in both genes differed from their P. falciparum orthologs. In addition, we found that, similar to merozoite antigens from P. falciparum malaria, genetic diversity of pvmsp-1 sequences showed no geographic clustering, while the non-merozoite antigen, pvcsp, showed strong geographic clustering. These findings suggest that while immune selection may act on both vivax vaccine candidate antigens, the geographic distribution of genetic variability differs greatly between these two genes. The selective forces driving this diversification could lead to antigen escape and vaccine failure. Better understanding the geographic distribution of genetic variability in vaccine candidate antigens will be key to designing and implementing efficacious vaccines.

  1. Production of a Recombinant Vaccine Candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei Exploiting the Bacterial N-Glycosylation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eGarcia-Quintanilla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developing immune responses towards surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work we functionally expressed the B. pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II, the C. jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase, and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future.

  2. Construction of a trivalent candidate Shigella vaccine strain with host-vector balanced-lethal system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮贤良; 徐永强; 吴旭东; 苏国富; 黄翠芬

    1997-01-01

    A trivalent live Shigella vaccine candidate FSD01 against S. flexneri 2a, S. sonnei and S. dysen-teriae I was constructed. This candidate strain was based on the S. flexneri 2a vaccine T32. By homologous recombi-nation exchange, the chromosomal asd gene of T32 was site-specifically inactivated, resulting in the strain unable to grow normally in LB broth, while another asd gene of S. mutans was employed to construct an Asd complementary vector. This combination of asd ’host/ Asd+ vector formed a balanced-lethal expression system in T32 strain. By use of this system, two important protective antigen genes coding for S. sonnei Form I antigen and Shiga toxin B subunit were cloned and expressed in T32, which led to the construction of trivalent candidate vaccine FSD01. Experimental results showed that this strain was genetically stable, but its recombinant plasmid was non-resistant. Moreover, it was able to effectively express trivalent antigens in one host and induce protective responses in mice against the

  3. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  4. Prevention and control of meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Amanda C; MacNeil, Jessica R; Clark, Thomas A; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Briere, Elizabeth Z; Meissner, H Cody; Baker, Carol J; Messonnier, Nancy E

    2013-03-22

    Meningococcal disease describes the spectrum of infections caused by Neisseria meningiditis, including meningitdis, bacteremia, and bacteremic pneumonia. Two quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines that provide protection against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, and Y (MenACWY-D [Menactra, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, Inc., Swiftwater, Pennsylvania] and MenACWY-CRM [Menveo, manufactured by Novartis Vaccines, Cambridge, Massachusetts]) are licensed in the United States for use among persons aged 2 through 55 years. MenACWY-D also is licensed for use among infants and toddlers aged 9 through 23 months. Quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4 [Menommune, manufactured by sanofi pasteur, Inc., Swiftwater, Pennsylvania]) is the only vaccine licensed for use among persons aged ≥56 years. A bivalent meningococcal polysaccharide protein conjugate vaccine that provides protection against meningococcal serogroups C and Y along with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (Hib-MenCY-TT [MenHibrix, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium]) is licensed for use in children aged 6 weeks through 18 months. This report compiles and summarizes all recommendations from CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding prevention and control of meningococcal disease in the United States, specifically the changes in the recommendations published since 2005 (CDC. Prevention and control of meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2005;54 [No. RR-7]). As a comprehensive summary of previously published recommendations, this report does not contain any new recommendations; it is intended for use by clinicians as a resource. ACIP recommends routine vaccination with a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) for adolescents aged 11 or 12 years, with a booster dose at age 16 years. ACIP also recommends routine vaccination for

  5. Limited potential for mosquito transmission of genetically engineered, live-attenuated western equine encephalitis virus vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turell, Michael J; O'Guinn, Monica L; Parker, Michael D

    2003-02-01

    Specific mutations associated with attenuation of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus in rodent models were identified during efforts to develop an improved VEE vaccine. Analogous mutations were produced in full-length cDNA clones of the Cba 87 strain of western equine encephalitis (WEE) virus by site-directed mutagenesis in an attempt to develop an improved WEE vaccine. Isogenic viral strains with these mutations were recovered after transfection of baby hamster kidney cells with infectious RNA. We evaluated two of these strains (WE2102 and WE2130) for their ability to replicate in and be transmitted by Culex tarsalis, the principal natural vector of WEE virus in the United States. Each of the vaccine candidates contained a deletion of the PE2 furin cleavage site and a secondary mutation in the E1 or E2 glycoprotein. Both of these potential candidates replicated in mosquitoes significantly less efficiently than did either wild-type WEE (Cba 87) virus or the parental clone (WE2000). Likewise, after intrathoracic inoculation, mosquitoes transmitted the vaccine candidate strains significantly less efficiently than they transmitted either the wild-type or the parental clone. One-day-old chickens vaccinated with either of the two vaccine candidates did not become viremic when challenged with virulent WEE virus two weeks later. Mutations that result in less efficient replication in or transmission by mosquitoes should enhance vaccine safety and reduce the possibility of accidental introduction of the vaccine strain to unintentional hosts.

  6. Large extracellular loop of tetraspanin as a potential vaccine candidate for filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajalakshmi Dakshinamoorthy

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis affects nearly 120 million people worldwide and mass preventive chemotherapy is currently used as a strategy to control this infection. This has substantially reduced the incidence of the infection in several parts of the world. However, a prophylactic vaccine would be more effective in preventing future infections and will supplement the mass chemotherapy efforts. Unfortunately, there is no licensed vaccine available currently to prevent this infection. Molecules expressed on the surface of the parasite are potential candidates for vaccine development as they are exposed to the host immune system. In this study we show that the large extracellular loop of tetraspanin (TSP LEL, a protein expressed on the cuticle of Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti is a potential vaccine candidate. Our results showed that BmTSP LEL is expressed on the surface of B. malayi infective third stage larvae (L3 and sera from human subjects who are putatively immune to lymphatic filariasis carry high titer of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies against BmTSP LEL and WbTSP LEL. We also showed that these antibodies in the sera of human subjects can participate in the killing of B. malayi L3 in an antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity mechanism. Vaccination trials in mice showed that close to 64% protection were achieved against challenge infections with B. malayi L3. Immunized animals showed high titer of anti-WbTSP LEL IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies in the sera and IFN-γ secreting cells in the spleen. Onchocerca volvulus another filarial parasite also expresses TSP LEL. Cross-reactivity studies showed that IgG1 antibody in the sera of endemic normal subjects, recognize OvTSP LEL. Similarly, anti-OvTSP LEL antibodies in the sera of subjects who are immune to O. volvulus were also shown to cross-react with rWbTSP LEL and rBmTSP LEL. These findings thus suggested that rTSP LEL can be developed as a potential vaccine candidate against multiple

  7. Identification of vaccine candidate antigens of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius by whole proteome characterization and serological proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Natacha; Martins, Joana; Lourenço, Ana Mafalda; Pomba, Constança; Varela Coelho, Ana

    2016-02-05

    The recent emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) has complicated considerably the treatment of infections caused by these bacteria. Therefore new treatment strategies are urgently needed, namely through the development of vaccines towards the control of bacterial infections. Our study describes an extensive characterization of the proteome of S. pseudintermedius through a 2-DE MALDI-TOF/TOF approach, followed by SERological Proteome Analysis (SERPA) to identify potential vaccine candidate antigens. We were able to identify 361 unique proteins, of which 39 are surface proteins. In order to assess the immunogenic potential of S. pseudintermedius proteins, a Western blot analysis of two-dimensional gels was carried out with serum from healthy dogs, dogs with atopic dermatitis infected and not infected with S. pseudintermedius. Only immunogenic areas detected by ≥ 50% of the dogs with atopic dermatitis infected with S. pseudintermedius sera and by proteins could induce hypersensitivity. We were able to identify 13 unique proteins after in-gel digestion of selected protein gel spots, with 4 antigenic proteins showing promising features for vaccine development. No specific antibodies were identified in the dogs with atopic dermatitis not infected with S. pseudintermedius sera that could contribute to prevention of infection. The SERPA approach employed in this study revealed novel candidate therapeutic targets for the control of S. pseudintermedius infections.

  8. The ID93 tuberculosis vaccine candidate does not induce sensitivity to purified protein derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Reese, Valerie; Granger, Brian; Orr, Mark T; Ireton, Gregory C; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2014-09-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a simple and inexpensive test to determine whether individuals have been exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This test is not always reliable, however, in people previously immunized with BCG and/or who have been exposed to environmental mycobacterial species due to a reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD) used in the skin test. An issue with BCG, therefore, is that the resulting sensitization to PPD in some individuals compromises the diagnostic use of the skin test. The ability to induce protective immune responses without sensitizing to the tuberculin skin test will be important properties of next-generation tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates. We show here that guinea pigs immunized with the candidate TB vaccine ID93/GLA-SE, currently in clinical trials, do not react to intradermal PPD administration. In contrast, positive DTH responses to both ID93 and components thereof were induced in ID93/GLA-SE-immunized animals, indicating robust but specific cellular responses were present in the immunized animals. Noninterference with the TST is an important factor for consideration in the development of a vaccine against M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of genes encoding vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenet Stella M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major concern in malaria vaccine development is genetic polymorphisms typically observed among Plasmodium isolates in different geographical areas across the world. Highly polymorphic regions have been observed in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antigenic surface proteins such as Circumsporozoite protein (CSP, Duffy-binding protein (DBP, Merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1, Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 and Thrombospondin related anonymous protein (TRAP. Methods Genetic variability was assessed in important polymorphic regions of various vaccine candidate antigens in P. vivax among 106 isolates from the Amazon Region of Loreto, Peru. In addition, genetic diversity determined in Peruvian isolates was compared to population studies from various geographical locations worldwide. Results The structured diversity found in P. vivax populations did not show a geographic pattern and haplotypes from all gene candidates were distributed worldwide. In addition, evidence of balancing selection was found in polymorphic regions of the trap, dbp and ama-1 genes. Conclusions It is important to have a good representation of the haplotypes circulating worldwide when implementing a vaccine, regardless of the geographic region of deployment since selective pressure plays an important role in structuring antigen diversity.

  10. Immunogenic efficacy of differently produced recombinant vaccines candidates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To describe the expression and immunogenic efficacy of differently produced recombinant vaccines candidates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Methods: The hybrid protein OprF (aa 190-342)-Opr I (aa 21-83) was modified N-terminally, either with a minimal histidine tag or with a homologous sequence of OprF. Both recombinant proteins were purified by nickel chelate affinity chromatography under native and denaturing conditions. Results :This produced three suitable candidates for a vaccination trial: protein His-F- I , which was purified in its native as well as in its refolded form,and the native purified N-terminally extended protein ex-F- I . In mice, significantly higher antibody titers and survival rates after challenge with P. aeruginosa were observed, following immunization with protein His-F- I purified under native conditions. Conclusion: A hybrid OprF-Opr I molecule was cloned and a purification method which yields a protective vaccine against P. aeruginosa infections was established.

  11. A defined tuberculosis vaccine candidate boosts BCG and protects against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C; Ordway, Diane J; Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Pine, Samuel O; Kahn, Maria; Phan, Tony; Orme, Ian M; Vedvick, Thomas S; Baldwin, Susan L; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2010-10-13

    Despite the widespread use of the childhood vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the disease remains a serious global health problem. A successful vaccine against TB that replaces or boosts BCG would include antigens that induce or recall the appropriate T cell responses. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens--including members of the virulence factor families PE/PPE and EsX or antigens associated with latency--were produced as a single recombinant fusion protein (ID93). When administered together with the adjuvant GLA-SE, a stable oil-in-water nanoemulsion, the fusion protein was immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. In mice, this fusion protein-adjuvant combination induced polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cell responses characterized by antigen-specific interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-2, as well as a reduction in the number of bacteria in the lungs of animals after they were subsequently infected with virulent or multidrug-resistant Mtb strains. Furthermore, boosting BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs with fusion peptide-adjuvant resulted in reduced pathology and fewer bacilli, and prevented the death of animals challenged with virulent Mtb. Finally, the fusion protein elicited polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in BCG-vaccinated or Mtb-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study establishes that the protein subunit vaccine consisting of the fusion protein and adjuvant protects against TB and drug-resistant TB in animals and is a candidate for boosting the protective efficacy of the childhood BCG vaccine in humans.

  12. One Family's Crusade To Inform the Public about Meningococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Linda and Carl

    2001-01-01

    Describes meningococcal meningitis, which strikes over 100 college students yearly. Living in dormitories puts students at risk for contracting the disease. The current vaccine protects against the four main types of the infection, though it is not perfect protection. Some states have adopted legislation requiring all incoming college freshmen and…

  13. One Family's Crusade To Inform the Public about Meningococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Linda and Carl

    2001-01-01

    Describes meningococcal meningitis, which strikes over 100 college students yearly. Living in dormitories puts students at risk for contracting the disease. The current vaccine protects against the four main types of the infection, though it is not perfect protection. Some states have adopted legislation requiring all incoming college freshmen and…

  14. Limited antigenic variation in the Trypanosoma cruzi candidate vaccine antigen TSA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J M; Zingales, B; Bottazzi, M E; Hotez, P; Zhan, B

    2014-12-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases in the Western Hemisphere. The toxicities and limited efficacies of current antitrypanosomal drugs have prompted a search for alternative technologies such as a therapeutic vaccine comprised of T. cruzi antigens, including a recombinant antigen encoding the N-terminal 65 kDa portion of Trypomastigote surface antigen-1 (TSA-1). With at least six known genetically distinct T. cruzi lineages, variability between the different lineages poses a unique challenge for the development of broadly effective therapeutic vaccine. The variability across the major lineages in the current vaccine candidate antigen TSA-1 has not previously been addressed. To assess the variation in TSA-1, we cloned and sequenced TSA-1 from several different T. cruzi strains representing three of the most clinically relevant lineages. Analysis of the different alleles showed limited variation in TSA-1 across the different strains and fit with the current theory for the evolution of the different lineages. Additionally, minimal variation in known antigenic epitopes for the HLA-A 02 allele suggests that interlineage variation in TSA-1 would not impair the range and efficacy of a vaccine containing TSA-1.

  15. Novel chikungunya vaccine candidate with an IRES-based attenuation and host range alteration mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Plante

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that has recently caused devastating urban epidemics of severe and sometimes chronic arthralgia. As with most other mosquito-borne viral diseases, control relies on reducing mosquito populations and their contact with people, which has been ineffective in most locations. Therefore, vaccines remain the best strategy to prevent most vector-borne diseases. Ideally, vaccines for diseases of resource-limited countries should combine low cost and single dose efficacy, yet induce rapid and long-lived immunity with negligible risk of serious adverse reactions. To develop such a vaccine to protect against chikungunya fever, we employed a rational attenuation mechanism that also prevents the infection of mosquito vectors. The internal ribosome entry site (IRES from encephalomyocarditis virus replaced the subgenomic promoter in a cDNA CHIKV clone, thus altering the levels and host-specific mechanism of structural protein gene expression. Testing in both normal outbred and interferon response-defective mice indicated that the new vaccine candidate is highly attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious after a single dose. Furthermore, it is incapable of replicating in mosquito cells or infecting mosquitoes in vivo. This IRES-based attenuation platform technology may be useful for the predictable attenuation of any alphavirus.

  16. Construction of a trivalent candidate vaccine against Shigella species with DNA recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王恒樑; 冯尔玲; 林云; 廖翔; 金明; 黄留玉; 苏国富; 黄翠芬

    2002-01-01

    In this work asd gene of Shigella flexneri 2a strain T32 was replaced by Vibrio cholerae toxin B subunit (ctxB) gene with DNA recombination in vivo and in vitro. The resulting derivative of T32, designed as FWL01, could stably express CtxB, but its growth in LB medium depended on the presence of diaminopimelic acid (DAP). Then form I plasmid of Shigella sonnei strain S7 was labeled with strain T32 asd gene and mobilized into FWL01. Thus a trivalent candidate oral vaccine strain, designed as FSW01, was constructed. In this candidate strain, a balanced-lethal system was constituted between the host strain and the form I plasmid expressing S. sonnei O antigen. Therefore the candidate strain can express stably not only its own O antigen but also CtxB and O antigen of S. sonnei in the absence of any antibiotic. Experiments showed that FSW01 did not invade HeLa cells or cause keratoconjunctivitis in guinea pigs. However, rabbits immunized FSW01 can elicit significant immune responses. In mice and rhesus monkey models, vaccinated animals were protected against the challenges of wild S. flexneri 2a strain 2457T and S. sonnei strain S9.

  17. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies.

  18. What Is Known about the Immune Response Induced by Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carolina; Yepes-Pérez, Yoelis; Hincapié-Escobar, Natalia; Díaz-Arévalo, Diana; Patarroyo, Manuel A.

    2017-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax continues being one of the most important infectious diseases around the world; P. vivax is the second most prevalent species and has the greatest geographic distribution. Developing an effective antimalarial vaccine is considered a relevant control strategy in the search for means of preventing the disease. Studying parasite-expressed proteins, which are essential in host cell invasion, has led to identifying the regions recognized by individuals who are naturally exposed to infection. Furthermore, immunogenicity studies have revealed that such regions can trigger a robust immune response that can inhibit sporozoite (hepatic stage) or merozoite (erythrocyte stage) invasion of a host cell and induce protection. This review provides a synthesis of the most important studies to date concerning the antigenicity and immunogenicity of both synthetic peptide and recombinant protein candidates for a vaccine against malaria produced by P. vivax. PMID:28243235

  19. Safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 - a MSP3-GLURP fusion protein malaria vaccine candidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esen, Meral; Kremsner, Peter G; Schleucher, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In highly endemic regions infants, children and pregnant women are mostly affected. An effective malaria vaccine would complement existing malaria control strategies because it can be integrated in existing immunization programs easily....... Here we present the results of the first phase Ia clinical trial of GMZ2 adjuvanted in aluminium hydroxide. GMZ2 is a malaria vaccine candidate, designed upon the rationale to induce immune responses against asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum similar to those encountered in semi-immune...... individuals. Ten, 30 and 100 microg of GMZ2 were well tolerated in 30 healthy malaria-naïve German volunteers when given three times in monthly intervals. Antigen-specific antibodies as well as memory B-cells were induced and detectable throughout the one year follow-up of the study. We conclude that GMZ2...

  20. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  1. Methodological validation of rocket immunoelectrophoresis(RIE)for determination of serogroup C meningococcal polysaccharide content in the tetravalent serogroup A/C/W135/Y meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine%火箭免疫电泳法定量检测4价脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗中C群脑膜炎球菌多糖含量的方法学验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林云; 李冶珊; 高华; 王平; 王建华; 刘梅影; 郭京蓉; 王雪薇

    2008-01-01

    目的 验证用火箭免疫电泳法(rocket immunoelectrophoresis,RIE)检测4价脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗(tetravalent serogroup A/C/W135/Y meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine,MPV4)中C群多糖含量的可靠性.方法以系列浓度的C群多糖溶液为标准,采用RIE对MPV4中C群多糖含量进行重复测定.结果最佳线性范围为30~86 mg/L,相关系数(r)均大于0.985;MPV4与C群多糖参比品的剂量反应曲线之间具有良好的平行性;在精密度试验中,试验内CV为6.08%~8.07%,试验间CV为7.24%~9.19%;A、W135和Y群多糖及乳糖不引起非特异性免疫反应.结论本法的线性、精密度和专属性均符合验证要求,可作为定量检测MPV4中C群多糖含量的方法.%Objective To validate the reliability of RIE for determination of serogroup C meningo-coccal polysaccharide(MenC PS)content in the tetravalent serogroup A/C/W135/Y meningococcal poly-saccharide vaccine(MPV4). Methods A series of concentrations of MenC PS as standards, MenC PS content in MPV4 was determined by RIE repeatly to validate linearity, precision and specificity. Results The optimal linear range was 30-86 mg/L and the coefficients of correlation(r)were>0.985. There was parallelism between the dose response curve of MenC PS and MPV4. The coefficients of variation for in-tra-assay and inter-assay precision were 6.08 %-8.07% and 7.24%-9.19%, respectively. No cross reac-tions were observed with serogroup A, W135 and Y meningococcal polysaccharide, as well as lactose. Conclusions The linearity, precision and specificity of this method are good. It is suitable for quantitative determination of MenC PS content in MPV4.

  2. A Rapid and Improved Method to Generate Recombinant Dengue Virus Vaccine Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Guan, Liming; Meschino, Steven; Fridman, Arthur; Bagchi, Ansu; Pak, Irene; ter Meulen, Jan; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important mosquito-borne infections accounting for severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, the tetravalent chimeric live attenuated Dengue vaccine Dengvaxia® was approved for use in several dengue endemic countries. In general, live attenuated vaccines (LAV) are very efficacious and offer long-lasting immunity against virus-induced disease. Rationally designed LAVs can be generated through reverse genetics technology, a method of generating infectious recombinant viruses from full length cDNA contained in bacterial plasmids. In vitro transcribed (IVT) viral RNA from these infectious clones is transfected into susceptible cells to generate recombinant virus. However, the generation of full-length dengue virus cDNA clones can be difficult due to the genetic instability of viral sequences in bacterial plasmids. To circumvent the need for a single plasmid containing a full length cDNA, in vitro ligation of two or three cDNA fragments contained in separate plasmids can be used to generate a full-length dengue viral cDNA template. However, in vitro ligation of multiple fragments often yields low quality template for IVT reactions, resulting in inconsistent low yield RNA. These technical difficulties make recombinant virus recovery less efficient. In this study, we describe a simple, rapid and efficient method of using LONG-PCR to recover recombinant chimeric Yellow fever dengue (CYD) viruses as potential dengue vaccine candidates. Using this method, we were able to efficiently generate several viable recombinant viruses without introducing any artificial mutations into the viral genomes. We believe that the techniques reported here will enable rapid and efficient recovery of recombinant flaviviruses for evaluation as vaccine candidates and, be applicable to the recovery of other RNA viruses.

  3. Evaluation of virulent and live Shigella sonnei vaccine candidates in a gnotobiotic piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kwang-Il; Venkatesan, Malabi M; Barnoy, Shoshana; Tzipori, Saul

    2013-08-20

    Newborn gnotobiotic (GB) piglets given virulent Shigella orally develop many of the clinical symptoms and gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations that mimic human shigellosis. Shigella sonnei virulent strain Moseley, a mutant ShET2-1,2, lacking enterotoxin SenA and its paralog SenB, and vaccine candidates WRSS1 and WRSs3 were evaluated in this model for rates of diarrhea, colonization and other GI symptoms and pathology. Moseley-infected piglets developed diarrhea from 1 to 7 days, with the highest rates seen on days 2-4 after inoculation. In contrast, WRSs3-infected piglets did not have diarrhea over the entire experimental period. Compared to the Moseley group, lower diarrheal rates were observed in the double enterotoxin mutant and significantly lower in the WRSS1 group. Moseley infection also caused marked mucosal damage in the GI tissues at PID1 to PID8, and induced predominantly proinflammatory cytokine secretion. IL-8 and to a lesser extent IL-6 and IL-1β were observed early after inoculation and IL-12 secretion could be measured till late in infection. The ShET2-1,2 mutant, WRSS1 and WRSs3 also colonized the GI tract in a manner similar to Moseley; however, both vaccine candidates developed milder histopathological indices and cytokine responses. WRSs3-infected animals showed the least pathology. Furthermore, unlike the other strains, WRSs3 was rarely detected in organs outside the gastrointestinal tract. These results support the development of the GB piglet model as a sensitive in vivo oral model for the evaluation of virulence of different Shigella strains which could be applied to other oral vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Vaccination of dogs with six different candidate leishmaniasis vaccines composed of a chimerical recombinant protein containing ribosomal and histone protein epitopes in combination with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, J; Janssen, L H M; van Kasteren-Westerneng, T J; van der Heijden-Liefkens, K H A; Schijns, V E J C; Heckeroth, A

    2009-07-16

    Chimerical protein "Q", composed of antigenic ribosomal and histone sequences, in combination with live BCG is a promising canine leishmaniasis vaccine candidate; one of the few vaccine candidates that have been tested successfully in dogs. Unfortunately, live BCG is not an appropriate adjuvant for commercial application due to safety problems in dogs. In order to find a safe adjuvant with similar efficacy to live BCG, muramyl dipeptide, aluminium hydroxide, Matrix C and killed Propionibacterium acnes in combination with either E. coli- or baculovirus-produced recombinant JPCM5_Q protein were tested. Groups of five or seven dogs were vaccinated with six different adjuvant-antigen combinations and challenged with a high dose intravenous injection of Leishmania infantum JPC strain promastigotes. All candidate vaccines proved to be safe, and both humoral and cellular responses to the recombinant proteins were detected at the end of the prime-boost vaccination scheme. However, clinical and parasitological data obtained during the 10 month follow-up period indicated that protection was not induced by either of the six candidate vaccines. Although no direct evidence was obtained, our data suggest that live BCG may have a significant protective effect against challenge with L. infantum in dogs.

  5. Candidate mosaic proteins for a pan-filoviral cytotoxic T-Cell lymphocyte vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thurmond, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yusim, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, B T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    than is possible with a wild-type protein, (2) reducing the number of low-prevalence k-mers minimizes the likelihood of undesirable immunodominance, and (3) excluding exogenous k-mers will result in mosaic proteins whose processing for presentation is close to what occurs with wild-type proteins. The first and second applications of the mosaic method were to HIV and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). HIV is the virus with the largest number of known sequences, and consequently a plethora of information for the CTL vaccine designer to incorporate into their mosaics. Experience with HIV and HCV mosaics supports the validity of the three conjectures above. The available FILV sequences are probably closer to the minimum amount of information needed to make a meaningful mosaic vaccine candidate. There were 532 protein sequences in the National Institutes of Health GenPept database in November 2007 when our reference set was downloaded. These sequences come from both Ebola and Marburg viruses (EBOV and MARV), representing transcripts of all 7 genes. The coverage of viral diversity by the 7 genes is variable, with genes 1 (nucleoprotein, NP), 4 (glycoprotein, GP; soluble glycoprotein, sGP) and 7 (polymerase, L) giving the best coverage. Broadly-protective vaccine candidates for diverse viruses, such as HIV or Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have required pools of antigens. FILV is similar in this regard. While we have designed CTL mosaic proteins using all 7 types of filoviral proteins, only NP, GP and L proteins are reported here. If it were important to include other proteins in a mosaic CTL vaccine, additional sequences would be required to cover the space of known viral diversity.

  6. Evaluation of eight live attenuated vaccine candidates for protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Everman, Jamie L; Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar; Katani, Robab; Barletta, Raúl G; Talaat, Adel M; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Chang, Yung-Fu; Kapur, Vivek; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), which results in serious economic losses worldwide in farmed livestock such as cattle, sheep, and goats. To control this disease, an effective vaccine with minimal adverse effects is needed. In order to identify a live vaccine for Johne's disease, we evaluated eight attenuated mutant strains of MAP using a C57BL/6 mouse model. The persistence of the vaccine candidates was measured at 6, 12, and 18 weeks post vaccination. Only strains 320, 321, and 329 colonized both the liver and spleens up until the 12-week time point. The remaining five mutants showed no survival in those tissues, indicating their complete attenuation in the mouse model. The candidate vaccine strains demonstrated different levels of protection based on colonization of the challenge strain in liver and spleen tissues at 12 and 18 weeks post vaccination. Based on total MAP burden in both tissues at both time points, strain 315 (MAP1566::Tn5370) was the most protective whereas strain 318 (intergenic Tn5367 insertion between MAP0282c and MAP0283c) had the most colonization. Mice vaccinated with an undiluted commercial vaccine preparation displayed the highest bacterial burden as well as enlarged spleens indicative of a strong infection. Selected vaccine strains that showed promise in the mouse model were moved forward into a goat challenge model. The results suggest that the mouse trial, as conducted, may have a relatively poor predictive value for protection in a ruminant host such as goats.

  7. Cell biological characterization of the malaria vaccine candidate trophozoite exported protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Kulangara

    Full Text Available In a genome-wide screen for alpha-helical coiled coil motifs aiming at structurally defined vaccine candidates we identified PFF0165c. This protein is exported in the trophozoite stage and was named accordingly Trophozoite exported protein 1 (Tex1. In an extensive preclinical evaluation of its coiled coil peptides Tex1 was identified as promising novel malaria vaccine candidate providing the rational for a comprehensive cell biological characterization of Tex1. Antibodies generated against an intrinsically unstructured N-terminal region of Tex1 and against a coiled coil domain were used to investigate cytological localization, solubility and expression profile. Co-localization experiments revealed that Tex1 is exported across the parasitophorous vacuole membrane and located to Maurer's clefts. Change in location is accompanied by a change in solubility: from a soluble state within the parasite to a membrane-associated state after export to Maurer's clefts. No classical export motifs such as PEXEL, signal sequence/anchor or transmembrane domain was identified for Tex1.

  8. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates using human CD4+ T-cells expression cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coler, Rhea N; Dillon, Davin C; Skeiky, Yasir A W; Kahn, Maria; Orme, Ian M; Lobet, Yves; Reed, Steven G; Alderson, Mark R

    2009-01-07

    To identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens as candidates for a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), we have employed a CD4+ T-cell expression screening method. Mtb-specific CD4+ T-cell lines from nine healthy PPD positive donors were stimulated with different antigenic substrates including autologous dendritic cells (DC) infected with Mtb, or cultured with culture filtrate proteins (CFP), and purified protein derivative of Mtb (PPD). These lines were used to screen a genomic Mtb library expressed in Escherichia coli and processed and presented by autologous DC. This screening led to the recovery of numerous T-cell antigens, including both novel and previously described antigens. One of these novel antigens, referred to as Mtb9.8 (Rv0287), was recognized by multiple T-cell lines, stimulated with either Mtb-infected DC or CFP. Using the mouse and guinea pig models of TB, high levels of IFN-gamma were produced, and solid protection from Mtb challenge was observed following immunization with Mtb9.8 formulated in either AS02A or AS01B Adjuvant Systems. These results demonstrate that T-cell screening of the Mtb genome can be used to identify CD4+ T-cell antigens that are candidates for vaccine development.

  9. Expression, purification and evaluation of recombinant lipoprotein of Salmonella typhi as a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Kundu, Subir; Debnath Das, Mira

    2017-03-01

    Lipoprotein has been reported as a vaccine candidate against many pathogenic bacteria, it plays direct role as a virulence-associated function. Here the approach is toward the expression of recombinant lipoprotein of Salmonella typhi in prokaryotic host and its evaluation as a vaccine candidate. Lipoprotein gene (lp1) was cloned in pET32a expression vector in addition to Bam HI and Hind III restriction sites, and BL21(pLysS) was used as prokaryotic expression host for transformation. Lipoprotein induction was performed by IPTG and 55 kDa (31 kDa of Gene +24 kDa of vector additional protein with His-tag) was analyzed by 12% SDS-PAGE. The recombinant lipoprotein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography due to the addition of 6X His-tag in recombinant lipoprotein. Western blot analysis using anti-His tag polyclonal antibodies confirmed the specificity of recombinant lipoprotein. Immunogenicity and protection study of recombinant lipoprotein against S. Typhi was performed in BALB/c mice. Adjuvants IFA and alum salts were used to enhance the immune response. ELISA results proved that biologically active truncated recombinant lipoprotein (31 kDa) is a suitable immunogen. Alum salts used as adjuvant was effective for long-lasting immunity. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Manigart

    Full Text Available The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97] and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57] on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028. Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics.

  11. Identification of conserved surface proteins as novel antigenic vaccine candidates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiabing; Xu, Zhuofei; Li, Lu; Chen, Huanchun; Zhou, Rui

    2012-12-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an important swine respiratory pathogen causing great economic losses worldwide. Identification of conserved surface antigenic proteins is helpful for developing effective vaccines. In this study, a genome-wide strategy combined with bioinformatic and experimental approaches, was applied to discover and characterize surface-associated immunogenic proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae. Thirty nine genes encoding outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and lipoproteins were identified by comparative genomics and gene expression profiling as being-highly conserved and stably transcribed in the different serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae reference strains. Twelve of these conserved proteins were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and their immunogenicity was estimated by homologous challenge in the mouse model, and then three of these proteins (APJL_0126, HbpA and OmpW) were further tested in the natural host (swine) by homologous and heterologous challenges. The results showed that these proteins could induce high titers of antibodies, but vaccination with each protein individually elicited low protective immunity against A. pleuropneumoniae. This study gives novel insights into immunogenicity of the conserved OMPs and lipoproteins of A. pleuropneumoniae. Although none of the surface proteins characterized in this study could individually induce effective protective immunity against A. pleuropneumoniae, they are potential candidates for subunit vaccines in combination with Apx toxins.

  12. Evaluation of enteric-coated tablets as a whole cell inactivated vaccine candidate against Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sonsire; Año, Gemma; Castaño, Jorge; Pino, Yadira; Uribarri, Evangelina; Riverón, Luis A; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Falero, Gustavo; Pérez, José L; Infante, Juan F; García, Luis G; Solís, Rosa L; Sierra, Gustavo; Talavera, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    A vaccine candidate against cholera was developed in the form of oral tablets to avoid difficulties during application exhibited by current whole cell inactivated cholera vaccines. In this study, enteric-coated tablets were used to improve the protection of the active compound from gastric acidity. Tablets containing heat-killed whole cells of Vibrio cholerae strain C7258 as the active pharmaceutical compound was enteric-coated with the polymer Kollicoat(®) MAE-100P, which protected them efficiently from acidity when a disintegration test was carried out. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibition test and Western blot assay revealed the presence of V. cholerae antigens as LPS, mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin (MSHA) and outer membrane protein U (Omp U) in enteric-coated tablets. Immunogenicity studies (ELISA and vibriocidal test) carried out by intraduodenal administration in rabbits showed that the coating process of tablets did not affect the immunogenicity of V. cholerae-inactivated cells. In addition, no differences were observed in the immune response elicited by enteric-coated or uncoated tablets, particularly because the animal model and immunization route used did not allow discriminating between acid resistances of both tablets formulations in vivo. Clinical studies with volunteers will be required to elucidate this aspect, but the results suggest the possibility of using enteric-coated tablets as a final pharmaceutical product for a cholera vaccine.

  13. Broadly neutralizing epitopes in the Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edwin; Salinas, Nichole D; Huang, Yining; Ntumngia, Francis; Plasencia, Manolo D; Gross, Michael L; Adams, John H; Tolia, Niraj Harish

    2016-05-31

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is the most promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. The polymorphic nature of PvDBP induces strain-specific immune responses, however, and the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies are unknown. These features hamper the rational design of potent DBP-based vaccines and necessitate the identification of globally conserved epitopes. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and mutational mapping, we have defined epitopes for three inhibitory mAbs (mAbs 2D10, 2H2, and 2C6) and one noninhibitory mAb (3D10) that engage DBP. These studies expand the currently known inhibitory epitope repertoire by establishing protective motifs in subdomain three outside the receptor-binding and dimerization residues of DBP, and introduce globally conserved protective targets. All of the epitopes are highly conserved among DBP alleles. The identification of broadly conserved epitopes of inhibitory antibodies provides critical motifs that should be retained in the next generation of potent vaccines for P. vivax malaria.

  14. Glyceradehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a suitable vaccine candidate for protection against bacterial and parasitic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Casal, Jose; Potter, Andrew A

    2016-02-17

    The enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as having other properties in addition to its key role in glycolysis. The ability of GAPDH to bind to numerous extracellular matrices, modulation of host-immune responses, a role in virulence and surface location has prompted numerous investigators to postulate that GAPDH may be a good vaccine candidate for protection against numerous pathogens. Although immune responses against GAPDH have been described for many microorganisms, vaccines containing GAPDH have been successfully tested in few cases including those against the trematode-Schistosoma mansoni, the helminth-Enchinococcus multilocularis; the nematode filaria- Litomosoides sigmodontis; fish pathogens such as Aeromonas spp., Vibrio spp., Edwarsiella spp., and Streptococcus iniae; and environmental streptococci, namely, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae. Before GAPDH-based vaccines are considered viable options for protection against numerous pathogens, we need to take into account the homology between the host and pathogen GAPDH proteins to prevent potential autoimmune reactions, thus protective GAPDH epitopes unique to the pathogen protein must be identified.

  15. Risk factors for meningococcal disease in university halls of residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, S. J.; Charlett, A.; Orr, H. J.; Barker, R. M.; Neal, K. R.; Taylor, C.; Monk, P. N.; Evans, M. R.; Stuart, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A retrospective ecological study was undertaken to identify social and environmental factors associated with increased incidence of meningococcal disease in university halls of residence. A standardized questionnaire was sent to UK universities and colleges of higher education outside London, for distribution to halls containing at least 50 students. Incidence rate ratios of invasive meningococcal disease were obtained for a range of social and environmental variables. Multi-variable Poisson regression analysis identified 3 factors as having a strong association: a high proportion of first year undergraduate residents (P = 0.0008), decreasing smokiness of the hall bar (P Universities should continue to promote awareness of meningococcal disease, encourage vaccination of first year students against serogroup C disease, and where appropriate, take measures to reduce overcrowding. PMID:11349971

  16. Characterization of Two Metal Binding Lipoproteins as Vaccine Candidates for Enterococcal Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Romero-Saavedra

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium and faecalis are Gram-positive opportunistic pathogens that have become leading causes of nosocomial infections over the last decades. Especially multidrug resistant enterococci have become a challenging clinical problem worldwide. Therefore, new treatment options are needed and the identification of alternative targets for vaccine development has emerged as a feasible alternative to fight the infections caused by these pathogens.We extrapolate the transcriptomic data from a mice peritonitis infection model in E. faecalis to identify putative up-regulated surface proteins under infection conditions in E. faecium. After the bionformatic analyses two metal binding lipoproteins were identified to have a high homology (>72% between the two species, the manganese ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (PsaAfm, and the zinc ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (AdcAfm. These candidate lipoproteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant proteins were used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies that were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Mice were passively immunized with the antibodies raised against recombinant lipoproteins, showing significant reduction of colony counts in mice livers after the bacterial challenge and demonstrating the efficacy of these metal binding lipoproteins as promising vaccine candidates to treat infections caused by these enterococcal pathogens.Overall, our results demonstrate that these two metal binding lipoproteins elicited specific, opsonic and protective antibodies, with an extensive cross-reactivity and serotype-independent coverage among these two important nocosomial pathogens. Pointing these two protein antigens as promising immunogens, that can be used as single components or as carrier

  17. The hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum intestinal transcriptome provides a platform for selecting drug and vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junfei; Damania, Ashish; Gao, Xin; Liu, Zhuyun; Mejia, Rojelio; Mitreva, Makedonka; Strych, Ulrich; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin

    2016-09-27

    The intestine of hookworms contains enzymes and proteins involved in the blood-feeding process of the parasite and is therefore a promising source of possible vaccine antigens. One such antigen, the hemoglobin-digesting intestinal aspartic protease known as Na-APR-1 from the human hookworm Necator americanus, is currently a lead candidate antigen in clinical trials, as is Na-GST-1 a heme-detoxifying glutathione S-transferase. In order to discover additional hookworm vaccine antigens, messenger RNA was obtained from the intestine of male hookworms, Ancylostoma ceylanicum, maintained in hamsters. RNA-seq was performed using Illumina high-throughput sequencing technology. The genes expressed in the hookworm intestine were compared with those expressed in the whole worm and those genes overexpressed in the parasite intestine transcriptome were further analyzed. Among the lead transcripts identified were genes encoding for proteolytic enzymes including an A. ceylanicum APR-1, but the most common proteases were cysteine-, serine-, and metallo-proteases. Also in abundance were specific transporters of key breakdown metabolites, including amino acids, glucose, lipids, ions and water; detoxifying and heme-binding glutathione S-transferases; a family of cysteine-rich/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) previously found in high abundance in parasitic nematodes; C-type lectins; and heat shock proteins. These candidates will be ranked for downstream antigen target selection based on key criteria including abundance, uniqueness in the parasite versus the vertebrate host, as well as solubility and yield of expression. The intestinal transcriptome of A. ceylanicum provides useful information for the identification of proteins involved in the blood-feeding process, representing a first step towards a reverse vaccinology approach to a human hookworm vaccine.

  18. Preparation and Evaluation of a New Lipopolysaccharide-based Conjugate as a Vaccine Candidate for Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Seyed Davar; Vaziri, Farzam; Eftekhary, Mamak; Karbasian, Maryam; Moshiri, Arfa; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad R; Ardestani, Mehdi S; Alitappeh, Meghdad Abdollahpour; Arsang, Amin; Fateh, Abolfazl; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Bahrmand, Ahmad R

    2015-02-01

    Development of an efficacious vaccine against brucellosis has been a challenge for scientists for many years. At present, there is no licensed vaccine against human brucellosis. To overcome this problem, currently, antigenic determinants of Brucella cell wall such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are considered as potential candidates to develop subunit vaccines. In this study, Brucella abortus LPS was used for conjugation to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outer membrane vesicle (OMV) as carrier protein using carbodiimide and adipic acid-mediated coupling and linking, respectively. Groups of eight BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with 10 μg LPS alone, combined LPS + OMV and conjugated LPS-OMV on 0 days, 14 days, 28 days and 42 days. Anti-LPS IgG was measured in serum. The yield of LPS to OMV in LPS-OMV conjugate was 46.55%, on the basis of carbohydrate content. The ratio for LPS to OMV was 4.07. The LPS-OMV conjugate was the most immunogenic compound that stimulated following the first injection with increased IgG titer of ∼5-fold and ∼1.3-fold higher than that produced against LPS and LPS in noncovalent complex to OMV (LPS + OMV), respectively. The highest anti-LPS IgG titer was detected 2 weeks after the third injection (Day 42) of LPS-OMV conjugate. The conjugated compound elicited higher titers of IgG than LPS + OMV, that showed a 100-120-fold rise of anti-LPS IgG in mice. These results indicate that our conjugated LPS-OMV can be used as a brucellosis vaccine, but further investigation is required.

  19. Isolation of a novel gene from Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and analysis of the recombinant antigen as promising vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Francesca; Boiani, Romina; Serafini, Giordano; Amagliani, Giulia; Dominici, Sabrina; Riccioni, Giulia; Zaccone, Renata; Mancuso, Monique; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Magnani, Mauro

    2013-01-21

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (PDP) is the causative agent of fish pasteurellosis, a bacterial disease causing important losses in marine aquaculture. Vaccines against the pathogen can be a way to control the infection and avoid antibiotic treatments. However, a satisfactory protective vaccine against fish pasteurellosis is not commercially available. In this study, a biotechnogical approach based on reverse vaccinology has been used to identify potential vaccine candidates for the development of a recombinant subunit vaccine. Genome sequencing of clones from a genomic cosmid library of PDP and in silico selection of the surface exposed proteins were the initial steps in vaccine candidate identification. From 370 open reading frames (ORF) eight potential antigens were selected, expressed as recombinant proteins and purified. These vaccine candidates were used to generate specific polyclonal antibodies in mice. Each antibody was then screened in vitro by inhibition adherence assay of live PDP on chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214). A lipoprotein, found to be involved in the adherence of the bacterium to epithelial cells and annotated as PDP_0080, was then selected. The recombinant protein was further investigated in fish vaccination and challenge experiments to assess its ability to protect sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, against PDP infection. Immunisation with PDP_0080 recombinant protein elicited high specific antibody titres. Furthermore, the survival rate of fish immunized with the 25 μg dose of protein was significantly higher compared to the control group. The results of the study suggest that the PDP_0080 protein could be a promising candidate for the design of a recombinant vaccine against pasteurellosis.

  20. Surveillance and control of meningococcal meningitis epidemics in refugee populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P S; Toole, M J; Nieburg, P; Waldman, R J; Broome, C V

    1990-01-01

    Epidemics of communicable diseases pose a direct threat to refugee and internally displaced populations, and could lead to high mortality rates and a disruption of basic health care services. Several large refugee populations live in regions of high meningococcal disease endemicity and their camps are at risk for outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis. Surveillance in these camps allows early detection and control of impending outbreaks. Confirmation of meningococcal disease can be performed under field conditions using simple techniques, such as latex agglutination. Isolates should be obtained for serogroup confirmation and antibiotic sensitivity studies at reference laboratories. Serogroup information is used to determine the risk of widespread epidemic disease and the utility of available vaccines. During epidemics, treatment regimens should be standardized, preferably with an effective single-dose antibiotic. Mass vaccination campaigns should be initiated, the populations at high risk being targeted for vaccination as quickly as possible. When the risk of epidemic disease is deemed to be high, preemptive vaccination may be warranted. Daily surveillance using a simple case definition is essential during an epidemic to determine the effectiveness of control measures and to delineate high-risk groups for vaccination or chemoprophylaxis. Many of these recommendations can be applied also to other populations in developing countries.

  1. A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗安全性观察%Safety of tetravalent meningococcal A, C, Y,W135 vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤妍; 张吉凯; 梁剑; 蒋详顺; 苏家立; 谢学海; 夏艳辉; 邓寿平; 冯社庄

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗在广东省广宁县和博罗县2~7岁人群中免疫后的安全性.方法 研究者主动观察疫苗接种后30 min,6、12、24、48、72 h的局部和全身反应并记录在疫苗接种日记卡上,通过主动报告和定期随访的形式收集4天~4周期间的异常反应情况.结果 共接种观察了2 974名适龄儿童,发生疫苗接种不良事件378例,异常反应率12.71%,其中发热反应率10.96%,局部反应发生率1.85%;疫苗接种后30min至72 h期间的全身和局部反应率分别为8.61%和1.82%.不良反应分级主要为2级以下,未观察到严重不良事件.所有全身反应症状和局部反应症状分别消失于接种后12 d内和6d内.结论 A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗在2~7岁人群中接种有较好的安全性.%Objective To evaluate the safety of tetravalent meningococcal A,C,Y,W135 vaccine in the population (aged 2-7 years old) from Boluo and Guangning county,Guangdong province.Methods Local and systemic reactions were recorded at 30 min,6,12,24,48 and 72 h after vaccination.Abnormal reactions were also recorded in the following 4 weeks.Results 2 974 children were vaccinated.378 cases (12.71%) had adverse events.The incidence of fever and local reaction was 10.96% and 1.85%,respectively.The incidence of systemic and local reaction occurred at 30 min to 72 h after immunization was 8.61% and 1.82%,respectively.Most of the side effects were classified as Grade 2 adverse reaction.Conclusion The tetravalent meningococcal A,C,Y,W135 vaccine was found to be safe for the children with an aged of 2-7 years old.

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Lülf, Anna; Marr, Lisa; Jany, Sylvia; Deeg, Cornelia A; Pijlman, Gorben P; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-04-07

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we generated and evaluated recombinant MVA candidate vaccines that deliver WNV envelope (E) antigens and fulfil all the requirements to proceed to clinical testing in humans. Infections of human and equine cell cultures with recombinant MVA demonstrated efficient synthesis and secretion of WNV envelope proteins in mammalian cells non-permissive for MVA replication. Prime-boost immunizations in BALB/c mice readily induced circulating serum antibodies binding to recombinant WNV E protein and neutralizing WNV in tissue culture infections. Vaccinations in HLA-A2.1-/HLA-DR1-transgenic H-2 class I-/class II-knockout mice elicited WNV E-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Moreover, the MVA-WNV candidate vaccines protected C57BL/6 mice against lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV infection and induced heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate these recombinant MVA-WNV vaccines in other preclinical models and use them as candidate vaccine in humans.

  3. Candidate Multi-Peptide-Vaccine Against Classical Swine Fever Virus Induces Strong Antibody Response with Predefined Specificity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耿; 董晓楠; 陈应华

    2002-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that the envelope glycoprotein E2 (gp55) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the most immunogenic protein. Interestingly, recombinant protein E2 that contains only one structural antigenic unit (unit B/C or A) could protect pigs from a lethal challenge of CSFV. Based on these findings, we designed and prepared five overlapping synthetic peptides that covered the sequence unit B/C (aa 693-777) of Shimen E2 and conjugated individual peptides with bovine serum albumin (BSA). After the vaccination, the specificity of the rabbit sera was analyzed in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The results show that each of the five candidate peptide-vaccines can successfully induce a high titer of specific antibodies in New Zealand White Rabbits (n=3). Subsequently, the five candidate peptide-vaccines were applied in combination for immunization of pigs (n=10) and induced specific and strong humoral responses against all of the five designed peptides in pigs. Our studies indicate that the candidate multi-peptide-vaccine would prove an excellent marker vaccine against CSFV and provide a model for developing effective synthetic peptide vaccines to stop viral epidemics in humans and animals.

  4. Carrier priming effect of CRM197 is related to an enhanced B and T cell activation in meningococcal serogroup A conjugate vaccination. Immunological comparison between CRM197 and diphtheria toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecetta, S; Tontini, M; Faenzi, E; Cioncada, R; Proietti, D; Seubert, A; Nuti, S; Berti, F; Romano, M R

    2016-04-29

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are composed of capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) of a pathogenic bacteria covalently linked to carrier proteins. Pre-exposure to the carrier is known to influence the efficacy of the glycoconjugate, by inducing enhanced or suppressed anti-CPS response. Following our previous work on the immunogenicity of diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and formaldehyde-treated diphtheria toxoid (DT) as carriers for meningococcal A (MenA) conjugates in mouse model, we further investigated the role of the carrier on the immunological response to glycoconjugate vaccines. We previously showed that high dosage DT priming could result in carrier-induced epitopic suppression (CIES), an event that did not occur for CRM197 priming, and we observed that anti-DT IgGs could cross-react with DT based conjugates in vitro. Here, we confirmed the cross-reactivity of anti-carrier IgGs with DT conjugates in vivo. Furthermore, we analyzed the splenocytes of animals primed with the carrier and subsequently immunized with the MenA conjugate. Pre-exposure to the carrier protein, both CRM197 and DT, resulted in increased carrier-specific plasma and memory B cell response. However, only for CRM197 priming an enhanced carbohydrate-specific plasma cell response was observed. Analysis of circulating IgGs confirmed these observations. Memory to the CPS resulted to be non-influenced by carrier priming. Analysis of T helper response showed an enhancement effect for CRM197 priming, while DT priming resulted in constrained T cell activation. Stimulation with CRM197, which does not require formaldehyde detoxification, of splenocytes from animal immunized with DT suggested that the formaldehyde treatment used to produce DT might be the cause of limited presentation of the antigen to the T cells. We concluded that the dominant carrier-specific B cell response in case of limited T cell recruitment might explain the previously observed CIES phenomenon in case of DT priming.

  5. Surface display of a borrelial lipoprotein on meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salverda, Merijn L M; Meinderts, Sanne M; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Wagemakers, Alex; Hovius, Joppe W R; van der Ark, Arno; Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-02-17

    Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) are gaining attention as vaccine candidates. The successful expression of heterologous antigens in OMVs, with the OMV functioning both as adjuvant and delivery vehicle, has greatly enhanced their vaccine potential. Since there are indications that surface exposed antigens might induce a superior immune response, targeting of heterologous antigens to the OMV surface is of special interest. Several systems for surface display of heterologous antigens on OMVs have been developed. However, these systems have not been used to display lipidated membrane-associated proteins known as lipoproteins, which are emerging as key targets for protective immunity. We were therefore interested to see whether we could express a foreign lipoprotein on the outer surface of OMVs. When outer surface protein A (OspA), a borrelial surface-exposed lipoprotein, was expressed in meningococci, it was found that although OspA was present in OMVs, it was no longer surface-exposed. Therefore, a set of fusions of OspA to different regions of factor H binding protein (fHbp), a meningococcal surface-exposed lipoprotein, were designed and tested for their surface-exposure. An N-terminal part of fHbp was found to be necessary for the successful surface display of OspA on meningococcal OMVs. When mice were immunized with this set of OMVs, an OspA-specific antibody response was only elicited by OMVs with clearly surface-exposed OspA, strengthening the idea that the exact positioning of an antigen in the OMV affects the immune response. This method for the surface display of heterologous lipoproteins on OMVs is a step forward in the development of OMVs as a vaccine platform.

  6. Live, attenuated influenza A H5N1 candidate vaccines provide broad cross-protection in mice and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorsolo L Suguitan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza A H5N1 viruses in humans and avian species that began in Asia and have spread to other continents underscore an urgent need to develop vaccines that would protect the human population in the event of a pandemic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Live, attenuated candidate vaccines possessing genes encoding a modified H5 hemagglutinin (HA and a wild-type (wt N1 neuraminidase from influenza A H5N1 viruses isolated in Hong Kong and Vietnam in 1997, 2003, and 2004, and remaining gene segments derived from the cold-adapted (ca influenza A vaccine donor strain, influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (H2N2, were generated by reverse genetics. The H5N1 ca vaccine viruses required trypsin for efficient growth in vitro, as predicted by the modification engineered in the gene encoding the HA, and possessed the temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotypes specified by the internal protein genes of the ca vaccine donor strain. More importantly, the candidate vaccines were immunogenic in mice. Four weeks after receiving a single dose of 10(6 50% tissue culture infectious doses of intranasally administered vaccines, mice were fully protected from lethality following challenge with homologous and antigenically distinct heterologous wt H5N1 viruses from different genetic sublineages (clades 1, 2, and 3 that were isolated in Asia between 1997 and 2005. Four weeks after receiving two doses of the vaccines, mice and ferrets were fully protected against pulmonary replication of homologous and heterologous wt H5N1 viruses. CONCLUSIONS: The promising findings in these preclinical studies of safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the H5N1 ca vaccines against antigenically diverse H5N1 vaccines provide support for their careful evaluation in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans.

  7. Limited variation in vaccine candidate Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-6 over multiple transmission seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branch OraLee H

    2010-05-01

    same community. By contrast, PfMSP6 was highly stable at the sequence level, with no SNPs detected in the 506 samples analysed. This limited diversity supports further investigation of PfMSP6 as a blood stage vaccine candidate, with the clear caveat that any such vaccine must either contain both alleles or generate cross-protective responses that react against both allele classes. Detailed immunoepidemiology studies are needed to establish the viability of these approaches before PfMSP6 advances further down the vaccine development pipeline.

  8. Early Transcriptional Signatures of the Immune Response to a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Non-human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Popper, Stephen J.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Relman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of a vaccine against dengue faces unique challenges, including the complexity of the immune responses to the four antigenically distinct serotypes. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling provides insight into the pathways and molecular features that underlie responses to immune system stimulation, and may facilitate predictions of immune protection. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we measured early transcriptional responses in the peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques following vaccination with a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate, TDV, which is based on a DENV-2 backbone. Different doses and routes of vaccine administration were used, and viral load and neutralizing antibody titers were measured at different time-points following vaccination. All 30 vaccinated animals developed a neutralizing antibody response to each of the four dengue serotypes, and only 3 of these animals had detectable serum viral RNA after challenge with wild-type dengue virus (DENV), suggesting protection of vaccinated animals to DENV infection. The vaccine induced statistically significant changes in 595 gene transcripts on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 as compared with baseline and placebo-treated animals. Genes involved in the type I interferon (IFN) response, including IFI44, DDX58, MX1 and OASL, exhibited the highest fold-change in transcript abundance, and this response was strongest following double dose and subcutaneous (versus intradermal) vaccine administration. In addition, modules of genes involved in antigen presentation, dendritic cell activation, and T cell activation and signaling were enriched following vaccination. Increased abundance of gene transcripts related to T cell activation on day 5, and the type I IFN response on day 7, were significantly correlated with the development of high neutralizing antibody titers on day 30. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that early transcriptional responses may be

  9. Early Transcriptional Signatures of the Immune Response to a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Non-human Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona R Strouts

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of a vaccine against dengue faces unique challenges, including the complexity of the immune responses to the four antigenically distinct serotypes. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling provides insight into the pathways and molecular features that underlie responses to immune system stimulation, and may facilitate predictions of immune protection.In this study, we measured early transcriptional responses in the peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques following vaccination with a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate, TDV, which is based on a DENV-2 backbone. Different doses and routes of vaccine administration were used, and viral load and neutralizing antibody titers were measured at different time-points following vaccination. All 30 vaccinated animals developed a neutralizing antibody response to each of the four dengue serotypes, and only 3 of these animals had detectable serum viral RNA after challenge with wild-type dengue virus (DENV, suggesting protection of vaccinated animals to DENV infection. The vaccine induced statistically significant changes in 595 gene transcripts on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 as compared with baseline and placebo-treated animals. Genes involved in the type I interferon (IFN response, including IFI44, DDX58, MX1 and OASL, exhibited the highest fold-change in transcript abundance, and this response was strongest following double dose and subcutaneous (versus intradermal vaccine administration. In addition, modules of genes involved in antigen presentation, dendritic cell activation, and T cell activation and signaling were enriched following vaccination. Increased abundance of gene transcripts related to T cell activation on day 5, and the type I IFN response on day 7, were significantly correlated with the development of high neutralizing antibody titers on day 30.These results suggest that early transcriptional responses may be predictive of development of adaptive immunity to TDV

  10. Analysis of the coverage capacity of the StreptInCor candidate vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Karine M; Freschi de Barros, Samar; Alencar, Raquel E; Postól, Edilberto; Martins, Carlo de Oliveira; Arcuri, Helen Andrade; Goulart, Cibelly; Kalil, Jorge; Guilherme, Luiza

    2014-07-07

    Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for infections as pharyngitis, sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The M protein is the major bacterial antigen and consists of both polymorphic N-terminal portion and a conserved region. In the present study, we analyzed the in vitro ability of StreptInCor a C-terminal candidate vaccine against S. pyogenes to induce antibodies to neutralize/opsonize the most common S. pyogenes strains in Sao Paulo by examining the recognition by sera from StreptInCor immunized mice. We also evaluated the presence of cross-reactive antibodies against human heart valve tissue. Anti-StreptInCor antibodies were able to neutralize/opsonize at least 5 strains, showing that immunization with StreptInCor is effective against several S. pyogenes strains and can prevent infection and subsequent sequelae without causing autoimmune reactions.

  11. Immunoproteomic analysis of Brucella melitensis and identification of a new immunogenic candidate protein for the development of brucellosis subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanling; Wang, Lin; Yin, Jigang; Wang, Xinglong; Cheng, Shipeng; Lang, Xulong; Wang, Xiuran; Qu, Hailong; Sun, Chunhui; Wang, Jinglong; Zhang, Rui

    2011-10-01

    In order to screen immunogenic candidate antigens for the development of a brucellosis subunit vaccine, an immunoproteomic assay was used to identify immunogenic proteins from Brucella melitensis 16 M soluble proteins. In this study, a total of 56 immunodominant proteins were identified from the two-dimensional electrophoresis immunoblot profiles by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Two proteins of interest, riboflavin synthase alpha chain (RS-α) and Loraine synthase (LS-2), which are both involved in riboflavin synthesis, were detected by two-dimensional immunoblots using antisera obtained from Brucella-infected human and goats. LS-2, however, is an already well-known vaccine candidate. Therefore, we focussed our studies on the novel vaccine candidate RS-α. B. melitensis RS-α and LS-2 were then expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins with His tag. The humoral and cellular immune responses to the recombinant (r)RS-α was characterized. In response to in vitro stimulation by rRS-α, splenocytes from mice vaccinated with rRS-α were able to produce γ-interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 but not interleukin (IL)-4 and interleukin (IL)-10. Furthermore, rRS-α or rLS-2-vaccinated mice were partially protected against B. melitensis infection. Our results suggested that we have developed a high-throughout, accurate, rapid and highly efficient method for the identification of candidate antigens by a combination of immunoproteomics with immunisation and bacterial challenge and rRs-α could be a useful candidate for the development of subunit vaccines against B. melitensis.

  12. Construction and preliminary immunobiological characterization of a novel, non-reverting, intranasal live attenuated whooping cough vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford-Nairns, Renee; Daggard, Grant; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2012-06-01

    We describe the construction and immunobiological properties of a novel whooping cough vaccine candidate, in which the aroQ gene, encoding 3-dehydroquinase, was deleted by insertional inactivation using the kanamycin resistance gene cassette and allelic exchange using a Bordetella suicide vector. The aroQ B. pertussis mutant required supplementation of media to grow but failed to grow on an unsupplemented medium. The aroQ B. pertussis mutant was undetectable in the trachea and lungs of mice at days 6 and 12 post-infection, respectively. Antigen-specific antibody isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a, were produced, and cell-mediated immunity [CMI], using interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma as indirect indicators, was induced in mice vaccinated with the aroQ B. pertussis vaccine candidate, which were substantially enhanced upon second exposure to virulent B. pertussis. Interleukin- 12 was also produced in the aroQ B. pertussis-vaccinated mice. On the other hand, neither IgG2a nor CMI-indicator cytokines were produced in DTaP-vaccinated mice, although the CMI-indicator cytokines became detectable post-challenge with virulent B. pertussis. Intranasal immunization with one dose of the aroQ B. pertussis mutant protected vaccinated mice against an intranasal challenge infection, with no pathogen being detected in the lungs of immunized mice by day 7 post-challenge. B. pertussis aroQ thus constitutes a safe, non-reverting, metabolite-deficient vaccine candidate that induces both humoral and cellmediated immune responses with potential for use as a single-dose vaccine in adolescents and adults, in the first instance, with a view to disrupting the transmission cycle of whooping cough to infants and the community.

  13. Identification and evaluation of vaccine candidate antigens from the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Kathryn; Wright, Harry W; Huntley, John F; Manson, Erin D T; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nath, Mintu; Bartley, Yvonne; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2015-11-01

    An aqueous extract of the haematophagous poultry ectoparasite, Dermanyssus gallinae, was subfractionated using anion exchange chromatography. Six of these subfractions were used to immunise hens and the blood from these hens was fed, in vitro, to poultry red mites. Mite mortality following these feeds was indicative of protective antigens in two of the subfractions, with the risks of mites dying being 3.1 and 3.7 times higher than in the control group (P<0.001). A combination of two-dimensional immunoblotting and immunoaffinity chromatography, using IgY from hens immunised with these subfractions, was used in concert with proteomic analyses to identify the strongest immunogenic proteins in each of these subfractions. Ten of the immunoreactive proteins were selected for assessment as vaccine candidates using the following criteria: intensity of immune recognition; likelihood of exposure of the antigen to the antibodies in a blood meal; proposed function and known vaccine potential of orthologous molecules. Recombinant versions of each of these 10 proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and were used to immunise hens. Subsequent in vitro feeding of mites on blood from these birds indicated that immunisation with Deg-SRP-1 (serpin), Deg-VIT-1 (vitellogenin), Deg-HGP-1 (hemelipoglycoprotein) or Deg-PUF-1 (a protein of unknown function) resulted in significantly increased risk of mite death (1.7-2.8times higher than in mites fed blood from control hens immunised with adjuvant only, P<0.001). The potential for using these antigens in a recombinant vaccine is discussed.

  14. Structure of SALO, a leishmaniasis vaccine candidate from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Kelleher, Alan; Liu, Zhuyun; Pollet, Jeroen; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Rezende, Wanderson C; Groen, Mallory Jo; Seid, Christopher A; Abdeladhim, Maha; Townsend, Shannon; de Castro, Waldione; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2017-03-01

    Immunity to the sand fly salivary protein SALO (Salivary Anticomplement of Lutzomyia longipalpis) protected hamsters against Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis infection and, more recently, a vaccine combination of a genetically modified Leishmania with SALO conferred strong protection against L. donovani infection. Because of the importance of SALO as a potential component of a leishmaniasis vaccine, a plan to produce this recombinant protein for future scale manufacturing as well as knowledge of its structural characteristics are needed to move SALO forward for the clinical path. Recombinant SALO was expressed as a soluble secreted protein using Pichia pastoris, rSALO(P), with yields of 1g/L and >99% purity as assessed by SEC-MALS and SDS-PAGE. Unlike its native counterpart, rSALO(P) does not inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, antibodies to rSALO(P) inhibit the anti-complement activity of sand fly salivary gland homogenate. Immunization with rSALO(P) produces a delayed type hypersensitivity response in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting rSALO(P) lacked anti-complement activity but retained its immunogenicity. The structure of rSALO(P) was solved by S-SAD at Cu-Kalpha to 1.94 Å and refined to Rfactor 17%. SALO is ~80% helical, has no appreciable structural similarities to any human protein, and has limited structural similarity in the C-terminus to members of insect odorant binding proteins. SALO has three predicted human CD4+ T cell epitopes on surface exposed helices. The results indicate that SALO as expressed and purified from P. pastoris is suitable for further scale-up, manufacturing, and testing. SALO has a novel structure, is not similar to any human proteins, is immunogenic in rodents, and does not have the anti-complement activity observed in the native salivary protein which are all important attributes to move this vaccine candidate forward to the clinical path.

  15. Structure of SALO, a leishmaniasis vaccine candidate from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatoyin A Asojo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to the sand fly salivary protein SALO (Salivary Anticomplement of Lutzomyia longipalpis protected hamsters against Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis infection and, more recently, a vaccine combination of a genetically modified Leishmania with SALO conferred strong protection against L. donovani infection. Because of the importance of SALO as a potential component of a leishmaniasis vaccine, a plan to produce this recombinant protein for future scale manufacturing as well as knowledge of its structural characteristics are needed to move SALO forward for the clinical path.Recombinant SALO was expressed as a soluble secreted protein using Pichia pastoris, rSALO(P, with yields of 1g/L and >99% purity as assessed by SEC-MALS and SDS-PAGE. Unlike its native counterpart, rSALO(P does not inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, antibodies to rSALO(P inhibit the anti-complement activity of sand fly salivary gland homogenate. Immunization with rSALO(P produces a delayed type hypersensitivity response in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting rSALO(P lacked anti-complement activity but retained its immunogenicity. The structure of rSALO(P was solved by S-SAD at Cu-Kalpha to 1.94 Å and refined to Rfactor 17%. SALO is ~80% helical, has no appreciable structural similarities to any human protein, and has limited structural similarity in the C-terminus to members of insect odorant binding proteins. SALO has three predicted human CD4+ T cell epitopes on surface exposed helices.The results indicate that SALO as expressed and purified from P. pastoris is suitable for further scale-up, manufacturing, and testing. SALO has a novel structure, is not similar to any human proteins, is immunogenic in rodents, and does not have the anti-complement activity observed in the native salivary protein which are all important attributes to move this vaccine candidate forward to the clinical path.

  16. Optimizing expression of the pregnancy malaria vaccine candidate, VAR2CSA in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narum David L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background VAR2CSA is the main candidate for a vaccine against pregnancy-associated malaria, but vaccine development is complicated by the large size and complex disulfide bonding pattern of the protein. Recent X-ray crystallographic information suggests that domain boundaries of VAR2CSA Duffy binding-like (DBL domains may be larger than previously predicted and include two additional cysteine residues. This study investigated whether longer constructs would improve VAR2CSA recombinant protein secretion from Pichia pastoris and if domain boundaries were applicable across different VAR2CSA alleles. Methods VAR2CSA sequences were bioinformatically analysed to identify the predicted C11 and C12 cysteine residues at the C-termini of DBL domains and revised N- and C-termimal domain boundaries were predicted in VAR2CSA. Multiple construct boundaries were systematically evaluated for protein secretion in P. pastoris and secreted proteins were tested as immunogens. Results From a total of 42 different VAR2CSA constructs, 15 proteins (36% were secreted. Longer construct boundaries, including the predicted C11 and C12 cysteine residues, generally improved expression of poorly or non-secreted domains and permitted expression of all six VAR2CSA DBL domains. However, protein secretion was still highly empiric and affected by subtle differences in domain boundaries and allelic variation between VAR2CSA sequences. Eleven of the secreted proteins were used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies reacted with CSA-binding infected erythrocytes, indicating that P. pastoris recombinant proteins possessed native protein epitopes. Conclusion These findings strengthen emerging data for a revision of DBL domain boundaries in var-encoded proteins and may facilitate pregnancy malaria vaccine development.

  17. Travel advice for the immunocompromised traveler: prophylaxis, vaccination, and other preventive measures [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel RR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patel RR, Liang SY, Koolwal P, Kuhlmann FM. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management. 2015;11:217–228.On page 224, Meningococcal vaccine heading, second sentence “Vaccination is recommended with the quadrivalent polysaccharide (Menactra™” should have read “Vaccination with the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4 is recommended”. Read the original paper

  18. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in an Area with Zika? Find a Clinic Yellow Fever Vaccinations Clinics FAQ Disease Directory Resources Resources for ... CE Courses and Training Presentations for Health Professionals Yellow Fever Vaccine Course About the Yellow Fever Vaccine Course ...

  19. Satisfactory safety and immunogenicity of MSP3 malaria vaccine candidate in Tanzanian children aged 12–24 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segeja Method D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and deployment of an effective malaria vaccine would complement existing malaria control measures. A blood stage malaria vaccine candidate, Merozoite Surface Protein-3 (MSP3, produced as a long synthetic peptide, has been shown to be safe in non-immune and semi-immune adults. A phase Ib dose-escalating study was conducted to assess the vaccine's safety and immunogenicity in children aged 12 to 24 months in Korogwe, Tanzania (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00469651. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, dose escalation phase Ib trial, in which children were given one of two different doses of the MSP3 antigen (15 μg or 30 μg or a control vaccine (Engerix B. Children were randomly allocated either to the MSP3 candidate malaria vaccine or the control vaccine administered at a schedule of 0, 1, and 2 months. Immunization with lower and higher doses was staggered for safety reasons starting with the lower dose. The primary endpoint was safety and reactogenicity within 28 days post-vaccination. Blood samples were obtained at different time points to measure immunological responses. Results are presented up to 84 days post-vaccination. Results A total of 45 children were enrolled, 15 in each of the two MSP3 dose groups and 15 in the Engerix B group. There were no important differences in reactogenicity between the two MSP3 groups and Engerix B. Grade 3 adverse events were infrequent; only five were detected throughout the study, all of which were transient and resolved without sequelae. No serious adverse event reported was considered to be related to MSP3 vaccine. Both MSP3 dose regimens elicited strong cytophilic IgG responses (subclasses IgG1 and IgG3, the isotypes involved in the monocyte-dependant mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum parasite-killing. The titers reached are similar to those from African adults having reached a state of premunition. Furthermore, vaccination induced seroconversion in

  20. Preliminary validation of rocket immunoelectrophoresis in detection of content and molecule size of poly-saccharides in ACYW135 meningococcal poly-saccharide vaccine%火箭免疫电泳法检测 ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗多糖含量和分子大小的初步验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世慧; 赵俊; 张霖阳; 李亚妹; 王玲; 吴丽洁; 周第

    2014-01-01

    Objective To validate the rocket immunoelectrophoresis in detection of the content and molecule size of poly -saccharides in ACYW135 meningococcal poly-saccharide vaccine .Methods The content and molecule size of polysaccha-rides in ACYW135 meningococcal poly-saccharide vaccine were separately detected by chemical methods and rocket immu-noelectrophoresis , and the results were statistically analyzed .Results The results of the two methods have no significant difference .Conclusion The rocket immunoelectrophoresis can be used to determine the content and molecule size of poly -saccharides in ACYW135 meningococcal poly-saccharide vaccine .%目的:对火箭电泳法用于检测ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗的多糖含量和多糖分子大小进行验证。方法用化学法和火箭电泳法分别检测ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗的多糖含量和多糖分子大小,统计学分析两种方法的检测结果。结果两种方法的检测结果差异无统计学意义。结论火箭电泳法可以用于检测ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗的多糖含量和多糖分子大小。

  1. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartl, Hana M; Nfon, Charles K; Zhang, Shunzhen; Marszal, Peter; Wilson, William C; Morrill, John C; Bettinger, George E; Peters, Clarence J

    2014-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory and thus the need exists to develop safe and efficacious vaccines that can be used outside the endemic zones. Commercial RVFV vaccines are available but have limitations that prevent their use in disease-free countries. Consequently, there are ongoing efforts to develop and/or improve RVFV vaccines with global acceptability. In this study a previously developed MP-12-derived vaccine candidate with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre Gn region of the M segment (arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384) developed by T. Ikegami, that was already shown to be safe in pregnant sheep causing neither abortion nor fetal malformation was further evaluated. This vaccine was tested for protection of sheep from viremia and fever following challenge with virulent RVFV ZH501 strain. A single vaccination with arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384 fully protected sheep when challenged four weeks post vaccination, thereby demonstrating that this vaccine is efficacious in protecting these animals from RVFV infection.

  2. Multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II controlled trial of an investigational recombinant Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine with and without outer membrane vesicles, administered in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Snape, Matthew D; Dawson, Tom; Holland, Ann; John, Tessa M; Evans, Anita; Telford, Karen L; Ypma, Ellen; Toneatto, Daniela; Oster, Philipp; Miller, Elizabeth; Pollard, Andrew J

    2010-11-15

    In the absence of an efficacious broadly protective vaccine, serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and septicemia in many industrialized countries. An investigational recombinant vaccine that contains 3 central proteins; Neisserial adhesin A (NadA), factor H binding protein (fHBP) and Neisserial heparin binding antigen (NHBA) has been developed. These antigens have been formulated with and without outer membrane vesicles (rMenB+OMV and rMenB, respectively) from the New Zealand epidemic strain (B:4:P1.7-2,4). In this trial, we assessed the immunogenicity of these formulations in infants, who are at greatest risk of contracting MenB disease. A total of 147 infants from the United Kingdom were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive rMenB or rMenB+OMV at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age or a single dose at 12 months of age. Serum samples taken before and after vaccination were assayed in a standardized serum bactericidal antibody assay against 7 MenB strains. Local and systemic reactogenicity were recorded for 7 days after each vaccination. Analysis was according to protocol. After 3 doses, both vaccines were immunogenic against strains expressing homologous or related NadA and fHBP. rMenB+OMV demonstrated greater immunogenicity than did rMenB and was immunogenic against strains expressing homologous PorA. Both vaccines elicited anamnestic responses after the fourth dose. For both vaccines, responses were lower against strains expressing heterologous fHBP variants and after a single dose at 12 months. The rMenB+OMV vaccine has the potential to protect infants from MenB disease, although the breadth of protection afforded to heterologous antigens requires additional investigation.

  3. Trends and variations in the epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Kuwait 1987-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Entesar H; Barakat, Mohammad; Al-Saleh, Mosaab

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine and conjugate pneumococcal vaccine into routine childhood vaccination in Kuwait has resulted in the emergence of Neisseria meningitidis as the leading cause of invasive bacterial infection in children. Currently, a quadrivalent ACYW-135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is administered as part of routine childhood vaccination in Kuwait at the age of 2 years. Conjugate meningococcal vaccines have been shown to be more effective in preventing meningococcal infection in young children. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of meningococcal disease (MD) in Kuwait and evaluate the need for conjugate vaccine in routine childhood immunization. We have reviewed the MD surveillance data from the communicable disease unit, Ministry of Health, Kuwait during the period from 1987 to 2013. The analysis included microbiologically confirmed cases of N. meningitidis in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. There were 293 cases of confirmed MD during the study period. Two hundred and four cases (70%) were in children ≤ 14 years of age. The mean incidence rate was 0.5/100,000 persons. The dominant serogroups were W-135 and B, accounting for 80 cases (32%) each. Serogroup B accounted for 69/204 (34%) of all cases in children ≤ 14 years and serogroup A accounted for 36/89 40% of all adult cases. There were three outbreaks: 1987 (caused by serogroup A), 1989 (caused by serogroup W-135) and 2002 (caused by serogroup B). The mean case fatality rate was 13.5%. In conclusion, despite childhood routine vaccination with ACYW-135 polysaccharide vaccine, infants and young children remain at high risk for MD, which supports the introduction of conjugate meningococcal vaccine to the routine childhood vaccination schedule.

  4. Evaluation of eight live attenuated vaccine candidates for protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in mice

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    John P Bannantine

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, which results in serious economic losses worldwide in farmed livestock such as cattle, sheep and goats. To control this disease, an effective vaccine with minimal adverse effects is needed. In order to identify a live vaccine for Johne’s disease, we evaluated eight attenuated mutant strains of MAP using a C57BL/6 mouse model. The persistence of the vaccine candidates was measured at 6, 12, and 18 weeks post vaccination. Only strains 320, 321 and 329 colonized both the liver and spleens up until the 12-week time point. The remaining five mutants showed no survival in those tissues, indicating their complete attenuation in the mouse model. The candidate vaccine strains demonstrated different levels of protection based on colonization of the challenge strain in liver and spleen tissues at 12 and 18 weeks post vaccination. Based on total MAP burden in both tissues at both time points, strain 315 (MAP1566::Tn5370 was the most protective whereas strain 318 (intergenic Tn5367 insertion between MAP0282c and MAP0283c had the most colonization. Mice vaccinated with an undiluted commercial vaccine preparation displayed the highest bacterial burden as well as enlarged spleens indicative of a strong infection. Selected vaccine strains that showed promise in the mouse model were moved forward into a goat challenge model. The results suggest that the mouse trial, as conducted, may have a relatively poor predictive value for protection in a ruminant host such as goats.

  5. Progressive decrease in the potential usefulness of meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB, Bexsero® in Gipuzkoa, Northern Spain.

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    Emilio Pérez-Trallero

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a vaccine is determined not only by the immunogenicity of its components, but especially by how widely it covers the disease-causing strains circulating in a given region. Because vaccine coverage varies over time, this study aimed to detect possible changes that could affect vaccine protection during a specific period in a southern European region. The 4CMenB vaccine is licensed for use in Europe, Canada, and Australia and is mainly directed against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. This vaccine contains four main immunogenic components: three recombinant proteins, FHbp, Nhba and NadA, and an outer membrane vesicle [PorA P1.4]. The allelic distribution of FHbp, Nhba, NadA, and PorA antigens in 82 invasive isolates (B and non-B serogroups isolated from January 2008 to December 2013 were analyzed. 4CMenB was likely protective against 61.8% and 50% of serogroup B and non-B meningococci, respectively, in the entire period, but between 2012 and 2013, the predicted protection fell below 45% (42.1% for serogroup B isolates.The observed decreasing trend in the predicted protection during the 6 years of the study (Χ2 for trend  = 4.68, p = 0.03 coincided with a progressive decrease of several clonal complexes (e.g., cc11, cc32 and cc41/44, which had one or more antigens against which the vaccine would offer protection.

  6. Immunoscreening of Plasmodium falciparum proteins expressed in a wheat germ cell-free system reveals a novel malaria vaccine candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masayuki; Takashima, Eizo; Ito, Daisuke; Miura, Kazutoyo; Thongkukiatkul, Amporn; Diouf, Ababacar; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Diakite, Mahamadou; Long, Carole A.; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    The number of malaria vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical development is limited. To identify novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidates, we constructed a library of 1,827P. falciparum proteins prepared using the wheat germ cell-free system (WGCFS). Also, a high-throughput AlphaScreen procedure was developed to measure antibody reactivity to the recombinant products. Purified IgGs from residents in malaria endemic areas have shown functional activity against blood-stage parasites as judged by an in vitro parasite Growth Inhibition Assay (GIA). Therefore, we evaluated the GIA activity of 51 plasma samples prepared from Malian adults living in a malaria endemic area against the WGCFS library. Using the AlphaScreen-based immunoreactivity measurements, antibody reactivity against 3 proteins was positively associated with GIA activity. Since anti-LSA3-C responses showed the strongest correlation with GIA activity, this protein was investigated further. Anti-LSA3-C-specific antibody purified from Malian adult plasmas showed GIA activity, and expression of LSA3 in blood-stage parasites was confirmed by western blotting. Taken together, we identified LSA3 as a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate, and we propose that this system will be useful for future vaccine candidate discovery. PMID:28378857

  7. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences for the fu...

  8. Linear synthesis and immunological properties of a fully synthetic vaccine candidate containing a sialylated MUC1 glycopeptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Pamela; Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Supekar, Nitin T.; Bradley, Judy M.; Cohen, Peter A.; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Boons, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    A strategy for the linear synthesis of a sialylated glycolipopeptide cancer vaccine candidate has been developed using a strategically designed sialyl-Tn building block and microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The glycolipopeptide elicited potent humoral and cellular immune responses. T

  9. Antigenic community between Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria glabrata: on the search of candidate antigens for vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chacón

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously confirmed the presence of common antigens between Schistosoma mansoni and its vector, Biomphalaria glabrata. Cross-reactive antigens may be important as possible candidates for vaccine and diagnosis of schistosomiasis. Sera from outbred mice immunized with a soluble Biomphalaria glabrata antigen (SBgA of non-infected B. glabrata snails recognized molecules of SBgA itself and S. mansoni AWA by Western blot. Recognition of several molecules of the SBgA were inhibited by pre-incubation with AWA (16, 30, 36, 60 and 155 kDa. The only specific molecule of AWA, inhibited by SBgA, was a 120 kDa protein. In order to determine which epitopes of SBgA were glycoproteins, the antigen was treated with sodium metaperiodate and compared with non-treated antigen. Molecules of 140, 60 and 24 kDa in the SBgA appear to be glycoproteins. Possible protective effects of the SBgA were evaluated immunizing outbred mice in two different experiments using Freund's Adjuvant. In the first one (12 mice/group, we obtained a significant level of protection (46% in the total worm load, with a high variability in worm recovery. In the second experiment (22 mice/group, no significant protection was observed, neither in worm load nor in egg production per female. Our results suggest that SBgA constitutes a rich source of candidate antigens for diagnosis and prophylactic studies.

  10. Immunogenicity and efficacy of flagellin-fused vaccine candidates targeting 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza in mice.

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    Ge Liu

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that the globular head of the hemagglutinin (HA antigen fused to flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium fljB (STF2, a TLR5 ligand elicits protective immunity to H1N1 and H5N1 lethal influenza infections in mice (Song et al., 2008, PLoS ONE 3, e2257; Song et al., 2009, Vaccine 27, 5875-5888. These fusion proteins can be efficiently and economically manufactured in E. coli fermentation systems as next generation pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines. Here we report immunogenicity and efficacy results of three vaccine candidates in which the HA globular head of A/California/07/2009 (H1N1 was fused to STF2 at the C-terminus (STF2.HA1, in replace of domain 3 (STF2R3.HA1, or in both positions (STF2R3.2xHA1. For all three vaccines, two subcutaneous immunizations of BALB/c mice with doses of either 0.3 or 3 µg elicit robust neutralizing (HAI antibodies, that lead to > = 2 Log(10 unit reduction in day 4 lung virus titer and full protection against a lethal A/California/04/2009 challenge. Vaccination with doses as low as 0.03 µg results in partial to full protection. Each candidate, particularly the STF2R3.HA1 and STF2R3.2xHA1 candidates, elicits robust neutralizing antibody responses that last for at least 8 months. The STF2R3.HA1 candidate, which was intermediately protective in the challenge models, is more immunogenic than the H1N1 components of two commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIVs in mice. Taken together, the results demonstrate that all three vaccine candidates are highly immunogenic and efficacious in mice, and that the STF2R3.2xHA1 format is the most effective candidate vaccine format.

  11. Protection from lethal challenge in a neonatal mouse model by circulating recombinant form coxsackievirus A16 vaccine candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingliang; Chang, Junliang; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Guo, Haoran; Wei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Circulating coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is a major cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in South-east Asia. At present, there is no vaccine against CA16. Pathogenic animal models that are sensitive to diverse circulating CA16 viruses would be desirable for vaccine development and evaluation. In this study, we isolated and characterized several circulating CA16 viruses from recent HFMD patients. These CA16 viruses currently circulating in humans were highly pathogenic in a newly developed neonatal mouse model; we also observed and analysed the pathogenesis of representative circulating recombinant form CA16 viruses. An inactivated CA16 vaccine candidate, formulated with alum adjuvant and containing submicrogram quantities of viral proteins, protected neonatal mice born to immunized female mice from lethal-dose challenge with a series of CA16 viruses. Further analysis of humoral immunity showed that antibody elicited from both the immunized dams and their pups could neutralize various lethal viruses by a cytopathic effect in vitro. Moreover, viral titres and loads in the tissues of challenged pups in the vaccine group were far lower than those in the control group, and some were undetectable. This lethal-challenge model using pathogenic CA16 viruses and the vaccine candidates that mediated protection in this model could be useful tools for the future development and evaluation of CA16 vaccines. PMID:24496826

  12. Evaluation of the potential of Mycobacterium smegmatis as vaccine Candidate against tuberculosis by in silico and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thuy Nguyen Thi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we scanned multiple published databases of gene expression in vivo of M. tuberculosis at different phases of infection in animals and humans, to select 38 proteins that are highly expressed in the active, latent and reactivation phases. The selected proteins were predicted for T and B epitopes. For each proteins, the regions containing T and B epitopes were selected at the same time to look for identical epitopes on M. smegmatis based on sequence alignments. Preliminary studies of humoral immunogenicity and cross-reactivity with M. tuberculosis in mice using two M. smegmatis-derived experimental vaccines were carried out, demonstrating the immunogenicity of M. smegmatis proteoliposomes and the recognition of M. tuberculosis proteins by the sera of animals immunized with this vaccine candidate. The conjunction of in silico and in vivo studies suggested the potential for future evaluation of M. smegmatis as vaccine candidate against tuberculosis using different strategies

  13. African Green Monkeys Recapitulate the Clinical Experience with Replication of Live Attenuated Pandemic Influenza Virus Vaccine Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Suguitan, Amorsolo; Orandle, Marlene; Paskel, Myeisha; Boonnak, Kobporn; Gardner, Donald J.; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Marino, Michael; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) H5N1, H7N3, H6N1, and H9N2 influenza vaccine viruses replicated in the respiratory tract of mice and ferrets, and 2 doses of vaccines were immunogenic and protected these animals from challenge infection with homologous and heterologous wild-type (wt) viruses of the corresponding subtypes. However, when these vaccine candidates were evaluated in phase I clinical trials, there were inconsistencies between the observations in animal models and in humans. The vaccine viruses did not replicate well and immune responses were variable in humans, even though the study subjects were seronegative with respect to the vaccine viruses before vaccination. Therefore, we sought a model that would better reflect the findings in humans and evaluated African green monkeys (AGMs) as a nonhuman primate model. The distribution of sialic acid (SA) receptors in the respiratory tract of AGMs was similar to that in humans. We evaluated the replication of wt and ca viruses of avian influenza (AI) virus subtypes H5N1, H6N1, H7N3, and H9N2 in the respiratory tract of AGMs. All of the wt viruses replicated efficiently, while replication of the ca vaccine viruses was restricted to the upper respiratory tract. Interestingly, the patterns and sites of virus replication differed among the different subtypes. We also evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of H5N1, H6N1, H7N3, and H9N2 ca vaccines. Protection from wt virus challenge correlated well with the level of serum neutralizing antibodies. Immune responses were slightly better when vaccine was delivered by both intranasal and intratracheal delivery than when it was delivered intranasally by sprayer. We conclude that live attenuated pandemic influenza virus vaccines replicate similarly in AGMs and human subjects and that AGMs may be a useful model to evaluate the replication of ca vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Ferrets and mice are commonly used for preclinical evaluation of influenza

  14. Leishmania genome analysis and high-throughput immunological screening identifies tuzin as a novel vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Bhavana Sethu; Wang, Ruobing; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-06-24

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania species. It is a major health concern affecting 88 countries and threatening 350 million people globally. Unfortunately, there are no vaccines and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. The emerging cases of drug-resistance further aggravate the situation, demanding rapid drug and vaccine development. The genome sequence of Leishmania, provides access to novel genes that hold potential as chemotherapeutic targets or vaccine candidates. In this study, we selected 19 antigenic genes from about 8000 common Leishmania genes based on the Leishmania major and Leishmania infantum genome information available in the pathogen databases. Potential vaccine candidates thus identified were screened using an in vitro high throughput immunological platform developed in the laboratory. Four candidate genes coding for tuzin, flagellar glycoprotein-like protein (FGP), phospholipase A1-like protein (PLA1) and potassium voltage-gated channel protein (K VOLT) showed a predominant protective Th1 response over disease exacerbating Th2. We report the immunogenic properties and protective efficacy of one of the four antigens, tuzin, as a DNA vaccine against Leishmania donovani challenge. Our results show that administration of tuzin DNA protected BALB/c mice against L. donovani challenge and that protective immunity was associated with higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 production in comparison to IL-4 and IL-10. Our study presents a simple approach to rapidly identify potential vaccine candidates using the exhaustive information stored in the genome and an in vitro high-throughput immunological platform.

  15. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: conceptual design of the vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    West Nile virus has become an important epidemiological problem attracting significant attention of health authorities, mass media, and the public. Although there are promising advancements toward addressing the vaccine need, the perspectives of the commercial availability of the vaccine remain uncertain. To a large extent this is due to lack of a sustained interest for further commercial development of the vaccines already undergoing the preclinical and clinical development, and a predicted insignificant cost effectiveness of mass vaccination. There is a need for a safe, efficacious and cost effective vaccine, which can improve the feasibility of a targeted vaccination program. In the present report, we summarize the background, the rationale, and the choice of the development pathway that we selected for the design of a live attenuated human West Nile vaccine in a novel infectious DNA format.

  16. HIV-1 Immunogen: an overview of almost 30 years of clinical testing of a candidate therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2016-07-01

    Although current antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV infection into a chronic, manageable disease, ART does not cure HIV infection. Furthermore, the majority of the world's infected individuals live in resource-limited countries in which access to ART is limited. Thus, the development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine would be an invaluable treatment alternative. Developed by the late Dr. Jonas Salk, HIV-1 Immunogen (Remune®) is a candidate therapeutic vaccine that has been studied in thousands of HIV-infected individuals in more than a dozen clinical trials during almost three decades. This Drug Evaluation, which summarizes the results of these trials that have shown the vaccine to be safe and immunogenic, also discusses the contradictory and controversial conclusions drawn from the phases 2, 2/3 and 3 trials that assessed the clinical efficacy of this vaccine. Given the lack of unequivocal clinical benefits of HIV-1 Immunogen despite almost 30 years of extensive testing, it does not appear, in our view, that this vaccine is a clinically effective immunotherapy. However, inclusion of this vaccine in the newly proposed 'Kick/Shock and Kill' strategy for HIV eradication, or use as a prophylactic vaccine, could be considered for future trials.

  17. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing.

  18. Force Spectroscopy of the Plasmodium falciparum Vaccine Candidate Circumsporozoite Protein Suggests a Mechanically Pliable Repeat Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aditya Prasad; Sharma, Shobhona; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2017-02-10

    The most effective vaccine candidate of malaria is based on the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a major surface protein implicated in the structural strength, motility, and immune evasion properties of the infective sporozoites. It is suspected that reversible conformational changes of CSP are required for infection of the mammalian host, but the detailed structure and dynamic properties of CSP remain incompletely understood, limiting our understanding of its function in the infection. Here, we report the structural and mechanical properties of the CSP studied using single-molecule force spectroscopy on several constructs, one including the central region of CSP, which is rich in NANP amino acid repeats (CSPrep), and a second consisting of a near full-length sequence without the signal and anchor hydrophobic domains (CSPΔHP). Our results show that the CSPrep is heterogeneous, with 40% of molecules requiring virtually no mechanical force to unfold (<10 piconewtons (pN)), suggesting that these molecules are mechanically compliant and perhaps act as entropic springs, whereas the remaining 60% are partially structured with low mechanical resistance (∼70 pN). CSPΔHP having multiple force peaks suggests specifically folded domains, with two major populations possibly indicating the open and collapsed forms. Our findings suggest that the overall low mechanical resistance of the repeat region, exposed on the outer surface of the sporozoites, combined with the flexible full-length conformations of CSP, may provide the sporozoites not only with immune evasion properties, but also with lubricating capacity required during its navigation through the mosquito and vertebrate host tissues. We anticipate that these findings would further assist in the design and development of future malarial vaccines. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Conservation of Meningococcal Antigens in the Genus Neisseria

    OpenAIRE

    Muzzi, Alessandro; Mora, Marirosa; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Donati, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis, one of the major causes of bacterial meningitis and sepsis, is a member of the genus Neisseria, which includes species that colonize the mucosae of many animals. Three meningococcal proteins, factor H-binding protein (fHbp), neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA), and N. meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), have been described as antigens protective against N. meningitidis of serogroup B, and they have been employed as vaccine components in preclinical and clinic...

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of the RIVM hexavalent meningococcal B vesicle vaccine for Rotterdam children aged 2-3 and 7-8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labadie J; de Kleijn ED; Lafeber AB; Mees MMM; Booy K; de Groot R; van Omme GW; van Dijken H; Kuipers AJ; van den Dobbelsteen G; Juttmann RE; Wala M; van Alphen AJW; Rumke HC; LVO

    2000-01-01

    In dit rapport wordt verslag gedaan van een gerandomiseerde gecontroleerd fase-II klinische studie naar de veiligheid en immunogeniciteit van het RIVM hexavalente MenB vesicle vaccin in 189 kinderen van 2-3 jaar en 168 kinderen van 7-8 jaar in de stad Rotterdam. Twee concentraties van het MenB

  1. Identification of peptidoglycan-associated proteins as vaccine candidates for enterococcal infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Romero-Saavedra

    Full Text Available Infections by opportunistic bacteria have significant contributions to morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients and also lead to high expenses in healthcare. In this setting, one of the major clinical problems is caused by Gram-positive bacteria such as enterococci and staphylococci. In this study we extract, purify, identify and characterize immunogenic surface-exposed proteins present in the vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE strain Enterococcus faecium E155 using three different extraction methods: trypsin shaving, biotinylation and elution at high pH. Proteomic profiling was carried out by gel-free and gel-nanoLC-MS/MS analyses. The total proteins found with each method were 390 by the trypsin shaving, 329 by the elution at high pH, and 45 using biotinylation. An exclusively extracytoplasmic localization was predicted in 39 (10% by trypsin shaving, in 47 (15% by elution at high pH, and 27 (63% by biotinylation. Comparison between the three extraction methods by Venn diagram and subcellular localization predictors (CELLO v.2.5 and Gpos-mPLoc allowed us to identify six proteins that are most likely surface-exposed: the SCP-like extracellular protein, a low affinity penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5, a basic membrane lipoprotein, a peptidoglycan-binding protein LysM (LysM, a D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase (DdcP and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PpiC. Due to their close relationship with the peptidoglycan, we chose PBP5, LysM, DdcP and PpiC to test their potential as vaccine candidates. These putative surface-exposed proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified proteins were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Passive immunization with rabbit antibodies raised against these proteins

  2. Protection of mice from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by ID87/GLA-SE, a novel tuberculosis subunit vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Duthie, Malcolm S; Misquith, Ayesha; Ireton, Greg; Lucas, Elyse; Laurance, John D; Bailor, Remy H; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2011-10-13

    Tuberculosis is a major health concern. Non-living tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates may not only be safer than the current vaccine (BCG) but could also be used to boost BCG to enhance or elongate protection. No subunit vaccines, however, are currently available for TB. To address this gap and to improve the global TB situation, we have generated a defined subunit vaccine by genetically fusing the genes of 3 potent protein Mtb antigens, Rv2875, Rv3478 and Rv1886, into a single product: ID87. When delivered with a TLR4 agonist-based adjuvant, GLA-SE, ID87 immunization reduced Mtb burden in the lungs of experimentally infected mice. The reduction in bacterial burden of ID87/GLA-SE immunized mice was accompanied by an early and significant leukocyte infiltration into the lungs during the infectious process. ID87/GLA-SE appears to be a promising new vaccine candidate that warrants further development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular signature of high yield (growth influenza a virus reassortants prepared as candidate vaccine seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojkumar Ramanunninair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human influenza virus isolates generally grow poorly in embryonated chicken eggs. Hence, gene reassortment of influenza A wild type (wt viruses is performed with a highly egg adapted donor virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8, to provide the high yield reassortant (HYR viral 'seeds' for vaccine production. HYR must contain the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of wt virus and one to six 'internal' genes from PR8. Most studies of influenza wt and HYRs have focused on the HA gene. The main objective of this study is the identification of the molecular signature in all eight gene segments of influenza A HYR candidate vaccine seeds associated with high growth in ovo. METHODOLOGY: The genomes of 14 wt parental viruses, 23 HYRs (5 H1N1; 2, 1976 H1N1-SOIV; 2, 2009 H1N1pdm; 2 H2N2 and 12 H3N2 and PR8 were sequenced using the high-throughput sequencing pipeline with big dye terminator chemistry. RESULTS: Silent and coding mutations were found in all internal genes derived from PR8 with the exception of the M gene. The M gene derived from PR8 was invariant in all 23 HYRs underlining the critical role of PR8 M in high yield phenotype. None of the wt virus derived internal genes had any silent change(s except the PB1 gene in X-157. The highest number of recurrent silent and coding mutations was found in NS. With respect to the surface antigens, the majority of HYRs had coding mutations in HA; only 2 HYRs had coding mutations in NA. SIGNIFICANCE: In the era of application of reverse genetics to alter influenza A virus genomes, the mutations identified in the HYR gene segments associated with high growth in ovo may be of great practical benefit to modify PR8 and/or wt virus gene sequences for improved growth of vaccine 'seed' viruses.

  4. Exoproteome and secretome derived broad spectrum novel drug and vaccine candidates in Vibrio cholerae targeted by Piper betel derived compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debmalya Barh

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species.

  5. In silico analysis to identify vaccine candidates common to multiple serotypes of Shigella and evaluation of their immunogenicity

    KAUST Repository

    Pahil, Sapna

    2017-08-02

    Shigellosis or bacillary dysentery is an important cause of diarrhea, with the majority of the cases occurring in developing countries. Considering the high disease burden, increasing antibiotic resistance, serotype-specific immunity and the post-infectious sequelae associated with shigellosis, there is a pressing need of an effective vaccine against multiple serotypes of the pathogen. In the present study, we used bio-informatics approach to identify antigens shared among multiple serotypes of Shigella spp. This approach led to the identification of many immunogenic peptides. The five most promising peptides based on MHC binding efficiency were a putative lipoprotein (EL PGI I), a putative heat shock protein (EL PGI II), Spa32 (EL PGI III), IcsB (EL PGI IV) and a hypothetical protein (EL PGI V). These peptides were synthesized and the immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice by ELISA and cytokine assays. The putative heat shock protein (HSP) and the hypothetical protein elicited good humoral response, whereas putative lipoprotein, Spa32 and IcsB elicited good T-cell response as revealed by increased IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine levels. The patient sera from confirmed cases of shigellosis were also evaluated for the presence of peptide specific antibodies with significant IgG and IgA antibodies against the HSP and the hypothetical protein, bestowing them as potential future vaccine candidates. The antigens reported in this study are novel and have not been tested as vaccine candidates against Shigella. This study offers time and cost-effective way of identifying unprecedented immunogenic antigens to be used as potential vaccine candidates. Moreover, this approach should easily be extendable to find new potential vaccine candidates for other pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Immunogenicity of a polyvalent HIV-1 candidate vaccine based on fourteen wild type gp120 proteins in golden hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani Masoud

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major obstacles in the design of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is the hypervariability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Most HIV-1 vaccine candidates have utilized envelope glycoprotein from a single virus isolate, but to date, none of them elicited broadly reactive humoral immunity. Herein, we hypothesised that a cocktail of HIV-1 gp120 proteins containing multiple epitopes may increase the breadth of immune responses against HIV-1. We compared and evaluated the immunogenicity of HIV-1 vaccines containing either gp120 protein alone or in combinations of four or fourteen gp120s from different primary HIV-1 isolates in immunized hamsters. Results We amplified and characterized 14 different gp120s from primary subtype B isolates with both syncytium and non-syncytium inducing properties, and expressed the proteins in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines. Purified proteins were used either alone or in combinations of four or fourteen different gp120s to vaccinate golden hamsters. The polyvalent vaccine showed higher antibody titers to HIV-1 subtype B isolates MN and SF162 compared to the groups that received one or four gp120 proteins. However, the polyvalent vaccine was not able to show higher neutralizing antibody responses against HIV-1 primary isolates. Interestingly, the polyvalent vaccine group had the highest proliferative immune responses and showed a substantial proportion of cross-subtype CD4 reactivity to HIV-1 subtypes B, C, and A/E Conclusion Although the polyvalent approach achieved only a modest increase in the breadth of humoral and cellular immunity, the qualitative change in the vaccine (14 vs. 1 gp120 resulted in a quantitative improvement in vaccine-induced immunity.

  7. Evidence for globally shared, cross-reacting polymorphic epitopes in the pregnancy-associated malaria vaccine candidate VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avril, Marion; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Gose, Severin O;

    2008-01-01

    Da) and extensive polymorphism may pose a challenge to vaccine development. In this study, rabbits were immunized with individual VAR2CSA Duffy binding-like (DBL) domains expressed in Pichia pastoris or var2csa plasmid DNA and sera were screened on different CSA-binding parasite lines. Rabbit antibodies to three......Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is characterized by the placental sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs) with the ability to bind to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). VAR2CSA is a leading candidate for a pregnancy malaria vaccine, but its large size ( approximately 350 k...

  8. Comparison of the safety and efficacy of a new live Salmonella Gallinarum vaccine candidate, JOL916, with the SG9R vaccine in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kiku; Chaudhari, Atul A; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated a recently developed live vaccine candidate for fowl typhoid (FT)-JOL916, a lon/cpxR mutant of Salmonella Gallinarum (SG)-by comparing its safety and efficacy with that of the well-known rough mutant strain SG9R vaccine in 6-wk-old Hy-Line hens. Forty-five chickens were divided into three groups of 15 chickens each. The chickens were then intramuscularly inoculated with 2 x 10(7) colony-forming units (CFUs) of JOL916 (JOL916 group), 2 x 10(7) CFUs of SG9R (SG9R group), or phosphate-buffered saline (control group). After vaccination, no clinical symptoms were observed in any of the groups. No differences in body weight increase were detected among the three groups postvaccination. A cellular immune response was observed at 2 wk postvaccination (wpv) in the JOL916 group with the peripheral lymphocyte proliferation assay, whereas no response was detected in the SG9R group. Elevation of SG antigen-specific plasma immunoglobulin was observed 2 and 3 wpv in the JOL916 and SG9R vaccine groups, respectively. After virulent challenge on day 25 postvaccination, 0, 1, and 15 chickens in the JOL916 group, SG9R group, and control group, respectively, died by 12 days postchallenge; the death rate of the SG9R vaccine group was statistically similar to that of the JOL916 group. Postmortem examination revealed that the JOL916 vaccine offered more efficient protection than the SG9R vaccine, with significantly decreased hepatic necrotic foci scores, splenic enlargement scores, necrotic foci scores, and recovery of the challenge strain from the spleen. Vaccination with JOL916 appears to be safe and offers better protection than SG9R against FT in chickens.

  9. The effects of CpG-ODNs and Chitosan adjuvants on the elicitation of immune responses induced by the HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Samira; Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2017-03-01

    HIV1-Tat-based vaccines could elicit broad, durable and neutralizing immune responses and are considered as potential AIDS vaccines. The present study aims to formulate CpG-ODNs adjuvant and Chitosan with Tat protein to enhance the immunogenicity of HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines and to investigate their efficacies in mice. To this end, we added CpG-ODNs, Chitosan and Alum as adjuvants to the Tat-based candidate vaccine formulations. Then, we compared frequency and magnitude of both humoral and cellular immune responses from mice immunized with the adjuvant-formulated Tat candidate vaccines against those obtained from mice immunized with recombinant Tat protein alone. Mice were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with the candidate vaccines. Measurements of anti-Tat immune responses showed that all vaccinated groups had a good immunity compared to the control groups and developed high levels of both humoral and cellular responses. However, immunized mice with CpG-ODNs, and Chitosan-adjuvanted Tat vaccines elicited stronger T-cell responses (both humoral and cellular immunity) compared to the others. These data suggest that co-administration of recombinant Tat protein with CpG-ODNs and Chitosan may serve as a potential formulation for enhancing of the Tat vaccine-induced immunity and might have effects on shaping Th polarization induced by HIV1-Tat protein vaccines. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Proteomic study via a non-gel based approach of meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine obtained from strain CU385: a road map for discovering new antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Jeovanis; Betancourt, L Zaro H; Sardiñas, Gretel; Yero, Daniel; Niebla, Olivia; Delgado, Maité; García, Darien; Pajón, Rolando; Sánchez, Aniel; González, Luis J; Padrón, Gabriel; Campa, Concepción; Sotolongo, Franklin; Barberó, Ramón; Guillén, Gerardo; Herrera, Luis; Besada, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    This work presents the results from a study of the protein composition of outer membrane vesicles from VA-MENGOC-BC (Finlay Institute, Cuba), an available vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis. Proteins were identified by means of SCAPE, a 2DE-free method for proteome studies. More than one hundred proteins were detected by tandem liquid chromatographymass spectrometry analysis of fractions enriched in peptides devoid of histidine or arginine residues, providing a detailed description of the vaccine. A bioinformatic analysis of the identified components resulted in the identification of 31 outer membrane proteins and three conserved hypothetical proteins, allowing the cloning, expression, purification and immunological study of two of them (NMB0088 and NMB1796) as new antigens.

  11. Invasive Meningococcal Men Y Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-18

    Dr. Leonard Mayer, a public health microbiologist at CDC, discusses invasive meningococcal disease.  Created: 4/18/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/23/2012.

  12. Prevention of meningococcal infections in the first 2 years of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-08-01

    The spectrum of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis includes bacteremia, fulminant sepsis (meningococcemia), meningitis, and pneumonia. The incidence of meningococcal infection has long been higher in infancy than adolescents or adults older than 65 years (a third group with an increased risk based on age). Five meningococcal serogroups (A, B, C, Y, and W135) cause the great majority of human disease. Serogroup B strains cause about two-thirds of disease in children younger than 6 years. For this reason, new meningococcal vaccine formulations have been developed and evaluated in children younger than 2 years. Of four meningococcal vaccines currently licensed in the United States, two conjugate products, (MenACWY-D [Menactra], Sanofi Pasteur; HibMenCY-TT [MenHibrix], GlaxoSmithKline), are recommended for infants and toddlers younger than 2 years who have an increased risk for invasive meningococcal disease. High-risk conditions are complement deficiencies, community outbreaks, functional or anatomic asplenia, and travel to high-risk areas in which serogroup A infection is prevalent. Recommendations vary by age, dosing, and indication between these two products. Both licensed products are immunogenic and have side-effect profiles that are considered safe for use. In most cases, concomitant use with other recommended childhood vaccines does not interfere with responses to these vaccines. As of yet, there has not been universal adoption of this immunization in the infant population by parents or providers. Factors that weigh against the implementation of a national routine infant program include the prevention of only 40 to 50 meningococcal cases, two to four deaths per year, and a relatively low case fatality among infants. Some argue that costs should not be considered a barrier because infant deaths and morbidity would be prevented. The availability of a serogroup B vaccine would improve impact and cost-effectiveness of a routine infant meningococcal vaccine

  13. Functional Exposed Amino Acids of OSPA as a Candidate for Lyme disease Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Kafee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borreliaburgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black legged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash, and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks. The protective role of antibodies to B. burgdorferi has been explored in animal models of Lyme disease. Findings indicated that antibodies against OspA were protective, making this antigen a likely candidate for a vaccine. Early clinical trials demonstrated that recombinant OspA was immunogenic and well tolerated, even in subjects with a history of Lyme disease. The present study was designed to in silico resolving the major obstacles in the control or in prevention of lyme diseases. We exploited bioinformatic tools to better understanding and characterizing the OspAstructure and select appropriate regions as effectiveB cell epitops.

  14. Plant expressed coccidial antigens as potential vaccine candidates in protecting chicken against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Kota; Sriraman, Rajan; Subramanian, B Mohana; Rao, N Hanumantha; Kasa, Balaji; Donikeni, Jagan; Narasu, M Lakshmi; Srinivasan, V A

    2012-06-22

    Coccidiosis is a disease caused by intracellular parasites belonging to the genus Eimeria. In the present study, we transiently expressed two coccidial antigens EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as poly histidine-tagged fusion proteins in tobacco. We have evaluated the protective efficacy of plant expressed EtMIC1 as monovalent and as well as bi-valent formulation where EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 were used in combination. The protective efficacy of these formulations was evaluated using homologous challenge in chickens. We observed better serum antibody response, weight gain and reduced oocyst shedding in birds immunized with EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as bivalent formulation compared to monovalent formulation. However, IFN-γ response was not significant in birds immunized with EtMIC1 compared to the birds immunized with EtMIC2. Our results indicate the potential use of these antigens as vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Puf mediates translation repression of transmission-blocking vaccine candidates in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Miao

    Full Text Available Translational control of gene expression plays an essential role in development. In malaria parasites, translational regulation is critical during the development of specialized transition stages between the vertebrate host and mosquito vector. Here we show that a Pumilio/FBF (Puf family RNA-binding protein, PfPuf2, is required for the translation repression of a number of transcripts in gametocytes including two genes encoding the transmission-blocking vaccine candidates Pfs25 and Pfs28. Whereas studies to date support a paradigm of Puf-mediated translation regulation through 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of target mRNAs, this study, for the first time, identifies a functional Puf-binding element (PBE in the 5'UTR of pfs25. We provide both in vitro and in vivo evidence to demonstrate that PfPuf2 binds to the PBEs in pfs25 and pfs28 to mediate translation repression. This finding provides a renewed view of Pufs as versatile translation regulators and sheds light on their functions in the development of lower branches of eukaryotes.

  16. The Neisseria meningitidis Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein Induces Cross-Strain Serum Bactericidal Activity and Is a Potential Serogroup B Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Salim, Omar; Williams, Jeannette N.; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2011-01-01

    A gene encoding a 29-kDa protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 with homology to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) protein of Legionella pneumophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified soluble recombinant protein (rMIP) was used for immunization studies. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of MIP from 13 well-characterized meningococcal strains, isolated from carriers or patients and differing in serogroup, serotype, and subtype, showed that the protein was highly conserved (98 to 100%), with only three distinct sequence types (designated I, II, and III) found. Western blotting showed that the MIP protein was expressed at similar levels by all of these strains. Immunization of mice with type I MC58 rMIP in detergent micelles and liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) induced high levels of surface-reactive antibodies with serum bactericidal activity (SBA) titers of 1/1,024 against the homologous strain. Bactericidal antibodies were also induced with the protein in saline alone and liposomes alone (titers, 1/128) but not following adsorption to Al(OH)3. Significantly, antisera raised against type I rMIP administered in saline or liposomes killed strains of heterologous sequence types II and III with similar SBA titers (1/128 to 1/256). Taken together, these findings suggest that rMIP can provide cross-strain protection against meningococci and should be considered a potential antigen for inclusion in new vaccines against meningococcal infection. PMID:21708989

  17. The Neisseria meningitidis macrophage infectivity potentiator protein induces cross-strain serum bactericidal activity and is a potential serogroup B vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Salim, Omar; Williams, Jeannette N; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2011-09-01

    A gene encoding a 29-kDa protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 with homology to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) protein of Legionella pneumophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified soluble recombinant protein (rMIP) was used for immunization studies. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of MIP from 13 well-characterized meningococcal strains, isolated from carriers or patients and differing in serogroup, serotype, and subtype, showed that the protein was highly conserved (98 to 100%), with only three distinct sequence types (designated I, II, and III) found. Western blotting showed that the MIP protein was expressed at similar levels by all of these strains. Immunization of mice with type I MC58 rMIP in detergent micelles and liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) induced high levels of surface-reactive antibodies with serum bactericidal activity (SBA) titers of 1/1,024 against the homologous strain. Bactericidal antibodies were also induced with the protein in saline alone and liposomes alone (titers, 1/128) but not following adsorption to Al(OH)(3). Significantly, antisera raised against type I rMIP administered in saline or liposomes killed strains of heterologous sequence types II and III with similar SBA titers (1/128 to 1/256). Taken together, these findings suggest that rMIP can provide cross-strain protection against meningococci and should be considered a potential antigen for inclusion in new vaccines against meningococcal infection.

  18. Live Attenuated Human Salmonella Vaccine Candidates: Tracking the Pathogen in Natural Infection and Stimulation of Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E; Buskirk, Amanda D; Tennant, Sharon M; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2016-11-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by members of the genus Salmonella, is responsible for considerable global morbidity and mortality in both animals and humans. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, focusing on human Salmonella infections. We will trace the path of Salmonella through the body, including host entry sites, tissues and organs affected, and mechanisms involved in both pathogenesis and stimulation of host immunity. Careful consideration of the natural progression of disease provides an important context in which attenuated live oral vaccines can be rationally designed and developed. With this in mind, we will describe a series of attenuated live oral vaccines that have been successfully tested in clinical trials and demonstrated to be both safe and highly immunogenic. The attenuation strategies summarized in this review offer important insights into further development of attenuated vaccines against other Salmonella for which live oral candidates are currently unavailable.

  19. Live Attenuated Human Salmonella Vaccine Candidates: tracking the pathogen in natural infection and stimulation of host immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E.; Buskirk, Amanda D.; Tennant, Sharon M.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by members of the genus Salmonella, is responsible for considerable global morbidity and mortality, in both animals and humans. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenesis of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, focusing on human Salmonella infections. We will trace the path of Salmonella through the body, including host entry sites, tissues and organs affected, and mechanisms involved in both pathogenesis and stimulation of host immunity. Careful consideration of the natural progression of disease provides an important context in which attenuated live oral vaccines can be rationally designed and developed. With this in mind, we will describe a series of attenuated live oral vaccines that have been successfully tested in clinical trials and demonstrated to be both safe and highly immunogenic. The attenuation strategies summarized in this review offer important insights into further development of attenuated vaccines against other Salmonella for which live oral candidates are currently unavailable. PMID:27809955

  20. A full-length Plasmodium falciparum recombinant circumsporozoite protein expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens platform as a malaria vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Noe

    Full Text Available The circumsporozoite protein (CSP of Plasmodium falciparum is a major surface protein, which forms a dense coat on the sporozoite's surface. Preclinical research on CSP and clinical evaluation of a CSP fragment-based RTS, S/AS01 vaccine have demonstrated a modest degree of protection against P. falciparum, mediated in part by humoral immunity and in part by cell-mediated immunity. Given the partial protective efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine in a recent Phase 3 trial, further improvement of CSP-based vaccines is crucial. In this report, we describe the preclinical development of a full-length, recombinant CSP (rCSP-based vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria suitable for current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP production. Utilizing a novel high-throughput Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform, we demonstrated greater efficacy of full-length rCSP as compared to N-terminally truncated versions, rapidly down-selected a promising lead vaccine candidate, and developed a high-yield purification process to express immunologically active, intact antigen for clinical trial material production. The rCSP, when formulated with various adjuvants, induced antigen-specific antibody responses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunofluorescence assay (IFA, as well as CD4+ T-cell responses as determined by ELISpot. The adjuvanted rCSP vaccine conferred protection in mice when challenged with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites containing the P. falciparum repeat region of CSP. Furthermore, heterologous prime/boost regimens with adjuvanted rCSP and an adenovirus type 35-vectored CSP (Ad35CS showed modest improvements in eliciting CSP-specific T-cell responses and anti-malarial protection, depending on the order of vaccine delivery. Collectively, these data support the importance of further clinical development of adjuvanted rCSP, either as a stand-alone product or as one of the components in a heterologous prime

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the nadA gene in Neisseria meningitidis impacts the prediction of coverage of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnocchi, Luca; Biolchi, Alessia; Ferlicca, Francesca; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Brunelli, Brunella; Brier, Sébastien; Norais, Nathalie; Chiarot, Emiliano; Bensi, Giuliano; Kroll, J Simon; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Donnelly, John; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Delany, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    The NadA adhesin is a major component of 4CMenB, a novel vaccine to prevent meningococcus serogroup B (MenB) infection. Under in vitro growth conditions, nadA is repressed by the regulator NadR and poorly expressed, resulting in inefficient killing of MenB strains by anti-NadA antibodies. Interestingly, sera from children infected with strains that express low levels of NadA in laboratory growth nevertheless recognize the NadA antigen, suggesting that NadA expression during infection may be different from that observed in vitro. In a strain panel covering a range of NadA levels, repression was relieved through deleting nadR. All nadR knockout strains expressed high levels of NadA and were efficiently killed by sera from subjects immunized with 4CMenB. A selected MenB strain, NGP165, mismatched for other vaccine antigens, is not killed by sera from immunized infants when the strain is grown in vitro. However, in an in vivo passive protection model, the same sera effectively protected infant rats from bacteremia with NGP165. Furthermore, we identify a novel hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA) derivative, reported by others to be produced during inflammation, which induces expression of NadA in vitro, leading to efficient antibody-mediated killing. Finally, using bioluminescent reporters, nadA expression in the infant rat model was induced in vivo at 3 h postinfection. Our results suggest that during infectious disease, NadR repression is alleviated due to niche-specific signals, resulting in high levels of NadA expression from any nadA-positive (nadA(+)) strain and therefore efficient killing by anti-NadA antibodies elicited by the 4CMenB vaccine.

  2. Immunoprotective efficacy of six in vivo-induced antigens against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae as potential vaccine candidates in murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Six in vivo-induced (IVI antigens-RnhB, GalU, GalT, Apl_1061, Apl_1166, and HflX were selected for a vaccine trial in a mouse model. The results showed that the IgG levels in each immune group was significantly higher than that of the negative control (P<0.001. Except rRnhB group, proliferation of splenocytes was observed in all immunized groups and a relatively higher proliferation activity was observed in rGalU and rGalT groups (P<0.05. In the rGalT vaccinated group, the proportion of CD4+ T cells in spleen was significant higher than that of negative control (P<0.05. Moreover, proportions of CD4+ T cells in other vaccinated groups were all up-regulated to varying degrees. Up-regulation of both Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2 and Th2 (IL-4 cytokines were detected. A survival rate of 87.5%, 62.5% and 62.5% were obtained among rGalT, rAPL_1166 and rHflX group, respectively while the remaining three groups was only 25%. Histopathological analyses of lungs indicated that surviving animals from the vaccinated groups showed relatively normal pulmonary structure alveoli. These findings confirm that IVI antigens used as vaccine candidates provide partial protection against APP infection in a mouse model, which could be used as potential vaccine candidates in piglets.

  3. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based dengue-2 vaccine candidate induces humoral response and protects mice against lethal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, Flavio; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; de Oliveira França, Rafael Freitas; Castro-Jorge, Luiza; Rose, John; Fonseca, Benedito A L da

    2016-09-01

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus disease throughout the world and it is responsible for more than 500,000 dengue hemorrhagic cases and 22,000 deaths every year. One vaccine was recently licensed for human use in Brazil, Mexico and Philippines and although at least seven candidates have been in clinical trials the results of the most developed CYD vaccine have demonstrated immunization problems, such as uneven protection and interference between serotypes. We constructed a vaccine candidate based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expression of pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) and tested it in mice to evaluate immunogenicity and protection against DENV-2 infection. VSV has been successfully used as vaccine vectors for several viruses to induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses. The VSV-DENV-2 recombinant was constructed by inserting the DENV-2 structural proteins into a VSV plasmid DNA for recombinant VSV-DENV-2 recovery. Infectious recombinant VSV viruses were plaque purified and prM and E expression were confirmed by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of proteins of infected cells. Forty Balb/C mice were inoculated through subcutaneous (s.c.) route with VSV-DENV-2 vaccine in a two doses schedule 15 d apart and 29 d after first inoculation, sera were collected and the mice were challenged with 50 lethal doses (LD50) of a neurovirulent DENV-2. The VSV-DENV-2 induced anti-DENV-2 antibodies and protected animals in the challenge experiment comparable to DENV-2 immunization control group. We conclude that VSV is a promising platform to test as a DENV vaccine and perhaps against others Flaviviridae.

  4. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  5. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  6. The association of meningococcal disease with influenza in the United States, 1989-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hartman Jacobs

    Full Text Available IMPORTANCE AND OBJECTIVE: Prior influenza infection is a risk factor for invasive meningococcal disease. Quantifying the fraction of meningococcal disease attributable to influenza could improve understanding of viral-bacterial interaction and indicate additional health benefits to influenza immunization. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A time series analysis of the association of influenza and meningococcal disease using hospitalizations in 9 states from 1989-2009 included in the State Inpatient Databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the proportion of positive influenza tests by subtype reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The model accounts for the autocorrelation of meningococcal disease and influenza between weeks, temporal trends, co-circulating respiratory syncytial virus, and seasonality. The influenza-subtype-attributable fraction was estimated using the model coefficients. We analyzed the synchrony of seasonal peaks in hospitalizations for influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and meningococcal disease. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In 19 of 20 seasons, influenza peaked≤2 weeks before meningococcal disease, and peaks were highly correlated in time (ρ = 0.95; P <.001. H3N2 and H1N1 peaks were highly synchronized with meningococcal disease while pandemic H1N1, B, and respiratory syncytial virus were not. Over 20 years, 12.8% (95% CI, 9.1-15.0 of meningococcal disease can be attributable to influenza in the preceding weeks with H3N2 accounting for 5.2% (95% CI, 3.0-6.5, H1N1 4.3% (95% CI, 2.6-5.6, B 3.0% (95% CI, 0.8-4.9 and pH1N1 0.2% (95% CI, 0-0.4. During the height of influenza season, weekly attributable fractions reach 59%. While vaccination against meningococcal disease is the most important prevention strategy, influenza vaccination could provide further protection, particularly in young children where the meningococcal disease vaccine is not recommended or protective against the most common

  7. Expression, purification and crystallization of CTB-MPR, a candidate mucosal vaccine component against HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Hsien Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available CTB-MPR is a fusion protein between the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB and the membrane-proximal region of gp41 (MPR, the transmembrane envelope protein of Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, and has previously been shown to induce the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies with antiviral functions. To further improve the design of this candidate vaccine, X-ray crystallography experiments were performed to obtain structural information about this fusion protein. Several variants of CTB-MPR were designed, constructed and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The first variant contained a flexible GPGP linker between CTB and MPR, and yielded crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 2.3 Å, but only the CTB region was detected in the electron-density map. A second variant, in which the CTB was directly attached to MPR, was shown to destabilize pentamer formation. A third construct containing a polyalanine linker between CTB and MPR proved to stabilize the pentameric form of the protein during purification. The purification procedure was shown to produce a homogeneously pure and monodisperse sample for crystallization. Initial crystallization experiments led to pseudo-crystals which were ordered in only two dimensions and were disordered in the third dimension. Nanocrystals obtained using the same precipitant showed promising X-ray diffraction to 5 Å resolution in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The results demonstrate the utility of femtosecond X-ray crystallography to enable structural analysis based on nano/microcrystals of a protein for which no macroscopic crystals ordered in three dimensions have been observed before.

  8. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis pathogenicity island-1 proteins as vaccine candidates against S. Enteritidis challenge in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desin, Taseen S; Wisner, Amanda L S; Lam, Po-King S; Berberov, Emil; Mickael, Claudia S; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2011-03-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans worldwide, which mainly results from the consumption of contaminated poultry meat and eggs. Vaccination of chickens is an important strategy to lower the prevalence of Salmonella in poultry flocks. The S. Enteritidis type 3 secretion system (T3SS) encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) is an important virulence factor that plays a role in invasion and systemic spread in chickens. In this manuscript, we evaluated the efficacy of SPI-1 proteins as vaccine candidates for protection against S. Enteritidis oral challenge. Our results demonstrate for the first time that SPI-1 T3SS proteins elicit antigen specific IgG antibody responses in chickens. In one study we show that vaccination with the aforementioned proteins reduces the levels of S. Enteritidis in the liver, but not in the spleen and cecal contents of chickens. However, a second study shows that vaccination of hens with SPI-1 proteins using a seeder model of infection does not affect the levels of S. Enteritidis in the cecal contents or internal organs of progeny obtained from these hens. Hence, the SPI-1 proteins, in conjunction with other proteins, may form important components of subunit vaccines used for protection against colonization by S. Enteritidis in poultry.

  9. A live attenuated recombinant dengue-4 virus vaccine candidate with restricted capacity for dissemination in mosquitoes and lack of transmission from vaccinees to mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, J M; Hanley, K A; Whitehead, S S; Strickman, D; Karron, R A; Durbin, A P; Murphy, B R

    2001-11-01

    2Adelta30 is a live dengue-4 virus vaccine candidate with a 30-nucleotide deletion in its 3'-untranslated region. To assess the transmissibility of 2Adelta30 by mosquitoes, we compared its in vivo replication in mosquitoes with that of its wild type DEN-4 parent. Both the vaccine candidate and wild type virus were equally able to infect the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens after intrathoracic inoculation. Relative to its wild type parent, 2Adelta30 was slightly restricted in its ability to infect the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes fed on an artificial blood meal and was even more restricted in its ability to disseminate from the midgut to the salivary glands. Thus, the 30-nucleotide deletion rendered the vaccine candidate more sensitive than its wild type parent to the mosquito midgut escape barrier. Most significantly, 2Adelta30 was not transmitted to 352 Ae. albopictus mosquitoes fed on 10 vaccinees, all of whom were infected with the vaccine candidate.

  10. First assessment of classical swine fever marker vaccine candidate CP7_E2alf for oral immunization of wild boar under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliziani, Francesco; Blome, Sandra; Petrini, Stefano; Giammarioli, Monica; Iscaro, Carmen; Severi, Giulio; Convito, Luca; Pietschmann, Jana; Beer, Martin; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2014-04-11

    Oral vaccination against classical swine fever (CSF) is a potent tool to control disease outbreaks in wild boar. So far, vaccination campaigns have been carried out using live attenuated vaccines that do not allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although this drawback is acceptable for wild boar, the use of marker vaccines would facilitate studies on disease and vaccination dynamics. Recently, the CSF marker vaccine candidate CP7_E2alf was assessed for oral immunization under laboratory conditions. Promising results prompted efforts to study the vaccine candidate under field conditions and in bait formulation. In this context, two oral vaccination campaigns were carried out with CP7_E2alf bait vaccines in two areas called 'faunistic-hunting farms' in the region of Umbria, Italy. One campaign was conducted using single vaccination, the second with the routinely employed double vaccination strategy. Both campaigns were carried out before concerted hunting actions were performed. Bait uptake, vaccine virus detection and antibody responses were assessed along with inspections upon gutting. As a comparator, seven wild boar were hand-fed with baits under laboratory conditions. In the field, bait uptake ranged from 63.7% to 98.7%, whereas antibody prevalence reached only 33.3-35.1%. The marker serology showed a strong influence of sample quality on the test outcome with a total of 85% of samples being classified correctly. Vaccine virus was not detectable. Under hand feeding conditions, six out of seven wild boar took up at least one bait, and five of them showed detectable antibody levels seven weeks after vaccination. These results were supplemented by stability tests. Appropriate stability of vaccine virus was shown both under field and laboratory conditions. In total, most results were in line with our expectations. However, optimization of the DIVA assay has to be attempted in the future.

  11. 冻干A+C群脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗安全性评估%Safety Evaluation of Group A and Group C Meningococcal Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine (Freeze-dried)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹青; 罗献伟; 苏颖; 陆志坚; 王晓萍; 方大春; 潘贵霞; 张怀忠; 夏志才

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety of group A and group C meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (freeze-dried)(MPCV-Fd/A+C) which widely used in infants and young children.Methods Stratified cluster sampling method was used to collect 6 to 23 months of age group over 100 thousand people inoculated with 2 doses of MPCV-Fd/A+C in 5 cities of Anhui province.The interval of two doses is one month,each dose is with 0.5ml,containing group A and group C polysaccharide 10μg respectively.Observing the side effect in 30 minutes and 24,48,72 hours after vaccination.Observation ended if there was no report of any adverse events after 7 days.Observation and recording of the side reaction were conducted according to the case report form (inoculation diary cards).Results There were 100,155 people who inoculated MPCV-Fd/A+C.The analysis showed that the rate of fever was 2.57 % after inoculating the first dose within 3 days and that reduced day by day; and the systemic side effect rates of allergy,irritability,lethargy,anorexia,vomiting,diarrhea were 0.04%,0.12%,0.05%,0.06%,0.05% and 0.09% respectively; and the local side effect rates of pain,redness,swelling reaction,subcutaneous induration were 0.03 %,0.05 %,0.04%,0.02% respectively.After the second dose,all side effect rates were reduced.And 90% reaction were mild and grade 4 reaction did not occur.Conclusion The side effect rate of MPCV-Fd/A+C was mild and lower after widely used in infants and young children,it was safe.%目的 评价冻干A+C群脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗(Group A and Group C Meningococcal Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine,Freeze-dried; MPCV-Fd/A+C),在婴幼儿中大规模使用后的安全性.方法 采用分层整群抽样,在安徽省5个市,对>10万名6~23月龄婴幼儿接种2剂MPCV-Fd/A+C,2剂间隔1个月,每剂0.5毫升(ml),含A群、C群荚膜多糖各10微克(μg).接种后进行30min即时反应观察,以及24、48、72h的随访观察,接种后第7天如

  12. A novel dengue virus serotype 1 vaccine candidate based on Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiqiang; Li, Zhushi; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xianwu; Wu, Yonglin; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    To develop a potential dengue vaccine candidate, a full-length cDNA clone of a novel chimeric virus was constructed using recombinant DNA technology, with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone, with its premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes substituted by their counterparts from dengue virus type 1 (DENV1). The chimeric virus (JEV/DENV1) was successfully recovered from primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells by transfection with the in vitro transcription products of JEV/DENV1 cDNA and was identified by complete genome sequencing and immunofluorescent staining. No neuroinvasiveness of this chimeric virus was observed in mice inoculated by the subcutaneous route (s.c.) or by the intraperitoneal route (i.p.), while some neurovirulence was displayed in mice that were inoculated directly by the intracerebral route (i.c.). The chimeric virus was able to stimulate high-titer production of antibodies against DENV1 and provided protection against lethal challenge with neuroadapted dengue virus in mice. These results suggest that the chimeric virus is a promising dengue vaccine candidate.

  13. Mutation of candidate immunosuppressive domains of viral envelope proteins in order to generate hyperimmunogenic vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    nosokomiel transmission. Den manglende effekt af især type 1 PRRSV vaccinen indikerer et behov for at forberede vacciner mod PRRSV og der er endnu ingen vaccine imod MERS coronavirus. Dog er der fornyeligt blevet rapporteret, at en Ebola vaccine har udvist 100% effektivitet, men i kapløbet mod de evigt...... udviklende patogener er vaccine forbedringer altid nødvendige. I denne afhandling bliver det demonstreret, at enkelte punkt mutationer af specifikke aminosyrer i de formodede ISD’er ikke ødelægger proteinernes funktion i cellekultur. Proteinernes funktion blev testet ved transduktion af vildtypevirus...

  14. Immunogenicity and in vitro Protective Efficacy of a Recombinant Multistage Plasmodium falciparum Candidate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya Ping; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Sacci, John B.; Holloway, Brian P.; Fujioka, Hisashi; Kumar, Nirbhay; Wohlhueter, Robert; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Collins, William E.; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-02-01

    Compared with a single-stage antigen-based vaccine, a multistage and multivalent Plasmodium falciparum vaccine would be more efficacious by inducing "multiple layers" of immunity. We have constructed a synthetic gene that encodes for 12 B cell, 6 T cell proliferative, and 3 cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes derived from 9 stage-specific P. falciparum antigens corresponding to the sporozoite, liver, erythrocytic asexual, and sexual stages. The gene was expressed in the baculovirus system, and a 41-kDa antigen, termed CDC/NIIMALVAC-1, was purified. Immunization in rabbits with the purified protein in the presence of different adjuvants generated antibody responses that recognized vaccine antigen, linear peptides contained in the vaccine, and all stages of P. falciparum. In vitro assays of protection revealed that the vaccine-elicited antibodies strongly inhibited sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells and growth of blood-stage parasites in the presence of monocytes. These observations demonstrate that a multicomponent, multistage malaria vaccine can induce immune responses that inhibit parasite development at multiple stages. The rationale and approach used in the development of a multicomponent P. falciparum vaccine will be useful in the development of a multispecies human malaria vaccine and vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  15. Truncated VP28 as oral vaccine candidate against WSSV infection in shrimp: an uptake and processing study in the midgut of Penaeus monodon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, V.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Singh, I.S.B.; Sudheer, N.S.; Vlak, J.M.; Caipang, C.M.A.; Brinchmann, M.; Kiron, V.

    2013-01-01

    Several oral vaccination studies have been undertaken to evoke a better protection against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a major shrimp pathogen. Formalin-inactivated virus and WSSV envelope protein VP28 were suggested as candidate vaccine components, but their uptake mechanism upon oral deliver

  16. Effect of the pre-erythrocytic candidate malaria vaccine RTS,S/AS01E on blood stage immunity in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejon, Philip; Cook, Jackie; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke

    2011-01-01

    (See the article by Greenhouse et al, on pages 19-26.) Background. RTS,S/AS01(E) is the lead candidate malaria vaccine and confers pre-erythrocytic immunity. Vaccination may therefore impact acquired immunity to blood-stage malaria parasites after natural infection. Methods. We measured, by enzym...

  17. Development of AAVLP(HPV16/31L2 particles as broadly protective HPV vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nieto

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV minor capsid protein L2 is a promising candidate for a broadly protective HPV vaccine yet the titers obtained in most experimental systems are rather low. Here we examine the potential of empty AAV2 particles (AAVLPs, assembled from VP3 alone, for display of L2 epitopes to enhance their immunogenicity. Insertion of a neutralizing epitope (amino acids 17-36 from L2 of HPV16 and HPV31 into VP3 at positions 587 and 453, respectively, permitted assembly into empty AAV particles (AAVLP(HPV16/31L2. Intramuscularly vaccination of mice and rabbits with AAVLP(HPV16/31L2s in montanide adjuvant, induced high titers of HPV16 L2 antibodies as measured by ELISA. Sera obtained from animals vaccinated with the AAVLP(HPV16/31L2s neutralized infections with several HPV types in a pseudovirion infection assay. Lyophilized AAVLP(HPV16/31L2 particles retained their immunogenicity upon reconstitution. Interestingly, vaccination of animals that were pre-immunized with AAV2--simulating the high prevalence of AAV2 antibodies in the population--even increased cross neutralization against HPV31, 45 and 58 types. Finally, passive transfer of rabbit antisera directed against AAVLP(HPV16/31L2s protected naïve mice from vaginal challenge with HPV16 pseudovirions. In conclusion, AAVLP(HPV16/31L2 particles have the potential as a broadly protective vaccine candidate regardless of prior exposure to AAV.

  18. Novel recombinant DNA vaccine candidates for human respiratory syncytial virus: Preclinical evaluation of immunogenicity and protection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M; Öhlschläger, Peter; Hamad, Maaweya E; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2017-03-08

    The development of safe and potent vaccines for human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is still a challenge for researchers worldwide. DNA-based immunization is currently a promising approach that has been used to generate human vaccines for different age groups. In this study, novel HRSV DNA vaccine candidates were generated and preclinically tested in BALB/c mice. Three different versions of the codon-optimized HRSV fusion (F) gene were individually cloned into the pPOE vector. The new recombinant vectors either express full-length (pPOE-F), secretory (pPOE-TF), or M282-90 linked (pPOE-FM2) forms of the F protein. Distinctive expression of the F protein was identified in HEp-2 cells transfected with the different recombinant vectors using ELISA and immunofluorescence. Mice immunization verified the potential for recombinant vectors to elicit significant levels of neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell lymphocytes. pPOE-TF showed higher levels of gene expression in cell culture and better induction of the humoral and cellular immune responses. Following virus challenge, mice that had been immunized with the recombinant vectors were able to control virus replication and displayed lower inflammation compared with mice immunized with empty pPOE vector or formalin-inactivated HRSV vaccine. Moreover, pulmonary cytokine profiles of mice immunized with the 3 recombinant vectors were similar to those of the mock infected group. In conclusion, recombinant pPOE vectors are promising HRSV vaccine candidates in terms of their safety, immunogenicity and protective efficiency. These data encourage further evaluation in phase I clinical trials.

  19. B群脑膜炎球菌疫苗候选抗原研究进展%Serogroup B meningococcal vaccine candidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应上云; 刘君杰; 胡四海

    2013-01-01

    B群脑膜炎球菌(MenB)的荚膜多糖结构与人体胚胎组织和神经组织结构类似,以MenB荚膜多糖作为疫苗抗原可能会引起人类的自身免疫病.因此,寻找非荚膜多糖抗原成为研制B群脑膜炎球菌疫苗的新选择.目前,可作为B群流脑疫苗的候选抗原包括:外膜囊泡和外膜蛋白、新型重组蛋白抗原NspA、fHBP、NadA、NhhA、GNA等.

  20. Vaccination with a Streptococcus pneumoniae trivalent recombinant PcpA, PhtD and PlyD1 protein vaccine candidate protects against lethal pneumonia in an infant murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, David; Xu, Qingfu; Pichichero, Michael E

    2014-05-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections continue to cause significant worldwide morbidity and mortality despite the availability of efficacious serotype-dependent vaccines. The need to incorporate emergent strains expressing additional serotypes into pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines has led to an identified need for a pneumococcal protein-based vaccine effective against a broad scope of serotypes. A vaccine consisting of several conserved proteins with different functions during pathogenesis would be preferred. Here, we investigated the efficacy of a trivalent recombinant protein vaccine containing pneumococcal choline-binding protein A (PcpA), pneumococcal histidine triad D (PhtD), and genetically detoxified pneumolysin (PlyD1) in an infant mouse model. We found the trivalent vaccine conferred protection from lethal pneumonia challenges using serotypes 6A and 3. The observed protection with trivalent PcpA, PhtD, and PlyD1 vaccine in infant mice supports the ongoing study of this candidate vaccine in human infant clinical trials.

  1. Discovery of GAMA, a Plasmodium falciparum merozoite micronemal protein, as a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Thangavelu U; Takeo, Satoru; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Thonkukiatkul, Amporn; Miura, Kazutoyo; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Zhou, Hong; Long, Carole A; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Thompson, Jennifer; Wilson, Danny W; Beeson, James G; Healer, Julie; Crabb, Brendan S; Cowman, Alan F; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-11-01

    One of the solutions for reducing the global mortality and morbidity due to malaria is multivalent vaccines comprising antigens of several life cycle stages of the malarial parasite. Hence, there is a need for supplementing the current set of malaria vaccine candidate antigens. Here, we aimed to characterize glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored micronemal antigen (GAMA) encoded by the PF08_0008 gene in Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies were raised against recombinant GAMA synthesized by using a wheat germ cell-free system. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated for the first time that GAMA is a microneme protein of the merozoite. Erythrocyte binding assays revealed that GAMA possesses an erythrocyte binding epitope in the C-terminal region and it binds a nonsialylated protein receptor on human erythrocytes. Growth inhibition assays revealed that anti-GAMA antibodies can inhibit P. falciparum invasion in a dose-dependent manner and GAMA plays a role in the sialic acid (SA)-independent invasion pathway. Anti-GAMA antibodies in combination with anti-erythrocyte binding antigen 175 exhibited a significantly higher level of invasion inhibition, supporting the rationale that targeting of both SA-dependent and SA-independent ligands/pathways is better than targeting either of them alone. Human sera collected from areas of malaria endemicity in Mali and Thailand recognized GAMA. Since GAMA in P. falciparum is refractory to gene knockout attempts, it is essential to parasite invasion. Overall, our study indicates that GAMA is a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen.

  2. Serum-free microcarrier based production of replication deficient Influenza vaccine candidate virus lacking NS1 using Vero cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Mylene L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus is a major health concern that has huge impacts on the human society, and vaccination remains as one of the most effective ways to mitigate this disease. Comparing the two types of commercially available Influenza vaccine, the live attenuated virus vaccine is more cross-reactive and easier to administer than the traditional inactivated vaccines. One promising live attenuated Influenza vaccine that has completed Phase I clinical trial is deltaFLU, a deletion mutant lacking the viral Nonstructural Protein 1 (NS1 gene. As a consequence of this gene deletion, this mutant virus can only propagate effectively in cells with a deficient interferon-mediated antiviral response. To demonstrate the manufacturability of this vaccine candidate, a batch bioreactor production process using adherent Vero cells on microcarriers in commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media is described. Results Five commercially available animal-component free, serum-free media (SFM were evaluated for growth of Vero cells in agitated Cytodex 1 spinner flask microcarrier cultures. EX-CELL Vero SFM achieved the highest cell concentration of 2.6 × 10^6 cells/ml, whereas other SFM achieved about 1.2 × 10^6 cells/ml. Time points for infection between the late exponential and stationary phases of cell growth had no significant effect in the final virus titres. A virus yield of 7.6 Log10 TCID50/ml was achieved using trypsin concentration of 10 μg/ml and MOI of 0.001. The Influenza vaccine production process was scaled up to a 3 liter controlled stirred tank bioreactor to achieve a cell density of 2.7 × 10^6 cells/ml and virus titre of 8.3 Log10 TCID50/ml. Finally, the bioreactor system was tested for the production of the corresponding wild type H1N1 Influenza virus, which is conventionally used in the production of inactivated vaccine. High virus titres of up to 10 Log10 TCID50/ml were achieved. Conclusions We describe for the

  3. Ex vivo transfection of trout pronephros leukocytes, a model for cell culture screening of fish DNA vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Villaizan, M; Martinez-Lopez, A; Garcia-Valtanen, P; Chico, V; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2012-09-07

    DNA vaccination opened a new era in controlling and preventing viral diseases since DNA vaccines have shown to be very efficacious where some conventional vaccines have failed, as it occurs in the case of the vaccines against fish novirhabdoviruses. However, there is a big lack of in vitro model assays with immune-related cells for preliminary screening of in vivo DNA vaccine candidates. In an attempt to solve this problem, rainbow trout pronephros cells in early primary culture were transfected with two plasmid DNA constructions, one encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and another encoding the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) glycoprotein G (G(VHSV)) - the only viral antigen which has conferred in vivo protection. After assessing the presence of GFP- and G(VHSV)-expressing cells, at transcription and protein levels, the immune response in transfected pronephros cells was evaluated. At 24h post-transfection, G(VHSV) up-regulated migm and tcr transcripts expression, suggesting activation of B and T cells, as well, a high up-regulation of tnfα gene was observed. Seventy-two hours post-transfection, we detected the up-regulation of mx and tnfα genes transcripts and Mx protein which correlated with the induction of an anti-VHSV state. All together we have gathered evidence for successful transfection of pronephros cells with pAE6G, which correlates with in vivo protection results, and is less time-consuming and more rapid than in vivo assays. Therefore, this outcome opens the possibility to use pronephros cells in early primary culture for preliminary screening fish DNA vaccines as well as to further investigate the function that these cells perform in fish immune response orchestration after DNA immunisation.

  4. CFP10: mFcγ2 as a novel tuberculosis vaccine candidate increases immune response in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghani, Ali Asghar; Soleimanpour, Saman; Farsiani, Hadi; Mosavat, Arman; Yousefi, Masoud; Meshkat, Zahra; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel; Eydgahi, Mohammad Reza Akbari; Sadeghian, Hamid; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Despite treatment with antibiotics and vaccination with BCG, tuberculosis (TB) is still considered as one of the most important public health problems in the world. Therefore, designing and producing a more effective vaccine against TB seems urgently. In this study, immunogenicity of a fusion protein which consisting or comprising CFP-10 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the Fc-domain of mouse IgG2a was evaluated as a novel subunit vaccine candidate against TB. Materials and Methods: The genetic constructs were cloned in pPICZαA expression vector and recombinant vectors (pPICZαA-CFP-10: Fcγ2a and pPICZαA-CFP-10:His) were transformed into Pichia pastoris. To evaluate the expression of recombinant proteins, SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting were used. The immunogenicity of recombinant proteins, with and without BCG were assessed in BALB/c mice and specific cytokines against recombinant proteins (IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-4, IL-17 and TGF-β) were evaluated. Results: The levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in mice that received recombinant proteins was higher than the control groups (BCG and PBS). Thus, both recombinant proteins (CFP-10:Fcγ2a and CFP-10:His) could excite good response in Th1-cells. The Fc-tagged protein had a stronger Th1 response with low levels of IL-4, as compared to CFP-10:His. However, the highest level of Th1 response was observed in groups that were vaccinated with BCG (prime) and then received recombinant protein CFP-10: Fcγ2a (booster). Conclusion: The results demonstrated that binding mice Fc-domain to CFP-10 protein can increase the immunogenicity of the subunit vaccine. Further studies, might be able to design and produce a new generation of subunit vaccines based on the Fc-fused immunogen. PMID:28293387

  5. 测定脑膜炎球菌疫苗C群多糖的双抗体夹心ELISA法的建立%Establishment of a double antibody sandwich ELISA for determination of group C polysaccharide in meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘殊男; 肖詹蓉; 王宇星; 张霖阳; 史雨舟; 王玲; 张萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish a double antibody sandwich ELISA for determination of group C polysaccharide in groups A,C,Y,W135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPV4).Methods The prepared polyclonal antibodies against group C polysaccharide were purified by octanoic acid-ammonium sulfate precipitation method,and then labeled with horseradish peroxidase by sodium periodate method.The polyclonal antibodies against group C polysaccharide were used as coated antibodies and the second enzyme-labled antibodies to establish a double antibody sandwich ELISA.The reaction conditions of the established ELISA were optimized,and specific quantitative determination of group C polysaccharide was carried out by the established ELISA.Results The specificity of the double antibody sandwich ELISA for determination of group C polysaccharide was high,and no cross reactions with groups A,Y and W135 were detected.The best linearity in dose-response curve of group C polysaccharide was found in a range of 2.5-20.0 ng/ml (r > 0.99).The precision and accuracy of the established ELISA were good.Coefficients of variation and recovery rates of intraand inter-assay were 0.6%-9.1% and 87.5%-100.0%,respectively.Quantitation limit was identified as 4.0 ng/ml.Group C polysaccharide contents,molecular dimension KDvalue and recovery rates of three batches of MPV4 detected by the established ELISA were in accordance with those of previous determination and temporary quality control standards.Conclusion The double antibody sandwich ELISA can be applied to detecting the key quality indexes of group C polysaccharide in MPV4.%目的 建立测定A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗(groups A,C,Y,W135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine,MPV4)C群多糖含量的双抗体夹心ELISA法.方法 制备抗C群多糖多克隆抗体,所得的多克隆抗体经辛酸-硫酸铵沉淀法纯化后,用过碘酸钠法对其标记辣根过氧化物酶.分别将抗C群多糖多克隆抗体作为包被抗

  6. Immunogenicity of a new recombinant IpaC from Shigella dysenteriae type I in guinea pig as a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaei, Fatemeh; Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Ahdi, Ali Mohammad; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Honari, Hussein; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant vaccine technology is one of the most developed means in controlling infectious diseases. However, an effective vaccine against Shigella is still missing. To evaluate recombinant IpaC protein of Shigella as a vaccine candidate. In this study we cloned IpaC gene into an expression vector in prokaryotic system. The protein expression was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and Western-Blotting analysis. The recombinant protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Guinea pigs were immunized with the recombinant protein and the level of immunogenicity was examined by ELISA and Western blotting of IpaC. Challenge test was done through the intraoculary injection of Shigella dysenteriae (6×108 CFU/eye) and after 48 hours was scored for keratoconjunctivitis. The results showed a remarkable level of immunogenicity in terms of antibody response and protection against keratoconjunctivitis in tested animals. The recombinant IpaC protein provided a protective system against Shigella dysenteriae type I during the challenge test. The results showed the potential of using recombinant IpaC in preparation of vaccine in perspective studies.

  7. Generation of Recombinant Equine Influenza Vaccine Candidate RgH3N1 Virus by Reverse Genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun; LIU Ming; YU Kang-zhen; Webster Robert

    2005-01-01

    The antigenic variation of influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins requires frequent changes in vaccine formulation. The new strategy of creating influenza seed strains for vaccine production is to generate 7 + 1 reassortants that contain seven genes from a high-yield virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34[A/PR/8/34](H1N1) and the HA gene from the circulating strains. By using this DNA-based cotransfection technique, we generated 7 + 1 reassortants rgH3N1 which had the antigenic determinants of influenza virus A/Songbird/HongKong/102/00[SB/HK/01](H3N8) and 7 other genes from A/PR/8/34. The hemagglutinin of A/Songbird/HongKong/102/00 is 96.3% homologous to that of A/Equine/Jilin/98[Eq/J1/89] (H3N8). The resulting virus rgH3N1 grows to high HA titers in chicken embryonated eggs, allowing vaccine preparation in unconcentrated allantoic fluid. The rgH3N1 is stable after multiple passages in embryonated eggs. The reassortant rgH3N1 virus could be used as vaccine candidate to reduce the reemergence of equine influenza outbreaks.

  8. Gonadotrophin releasing hormone-based vaccine, an effective candidate for prostate cancer and other hormone-sensitive neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junco, Jesús A; Basalto, Roberto; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Reyes, Osvaldo; Pimentel, Eulogio; Calzada, Lesvia; Castro, Maria D; Arteaga, Niurka; López, Yovisleidis; Hernández, Héctor; Bringas, Ricardo; Garay, Hilda; Peschke, Peter; Bertot, José; Guillén, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Prostate growth, development, functions, and neoplastic transformation is androgen dependent. Estrogens have similar effects in the ovary and breast. Previous studies using gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH/LHRH) vaccines have shown the usefulness of immunization against this hormone in prostate (PC) and breast cancer (BC). We have synthesized a peptide mutated at position 6 and attached to the 830-844 tetanic toxoid (TT) helper T cell sequence in the same synthesis process. After repeated pig immunizations, we have demonstrated a vaccine that significantly decreased testes size (p < 0.001), prostate (p < 0.01), seminal vesicles (p < 0.01), and testosterone (T) castration [0.05 nM ml(-1) (p < 0. 01)]. Similar results were obtained in adult male and female healthy dogs and Macaca fascicularis models. These data indicate that this GnRHm1-TT vaccine is safe and able to induce significant tumor growth inhibition in the Dunning R3327-H rat androgen responsive prostate tumor model. In these rats, the immunization induced high anti-GnRH titers concomitant with T castration reduction (p < 0.01) in 90% of the animals tested. In addition, 70% of the responders exhibited tumor growth inhibition (p = 0.02) and a survival rate approximately three times longer that those of untreated rats. These data indicate that GnRHm1-TT vaccine may be a potential candidate in the treatment of PC, BC, and other hormone-dependent cancers.

  9. Comparative testing of six antigen-based malaria vaccine candidates directed toward merozoite-stage Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, David E; Cavanagh, David R; Remarque, Edmond J;

    2008-01-01

    Immunogenicity testing of Plasmodium falciparum antigens being considered as malaria vaccine candidates was undertaken in rabbits. The antigens compared were recombinant baculovirus MSP-1(19) and five Pichia pastoris candidates, including two versions of MSP-1(19), AMA-1 (domains I and II), AMA-1...

  10. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyesun Jang

    Full Text Available Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens.

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of the malaria candidate vaccines FP9 CS and MVA CS in adult Gambian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoukhuede, E B; Berthoud, T; Milligan, P; Bojang, K; Ismaili, J; Keating, S; Nwakanma, D; Keita, S; Njie, F; Sowe, M; Todryk, S; Laidlaw, S M; Skinner, M A; Lang, T; Gilbert, S; Greenwood, B M; Hill, A V S

    2006-10-30

    We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of prime-boost vectors encoding the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) protein expressed either in the attenuated fowl-pox virus (FP9) or modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Thirty-two adult Gambians in groups of four to eight received one, two or three doses of FP9 CS and/or MVA CS. No serious adverse event was observed following vaccination. The most immunogenic regimen was two doses of FP9 followed by a single dose of MVA 4 weeks later (an average of 1000 IFN-gamma spot forming units/million PBMCs). This level of effector T-cell responses appears higher than that seen in previously reported studies of CS-based candidate malaria vaccines.

  12. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac#x2122;) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage as well as invasive meningococcal disease and whether PsA-TT can prevent pharyngeal carriage needs to be determined. To address this issue, a consortium (the African Meningococcal Carriage (MenAfriCar) consortium) was established in 2009 to investigate the pattern of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt prior to and after the introduction of PsA-TT. This article describes how the consortium was established, its objectives and the standardised field and laboratory methods that were used to achieve these objectives. The experience of the MenAfriCar consortium will help in planning future studies on the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt and elsewhere. Un vaccin conjugué contenant un polysaccharide du sérogroupe A méningococcique et une anatoxine du tétanos (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac™) est en cours de déploiement dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite. L’ expérience avec d’ autres vaccins conjugués polysaccharide/protéine a montré qu’ une partie importante de leur succès a été leur capacité à empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé et donc à arrêter la transmission et à induire une immunité de group. Si PsA-TT doit d’ atteindre l’ objectif de prévenir les épidémies, il devrait être en mesure d’ empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé ainsi que la méningococcie invasive et le fait que PsA-TT puisse emp

  13. Development of influenza A(H7N9) candidate vaccine viruses with improved hemagglutinin antigen yield in eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenour, Callie; Johnson, Adam; Winne, Emily; Hossain, Jaber; Mateu-Petit, Guaniri; Balish, Amanda; Santana, Wanda; Kim, Taejoong; Davis, Charles; Cox, Nancy J; Barr, John R; Donis, Ruben O; Villanueva, Julie; Williams, Tracie L; Chen, Li-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background The emergence of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in poultry causing zoonotic human infections was reported on March 31, 2013. Development of A(H7N9) candidate vaccine viruses (CVV) for pandemic preparedness purposes was initiated without delay. Candidate vaccine viruses were derived by reverse genetics using the internal genes of A/Puerto/Rico/8/34 (PR8). The resulting A(H7N9) CVVs needed improvement because they had titers and antigen yields that were suboptimal for vaccine manufacturing in eggs, especially in a pandemic situation. Methods Two CVVs derived by reverse genetics were serially passaged in embryonated eggs to improve the hemagglutinin (HA) antigen yield. The total viral protein and HA antigen yields of six egg-passaged CVVs were determined by the BCA assay and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) analysis, respectively. CVVs were antigenically characterized by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays with ferret antisera. Results Improvement of total viral protein yield was observed for the six egg-passaged CVVs; HA quantification by IDMS indicated approximately a twofold increase in yield of several egg-passaged viruses as compared to that of the parental CVV. Several different amino acid substitutions were identified in the HA of all viruses after serial passage. However, HI tests indicated that the antigenic properties of two CVVs remained unchanged. Conclusions If influenza A(H7N9) viruses were to acquire sustained human-to-human transmissibility, the improved HA yield of the egg-passaged CVVs generated in this study could expedite vaccine manufacturing for pandemic mitigation. PMID:25962412

  14. Toxoplasma gondii Elongation Factor 1-Alpha (TgEF-1α) Is a Novel Vaccine Candidate Antigen against Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yujian; Gadahi, Javaid A.; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular parasite which can infect almost all warm-blood animals, leading to toxoplasmosis. Screening and discovery of an effective vaccine candidate or new drug target is crucial for the control of this disease. In this study, the recombinant T. gondii elongation factor 1-alpha (rTgEF-1α) was successfully expressed in in Escherichia coli. Passive immunization of mice with anti-rTgEF-1α polyclonal antibody following challenge with a lethal dose of tachyzoites significantly increased the survival time compared with PBS control group. The survival time of mice challenged with tachyzoites pretreated with anti-rTgEF-1α PcAb also was significantly increased. Invasion of tachyzoites into mouse macrophages was significantly inhibited in the anti-rTgEF-1α PcAb pretreated group. Mice vaccinated with rTgEF-1α induced a high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies and production of IFN-gamma, interleukin-4. The expression levels of MHC-I and MHC-II molecules as well as the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in mice vaccinated with rTgEF-1α was significantly increased, respectively (P < 0.05), compared with all the controls. Immunization with rTgEF-1α significantly (P < 0.05) prolonged survival time (14.53 ± 1.72 days) after challenge infection with the virulent T. gondii RH strain. These results indicate that T. gondii EF-1α plays an essential role in mediating host cell invasion by the parasite and, as such, could be a candidate vaccine antigen against toxoplasmosis.

  15. Malaria vaccine candidate antigen targeting the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum produced at high level in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel, Nadja; Boes, Alexander; Edgue, Güven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Reimann, Andreas; Schillberg, Stefan; Pradel, Gabriele; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Spiegel, Holger; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    Plants have emerged as low-cost production platforms suitable for vaccines targeting poverty-related diseases. Besides functional efficacy, the stability, yield, and purification process determine the production costs of a vaccine and thereby the feasibility of plant-based production. We describe high-level plant production and functional characterization of a malaria vaccine candidate targeting the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum. CCT, a fusion protein composed of three sporozoite antigens (P. falciparum cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites [PfCelTOS], P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein [PfCSP], and P. falciparum thrombospondin-related adhesive protein [PfTRAP]), was transiently expressed by agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, accumulated to levels up to 2 mg/g fresh leaf weight (FLW), was thermostable up to 80°C and could be purified to >95% using a simple two-step procedure. Reactivity of sera from malaria semi-immune donors indicated the immunogenic conformation of the purified fusion protein consisting of PfCelTOS, PfCSP_TSR, PfTRAP_TSR domains (CCT) protein. Total IgG from the CCT-specific mouse immune sera specifically recognized P. falciparum sporozoites in immunofluorescence assays and induced up to 35% inhibition in hepatocyte invasion assays. Featuring domains from three promising sporozoite antigens with different roles (attachment and cell traversal) in the hepatocyte invasion process, CCT has the potential to elicit broader immune responses against the pre-erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum and represents an interesting new candidate, also as a component of multi-stage, multi-subunit malaria vaccine cocktails.

  16. Invasive meningococcal disease epidemiology and control measures: a framework for evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coudeville L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal disease can have devastating consequences. As new vaccines emerge, it is necessary to assess their impact on public health. In the absence of long-term real world data, modeling the effects of different vaccination strategies is required. Discrete event simulation provides a flexible platform with which to conduct such evaluations. Methods A discrete event simulation of the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease was developed to quantify the potential impact of implementing routine vaccination of adolescents in the United States with a quadrivalent conjugate vaccine protecting against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135. The impact of vaccination is assessed including both the direct effects on individuals vaccinated and the indirect effects resulting from herd immunity. The simulation integrates a variety of epidemiologic and demographic data, with core information on the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and outbreak frequency derived from data available through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Simulation of the potential indirect benefits of vaccination resulting from herd immunity draw on data from the United Kingdom, where routine vaccination with a conjugate vaccine has been in place for a number of years. Cases of disease are modeled along with their health consequences, as are the occurrence of disease outbreaks. Results When run without a strategy of routine immunization, the simulation accurately predicts the age-specific incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and the site-specific frequency of outbreaks in the Unite States. 2,807 cases are predicted annually, resulting in over 14,000 potential life years lost due to invasive disease. In base case analyses of routine vaccination, life years lost due to infection are reduced by over 45% (to 7,600 when routinely vaccinating adolescents 12 years of age at 70% coverage. Sensitivity analyses indicate that herd immunity plays

  17. Immunostimulation by Synthetic Lipopeptide-Based Vaccine Candidates: Structure-Activity Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Mehfuz; Toth, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Peptide-based vaccines offer several advantages over conventional whole organism or protein approaches by offering improved purity and specificity in inducing immune response. However, peptides alone are generally non-immunogenic. Concerns remain about the toxicity of adjuvants which are critical for immunogenicity of synthetic peptides. The use of lipopeptides in peptide vaccines is currently under intensive investigation because potent immune responses can be generated without the use of ad...

  18. Establishment of a method for determination of polysaccharide contents in groups A, C, Y, W135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine%A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗多糖含量测定方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖詹蓉; 潘殊男; 李世慧; 栗妍; 张萍

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立测定A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌(meningococcus,Men)多糖疫苗(groups A,C,Y,W135 menignococcal polysaccharide vaccine,MPV4)多糖含量的火箭免疫电泳(rocket immunoelectro-phoresis,RIE)法.方法 分别用A、C、Y、W135群Men菌液,A、C、Y、W135群Men菌液加弗氏佐剂,A、C、Y、W135群Men多糖-牛白蛋白结合物免疫家兔,制备特异性抗血清.将制备的抗血清以一定的比例加入琼脂糖凝胶制成平板,并将纯化的多糖作为定量参考品加入抗原孔进行RIE.以多糖含量和对应的RIE峰高作标准曲线并建立直线回归方程.采用优化的RIE法测定MPV4多糖含量和分子大小.结果 菌液加佐剂制备的抗血清效价较理想.在确定的电泳条件下,建立的RIE法制备的标准曲线呈现良好的线性关系,相关系数值均>0.98.该法特异性较好,未检出各多糖间的交叉反应.采用该法测定的3批MPV4的多糖含量、分子大小及回收率均与先前的检定结果相符,均符合质控标准.结论 建立的RIE法可作为MPV4多糖抗原含量的测定方法.%Objective To establish a rocket immunoelectrophoresis (ME) method for determination of polysaccharide contents in groups A,C,Y,W135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPV4). Methods Rabbits were immunized with meningococcal groups A,C,Y,W135 suspensions, mixture of Freund adjuvant with meningococcal suspension and meningococcal polysaccharide-bovine albumin conjugate, respectively.Specific antisera were prepared. The specific antisera were added to agarose gel with a certain proportion to pave plate, and pure polysaccharides as quantitative references were added into gel holes to carry out RIE.Standard curves were made with polysaccharide concentrations and precipitation peaks formed by RIE, and linear regression equations were established. Polysaccharide contents and molecular sizes in MPV4 were determined by the established RIE methed. Results Optimal antiserum titers were obtained

  19. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresno Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II, to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

  20. Phase 1 trial of malaria transmission blocking vaccine candidates Pfs25 and Pvs25 formulated with montanide ISA 51.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pfs25 and Pvs25, surface proteins of mosquito stage of the malaria parasites P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively, are leading candidates for vaccines preventing malaria transmission by mosquitoes. This single blinded, dose escalating, controlled Phase 1 study assessed the safety and immunogenicity of recombinant Pfs25 and Pvs25 formulated with Montanide ISA 51, a water-in-oil emulsion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The trial was conducted at The Johns Hopkins Center for Immunization Research, Washington DC, USA, between May 16, 2005-April 30, 2007. The trial was designed to enroll 72 healthy male and non-pregnant female volunteers into 1 group to receive adjuvant control and 6 groups to receive escalating doses of the vaccines. Due to unexpected reactogenicity, the vaccination was halted and only 36 volunteers were enrolled into 4 groups: 3 groups of 10 volunteers each were immunized with 5 microg of Pfs25/ISA 51, 5 microg of Pvs25/ISA 51, or 20 microg of Pvs25/ISA 51, respectively. A fourth group of 6 volunteers received adjuvant control (PBS/ISA 51. Frequent local reactogenicity was observed. Systemic adverse events included two cases of erythema nodosum considered to be probably related to the combination of the antigen and the adjuvant. Significant antibody responses were detected in volunteers who completed the lowest scheduled doses of Pfs25/ISA 51. Serum anti-Pfs25 levels correlated with transmission blocking activity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: It is feasible to induce transmission blocking immunity in humans using the Pfs25/ISA 51 vaccine, but these vaccines are unexpectedly reactogenic for further development. This is the first report that the formulation is associated with systemic adverse events including erythema nodosum. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00295581.

  1. Comparison of a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit with a commercial vaccine for efficacy of protection against internal egg contamination by Salmonella in hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul M; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-07-01

    This study compared a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate secreting Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (SE-LTB) with a commercial Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine for efficacy of protection against SE infection in laying hens. Chickens were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Group A chickens were inoculated orally with phosphate-buffered saline and served as controls, group B chickens were inoculated orally with the vaccine candidate, and group C chickens were inoculated intramuscularly with a commercial vaccine, the primary inoculation in groups B and C being at 10 wk of age and the booster at 16 wk. Groups B and C showed significantly higher titers of plasma immunoglobulin G, intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A, and egg yolk immunoglobulin Y antibodies compared with the control group, and both vaccinated groups showed a significantly elevated cellular immune response. After virulent challenge, group B had significantly lower production of thin-shelled and/or malformed eggs and a significantly lower rate of SE contamination of eggs compared with the control group. Furthermore, the challenge strain was detected significantly less in all of the examined organs of group B compared with the control group. Group C had lower gross lesion scores only in the spleen and had lower bacterial counts only in the spleen, ceca, and ovary. These findings indicate that vaccination with the SE-LTB vaccine candidate can efficiently reduce internal egg and internal organ contamination by Salmonella and has advantages over the commercial vaccine.

  2. Safety of the malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01E in 5 to 17 month old Kenyan and Tanzanian Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusingu, John; Olotu, Ally; Leach, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01(E), showed promising protective efficacy in a trial of Kenyan and Tanzanian children aged 5 to 17 months. Here we report on the vaccine's safety and tolerability. The experimental design was a Phase 2b, two-centre, double-blind (observer- and participant...... after each vaccination. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were recorded throughout the study period which lasted for 14 months after dose 1 in Korogwe, Tanzania and an average of 18 months post-dose 1 in Kilifi, Kenya. Blood samples for safety monitoring of haematological, renal and hepatic functions were......) recipient and nine episodes among eight rabies vaccine recipients met the criteria for severe malaria. Unsolicited AEs were reported in 78% of subjects in the RTS,S/AS01(E) group and 74% of subjects in the rabies vaccine group. In both vaccine groups, gastroenteritis and pneumonia were the most frequently...

  3. The candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, induces highly durable Th1 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tameris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccination against tuberculosis (TB should provide long-term protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb. The current TB vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, protects against disseminated childhood TB, but protection against lung TB in adolescents and adults is variable and mostly poor. One potential reason for the limited durability of protection may be waning of immunity through gradual attrition of BCG-induced T cells. We determined if a MVA85A viral-vector boost could enhance the durability of mycobacteria-specific T cell responses above those induced by BCG alone. METHODS: We describe a long-term follow-up study of persons previously vaccinated with MVA85A. We performed a medical history and clinical examination, a tuberculin skin test and measured vaccine-specific T cell responses in persons previously enrolled as adults, adolescents, children or infants into three different Phase II trials, between 2005 and 2011. RESULTS: Of 252 potential participants, 183 (72.6% consented and completed the study visit. Vaccine-induced Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were remarkably persistent in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults, adolescents, children and infants, up to 6 years after MVA85A vaccination. Specific CD4+ T cells expressed surface markers consistent with either CD45RA-CCR7+ central memory or CD45RA-CCR7- effector memory T cells. Similarly durable Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detected in HIV-infected persons who were on successful antiretroviral therapy when MVA85A was administered. By contrast, Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies in untreated MVA85A-vaccinated HIV-infected persons were mostly undetectable 3-5 years after vaccination. CONCLUSION: MVA85A induces remarkably durable T cell responses in immunocompetent persons. However, results from a recent phase IIb trial of MVA85A, conducted in infants from the same geographic area and study population, showed no vaccine efficacy, suggesting

  4. Characterization of inherent particles and mechanism of thermal stress induced particle formation in HSV-2 viral vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lillian; Kirkitadze, Marina; Bhandal, Kamaljit; Roque, Cristopher; Yang, Eric; Carpick, Bruce; Rahman, Nausheen

    2017-09-14

    Vaccine formulations may contain visible and/or subvisible particles, which can vary in both size and morphology. Extrinsic particles, which are particles not part of the product such as foreign contaminants, are generally considered undesirable and should be eliminated or controlled in injectable products. However, biological products, in particular vaccines, may also contain particles that are inherent to the product. Here we focus on the characterization of visible and subvisible particles in a live, replication-deficient viral vaccine candidate against HSV genital herpes in an early developmental stage. HSV-2 viral vaccine were characterized using a panel of analytical methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-flow imaging (MFI), dynamic light scattering (DLS), right angle light scattering (RALS), and intrinsic fluorescence. Particles in HSV-2 vaccine typically ranged from hundreds of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers in size and were determined to be inherent to the product. The infectious titer did not correlate with any trend in subvisible particle concentration and size distribution as shown by DLS, MFI, and TEM under stressed conditions. This suggested that particle changes in the submicron range were related to HSV-2 virion structure and had direct impact on biological activity. It was also observed that subvisible and visible particles could induce aggregation in the viral product. The temperature induced aggregation was observed by RALS, intrinsic fluorescence, and DLS. The increase of subvisible particle size with temperature could be fitted to a two-step thermokinetic model. Visible and subvisible particles were found to be inherent to the HSV-2 viral vaccine product. The mechanism of protein aggregation was discussed and a two

  5. An alphavirus replicon-derived candidate vaccine against Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, M T; Whitmore, A; Thompson, J; Parsons, M; Grobbelaar, A A; Kemp, A; Paweska, J T; Madric, K; White, L J; Swanepoel, R; Burt, F J

    2009-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted bunyavirus (genus Phlebovirus) associated with severe disease in livestock and fatal encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever in a proportion of infected humans. Although live attenuated and inactivated vaccines have been used in livestock, and on a limited scale in humans, there is a need for improved anti-RVFV vaccines. Towards this goal, Sindbis virus replicon vectors expressing the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins, as well as the non-structural nsM protein, were constructed and evaluated for their ability to induce protective immune responses against RVFV. These replicon vectors were shown to produce the RVFV glycoproteins to high levels in vitro and to induce systemic anti-RVFV antibody responses in immunized mice, as determined by RVFV-specific ELISA, fluorescent antibody tests, and demonstration of a neutralizing antibody response. Replicon vaccination also provided 100% protection against lethal RVFV challenge by either the intraperitoneal or intranasal route. Furthermore, preliminary results indicate that the replicon vectors elicit RVFV-specific neutralizing antibody responses in vaccinated sheep. These results suggest that alphavirus-based replicon vectors can induce protective immunity against RVFV, and that this approach merits further investigation into its potential utility as a RVFV vaccine.

  6. A dual purpose universal influenza vaccine candidate confers protective immunity against anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Maria T; Li, Junwei; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Navarro, Ashley; Wu, Lihong; Yan, Yongyong; Zeng, Mingtao

    2017-03-01

    Preventive influenza vaccines must be reformulated annually because of antigen shift and drift of circulating influenza viral strains. However, seasonal vaccines do not always match the circulating strains, and there is the ever-present threat that avian influenza viruses may adapt to humans. Hence, a universal influenza vaccine is needed to provide protective immunity against a broad range of influenza viruses. We designed an influenza antigen consisting of three tandem M2e repeats plus HA2, in combination with a detoxified anthrax oedema toxin delivery system (EFn plus PA) to enhance immune responses. The EFn-3×M2e-HA2 plus PA vaccine formulation elicited robust, antigen-specific, IgG responses; and was protective against heterologous influenza viral challenge when intranasally delivered to mice three times. Moreover, use of the detoxified anthrax toxin system as an adjuvant had the additional benefit of generating protective immunity against anthrax. Hence, this novel vaccine strategy could potentially address two major emerging public health and biodefence threats. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Immunostimulation by synthetic lipopeptide based vaccine candidates: structure-activity relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehfuz eZaman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptide based vaccines offer several advantages over conventional whole organism or protein approaches by offering improved purity and specificity in inducing immune response. However, peptides alone are generally non-immunogenic. Concerns remain about the toxicity of adjuvants which are critical for immunogenicity of synthetic peptides. The use of lipopeptides in peptide vaccines is currently under intensive investigation because potent immune responses can be generated without the use of adjuvant (thus are self-adjuvanting. Several lipopeptides derived from microbial origin, and their synthetic versions or simpler fatty acid moieties impart this self-adjuvanting activity by signalling via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Engagement of this innate immune receptor on antigen-presenting cell leads to the initiation and development of potent immune responses. Therefore optimization of lipopeptides to enhance TLR2-mediated activation is a promising strategy for vaccine development. Considerable structure-activity relationships that determine TLR2 binding and consequent stimulation of innate immune responses have been investigated for a range of lipopeptides. In this review we address the development of lipopeptide vaccines, mechanism of TLR2 recognition, and immune activation. An overview is provided of the best studied lipopeptide vaccine systems.

  8. Subunit vaccine candidates against Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Skov, Jakob; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holm Mattsson, Andreas; Dalsgaard, Inger; Kania, Per Walter; Buchmann, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis and a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Injection vaccination with commercial mineral oil-adjuvanted bacterin vaccines has been partly successful in preventing the disease but in Danish rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) aquaculture furunculosis outbreaks still occur. In this study we tested the efficacy of experimental subunit vaccines against A. salmonicida infection in rainbow trout. We utilized in silico screening of the proteome of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strain A449 and identified potential protective protein antigens that were tested by in vivo challenge trial. A total of 14 proteins were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and prepared in 3 different subunit vaccine combinations to immunize 3 groups of rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. The fish were exposed to virulent A. salmonicida 7 weeks after immunization. To assess the efficacy of the subunit vaccines we evaluated the immune response in fish after immunization and challenge infection by measuring the antibody levels and monitoring the survival of fish in different groups. The survival of fish at 3 weeks after challenge infection showed that all 3 groups of fish immunized with 3 different protein combinations exhibited significantly lower mortalities (17–30%) compared to the control groups (48% and 56%). The ELISA results revealed significantly elevated antibody levels in fish against several protein antigens, which in some cases were positively correlated to the survival. PMID:28182704

  9. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jones

    Full Text Available Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins.

  10. High level expression, purification and characterization of recombinant CCR5 as a vaccine candidate against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kongtian; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Meng; Qin, Xin; Zhang, Cun; Li, Weina; Hao, Qiang; Wang, Zenglu; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2013-06-01

    Cysteine-cysteine chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is an important co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and CCR5 neutralizing agents have proven efficient in patients suffering from HIV infection. Here, we expressed and purified various CCR5 vaccines named rCCR5, PADRE-rCCR5, GST-C1 and GST-C2 composed of different epitopes of CCR5. Results showed that vaccines containing multiple epitopes (rCCR5 and PADRE-rCCR5) induced stronger immune responses than single-epitope ones (GST-C1 and GST-C2). In addition, the elicited antibodies can specifically bind CCR5(+) U937 but not CCR5(-) Wish cells. These results demonstrate that the CCR5 vaccines are useful for further research, especially for the in vitro preclinical evaluation of their potential as biological CCR5 neutralizing agents.

  11. Intradermal immunization improves protective efficacy of a novel TB vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Bertholet, Sylvie; Kahn, Maria; Zharkikh, Irina; Ireton, Gregory C; Vedvick, Thomas S; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2009-05-18

    We have developed the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) fusion protein (ID83), which contains the three Mtb proteins Rv1813, Rv3620 and Rv2608. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of ID83 in combination with several emulsion-formulated toll-like receptor agonists. The ID83 subunit vaccines containing synthetic TLR4 or TLR9 agonists generated a T helper-1 immune response and protected mice against challenge with Mtb regardless of route. The ID83 vaccine formulated with gardiquimod (a TLR7 agonist) also resulted in a protective response when administered intradermally, whereas the same vaccine given subcutaneously failed to provide protection. This highlights the need to explore different routes of immunization based on the adjuvant formulations used.

  12. Subunit vaccine candidates against Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika Haahr; Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Skov, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    .p.) injection. The fish were exposed to virulent A. salmonicida 7 weeks after immunization. To assess the efficacy of the subunit vaccines we evaluated the immune response in fish after immunization and challenge infection by measuring the antibody levels and monitoring the survival of fish in different groups......Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis and a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Injection vaccination with commercial mineral oil-adjuvanted bacterin vaccines has been partly successful in preventing the disease but in Danish....... The survival of fish at 3 weeks after challenge infection showed that all 3 groups of fish immunized with 3 different protein combinations exhibited significantly lower mortalities (17-30%) compared to the control groups (48% and 56%). The ELISA results revealed significantly elevated antibody levels in fish...

  13. Subunit vaccine candidates against Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika Haahr; Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Skov, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    .p.) injection. The fish were exposed to virulent A. salmonicida 7 weeks after immunization. To assess the efficacy of the subunit vaccines we evaluated the immune response in fish after immunization and challenge infection by measuring the antibody levels and monitoring the survival of fish in different groups......Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis and a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Injection vaccination with commercial mineral oil-adjuvanted bacterin vaccines has been partly successful in preventing the disease but in Danish....... The survival of fish at 3 weeks after challenge infection showed that all 3 groups of fish immunized with 3 different protein combinations exhibited significantly lower mortalities (17–30%) compared to the control groups (48% and 56%). The ELISA results revealed significantly elevated antibody levels in fish...

  14. Glutathione S-transferases of 28kDa as major vaccine candidates against schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Riveau

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available For the development of vaccine strategies to generate efficient protection against chronic infections such as parasitic diseases, and more precisely schistosomiasis, controlling pathology could be more relevant than controlling the infection itself. Such strategies, motivated by the need for a cost-effective complement to existing control measures, should focus on parasite molecules involved in fecundity, because in metazoan parasite infections pathology is usually linked to the output of viable eggs. In numerous animal models, vaccination with glutathione S-transferases of 28kDa has been shown to generate an immune response strongly limiting the worm fecundity, in addition to the reduction of the parasite burden. Recent data on acquired immunity directed to 28GST in infected human populations, and new development to draw adapted vaccine formulations, are presented.

  15. Evaluation of Borrelia burgdorferi BbHtrA Protease as a Vaccine Candidate for Lyme Borreliosis in Mice.

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    Amy J Ullmann

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi synthesizes an HtrA protease (BbHtrA which is a surface-exposed, conserved protein within Lyme disease spirochetes with activity toward CheX and BmpD of Borrelia spp, as well as aggrecan, fibronectin and proteoglycans found in skin, joints and neural tissues of vertebrates. An antibody response against BbHtrA is observed in Lyme disease patients and in experimentally infected laboratory mice and rabbits. Given the surface location of BbHtrA on B. burgdorferi and its ability to elicit an antibody response in infected hosts, we explored recombinant BbHtrA as a potential vaccine candidate in a mouse model of tick-transmitted Lyme disease. We immunized mice with two forms of BbHtrA: the proteolytically active native form and BbHtrA ablated of activity by a serine to alanine mutation at amino acid 226 (BbHtrA(S226A. Although inoculation with either BbHtrA or BbHtrA(S226A produced high-titer antibody responses in C3H/HeJ mice, neither antigen was successful in protecting mice from B. burgdorferi challenge. These results indicate that the search for novel vaccine candidates against Lyme borreliosis remains a challenge.

  16. Comparative evaluation of two vaccine candidates against experimental leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major infection in four inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhnini, Fouad; Chenik, Mehdi; Laouini, Dhafer; Louzir, Hechmi; Cazenave, Pierre André; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-11-01

    Experimental leishmaniasis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are the most investigated murine models that were used for the preclinical evaluation of Leishmania vaccine candidates. We have previously described two new inbred mouse strains named PWK and MAI issued from feral founders that also support the development of experimental leishmaniasis due to L. major. In this study, we sought to determine whether different mouse inbred strains generate concordant or discordant results when used to evaluate the potential of Leishmania proteins to protect against experimental leishmaniasis. To this end, two Leishmania proteins, namely, LACK (for Leishmania homolog of receptor for activated C kinase) and LmPDI (for L. major protein disulfide isomerase) were compared for their capacity to protect against experimental leishmaniasis in PWK, MAI, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 inbred mouse strains. Our data show that the capacity of Leishmania proteins to confer protection depends on the mouse strain used, stressing the important role played by the genetic background in shaping the immune response against the pathogen. These results may have important implications for the preclinical evaluation of candidate Leishmania vaccines: rather than using a single mouse strain, a panel of different inbred strains of various genetic backgrounds should be tested in parallel. The antigen that confers protection in the larger range of inbred strains may have better chances to be also protective in outbred human populations and should be selected for clinical trials.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Two Vaccine Candidates against Experimental Leishmaniasis Due to Leishmania major Infection in Four Inbred Mouse Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhnini, Fouad; Chenik, Mehdi; Laouini, Dhafer; Louzir, Hechmi; Cazenave, Pierre André; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-01-01

    Experimental leishmaniasis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are the most investigated murine models that were used for the preclinical evaluation of Leishmania vaccine candidates. We have previously described two new inbred mouse strains named PWK and MAI issued from feral founders that also support the development of experimental leishmaniasis due to L. major. In this study, we sought to determine whether different mouse inbred strains generate concordant or discordant results when used to evaluate the potential of Leishmania proteins to protect against experimental leishmaniasis. To this end, two Leishmania proteins, namely, LACK (for Leishmania homolog of receptor for activated C kinase) and LmPDI (for L. major protein disulfide isomerase) were compared for their capacity to protect against experimental leishmaniasis in PWK, MAI, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 inbred mouse strains. Our data show that the capacity of Leishmania proteins to confer protection depends on the mouse strain used, stressing the important role played by the genetic background in shaping the immune response against the pathogen. These results may have important implications for the preclinical evaluation of candidate Leishmania vaccines: rather than using a single mouse strain, a panel of different inbred strains of various genetic backgrounds should be tested in parallel. The antigen that confers protection in the larger range of inbred strains may have better chances to be also protective in outbred human populations and should be selected for clinical trials. PMID:19726616

  18. Characterization and evaluation of a Sarcoptes scabiei allergen as a candidate vaccine

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    Zhang Runhui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoptic mange caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei is a worldwide disease affecting both humans and animals. Here we report the molecular characterization and evaluation of a recombinant S. scabiei tropomyosin (SsTm protein in a vaccination trial in rabbits. Methods The full-length cDNA was cloned in a bacterial pET vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in BL21 (DE3 cells and purified. Using specific rabbit antiserum, tropomyosin was localized immunohistochemically in mite tissue sections. Vaccination trials with the recombiant SsTm was carried out in New Zealand rabbits. Results The full-length open reading frame (ORF of the 852 bp cloned gene from S. scabiei encodes a 32.9 kDa protein. The amino acid sequence showed 98.94%, 97.89% and 98.59% homology to Dermatophagoides farina and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 10 allergens and Psoroptes ovis tropomyosin, respectively. Tropomyosin was localized immunohistochemically in mite tissue sections mainly in the mouthparts, legs and integument of the epidermis. The predicted cross-reactivity of SsTm indicated that it is an allergenic protein. While vaccination with the recombiant SsTm resulted in high levels of specific IgG (P S. scabiei challenge were observed. After challenge, specific IgG levels remained significantly higher than the control (P P > 0.05. However, the lesion areas in the vaccination group decreased at the end of the experiment compared with controls. Conclusions Although vaccination with recombinant SsTm did not efficiently control sarcoptic mange in rabbits, the immunogenic properties of tropomyosin suggest it may be developed as a vaccine with alternative adjuvants or delivery methods.

  19. HA03 as an Iranian Candidate Concealed Antigen for Vaccination against Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum: Comparative Structural and In silico Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades researchers had focused on developing a vaccine against tick based on protective antigen. Recombinant vaccines based on concealed antigen from Boophilus microplus have been developed in Australia and Cuba by the name of TICKGARD and GAVAC (De La Fuente and Kocan, 2006. Further studies on this antigen have shown some extent of protection against other species (De Vos et al., 2001. In Iran most important species is Hyalomma anatolicum and limited information about its control are available. This paper reports structural and polymorphic analysis of HA03 as an Iranian candidate concealed antigen of H. a. anatolicum deposited in Gen-Bank .(Aghaeipour et al. GQ228820. The comparison between this antigen and other mid gut concealed antigen that their characteristics are available in GenBank showed there are high rate of similarity between them. The HA03 amino acid sequence had a homology of around 89%, 64%, 56% with HA98, BM86, BM95 respectively. Potential of MHC class I and II binding region indicated a considerable variation between BM86 antigen and its efficiency against Iranian H. a. anatolicum. In addition, predicted major of hydrophobisity and similarity in N-glycosylation besides large amount of cystein and seven EGF like regions presented in protein structure revealed that value of HA03 as a new protective antigen and the necessity of the development, BM86 homolog of H. a. anatolicum HA03 based recombinant vaccine.

  20. Phase I randomised clinical trial of an HIV-1(CN54, clade C, trimeric envelope vaccine candidate delivered vaginally.

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    David J Lewis

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: We conducted a phase 1 double-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT of a HIV-1 envelope protein (CN54 gp140 candidate vaccine delivered vaginally to assess immunogenicity and safety. It was hypothesised that repeated delivery of gp140 may facilitate antigen uptake and presentation at this mucosal surface. Twenty two healthy female volunteers aged 18-45 years were entered into the trial, the first receiving open-label active product. Subsequently, 16 women were randomised to receive 9 doses of 100 µg of gp140 in 3 ml of a Carbopol 974P based gel, 5 were randomised to placebo solution in the same gel, delivered vaginally via an applicator. Participants delivered the vaccine three times a week over three weeks during one menstrual cycle, and were followed up for two further months. There were no serious adverse events, and the vaccine was well tolerated. No sustained systemic or local IgG, IgA, or T cell responses to the gp140 were detected following vaginal immunisations. Repeated vaginal immunisation with a HIV-1 envelope protein alone formulated in Carbopol gel was safe, but did not induce local or systemic immune responses in healthy women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637962.

  1. A Library of Plasmodium vivax Recombinant Merozoite Proteins Reveals New Vaccine Candidates and Protein-Protein Interactions.

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    Jessica B Hostetler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A vaccine targeting Plasmodium vivax will be an essential component of any comprehensive malaria elimination program, but major gaps in our understanding of P. vivax biology, including the protein-protein interactions that mediate merozoite invasion of reticulocytes, hinder the search for candidate antigens. Only one ligand-receptor interaction has been identified, that between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the erythrocyte Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC, and strain-specific immune responses to PvDBP make it a complex vaccine target. To broaden the repertoire of potential P. vivax merozoite-stage vaccine targets, we exploited a recent breakthrough in expressing full-length ectodomains of Plasmodium proteins in a functionally-active form in mammalian cells and initiated a large-scale study of P. vivax merozoite proteins that are potentially involved in reticulocyte binding and invasion.We selected 39 P. vivax proteins that are predicted to localize to the merozoite surface or invasive secretory organelles, some of which show homology to P. falciparum vaccine candidates. Of these, we were able to express 37 full-length protein ectodomains in a mammalian expression system, which has been previously used to express P. falciparum invasion ligands such as PfRH5. To establish whether the expressed proteins were correctly folded, we assessed whether they were recognized by antibodies from Cambodian patients with acute vivax malaria. IgG from these samples showed at least a two-fold change in reactivity over naïve controls in 27 of 34 antigens tested, and the majority showed heat-labile IgG immunoreactivity, suggesting the presence of conformation-sensitive epitopes and native tertiary protein structures. Using a method specifically designed to detect low-affinity, extracellular protein-protein interactions, we confirmed a predicted interaction between P. vivax 6-cysteine proteins P12 and P41, further suggesting that the proteins

  2. Estimates of the burden of meningococcal disease in Italy: implications for prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, D; Fortunato, F; Prato, R

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is an acute, severe bacterial infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis. The most common presentations of invasive meningococcal infection (IMD) are meningitis and sepsis, less common pathologic presentations include focal infections. IMD can develop from initial symptoms to death within 24 hours. As many as 20% of survivors have permanent sequelae. Infants sources (notifications, hospitalizations, and laboratory surveillance). The sensitivity of the three systems was 36.7% (95% CI: 17.5%-57.9%) and registrations lost nearly 28 cases/year in the period 2001- 2013. In the National Surveillance of Invasive Bacterial Diseases, serogroup B accounted for 64.9% of samples serotyped in 2011. Applying this percentage to the total number of hospitalizations for IMD registered in the same year (n = 256), we obtained an estimated 166 episodes attributable to serogroup B. Our work highlights the importance of enhancing surveillance for meningococcal disease and strengthening vaccinations against all preventable serogroups.

  3. Protective efficacy and immune responses by homologous prime-booster immunizations of a novel inactivated Salmonella Gallinarum vaccine candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG) ghost vaccine candidate was recently constructed. In this study, we evaluated various prime-boost vaccination strategies using the candidate strain to optimize immunity and protection efficacy against fowl typhoid. Materials and Methods The chickens were divided into five groups designated as group A (non-immunized control), group B (orally primed and boosted), group C (primed orally and boosted intramuscularly), group D (primed and boosted intramuscularly), and group E (primed intramuscularly and boosted orally). The chickens were primed with the SG ghost at 7 days of age and were subsequently boosted at the fifth week of age. Post-immunization, the plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA) levels, and the SG antigen-specific lymphocyte stimulation were monitored at weekly interval and the birds were subsequently challenged with a virulent SG strain at the third week post-second immunization. Results Chickens in group D showed an optimized protection with significantly increased plasma IgG, sIgA, and lymphocyte stimulation response compared to all groups. The presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and monocyte/macrophage (M/M) in the spleen, and splenic expression of cytokines such as interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the immunized chickens were investigated. The prime immunization induced significantly higher splenic M/M population and mRNA levels of IFN-γ whereas the booster showed increases of splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell population and IL-6 cytokine in mRNA levels. Conclusion Our results indicate that the prime immunization with the SG ghost vaccine induced Th1 type immune response and the booster elicited both Th1- and Th2-related immune responses. PMID:27489805

  4. Critical analysis of old and new vaccines against N. meningitidis serogroup C, considering the meningococcal disease epidemiology in Brazil Análise crítica das antigas e novas vacinas contra a N. meningitidis do sorogrupo C, considerando a epidemiologia da doença meningocócica no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the impact of meningococcal disease is substantial, and the potential for the introduction and spread of more virulent strains of N. meningitidis or strains with increased resistance to current antibiotics causes concern, making prevention essential. OBJECTIVES: Review the indications for meningococcal disease vaccines, considering the epidemiological status in Brazil. METHODS: A critical literature review on this issue using the Medline and Lilacs databases. RESULTS: In Brazil, MenB and MenC were the most important serogroups identified in the 1990s. Polysaccharide vaccines available against those serogroups can offer only limited protection for infants, the group at highest risk for meningococcal disease. Additionally, polysaccharide vaccines may induce a hypo-responsive state to MenC. New meningococcal C conjugate vaccines could partially solve these problems, but it is unlikely that in the next few years a vaccine against MenB that can promote good protection against multiple strains of MenB responsible for endemic and epidemic diseases will become available. CONCLUSIONS: In order to make the best decision about recommendations on immunization practices, better quality surveillance data are required. In Brazil, MenC was responsible for about 2,000 cases per year during the last 10 years. New conjugate vaccines against MenC are very effective and immunogenic, and they should be recommended, especially for children less than 5 years old. Polysaccharide vaccines should be indicated only in epidemic situations and for high-risk groups. Until new vaccines against MenC and MenB are available for routine immunization programs, the most important measure for controlling meningococcal disease is early diagnosis of these infections in order to treat patients and to offer chemoprophylaxis to contacts.Em todo o mundo, o impacto das doenças meningocócicas é enorme e o potencial para a introdução e disseminação de cepas da N

  5. Bo-lysin: A Potential Candidate as a biomarker of Protection after Vaccination against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major health problem worldwide. A Th1 type response with release of IFN {gamma}https://webmail.utmb.edu/math/gamma.gif and cytotoxic granules such as granulysin and perforin, play a major role in the disease. Measurements of protection after TB vaccination include IFN {...

  6. Assessment of vaccine candidates for persons aged 50 and older : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, Renske; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; van Essen, Ted G. A.; Suijkerbuijk, Anita; van Lier, Alies; de Melker, Hester E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing life expectancy in most European countries has resulted in growth of the population 50 and older. This population is more susceptible to infectious diseases because of immunosenescence, comorbidity and general frailty. Thus, to promote healthy aging, vaccination against va

  7. Studies on a new candidate vaccine for Rhodococcus equi infections in foals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Anton A. C.; Grommen, Ries; Hessels, Gerda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus (R.) equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals up to 5 months of age. Despite the great need for a prophylactic measure against this devastating disease, no commercial vaccine is available. Today only long-term and cumbersome

  8. Anti-cattle tick vaccines: Many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an invited paper from the editor-in-chief of International Journal for Parasitology who requested a Current Opinion manuscript to discuss the status of anti-cattle tick vaccine research. Arguably the world's most significant arthropod pest of cattle, control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus...

  9. Identification of vaccine candidates against serogroup B meningococcus by whole-genome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizza, M; Scarlato, [No Value; Masignani, [No Value; Giuliani, MM; Arico, B; Comanducci, M; Jennings, GT; Baldi, L; Bartolini, E; Capecchi, B; Galeotti, CL; Luzzi, E; Manetti, R; Marchetti, E; Mora, M; Nuti, S; Ratti, G; Santini, L; Savino, S; Scarselli, M; Storni, E; Zuo, PJ; Broeker, M; Hundt, E; Knapp, B; Blair, E; Mason, T; Tettelin, H; Hood, DW; Jeffries, AC; Saunders, NJ; Granoff, DM; Venter, JC; Moxon, ER; Grandi, G; Rappuoli, R

    2000-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial septicemia and meningitis. Sequence variation of surface-exposed proteins and cross-reactivity of the serogroup B capsular polysaccharide with human tissues have hampered efforts to develop a successful vaccine. To overcome these obstacles, the en

  10. A randomized controlled phase Ib trial of the malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2 in African children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Bélard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GMZ2 is a fusion protein of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3 and glutamate rich protein (GLURP that mediates an immune response against the blood stage of the parasite. Two previous phase I clinical trials, one in naïve European adults and one in malaria-exposed Gabonese adults showed that GMZ2 was well tolerated and immunogenic. Here, we present data on safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 in one to five year old Gabonese children, a target population for future malaria vaccine efficacy trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty children one to five years of age were randomized to receive three doses of either 30 µg or 100 µg of GMZ2, or rabies vaccine. GMZ2, adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide, was administered on Days 0, 28 and 56. All participants received a full course of their respective vaccination and were followed up for one year. Both 30 µg and 100 µg GMZ2 vaccine doses were well tolerated and induced antibodies and memory B-cells against GMZ2 as well as its antigenic constituents MSP3 and GLURP. After three doses of vaccine, the geometric mean concentration of antibodies to GMZ2 was 19-fold (95%CI: 11,34 higher in the 30 µg GMZ2 group than in the rabies vaccine controls, and 16-fold (7,36 higher in the 100 µg GMZ2 group than the rabies group. Geometric mean concentration of antibodies to MSP3 was 2.7-fold (1.6,4.6 higher in the 30 µg group than in the rabies group and 3.8-fold (1.5,9.6 higher in the 100 µg g