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Sample records for meningitis clinical decision

  1. Meningitis, Clinical Presentation of Tetanus

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    Anna Moniuszko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease.

  2. Early diagnosis model for meningitis supports public health decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Rebecca M; Ejidokun, Oluwatoyin O; Verlander, Neville Q; Fraser, Graham; Meltzer, Margie; Rehman, Yasmin; Muir, Peter; Ninis, Nelly; Stuart, James M

    2011-07-01

    To develop a predictive model for rapid differential diagnosis of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia to support public health decisions on chemoprophylaxis for contacts. Prospective study of suspected cases of acute meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia admitted to hospitals in the South West, West Midlands and London Regions of England from July 2008 to June 2009. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory variables on admission were recorded. Logistic regression was used to derive a predictive model. Of the 719 suspect cases reported, 385 confirmed cases were included in analysis. Peripheral blood polymorphonuclear count of >16 × 10(9)/l, serum C-reactive protein of >100 mg/l and haemorrhagic rash were strongly and independently associated with diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia. Using a simple scoring system, the presence of any one of these factors gave a probability of >95% in predicting the final diagnosis. We have developed a model using laboratory and clinical factors, but not dependent on availability of CSF, for differentiating acute bacterial from viral meningitis within a few hours of admission to hospital. This scoring system is recommended in public health management of suspected cases of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia to inform decisions on chemoprophylaxis. Copyright © 2011 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Following the (Clinical Decision) Rules: Opportunities for Improving Safety and Resource Utilization With the Bacterial Meningitis Score.

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    Hagedorn, Philip A; Shah, Samir S; Kirkendall, Eric S

    2016-05-01

    The Bacterial Meningitis Score accurately classifies children with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis at very low risk (VLR) versus not very low risk (non-VLR) for bacterial meningitis. Most children with CSF pleocytosis detected during emergency department evaluation are hospitalized despite the high accuracy of this prediction rule and the decreasing incidence of bacterial meningitis. The lack of widespread use of this rule may contribute to unnecessary risk exposure and costs. This cross-sectional study included 1049 patients who, between January 2010 and May 2013, had suspicion for meningitis and underwent both a complete blood cell count and CSF studies during their emergency department evaluation. We then examined their hospitalizations to characterize exposure to drugs, radiologic studies, and the costs associated with their care to determine the safety and value repercussions of these VLR admissions. Primary outcomes include duration of antibiotics, exposure to drugs and radiology studies, safety events, and costs incurred during these VLR admissions. Twenty patients classified as VLR were admitted to the hospital. On average they received 35 hours of antibiotic therapy. There was 1 adverse drug event and 1 safety event. The VLR patients admitted to the hospital were exposed to risk and costs despite their low risk stratification. Systematic application of the Bacterial Meningitis Score could prevent these exposures and costs. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

  4. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningitis - bacterial; Meningitis - viral; Meningitis - fungal; Meningitis - vaccine ... These infections usually get better without treatment. But, bacterial meningitis infections are very serious. They may result in ...

  5. Clinical research progress of tuberculous meningitis

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    Zhan-yun MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis is an infectious disease of central nervous system caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It mainly invades into brain meninges and parenchyma, and may spread to the spinal cord and spinal meninges. The disability rate and mortality rate of this disease are very high. In recent years, incidence of tuberculosis increased significantly due to the increase of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases, population mobility, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS epidemic and other factors. Tuberculosis is still a worldwide serious threat to human life and health, especially in the underdeveloped and developing countries. China is the world's largest developing country with large population, so tuberculosis prevention and control is still a quite severe problem. In this paper, the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment progress of tuberculous meningitis were reviewed systematically. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.004

  6. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Chunjing; Shu Jiner; Chen Jian; Sheng Sanlan; Lu Jinhua; Cai Xiaoxiao; Li Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T 1 hypointensity and T 2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  7. [Validation of a clinical prediction rule to distinguish bacterial from aseptic meningitis].

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    Agüero, Gonzalo; Davenport, María C; Del Valle, María de la P; Gallegos, Paulina; Kannemann, Ana L; Bokser, Vivian; Ferrero, Fernando

    2010-02-01

    Despite most meningitis are not bacterial, antibiotics are usually administered on admission because bacterial meningitis is difficult to be rule-out. Distinguishing bacterial from aseptic meningitis on admission could avoid inappropriate antibiotic use and hospitalization. We aimed to validate a clinical prediction rule to distinguish bacterial from aseptic meningitis in children, on arriving to the emergency room. This prospective study included patients aged or = 1000 cells/mm(3), CSF protein > or = 80 mg/dl, peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count > or = 10.000/mm(3), seizure = 1 point each. Sensitivity (S), specificity (E), positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR and NLR) of the BMS to predict bacterial meningitis were calculated. Seventy patients with meningitis were included (14 bacterial meningitis). When BMS was calculated, 25 patients showed a BMS= 0 points, 11 BMS= 1 point, and 34 BMS > or = 2 points. A BMS = 0 showed S: 100%, E: 44%, VPP: 31%, VPN: 100%, RVP: 1,81 RVN: 0. A BMS > or = 2 predicted bacterial meningitis with S: 100%, E: 64%, VPP: 41%, VPN: 100%, PLR: 2.8, NLR:0. Using BMS was simple, and allowed identifying children with very low risk of bacterial meningitis. It could be a useful tool to assist clinical decision making.

  8. MODERN CLINICAL AND LABORATORY FEATURES OF ENTEROVIRAL MENINGITIS

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    O. V. Usacheva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Among numerous viral meningitises from 80% to 90% of cases are accounted for meningitis of enteroviral etiology according to the international data. Despite the favorable disease course, there are forms which are characterized by severe damage of CNS. In order to improve diagnostics of enteroviral meningitis in this article we have made a comparative analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters in 23 patients with enteroviral meningitis and 18 patients with serous meningitis of non-enteroviral etiology. Anamnesis data and the major clinical manifestations of the disease dynamics were analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the comparison of diagnoses, by which patients were sent to infectious hospital, the symptoms that occurred during patients’ admission into hospitals and their severity. The presence and severity of meningeal symptoms and the indices of cerebrospinal fluid in the patients of the comparison group were analyzed in detail. It is shown that enteroviruses are the important factor in the development of meningitis in the children of younger age. The clinical picture of enteroviral meningitis often develops gradually for 2-3 days and includes the typical syndromes: intoxication and meningeal ones. Every third patient with enterovirus infection has diarrhea and catarrhal symptoms, that’s why it is difficult to diagnose meningitis in its early stages, but it allows to assume enteroviral etiology of the disease. The meningitis of enteroviral etiology is characterized by multiple meningeal signs, while the non-enteroviral meningitis is characterized by dissociation with the prevalence of the of Kernig’s and Brudzinski’s symptoms. The analysis of the laboratory data showed that the enteroviral meningitis is characterized by low (over 50-100 cells "mixed" pleocytosis (the ratio of lymphocytes and neutrophils is about 1:1. These data can be used for differential diagnosis between enteroviral meningitis and serous meningitis of

  9. Clinical study on epilepsy secondary to fungal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu YANG; Min ZHANG; Xi HE

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), imaging and EEG characteristics of 10 patients with epilepsy secondary to fungal meningitis were retrospectively analyzed, so as to improve the diagnosis and treatment of fungal meningitis. The results suggest that patients with fungal meningitis involving the cortex were sensitive to secondary epilepsy; imaging examinations showing frontotemporal lesions and EEG showing moderate-to-severe abnormalities were sensitive to secondary ...

  10. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

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    Ceccato, P.; Trzaska, S.; Perez, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; del Corral, J.; Cousin, R.; Blumenthal, M. B.; Connor, S.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use, and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular Meningitis and Malaria. In this paper we present the new and improved products that have been developed for monitoring dust, temperature, rainfall and vectorial capacity model for monitoring and forecasting risks of Meningitis and Malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  11. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Pietro; Trzaska, Sylwia; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Kalashnikova, Olga; del Corral, John; Cousin, Remi; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Bell, Michael; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2013-01-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular meningitis and malaria. In this paper, we present the new and improved products that have been developed for: (i) estimating dust aerosol for forecasting risks of meningitis and (ii) for monitoring temperature and rainfall and integrating them into a vectorial capacity model for forecasting risks of malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map Room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  12. Clinical and microbiological features of cryptococcal meningitis

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    Lucia Kioko Hasimoto e Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, the clinical features, underlying diseases and clinical outcomes of patients with cryptococcosis were investigated. In addition, a molecular analysis of the Cryptococcus neoformans species complex isolated from these patients was performed. Methods A prospective study of 62 cases of patients with cryptococcal infection was conducted at the Hospital de Doenças Tropicais de Goiás Dr. Anuar Auad from 2009-2010. Cryptococcal meningitis cases were diagnosed by direct examination and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sample culture. The profiling of these patients was assessed. The CSF samples were submitted to India ink preparation and cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar, and C. neoformans was identified by the production of urease, a positive phenoloxidase test and assimilation of carbohydrates. C. neoformans and C. gattii isolates were distinguished by growth on L-canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue medium, and molecular analysis was conducted via PCR fingerprinting reactions using M13 and (GACA4 primers. Results From the 62 patients with cryptococcosis, 71 isolates of CSF were obtained; 67 (94.4% isolates were identified as C. neoformans var. grubii/VNI, and 4 (5.6% were identified as C. gattii/VGII. Of these patients, 53 had an HIV diagnosis. The incidence of cryptococcosis was higher among patients 20-40 years of age, with 74.2% of the cases reported in males. Cryptococcus-related mortality was noted in 48.4% of the patients, and the symptoms were altered sensorium, headache, fever and stiff neck. Conclusions The high morbidity and mortality observed among patients with cryptococcosis demonstrate the importance of obtaining information regarding the epidemiological profile and clinical course of the disease in the State of Goiás, Brazil.

  13. Computed tomography in cases of coccidioidal meningitis, with clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetter, A.G.; Fischer, D.W.; Flom, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans of 22 patients with coccidioidal meningitis were reviewed and their clinical course was analyzed. Abnormalities of the ventricular system or the basilar cisterns or both were present in 16 instances. Although it is not a definitive diagnostic tool, the CT scan is helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of coccidioidal meningitis and in predicting the prognosis of patients affected by the disease. 19 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  14. Performance of thirteen clinical rules to distinguish bacterial and presumed viral meningitis in Vietnamese children.

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    Nguyen Tien Huy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Successful outcomes from bacterial meningitis require rapid antibiotic treatment; however, unnecessary treatment of viral meningitis may lead to increased toxicities and expense. Thus, improved diagnostics are required to maximize treatment and minimize side effects and cost. Thirteen clinical decision rules have been reported to identify bacterial from viral meningitis. However, few rules have been tested and compared in a single study, while several rules are yet to be tested by independent researchers or in pediatric populations. Thus, simultaneous test and comparison of these rules are required to enable clinicians to select an optimal diagnostic rule for bacterial meningitis in settings and populations similar to ours. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the Infectious Department of Pediatric Hospital Number 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The performance of the clinical rules was evaluated by area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC using the method of DeLong and McNemar test for specificity comparison. RESULTS: Our study included 129 patients, of whom 80 had bacterial meningitis and 49 had presumed viral meningitis. Spanos's rule had the highest AUC at 0.938 but was not significantly greater than other rules. No rule provided 100% sensitivity with a specificity higher than 50%. Based on our calculation of theoretical sensitivity and specificity, we suggest that a perfect rule requires at least four independent variables that posses both sensitivity and specificity higher than 85-90%. CONCLUSIONS: No clinical decision rules provided an acceptable specificity (>50% with 100% sensitivity when applying our data set in children. More studies in Vietnam and developing countries are required to develop and/or validate clinical rules and more very good biomarkers are required to develop such a perfect rule.

  15. Clinical findings and management of patients with meningitis with an emphasis on Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in rural Tanzania.

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    Storz, Corinna; Schutz, Cornelia; Tluway, Anthony; Matuja, William; Schmutzhard, Erich; Winkler, Andrea S

    2016-07-15

    The spectrum of meningitis pathogens differs depending on the age of patients and the geographic region, amongst other. Although meningitis vaccination programs have led to the reduction of incidence rates, an imbalance between low- and high-income countries still exists. In a hospital-based study in rural northern Tanzania, we consecutively recruited patients with confirmed meningitis and described their clinical and laboratory characteristics. A total of 136 patients with meningitis were included. Fever (85%), meningism (63%) and impairment of consciousness (33%) were the most frequent clinical symptoms/signs. Nearly 10% of all patients tested were positive for malaria. The majority of the patients with bacterial meningitis (39%), especially those under 5years of age, were confirmed to be infected with Haemophilus influenzae (26%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (19%) and Neisseria meningitidis (15%). Haemophilus influenzae represented the dominant causative organism in children under 2years of age. Our study emphasizes the importance of recognizing warning symptoms like fever, meningism and impairment of consciousness, implementing laboratory tests to determine responsible pathogens and evaluating differential diagnoses in patients with meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. It also shows that Haemophilus influenza meningitis is still an important cause for meningitis in the young, most probabaly due to lack of appropriate vaccination coverage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Meningitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-24

    This podcast gives a general overview of meningitis, including what it is, the five types, and the causes.  Created: 10/24/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/24/2012.

  17. Childhood Acute Bacterial Meningitis: Clinical Spectrum, Bacteriological Profile and Outcome.

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    Bari, Attia; Zeeshan, Fatima; Zafar, Aiza; Ejaz, Hassan; Iftikhar, Aisha; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2016-10-01

    To determine the disease pattern, etiological agents and outcome of childhood acute bacterial meningitis. Adescriptive study. Department of Paediatric Medicine, The Children's Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2012. Atotal of 199 children between the ages of 1 month and 5 years, admitted with the diagnosis of meningitis on the basis of clinical findings and positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), were included. In all patients, complete blood count (CBC), CSF culture sensitivity, and blood culture sensitivity were performed. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Out of 199 children, 127 (63.8%) were males with M:F ratio of 1.7:1. Mean age was 11.33 ±12 months. Maximum numbers of children were bacterial meningitis mostly affected children under the age of 1 year. CSF culture revealed both Grampositive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most common pathogen in children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae.

  18. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in adults: clinical characteristics, etiology, treatment and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Samkar, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we describe the clinical characteristics, etiology, treatment and outcome of zoonotic bacterial meningitis. Each chapter describes meningitis patients infected by a specific zoonotic pathogen, such as Streptococcus equi, Streptococcuis suis, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, Campylobacter

  19. [A clinical study of 26 cases of cryptococcal meningitis].

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    Liu, Zhengyin; Wang, Aixia; Li, Taisheng; Qin, Shulin; Sheng, Ruiyuan

    2002-08-01

    To study the diagnosis and therapy of cryptococcal meningitis. Retrospective review of the clinical features, treatment and outcome of 26 patients with cryptococcal meningitis from October 1981 to September 2001 at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The age of the patients ranged from 5 to 62 years (mean: 35.6 years), 12 were male and 14 were female. There were 16 patients with underlying diseases, 9 had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 4 had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 3 had other diseases. 12 patients had contact with pigeons. The nonspecific clinical and laboratory findings in these patients led to misdiagnosis: as lupus encephalopathy in 6 cases and tuberculous meningitis in 5 cases. 23 of the 26 cases were positive of cryptococcus on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) smear. 13 cases were positive on CSF culture, but latex coagulate test performed in 20 cases were all positive, 15 patients had high intracranial pressure (> 300 mm H(2)O), 9 patients with dilated ventricle received brain ventricular draining. Only 2 cases used fluconazole monotherapy. One patient only used amphotericin B. The rest of the patients were given amphotericin B in combination with flucytosine (12 patients) or fluconazole (5 cases), or flucytosine combined with fluconazole (6 cases). The mean dose of amphotericin B was 2.6 g, the highest dose of amphotericin B and liposomal amphotericin B was 10.05 g and 20 g, respectively. The outcome of the 26 cases showed that 17 were cured, 4 improved, 3 patients were died and 2 patients gave up any further treatment. From Oct. 1981 to Sep. 1996 we found only 9 cases, but in recent 5 years we found 17 cases. The incidence of cryptococcal meningitis was increasing in the recent 5 years. The conditions associated with this disease include extensive broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppressive drugs or ligh-dose corticosteroids and increasing cases of HIV/AIDS. The early diagnosis

  20. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in adults: clinical characteristics, etiology, treatment and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    van Samkar, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we describe the clinical characteristics, etiology, treatment and outcome of zoonotic bacterial meningitis. Each chapter describes meningitis patients infected by a specific zoonotic pathogen, such as Streptococcus equi, Streptococcuis suis, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, Campylobacter fetus and Leptospira. We combine cases identified in a nationwide prospective cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients with a literature review on meningitis caused by each zoonotic patho...

  1. Clinical Presentation, Aetiology, and Outcomes of Meningitis in a Setting of High HIV and TB Prevalence

    OpenAIRE

    Thinyane, Keneuoe Hycianth; Motsemme, Keanole Mofona; Cooper, Varsay Jim Lahai

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis causes significant morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of this study was to study the clinical presentation, aetiology, and outcomes of meningitis among adult patients admitted to Queen Mamohato Memorial Hospital in Maseru, Lesotho, with a diagnosis of meningitis. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and April 2014; data collected included presenting signs and symptoms, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise ...

  2. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  3. Decision analysis using decision trees for a simple clinical decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, Brian

    2012-10-01

    To illustrate the use of decision trees with a utility index in clinical decision making. A decision tree was created related to whether or not to perform a tonsillectomy. Data from the literature were applied to a common hypothetical clinical scenario. A decision tree graphically represents the typical decision-making process that many clinicians use. The addition of utility functions permitted consideration of the adverse or beneficial effects of outcomes, altering the treatment decision. Quantitative tools such as decision trees may quantify outcome preferences and aid in clinical decision making, but the proper tool and background data are essential.

  4. Childhood acute bacterial meningitis: clinical spectrum, bacteriological profile and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.; Zeeshan, S.; Rathore, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the disease pattern, etiological agents and outcome of childhood acute bacterial meningitis. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Paediatric Medicine, The Children's Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2012. Methodology: A total of 199 children between the ages of 1 month and 5 years, admitted with the diagnosis of meningitis on the basis of clinical findings and positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), were included. In all patients, complete blood count (CBC), CSF culture sensitivity, and blood culture sensitivity were performed. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 199 children, 127 (63.8%) were males with M:F ratio of 1.7:1. Mean age was 11.33 ± 12 months. Maximum numbers of children were < 1 year of age, 136 (68.3%). Only 90 (45.2%) children were fully vaccinated according to Expanded Program of Immunisation (EPI) schedule. Presentations with refusal to take feed (p=0.008) and with impaired conscious state were independent predictors of death (p=0.002). Complications were noted in 34 (17%) and were significantly associated with severe malnutrition (p=0.006) and altered conscious level at presentation (p < 0.001). The common pathogens identified on CSF culture were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) in 11 (5.5%) and streptococcus pneumoniae in 5 (2.5%). Overall mortality was 10.1%. The commonest pathogen isolated from children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae (p=0.039). Conclusion: Acute bacterial meningitis mostly affected children under the age of 1 year. CSF culture revealed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most common pathogen in children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae. (author)

  5. Shared clinical decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  6. Clinical Presentation, Aetiology, and Outcomes of Meningitis in a Setting of High HIV and TB Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keneuoe Hycianth Thinyane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis causes significant morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of this study was to study the clinical presentation, aetiology, and outcomes of meningitis among adult patients admitted to Queen Mamohato Memorial Hospital in Maseru, Lesotho, with a diagnosis of meningitis. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and April 2014; data collected included presenting signs and symptoms, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise data; association between variables was analysed using Fisher’s exact test. 56 patients were enrolled; the HIV coinfection rate was 79%. The most common presenting symptoms were altered mental status, neck stiffness, headache, and fever. TB meningitis was the most frequent diagnosis (39%, followed by bacterial (27%, viral (18%, and cryptococcal meningitis (16%. In-hospital mortality was 43% with case fatalities of 23%, 40%, 44%, and 90% for TB, bacterial, cryptococcal, and viral meningitis, respectively. Severe renal impairment was significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, the causes of meningitis in this study reflect the high prevalence of HIV and TB in our setting. Strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality due to meningitis should include improving diagnostic services to facilitate early detection and treatment of meningitis and timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  7. Clinical Presentation, Aetiology, and Outcomes of Meningitis in a Setting of High HIV and TB Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinyane, Keneuoe Hycianth; Motsemme, Keanole Mofona; Cooper, Varsay Jim Lahai

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis causes significant morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of this study was to study the clinical presentation, aetiology, and outcomes of meningitis among adult patients admitted to Queen Mamohato Memorial Hospital in Maseru, Lesotho, with a diagnosis of meningitis. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and April 2014; data collected included presenting signs and symptoms, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise data; association between variables was analysed using Fisher's exact test. 56 patients were enrolled; the HIV coinfection rate was 79%. The most common presenting symptoms were altered mental status, neck stiffness, headache, and fever. TB meningitis was the most frequent diagnosis (39%), followed by bacterial (27%), viral (18%), and cryptococcal meningitis (16%). In-hospital mortality was 43% with case fatalities of 23%, 40%, 44%, and 90% for TB, bacterial, cryptococcal, and viral meningitis, respectively. Severe renal impairment was significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, the causes of meningitis in this study reflect the high prevalence of HIV and TB in our setting. Strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality due to meningitis should include improving diagnostic services to facilitate early detection and treatment of meningitis and timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients. PMID:26491454

  8. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, J.Y.; Brouwer, M.C.; Aronica, E.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and

  9. Pneumococcal meningitis: Clinical-pathological correlations (meningene-path)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and

  10. Clinical analysis of 26 cases with cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wei HU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical features of cryptococcal meningitis (CM and summarize its clinical manifestations, laboratory data, differential diagnosis and treatment, so as to discuss the treatment progress of CM.  Methods Clinical data of 26 cases with CM were retrospectively analyzed, and the treatment experiences were summarized.  Results All patients had headache and fever, and were positive for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF latex agglutination test. Twenty-one patients' CSF smear were found Cryptococcus neoformans. Almost 76.92% (20/26 of patients were cured or became better after receiving combined treatment of amphotericin B, flucytosine and fluconazole. The symptoms and signs of 4 patients who received combined treatment of amphotericin B and voriconazole were greatly improved.  Conclusions CM can prone to be misdiagnosed at early stage. CSF smear and fungi culture are beneficial to the diagnosis. Latex agglutination test is a quick and easy examination to reduce the misdiagnosis rate of CM. The combination of amphotericin B, flucytosine and fluconazole is effective for the treatment of CM. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.009

  11. Bacterial meningitis in newborn and infant: correlation between organism, CT findings and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Park, Young Seo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Suh, Dae Chul; Chung, Young Kyo

    1993-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis often results in significant neurologic complications regardless of the antibiotics treatment Computed tomographic (CT) finding of tuberculous meningitis is fairly well known but not the findings of bacterial meningitis. This study was performed to determine the incidence of causative organisms and to correlate between the organisms and computed tomographic (CT) findings with clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis in newborns and infants. We analyzed the brain CT and clinical records of 15 infants who had been diagnosed as bacterial meningitis by CSF culture. We found that the most common organisms were Group B streptococcus in neonates without no neurologic complications in all but one and Hemophilus influenza in infants whose clinical outcomes were poor in all except one. CT findings related with poor prognosis in this study were cerebral edema, basal cisternal obliteration and enhancement, and cerebral infarction on initial CT and ventriculomegaly on follow-up CT. We concluded that CT diagnosed intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis well and could contributed to better treatment of bacterial meningitis

  12. Bacterial meningitis in newborn and infant: correlation between organism, CT findings and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Young; Park, Young Seo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Suh, Dae Chul; Chung, Young Kyo [College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-03-15

    Acute bacterial meningitis often results in significant neurologic complications regardless of the antibiotics treatment Computed tomographic (CT) finding of tuberculous meningitis is fairly well known but not the findings of bacterial meningitis. This study was performed to determine the incidence of causative organisms and to correlate between the organisms and computed tomographic (CT) findings with clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis in newborns and infants. We analyzed the brain CT and clinical records of 15 infants who had been diagnosed as bacterial meningitis by CSF culture. We found that the most common organisms were Group B streptococcus in neonates without no neurologic complications in all but one and Hemophilus influenza in infants whose clinical outcomes were poor in all except one. CT findings related with poor prognosis in this study were cerebral edema, basal cisternal obliteration and enhancement, and cerebral infarction on initial CT and ventriculomegaly on follow-up CT. We concluded that CT diagnosed intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis well and could contributed to better treatment of bacterial meningitis.

  13. Epidemiological, Clinical and Prognostic Profile of Acute Bacterial Meningitis among Children in Alexandria, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farag HF

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To address the epidemiological characteristics and clinical indices that may predict the prognostic profile of meningitis among children. Methods: Children admitted to Alexandria fever hospital with clinical diagnosis of meningitis/meningoencephalitis during the period 2002-2003 were recruited for the study. They were subjected to clinical examination as well as CSF bacteriological and serological investigations Results: Three hundred and ten patients (195 males and 115 females were included. About 65.2% of them were infected with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM and 34.8% were infected with aseptic meningitis. In this study, ABM was caused by Haemophilus influenzae (21%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (13.9%, Neisseria meningitidis (14.2% and other undetermined bacteria (16.1%. ABM showed significant association with age group 1-9 years (66.3%, low socio-economic class (96%, working mother (83.2%, more than two smokers in the family (62.9% and cold seasons(fall 35.1% and winter 48.5%. Aseptic meningitis showed significant association with age group 3-15 months (100% and previous immunization(81.5%. The overall case fatality rate was 10.3%; 13.9% for ABM and 3.4% for aseptic meningitis. 7.1% of all survivors developed epileptic attacks. Predictors for death or epilepsy events were high WHO meningitis score (> 9, decreased CSF glucose level (Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of several predictors of the outcome of meningitis in children. It is concluded that quick and simple scoring scales, such as the WHO scale, are not only applicable but valuable prognostic tools for meningitis in children.

  14. Meningitis tuberculosa: Clinical findings and results of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, M.; Loddenkemper, R.; Hoffmann, H.G.; Krankenhaus Zehlendorf, Berlin; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Altona

    1982-01-01

    Guided by 9 own observations between 1977 and 1981, new diagnostic facilities in tuberculous meningitis are discussed. For differentiation from viral meningitis, measurement of CSF lactic acid concentration in addition to that of CSF glucose has proved to be of value in recent years. In accordance with the literature, two cases of this series which were examined for CSF lactic acid concentration showed markedly elevated levels of 8,4 rsp. 10,4 mmol/l. In contrast to this, in viral meningitis usually values of less than 3.5 mmol/l are found. Additionally, the presence of hypochlor- and hyponatremia, which could be demonstrated in 6 of our 9 patients, may raise the suspicion of tuberculous etiology. In the series presented, cranial computed tomography was of greatest diagnostic value, enabling the diagnosis of hydrocephalus internus in 5, and basal arachnoiditis in 2 cases. (orig.) [de

  15. Meningitis tuberculosa: Clinical findings and results of cranial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, M.; Loddenkemper, R.; Hoffmann, H.G.

    1982-10-01

    Guided by 9 own observations between 1977 and 1981, new diagnostic facilities in tuberculous meningitis are discussed. For differentiation from viral meningitis, measurement of CSF lactic acid concentration in addition to that of CSF glucose has proved to be of value in recent years. In accordance with the literature, two cases of this series which were examined for CSF lactic acid concentration showed markedly elevated levels of 8,4 rsp. 10,4 mmol/l. In contrast to this, in viral meningitis usually values of less than 3.5 mmol/l are found. Additionally, the presence of hypochlor- and hyponatremia, which could be demonstrated in 6 of our 9 patients, may raise the suspicion of tuberculous etiology. In the series presented, cranial computed tomography was of greatest diagnostic value, enabling the diagnosis of hydrocephalus internus in 5, and basal arachnoiditis in 2 cases.

  16. Clinical characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in Denmark in the post-vaccination era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T.I.; Howitz, M.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    P>The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 1993 may have influenced the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis (i.e. increasing frequency of other non-vaccine types; presentation in other age groups). Based on nationwide....... The presence of a lung focus was an independent prognostic factor for an unfavourable outcome (p 0.03). In conclusion, meningitis caused by Hib has been infrequent in Denmark after introduction of the Hib vaccine in the childhood vaccination programme, and no increase in meningitis cases due to non-b type H...... registration, clinical information and laboratory findings were collected from all 65 confirmed cases of H. influenzae meningitis during the period 1994-2005. Twenty-nine patients (45%) were 24 years old [median 62 years (range 25...

  17. Etiology and clinical management of adult meningitis in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizal Ganiem, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis consists of 8 chapters and addresses the etiology, diagnosis, outcome and treatment of adult meningitis in Indonesia. The studies were conducted in Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, the referral hospital for West Java province, Indonesia between December 2006 and August 2012. In a cohort

  18. Bacterial meningitis: epidemiology, herd protection, clinical characteristics, and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studied the epidemiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis after the nationwide implementation of paediatric conjugate vaccines, as well as the long-term epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease and neonatal group B streptococcal disease in the Netherlands. Furthermore,

  19. Comparison of clinical features and prognostic factors in HIV-negative adults with cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculous meningitis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Junyan; Zhou, Taoyou; Zhong, Cejun; Deng, Rong; Lü, Xiaoju

    2017-01-10

    The incidence of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) and tuberculous meningitis (TBM) have gradually increased in recent years. These two types of meningitis are easily misdiagnosed which leads to a poor prognosis. In this study we compared differences of clinical features and prognostic factors in non-HIV adults with CM and TBM. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of CM and TBM patients from January 2008 to December 2015 in our university hospital in China. The data included demographic characteristics, laboratory results, imaging findings, clinical outcomes. A total of 126 CM and 105 TBM patients were included. CM patients were more likely to present with headache, abnormal vision and hearing, and they might be less prone to fever and cough than TBM patients (P meningitis which could help to improve the treatment outcome. Further studies are worth to be done.

  20. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  1. Clinical manifestations of Eosinophilic meningitis due to infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Chindaprasirt, Jarin; Senthong, Vichai; Limpawattana, Panita; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tassniyom, Sompon; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2013-12-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis, caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is prevalent in northeastern Thailand, most commonly in adults. Data regarding clinical manifestations of this condition in children is limited and may be different those in adults. A chart review was done on 19 eosinophilic meningitis patients aged less than 15 years in Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Clinical manifestations and outcomes were reported using descriptive statistics. All patients had presented with severe headache. Most patients were males, had fever, nausea or vomiting, stiffness of the neck, and a history of snail ingestion. Six patients had papilledema or cranial nerve palsies. It was shown that the clinical manifestations of eosinophilic meningitis due to A. cantonensis in children are different from those in adult patients. Fever, nausea, vomiting, hepatomegaly, neck stiffness, and cranial nerve palsies were all more common in children than in adults.

  2. Correlation of MRI and clinical features in meningeal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, M.; Tanaka, R.; Takeda, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ten patients with meningeal carcinomatosis associated with nonhaemoatological neoplasms were examined: Six with breast, two with gastrointestinal and one with lung cancer, plus one with a tumour of unknown origin. Cytology was positive in all but one. The patients were classified into four groups according to the gadolinium-enhanced MRI (Gd-MRI) appearances: Group 1 had pure leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, group 2 dural carcinomatosis, group 3 spinal leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, and group 4 had normal Gd-MRI except for hydrocephalus. In group 1, Gd-MRI showed diffuse enhancement of the subarachnoid space, including the cisterns around the midbrain, the sylvian fissures, or cerebellar and cerebral sulci. In group 2, Gd-MRI showed diffuse, thick, partially nodular enhancement of the dura mater. No leptomeningeal or subependymal enhancement was evident. In group 3, nodular masses were seen only in the spinal canal. In group 4, no definite evidence of meningeal carcinomatosis was demonstrated on contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) or Gd-MRI. The median survival time was 2.0 months in group 1, 1.0 month in group 3, and 4.5 months in group 4, but the two patients in group 2 were alive 10 and 15 months after a definite diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis was made. In all patients examined by both CE-CT and Gd-MRI, the latter was superior for identification of meningeal carcinomatosis. Hydrocephalus is an important indirect sign of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, but was not seen in patients with dural carcinomatosis despite the presence of increased intracranial pressure. (orig.)

  3. Recurrent Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jon; Galen, Benjamin T

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare clinical scenario that can be self-limiting or life threatening depending on the underlying etiology. This review describes the causes, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis for recurrent meningitis. As a general overview of a broad topic, the aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a comprehensive differential diagnosis to aide in the evaluation and management of a patient with recurrent meningitis. New developments related to understanding the pathophysiology of recurrent meningitis are as scarce as studies evaluating the treatment and prevention of this rare disorder. A trial evaluating oral valacyclovir suppression after HSV-2 meningitis did not demonstrate a benefit in preventing recurrences. The data on prophylactic antibiotics after basilar skull fractures do not support their use. Intrathecal trastuzumab has shown promise in treating leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from HER-2 positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases are new potential causes of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Despite their potential for causing recurrent meningitis, the clinical entities reviewed herein are not frequently discussed together given that they are a heterogeneous collection of unrelated, rare diseases. Epidemiologic data on recurrent meningitis are lacking. The syndrome of recurrent benign lymphocytic meningitis described by Mollaret in 1944 was later found to be closely related to HSV-2 reactivation, but HSV-2 is by no means the only etiology of recurrent aseptic meningitis. While the mainstay of treatment for recurrent meningitis is supportive care, it is paramount to ensure that reversible and treatable causes have been addressed for further prevention.

  4. [Clinical analysis and follow-up of neonatal purulent meningitis caused by group B streptococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minli; Zhu, Jianghu; Li, Haijing; Liu, Peining; Lin, Zhenlang

    2014-02-01

    To study the clinical characteristics, antibiotics sensitivity and outcome of group B streptococcus (GBS) meningitis in neonates in order to provide the guide for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. A retrospective review was performed and a total of 13 cases of neonatal purulent meningitis caused by GBS were identified in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from January 1, 2005 to May 31, 2013. The clinical characteristics, antibiotics sensitivity test results and outcome were analyzed. Fever, poor feeding, seizure and lethargy were common clinical signs of neonatal purulent meningitis caused by GBS. Three cases of early onset GBS meningitis received prepartum antibiotics. All 13 cases had abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and 11 cases had increased CRP within hours after admission. Of the 13 patients, 7 were cured, 4 discharged with improvement, 2 patients died during hospitalization after being given up because of serious complication. The average length of stay for recovered patients was (47 ± 21)d. Acute complications mainly included hyponatremia (5 cases), intracranial hemorrhage (3 cases) , ventriculomegaly (3 cases) , subdural collection (2 cases) , hydrocephalus (2 cases), septic shock (2 cases), cerebral hernia (1 case), encephalomalacia (1 case). One preterm patient with early onset GBS meningitis died 1 month after hospital discharge. Among 7 survivors with 10-24 months follow-up, 3 were early onset GBS meningitis, 2 with normal results of neurologic examination, 1 with delayed motor development, 4 were late onset GBS meningitis, 1 with normal results of neurologic examination, 3 were neurologically impaired with manifestations including delayed motor development (2 cases) and seizures (1 case). All the GBS strains were sensitive to penicillin and linezolid (13/13, 10/10), the susceptibility to levofloxacin, ampicillin and vancomycin were 11/12, 9/10, 8/13 respectively. The clinical

  5. Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory contains descriptions of past and present CDS projects across the Federal Government. It includes Federal projects,...

  6. Validation of the bacterial meningitis score in adults presenting to the ED with meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Robert; Edlow, Jonathan A; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2016-07-01

    The Bacterial Meningitis Score classifies children with meningitis and none of the following high-risk predictors at very low risk for bacterial meningitis: positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stain, CSF protein ≥80mg/dL, CSF absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≥1000 cells/mm(3), peripheral ANC ≥10,000 cells/mm(3), and seizure at or prior to presentation. Although extensively validated in children, the Bacterial Meningitis Score has not been rigorously evaluated in adults. We performed a single-center cross-sectional retrospective study of adults presenting to the emergency department between 2003 and 2013 with meningitis (defined by CSF white blood cell count ≥10 cells/mm(3)). We defined a case of bacterial meningitis with either a positive CSF or blood culture. We report the performance of the Bacterial Meningitis Score in the study population. We identified 441 eligible patients of which, 4 (1%) had bacterial meningitis. The Bacterial Meningitis Score had a sensitivity of 100% [95% confidence interval (CI) 40%-100%], specificity 51% (95% CI, 46%-56%) and negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI, 98%-100%). None of the low risk adults had bacterial meningitis. If Bacterial Meningitis Score had been applied prospectively, the hospital admission rate would have dropped from 84% to 49% without missing any patients with bacterial meningitis. The Bacterial Meningitis Score accurately identified patients at low risk for bacterial meningitis and could assist clinical decision-making for adults with meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis.

  8. Diagnostic clinical and laboratory findings in response to predetermining bacterial pathogen: data from the Meningitis Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karanika

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Childhood meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality in many countries. The search for rapid diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis has lead to the further exploration of prognostic factors. This study was scheduled in an attempt to analyze various clinical symptoms as well as rapid laboratory results and provide an algorithm for the prediction of specific bacterial aetiology of childhood bacterial meningitis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the 32 year period, 2477 cases of probable bacterial meningitis (BM were collected from the Meningitis Registry (MR. Analysis was performed on a total of 1331 confirmed bacterial meningitis cases of patients aged 1 month to 14 years. Data was analysed using EPI INFO (version 3.4.3-CDC-Atlanta and SPSS (version 15.0-Chicago software. Statistically significant (p or = 15000/microL (OR 2.19 with a PPV of 77.8% (95%CI 40.0-97.2. For the diagnosis of Haemophilus influenzae, the most significant group of diagnostic criteria included, absence of haemorrhagic rash (OR 13.61, age > or = 1 year (OR 2.04, absence of headache (OR 3.01, CSF Glu < 40 mg/dL (OR 3.62 and peripheral WBC < 15,000/microL (OR 1.74 with a PPV of 58.5% (95%CI 42.1-73.7. CONCLUSIONS: The use of clinical and laboratory predictors for the assessment of the causative bacterial pathogen rather than just for predicting outcome of mortality seems to be a useful tool in the clinical management and specific treatment of BM. These findings should be further explored and studied.

  9. Meningitis - cryptococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated April 15, 2016. www.cdc.gov/meningitis/fungal.html . Accessed December 5, 2016. Review Date 11/27/2016 Updated by: Arnold Lentnek, MD, Infectious Diseases Medical Practice of NY and Clinical Research Centers ...

  10. Prevalence and clinical presentation of Cryptococcal meningitis among HIV seropositive patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradkar, Vasant; Mathur, M.; De, A.; Kumar, S.; Rathi, M.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 573 HIV seropositive and clinically suspected cases of Cryptococcal meningitis were included in the study, from January 2006 to January 2007. CSF samples were processed by negative staining with 10% Nigrosin, cultured on Sabouraud's dextrose agar, biochemical tests, such as urease test and brownish growth in Niger seed agar. The prevalence of Cryptococcal meningitis was found to be 2.79%. The most common signs and symptoms were: fever (100%), headache (100%), altered sensorium (100%), and neck stiffness (90%). All the patients responded to intravenous Amphotericin B treatment. PMID:21938109

  11. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and prevention of zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults. We identified 16 zoonotic bacteria causing meningitis in adults. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon compared to bacterial meningitis caused by

  12. Neoplastic meningitis: a retrospective review of clinical presentations, radiological and cerebrospinal fluid findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearanaisilp, Sorrawit; Sangruji, Tumthip; Danchaivijitr, Chotipat; Danchaivijitr, Nasuda

    2014-08-01

    To review the clinical, radiological, and laboratory presentations of patients with neoplastic meningitis. Patients with neoplastic meningitis were recruited by a retrospective search of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytopathological report database of Siriraj Hospital between 1997 and 2006. Clinical information and CSF result of these patients were extracted from their medical records. Neuroimagings were reviewed by a neuroradiologist. The present study revealed 40 cases of neoplastic meningitis, which comprised of 17 cases with carcinomatous meningitis (CM) and 23 lymphoma/leukemia meningitis (LM) cases. In patients with CM, the majority (70%) had adenocarcinoma of lung or breast. Three of 17 cases with unknown primary tumor had carcinomatous meningitis as an initial presentation. In LM most of the cases (70%) were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The most common symptom among patients with CM and LM was headache follow by cranial nerve palsy. In CM cases, CSF cytology was positive in the first specimen in 15 cases (82.35%) and in 22 from 23 cases (95.7%) in LM cases. Overall CSF showed pleocytosis in 36 cases (90%), most of which were lymphocyte predominant. The most common findings from brain imagings were leptomeningeal enhancement and hydrocephalus. The common primary sites were lung and breast cancer in the CM group and ALL and NHL in the LM group. The common symptoms were headache and cranial nerve palsy. Routine CSF examination was abnormal in virtually all cases. Positive CSF cytology was a gold standard for a diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. High index of suspicious and awareness were required to avoid miss diagnosis.

  13. Clinical, epidemiological and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: Report of 11 cases with varicella zoster virus meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Shinichi; Shiga, Yuji; Himeno, Takahiro; Tachiyama, Keisuke; Kamimura, Teppei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takemaru, Makoto; Takeshita, Jun; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2017-09-30

    We treated 11 cases (52.7 ± 14.9 years, all male) with varicella zoster virus (VZV) meningitis and 437 cases with adult aseptic meningitis from 2004 to 2016. The incidence rate of adult VZV meningitis in the cases with aseptic meningitis was 2.5%. Herpes zoster infections are reported to have occurred frequently in summer and autumn. VZV meningitis also occurred frequently in the similar seasons, in our patients. The diagnoses were confirmed in 9 cases with positive VZV-DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid and in 2 cases with high VZV-IgG indexes (> 2.0). For diagnosis confirmation, the former test was useful for cases within a week of disease onset, and the latter index was useful for cases after a week of disease onset. Zoster preceded the meningitis in 8 cases, while the meningitis preceded zoster in 1 case, and 2 cases did not have zoster (zoster sine herpete). Two patients were carriers of the hepatitis B virus, 1 patient was administered an influenza vaccine 4 days before the onset of meningitis, and 1 patient was orally administered prednisolone for 2 years, for treatment. Their immunological activities might have been suppressed. The neurological complications included trigeminal neuralgia, facial palsy (Ramsay Hunt syndrome), glossopharyngeal neuralgia, and Elsberg syndrome. Because the diseases in some patients can become severe, they require careful treatment.

  14. Sepsis and meningitis in hospitalized children: performance of clinical signs and their prediction rules in a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbakel, Jan Y; MacFaul, Roderick; Aertgeerts, Bert; Buntinx, Frank; Thompson, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Feverish illness is a common presentation to acute pediatric services. Clinical staff faces the challenge of differentiating the few children with meningitis or sepsis from the majority with self-limiting illness. We aimed to determine the diagnostic value of clinical features and their prediction rules (CPR) for identifying children with sepsis or meningitis among those children admitted to a District General Hospital with acute febrile illness. Acutely ill children admitted to a District General Hospital in England were included in this case-control study between 2000 and 2005. We examined the diagnostic accuracy of individual clinical signs and 6 CPRs, including the National Institute for Clinical Excellence "traffic light" system, to determine clinical utility in identifying children with a diagnosis of sepsis or meningitis. Loss of consciousness, prolonged capillary refill, decreased alertness, respiratory effort, and the physician's illness assessment had high positive likelihood ratios (9-114), although with wide confidence intervals, to rule in sepsis or meningitis. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence traffic light system, the modified Yale Observation Scale, and the Pediatric Advanced Warning Score performed poorly with positive likelihood ratios ranging from 1 to 3. The pediatrician's overall illness assessment was the most useful feature to rule in sepsis or meningitis in these hospitalized children. Clinical prediction rules did not effectively rule in sepsis or meningitis. The modified Yale Observation Scale should be used with caution. Single clinical signs could complement these scores to rule in sepsis or meningitis. Further research is needed to validate these CPRs.

  15. Clinical and pathogenic analysis of 507 children with bacterial meningitis in Beijing, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Xiao; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Shi, Wei; Yao, Kai-Hu; Liu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Gang; Yang, Yong-Hong

    2016-09-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and analyze the pathogens of bacterial meningitis in children. Bacterial meningitis cases occurring from January 2010 through December 2014 at Beijing Children's Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The records of all patients, including data on clinical features and laboratory information, were obtained and analyzed. In total, the cases of 507 pediatric patients seen over a 5-year period were analyzed; 220 of these cases were etiologically confirmed. These patients were classified into four age groups: 29 days to 1 year (n=373, 73.6%), 1-3 years (n=61, 12.0%), 3-6 years (n=41, 8.1%), and >6 years (n=32, 6.3%). The main pathogens identified in this study were Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=73, 33.2%), Escherichia coli (n=24, 10.9%), Enterococcus (n=22, 10.0%), and group B Streptococcus (n=18, 8.2%). All Gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. All Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to meropenem. The total non-susceptibility rate of S. pneumoniae to penicillin was 47.6% (20/42). The resistance rates to ceftriaxone, cefepime, and ceftazidime were 75% (9/12), 55.6% (5/9), and 40% (4/10), respectively. The main pathogen of bacterial meningitis in this study was S. pneumoniae. The antibiotic resistance rates among children with bacterial meningitis are of serious concern. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Culture-proven bacterial meningitis in elderly patients in southern Taiwan: clinical characteristics and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Lu, Chen-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Shu-Fang; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2006-06-01

    The epidemiologic landscape of causative pathogens and clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis varies with several clinical factors including preceding/pre-existent medical and/or surgical conditions, modes of contraction, geographic distributions, status of vaccinations, the study time periods and differences among age groups. In order to delineate the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in senior adults (ages > or =60 y/o) in southern Taiwan, we analyzed the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of 64 senior adults (42 men and 22 women, aged 60-80 years) with bacterial meningitis collected over a period of 13 years at our hospital. The prognostic factors between fatal and non-fatal groups of patients were compared. Twenty-seven of the 64 patients belonged to a nosocomial infection group, and the other 37 comprised a community-acquired infection group. Sixty percent (39/64) of the patients had a post-neurosurgical state as the most preceding event prior to infection. Liver disease (13) and diabetes mellitus (6) were the most common underlying conditions of the other 25 patients with spontaneous meningitis. Of these 64 patients, Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae (18), Acinetobacter baumannii (5), Escherichia coli (5), and Enterobacter species (5) were the most commonly implicated Gram-negative pathogens. Staphylococcus (S.) aureus infection was increasing during the study period. The therapeutic results of this group of patients showed a mortality rate of 38% (24/64). The presence of septic shock was the most significant prognostic factor. In conclusion, for this study group, a post-neurosurgical state was the single most important preceding event for senior adults developing bacterial meningitis. Of the implicated pathogens, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus were the most common gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens, respectively. The therapeutic result of this specific group of patients showed a high mortality rate; however, the small case number and

  17. Frequency and clinical significance of CAT findings in purulent and lymphocytic meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, E.; Kloes, G.; Hopp, G.; Becker, H.

    1982-01-01

    From 1974-1980, computerized tomography was carried out on 34 patients with purulent and on 17 patients with lymphocytic meningitis. 25 out of the patients with purulent meningitis resp. meningoencephalitis could be examined in the acute stage. For all patients with already attenuated clinical symptoms normal results were obtained, while for the remainder findings were in part highly pathological consisting, e.g. in dilatations or narviowings of the ventricula system, failure to make the outer liquor cavities roentgenoparens, accumulation of pas in the subarachnoidal and subdur spaces including the interhemispheric clefs, cerebral medulla and periventricular edemas, abscesses and signs of ependymitis. Various findings could only be classified as pathological upon serial examination. Correlation statistics showed that all patients with marked pathological CT findings also suffered from distinct pertubations of consciousness. Out of 14 patients with pathological CT findings, 12 died. No connexions could be established between the level of liquor cell counts and CT alterations. Among 17 patients with a lymphocytic meningitis, CT findings were pathological with a mean dilatation of the ventricular system in only one case of chronic course and predominantly basal localization. The patient decreased. Phathological CT findings in purulent and lymphocytic meningitis point to an unfavourable prognosis. (orig.) [de

  18. Clinical outcome of pneumococcal meningitis during the emergence of pencillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouveia Edilane L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior to the availability of generic third-generation cephalosporins, penicillins were widely used for treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in developing countries despite concerns about rising levels of penicillin resistance among pneumococcal isolates. We examined the impact of penicillin resistance on outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis over a ten year period in an infectious diseases hospital in Brazil. Methods Clinical presentation, antimicrobial therapy and outcomes were reviewed for 548 patients with culture-confirmed pneumococcal meningitis from December, 1995, to November, 2005. Pneumococcal isolates from meningitis patients were defined as penicillin-resistant if Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for penicillin were greater than 0.06 μg/ml. Proportional hazards regression was used to identify risk factors for fatal outcomes. Results During the ten-year period, ceftriaxone replaced ampicillin as first-line therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis. In hospital case-fatality for pneumococcal meningitis was 37%. Of 548 pneumococcal isolates from meningitis cases, 92 (17% were resistant to penicillin. After controlling for age and severity of disease at admission, penicillin resistance was associated with higher case-fatality (Hazard Ratio [HR], 1.62; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.08-2.43. Penicillin-resistance remained associated with higher case-fatality when initial therapy included ceftriaxone (HR, 1.68; 95% CI 1.02-2.76. Conclusions Findings support the use of third generation cephalosporin antibiotics for treatment of suspected pneumococcal meningitis even at low prevalence of pneumococcal resistance to penicillins.

  19. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated recurrent aseptic (Mollaret's meningitis in genitourinary medicine clinic: a case report

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    Abou-Foul AK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad K Abou-Foul, Thajunisha M Buhary, Sedki L Gayed Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Royal Blackburn Hospital, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK Introduction: Cases of idiopathic recurrent benign aseptic meningitis were first described by Mollaret. Today, herpes simplex virus (HSV is considered the cause of most cases of Mollaret's meningitis. Case report: A 40-year-old male was referred to our genitourinary medicine clinic with recurrent genital herpetic lesions. He had HSV-2-positive genital ulcers 8 years earlier. One year after the first infection, he developed severe recurrent attacks of headache associated with meningitis symptoms. The results of all radiological and biochemical tests were normal, but the patient reported a correlation between his attacks and genital herpes flare-ups. We diagnosed the patient with Mollaret's meningitis and started him on continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy, which resulted in marked clinical improvement. Discussion: Mollaret's meningitis is a rare form of idiopathic recurrent aseptic meningitis that has a sudden onset, short duration, and spontaneous remission with unpredictable recurrence. We believe that the presence of concurrent or recurrent mucocutaneous herpetic lesions can aid its diagnosis, prior to which, affected patients usually have many unnecessary investigations and treatments. Therefore, detailed sexual history should be sought in all patients with aseptic meningitis, and clinicians should also ask about history of recurrent headaches in all patients with recurrent herpetic anogenital lesions. Continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy may reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and can dramatically improve lifestyle. Keywords: HSV-2 virus, acyclovir, Mollaret's meningitis, recurrent aseptic meningitis, HSV-2 virus, viral meningitis, acyclovir

  20. Clinical and epidemiological peculiarities of enterovirus meningitis in the period of seasonal outbreak in 2015

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    Z. A. Khokhlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim. To analyse the morbidity of the enterovirus infection (EI in Novokuznetsk – the major industrial city of Western Siberia and to determine the clinical peculiarities of enterovirus meningitis (EM in the outbreak period in 2015.The materials and methods. There have been analysed the official statistical data in the period of 2006–2015 and the enterovirus meningitis, clinical manifestations in 148 patients, hospitalized in 2015. Liquor was tested by the method of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR for presence RNA of the enteroviruses. The C-reactive protein value was tested by the method of the latex test and the procalcitonin value was tested by the method of the immunoenzymatic analysis. The statistical material treatment has been done using InStat programme.The results. There has been registered 3,2 times growth of the enterovirus infection morbidity in 2015, compared to 2014, which 6,2 times exceeds Russia, s average rate. The enteroviruses ECHO 30 have been identified in patients, biological material and in wastewater. In the structure of the clinical forms the share of the enterovirus meningitis makes 92, 91%. The children, s morbidity 4,57 times exceeds the total burden of disease. The age structure accompanying the enterovirus meningitis: children 2–6 years of age – 47,3%, 7–14 years of age – 27,7%, 15–17 years of age – 7,43%, 18–53 years of age – 17,57%. Vomiting and headache in children (under the age of 7 are registered rarely, and the full meningeal syndrome and the neutrophil pleocytosis in liquor in children (under the age of 7 are registered more frequently. The rate of children and adults has increased in 2015, compared to 2005. The alteration in clinical picture relates to degree of meningeal syndrome intensity and catarrhal manifestations. The C-reactive protein value (in 67,21% and the procalcitonin value (in 100% don, t exceed the threshold values in patients with

  1. Incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of HIV-1-associated cryptococcal meningitis during the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touma, Madeleine; Rasmussen, Line D; Martin-Iguacel, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with advanced immunosuppression predisposes to cryptococcal meningitis (CM). We describe the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of CM in HIV-infected individuals during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. METHODS...

  2. Management of cryptococcal meningitis in a district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal: A clinical audit

    OpenAIRE

    Adeyemi, Benjamin O.; Ross, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the development of context-specific guidelines, cryptococcal meningitis (CCM) remains a leading cause of death amongst HIV-infected patients. Results from clinical audits in routine practice have shown critical gaps in clinicians’ adherence to recommendations regarding the management of CCM.Aim: The aim of this study was to review the acute management of CCM at an urban district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa with a view to making recommendations for improving car...

  3. Epidemiological and clinical studies on aseptic meningitis in 377 cases, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Masaaki; Kondo, Tomio; Takashima, Akira; Kono, Shinya; Yamashina, Manabu

    1984-01-01

    Brain CT scan performed in the acute phase of aseptic meningitis in 88 cases revealed abnormal findings in 5 consisting of 2 of cerebral edema, 2 of subdural hygroma and one of cerebral atrophy. Clinical findings showed no particular relation to the age, but cerebral edema was observed in the cases of possible cephalomeningitis diagnosed on the basis of accompanying convulsion and disturbance of consciousness. Abnormal findings were associated with 25% of symptoms diagnosed more than 4 days after onset. (Chiba, N.)

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans population diversity and clinical outcomes of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis patients in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyazika, Tinashe K; Hagen, Ferry; Machiridza, Tendai; Kutepa, Melody; Masanganise, Faith; Hendrickx, Marijke; Boekhout, Teun; Magombei-Majinjiwa, Tricia; Siziba, Nonthokozo; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Mateveke, Kudzanai; Meis, Jacques F; Robertson, Valerie J

    2016-11-01

    HIV and cryptococcal meningitis co-infection is a major public health problem in most developing countries. Cryptococcus neoformans sensu stricto is responsible for the majority of HIV-associated cryptococcosis cases in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the available information, little is known about cryptococcal population diversity and its association with clinical outcomes in patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. In a prospective cohort, we investigated the prevalence and clinical outcome of Cryptococcusneoformans sensu stricto meningitis among HIV-infected patients in Harare, Zimbabwe, and compared the genotypic diversity of the isolates with those collected from other parts of Africa. Molecular typing was done using amplified fragment length polymorphism genotyping and microsatellite typing. The majority of patients with HIV-associated Cryptococcusneoformans sensu stricto meningitis in this cohort were males (n=33/55; 60.0 %). The predominant Cryptococcus neoformans sensu stricto genotype among the Zimbabwean isolates was genotype AFLP1/VNI (n=40; 72.7 %), followed by AFLP1A/VNB/VNII (n=8; 14.6 %), and AFLP1B/VNII was the least isolated (n=7; 12.7 %). Most of the isolates were mating-type α (n=51; 92.7 %), and only four (7.3 %) were mating-type a. Overall in-hospital mortality was 55.6 % (n=30), and no difference between infecting genotype and clinical outcome of patient (P=0.73) or CD4+ counts (P=0.79) was observed. Zimbabwean Cryptococcusneoformans sensu stricto genotypes demonstrated a high level of genetic diversity by microsatellite typing, and 51 genotypes within the main molecular types AFLP1/VNI, AFLP1A/VNB/VNII and AFLP1B/VNII were identified. This study demonstrates that Cryptococcusneoformans sensu stricto in Zimbabwe has a high level of genetic diversity when compared to other regional isolates.

  5. The clinical characteristics of adult bacterial meningitis caused by non-Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa Pseudomonas species: A clinical comparison with Ps. aeruginosa meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Ren; Lien, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Lai, Wei-An; Hsu, Che-Wei; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chien, Chun-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2018-01-01

    Adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) caused by non-Pseudomonas (Ps.) aeruginosa Pseudomonas (NPAP) species infection has rarely been reported. The clinical characteristics of 52 cases of Pseudomonas ABM (11 NPAP- and 41 Ps. aeruginosa-related meningitis) collected during a 30-year study period (1986-2015) were included. Eleven cases of NPAP ABM were identified in the literature, and their clinical data were also collected. Therefore, a total of 22 NPAP ABM cases were enrolled. The clinical characteristics of the NPAP ABM and Ps. aeruginosa ABM groups were compared. Of the implicated NPAP strains, Ps. putida and Ps. stutzeri were the most common (7 cases each), followed by Ps. mendocina in 4, Ps. fluorescens in 1, Ps. fulva in 1, Ps. alcaligenes in 1, and Ps. mosselii in 1. Of the 22 cases, 50% (11/22) had an underlying postneurosurgical state. Fever (77.3%, 17/22) and altered consciousness (45.5%, 10/22) were the most common clinical presentations. Antibiotic non-susceptibility was found in 3 strains of Ps. putida and 1 Ps. mosselii strain. Compared to the patients with Ps. aeruginosa ABM, those with NPAP ABM had a higher incidence of spontaneous infections and a better survival rate. In conclusion, although Ps. putida, Ps. stutzeri and Ps. mendocina were the major implicated strains of NPAP ABM, the clinical characteristics of this specific group of ABM demonstrated marked heterogeneity. Even though the cases with NPAP ABM had better therapeutic results than those with Ps. aeruginosa ABM, further large-scale studies are needed to better delineate this specific group of ABM. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. The clinical characteristics of adult bacterial meningitis caused by non-Pseudomonas (Ps. aeruginosa Pseudomonas species: A clinical comparison with Ps. aeruginosa meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ren Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bacterial meningitis (ABM caused by non-Pseudomonas (Ps. aeruginosa Pseudomonas (NPAP species infection has rarely been reported. The clinical characteristics of 52 cases of Pseudomonas ABM (11 NPAP- and 41 Ps. aeruginosa-related meningitis collected during a 30-year study period (1986–2015 were included. Eleven cases of NPAP ABM were identified in the literature, and their clinical data were also collected. Therefore, a total of 22 NPAP ABM cases were enrolled. The clinical characteristics of the NPAP ABM and Ps. aeruginosa ABM groups were compared. Of the implicated NPAP strains, Ps. putida and Ps. stutzeri were the most common (7 cases each, followed by Ps. mendocina in 4, Ps. fluorescens in 1, Ps. fulva in 1, Ps. alcaligenes in 1, and Ps. mosselii in 1. Of the 22 cases, 50% (11/22 had an underlying postneurosurgical state. Fever (77.3%, 17/22 and altered consciousness (45.5%, 10/22 were the most common clinical presentations. Antibiotic non-susceptibility was found in 3 strains of Ps. putida and 1 Ps. mosselii strain. Compared to the patients with Ps. aeruginosa ABM, those with NPAP ABM had a higher incidence of spontaneous infections and a better survival rate. In conclusion, although Ps. putida, Ps. stutzeri and Ps. mendocina were the major implicated strains of NPAP ABM, the clinical characteristics of this specific group of ABM demonstrated marked heterogeneity. Even though the cases with NPAP ABM had better therapeutic results than those with Ps. aeruginosa ABM, further large-scale studies are needed to better delineate this specific group of ABM.

  7. Clinical characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in Denmark in the post-vaccination era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T.I.; Howitz, M.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    P>The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 1993 may have influenced the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis (i.e. increasing frequency of other non-vaccine types; presentation in other age groups). Based on nationwide...... registration, clinical information and laboratory findings were collected from all 65 confirmed cases of H. influenzae meningitis during the period 1994-2005. Twenty-nine patients (45%) were 24 years old [median 62 years (range 25...... infected with Hib, two cases (13%) were identified as true vaccine failures. Six patients (9%) died; one premature infant infected with serotype f and five adults (age 83-96 years) with non-typeable H. influenzae. Hearing loss was reported in 16% of the surviving children and in 10% of the surviving adults...

  8. Cryptococcosis and cryptococcal meningitis: New predictors and clinical outcomes at a United States academic medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef Hamadani, Bahar H; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; McCollister, Bruce; Shapiro, Leland; Beckham, J David; Henao-Martínez, Andrés F

    2017-12-28

    As the diagnosis of cryptococcosis is challenging in low-prevalence settings, uncovering predictive factors can improve early diagnosis and timely treatment. The aim of the study was to relate clinical outcomes to predictive variables for the presence of cryptococcosis. A retrospective case-control study matched by collection date, age and gender at a 1:2 ratio (55 cases and 112 controls) was performed in case patients diagnosed with Cryptococcus infection at the University of Colorado Hospital between 2000 and 2017 (n = 167). A bivariate and a forward, stepwise multivariable logistic regression model were performed to identify predictors of cryptococcosis infection. In an adjusted multivariable model, cryptococcal infection was significantly associated with the presence of respiratory symptoms, hyponatremia, lung disease or corticosteroids. Additionally, cryptococcal meningitis was associated with headaches, corticosteroids or increased CSF protein. Conversely, a reduced risk of cryptococcosis was associated with hypertension or peripheral monocytosis. Cryptococcal meningitis leads to subsequent hearing impairment (16% vs 4% (control), P = .013), muscle weakness (40% vs 20%, P = .021), cognitive deficits (33% vs 6%, P = .0001) or any adverse outcome (84% vs 29%, P = .0001). We uncovered novel clinical predictors for the presence of cryptococcal infection or cryptococcal meningitis. This study in patients at a low-prevalence US medical centre underscores the importance of early diagnosis in this population. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal meningitis; Pneumococcus - meningitis ... Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type of bacteria is the ...

  10. Meningococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Meningococcal meningitis Fact sheet Reviewed January 2018 Key facts Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis, a serious ...

  11. Correlation of anti-fungal susceptibility with clinical outcomes in patients with cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chen-Hsiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate the correlation of minimum inhibiting concentrations (MICs, obtained by broth micro-dilution, and clinical response in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Methods Using retrospective analyses covering the period 2001–2010, factors affecting clinical therapeutic cure in patients with cryptococcal meningitis 10 weeks after the start of anti-fungal therapy were identified. Specific emphasis was placed on the role of anti-fungal susceptibility. Results Of 46 patients with cryptococcal meningitis identified, 21 were cured after 10 weeks of treatment. Overall, 12 strains (26.1% were resistant to fluconazole (>8 μg/ml and 8 (17.4% had an MIC >1 μg/ml for amphotericin B. Twenty-three patients received combination amphotericin B and fluconazole as their initial antifungal therapy, 17 were given amphotericin B only, five received fluconazole only, and one received a combination of amphotericin B and flucytosine. After 2 weeks, all patients received fluconazole (400–600 mg daily for 8 weeks at least, then 200 mg daily thereafter. The presence of isolates resistant to fluconazole (MIC >8 μg/ml; 4.8% vs. 44%, p 8 μg/ml, was an independent predictor of therapeutic cure at 10-week evaluation (OR = 15.7; 95% CI: 1.8-135.9; p = 0.01, but higher MIC of amphotericin B (>1 μg/ml was not. Conclusions The MICs of fluconazole, determined by the CLSI method, may be a potential predictor of therapeutic cure in patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

  12. Analysis of clinical information and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Dahee; Heo, Tae Hoon; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Mi Kyung; Eun, So-Hee; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Meningitis is among the most common infections affecting the central nervous system. It can be difficult to determine the exact pathogen responsible for the infection and patients are often treated with empiric antibiotics. This study was conducted to identify the most common clinical characteristics of enteroviral meningitis in children and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for early detection of an enterovirus. Methods We an...

  13. Mesenteric Lymphadenopathy in Childhood Epidemic Aseptic Meningitis: Sonographic Features and Clinical Significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Sung Hee; Park, Young Chan; Lee, Young Hwan [Catholic University of Daegu, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To evaluate the sonographic features of mesenteric lymphadenopathy in childhood epidemic aseptic meningitis and to assess their clinical significance. Thirty-three patients (25 male, 8 female: mean age, 8.6 years) with a diagnosis of aseptic meningitis were prospectively evaluated with abdominal ultrasonography for the presence of enlarged mesenteric nodes. The size and number of enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed in relationship with the patient's age, between the patients with abdominal pain or diarrhea (16 cases, 48%) and asymptomatic patients (17 cases, 52%). Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 31 patients (94%), all 16 symptomatic and 15 of the 17 asymptomatic patients. The number of enlarged nodes was most prevalent between 6-10, seen in 16 patients (52%) and the largest node ranged in size from 4 to 8 mm. Among the 31 patients with mesenteric lymphadenopathy, the mean size of the largest node was statistically different between the symptomatic (6.0 mm) and asymptomatic (5.0 mm) groups (p = 0.021). The number of enlarged nodes and the patient's age were not statistically different between the two groups. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in almost all cases of childhood epidemic aseptic meningitis, and may be related to the mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by enterovirus

  14. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  15. Mesenteric Lymphadenopathy in Childhood Epidemic Aseptic Meningitis: Sonographic Features and Clinical Significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Sung Hee; Park, Young Chan; Lee, Young Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the sonographic features of mesenteric lymphadenopathy in childhood epidemic aseptic meningitis and to assess their clinical significance. Thirty-three patients (25 male, 8 female: mean age, 8.6 years) with a diagnosis of aseptic meningitis were prospectively evaluated with abdominal ultrasonography for the presence of enlarged mesenteric nodes. The size and number of enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed in relationship with the patient's age, between the patients with abdominal pain or diarrhea (16 cases, 48%) and asymptomatic patients (17 cases, 52%). Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 31 patients (94%), all 16 symptomatic and 15 of the 17 asymptomatic patients. The number of enlarged nodes was most prevalent between 6-10, seen in 16 patients (52%) and the largest node ranged in size from 4 to 8 mm. Among the 31 patients with mesenteric lymphadenopathy, the mean size of the largest node was statistically different between the symptomatic (6.0 mm) and asymptomatic (5.0 mm) groups (p = 0.021). The number of enlarged nodes and the patient's age were not statistically different between the two groups. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in almost all cases of childhood epidemic aseptic meningitis, and may be related to the mesenteric lymphadenitis caused by enterovirus

  16. Cranial CT, Lumbar Puncture, and Clinical Deterioration in Bacterial Meningitis: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Sprengers, Marieke E S; Roosendaal, Stefan D; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-03-07

    It is unclear how often lumbar puncture (LP) is complicated by cerebral herniation in patients with bacterial meningitis and whether cranial CT can be used to identify patients at risk for herniation. We performed a nationwide prospective cohort study of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis from 2006 to 2014 and identified patients with clinical deterioration possibly caused by LP. For systematic evaluation of contraindications for LP on cranial CT, these patients were matched to patients in the cohort without deterioration. Four experts, blinded for outcome, scored cranial CT results for contraindications for LP. A Fleiss' generalized Kappa for this assessment was determined. Of 1533 episodes, 47 (3.1%) had deterioration possibly caused by LP. Two patients deteriorated within 1 hour after LP (0.1%). In 43 of 47 patients with deterioration cranial CT was performed prior to LP, so CT results were matched with 43 patients without deterioration. The interrater reliability of assessment of contraindications for LP on cranial CT was moderate (Fleiss' generalized Kappa 0.47). A contraindication for LP was reported by all 4 raters in 6 patients with deterioration (14%) and in 5 without deterioration (11%). LP can be performed safely in the large majority of patients with bacterial meningitis, as it is only very rarely complicated by cerebral herniation. Cranial CT can be considered a screening method for contraindications for LP, but the interrater reliability of this assessment is moderate.

  17. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jintong; Kan, Juan; Qiu, Gang; Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1-4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis.

  18. Rapid Clinical Score for the Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jipa, Raluca; Olaru, Ioana D; Manea, Eliza; Merisor, Simona; Hristea, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to retrospectively validate a previously described rapid clinical score (RCS) in distinguishing tuberculous meningitis (TBM) from viral meningitis (VM) in people who are at increased risk of tuberculosis, as well as from cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in HIV-infected patients. We performed a retrospective study of patients admitted with a diagnosis of aseptic meningitis between January 2012 and December 2015, to a referral hospital for infectious diseases. The variables included in RCS were duration of symptoms before admission, neurological stage, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to blood glucose ratio, and CSF protein. We included in this retrospective study 31 patients with definite or probable TBM including 14 HIV-infected patients, 62 HIV-noninfected patients with VM, and 18 HIV-infected patients with CM. The sensitivity of RCS to distinguish TBM from VM was 96.7%, with a specificity of 81.1% and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.949 (0.90-0.99). When all four criteria from the RCS were present, the specificity increased at 100%. In HIV-infected patients, the sensitivity and specificity of RCS in differentiating TBM from CM were 86.6% and 27.7%, respectively, and the area under the ROC curve was 0.669 (0.48-0.85). This easy-to-use RCS was found to be helpful in differentiating TBM from VM, with a better sensitivity than molecular amplification techniques and a relatively good specificity. However, the RCS was not useful to differentiate between TBM and CM in HIV-infected patients.

  19. Clinical presentation and prognostic factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis according to the focus of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuelsson Susanne

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a nationwide study in Denmark to identify clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae according to the focus of infection. Methods Based on a nationwide registration, clinical information's was prospectively collected from all reported cases of pneumococcal meningitis during a 2-year period (1999–2000. Clinical and laboratory findings at admission, clinical course and outcome of the disease including follow-up audiological examinations were collected retrospectively. The focus of infection was determined according to the clinical diagnosis made by the physicians and after review of the medical records. Results 187 consecutive cases with S. pneumoniae meningitis were included in the study. The most common focus was ear (30%, followed by lung (18%, sinus (8%, and other (2%. In 42% of cases a primary infection focus could not be determined. On admission, fever and an altered mental status were the most frequent findings (in 93% and 94% of cases, respectively, whereas back rigidity, headache and convulsion were found in 57%, 41% and 11% of cases, respectively. 21% of patients died during hospitalisation (adults: 27% vs. children: 2%, Fisher Exact Test, P P = 0.0005. Prognostic factors associated with fatal outcome in univariate logistic regression analysis were advanced age, presence of an underlying disease, history of headache, presence of a lung focus, absence of an otogenic focus, having a CT-scan prior to lumbar puncture, convulsions, requirement of assisted ventilation, and alterations in various CSF parameters (WBC P P = 0.005. Conclusion These results emphasize the prognostic importance of an early recognition of a predisposing focus to pneumococcal meningitis.

  20. Types, Risk Factors, Clinical symptoms and Diagnostic Tests of Acute Adult Meningitis in Northern Iran During 2006-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Babamahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment and otherwise associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess types, risk factors, clinical symptoms and diagnostic tests of meningitis in hospitalized patients of Mazandaran University of medical sciences hospitals during 2006-2012. Matherials and Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study. Following approval of the ethics committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, records of adult patients diagnosed with acute meningitis from 2006 to 2012 were extracted from Mazandaran Provincial Health Center and patients attending hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Statistical Analysis Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, standard deviation, and median). Results In this study, of the 137 patients with meningitis, 73 (53.9%) were viral, 61 (46%) bacterial, 1 (0.7%) fungal, and 2 (1.4%) unknown. The majority of risk factors in patients were head trauma, upper respiratory infection, and drug addiction. The most common clinical signs were headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, and stiff neck. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of meningitis was much lower than any other country. It could be due to geographic variation or incomplete recording of patient's data. It is recommended to perform a longitudinal study during the coming years on patients with meningitis. PMID:26155497

  1. Laboratorial diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis

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    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    Full Text Available Meningitis is the main infectious central nervous system (CNS syndrome. Viruses or bacteria can cause acute meningitis of infectious etiology. The term "Aseptic Meningitis" denotes a clinical syndrome with a predominance of lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, with no common bacterial agents identified in the CSF. Viral meningitis is considered the main cause of lymphocyte meningitis. There are other etiologies of an infectious nature. CSF examination is essential to establish the diagnosis and to identify the etiological agent of lymphocytic meningitis. We examined CSF characteristics and the differential diagnosis of the main types of meningitis.

  2. Clinical characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in Denmark in the post-vaccination era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T.I.; Howitz, Michael Frantz; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    registration, clinical information and laboratory findings were collected from all 65 confirmed cases of H. influenzae meningitis during the period 1994-2005. Twenty-nine patients (45%) were 24 years old [median 62 years (range 25......-96)]. Hib accounted for 31% (20/65) of the cases, and significantly more children were infected with Hib compared with adults [53% (16/29) vs. 11% (4/36), respectively, p 0.0003]. Overall, 38% of cases had an otogenic focus and this was thus the most frequent primary focus of infection. Among children...

  3. Acute bacterial meningitis in the intensive care unit and risk factors for adverse clinical outcomes: retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, D; Gonçalves-Pereira, J; Janeiro, S; Silvestre, J; Bento, L; Póvoa, P

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis constitutes a medical emergency. Its burden has driven from childhood to the elderly and the immunocompromised population. However, the admission of patients with bacterial meningitis to the intensive care unit (ICU) has been sparsely approached, as have the prognostic factors associated with an adverse clinical outcome. We performed a retrospective analysis during a 7-year period of patients older than 18 years admitted to 2 polyvalent ICUs. Clinical, demographic, and outcome data were collected to evaluate its clinical impact on the outcome of patients with acute bacterial meningitis. We identified 65 patients with the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis (mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, 23; hospital mortality, 40%). Upon clinical presentation, their most frequent signs were fever (84%), seizures (21.5%), and a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score (GCSbacterial meningitis admitted to ICU had substantial morbidity and mortality. Those with low GCS or absence of fever have a particularly high risk of an adverse outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with

  5. Role of the functional status of the autonomic nervous system in the clinical course of purulent meningitis

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    D. A. Zadiraka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purulent meningitis is defined by high indices of sickness and lethality rates, a great risk of cerebral and extracerebral complications development, steady residual consequences formation. During neuroinfections, the state of adaptation mechanisms, which is characterized by exhaustion of regulatory systems with the development of decompensation, plays a crucial part. Heart rate variability clearly reflects the degree of regulatory system tension caused by the influence of both physiological and pathological factors. Research aim: to increase the autonomic dysfunction diagnostics efficiency for patients suffering from purulent meningitis in the disease dynamics based on the complex of clinical evidence and functional status of autonomic nervous system. Materials and methods. There were 60 patients with purulent meningitis under medical observation. Wein’s questionnaire was used for the detection of clinical presentations of autonomic dysfunction. Functional status of autonomic nervous system was diagnosed using the method of computer-based cardiointervalometry. The screening group was formed of 20 healthy individuals. Research findings and theirs discussion. Cerebral meningeal symptom was dominant among the patients suffering from purulent meningitis at the peak of the disease. At hospitalization every fifth person (23,3% had the objective evidence of autonomic dysfunction in the form of a postural tremor of upper limbs and eyelids. The analysis of autonomic nervous system parameters functional status among the patients suffering from purulent meningitis at the peak of disease showed heart rate variability decrease in the main branches of autonomic regulation and the presence of autonomic imbalance towards vagotonia. Since the second week, clinical signs of autonomic dysfunction prevailed in the dynamics of patients suffering from purulent meningitis in the course of standard treatment, which was proved by Wein’s survey of the patients. The

  6. CSF LACTATE IN MENINGITIS

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    Anjampakuthikal Aboobekar Haris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningitis is an infection within the subarachnoid space characterised by a CNS inflammatory reaction. It is a serious condition requiring immediate diagnosis and appropriate treatment to be started at the earliest to prevent mortality as well as irreversible neurological deficits. CSF lactate has been found useful in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in many studies in the western population, but studies in Indian population are limited. The aim of the study is to study whether CSF lactate can be used to distinguish bacterial from viral meningitis and to study the levels of CSF lactate in tuberculosis meningitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a descriptive study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. In this study, 78 cases of meningitis were selected. Cases are patients with bacterial, viral or tuberculosis meningitis admitted to the hospital under the Department of Medicine and Neurology. Cases are grouped into bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis based on clinical picture, CSF analysis and imaging characteristics. CSF lactate estimation was done by dry chemistry method. Using appropriate statistical methods and SPSS software, CSF lactate levels were compared among these groups and analysed for any association with the final outcome. RESULTS The levels of CSF lactate in bacterial meningitis were higher than viral meningitis with a statistical significance of p 35 mg/dL for bacterial meningitis in this study was 95% and 100% respectively and the positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 96%. The mean CSF lactate values in bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis were 124.40 ± 35.85 mg/dL, 24.34 ± 6.05 mg/dL and 50.13 ± 9.89 mg/dL, respectively. CONCLUSION CSF lactate level was significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis than tuberculosis or viral meningitis and can be used as a marker for differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  7. Radiographic and tomographic aspects of meningeal hemangiosarcoma in a German Shepherd dog with clinical signs of cauda equina sindrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A.C.B. de C.F.; Ferrigno, C.R.A.; Matera, J.M.; Torres, L.N.; Sinhorini, I.L.; Cortopassi, S.R.G.; Hage, M.C.F.N.S.

    2007-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma is a highly malignant neoplasia derived from the endothelial cell line and, therefore, can arise in any tissue with blood vessels. A case of a rare meningeal site of hemangiosarcoma in an eight-year old German Shepherd dog with clinical signs of cauda equina sindrome is described. The diagnosis was made based on clinical, radiographic, tomographic and histopathological findings [pt

  8. Common bacterial isolates, clinical outcome and TB meningitis in children admitted at Morogoro Regional Referral Hospital, Tanzania

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    Ramadhani Salum Chambuso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial meningitis is still one of the major causes of deaths, disabilities, and mental retardation in children in Morogoro region. To study the current meningitis burden, we evaluated the common bacterial isolates and clinical outcome of the disease in the region. Methods: We conducted a hospital-based prospective study on 1352 children aged between 7 days and 12 years admitted in pediatric wards at Morogoro Regional Referral Hospital for 7 months. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for laboratory microbiological examination was collected by lumbar puncture in 72 children with signs and symptoms of meningitis. Latex agglutination test was used to confirm the bacterial colonies in the culture. Chi-square test was used for relative risk with 95% confidence intervals; statistical analysis and tests were considered statistically significant when P < 0.05. Results: Among 72 CSF samples, 23 (31.9% were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, 6 (8.3% for Haemophilus influenzae, 5 (6.9% for Group B Streptococcus, 3 (4.2% for Escherichia coli, and 1 (1.4% was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, 34 CSF samples showed no bacteria growth in the culture media. In addition, 39 children (54.2% did not respond to the treatment, whereas 79.5% (n = 39 of them died, while 20.5% (n = 39 of them were referred to a tertiary hospital. Nevertheless, the incidence of meningitis infection was 5.3% (n = 1352 among the admitted children. Conclusions: S. pneumoniae was the major laboratory-confirmed bacterial isolate associated with meningitis in children. We report for the first time the presence of tuberculous meningitis in Morogoro region. Ziehl–Neelsen staining for acid-fast bacilli should be mandatory for any case clinically suspected for meningitis.

  9. Common bacterial isolates, clinical outcome and TB meningitis in children admitted at Morogoro Regional Referral Hospital, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambuso, Ramadhani Salum; Mkhoi, Mkhoi Lord; Kaambo, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is still one of the major causes of deaths, disabilities, and mental retardation in children in Morogoro region. To study the current meningitis burden, we evaluated the common bacterial isolates and clinical outcome of the disease in the region. We conducted a hospital-based prospective study on 1352 children aged between 7 days and 12 years admitted in pediatric wards at Morogoro Regional Referral Hospital for 7 months. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for laboratory microbiological examination was collected by lumbar puncture in 72 children with signs and symptoms of meningitis. Latex agglutination test was used to confirm the bacterial colonies in the culture. Chi-square test was used for relative risk with 95% confidence intervals; statistical analysis and tests were considered statistically significant when P < 0.05. Among 72 CSF samples, 23 (31.9%) were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, 6 (8.3%) for Haemophilus influenzae, 5 (6.9%) for Group B Streptococcus, 3 (4.2%) for Escherichia coli, and 1 (1.4%) was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, 34 CSF samples showed no bacteria growth in the culture media. In addition, 39 children (54.2%) did not respond to the treatment, whereas 79.5% (n = 39) of them died, while 20.5% (n = 39) of them were referred to a tertiary hospital. Nevertheless, the incidence of meningitis infection was 5.3% (n = 1352) among the admitted children. S. pneumoniae was the major laboratory-confirmed bacterial isolate associated with meningitis in children. We report for the first time the presence of tuberculous meningitis in Morogoro region. Ziehl-Neelsen staining for acid-fast bacilli should be mandatory for any case clinically suspected for meningitis.

  10. Clinical and Microbiological Features of Salmonella Meningitis in a South African Population, 2003–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, Karen H.; Sooka, Arvinda; Musekiwa, Alfred; Smith, Anthony M.; Ismail, Husna; Tau, Nomsa P.; Crowther-Gibson, Penny; Angulo, Frederick J.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The clinical and microbiological characteristics of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) meningitis in South Africa, where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence is high (approximately 15% in persons ≥15 years of age), were reviewed. Methods. From 2003 through 2013, 278 cases were identified through national laboratory-based surveillance. Clinical information (age, sex, outcome, Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS], and HIV status) was ascertained at selected sites. Isolates were serotyped; susceptibility testing and multilocus sequence typing on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates was performed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with mortality outcome, using Stata software, version 13. Results. Where age was ascertained, 139 of 256 (54.3%) patients were 15 years were HIV infected, compared with 24 of 46 (52.2%) patients aged meningitis in South Africa is highly associated with HIV in adults, with neonates (irrespective of HIV status), and with Salmonella Typhimurium ST313. GCS is the best predictor of mortality: early diagnosis and treatment are critical. Focused prevention requires further studies to understand the sources and transmission routes. PMID:26449942

  11. Utility of clinical assessment, imaging, and cryptococcal antigen titer to predict AIDS-related complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis

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    Kandel Sean

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of AIDS-related complicated cryptococcal meningitis. The outcome was complicated cryptococcal meningitis: prolonged (≥ 14 days altered mental status, persistent (≥ 14 days focal neurologic findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shunt placement or death. Predictor variable operating characteristics were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of the outcome. Results From 1990-2009, 82 patients with first episode of cryptococcal meningitis were identified. Of these, 14 (17% met criteria for complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis (prolonged altered mental status 6, persistent focal neurologic findings 7, CSF surgical shunt placement 8, and death 5. Patients with complicated cryptococcal meningitis had higher frequency of baseline focal neurological findings, head computed tomography (CT abnormalities, mean CSF opening pressure, and cryptococcal antigen (CRAG titers in serum and CSF. ROC area of log2 serum and CSF CRAG titers to predict complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis were comparable, 0.78 (95%CI: 0.66 to 0.90 vs. 0.78 (95% CI: 0.67 to 0.89, respectively (χ2, p = 0.95. The ROC areas to predict the outcomes were similar for CSF pressure and CSF CRAG titers. In a multiple logistic regression model, the following were significant predictors of the outcome: baseline focal neurologic findings, head CT abnormalities and log2 CSF CRAG titer. Conclusions During initial clinical evaluation, a focal neurologic exam, abnormal head CT and large cryptococcal burden measured by CRAG titer are associated with the outcome of complicated cryptococcal meningitis following 2 weeks from antifungal therapy initiation.

  12. Utility of clinical assessment, imaging, and cryptococcal antigen titer to predict AIDS-related complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Caperna, Joseph; Sitapati, Amy M; Jafari, Hamta; Kandel, Sean; Mathews, William C

    2010-08-03

    This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of AIDS-related complicated cryptococcal meningitis. The outcome was complicated cryptococcal meningitis: prolonged (>/= 14 days) altered mental status, persistent (>/= 14 days) focal neurologic findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt placement or death. Predictor variable operating characteristics were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of the outcome. From 1990-2009, 82 patients with first episode of cryptococcal meningitis were identified. Of these, 14 (17%) met criteria for complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis (prolonged altered mental status 6, persistent focal neurologic findings 7, CSF surgical shunt placement 8, and death 5). Patients with complicated cryptococcal meningitis had higher frequency of baseline focal neurological findings, head computed tomography (CT) abnormalities, mean CSF opening pressure, and cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) titers in serum and CSF. ROC area of log2 serum and CSF CRAG titers to predict complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis were comparable, 0.78 (95%CI: 0.66 to 0.90) vs. 0.78 (95% CI: 0.67 to 0.89), respectively (chi2, p = 0.95). The ROC areas to predict the outcomes were similar for CSF pressure and CSF CRAG titers. In a multiple logistic regression model, the following were significant predictors of the outcome: baseline focal neurologic findings, head CT abnormalities and log2 CSF CRAG titer. During initial clinical evaluation, a focal neurologic exam, abnormal head CT and large cryptococcal burden measured by CRAG titer are associated with the outcome of complicated cryptococcal meningitis following 2 weeks from antifungal therapy initiation.

  13. Patients' Values in Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Pachur, Thorsten; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas

    2017-09-01

    Shared decision-making involves the participation of patient and dental practitioner. Well-informed decision-making requires that both parties understand important concepts that may influence the decision. This fourth article in a series of 4 aims to discuss the importance of patients' values when a clinical decision is made. We report on how to incorporate important concepts for well-informed, shared decision-making. Here, we present patient values as an important issue, in addition to previously established topics such as the risk of bias of a study, cost-effectiveness of treatment approaches, and a comparison of therapeutic benefit with potential side effects. We provide 2 clinical examples and suggestions for a decision tree, based on the available evidence. The information reported in this article may improve the relationship between patient and dental practitioner, resulting in more well-informed clinical decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tubercular meningitis in children: Clinical, pathological, and radiological profile and factors associated with mortality

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    Anil V Israni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Childhood tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries with tubercular meningitis being a serious complication with high mortality and morbidity. Aim: To study the clinicopathological as well as radiological profile of childhood tuberculous meningitis (TBM cases. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study including children <14 years of age with TBM admitted in a tertiary care hospital from Western India. Subjects and Methods: TBM was diagnosed based on predefined criteria. Glassgow coma scale (GCS and intracranial pressure (ICP was recorded. Staging was done as per British Medical Council Staging System. Mantoux test, chest X-ray, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination, neuroimaging, and other investigations were done to confirm TB. Statistical Analysis Used: STATA software (version 9.0 was used for data analysis. Various risk factors were determined using Chi-square tests, and a P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Forty-seven children were included, of which 11 (24.3% died. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and meningismus was the most common sign. Twenty-nine (62% children presented with Stage III disease. Stage III disease, low GCS, and raised ICP were predictors of mortality. Findings on neuroimaging or CSF examination did not predict mortality. Conclusions: Childhood TBM presents with nonspecific clinical features. Stage III disease, low GCS, lack of Bacillus Calmette–Gu͹rin vaccination at birth and raised ICP seem to the most important adverse prognostic factors.

  15. Clinical characteristics, pathogens implicated and therapeutic outcomes of mixed infection in adult bacterial meningitis

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    Wan-Chen Tsai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed retrospectively the data for adult patients with bacterial meningitis over a period of 10.5 years in our hospital. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data of the 21 cases (52 strains of mixed infection were analyzed. Two hundred and fifteen cases of single pathogen adult bacterial meningitis (ABM were also included for comparison. Post-neurosurgical type of ABM was presented in 86% of the mixed infection group. Brain abscess was found in three patients. Fourteen patients survived and seven cases died. The analysis showed a statistical significance for the mixed infection group having a higher rate of nosocomially-acquired, post-neurosurgical condition, hydrocephalus, and lower level of cerebrospinal fluid white cell count, protein and lactate than the single pathogen group. Logistic regression analysis showed the independent factor of “hydrocephalus” (p = 0.002. Presence of hydrocephalus is a significant neuroimaging feature when compared with the single pathogen group. As compared with the previous study results of mixed infection in ABM, the present study showed a change of pathogens implicated of increasing Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. infections, and an emergence of anaerobic pathogens. All these changes deserve special attention because of the need for an appropriate choice of empirical antibiotics and choice of culture method.

  16. Relationship between serial CT findings and clinical course of purulent meningitis

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    Nakata, Mihoko; Nakata, Hajime; Kawanami, Takashi; Fukuda, Miho

    1984-11-01

    We reviewed the CT examinations and clinical records of 31 patients of purulent meningitis to evaluate the relation of CT findings to pathogenic bacteria and clinical course. The most frequently observed abnormal CT finding was an enlargement of the subarachnoid space and ventricles. There was no relationship between those abnormal CT findings and pathogenic bacteria. Enlargement of ventricles, low density area of the white matter and subdural effusion suggested the necessity of the surgical treatment or poor prognosis. The patients with convulsion or re-elevation of CRP had a tendency to show an exacerbation of such abnormalities. On the contrary, abnormal CT findings improved in the patients without convulsion or with decrease of CRP. We conclude that a follow-up CT examination is indicated in cases developing convulsion or re-elevation of CRP. (author).

  17. [Meningitis carcinomatosa (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhäusl, H

    1979-06-20

    On the basis of a case report the clinical picture of meningitis carcinomatosa is discussed. The cerebrospinal fluid is the most important criterion for the diagnosis. All other examinations (EEG, brain-scan, X-ray) yield only imperfect information. The clinical picture of meningitis carcinomatosa is similar above all to meningitis tuberculosa. If cerebrospinal fluid shows inflammatory signs and there is a breakdown of cerebral nerves (blindness, deafness) meningitis carcinomatosa always should be considered, even if thorough examination does not succeed in proving a primary tumour.

  18. Clinical value of indicators of cationic proteins, leukocytes myeloperoxidase and fibronectin blood plasma in viral meningitis in children

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    O. G. Kimirilova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: was to establish clinical and diagnostic value of cytochemical indices of peripheral blood leukocytes (cationic protein and myeloperoxidase, fibronectin blood plasma to assess the severity, predict the course and outcome of viral meningitis in children.Subjects and methods. In 450 patients with viral meningitis (enterovirus, arbovirus, parotitic, herpesviral, adenovirus etiology at the age of 14 years, the parameters of the microbicidal system of leukocytes (cation proteins, myeloperoxidase and fibronectin blood plasma were determined. Etiological diagnosis of meningitis was confirmed by release of viral RNA from blood and cerebrospinal fluid by the polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.The results and conclusion. Found that severe, prolonged duration, lethal outcome of viral meningitis in children are accompanied by sugnificant suppression of cationic proteins, myeloperoxidase, fibronectin blood plasma, maximally expressed in lethal outcomes, compared with the severe form, but with a favorable outcome and control. Settings imbalance cationic proteins, myeloperoxidase, fibronectin blood plasma are objective criteria of the adaptation syndrome that reflects the state of the phagocytosis system in viral meningitis in children and can be considered as additional criteria for predicting the course and outcome of disease.

  19. Meningitis - meningococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal meningitis; Gram negative - meningococcus ... Meningococcal meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis (also known as meningococcus). Meningococcus is the most common cause ...

  20. Hamsi scoring in the prediction of unfavorable outcomes from tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, Hakan; Ozturk-Engin, Derya; Tireli, Hulya

    2015-01-01

    Predicting unfavorable outcome is of paramount importance in clinical decision making. Accordingly, we designed this multinational study, which provided the largest case series of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). 43 centers from 14 countries (Albania, Croatia, Denmark, Egypt, France, Hungary, Iraq, ...

  1. Comparison of Scrub Typhus Meningitis with Acute Bacterial Meningitis and Tuberculous Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarlapudi, Svas Raju; Chacko, Anila; Samuel, Prasanna; Verghese, Valsan Philip; Rose, Winsley

    2018-01-15

    To compare scrub typhus meningitis with bacterial and tuberculous meningitis. Children aged <15 years admitted with meningitis were screened and those who fit criteria for diagnosis of scrub typhus meningitis (n=48), bacterial meningitis (n=44) and tuberculous meningitis (n=31) were included for analysis. Clinical features, investigations and outcomes were compared between the three types of meningitis. Mean age, duration of fever at presentation, presence of headache and, altered sensorium and presence of hepatomegaly/splenomegaly were statistically significantly different between the groups. Scrub typhus had statistically significant thrombocytopenia, shorter hospital stay and a better neurological and mortality outcome. Sub-acute presentation of meningitis in older age group children, and good outcome is associated with scrub typhus when compared to bacterial and tuberculous meningitis.

  2. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  3. MORTALITY AFTER CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF AIDS-ASSOCIATED CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS IN KENYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Randall; Mdodo, Rennatus; Omonge, Enoch; Jaoko, Walter; Baddley, John; Pappas, Peter; Mirjam-Colette, Kempf; Aban, Inmaculada; Odera, Susan; Suleh, Andrew; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the clinical management and mortality associated with cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in Kenya. Introduction Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is an increasingly prevalent infection among AIDS patients and is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa. The short-term prognosis and management of patients with CM may be improved by identifying factors leading to mortality in CM patients. Design A retrospective chart review of 76 HIV-infected CM patients admitted between August 2008 and March 2009 at Kenyatta National Hospital and Mbagathi District Hospital. Subjects Seventy six confirmed CM positive patients. Results Results show that 30 (40%) of 76 patients diagnosed with CM died during hospitalization after a median hospital stay of 10 days (range, 2–73 days). Significant predictors of mortality in the univariate model were Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) co-infection (P = 0.04), having been diagnosed with a co-morbid condition such as diabetes, oral candidiasis and hypertension (P = 0.01), and a low median CD4+ T lymphocyte count (P < 0.001). The multivariable model revealed that male sex, previous or current ART at admission and CD4+ T lymphocyte count less than 50 were significant predictors of mortality. Conversely, a minimum of two weeks of amphotericin B treatment (P < 0.001), initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (P = 0.007) and monitoring of creatinine and electrolyte levels (P = 0.02) were significantly associated with survival in the univariate model. Conclusions These results demonstrate the CM-associated mortality in Kenya is high and that there is an opportunity to improve the management and the short-term outcomes of hospitalized HIV positive patients with CM. PMID:25684784

  4. Personalized Clinical Decision Making in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Pfeiffer, Per

    2016-01-01

    and initial stages. This article outlines the potential use of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in clinical decision making with special regard to preoperative evaluation and response assessment in gastric cancer (including the gastroesophageal junction), pancreatic cancer (excluding neuroendocrine tumors...

  5. Role of Clinical Presentations and Routine CSF Analysis in the Rapid Diagnosis of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Cases of Negative Gram Stained Smears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Rabab; El-Kholy, Badawy; Yosry, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Bacterial meningitis is a lethal, disabling endemic disease needing prompt antibiotic management. Gram stained smears is rapid accurate method for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. In cases of negative gram stained smears diagnosis is delayed till culture results. We aim to assess the role of clinical presentations and routine CSF analysis in the cost-effective rapid diagnosis of negative gram stained smears bacterial meningitis. Methods. Cross sectional study including 623 acute meningitis patients divided into two groups: bacterial meningitis and nonbacterial meningitis groups. The clinical presentations, systemic inflammatory parameters, and CSF analysis were evaluated and compared in both groups. Results. Altered conscious level, localizing neurological signs, Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs together with peripheral leucocytosis (>10.000/mm3), high CRP (>6) together with high CSF protein (>50 gl/dL), CSF neutrophilic count (≥50% of total CSF leucocytic count), and low CSF glucose level (bacterial meningitis patients. From the significant CSF analysis variables CSF protein carried the higher accuracy of diagnosis 78% with sensitivity 88% and specificity 72%. Conclusions. High CSF protein (>50 mg/dL) together with plasma inflammatory markers and CSF cytochemical parameters can diagnose bacterial meningitis in gram stain negative smear till culture results. PMID:24803939

  6. Bacterial Meningitis Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1995-01-01

    The neurologic, psychological, and educational outcomes of bacterial meningitis in 130 children evaluated at a mean age of 8 years, and 6 years after their meningitis, are reported from the Department of Paediatrics and Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, University of Melbourne, and the Royal Children’s Hospital, Victoria, Australia.

  7. [Carcinomatous meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserni, Gábor; Vágó, Tibor; Török, Norbert; Gaál, Zoltán; Velkei, Tamás; Serényi, Péter; Göczo, Katalin; Tusa, Magdolna; Kovács, Katalin; Szucs, Miklós

    2007-10-01

    Carcinomatous meningitis is a serious complication of advanced stage solid tumours, which may become more common with improved survival. A 53-year-old woman with a recent history of breast cancer (pT2pN2M0) had been treated by mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She presented with weakness, diplopia and vertigo raising the possibility of vertebrobasilar ischaemia or an intracranial mass. In another patient, a 62-year-old man with hypertension, a stenotic common bile duct had been diagnosed when examined for abdominal complaints. When he presented with a high blood pressure value accompanied by intensive headache, vomiting and bilateral hearing loss, he was thought to have a hypertensive crisis. The rapidly progressive neurological symptoms and the history of breast cancer and findings suggesting pancreatic head tumour, respectively, led to the clinical diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis in both cases, despite any evidence on CT scans or a negative MR scan, though of limited value, in the first case. This diagnosis was confirmed by the laboratory and cytological findings of the cerebrospinal fluid, and also by the post mortem examination, since both patients died within a month after the onset of the symptoms. The primary tumour in the second patient proved to be a widely metastasizing diffuse type gastric cancer. Carcinomatous meningitis has a varying but characteristic presentation which generally makes it easy to diagnose, but it can sometimes present differential diagnostic problems. What we can learn from these two cases may help in recognizing this complication.

  8. Chronic Meningitis: A study on epidemiological and clinical findings, treatment results and prognosis of 97 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ahmadinejad Z

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system’s disorders including chronic meningitis (CM have considerable mortality and irreversible complications, and diagnosis and treatment of CM is difficult. In this retrospective study we reviwed epidemiological and clinical findings, treatment results and prognostic factors of 97 patients with CM admitted in Imam Khomeini hospital for the last 10 years. Important etiological factors in this study included: Mycobacterium Tuberculousis (8.2% Brucellae SP (5.2%, malignancies (1% and unknown (85.5%; the sexual ratio was 2:1 (Male/Female and the most common clinical manifestations were: fever, headache, cranial and motor neuron involvement, seizure and ataxia. Treatment regimens used included antituberculosis agents with or witout corticosteroids, in which the prognosis was better in patients who had been treated with antituberculosis agents alone. The mortality rate was 22.7%, which was in accordance with other studies. We suggest using of antituberculosis treatment alone in comparison with antituberculosis and corticosteroid. Last but not least a double blind randomized clinical trial for a longer period is needed to further substantiate the results of this study.

  9. Clinical implication of extended-spectrum cephalosporin nonsusceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S-H; Chung, J-W; Kim, B-N; Kwak, Y G; Kim, T H; Lee, E J; Choo, E J; Jeon, M-H; Lee, M S; Bae, I-G; Lee, S-R; Song, E H; Jun, J-B; Kim, M-N; Kim, S-H; Lee, S-O; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Choi, S-H

    2012-11-01

    The clinical implication of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC) resistance has been unclear in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis (SPM). We collected the clinical data of 120 patients with SPM in 12 hospitals of the Republic of Korea. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of 23 ESC-nonsusceptible SPM episodes were compared to those of 97 ESC-susceptible episodes. Hospital acquisition, presence of other foci of pneumococcal infection, septic shock at initial presentation, or concomitant bacteremia were more commonly observed in ESC-nonsusceptible than ESC-susceptible SPM. Empiric antimicrobial therapy with vancomycin and ESC combination was very common in both groups. Although there was a tendency towards higher early fatality in ESC-nonsusceptible SPM (3-day mortality; 17.4 % vs. 4.4 %, p = 0.05), in-hospital mortality (26.1 % vs. 20.9 %, p = 0.59) and median length of hospital stay (20 days vs. 24 days, p = 0.34) did not differ between ESC-nonsusceptible and ESC-susceptible SPM.

  10. Comparisons of clinical features and mortality of cryptococcal meningitis between patients with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Wang, Jann-Tay; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2011-10-01

    Cryptococcosis is a systemic infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, and cryptococcal meningitis can occur in patients with late-stage human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and other forms of immunosuppressive status. This study was designed to compare clinical features and laboratory findings of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. From January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, all patients aged more than 18 years hospitalized at National Taiwan University Hospital with a diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis were analyzed retrospectively. In total, 88 patients with cryptococcal meningitis were identified and 37 (42%) were HIV infected. Cryptococcal meningitis occurred in young (mean, 38 vs. 60; p cryptococcal antigen titer exceeding 1:512 (77% vs. 50%; p = 0.026), more extraneural involvement (70% vs. 49%; p = 0.046), more cryptococcemia (68% vs. 35%; p = 0.003), and higher proportion of normal brain images (44% vs. 13%; p = 0.003) than HIV-negative group. The all-cause mortality rates on Day 30 and Day 90 were 23.9% and 31.8%, respectively. The independent risk factors for Day 30 mortality were altered mental status, extraneural involvement, absence of lymphocyte predominance, and absence of leptomeningeal enhancement (odds ratio: 7.84, 9.71, 0.22, and 0.07, respectively; 95% confidence interval): 2.03-30.27, 2.01-46.94, 0.06-0.80, and 0.01-0.49, respectively). Those for Day 90 mortality were serum white count more than 11,000/μL, higher Charlson comorbidity score, and absence of normal brain images (odds ratio: 5.39, 1.40, and 0.09, respectively; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-23.72, 1.11-1.76, and 0.01-0.78, respectively). The clinical features of cryptococcal meningitis between HIV and non-HIV patients have some divergences, including age, sex, underlying diseases, CSF parameters, extraneural site involvement, fungemia, and so on. We also identified risk factors for mortality of this disease. However, the

  11. Cryptococcal genotype influences immunologic response and human clinical outcome after meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Darin L; Moskalenko, Oleksandr; Corcoran, Jennifer M; McDonald, Tami; Rolfes, Melissa A; Meya, David B; Kajumbula, Henry; Kambugu, Andrew; Bohjanen, Paul R; Knight, Joseph F; Boulware, David R; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, cryptococcal meningitis (CM) continues to be a predominant cause of AIDS-related mortality. Understanding virulence and improving clinical treatments remain important. To characterize the role of the fungal strain genotype in clinical disease, we analyzed 140 Cryptococcus isolates from 111 Ugandans with AIDS and CM. Isolates consisted of 107 nonredundant Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii strains and 8 C. neoformans var. grubii/neoformans hybrid strains. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize genotypes, yielding 15 sequence types and 4 clonal clusters. The largest clonal cluster consisted of 74 isolates. The results of Burst and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the C. neoformans var. grubii strains could be separated into three nonredundant evolutionary groups (Burst group 1 to group 3). Patient mortality was differentially associated with the different evolutionary groups (P = 0.04), with the highest mortality observed among Burst group 1, Burst group 2, and hybrid strains. Compared to Burst group 3 strains, Burst group 1 strains were associated with higher mortality (P = 0.02), exhibited increased capsule shedding (P = 0.02), and elicited a more pronounced Th(2) response during ex vivo cytokine release assays with strain-specific capsule stimulation (P = 0.02). The results of these analyses suggest that cryptococcal strain variation can be an important determinant of human immune responses and mortality. Cryptococcus neoformans is a common life-threatening human fungal pathogen that is responsible for an estimated 1 million cases of meningitis in HIV-infected patients annually. Virulence factors that are important in human disease have been identified, yet the impacts of the fungal strain genotype on virulence and outcomes of human infection remain poorly understood. Using an analysis of strain variation based on in vitro assays and clinical data from Ugandans living with AIDS and cryptococcal infection, we report

  12. Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Teresa Alvarado Guevara; Lizzie Marie Castillo Solano

    2006-01-01

    En Costa Rica la meningitis bacteriana se ha convertido en un tema prioritario en lo que a vigilancia epidemiológica se refiere, en los últimos meses se ha dado un aumento en la atención pública de este tema, debido a este fenómeno se hace necesario realizar una revisión del tema. La meningitis es una inflamación de las leptomeninges y colonización del líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR) debido a diferentes agentes, lo cual produce síntomas meníngeos (Ej., cefalea, rigidez nucal, fotofobia) y pleoc...

  13. Management of cryptococcal meningitis in a district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Benjamin O; Ross, Andrew

    2014-10-13

    Despite the development of context-specific guidelines, cryptococcal meningitis (CCM) remains a leading cause of death amongst HIV-infected patients. Results from clinical audits in routine practice have shown critical gaps in clinicians' adherence to recommendations regarding the management of CCM. The aim of this study was to review the acute management of CCM at an urban district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa with a view to making recommendations for improving care. An urban district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A retrospective audit was performed on clinical records of all patients (age > 13 years) admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of CCM between June 2011 and December 2012. Measurement of cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure at initial lumbar puncture (LP) was done rarely and only 23.4% of patients had therapeutic LPs. The majority of patients (117/127; 92.1%) received amphotericin B, however, only 19 of the 117 patients (16.2%) completed the 14-day treatment target. Amphotericin B-toxicity monitoring and prevention was suboptimal; however, in-patient referral for HIV counselling and testing was excellent. The quality of care of CCM based on selected process criteria showed gaps in routine care at the hospital despite the availability of context-specific guidelines. An action plan for improving care was developed based on stakeholders' feedback. A repeat audit should be conducted in the future in order to evaluate the impact of this plan and to ensure that improvements are sustained.

  14. Clinical, biochemical and microbiological factors associated with the prognosis of pneumococcal meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Iolanda; Calzada, Yolanda; Monfort, Laura; Vila-Pérez, David; Felipe, Aida; Ortiz, Jessica; Cambra, Francisco José; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) has a high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to evaluate what factors are related to a poor PM prognosis. Prospective observational study conducted on patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in a tertiary hospital with a diagnosis of PM (January 2000 to December 2013). Clinical, biochemical and microbiological data were recorded. Variable outcome was classified into good or poor (neurological handicap or death). A multivariate logistic regression was performed based on the univariate analysis of significant data. A total of 88 patients were included. Clinical variables statistically significant for a poor outcome were younger age (p=.008), lengthy fever (p=.016), sepsis (p=.010), lower Glasgow Score (pbiochemical variables were higher level of C-reactive protein (pindicators of poor outcome were age less than 2 years (p=.011), high score on SOFA (p=.030), low Glasgow Score (p=.042), and severe hypoglycorrhachia (p=.009). Patients younger than 2 years of age, with depressed consciousness at admission, especially when longer mechanical ventilation is required, are at high risk of a poor outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Genotypic Diversity Is Associated with Clinical Outcome and Phenotype in Cryptococcal Meningitis across Southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A Beale

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is a major cause of mortality throughout the developing world, yet little is known about the genetic markers underlying Cryptococcal virulence and patient outcome. We studied a cohort of 230 Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn isolates from HIV-positive South African clinical trial patients with detailed clinical follow-up using multi-locus sequence typing and in vitro phenotypic virulence assays, correlating these data with clinical and fungal markers of disease in the patient. South African Cn displayed high levels of genetic diversity and locus variability compared to globally distributed types, and we identified 50 sequence types grouped within the main molecular types VNI, VNII and VNB, with 72% of isolates typed into one of seven 'high frequency' sequence types. Spatial analysis of patients' cryptococcal genotype was not shown to be clustered geographically, which might argue against recent local acquisition and in favour of reactivation of latent infection. Through comparison of MLST genotyping data with clinical parameters, we found a relationship between genetic lineage and clinical outcome, with patients infected with the VNB lineage having significantly worse survival (n=8, HR 3.35, CI 1.51-7.20, p=0.003, and this was maintained even after adjustment for known prognostic indicators and treatment regimen. Comparison of fungal genotype with in vitro phenotype (phagocytosis, laccase activity and CSF survival performed on a subset of 89 isolates revealed evidence of lineage-associated virulence phenotype, with the VNII lineage displaying increased laccase activity (p=0.001 and ex vivo CSF survival (p=0.0001. These findings show that Cryptococcus neoformans is a phenotypically heterogeneous pathogen, and that lineage plays an important role in cryptococcal virulence during human infection. Furthermore, a detailed understanding of the genetic diversity in Southern Africa will support further investigation into how genetic

  16. Genotypic Diversity Is Associated with Clinical Outcome and Phenotype in Cryptococcal Meningitis across Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Mathew A; Sabiiti, Wilber; Robertson, Emma J; Fuentes-Cabrejo, Karen M; O'Hanlon, Simon J; Jarvis, Joseph N; Loyse, Angela; Meintjes, Graeme; Harrison, Thomas S; May, Robin C; Fisher, Matthew C; Bicanic, Tihana

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a major cause of mortality throughout the developing world, yet little is known about the genetic markers underlying Cryptococcal virulence and patient outcome. We studied a cohort of 230 Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) isolates from HIV-positive South African clinical trial patients with detailed clinical follow-up using multi-locus sequence typing and in vitro phenotypic virulence assays, correlating these data with clinical and fungal markers of disease in the patient. South African Cn displayed high levels of genetic diversity and locus variability compared to globally distributed types, and we identified 50 sequence types grouped within the main molecular types VNI, VNII and VNB, with 72% of isolates typed into one of seven 'high frequency' sequence types. Spatial analysis of patients' cryptococcal genotype was not shown to be clustered geographically, which might argue against recent local acquisition and in favour of reactivation of latent infection. Through comparison of MLST genotyping data with clinical parameters, we found a relationship between genetic lineage and clinical outcome, with patients infected with the VNB lineage having significantly worse survival (n=8, HR 3.35, CI 1.51-7.20, p=0.003), and this was maintained even after adjustment for known prognostic indicators and treatment regimen. Comparison of fungal genotype with in vitro phenotype (phagocytosis, laccase activity and CSF survival) performed on a subset of 89 isolates revealed evidence of lineage-associated virulence phenotype, with the VNII lineage displaying increased laccase activity (p=0.001) and ex vivo CSF survival (p=0.0001). These findings show that Cryptococcus neoformans is a phenotypically heterogeneous pathogen, and that lineage plays an important role in cryptococcal virulence during human infection. Furthermore, a detailed understanding of the genetic diversity in Southern Africa will support further investigation into how genetic diversity is

  17. [Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: a report of 12 cases of herpes simplex meningitis, and a comparison with cases of herpes simplex encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Takahiro; Shiga, Yuji; Takeshima, Shinichi; Tachiyama, Keisuke; Kamimura, Teppei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takemaru, Makoto; Takeshita, Jun; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2018-01-26

    We treated 437 cases of adult aseptic meningitis and 12 cases (including 2 recurrent patients; age, 31.8 ± 8.9 years; 7 females) of herpes simplex meningitis from 2004 to 2016. The incidence rate of adult herpes simplex meningitis in the cases with aseptic meningitis was 2.7%. One patient was admitted during treatment of genital herpes, but no association was observed between genital herpes and herpes simplex meningitis in the other cases. The diagnoses were confirmed in all cases as the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-DNA. For diagnosis confirmation, the DNA test was useful after 2-7 days following initial disease onset. Among other types of aseptic meningitis, the patients with herpes simplex meningitis showed relatively high white blood cell counts and relatively high CSF protein and high CSF cell counts. CSF cells showed mononuclear cell dominance from the initial stage of the disease. During same period, we also experienced 12 cases of herpes simplex encephalitis and 21 cases of non-hepatic acute limbic encephalitis. Notably, the patients with herpes simplex meningitis were younger and their CSF protein and cells counts were higher than those of the patients with herpes simplex encephalitis.

  18. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  19. Clinical usefulness and accuracy of polymerase chain reaction in the detection of bacterial meningitis agents in pediatric cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, M; Alaidarous, A

    2018-02-16

    Bacterial meningitis poses enormous healthcare challenges due to a high mortality, morbidity and sequelae. Neisseria (N.) meningitidis, Haemophilus (H.) influenzae, Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae and S. agalactiae remain among the most prevalent infectious agents that cause bacterial meningitis in children. The objective of this study was the simultaneous detection of these pathogens in suspected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) and compare PCR results with standard diagnostics currently used in clinical practice. CSF specimens were obtained from 515 children (<5 years) clinically suspected of having acute bacterial meningitis. Based on bacterial culture, four isolates of salmonella sp and one Citrobacter freundii isolate were identified. The remaining 510 CSF specimens, having negative culture, were subjected to mPCR. Twenty-three (4.51%) CSF samples yielded a PCR positive signal. The pathogens identified were: S. pneumoniae (n=13), H. influenzae (n=7) and N. meningitidis (n=3). S. agalactiae was not detected. Using sequential multiplex PCR, serogrouping of S. pneumoniae revealed 3 different serotypes: serotype 19A (n=6), 19F (n=4) and serotype 23F (n=3). Only the serotype A was identified for the 3N. meningitidis isolates. Despite vaccination, S. pneumoniae remains a leading cause of pediatric invasive disease. Detecting causative organism remains the most critical aspect for management of children with suspected meningitis. PCR method is more sensitive and rapid than culture for detecting the infectious agents. Institution of PCR diagnostics is recommended for early and appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical decision support system in dental implantology

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Polášková; Jitka Feberová; Taťjána Dostálová; Pavel Kříž; Michaela Seydlová

    2013-01-01

    Implantology is rapidly developing interdisciplinary field providing enormous amounts of data to be classified, evaluated and interpreted. The analysis of clinical data remains a big challenge, because each new system has specific requirements. The aim of study was prepare specific tool for treatment planning. Decision support system is built on Expert system. It is interactive software which provides clinical recommendations and treatment planning. Expert systems are knowledge-based computer...

  1. Management of cryptococcal meningitis in a district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal: A clinical audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin O. Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the development of context-specific guidelines, cryptococcal meningitis (CCM remains a leading cause of death amongst HIV-infected patients. Results from clinical audits in routine practice have shown critical gaps in clinicians’ adherence to recommendations regarding the management of CCM.Aim: The aim of this study was to review the acute management of CCM at an urban district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa with a view to making recommendations for improving care.Setting: An urban district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.Methods: A retrospective audit was performed on clinical records of all patients (age > 13 years admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of CCM between June 2011 and December 2012.Results: Measurement of cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure at initial lumbar puncture (LP was done rarely and only 23.4% of patients had therapeutic LPs. The majority of patients (117/127; 92.1% received amphotericin B, however, only 19 of the 117 patients (16.2% completed the 14-day treatment target. Amphotericin B-toxicity monitoring and prevention was suboptimal; however, in-patient referral for HIV counselling and testing was excellent.Conclusions: The quality of care of CCM based on selected process criteria showed gaps in routine care at the hospital despite the availability of context-specific guidelines. An action plan for improving care was developed based on stakeholders’ feedback. A repeat audit should be conducted in the future in order to evaluate the impact of this plan and to ensure that improvements are sustained.

  2. Analysis of clinical outcomes in pediatric bacterial meningitis focusing on patients without cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Li; Chi, Hsin; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Huang, Daniel Tsung-Ning; Chiu, Nan-Chang

    2016-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell count and biochemical examinations and cultures form the basis for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, some patients do not have typical findings and are at a higher risk of being missed or having delayed treatment. To better understand the correlation between CSF results and outcomes, we evaluated CSF data focusing on the patients with atypical findings. This study enrolled CSF culture-proven bacterial meningitis patients aged from 1 month to 18 years in a medical center. The patients were divided into "normal" and "abnormal" groups for each laboratory result and in combination. The correlations between the laboratory results and the outcomes were analyzed. A total of 175 children with confirmed bacterial meningitis were enrolled. In CSF examinations, 16.2% of patients had normal white blood cell counts, 29.5% had normal glucose levels, 24.5% had normal protein levels, 10.2% had normal results in two items, and 8.6% had normal results in all three items. In logistic regression analysis, a normal CSF leukocyte count and increased CSF protein level were related to poor outcomes. Patients with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and hyponatremia were at a higher risk of mortality and the development of sequelae. In children with bacterial meningitis, nontypical CSF findings and, in particular, normal CSF leukocyte count and increased protein level may indicate a worse prognosis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-12-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis.

  4. Age related clinical manifestation of acute bacterial meningitis in children presenting to emergency department of a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, J.; Khursheed, M.; Feroze, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in different age groups of a paediatric population. Methods: The retrospective study comprised patients who had been admitted through the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi with the relevant diagnosis from September 2009 to September 2011. Case record forms were used to collect data from patient files. Data was collected using variables such as age, gender, presenting complaints, clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography scan findings and final outcome of patients. There was a minimal risk of breach in patient confidentiality. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 192 patients were enrolled. The presenting complaint in 165 (86%) patients was fever; vomiting in 93 (48.43%); and 49 (52.68%) of them were more than 5 years old. Irritability was present in 54 (28.12%) children, of whom 27 (50%) were less than one year. Fits were present in 47 (24.47%) cases out of which 21 (44.68%) were less than one year. Neck stiffness and signs of meningeal irritation, Kerning's sign and Brudzincski's sign, were present in 53 (27.60%) patients; 26 (13.54%); and 18 (9.3%) respectively. These signs were more common in children over 5 years of age, reflected by 29 (54.7%), 16 (61.5%) and 11 (61.11%) patients respectively. On presentation, headache was found in 77 (40.10%) children among whom 56 (72.72%) were over 5 years. Besides, 151 (78.6%) patients required admission to the ward, while 40 (20.8%) were admitted in High Dependancy Unit/critical care units. Adverse outcome was observed in 6 (3.12%) patients. Conclusion: Younger children with acute bacterial meningitis presented with non-specific signs and symptoms. Headache and signs of meningeal irritation were common findings in children over 5 years. (author)

  5. IBM's Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, M S; Sun, J; Knoop, S; Shabo, A; Carmeli, B; Sow, D; Syed-Mahmood, T; Rapp, W

    2014-08-15

    This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation.

  6. Clinical decision support system in dental implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Polášková

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Implantology is rapidly developing interdisciplinary field providing enormous amounts of data to be classified, evaluated and interpreted. The analysis of clinical data remains a big challenge, because each new system has specific requirements. The aim of study was prepare specific tool for treatment planning. Decision support system is built on Expert system. It is interactive software which provides clinical recommendations and treatment planning. Expert systems are knowledge-based computer programs designed to provide assistance in diagnosis and treatment planning. These systems are used for health care (dentistry, medicine, pharmacy etc.. The application contained the medical history analysis to obtaining information useful in formulating a diagnosis and providing implant insertion and prosthetic reconstruction to the patient; the diagnostic examination of dental implant procedure; implant positioning diagnosis – 3-D measurement; diagnostic information for treatment planning; treatment plan in the form of objective measurement of implant placement that helps surgeon and prosthodontics. The decision algorithm implemented by programming language is used. Core of program is an expert knowledge programming like a decision tree. The analysis of the decision-making process for implant treatment in general practice is prepared and analyzed.

  7. 2017 Infectious Diseases Society of America's Clinical Practice Guidelines for Healthcare-Associated Ventriculitis and Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tunkel, Allan R.; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Bhimraj, Adarsh; Byers, Karin; Kaplan, Sheldon L.; Michael Scheld, W.; van de Beek, Diederik; Bleck, Thomas P.; Garton, Hugh J. L.; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2017-01-01

    The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee collaborated with partner organizations to convene a panel of 10 experts on healthcare-associated ventriculitis and meningitis. The panel represented pediatric and adult specialists in the field of

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans population diversity and clinical outcomes of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis patients in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyazika, Tinashe K; Hagen, Ferry; Machiridza, Tendai; Kutepa, Melody; Masanganise, Faith; Hendrickx, Marijke; Boekhout, Teun; Magombei-Majinjiwa, Tricia; Siziba, Nonthokozo; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Mateveke, Kudzanai; Meis, Jacques F; Robertson, Valerie J

    2016-01-01

    HIV and cryptococcal meningitis co-infection is a major public health problem in most developing countries. Cryptococcus neoformans sensu stricto is responsible for the majority of HIV-associated cryptococcosis cases in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the available information, little is known about

  9. Post-surgical enterococcal meningitis: clinical and epidemiological study of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardado, Rodríguez; Asensi, V; Torres, J M; Pérez, F; Blanco, A; Maradona, J A; Cartón, J A

    2006-01-01

    Enterococcal post-surgical meningitis is an uncommon disease. 20 episodes of nosocomial post-surgical enterococcal meningitis diagnosed between 1994 and 2003 were retrospectively studied. During the period of study 20 cases of post-surgical enterococcal meningitis (60% female, mean age 55+/-18 y, range 16-78 y) were reviewed. The mean time between admission at the hospital and surgery was 26 (SD = 15) d (range 7-61 d). The most frequent underlying diseases were: intracerebral haemorrhage (55%), brain neoplasms (25%), head trauma (15%) and hydrocephalus (5%). 11 patients had previously received antibiotic treatment. The isolates identified were Enterococcus faecalis (n = 18) (90%), E. faecium (1) and E. durans (1). 11 patients had polymicrobial infections. The treatment most frequently used was vancomycin alone or with other antibiotics (11). In 5 patients intrathecal vancomycin (20 mg/d) was also added. The mortality rate was not different in intrathecally treated patients. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) devices were removed in 8 patients. Four patients died due to the infection. Mortality was significantly associated with lack of removal of the CSF devices (p = 0.04). Enterococcal spp. are a cause of nosocomial meningitis associated with neurosurgical procedures and the presence of neurological devices.

  10. Dialogic Consensus In Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Paul; Lovat, Terry

    2016-12-01

    This paper is predicated on the understanding that clinical encounters between clinicians and patients should be seen primarily as inter-relations among persons and, as such, are necessarily moral encounters. It aims to relocate the discussion to be had in challenging medical decision-making situations, including, for example, as the end of life comes into view, onto a more robust moral philosophical footing than is currently commonplace. In our contemporary era, those making moral decisions must be cognizant of the existence of perspectives other than their own, and be attuned to the demands of inter-subjectivity. Applicable to clinical practice, we propose and justify a Habermasian approach as one useful means of achieving what can be described as dialogic consensus. The Habermasian approach builds around, first, his discourse theory of morality as universalizable to all and, second, communicative action as a cooperative search for truth. It is a concrete way to ground the discourse which must be held in complex medical decision-making situations, in its actual reality. Considerations about the theoretical underpinnings of the application of dialogic consensus to clinical practice, and potential difficulties, are explored.

  11. Meta-analysis of adjunctive dexamethasone to improve clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Yuzhen; Liu, Qi; Kong, Cuicui; Xu, Guixia

    2018-02-01

    The current recommended therapies for bacterial meningitis are effective antimicrobial agents and the implementation of childhood vaccination programs. However, the role of adjunctive dexamethasone therapy in bacterial meningitis remains controversial. Using meta-analysis, this study aims to investigate the efficacy of adjunctive dexamethasone therapy in bacterial meningitis by comparing it with antibiotic therapy. Documents of randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to the treatment of bacterial meningitis in children with dexamethasone published since the establishment of the databases to December in 2016 were retrieved from the databases of Cochrane Library, Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. The references in RCT were retrieved by hands at the same time. Full texts of screened documents were searched and given qualitative review, and then, all RCT included were analyzed statistically by using Review Manger 5.3 software. The search yielded 15 studies (2409 children cases), among which 4 fall in grade A and 11 were grade B. The results of meta-analysis have shown that patients who received dexamethasone have significantly lower risks in incidence of hearing loss (OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.53-0.89, P = 0.004) and severe neurological sequelae (OR = 0.59, 95%CI 0.37-0.95, P = 0.03), but the follow-up mortality is hardly effected (OR = 0.86, 95%CI 0.67-1.10, P = 0.23). Evidence has proven that the adjunctive administration of dexamethasone is conducive to treating children with bacterial meningitis to a certain extent, to decreasing the possibility of hearing loss and severe neurological sequelae, but has no significant effect on the follow-up mortality.

  12. Iatrogenic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Genaro Mutarelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic meningitis can be caused by a number of mechanisms. The recent case reports of fungal meningitis after application of epidural methylprednisolone caused warning in the medical community. Cases were caused by contaminated lots of methylprednisolone from a single compounding pharmacy. Several medications can cause meninigitis by probable hypersensitivity mechanism. Neurologists should be alert to the recent description of the use of lamotrigine and development of aseptic meningitis.

  13. Parasitic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis ... and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Various parasites can cause meningitis or can affect the brain or nervous ...

  14. A distributed clinical decision support system architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker H. El-Sappagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an open and distributed clinical decision support system architecture. This technical architecture takes advantage of Electronic Health Record (EHR, data mining techniques, clinical databases, domain expert knowledge bases, available technologies and standards to provide decision-making support for healthcare professionals. The architecture will work extremely well in distributed EHR environments in which each hospital has its own local EHR, and it satisfies the compatibility, interoperability and scalability objectives of an EHR. The system will also have a set of distributed knowledge bases. Each knowledge base will be specialized in a specific domain (i.e., heart disease, and the model achieves cooperation, integration and interoperability between these knowledge bases. Moreover, the model ensures that all knowledge bases are up-to-date by connecting data mining engines to each local knowledge base. These data mining engines continuously mine EHR databases to extract the most recent knowledge, to standardize it and to add it to the knowledge bases. This framework is expected to improve the quality of healthcare, reducing medical errors and guaranteeing the safety of patients by helping clinicians to make correct, accurate, knowledgeable and timely decisions.

  15. Decision-theoretic refinement planning: a new method for clinical decision analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Doan, A.; Haddawy, P.; Kahn, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical decision analysis seeks to identify the optimal management strategy by modelling the uncertainty and risks entailed in the diagnosis, natural history, and treatment of a particular problem or disorder. Decision trees are the most frequently used model in clinical decision analysis, but can be tedious to construct, cumbersome to use, and computationally prohibitive, especially with large, complex decision problems. We present a new method for clinical decision analysis that combines t...

  16. Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis: a clinical study of 42 consecutive cases in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Erwan; Ghawche, Frédéric; Delattre, Alex; Berberian, Anthony; Levy, Marc; Valour, Florent

    2014-06-01

    In endemic areas, eosinophilic meningitis is mainly caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. We describe a series of this poorly-known condition. Retrospective cohort study (2000-2012) including all patients diagnosed with eosinophilic meningitis in French Polynesia. Forty-two patients (males: 61.9%, age: 22 (IQR 17-32)) were diagnosed with a serologically proven (n=13) or probable A. cantonensis meningitis, mostly during the dry season (66.6%) and following the consumption of or prolonged contact with an intermediate/paratenic host (64.3%). No differential diagnosis was found in probable cases, in whom serological tests were performed earlier (7.5 days (6.5-10)) compared to positive patients (7.5 (6.5-10) versus 11 (7-30) days, p=0.02). The most commonly reported symptom was headache (92.8%). Fever (7.1%) and biological inflammatory syndrome (14.3%) were rare. Blood eosinophil count was 1200/mm(3) (900-2548). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis disclosed a protein level of 0.9 g/L (0.7-1.1), a CSF/plasma glucose ratio of 0.50 (0.40-0.55), and 500 leucocytes/mm(3) (292-725; eosinophils: 42.0% (29.5-60); lymphocytes: 46.5% (32.5-59.0)). Thirteen cases (31.0%) were severe, with 11 focal neurological deficits. A delayed hospital referral (OR 1.13, p=0.05) was associated with severity. A. cantonensis meningitis must be evocated in young patients with meningitic syndrome, severe headache, and CSF inflammation with predominance of eosinophils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Meta-analysis of studies comparing adjuvant dexamethasone to glycerol to improve clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Vaziri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurological complications are a problematic factor in acute bacterial meningitis; hence, its prevention is the key to ensure the success of meningitis treatment. Glycerol and dexamethasone are both applied in this regard. Oral glycerol is an appropriate alternative instead of intravenous dexamethasone because it does not have problems related to intravenous injection, the high cost, and drug complications. The main objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of adjuvant dexamethasone versus glycerol in order to improve the clinical outcome of bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: We conducted a search on the available resources including PubMed, Ovid, Elsevier, Cochrane, and another search engines such as Google till 2014. All clinical trials that were performed in the field of comparing the effectiveness of the two drugs and met the inclusion criteria were gathered and after extraction the relative risk (RR values, the pooled RR was calculated. The main outcome was neurological complications. Meta-analysis of the data was performed in Stata version 11.2 using both fixed and random effect models, weighting each study by inverse of variance. Results: In 5 comparative studies (1,340 patients, the rate of neurological complications of glycerol compared to that of dexamethasone was 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.98 compared to 1.12]. The rate of neurological complications of dexamethasone compared to dexamethasone + glycerol was 1 (95% CI, 0.97 compared to 1.03, dexamethasone compared to placebo was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.97 compared to 1.03, glycerol compared to glycerol + dexamethasone was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.94 compared to 1.02, and glycerol compared to placebo was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94 compared to 1.01. In these studies, no difference was reported between dexamethasone and glycerol in terms of reducing neurological complications. Conclusion: Although there were some weak evidences for the nonstatistical significant effect of

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors for Poor Outcome in Infants Less Than 90 Days of Age with Bacterial Meningitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okike, Ifeanyichukwu O; Ladhani, Shamez N; Johnson, Alan P; Henderson, Katherine L; Blackburn, Ruth M; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Cafferkey, Mary; Anthony, Mark; Ninis, Nelly; Heath, Paul T

    2018-01-29

    To describe the clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with poor outcome in infants <90 days of age with bacterial meningitis. Prospective, enhanced, national population-based active surveillance for infants aged <90 days with bacterial meningitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland between July 2010 and July 2011. Infants were identified through the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit, laboratory surveillance and meningitis charities. Clinical details was available for 263 out of 298 (88%) infants where a bacterium was identified, 184 (70%) were born at term. Fever was reported in 143 (54%), seizures in 73 (28%), bulging fontanelle in 58 (22%), coma in 15 (6%) and neck stiffness in 7 (3%). 23 (9%) died and 56/240 (23%) of the survivors had serious central nervous system (CNS) complications at discharge. Temperature instability (odds ratio [OR] 2.99; 95% CI: 1.21-7.41), seizures (OR 7.06; 95% CI: 2.80-17.81), CSF protein greater than the median concentration (2275mg/dl; OR 2.62; 95% CI: 1.13-6.10) and pneumococcal meningitis (OR 4.83; 95% CI: 1.33-17.58) were independently associated with serious CNS complications, while prematurity (OR 5.84; 95% CI: 2.02-16.85), low birthweight (OR 8.48; 95% CI: 2.60-27.69), coma at presentation (OR 31.85; 95% CI: 8.46-119.81) and pneumococcal meningitis (OR 4.62; 95% CI: 1.19-17.91) were independently associated with death. The classic features of meningitis were uncommon. The presentation in young infants is often non-specific and only half of cases presented with fever. A number of clinical and laboratory factors were associated with poor outcomes; further research is required to determine how knowledge of these risk factors might improve clinical management and outcomes.

  19. Acute versus subacute community-acquired meningitis: Analysis of 611 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Tarek; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    Community-acquired meningitis can be classified into acute and subacute presentations by the duration of illness of ≤ or >5 days, respectively. There are currently no studies comparing the clinical features, management decisions, etiologies, and outcomes between acute and subacute presentations.It is a retrospective study of adults with community-acquired meningitis hospitalized in Houston, TX between January 2005 and January 2010. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of ≤4.A total of 611 patients were identified, of which 458 (75%) were acute and 153 subacute (25%). The most common etiologies were unknown in 418 (68.4%), viral in 94 (15.4%), bacterial in 47 (7.7%), fungal in 42 patients (6.9%), and other noninfectious etiologies in 6 (1%). Patients with subacute meningitis were more likely to be immunosuppressed or have comorbidities, had fungal etiologies, and had higher rates of hypoglycorrachia and abnormal neurological findings (P 65 years and abnormal neurological findings were predictive of an adverse clinical outcome in both acute and subacute meningitis, whereas fever was also a significant prognostic factor in acute meningitis. (P meningitis differ in regards to clinical presentations, etiologies, laboratory findings, and management decisions, but did not differ in rates of adverse clinical outcomes. Future studies including thoroughly investigated patients with new diagnostic molecular methods may show different results and outcomes.

  20. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute bacterial meningitis in elderly patients over 65: a hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Wei-An

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis in elderly patients. Methods 261 patients with adult bacterial meningitis (ABM, collected during a study period of 11 years (2000-2010, were included for study. Among them, 87 patients aged ≥ 65 years and were classified as the elderly group. The clinical and laboratory characteristics and prognostic factors were analyzed, and a clinical comparison with those of non-elderly ABM patients was also made. Results The 87 elderly ABM patients were composed of 53 males and 34 females, aged 65-87 years old (median = 71 years. Diabetes mellitus (DM was the most common underlying condition (34%, followed by end stage renal disease (7%, alcoholism (4% and malignancies (4%. Fever was the most common clinical manifestation (86%, followed by altered consciousness (62%, leukocytosis (53%, hydrocephalus (38%, seizure (30%, bacteremia (21% and shock (11%. Thirty-nine of these 87 elderly ABM patients had spontaneous infection, while the other 48 had post-neurosurgical infection. Forty-four patients contracted ABM in a community-acquired state, while the other 43, a nosocomial state. The therapeutic results of the 87 elderly ABM patients were that 34 patients expired and 53 patients survived. The comparative results of the clinical and laboratory characteristics between the elderly and non-elderly ABM patients showed that only peripheral blood leukocytosis was significant. Presence of shock and seizure were significant prognostic factors of elderly ABM patients. Conclusions Elderly ABM patients accounted for 34.8% of the overall ABM cases, and this relatively high incidence rate may signify the future burden of ABM in the elderly population in Taiwan. The relative frequency of implicated pathogens of elderly ABM is similar to that of non-elderly ABM. Compared with non-elderly patients, the elderly ABM patients have a significantly lower incidence of peripheral blood leukocytosis

  1. Chemical meningitis in metrizamide myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Hesselberg, J.P.; Anda, S.; Dale, L.; Hellum, K.

    1986-01-01

    Seven patients with acute chemcial meningitis after metrizamide myelography are described. Five of the cases occurred within a time span of two months. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings in the acute stage of the illness were similar to findings in acute bacterial meningitis. Possible causes of this complication are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningitis - syphilitic; Neurosyphilis - syphilitic meningitis ... Syphilitic meningitis is a form of neurosyphilis . This condition is a life-threatening complication of syphilis infection. Syphilis is ...

  3. Clinical presentation, natural history, and cumulative death rates of 230 adults with primary cryptococcal meningitis in Zambian AIDS patients treated under local conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaba, P; Mwansa, J; Chintu, C; Pobee, J; Scarborough, M; Portsmouth, S; Zumla, A

    2001-12-01

    Inpatient medical wards, Department of Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. To define the natural history, clinical presentation, and management outcome of microbiologically confirmed cryptococcal meningitis in adult AIDS patients treated under local conditions where antifungal and antiretroviral therapies are not routinely available. A descriptive, longitudinal, observational study. All adult patients admitted to the medical wards of the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia with cerebrospinal fluid culture proved, primary cryptococcal meningitis, during a 12 month period were enrolled into the study. The following details were acquired: clinical features, HIV status, laboratory data, treatment accorded, and survival. A total of 230 patients with primary cryptococcal meningitis were studied (median age 32 years; range 15-65 years; 112 males, 118 females). Cryptococcal meningitis was the first AIDS defining illness in 210 (91%) patients. One hundred and thirty of the 230 (56%) patients had received treatment with fluconazole monotherapy and 100 (43%) patients received palliative care only without any antifungal therapy. A 100% case fatality rate was observed in both groups at follow up: by seven weeks in the untreated group and at six months in the fluconazole treated group. The cumulative median survival from time of diagnosis was 19 days (range 1-164 days) for the fluconazole treated group and 10 days (range 0-42 days) for the untreated group. Cryptococcal meningitis, under current treatment accorded at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, has a 100% mortality in young Zambian adults with AIDS. The current treatment accorded to Zambian adults with cryptococcal meningitis is inappropriate. An urgent need exists to improve strategies for the clinical management of AIDS patients in poor African countries. The wider ethical and operational issues of making available antifungals to African AIDS patients are discussed.

  4. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...

  5. Bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Lawrence C; Boggess, Kim A; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis is uncommon but devastating. Morbidity among survivors remains high. The types and distribution of pathogens are related to gestational age, postnatal age, and geographic region. Confirming the diagnosis is difficult. Clinical signs are often subtle, lumbar punctures are frequently deferred, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures can be compromised by prior antibiotic exposure. Infants with bacterial meningitis can have negative blood cultures and normal CSF parameters. Promising tests such as the polymerase chain reaction require further study. Prompt treatment with antibiotics is essential. Clinical trials investigating a vaccine for preventing neonatal Group B Streptococcus infections are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. HIB-INFECTION: MENINGITIS, CELLULITIS IN THE CHILD OF 6 MONTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Harchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical case of Hib-infection is the clinic purulent meningitis and pannikulita young child. Shows the complexity of the differential diagnosis of meningitis in combination with panniculitis with meningococcal disease (meningitis, meningokokktsemiya.

  7. [Clinical analysis of patients with bacterial meningitis in childhood and reevaluation of rapid antigen detection methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, A; Kuroki, H; Ohshima, H; Sugioka, T; Ishiwada, N; Takeda, N; Aizawa, J; Ohkusu, K

    1999-09-01

    Twenty-eight cases of bacterial meningitis during the recent ten years were analyzed retrospectively, and the following results were obtained. 1. Pathogens were as follows; H. influenzae 13 (46.4%), S. pneumoniae 8 (28.6%), S. agalactiae 4 (14.3%), E. coli 2 (7.1%), and L. monocytogenes 1 case (3.6%). 2. Twelve out of the thirteen H. influenzae cases were caused by serotype b (Hib), and 2 strains were beta-lactamase producer. Fifty percent of the S. pneumoniae cases were caused by penicillin-resistant strains. And all these resistant strains belonged to serotype 19 or 23. 3. Underlying diseases related to the onset of meningitis were found in 46% of the cases, and these consisted of CNS shunt operated 5, asplenia or polysplenia 2, Mondini's anomaly 1, sacral dermal sinus 1, and neonate 4 cases. 4. Prognosis of these cases were three deaths, four with neurologic sequelae, and twenty-one complete recoveries. 5. On admission, 85% (17/20) of the cases were diagnosed correctly by the rapid antigen detection. Sensitivity and specificity of the rapid antigen detection by using latex particle agglutination is 90% and 100% in the Hib cases, and 83% and 100% in the S. pneumoniae cases respectively. Moreover, the bacteriologically unknown 2 cases caused by parenteral partial treatment were also diagnosed by the detection of antigen in concentrated urine.

  8. Clinical course, complications and predictors of mortality in patients with tuberculous meningitis - an experience of fifty two cases at civil hospital karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salekeen, S.; Mahmood, K.; Naqvi, I.H.; Baig, M.Y.; Akhtar, S.T.; Abbasi, A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical course, complications and predictors of mortality in reducing the consequent morbidity and mortality in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Methods: A prospective study was carried out at Civil Hospital Karachi from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty-two confirmed cases of tuberculous meningitis were included. The entire clinical course with complications and predictors of mortality were assessed. Data was analyzed using kSPSS version 17.0. Results: The mean age of the patients was 36.29+-16.7 years with an equal gender distribution. The presenting complaints were fever 51 (98.1%), neck-stiffness 44 (84.61%), and altered level of consciousness 40 (76.9%), headache 31 (59.6%), vomiting 19 (36.5%) and focal weakness 10 (19.2%). Among CNS signs, 47 (90.4%) patients had signs of meningeal irritation, 14 (26.9%) had cranial nerve palsies with abducent nerve being the most commonly involved cranial nerve (25%). Mean GCS was 11.4+-2.9 and most of the patients presented with medical research council Stage 2 of tuberculous meningitis (which is minimally altered level of consciousness with minor focal neurological signs). Overall mortality was 21.1%. Univariate analysis revealed old age; advanced stage of tuberculous meningitis, serum sodium 9000/mL development of hydrocephalus and use of mechanical ventilation as major predictors of mortality. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis is a frequently reported problem in our part of the world. Hydrocephalus along with other sequelae are common complications. All patients should be assessed for the presence of risk factors affecting mortality of the disease. (author)

  9. Características clínico-microbiológicas de la meningitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae resistente a la penicilina Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis resistant to penicillin clinical and microbiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demóstenes Gómez-Barreto

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislado del líquido cefalorraquídeo de niños con meningitis, así como describir y comparar las características clínicas y microbiológicas, el tratamiento y la evolución del padecimiento entre niños infectados con cepas sensibles y resistentes a la penicilina y la cefalosporina. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Treinta y ocho niños con meningitis neumocócica fueron incluidos prospectivamente en el Programa Institucional de Vigilancia de las Infecciones Neumocócicas, durante el lapso 1994-1998. Los datos clínicos y de laboratorio se colectaron de cada expediente. RESULTADOS: Del total de niños, 63% era menor de dos años de edad, 28.9% mostró cepas insensibles a la penicilina, 18.4% tenía resistencia intermedia, y 10.5% tenía resistencia elevada. El 2.6% mostró también resistencia a la cefotaxima. La única característica (por la prueba exacta de Fisher asociada con la resistencia fue: enfermedad de base previa al proceso (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the susceptibility to antibiotics of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis. To describe and compare the clinical and microbiological characteristics, treatment and outcome among children infected with strains either susceptible or resistant to penicillin and cephalosporin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 38 children with pneumococcal meningitis were prospectively enrolled in the Institutional Surveillance Program for Pneumococcal Infections during 1994-1998. Clinical and laboratory data were collected by chart review. RESULTS: Of the 38 children, 24 (63% were less than 2 years of age, 11 (28.9% had drug-resistant S. pneumoniae, 18.4% had intermediate resistance, 10.5% high level resistance and 2.6% also showed high level resistance to cefotaxime. The only associated factors (by Fisher’s exact test associated to resistance were: previous use of antibiotics (p=0

  10. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain places, such as: The meningitis belt in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly during the dry season Mecca during the ... a serious Hib infection Your doctor or local health department will tell you if you or someone ...

  11. [Cryptococcal meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spil, W E Erwin; Nooijen, Suzan; de Jong, Peter Y P; Aliredjo, Riena P; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; Verhave, Jacobien C

    2015-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of disseminated cryptococcal infection, often presenting as a primary respiratory infection with yeast cells originating from bird excreta. Because Cryptococcus neoformans has a tropism for cerebrospinal fluid, most patients suffer from meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Symptoms of cryptococcal meningitis are non-specific: headache, fever, nausea, or altered mental state and behaviour. Case descriptions of a renal transplant recipient and an HIV patient illustrate the non-specific presentation of cryptococcal meningitis. Lumbar puncture seemed to be critical in establishing the diagnosis. Cerebrospinal fluid, blood and other tissues were tested for C. neoformans by microscopy, culture and antigen tests. The patients were successfully treated with amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B intravenously and flucytosine intravenously or orally, followed by long-term fluconazole. The mortality rate for cryptococcal meningitis is 41% among renal transplant recipients and 20% in HIV patients.

  12. [Cryptococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, W.E. van; Nooijen, S.; Jong, P.Y. de; Aliredjo, R.P.; Sevaux, R.G.L. de; Verhave, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of disseminated cryptococcal infection, often presenting as a primary respiratory infection with yeast cells originating from bird excreta. Because Cryptococcus neoformans has a tropism for cerebrospinal fluid, most patients suffer from meningitis or

  13. Características clínicas y epidemiológicas de la meningitis aséptica en recién nacidos Clinical and epidemiological features of aseptic meningitis in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Díaz Álvarez

    2012-03-01

    ón y los resultados en los exámenes de biometría hemática y del examen citoquímico del líquido cefalorraquídeo, aunque característicos de una infección de esta índole, tienen amplia variabilidad, pues puede haber pacientes que presenten hallazgos que se asemejan a los observados en pacientes con meningitis bacteriana, lo cual puede crear incertidumbre clínica al médico que evalúa el paciente.Objective: to show the clinical and epidemiological features of the aseptic meningitis, potentially by enterovirus in newborns seen in our service of Neonatology. Methods: a retrospective study was conducted in 291 neonatal patients admitted in the Neonatology service of the "Juan Manuel Márquez" Children Hospital from 1992 to 2009, diagnosed with aseptic meningitis. Information was collected from a database created for a research on neonatal meningitis. Different clinical and epidemiological variables of presentation of this disease were analyzed. Results: there were peaks of increase in the incidence of the aseptic meningitis with a statistically significant trend to decrease within the 18 years old (p= 0.00027. The frequency of presentation showed a grouping of cases towards June to November. The fever was present in all patients, followed by irritability and presence of different manifestations of respiratory tract. The appearance of the sick child and the convulsions were no more frequent manifestations. Excepting for the pleocytosis, the conventional indicators in the cerebrospinal fluid/blood had a mean within the normal limits for the neonatal period, however, the ranks were wide. There were patients presenting with a significant pleocytosis, other with predominance of polimorphonuclear ones in a ratio higher than 50 % and also a low relation of glucose-cerebrospinal fluid/blood. The natural history of all patients was favorable without neurological immediate obvious sequelae. Conclusions: the episodes of aseptic meningitis occurred have a pattern

  14. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. influenzae meningitis; H. flu meningitis; Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis ... H. influenzae meningitis is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. This illness is not the same as the flu ( influenza ), ...

  15. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mould, D. R.; D'Haens, G.; Upton, R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug

  16. Meningitis caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae: a retrospective clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Harder, Eva; Wandall, Johan

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 26 patients (median age 62 years, range 5-76 years) admitted to our institution during 1978-98 with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae (comprising 1.9% of all patients with ABM). 19 cases were community......-acquired and 7 were nosocomial. 73% had comorbid or predisposing conditions and 73% had an identifiable extracerebral focus; only in 2 patients no comorbid disease, primary focus or predisposing condition was present. Five patients had cerebral abscesses, and 5 had endocarditis. Beta-haemolytic streptococci were...... grown in 14 cases (serotype A: 4, B: 5, C: 1, G: 4) and were predominant among patients with endocarditis, whereas alpha- or non-haemolytic strains grew in 12 cases (S. mitis: 4, S. constellatus: 2, E. faecalis: 2, S. bovis: 1, unspecified: 3) and were predominant in patients with a brain abscess...

  17. Meningitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Meningitis KidsHealth / For Parents / Meningitis What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Meningitis What Is Meningitis? Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the ...

  18. ATYPICAL CSF PICTURE IN VIRAL MENINGITIS HSV- TYPE-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute infections of nervous system are among the most important problems in medicine because early recognition, efficient decision making and rapid institution of therapy can be lifesaving. Making a clinical diagnosis of acute meningitis depends on the cornerstone of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination. We present a case with the above-mentioned difficulty and the approach involved in establishing the exact diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. CONCLUSION About findings in viral meningitis one should be careful while evaluating a CSF report so as to not make a mistaken diagnosis and delay treatment. The most important analysis in patients whose symptoms are consistent with herpes simplex meningitis is the detection of Herpes simplex Virus deoxy-ribo-nucleic acid (HSV-DNA in CSF with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.

  19. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  20. Conceptualising a system for quality clinical decision-making in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a feedback mechanism to promote or improve the quality of clinical decisions in nursing, standards for quality clinical decision-making are proposed in an exemplary manner. In addition, a system for quality clinical decisionmaking in nursing capitalises on the heritage of the nursing process. Considering the changes and ...

  1. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  2. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system. Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool’s output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (氈2 test with Yates’ correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool’s and the doctor’s diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses. Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool’s performance for that factor. Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  3. [Clinical judgment and decision, pedagogy and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacronique, J F

    1987-01-01

    The interactive systems of logical interference represent but one of the computer applications to medicine. While the potential of computers in medical practice is beyond question, their actual use is not widespread. After the stage of practical demonstration of the working features of the hardware, one needs to define accurately the purpose to which the computer is intended in order to perform efficiently in its everyday use. To a certain extent, this unavoidable specialisation contrasts with the ubiquitous presence of computers and the availability of software the use of which does not, in principle, require particular training. A teaching experience directed to a number of different user groups in various fields has prompted us to examine the bases of the difficulties we met with. While some of them are related to cultural (or even religious) grounds, other, being of more technical nature, are more readily amendable to a methodological inquiry. Briefly, this analysis has led us to suggest a revision of various computer applications, including the interactive systems of logical interference, in the field of clinical research. A minimal theoretical training is essential in order to prevent delusions caused by an improvident autodidactic approach. The formal analysis of decision making appears as an excellent teaching guideline since it allows to refresh the elementary statistical concepts and then to approach economical aspects of health management (especially the cost/benefit and cost/effectiveness studies), as well as the sciences of administration as applied to health problems. Oncology represents a particularly suitable field of application on several accounts. It covers various and complex clinical domains, constant conceptual developments and finally, owing to the need for a systematic organisation of the data collection, it offers persuasive applications whose lasting features should warrant the necessary initial effort of investment.

  4. Computerised clinical decision support for suspected PE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, David; Resano, Santiago; Otero, Remedios; Jurkojc, Carolina; Portillo, Ana Karina; Ruiz-Artacho, Pedro; Corres, Jesús; Vicente, Agustina; den Exter, Paul L; Huisman, Menno V; Moores, Lisa; Yusen, Roger D

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of an evidence-based clinical decision support (CDS) algorithm on the use and yield of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and on outcomes of patients evaluated in the emergency department (ED) for suspected PE. The study included 1363 consecutive patients evaluated for suspected PE in an ED during 12 months before and 12 months after initiation of CDS use. Introduction of CDS was associated with decreased CTPA use (55% vs 49%; absolute difference (AD), 6.3%; 95% CI 1.0% to 11.6%; p=0.02). The use of CDS was associated with fewer symptomatic venous thromboembolic events during follow-up in patients with an initial negative diagnostic evaluation for PE (0.7% vs 3.2%; AD 2.5%; 95% CI 0.9% to 4.6%; p<0.01). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Utility of clinical assessment, imaging, and cryptococcal antigen titer to predict AIDS-related complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cachay, Edward R; Caperna, Joseph; Sitapati, Amy M; Jafari, Hamta; Kandel, Sean; Mathews, William C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of AIDS-related complicated cryptococcal meningitis. The outcome was complicated cryptococcal meningitis: prolonged (≥ 14 days) altered mental status, persistent (≥ 14 days) focal neurologic findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt placement or death. Predictor variable operating characteristics were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Multivariate analysis identified independen...

  6. Incidence and clinical features of herpes simplex viruses (1 and 2) and varicella-zoster virus infections in an adult Korean population with aseptic meningitis or encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Jo, Ik Joon; Sim, Min Seob; Song, Keun Jeong; Kim, Byoung Joon; Na, Duk L; Huh, Hee Jae; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2014-06-01

    Since there are limited data on the incidence and clinical findings of central nervous system (CNS) infection by three α-herpesviruses including human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in Korea, a retrospective analysis of clinical data and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results was performed in patients who presented with suspicion of acute viral meningitis and/or encephalitis at the emergency department of a tertiary referral hospital in Seoul, Korea. During the 3-year study period, a total of 224 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 224 patients were examined. Among the 224 patients, 135 (60.3%) patients were identified as having aseptic meningitis (n = 70, 51.9%), encephalitis (n = 41, 30.4%) or meningoencephalitis (n = 24, 17.8%) at discharge. Twenty-four (17.8%) patients were identified as having VZV meningitis (n = 16, 11.9%), VZV meningoencephalitis (n = 2, 1.5%), HSV-2 meningitis (n = 4, 3.0%), or HSV-1 encephalitis (n = 2, 1.5%). Of the 24 patients infected with the three herpesviruses, immunocompromised patients accounted for 33.3% (n = 8). Skin rashes were observed in half (n = 9) of the patients with VZV, and none with HSV-1 or HSV-2. One patient with VZV meningitis and four patients with brain parenchymal involvement had neurologic sequelae. In conclusion, three herpesviruses are important causative agents of CNS infectious disease with significant morbidity in adults, regardless of the immunologic status. Therefore, CSF should be examined for HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV using sensitive diagnostic methods in all cases of adult patients with clinical manifestations of CNS disease in order to identify the correct etiology and to determine appropriate therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. How to make the best decision. Philosophical aspects of clinical decision theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, H R

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss some of the philosophical implications of the use of decision-analytic techniques. The probabilities of a decision analysis are subjective measures of belief, and it is concluded that clinicians base their subjective beliefs on both recorded observations and theoretical knowledge. The clinical decision maker also evaluates the consequences of his actions, and therefore clinical decision theory transcends medical science. A number of different schools of normative ethics are mentioned to illustrate the complexity of everyday decision making. The philosophical terminology is useful for the analysis of clinical problems, and it is argued that clinical decision making has both a teleological and a deontological component. The results of decision-analytic studies depend on such factors as the wealth of the country, the organization of the health service, and cultural norms.

  8. Clinical presentation, natural history, and cumulative death rates of 230 adults with primary cryptococcal meningitis in Zambian AIDS patients treated under local conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaba, P; Mwansa, J; Chintu, C; Pobee, J; Scarborough, M; Portsmouth, S; Zumla, A

    2001-01-01

    SETTING—Inpatient medical wards, Department of Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.
OBJECTIVE—To define the natural history, clinical presentation, and management outcome of microbiologically confirmed cryptococcal meningitis in adult AIDS patients treated under local conditions where antifungal and antiretroviral therapies are not routinely available.
DESIGN—A descriptive, longitudinal, observational study.
METHODS—All adult patients admitted to the medical wards of the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia with cerebrospinal fluid culture proved, primary cryptococcal meningitis, during a 12 month period were enrolled into the study. The following details were acquired: clinical features, HIV status, laboratory data, treatment accorded, and survival.
RESULTS—A total of 230 patients with primary cryptococcal meningitis were studied (median age 32 years; range 15-65 years; 112 males, 118 females). Cryptococcal meningitis was the first AIDS defining illness in 210 (91%) patients. One hundred and thirty of the 230 (56%) patients had received treatment with fluconazole monotherapy and 100 (43%) patients received palliative care only without any antifungal therapy. A 100% case fatality rate was observed in both groups at follow up: by seven weeks in the untreated group and at six months in the fluconazole treated group. The cumulative median survival from time of diagnosis was 19 days (range 1-164 days) for the fluconazole treated group and 10 days (range 0-42 days) for the untreated group.
CONCLUSION—Cryptococcal meningitis, under current treatment accorded at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, has a 100% mortality in young Zambian adults with AIDS. The current treatment accorded to Zambian adults with cryptococcal meningitis is inappropriate. An urgent need exists to improve strategies for the clinical management of AIDS patients in poor African countries. The wider ethical and operational issues of

  9. Clinical importance of the middle meningeal artery: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlu; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    The middle meningeal artery (MMA) is a very important artery in neurosurgery. Many diseases, including dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), pseudoaneurysm, true aneurysm, traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF), moyamoya disease (MMD), recurrent chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), migraine and meningioma, can involve the MMA. In these diseases, the lesions occur in either the MMA itself and treatment is necessary, or the MMA is used as the pathway to treat the lesions; therefore, the MMA is very important to the development and treatment of a variety of neurosurgical diseases. However, no systematic review describing the importance of MMA has been published. In this study, we used the PUBMED database to perform a review of the literature on the MMA to increase our understanding of its role in neurosurgery. After performing this review, we found that the MMA was commonly used to access DAVFs and meningiomas. Pseudoaneurysms and true aneurysms in the MMA can be effectively treated via endovascular or surgical removal. In MMD, the MMA plays a very important role in the development of collateral circulation and indirect revascularization. For recurrent CDSHs, after burr hole irrigation and drainage have failed, MMA embolization may be attempted. The MMA can also contribute to the occurrence and treatment of migraines. Because the ophthalmic artery can ectopically originate from the MMA, caution must be taken to avoid causing damage to the MMA during operations. PMID:27766029

  10. Cryptococcal meningitis in Durban, South Africa: a comparison of clinical features, laboratory findings, and outcome for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, M Y; Coovadia, Y M

    1997-02-01

    We retrospectively compared the clinical manifestations, laboratory features, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis in 44 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 21 HIV-negative patients in Durban, South Africa, and contrasted our findings with those in the developed world. Cryptococcal meningitis was the initial AIDS-defining illness in 84% of patients. Headache, fever, convulsions, neck stiffness, and neurological signs were more common in HIV-positive patients. We detected neurological abnormalities in 50% of the HIV-positive group. Seventeen percent of HIV-positive patients had completely normal CSF indices. HIV-positive patients with cryptococcal meningitis frequently had oral candidiasis and tuberculosis as coexistent illnesses. Prognostic factors identified in the West do not appear to be applicable in Africa. Death during hospitalization was significantly higher in the HIV-positive group. HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in Africa is apparently associated with higher rates of neurological complications and death than is such disease in developed countries of the world.

  11. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  12. Clinical Value of Assessing Cytokine Levels for the Differential Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis in a Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Shao, Wen-Xia; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Shen, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Xue-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Yu, Yong-Lin; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-03-01

    We performed a prospective observational study to evaluate the utility of measuring inflammatory cytokine levels to discriminate bacterial meningitis from similar common pediatric diseases. Inflammatory cytokine levels and other cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physicochemical indicators were evaluated in 140 patients who were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis via microbiological culture or PCR assay. The CSF concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, CSF/blood IL-6 and IL-10 ratios, CSF white blood cell count, and CSF micro total protein were significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis patients compared with healthy children or patients with viral encephalitis, epilepsy, or febrile convulsions (P bacterial meningitis episodes by receiver-operating characteristic analysis were 0.988, 0.949, 0.995, 0.924, 0.945, and 0.928, respectively. The area under the curve for the combination of CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio was larger than that for either parameter alone, and the combination exhibited enhanced specificity and positive predictive value. After effective meningitis treatment, CSF IL-6 levels dropped significantly. These results suggest that CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio are good biomarkers in discriminating bacterial meningitis. Evaluating CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio in combination can improve diagnostic efficiency. Additionally, CSF IL-6 levels can be used to monitor the effects of bacterial meningitis treatment.

  13. The enhanced pneumococcal LAMP assay: a clinical tool for the diagnosis of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease in developed and developing countries. We studied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP technique to assess its suitability for detecting S. pneumoniae nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an improved LAMP assay targeting the lytA gene (Streptococcus pneumoniae [Sp] LAMP. The analytical specificity of the primers was validated by using 32 reference strains (10 Streptococcus and seven non-Streptococcus species plus 25 clinical alpha-hemolytic streptococcal strains, including four S. pneumoniae strains and 21 other strains (3 S. oralis, 17 S. mitis, and one Streptococcus species harboring virulence factor-encoding genes (lytA or ply. Within 30 minutes, the assay could detect as few as 10 copies of both purified DNA and spiked CSF specimens with greater sensitivity than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The linear determination range for this assay is 10 to 1,000,000 microorganisms per reaction mixture using real-time turbidimetry. We evaluated the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the Sp LAMP assay using 106 randomly selected CSF specimens from children with suspected meningitis in Korea, China and Vietnam. For comparison, CSF specimens were also tested against conventional PCR and culture tests. The detection rate of the LAMP method was substantially higher than the rates of PCR and culture tests. In this small sample, relative to the LAMP assay, the clinical sensitivity of PCR and culture tests was 54.5% and 33.3%, respectively, while clinical specificity of the two tests was 100%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared to PCR, Sp LAMP detected S. pneumoniae with higher analytical and clinical sensitivity. This specific and sensitive LAMP method offers significant advantages for screening patients on a population basis and for diagnosis in clinical settings.

  14. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Bj?rk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with d...

  15. Clinical models of decision making in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Kaplan, Brent A

    2018-01-01

    As research on decision making in addiction accumulates, it is increasingly clear that decision-making processes are dysfunctional in addiction and that this dysfunction may be fundamental to the initiation and maintenance of addictive behavior. How drug-dependent individuals value and choose among drug and nondrug rewards is consistently different from non-dependent individuals. The present review focuses on the assessment of decision-making in addiction. We cover the common behavioral tasks that have shown to be fruitful in decision-making research and highlight analytical and graphical considerations, when available, to facilitate comparisons within and among studies. Delay discounting tasks, drug demand tasks, drug choice tasks, the Iowa Gambling Task, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task are included. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Concurrent meningitis and vivax malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Santra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an endemic infectious disease in India. It is often associated with other infective conditions but concomitant infection of malaria and meningitis are uncommon. We present a case of meningitis with vivax malaria infection in a 24-year-old lady. This case emphasizes the importance of high index of clinical suspicion to detect other infective conditions like meningitis when fever does not improve even after anti-malarial treatment in a patient of malaria before switching therapy suspecting drug resistance, which is quite common in this part of world.

  17. Cerebral Vasculitis Complicating Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khedher

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral vasculitis is an uncommon life-threatening complication of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Patient and methods: We report the case of a 64-year-old woman with pneumococcal meningitis who developed parainfectious vasculitis causing ischaemic brain damage. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical and radiological recovery after delayed addition of corticosteroid was achieved. Discussion: This report shows that the onset of neurological deficits following pneumococcal meningitis can be caused by cerebral vasculitis. Underdosing with antibiotics and delayed adjunctive dexamethasone seem to favour this complication. There are no guidelines for treatment but high doses of steroids led to resolution in this case.

  18. Early clinical and subclinical visual evoked potential and Humphrey's visual field defects in cryptococcal meningitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal induced visual loss is a devastating complication in survivors of cryptococcal meningitis (CM. Early detection is paramount in prevention and treatment. Subclinical optic nerve dysfunction in CM has not hitherto been investigated by electrophysiological means. We undertook a prospective study on 90 HIV sero-positive patients with culture confirmed CM. Seventy-four patients underwent visual evoked potential (VEP testing and 47 patients underwent Humphrey's visual field (HVF testing. Decreased best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was detected in 46.5% of patients. VEP was abnormal in 51/74 (68.9% right eyes and 50/74 (67.6% left eyes. VEP P100 latency was the main abnormality with mean latency values of 118.9 (±16.5 ms and 119.8 (±15.7 ms for the right and left eyes respectively, mildly prolonged when compared to our laboratory references of 104 (±10 ms (p<0.001. Subclinical VEP abnormality was detected in 56.5% of normal eyes and constituted mostly latency abnormality. VEP amplitude was also significantly reduced in this cohort but minimally so in the visually unimpaired. HVF was abnormal in 36/47 (76.6% right eyes and 32/45 (71.1% left eyes. The predominant field defect was peripheral constriction with an enlarged blind spot suggesting the greater impact by raised intracranial pressure over that of optic neuritis. Whether this was due to papilloedema or a compartment syndrome is open to further investigation. Subclinical HVF abnormalities were minimal and therefore a poor screening test for early optic nerve dysfunction. However, early optic nerve dysfunction can be detected by testing of VEP P100 latency, which may precede the onset of visual loss in CM.

  19. CT scanning in meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardle, Stephan; Carty, Helen (Royal Liverpool Children' s Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Department of Radiology)

    12 pediatric cases of acute meningitis were reviewed retrospectively. Findings on CT scan were compared with the clinical course and resulting neurological sequelae. Complications detected by CT scanning include subdural effusion, empyema, hydrocephalus, cerebral atrophy, oedema and infarction. The CT scan results adequately correlated with neurological signs in most cases. Infarction was a reliable indicator of neurological sequelae. Cerebral atrophy alone, however, did not correlate well with the clinical sequelae. (author). 19 refs.; 5 figs.; 6 tabs.

  20. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  1. Viral Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complications, such as brain damage, hearing loss, or learning disabilities. The germs that cause bacterial meningitis can also be associated with another serious illness, sepsis . Sepsis is the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection that can cause tissue ...

  2. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Cryptococcal meningitis occurred in an elderly Coloured woman in the Northern Cape. She presented with symp- toms and signs suggestive of encephalitis 4 weeks after a cholecystectomy. After the administration of cortisone, cryptococcal organisms were isolated in her cerebrospinal fluid. She was first ...

  3. Patient decision-making for clinical genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gwen

    2007-03-01

    Medicine is incorporating genetic services into all avenues of health-care, ranging from the rarest to the most common diseases. Cognitive theories of decision-making still dominate professionals' understanding of patient decision-making about how to use genetic information and whether to have testing. I discovered a conceptual model of decision-making while carrying out a phenomenological-hermeneutic descriptive study of a convenience sample of 12 couples who were interviewed while deciding whether to undergo prenatal genetic testing. Thirty-two interviews were conducted with 12 men and 12 women separately. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and all data were analyzed using three levels of coding that were sorted into 30 categories and then abstracted into three emergent meta-themes that described men's and women's attempts to make sense and find meaning in how to best use prenatal genetic technology. Their descriptions of how they thought about, communicated, and coped with their decision were so detailed it was possible to discern nine different types of thinking they engaged in while deciding to accept or decline testing. They believed that decision-making is a process of working through your own personal style of thinking. This might include only one or any combination of the following types of thinking: analytical, ethical, moral, reflective, practical, hypothetical, judgmental, scary, and second sight, as described in detail by these 12 couples.

  4. MRI enhancing patterns of non-meningioma meningeal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaofeng; Ding Juan; Xiao Xiangsheng; Shi Zengru; Yu Hong; Gu Qian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI appearances of meningeal diseases and to study MRI diagnostic value of enhancing patterns in different meningeal processes. Methods: Sixty-one patients with integrated clinical data, including 27 infectious meningitis, 4 inflammatory meningitis (2 eosinophilic granuloma, 1 Wegener granuloma, and 1 unknown etiological factor), 12 meningeal metastasis, 2 meningeal lymphoma, 8 cerebrovascular disease, and 8 postoperative changes, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were examined on MRI before and after contrast administration. Results: (1) MR plain scan: positive findings of plain scan were revealed in only 3 cases, including 1 linear meningeal thickening pattern and 2 nodular pattern. (2) MR enhancement: All cases showed 3 kinds of enhancing patterns: 19 dural-arachnoid pattern, 32 pia-arachnoid pattern, and 10 total meninges pattern, respectively. Conclusion: Different meningeal diseases have different MR imaging manifestations. Creating the enhancement patterns of various diseases can have great clinical significance. (authors)

  5. Clinical Predictors of Malaria, Acute Bacterial Meningitis and Treatment Outcomes among Febrile Children Admitted with Altered Mental Status in Northwestern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumanne, Shakilu; Meda, John; Hokororo, Adolfine; Leshabari, Kelvin

    2017-11-30

    Malaria and acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) are the leading infectious causes of febrile encephalopathy in malaria endemic settings. The clinical distinction of the two conditions is complicated by overlap in clinical features. To determine the clinical predictors for malaria, ABM and treatment outcome in febrile children aged 2 months to 12 years with altered mentation at two tertiary hospitals in Northwestern Tanzania. Prospective study of 103 children to document demographic data and physical examination findings, such as level of consciousness and meningeal irritations. Laboratory results for cerebrospinal fluid, hemoglobin, malaria and HIV were also evaluated. Age >60 months and hemoglobin ≤5 g/dl were independent predictors of malaria; (p = 0.013 and 0.004, respectively). HIV infection was the only predictor of meningitis, p = 0.037, and mortality was high if the diagnosis was unconfirmed. Children with febrile encephalopathy are more likely to have malaria than ABM if they have severe anemia. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Clinical features, acute complications, and outcome of Salmonella meningitis in children under one year of age in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Meng-Luen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella meningitis remains a threat to children below two years of age in both developing and developed countries. However, information on such infections has not been well characterized. We analyzed data related to twelve years of experience in order to clarify the comprehensive features of Salmonella meningitis in our patients, including admission characteristics, acute complications, and long-term outcome. Methods The records of patients with spontaneous Salmonella meningitis from 1982 to 1994 were retrospectively reviewed. The long-term outcome was prospectively determined for survivors at school age by the developmental milestones reported by their parents and detailed neurological evaluation along with intelligence, hearing, visual, speech and language assessments. Results Of the twenty-four patients, seizures were noted in fifteen (63% before admission and thirteen (54% during hospitalization. Acute complications mainly included hydrocephalus (50%, subdural collection (42%, cerebral infarction (33%, ventriculitis (25%, empyema (13%, intracranial abscess (8%, and cranial nerve palsy (8%. Three patients (13% died during the acute phase of Salmonella meningitis. The twenty-one survivors, on whom we followed up at school age, have sequelae consisting of language disorder (52%, motor disability (48%, intelligence quotient Conclusion Salmonella meningitis in neonates and infants had a wide spectrum of morbidity and acute complications, leading to a complicated hospital course and subsequently a high prevalence of permanent adverse outcome. Thus, early recognition of acute complications of Salmonella meningitis and a follow-up plan for early developmental assessment of survivors are vital.

  7. Clinical Decision Support: Statistical Hopes and Challenges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Zvárová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2016), s. 30-34 ISSN 1805-8698 Grant - others:Nadační fond na opdporu vědy(CZ) Neuron Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support * data mining * multivariate statistics * psychiatry * information based medicine Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  8. Overview: treatment of cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, A M; Stern, J J; Dupont, B

    1990-01-01

    Infections caused by Cryptococcus neoformans cause significant morbidity and high mortality, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Cryptococcal meningitis is an important cause of central nervous system disease and death in patients with AIDS. Although the introduction of amphotericin B has greatly improved the prognosis of patients with cryptococcal meningitis, 30 years of experience have revealed important clinical limitations, including modest efficacy, nephrotoxicity, other clinically significant toxicities, and the inconvenience of intravenous dosing. The discovery of the additive effects of amphotericin B and flucytosine in cryptococcosis resulted in some improvement in efficacy and reduction in amphotericin B-related toxicity. However, approximately 30% of patients with cryptococcal meningitis still fail to respond to therapy. Ketoconazole has not proved useful in treating cryptococcal meningitis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the antifungal triazoles fluconazole, itraconazole, and SCH 39304 represent an advance in the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis, particularly in AIDS patients. Preliminary clinical trials in patients with and without AIDS have indicated that fluconazole and intraconazole are effective and well tolerated as either initial or maintenance therapy. Two large comparative trials of fluconazole and amphotericin B in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (mostly those with AIDS) are under way.

  9. Pituitary apoplexy initially mistaken for bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Sui Hsien; Das, Kumar; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    We presented a case of a 62-year-old man whose initial clinical picture was suggestive of bacterial meningitis, but instead had pituitary apoplexy. We highlighted how pituitary apoplexy can mimic bacterial meningitis, learning points on how clinical assessment can aid earlier diagnosis and the importance of considering this differential diagnosis, particularly with the associated morbidity and mortality if missed.

  10. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging

  11. Cryptococcal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    DING Wen-ting; ZOU Yue-li; BU Hui; HE Jun-ying; WANG Yun-can

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a kind of encapsulated fungal organism that widely exists in the nature. Because of its neurotropic nature, the central nervous system becomes its major target organ. Cryptococcus neoformans can use "transcellular pathway", "paracellular pathway" and "Trojan horse approach" to cross blood-brain barrier, and then make the devastating diffusion. Despite antifungal therapy, the mortality rate remains between 10% and 25% in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM) and...

  12. Decision aids for people considering taking part in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Katie; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Brehaut, Jamie C; Politi, Mary C; Skea, Zoe

    2015-11-27

    Several interventions have been developed to promote informed consent for participants in clinical trials. However, many of these interventions focus on the content and structure of information (e.g. enhanced information or changes to the presentation format) rather than the process of decision making. Patient decision aids support a decision making process about medical options. Decision aids support the decision process by providing information about available options and their associated outcomes, alongside information that enables patients to consider what value they place on particular outcomes, and provide structured guidance on steps of decision making. They have been shown to be effective for treatment and screening decisions but evidence on their effectiveness in the context of informed consent for clinical trials has not been synthesised. To assess the effectiveness of decision aids for clinical trial informed consent compared to no intervention, standard information (i.e. usual practice) or an alternative intervention on the decision making process. We searched the following databases and to March 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OvidSP) (from 1950); EMBASE (OvidSP) (from 1980); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (from 1806); ASSIA (ProQuest) (from 1987); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/); ClinicalTrials.gov; ISRCTN Register (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/). We also searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. We contacted study authors and other experts. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing decision aids in the informed consent process for clinical trials alone, or in conjunction with standard information (such as written or verbal) or alongside alternative interventions (e.g. paper-based versus web-based decision aids). Included trials involved

  13. Clinical decision-making: physicians' preferences and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Martha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision-making has been advocated; however there are relatively few studies on physician preferences for, and experiences of, different styles of clinical decision-making as most research has focused on patient preferences and experiences. The objectives of this study were to determine 1 physician preferences for different styles of clinical decision-making; 2 styles of clinical decision-making physicians perceive themselves as practicing; and 3 the congruence between preferred and perceived style. In addition we sought to determine physician perceptions of the availability of time in visits, and their role in encouraging patients to look for health information. Methods Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. physicians. Results 1,050 (53% response rate physicians responded to the survey. Of these, 780 (75% preferred to share decision-making with their patients, 142 (14% preferred paternalism, and 118 (11% preferred consumerism. 87% of physicians perceived themselves as practicing their preferred style. Physicians who preferred their patients to play an active role in decision-making were more likely to report encouraging patients to look for information, and to report having enough time in visits. Conclusion Physicians tend to perceive themselves as practicing their preferred role in clinical decision-making. The direction of the association cannot be inferred from these data; however, we suggest that interventions aimed at promoting shared decision-making need to target physicians as well as patients.

  14. Bayesian networks for clinical decision support: A rational approach to dynamic decision-making under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation deals with decision support in the context of clinical oncology. (Dynamic) Bayesian networks are used as a framework for (dynamic) decision-making under uncertainty and applied to a variety of diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment problems in medicine. It is shown that the proposed

  15. Bayesian networks for clinical decision support: A rational approach to dynamic decision-making under uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation deals with decision support in the context of clinical oncology. (Dynamic) Bayesian networks are used as a framework for (dynamic) decision-making under uncertainty and applied to a variety of diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment problems in medicine. It is shown that the proposed models perform well in realistic settings

  16. The impact of simulation sequencing on perceived clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Aimee; Hansen, Jamie; Paquette, Mary; Topp, Robert

    2017-09-01

    An emerging nursing education trend is to utilize simulated learning experiences as a means to optimize competency and decision making skills. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in students' perception of clinical decision making and clinical decision making-related self-confidence and anxiety based on the sequence (order) in which they participated in a block of simulated versus hospital-based learning experiences. A quasi-experimental crossover design was used. Between and within group differences were found relative to self-confidence with the decision making process. When comparing groups, at baseline the simulation followed by hospital group had significantly higher self-confidence scores, however, at 14-weeks both groups were not significantly different. Significant within group differences were found in the simulation followed by hospital group only, demonstrating a significant decrease in clinical decision making related anxiety across the semester. Finally, there were no significant difference in; perceived clinical decision making within or between the groups at the two measurement points. Preliminary findings suggest that simulated learning experiences can be offered with alternating sequences without impacting the process, anxiety or confidence with clinical decision making. This study provides beginning evidence to guide curriculum development and allow flexibility based on student needs and available resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. An exploration of clinical decision making in mental health triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Natisha

    2009-08-01

    Mental health (MH) triage is a specialist area of clinical nursing practice that involves complex decision making. The discussion in this article draws on the findings of a Ph.D. study that involved a statewide investigation of the scope of MH triage nursing practice in Victoria, Australia. Although the original Ph.D. study investigated a number of core practices in MH triage, the focus of the discussion in this article is specifically on the findings related to clinical decision making in MH triage, which have not previously been published. The study employed an exploratory descriptive research design that used mixed data collection methods including a survey questionnaire (n = 139) and semistructured interviews (n = 21). The study findings related to decision making revealed a lack of empirically tested evidence-based decision-making frameworks currently in use to support MH triage nursing practice. MH triage clinicians in Australia rely heavily on clinical experience to underpin decision making and have little of knowledge of theoretical models for practice, such as methodologies for rating urgency. A key recommendation arising from the study is the need to develop evidence-based decision-making frameworks such as clinical guidelines to inform and support MH triage clinical decision making.

  18. An introduction to clinical decision analysis in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korah Sanita

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmologists are often confronted with difficult clinical management problems. In such cases, even published experience may be limited; consequently multiple, generally unproven management options are usually available. When placed in such situations, most of us decide on the most appropriate course of action based on intuition or (limited previous experience. In this article, we use examples to introduce the concept of decision analysis, a method of generating objective decisions for complex clinical problems.

  19. A prospective longitudinal study of the clinical outcomes from cryptococcal meningitis following treatment induction with 800 mg oral fluconazole in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Rothe

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common neurological infection in HIV infected patients in Sub Saharan Africa, where gold standard treatment with intravenous amphotericin B and 5 flucytosine is often unavailable or difficult to administer. Fluconazole monotherapy is frequently recommended in national guidelines but is a fungistatic drug compromised by uncertainty over optimal dosing and a paucity of clinical end-point outcome data.From July 2010 until March 2011, HIV infected adults with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis were recruited at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi. Patients were treated with oral fluconazole monotherapy 800 mg daily, as per national guidelines. ART was started at 4 weeks. Outcomes and factors associated with treatment failure were assessed 4, 10 and 52 weeks after fluconazole initiation.Sixty patients were recruited. 26/60 (43% died by 4 weeks. 35/60 (58.0% and 43/56 (77% died or failed treatment by 10 or 52 weeks respectively. Reduced consciousness (Glasgow Coma Score 3 of 5 and confusion (Abbreviated Mental Test Score <8 of 10 were all common at baseline and associated with death or treatment failure. ART prior to recruitment was not associated with better outcomes.Mortality and treatment failure from cryptococcal meningitis following initiation of treatment with 800 mg oral fluconazole is unacceptably high. To improve outcomes, there is an urgent need for better therapeutic strategies and point-of-care diagnostics, allowing earlier diagnosis before development of neurological deficit.

  20. A prospective longitudinal study of the clinical outcomes from cryptococcal meningitis following treatment induction with 800 mg oral fluconazole in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Camilla; Sloan, Derek J; Goodson, Patrick; Chikafa, Jean; Mukaka, Mavuto; Denis, Brigitte; Harrison, Tom; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Heyderman, Robert S; Lalloo, David G; Allain, Theresa; Feasey, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common neurological infection in HIV infected patients in Sub Saharan Africa, where gold standard treatment with intravenous amphotericin B and 5 flucytosine is often unavailable or difficult to administer. Fluconazole monotherapy is frequently recommended in national guidelines but is a fungistatic drug compromised by uncertainty over optimal dosing and a paucity of clinical end-point outcome data. From July 2010 until March 2011, HIV infected adults with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis were recruited at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi. Patients were treated with oral fluconazole monotherapy 800 mg daily, as per national guidelines. ART was started at 4 weeks. Outcomes and factors associated with treatment failure were assessed 4, 10 and 52 weeks after fluconazole initiation. Sixty patients were recruited. 26/60 (43%) died by 4 weeks. 35/60 (58.0%) and 43/56 (77%) died or failed treatment by 10 or 52 weeks respectively. Reduced consciousness (Glasgow Coma Score 3 of 5) and confusion (Abbreviated Mental Test Score death or treatment failure. ART prior to recruitment was not associated with better outcomes. Mortality and treatment failure from cryptococcal meningitis following initiation of treatment with 800 mg oral fluconazole is unacceptably high. To improve outcomes, there is an urgent need for better therapeutic strategies and point-of-care diagnostics, allowing earlier diagnosis before development of neurological deficit.

  1. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely.

  2. Experimental studies of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christian T

    2010-01-01

    This thesis summarizes experimental meningitis research conducted at Statens Serum Institut in collaboration with the Copenhagen HIV programme and the Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance between 2001 and 2007. Previous experimental studies had shown that the host inflammatory response in invasive infections contributed significantly to an extremely poor outcome despite initiation of efficient antimicrobial chemotherapy. Consequently, we aimed to investigate and clarify how the course of disease in pneumococcal meningitis was modulated by local meningeal inflammation and concomitant systemic infection and inflammation. Experimental studies were based on the development of a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis, refined and optimized to closely resemble the human disease, mimicking disease severity, outcome, focal- and global brain injury and brain pathophysiology. These endpoints were evaluated by the development of a clinical score system, definition of outcomes and measurement of hearing loss by otoacoustic emission. The investigation of in-vitro and in-vivo brain pathology with histology and MRI revealed an injury pattern similar to that found clinically. Additionally, MRI enabled the study of parameters closely related to the cerebral pathophysiology of meningitis (brain oedema, blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, focal brain injury and hydrocephalus). Modulation of the inflammatory host response was achieved by initiation of treatment prior to infection: 1) G-CSF treatment increased the peripheral availability of leukocytes, 2) Selectin blocker fucoidin attenuated meningeal leukocyte accumulation and 3) A serotype specific Ab augmented systemic pneumococcal phagocytosis. The studies revealed a dual role of the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis. Whilst focal brain injury appeared to result from local meningeal infectious processes, clinical disease severity and outcome appeared determined by systemic infection. Furthermore systemic

  3. Clinical burden of pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia in Norway 2 years after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Samantha; Raluy-Callado, Mireia; Lambrelli, Dimitra; Wasiak, Radek; Eriksson, Daniel; Gray, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    This population-based, retrospective study quantified the rates of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia in Norway from 2008 to 2009 and determined the proportions of cases caused by pneumococcal vaccine serotypes. Data on patients with all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia were obtained from the Norwegian Patient Registry, which collects hospitalization data from all Norwegian public hospitals based on International Classification of Diseases codes. Norwegian Patient Registry case records linked to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases provided serotype data for invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with microbiological cultures. In 2008 and 2009, hospitalization rates were relatively stable for all-cause pneumonia (5.28 and 5.35, respectively, per 1000), meningitis (10.70 and 9.67, respectively, per 100,000), and septicemia (from 171.81 to 161.46 per 100,000). In contrast, rates decreased for International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosed pneumococcal pneumonia (from 13.66 to 10.52 per 100,000), although these cases may be under-reported because of inclusion in all-cause pneumonia. Rates also decreased in diagnosed pneumococcal meningitis (from 1.60 to 1.19 per 100,000) and diagnosed pneumococcal septicemia (from 9.08 to 7.94 per 100,000). Diagnosed pneumococcal disease rates were highest in younger children and older adults, peaking at ⩾ 60 years old. Pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia caused by serotypes included in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine decreased substantially during the study period, with corresponding serotype replacement by non-7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotypes. From 2008 to 2009, International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnosed pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia decreased in most age groups but remained greatest among subjects aged 0-1 and ⩾ 60 years. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  4. The Feasibility of Sophisticated Multicriteria Support for Clinical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G; Veazie, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    Multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) methods are well-suited to serve as the foundation for clinical decision support systems. To do so, however, they need to be appropriate for use in busy clinical settings. We compared decision-making processes and outcomes of patient-level analyses done with a range of multicriteria methods that vary in ease of use and intensity of decision support, 2 factors that could affect their ease of implementation into practice. We conducted a series of Internet surveys to compare the effects of 5 multicriteria methods that differ in user interface and required user input format on decisions regarding selection of a preferred method for lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. The study sample consisted of members of an online Internet panel maintained by Fluidsurveys, an Internet survey company. Study outcomes were changes in preferred option, decision confidence, preparation for decision making, the Values Clarification and Decisional Uncertainty subscales of the Decisional Conflict Scale, and method ease of use. The frequency of changes in the preferred option ranged from 9% to 38%, P decision support provided by the MCDM method increased. The proportion of respondents who rated the method as easy ranged from 57% to 79% and differed significantly among MCDM methods, P = 0.003, but was not consistently related to intensity of decision support or ease of use. Decision support based on MCDM methods is not necessarily limited by decreases in ease of use. This result suggests that it is possible to develop decision support tools using sophisticated multicriteria techniques suitable for use in routine clinical care settings.

  5. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  6. Decision Analysis for Metric Selection on a Clinical Quality Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Rebecca M; Storey, Patricia E; Vitale, Michael; Markan-Aurora, Sumita; Gordon, Randolph; Prevost, Traci Q; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Woeltje, Keith F

    2016-09-01

    Clinical quality scorecards are used by health care institutions to monitor clinical performance and drive quality improvement. Because of the rapid proliferation of quality metrics in health care, BJC HealthCare found it increasingly difficult to select the most impactful scorecard metrics while still monitoring metrics for regulatory purposes. A 7-step measure selection process was implemented incorporating Kepner-Tregoe Decision Analysis, which is a systematic process that considers key criteria that must be satisfied in order to make the best decision. The decision analysis process evaluates what metrics will most appropriately fulfill these criteria, as well as identifies potential risks associated with a particular metric in order to identify threats to its implementation. Using this process, a list of 750 potential metrics was narrowed to 25 that were selected for scorecard inclusion. This decision analysis process created a more transparent, reproducible approach for selecting quality metrics for clinical quality scorecards. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Noriko; Sato, Hiromi; Kawaguchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tanaka, Makoto

    1982-01-01

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  8. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Noriko; Sato, Hiromi; Kawaguchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tanaka, Makoto (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis.

  9. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  10. The impact of an electronic clinical decision support for pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    State-of-the-art electronic radiology workflow can provide clinical decision support (CDS) for specialised imaging requests, but there has been limited work on the clinical impact of CDS in PE, particularly in resource-constrained environments. Objective. To determine the impact of an electronic CDS for PE on the efficiency ...

  11. Clinical decision making of nurses regarding elder abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana J

    2013-01-01

    A descriptive correlational design was used to examine the clinical decision making of nurses regarding elder abuse. The relationship of the nurses' applied knowledge of elder abuse, years of experience as a Registered Nurse (RN), clinical level of practice status, the use of intuition, and clinical decision outcomes for patients in cases of suspected elder abuse were examined. The convenience sample of 84 RNs consisted of 68 females and 16 males. Results indicated an overall model of two predictors that significantly predicted outcomes. The t-test revealed no difference between RNs who received elder abuse education and those who did not.

  12. Making smart investment decisions in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansback, Nick; Keystone, Edward; O'Dell, James; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Hannagan, Keri; Brophy, Mary; Anis, Aslam

    2015-12-29

    A recent trial in rheumatoid arthritis found an inexpensive, but infrequently used, combination of therapies is neither inferior nor less safe than an expensive biologic drug. If the trial had been conducted over 10 years ago, arguably 100's of millions of dollars since spent on biologics could have been released to other, more effective treatments. Given the ever increasing number of trials proposed, this commentary uses the trial as an example to challenge payers and research funders to make smarter investments in clinical research to save potential future costs. NCT00405275 , registered 29 November 2006.

  13. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times, the incidence of cryptococcal meningitis in patients infected with HIV has increased worldwide mainly because of the increased awareness by both the physicians and clinical microbiologists. We report here three cases of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV patients treated at the Port-of Spain General Hospital in ...

  14. Clinical characteristics of post-neurosurgical Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in adults and a clinical comparison to the spontaneous form in a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Neng; Lu, Chen-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shu-Fang; Wang, Hung-Chen; Yang, Tzu-Ming; Hsieh, Mei-Jen; Chien, Chun-Chih

    2010-03-01

    A total of 46 patients (nine post-neurosurgical, 37 spontaneous) with adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) caused by Klebsiellapneumoniae infection were included in this study. The nine patients in the post-neurosurgical K. pneumoniae ABM group (seven male, two female) had a mean age of 48.9 years. Two patients in this group also had diabetes mellitus (DM) and one had liver disease. The most common presentation of patients in post-neurosurgical K. pneumoniae ABM group was fever (nine patients), followed by altered consciousness (seven patients) and hydrocephalus (six patients). With medical and/or surgical treatment, a mortality of 22.2% (2/9) occurred. Compared to patients who had spontaneous K. pneumoniae ABM, those with the post-neurosurgical form had a lower incidence of community-acquired infection, seizure and DM, but had a higher incidence of leukocytosis, hydrocephalus, cerebrospinal fluid leak and bacterial strains with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Univariate analysis found these clinical differences to be statistically significant, however they were not significant on multivariate analysis. This study reveals that there are clinical differences between the post-neurosurgical and spontaneous presentations of K. pneumoniae ABM. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenga, N; Sicard, S; Cuadro-Alvarez, E; Long, L; Njuieyon, F; Martin, E; Kom-Tchameni, R; Balcaen, J; Moreau, B; Boukhari, R

    2015-01-01

    Controlling vaccine-preventable infectious diseases is a public health priority in French Guiana but there is currently no epidemiological data on pediatric bacterial meningitis in this overseas department. Our aim was to describe data related to pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana and compare it with that of metropolitan France. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 to describe the clinical picture, biological data, epidemiology, and outcome of pediatric bacterial meningitis case patients in French Guiana. The median age of bacterial meningitis patients was 6months [0-15] and the sex ratio 1.06. We observed a total of 60 bacterial meningitis case patients. Most presented with pneumococcal meningitis (24 patients; 40%); 11 with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis (23%), five with group B streptococcal meningitis (8.5%), and five others (8.5%) with staphylococcal meningitis (three patients presented with coagulase-negative staphylococci and two with Staphylococcus aureus). Only one patient presented with group B meningococcal meningitis, an 18-month-old infant. We recorded 14 deaths (overall case fatality: 23%); eight were due to Streptococcus pneumoniae (case fatality: 33%). The overall sequelae rate was 28%. It was 32% for patients presenting with pneumococcal meningitis. We observed that 38% of children who had never been vaccinated were infected by a vaccine-preventable bacterium. We observed many differences in the distribution of the bacteria and in the patients' prognosis when comparing the French Guiana data with that of metropolitan France. Improving vaccination coverage would decrease the incidence of H. influenzae meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the clinical presentations of Naegleria fowleri primary amoebic meningoencephalitis with pneumococcal meningitis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Saad Shaukat, Muhammad Hamza; Ahmed, Bilal; Beg, Mohammad Asim; Kadir, Muhammad Masood; Mahmood, Syed Faisal

    2016-08-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but fatal infection caused by Naegleria fowleri. The infection is acquired by deep nasal irrigation with infected water. Patients present with signs and symptoms similar to pneumococcal meningitis, leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment and hence high mortality. We conducted a case-control study comparing culture proven cases of PAM with pneumococcal meningitis presenting to our center between April 2008 and September 2014. Only patients with blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid cultures positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae during the same time period were included for comparison. There were 19 cases of PAM and pneumococcal meningitis, each. When comparing PAM with pneumococcal meningitis, patients with PAM were more likely to be male (89.5 vs. 36.8 %), younger (mean age: 30 vs. 59 years), present with seizures (42.1 vs. 5.3 %). Both groups of patients presented with similar vital signs and there were no remarkable differences on physical examinations, Glasgow Coma Scale scores, laboratory and radiological investigations and cerebrospinal fluid parameters. PAM was also more likely to present if the city's average maximum temperature was higher in the previous week (mean: 34.6 vs. 30 °C). There was history of fresh water contact in only one patient. On multivariate analysis, PAM was more likely if patients presented when the city's average maximum temperature was high, being young males. PAM and pneumococcal meningitis remain virtually indistinguishable; however, these predictive features should be validated in a prospective study and may lead to a viable algorithm for early management of these patients.

  17. Clinical decision making of nurses working in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  18. Clinical Decision Support with Guidelines and Bayesian Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nee, Oliver; Hein, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter the state of the art of decision support in medicine along with clinical guidelines has been described. Especially in fields of medicine where workflows are highly standardized and do not depend in a great extend on intra-individual variations, clinical guidelines are well accepted. In these fields the clinician can benefit from computer assistance. The implementation of a CDSS requires on one hand the formalization of the clinical guidelines and mechanisms for reasoning. This...

  19. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    OpenAIRE

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis, whether therapeutic action is necessary, and which post-therapeutic trajectory is to be followed. All these bedside decisions are related to each other, and the whole task of clinical patient management ca...

  20. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  1. Outbreak of Enterovirus - 71 Meningitis in Calicut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Sasidharan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Enterovirus 71(EV 71 causes wide spectrum of infections ranging from asymptomatic conditions to clinical syndromes like diarrhea, rash, hand-foot-and mouth disease (HFMD, herpangina, aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, bulbar and brainstem encephalitis Guillain Barre syndrome, pulmonary haemorrhage. This study deals with an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children caused by EV 71 virus. Methods: The authors report an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children in and around Calicut in June 2008. Clinical and laboratory study was done in collaboration with National Centre for Disease Control, New Delhi. 149 children with aseptic meningitis were studied and followed up from June 2008 to May 2009. Result: All children had clinical features suggestive of aseptic meningitis and serology showed the rising antibody titre against EV 71 virus infection. CSF analysis also showed four fold rise in antibodies in one and ≥ 1:2 neutralising antibodies titer against EV- 71 in four samples indicating meningitis due to EV-71. Conclusion: EV 71 was identified as the causative agent of the outbreak of aseptic meningitis in the study and the fact that the EV 71 infection has evolved from minor illness like HFMD to major illness like aseptic meningitis from the same locality is truly alarming.

  2. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SERUM C - REACTIVE PROTEIN ESTIMATION IN ACUTE MENINGITIS IN ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Konatham; Kathyayani

    2015-01-01

    In the study of 50 cases of acute meningitis the following observations were made in sex incidence, age, clinical presentation, CSF analysis and serum C reactive protein levels and prognosis. Serum CRP level of less than 6 mg / l with signs of meningeal inf ection is a definitive indicative of viral meningitis and CRP levels more than 48 mg / l with clinical signs of meningeal infection is definite indication of bacterial meningitis. AIM OF THE STUDY: to evalu...

  3. Implications of caries diagnostic strategies for clinical management decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baelum, Vibeke; Hintze, Hanne; Wenzel, Ann

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In clinical practice, a visual-tactile caries examination is frequently supplemented by bitewing radiography. This study evaluated strategies for combining visual-tactile and radiographic caries detection methods and determined their implications for clinical management decisions...... that the visual-tactile method alone was the superior strategy, resulting in most correct clinical management decisions and most correct decisions regarding the choice of treatment.......-specificity) were calculated for each diagnostic strategy. RESULTS: Visual-tactile examination provided a true-positive rate of 34.2% and a false-positive rate of 1.5% for the detection of a cavity. The combination of a visual-tactile and a radiographic examination using the lesion in dentin threshold...

  4. Improving clinical decision support using data mining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn-Thornton, Kath E.; Thorpe, Simon I.

    1999-02-01

    Physicians, in their ever-demanding jobs, are looking to decision support systems for aid in clinical diagnosis. However, clinical decision support systems need to be of sufficiently high accuracy that they help, rather than hinder, the physician in his/her diagnosis. Decision support systems with accuracies, of patient state determination, of greater than 80 percent, are generally perceived to be sufficiently accurate to fulfill the role of helping the physician. We have previously shown that data mining techniques have the potential to provide the underpinning technology for clinical decision support systems. In this paper, an extension of the work in reverence 2, we describe how changes in data mining methodologies, for the analysis of 12-lead ECG data, improve the accuracy by which data mining algorithms determine which patients are suffering from heart disease. We show that the accuracy of patient state prediction, for all the algorithms, which we investigated, can be increased by up to 6 percent, using the combination of appropriate test training ratios and 5-fold cross-validation. The use of cross-validation greater than 5-fold, appears to reduce the improvement in algorithm classification accuracy gained by the use of this validation method. The accuracy of 84 percent in patient state predictions, obtained using the algorithm OCI, suggests that this algorithm will be capable of providing the required accuracy for clinical decision support systems.

  5. Clinical features and serum biomarkers in HIV immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after cryptococcal meningitis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, David R; Meya, David B; Bergemann, Tracy L; Wiesner, Darin L; Rhein, Joshua; Musubire, Abdu; Lee, Sarah J; Kambugu, Andrew; Janoff, Edward N; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2010-12-21

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves survival in persons with cryptococcal meningitis (CM) and AIDS, ART frequently elicits HIV immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), an exaggerated and frequently deadly inflammatory reaction that complicates recovery from immunodeficiency. The pathogenesis of IRIS is poorly understood and prediction of IRIS is not possible. We prospectively followed 101 ART-naïve Ugandans with AIDS and recent CM for one year after initiating ART, and used Luminex multiplex assays to compare serum cytokine levels in participants who did or did not develop IRIS. IRIS occurred in 45% of participants with recent CM on ART, including 30% with central nervous system (CNS) manifestations. The median time to CM-IRIS was 8.8 wk on ART. Overall mortality on ART was 36% with IRIS and 21% without IRIS. CM-IRIS was independently associated with death (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-5.1, p = 0.04). Patients experiencing subsequent CM-IRIS had 4-fold higher median serum cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) levels pre-ART (p = 0.006). Higher pre-ART levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-17 as well as lower tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) predicted future IRIS in multivariate analyses (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.82). An algorithm based on seven pre-ART serum biomarkers was a robust tool for stratifying high (83%), moderate (48%), and low risk (23%) for IRIS in the cohort. After ART was initiated, increasing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer, IL-6, IL-7, IL-13, G-CSF, or IL-1RA were associated with increasing hazard of IRIS by time-to-event analysis (each p≤0.001). At the time of IRIS onset, multiple proinflammatory cytokine responses were present, including CRP and IL-6. Mortality was predicted by pre-ART increasing IL-17, decreasing GM-CSF, and CRP level >32 mg/l (highest quartile). Pre-ART CRP

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Wen-ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a kind of encapsulated fungal organism that widely exists in the nature. Because of its neurotropic nature, the central nervous system becomes its major target organ. Cryptococcus neoformans can use "transcellular pathway", "paracellular pathway" and "Trojan horse approach" to cross blood-brain barrier, and then make the devastating diffusion. Despite antifungal therapy, the mortality rate remains between 10% and 25% in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, and at least one-third of patients have experienced failure of antifungal therapy. Consequently, it is very important for us to understand the pathogenesis of CM, to diagnose as soon as possible and to explore more reasonable treatment.

  7. The potential conflict between clinical and judicial decision making heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, E; Merckelbach, H

    1999-01-01

    The Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale (GSS; Gudjonsson, 1984) was introduced as a tool for identifying suspects who are at risk of making false confessions. High GSS-scores indicate a greater risk of making false confessions. Recently, some authors have claimed that low GSS-scores can be used to support the credibility of recovered memories. This new application broadens the use of the GSS in two ways. First, low GSS-scores are considered to possess diagnostic value. Second, the GSS is advocated as a practical tool in clinical settings. This article critically evaluates such a clinical application of the GSS. Our main argument has to do with the incompatibility of basic clinical and judicial decision making heuristics. Psychotherapists, and other medical professionals, should base their decisions on different parameters than judicial professionals. Compared to judicial heuristics, clinical heuristics can be characterized as more empathetic, less critical, and less conservative. Given these differences, clinical conclusions (including those about the accuracy of recovered memories) cannot be easily translated into judicial decisions. If they do enter the judicial domain, these conclusions may lead to dubious forensic decisions. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care.

  9. Cerebrovascular injury in cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Arvind, Vanjare Harshad; Muliyil, Divya; Kuriakose, Cijoy K; George, Anu Anna; Karuppusami, Reka; Benton Carey, Ronald Albert; Mani, Sunithi; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2018-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis continues to be one of the common causes of chronic central nervous system infection worldwide. Individuals with cryptococcal meningitis can occasionally present with small vessel vasculitis causing infarcts primarily in the basal ganglia, internal capsule, and thalamus. Literature regarding patterns of cerebrovascular injury among patients with cryptococcal meningitis is scanty, and outcome following these vascular involvements is unknown. Aim To study the clinical profile, imaging findings, and details of vascular territory involved among patients admitted with cryptococcal meningitis and central nervous system infarct in a tertiary care center from India. And to compare the outcomes of patients of cryptococcal meningitis with or without central nervous system infarcts in terms of mortality and morbidity, Methodology A total of 151 patients with microbiologically proven cryptococcal meningitis over a time span of 11 years were retrospectively enrolled into the study. Of these, 66 patients met the inclusion criteria of having appropriate imaging of the brain. The presence of infarct in the imaging was analyzed by two independent radiologists. Patterns of central nervous system involvement and types of vascular injury were ascertained based on radiological parameters. Clinical parameters and outcomes of patients with and without infarcts were compared. Results Twenty (13%) of these patients had evidence of central nervous system infarcts on imaging. The mean age of patients with and without infarcts was 41 years and 38 years, respectively. Male predominance was present among both the groups. The presence of fever, neck stiffness, positive blood culture, and hydrocephalus in central nervous system imaging was similar among patients with or without infarct. Longer duration of illness, low sensorium at the time of presentation, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, presence of meningeal inflammation, cryptococcomas, and basal exudates in

  10. Risk perception and clinical decision making in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aim to present new knowledge about different perspectives of health care professionals’ risk perceptions and clinical decision making. Furthermore, we intend to discuss differences between professional and personal risk perceptions and the impact on decisions in terms of both short...... and long-term outcomes. Background Insight into healthcare professionals’ perception of risk is a cornerstone for understanding their strategies for practising preventive care. The way people perceive risk can be seen as part of a general personality trait influenced by a mixture of individual...... considerations and the specific context. Most research has been focused on understanding of the concepts of risk. However healthcare professionals’ risk perception and personal attitudes also affect their clinical decision-making and risk communication. The differences between health care professionals’ personal...

  11. Decision making in clinical veterinary practice | Anene | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decision making in clinical veterinary practice. BM Anene. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  12. Hubble: Linked Data Hub for Clinical Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Magliacane, S.; Rietveld, L.; de Vries, G.; Wibisono, A.; Schlobach, S.; Simperl, E.; Norton, B.; Mladenic, D.; Della Valle, E.; Fundulaki, I.; Passant, A.; Troncy, R.

    2015-01-01

    The AERS datasets is one of the few remaining, large publicly available medical data sets that until now have not been published as Linked Data. It is uniquely positioned amidst other medical datasets. This paper describes the Hubble prototype system for clinical decision support that demonstrates

  13. Impact of Medical Library Services on Clinical Decision-Making ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship does not, however, exist between use of library “AND” service delivery. Generally, the library impacted on the Doctors' clinical decision-making despite its huge limitations enumerated by the Doctors. Recommendations were made towards a balanced collection development of both print and non-print materials ...

  14. Competence and decision-making: Ethics and clinical psychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The making of decisions pertaining to health and personal issues is dependent on the ability of the patient to function in various areas. The concept of competence is viewed differently from the clinical as opposed to the legal viewpoint. Some jurisdictions have introduced into legislation more specific legal guidelines for ...

  15. Clinical evaluation of the antifungal effect of sertraline in the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV patients: a single Mexican center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Lozano, Hiram; Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; González, Gloria M; Hernández-Rodríguez, Pedro A; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Castillo-Reyna, Luis; Galindo-Alvarado, Sandra G; Martínez-Reséndez, Michel F

    2018-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a potentially fatal fungal infection associated with a significant attributable morbidity and mortality, especially among HIV/AIDS patients. The first-line therapy for the treatment of this clinical entity is the combinatory therapy of amphotericin B plus flucytosine. However, the high cost, toxic effects, and limited repertoire of effective antifungal drugs have led to the investigation of novel molecules. This is a prospective, double-blinded, and randomized study performed in a Mexican tertiary care center to evaluate the antifungal activity of sertraline in the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV patients. During June 2015-December 2016, patients were recruited and included in one of two study groups: group A was given standard antifungal treatment plus sertraline 200 mg/day, while group B was given standard antifungal plus placebo. Lumbar punctures were performed on days 0, 7, and 14 of the study, and cryptococcal antigenemia and quantitative fungal culture in cerebrospinal fluid at each time point were evaluated to measure the rate of fungal clearance. The fungal loads and cryptococcal antigenemia titers showed a marked tendency to decrease by day 14 in both groups. Otherwise, group B exhibited a slightly higher nonstatistical rate of fungal clearance (-0.2868 ± 0.08275 log CFU/ml/day) than group A (-0.2496 ± 0.08340 log CFU/ml/day). A statistical difference between study groups was not found. This is the first study in Latin America that reports the experience of using sertraline as an adjuvant in the antifungal management of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV patients.

  16. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bijlsma, Merijn W; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and is associated with a high disease burden. We reviewed recent progress in the management of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. The worldwide burden of disease of bacterial meningitis remains high, despite the decreasing incidence following introduction of routine vaccination campaigns. Delay in diagnosis and treatment remain major concerns in the management of acute bacterial meningitis. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases guidelines strive for a door-to-antibiotic-time less than 1 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as an important diagnostic tool to identify the causative organism. Point-of-care tests using fast multiplex PCR have been developed, but additional value has not been proven. Although anecdotal observations advocate pressure-based management, a randomized controlled trial will need to be performed first to determine efficacy and safety of such an aggressive treatment approach. Adjunctive dexamethasone remains the only adjunctive therapy with proven efficacy. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has been decreasing after the implementation of effective vaccines. Treatment should be administered as soon as possible and time to treatment should not exceed 1 h.

  17. Supporting meningitis diagnosis amongst infants and children through the use of fuzzy cognitive mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Meningitis is characterized by an inflammation of the meninges, or the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for a positive outcome, yet identifying meningitis is a complex process involving an array of signs and symptoms and multiple causal factors which require novel solutions to support clinical decision-making. In this work, we explore the potential of fuzzy cognitive map to assist in the modeling of meningitis, as a support tool for physicians in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Methods Fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) is a method for analysing and depicting human perception of a given system. FCM facilitates the development of a conceptual model which is not limited by exact values and measurements and thus is well suited to representing relatively unstructured knowledge and associations expressed in imprecise terms. A team of doctors (physicians), comprising four paediatricians, was formed to define the multifarious signs and symptoms associated with meningitis and to identify risk factors integral to its causality, as indicators used by clinicians to identify the presence or absence of meningitis in patients. The FCM model, consisting of 20 concept nodes, has been designed by the team of paediatricians in collaborative dialogue with the research team. Results The paediatricians were supplied with a form containing various input parameters to be completed at the time of diagnosing meningitis among infants and children. The paediatricians provided information on a total of 56 patient cases amongst children whose age ranged from 2 months to 7 years. The physicians’ decision to diagnose meningitis was available for each individual case which was used as the outcome measure for evaluating the model. The FCM was trained using 40 cases with an accuracy of 95%, and later 16 test cases were used to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the model. The system produced the results

  18. Iatrogenic streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Praper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 28-year-old patient who underwent spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section, and developed meningitis, Streptococcus salivarius was isolated in the cerebrospinal fluid. The Viridans streptococci are a part of a normal human mouth flora, therefore the patient most likely developed iatrogenic meningitis due to droplet transmission of bacteria intrathecally. We discuss etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic tools, treatment and prognosis of meningitis afer intrathecal procedures and we emphasize the importance of strict aseptic technique while performing neuraxial procedures. Iatrogenic meningitis should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients who present with symptoms and signs of meningitis after neuraxial blockade.

  19. Incorporating clinical guidelines through clinician decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Brent A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally acknowledged that a disparity between knowledge and its implementation is adversely affecting quality of care. An example commonly cited is the failure of clinicians to follow clinical guidelines. A guiding assumption of this view is that adherence should be gauged by a standard of conformance. At least some guideline developers dispute this assumption and claim that their efforts are intended to inform and assist clinical practice, not to function as standards of performance. However, their ability to assist and inform will remain limited until an alternative to the conformance criterion is proposed that gauges how evidence-based guidelines are incorporated into clinical decisions. Methods The proposed investigation has two specific aims to identify the processes that affect decisions about incorporating clinical guidelines, and then to develop ad test a strategy that promotes the utilization of evidence-based practices. This paper focuses on the first aim. It presents the rationale, introduces the clinical paradigm of treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and discusses an exemplar of clinician non-conformance to a clinical guideline. A modification of the original study is proposed that targets psychiatric trainees and draws on a cognitively rich theory of decision-making to formulate hypotheses about how the guideline is incorporated into treatment decisions. Twenty volunteer subjects recruited from an accredited psychiatry training program will respond to sixty-four vignettes that represent a fully crossed 2 × 2 × 2 × 4 within-subjects design. The variables consist of criteria contained in the clinical guideline and other relevant factors. Subjects will also respond to a subset of eight vignettes that assesses their overall impression of the guideline. Generalization estimating equation models will be used to test the study's principal hypothesis and perform secondary analyses. Implications The original

  20. Standards in clinical decision support: activities in health level seven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenders, Robert A; Jenders, Robert Allen; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Sailors, R Matthew

    2008-11-06

    Health Level Seven (HL7) has evolved into an international standards development organization (SDO) with a suite of standards. Prominent among these are formalisms related to clinical decision support, including the Arden Syntax, GELLO and Decision Support Service (DSS) standards. Continuing improvement in these standards and ongoing development of future decision support standards require wide participation in order to maximize their success. Accordingly, the purpose of the workshop is twofold. First, instructors will convey the latest developments regarding existing decision support standards and related efforts to develop new standards. Second, the instructors will solicit feedback so that attendees who do not participate in HL7 can have input into the standards activities of that organization. The instructors of this workshop, who are the co-chairs and/or members of the Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee of HL7, will review progress in these areas. They will present the details of the ongoing development of the extant Arden Syntax, GELLO and DSS standards. They will discuss work on current draft and proposed future standards, including the Infobutton communication and Order Set standards that are undergoing development in anticipation of certification as standards. Finally, they will solicit discussion regarding the future direction of standards development in these areas.

  1. Clinical decisions for anterior restorations: the concept of restorative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Jorge André; Almeida, Paulo Júlio; Fischer, Alex; Phaxay, Somano Luang

    2012-12-01

    The choice of the most appropriate restoration for anterior teeth is often a difficult decision. Numerous clinical and technical factors play an important role in selecting the treatment option that best suits the patient and the restorative team. Experienced clinicians have developed decision processes that are often more complex than may seem. Less experienced professionals may find difficulties making treatment decisions because of the widely varied restorative materials available and often numerous similar products offered by different manufacturers. The authors reviewed available evidence and integrated their clinical experience to select relevant factors that could provide a logical and practical guideline for restorative decisions in anterior teeth. The presented concept of restorative volume is based on structural, optical, and periodontal factors. Each of these factors will influence the short- and long-term behavior of restorations in terms of esthetics, biology, and function. Despite the marked evolution of esthetic restorative techniques and materials, significant limitations still exist, which should be addressed by researchers. The presented guidelines must be regarded as a mere orientation for risk analysis. A comprehensive individual approach should always be the core of restorative esthetic treatments. The complex decision process for anterior esthetic restorations can be clarified by a systematized examination of structural, optical, and periodontal factors. The basis for the proposed thought process is the concept of restorative volume that is a contemporary interpretation of restoration categories and their application. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-05-21

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Endocarditis was identified in 24 of 1025 episodes (2%) of bacterial meningitis. Cultures yielded Streptococcus pneumoniae in 13 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus salivarius in 1 patient each. Clues leading to the diagnosis of endocarditis were cardiac murmurs, persistent or recurrent fever, a history of heart valve disease, and S aureus as the causative pathogen of bacterial meningitis. Treatment consisted of prolonged antibiotic therapy in all patients and surgical valve replacement in 10 patients (42%). Two patients were treated with oral anticoagulants, and both developed life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage. Systemic (70%) and neurological (54%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (63%). Seven of 24 patients (29%) with meningitis and endocarditis died. Endocarditis is an uncommon coexisting condition in bacterial meningitis but is associated with a high rate of unfavorable outcome.

  3. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-09-13

    To describe the epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and prevention of zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults. We identified 16 zoonotic bacteria causing meningitis in adults. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon compared to bacterial meningitis caused by human pathogens, and the incidence has a strong regional distribution. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is mainly associated with animal contact, consumption of animal products, and an immunocompromised state of the patient. In a high proportion of zoonotic bacterial meningitis cases, CSF analysis showed only a mildly elevated leukocyte count. The recommended antibiotic therapy differs per pathogen, and the overall mortality is low. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon but is associated with specific complications. The suspicion should be raised in patients with bacterial meningitis who have recreational or professional contact with animals and in patients living in regions endemic for specific zoonotic pathogens. An immunocompromised state is associated with a worse prognosis. Identification of risk factors and underlying disease is necessary to improve treatment. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  5. Discounting and risk characteristics in clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortendahl, Monica; Fries, James F

    2006-03-01

    Time-related aspects have attracted an increasing interest in medical decisions. Health promotion often works toward remote goals, and many clinical judgments and decisions include an exchange of costs today for benefits in the future. The concept of diminishing value over time is positive discounting when the benefits occur so far in the future that they seem of little value relative to the immediate cost. If there is a preference to live for the present rather than save for the future, such a preference might not contribute to good health according to a lower discount rate. As discounting is related to risk an analysis of uncertainty is required being an unavoidable condition in health work. Shared decision-making between doctor and patient has increasingly been emphasized, where risk characteristics and time-related aspects should be taken into account to reach a decision based upon mutual agreement. The framework of time and risk for analysis can perform a useful role in clinical judgments and decisions, where framing of different features of risk might diminish discounting and increase compliance to treatment. A summary of valuation factors in medical decision making is presented: (a) long-term decisions are sensitive to discount rates; (b) discount rates vary by domain, by outcome, by individuals and by level of certainty; (c) probability discounting is used if the risk is perceived as controllable; (d) the doctor uses expected value, the patient is risk aversive; (e) asymmetric discounting for patients and doctors gives poor compliance; (f) discount rates are influenced by framing.

  6. Aspectos clínicos e laboratoriais de meningite piogênica em lactentes Clinical and laboratorial aspects of acute bacterial meningitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Lucena

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever as características clínicas e laboratoriais da meningite piogênica em lactentes. MÉTODO: informações obtidas a partir do acompanhamento prospectivo dos lactentes com meningite piogênica, admitidos no Hospital Couto Maia no período de março a dezembro de 1997, foram inseridas em um banco de dados e analisadas com auxílio de programas estatísticos. RESULTADOS: meningite piogênica foi mais prevalente em lactentes com idade entre 6 meses e 1 ano, sendo o agente etiológico mais freqüente o Haemophilus influenzae. A letalidade global foi de 25,9% e, entre os sobreviventes, 39,3% deixaram o hospital apresentando alguma anormalidade compatível com envolvimento encefálico ao exame neurológico. CONCLUSÃO: meningite piogênica em lactentes se constitui em enfermidade com taxa de letalidade elevada, sendo, na maioria dos casos, passível de prevenção. Consideramos de grande relevância a adoção de medidas profiláticas de saúde visando redução da incidência desta enfermidade.OBJECTIVE: to describe clinical and laboratorial characteristics of acute bacterial meningitis in infants. METHOD: data from the prospective follow-up of infants with acute bacterial meningitis, admitted at the Hospital Couto Maia between March and December 1997, were analyzed with specific statistical software. RESULTS: acute bacterial meningitis was more prevalent in infants with ages varying from 6 months to 1 year. The most frequent etiologic agent was Haemophilus influenzae. The global lethality was 25.9% and among the survivors 39.3% left the hospital with some abnormality in the neurological exam compatible with the brain involvement. CONCLUSION: acute bacterial meningitis in infants is a high lethality disease that in the majority of cases can be prevented. We consider of great relevance the adoption of health prevention strategies in order to reduce the incidence of this disease.

  7. Constructing diagnostic likelihood: clinical decisions using subjective versus statistical probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, John; Jackson, Ruth

    2017-07-01

    Although physicians are highly trained in the application of evidence-based medicine, and are assumed to make rational decisions, there is evidence that their decision making is prone to biases. One of the biases that has been shown to affect accuracy of judgements is that of representativeness and base-rate neglect, where the saliency of a person's features leads to overestimation of their likelihood of belonging to a group. This results in the substitution of 'subjective' probability for statistical probability. This study examines clinicians' propensity to make estimations of subjective probability when presented with clinical information that is considered typical of a medical condition. The strength of the representativeness bias is tested by presenting choices in textual and graphic form. Understanding of statistical probability is also tested by omitting all clinical information. For the questions that included clinical information, 46.7% and 45.5% of clinicians made judgements of statistical probability, respectively. Where the question omitted clinical information, 79.9% of clinicians made a judgement consistent with statistical probability. There was a statistically significant difference in responses to the questions with and without representativeness information (χ2 (1, n=254)=54.45, pprobability. One of the causes for this representativeness bias may be the way clinical medicine is taught where stereotypic presentations are emphasised in diagnostic decision making. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Diagnostic functional MRI: illustrated clinical applications and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Andreas Joachim; Homola, György; Biller, Armin; Solymosi, László; Bendszus, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular research tool, yet its use for diagnostic purposes and actual treatment planning has remained less widespread. The literature yields rather sparse evidence-based data on clinical fMRI applications and accordant decision-making. Notwithstanding, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)- and arterial spin labeling (ASL)-fMRI can be judiciously combined with perfusion measurements, electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fiber tractographies to assist clinical decisions. In this article we provide an overview of clinical fMRI applications based on illustrative examples. Assessment of cochlear implant candidates by fMRI is covered in some detail, and distinct reference is made to particular challenges imposed by brain tumors, other space-occupying lesions, cortical dysplasias, seizure disorders, and vascular malformations. Specific strategies, merits, and pitfalls of analyzing and interpreting diagnostic fMRI studies in individual patients are highlighted. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  10. Does antimicrobial usage before meningitis lead to a higher risk of adult postsurgical Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis than that of Enterobacteriaceae meningitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiraslan, Hayati; Ulutabanca, Halil; Ercal, Baris Derya; Metan, Gokhan; Alp, Emine

    2016-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Enterobacteriaceae are two pathogens responsible for postneurosurgical meningitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the factors that influenced the outcomes in patients with postneurosurgical meningitis caused by A. baumannii and Enterobacteriaceae. Patients with post-surgical meningitis were identified from infection control committee charts between 2007 and 2015. Subjects over 16 years old who had positive cerebral spinal fluid cultures for A. baumannii or Enterobacteriaceae were enrolled in the study. Clinical and laboratory data for 30 patients with A. baumannii meningitis were compared with those of 12 patients with Enterobacteriaceae meningitis. The mean age of patients was 51.9 years and 57.1% were male. Eleven patients had comorbidities, the most common being diabetes mellitus. Most patients were due to intracranial haemorrhage (78.6%). The rate of the patients who received an appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 35.7%, and the crude mortality rate was 64.3%. In univariate analysis, previous antibiotic use, an infection before meningitis and mechanical ventilation had an increased risk of A. baumannii meningitis. Moreover, intrathecal antimicrobial use, inappropriate empirical antimicrobial use, antimicrobial resistance and alanine aminotransferase elevation were significantly higher in patients with A. baumannii meningitis than in those with Enterobacteriaceae meningitis. Antimicrobial use before meningitis (8.84 times) and mechanical ventilation (7.28 times) resulted in an increased risk of A. baumannii meningitis. None of the results affected 30-day mortality. Avoidance of unnecessarily prolonged antimicrobial usage may help to prevent a selection of A. baumannii.

  11. Toothpick meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhou, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year-old male with a history of hypertension, back pain, diverticulosis and anal fistula presents with acute onset syncopal episodes, worsening back pain, and altered mental status. The patient exhibited considerable leukocytosis but was hemodynamically stable. CT imaging of the head revealed a gas pattern in the posterior fossa and velum interpositum. CT imaging of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a needle-like foreign body traversing the left sacrum to the sigmoid colon. A lumbar puncture revealed meningitis. Flexible sigmoidoscopies were performed without successful visualization of the foreign body. An explorative laparoscopy was successfully performed, enabling retrieval of what was determined to be a wooden toothpick. The patient remained hemodynamically stable with persistent altered mental status and was eventually discharged after completion of antibiotics on day 47 of hospitalization. This case illustrates a rare complication of ingesting a sharp foreign body that was identified by CT of the brain and abdomen/pelvis with successful surgical repair.

  12. Medicininduceret aseptisk meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina Podlekareva; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a rare adverse effect of some drugs. We report a patient with four episodes of meningitis caused by ibuprofen. In all episodes the patient had taken ibuprofen for pain, and subsequently developed fever and cerebrovascular symptoms. Drug-induced meningitis cannot...

  13. Clinical features and serum biomarkers in HIV immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after cryptococcal meningitis: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Boulware

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although antiretroviral therapy (ART improves survival in persons with cryptococcal meningitis (CM and AIDS, ART frequently elicits HIV immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS, an exaggerated and frequently deadly inflammatory reaction that complicates recovery from immunodeficiency. The pathogenesis of IRIS is poorly understood and prediction of IRIS is not possible.We prospectively followed 101 ART-naïve Ugandans with AIDS and recent CM for one year after initiating ART, and used Luminex multiplex assays to compare serum cytokine levels in participants who did or did not develop IRIS. IRIS occurred in 45% of participants with recent CM on ART, including 30% with central nervous system (CNS manifestations. The median time to CM-IRIS was 8.8 wk on ART. Overall mortality on ART was 36% with IRIS and 21% without IRIS. CM-IRIS was independently associated with death (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-5.1, p = 0.04. Patients experiencing subsequent CM-IRIS had 4-fold higher median serum cryptococcal antigen (CRAG levels pre-ART (p = 0.006. Higher pre-ART levels of interleukin (IL-4 and IL-17 as well as lower tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF predicted future IRIS in multivariate analyses (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.82. An algorithm based on seven pre-ART serum biomarkers was a robust tool for stratifying high (83%, moderate (48%, and low risk (23% for IRIS in the cohort. After ART was initiated, increasing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, D-dimer, IL-6, IL-7, IL-13, G-CSF, or IL-1RA were associated with increasing hazard of IRIS by time-to-event analysis (each p≤0.001. At the time of IRIS onset, multiple proinflammatory cytokine responses were present, including CRP and IL-6. Mortality was predicted by pre-ART increasing IL-17, decreasing GM-CSF, and CRP level >32 mg/l (highest quartile. Pre-ART CRP

  14. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support Decreases Inappropriate Plasma Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil; Baker, Steven A; Spain, David; Shieh, Lisa; Shepard, John; Hadhazy, Eric; Maggio, Paul; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2017-08-01

    To curtail inappropriate plasma transfusions, we instituted clinical decision support as an alert upon order entry if the patient's recent international normalized ratio (INR) was 1.7 or less. The alert was suppressed for massive transfusion and within operative or apheresis settings. The plasma order was automatically removed upon alert acceptance while clinical exception reasons allowed for continued transfusion. Alert impact was studied comparing a 7-month control period with a 4-month intervention period. Monthly plasma utilization decreased 17.4%, from a mean ± SD of 3.40 ± 0.48 to 2.82 ± 0.6 plasma units per hundred patient days (95% confidence interval [CI] of difference, -0.1 to 1.3). Plasma transfused below an INR of 1.7 or less decreased from 47.6% to 41.6% (P = .0002; odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.89). The alert recommendation was accepted 33% of the time while clinical exceptions were chosen in the remaining cases (active bleeding, 31%; other clinical indication, 33%; and apheresis, 2%). Alert acceptance rate varied significantly among different provider specialties. Clinical decision support can help curtail inappropriate plasma use but needs to be part of a comprehensive strategy including audit and feedback for comprehensive, long-term changes. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Intuition in Clinical Decision Making: Differences Among Practicing Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Hill, Pamela D

    2017-08-01

    To examine the relationships and differences in the use of intuition among three categories of practicing nurses from various clinical units at a medical center in the Midwest. Descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional, prospective design. Three categories of nurses were based on the clinical unit: medical/surgical nurses ( n = 42), step-down/progressive care nurses ( n = 32), and critical care nurses ( n = 24). Participants were e-mailed the Rew Intuitive Judgment Scale (RIJS) via their employee e-mail to measure intuition in clinical practice. Participants were also asked to rate themselves according to Benner's (novice to expert) proficiency levels. Nurses practicing at higher self-reported proficiency levels, as defined by Benner, scored higher on the RIJS. More years of clinical experience were associated with higher self-reported levels of nursing proficiency and higher scores on the RIJS. There were no differences in intuition scores among the three categories of nurses. Nurses have many options, such as the nursing process, evidence-based clinical decision-making pathways, protocols, and intuition to aid them in the clinical decision-making process. Nurse educators and development professionals have a responsibility to recognize and embrace the multiple thought processes used by the nurse to better the nursing profession and positively affect patient outcomes.

  16. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  17. Modeling information flows in clinical decision support: key insights for enhancing system effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medlock, Stephanie; Wyatt, Jeremy C.; Patel, Vimla L.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in the field of clinical decision support is to determine what characteristics of systems make them effective in supporting particular types of clinical decisions. However, we lack such a theory of decision support itself and a model to describe clinical decisions and the

  18. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  19. A study to explore if dentists’ anxiety affects their clinical decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Chipchase, Susan Y.; Chapman, Helen R.; Bretherton, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Aims To develop a measure of dentists’ anxiety in clinical situations; to establish if dentists’ anxiety in clinical situations affected their self-reported clinical decision-making; to establish if occupational stress, as demonstrated by burnout, is associated with anxiety in clinical situations and clinical decision-making; and to explore the relationship between decision-making style and the clinical decisions which are influenced by anxiety. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary D...

  20. Treatment of cryptococcal meningitis associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group and AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, C M; Saag, M S; Cloud, G A; Hamill, R J; Graybill, J R; Sobel, J D; Johnson, P C; Tuazon, C U; Kerkering, T; Moskovitz, B L; Powderly, W G; Dismukes, W E

    1997-07-03

    Treatment with low-dose amphotericin B (0.4 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) or oral azole therapy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and cryptococcal meningitis has been associated with high mortality and low rates of cerebrospinal fluid sterilization. In a double-blind multicenter trial we randomly assigned patients with a first episode of AIDS-associated cryptococcal meningitis to treatment with higher-dose amphotericin B (0.7 mg per kilogram per day) with or without flucytosine (100 mg per kilogram per day) for two weeks (step one), followed by eight weeks of treatment with itraconazole (400 mg per day) or fluconazole (400 mg per day) (step two). Treatment was considered successful if cerebrospinal fluid cultures were negative at 2 and 10 weeks or if the patient was clinically stable at 2 weeks and asymptomatic at 10 weeks. At two weeks, the cerebrospinal fluid cultures were negative in 60 percent of the 202 patients receiving amphotericin B plus flucytosine and in 51 percent of the 179 receiving amphotericin B alone (P=0.06). Elevated intracranial pressure was associated with death in 13 of 14 patients during step one. The clinical outcome did not differ significantly between the two groups. Seventy-two percent of the 151 fluconazole recipients and 60 percent of the 155 itraconazole recipients had negative cultures at 10 weeks (95 percent confidence interval for the difference in percentages, -100 to 21). The proportion of patients who had clinical responses was similar with fluconazole (68 percent) and itraconazole (70 percent). Overall mortality was 5.5 percent in the first two weeks and 3.9 percent in the next eight weeks, with no significant difference between the groups. In a multivariate analysis, the addition of flucytosine during the initial two weeks and treatment with fluconazole for the next eight weeks were independently associated with cerebrospinal fluid sterilization. For the initial treatment of AIDS

  1. WaterlooClarke: TREC 2015 Clinical Decision Support Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-20

    infertility treatment and ectopic pregnancy Processed example (filtering + one synonyms+boolean operators): (dysmenorrhea OR men- orrhalgia) AND... medical questions (diagnosis, test and treatment articles). The two different full-text search engines we adopted in order to search over the collection of...Abstract Clinical decision support systems help physicians with finding additional information about a partic- ular medical case. In this paper, we

  2. Medicininduceret aseptisk meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina Podlekareva; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a rare adverse effect of some drugs. We report a patient with four episodes of meningitis caused by ibuprofen. In all episodes the patient had taken ibuprofen for pain, and subsequently developed fever and cerebrovascular symptoms. Drug-induced meningitis cannot...... be distinguished from meningitis caused by other agents. Diagnosis is therefore based on close association between drug administration and onset of symptoms, as well as negative microbiology tests results, especially if previous episodes of drug-induced meningitis have occurred....

  3. Is it possible to differentiate tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients using only clinical and basic cerebrospinal fluid characteristics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J E Vidal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis (TBM and CM are the most common causes of opportunistic meningitis in HIVinfected patients from resource-limited settings, and the differential diagnosis is challenging. Objective. To compare clinical and basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF characteristics between TBM and CM in HIV-infected patients. Methods. A retrospective analysis was conducted of clinical, radiological and laboratory records of 108 and 98 HIV-infected patients with culture-proven diagnosis of TBM and CM, respectively. The patients were admitted at a tertiary centre in São Paulo, Brazil. A logistic regression model was used to distinguish TBM from CM and derive a diagnostic index based on the adjusted odds ratio (OR to differentiate these two diseases. Results. In multivariate analysis, TBM was independently associated with: CSF with neutrophil predominance (odds ratio (OR 35.81, 95% confidence interval (CI 3.80 - 341.30, p=0.002, CSF pleocytosis (OR 9.43, 95% CI 1.30 - 68.70, p=0.027, CSF protein >1.0 g/L (OR 5.13, 95% CI 1.38 - 19.04, p=0.032 and Glasgow Coma Scale <15 (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.03 - 9.34, p=0.044. Nausea and vomiting (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.08 - 0.90, p=0.033 were associated with CM. Algorithm-related area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.815 (95% CI 0.758 - 0.873, p<0.0001, but an accurate cut-off was not derived. Conclusion. Although some clinical and basic CSF characteristics appear useful in the differential diagnosis of TBM and CM in HIVinfected patients, an accurate algorithm was not identified. Optimised access to rapid, sensitive and specific laboratory tests is essential.

  4. Is it possible to differentiate tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients using only clinical and basic cerebrospinal fluid characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, J E; Peixoto de Miranda, E J F; Gerhardt, J; Croda, M; Boulware, D R

    2017-01-30

    Tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis (TBM and CM) are the most common causes of opportunistic meningitis in HIVinfected patients from resource-limited settings, and the differential diagnosis is challenging. To compare clinical and basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics between TBM and CM in HIV-infected patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted of clinical, radiological and laboratory records of 108 and 98 HIV-infected patients with culture-proven diagnosis of TBM and CM, respectively. The patients were admitted at a tertiary centre in São Paulo, Brazil. A logistic regression model was used to distinguish TBM from CM and derive a diagnostic index based on the adjusted odds ratio (OR) to differentiate these two diseases. In multivariate analysis, TBM was independently associated with: CSF with neutrophil predominance (odds ratio (OR) 35.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.80 - 341.30, p=0.002), CSF pleocytosis (OR 9.43, 95% CI 1.30 - 68.70, p=0.027), CSF protein >1.0 g/L (OR 5.13, 95% CI 1.38 - 19.04, p=0.032) and Glasgow Coma Scale <15 (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.03 - 9.34, p=0.044). Nausea and vomiting (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.08 - 0.90, p=0.033) were associated with CM. Algorithm-related area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.815 (95% CI 0.758 - 0.873, p<0.0001), but an accurate cut-off was not derived. Although some clinical and basic CSF characteristics appear useful in the differential diagnosis of TBM and CM in HIVinfected patients, an accurate algorithm was not identified. Optimised access to rapid, sensitive and specific laboratory tests is essential.

  5. Clinical decision-making of rural novice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seright, T J

    2011-01-01

    Nurses in rural settings are often the first to assess and interpret the patient's clinical presentations. Therefore, an understanding of how nurses experience decision-making is important in terms of educational preparation, resource allocation to rural areas, institutional cultures, and patient outcomes. Theory development was based on the in-depth investigation of 12 novice nurses practicing in rural critical access hospitals in a north central state. This grounded theory study consisted of face-to-face interviews with 12 registered nurses, nine of whom were observed during their work day. The participants were interviewed a second time, as a method of member checking, and during this interview they reviewed their transcripts, the emerging themes and categories. Directors of nursing from both the research sites and rural hospitals not involved in the study, experienced researchers, and nurse educators facilitated triangulation of the findings. 'Sociocentric rationalizing' emerged as the central phenomenon and referred to the sense of belonging and agency which impacted the decision-making in this small group of novice nurses in rural critical access hospitals. The observed consequences, which were conceptualized during the axial coding process and were derived from observations and interviews of the 12 novice nurses in this study include: (1) gathering information before making a decision included assessment of: the credibility of co-workers, patients' subjective and objective data, and one's own past and current experiences; (2) conferring with co-workers as a direct method of confirming/denying decisions being made was considered more realistic and expedient than policy books and decision trees; (3) rural practicum clinical experiences, along with support after orientation, provide for transition to the rural nurse role; (4) involved directors of nursing served as both models and protectors of novice nurses placed in high accountability positions early in

  6. The role of ICP monitoring in meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Areej; Aguilar-Salinas, Pedro; Hanel, Ricardo A; Naval, Neeraj; Chmayssani, Mohamad

    2017-11-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has been widely accepted in the management of traumatic brain injury. However, its use in other pathologies that affect ICP has not been advocated as strongly, especially in CNS infections. Despite the most aggressive and novel antimicrobial therapies for meningitis, the mortality rate associated with this disease is far from satisfactory. Although intracranial hypertension and subsequent death have long been known to complicate meningitis, no specific guidelines targeting ICP monitoring are available. A review of the literature was performed to understand the pathophysiology of elevated ICP in meningitis, diagnostic challenges, and clinical outcomes in the use of ICP monitoring.

  7. A Comparison of Hospital Versus Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy at Home for Pyelonephritis and Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensey, Conor C; Sett, Arun; Connell, Tom G; Bryant, Penelope A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the benefits of home treatment with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), children with pyelonephritis and meningitis are rarely included. We aimed to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes between hospital and home treatment for these conditions and to identify factors influencing home treatment. Children admitted to the hospital with pyelonephritis or proven and presumed bacterial meningitis from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013 were identified retrospectively. Patients who received any OPAT (home group) received daily visits via our Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) program; inpatients (hospital group) received standard care. Clinical and demographic features, length of stay, readmission rate and cost were compared between hospital and home groups. One hundred thirty-nine children with pyelonephritis and 70 with meningitis were identified, of which 127 and 44 were potentially suitable for OPAT, respectively. Of these, 12 (9%) with pyelonephritis received OPAT, contrasting with 29 (66%) with meningitis. Clinical features did not differ between hospital- and home-treated patients for either condition. Patients with meningitis in the hospital group were younger than those transferred to HITH (1 vs. 2 months; P = 0.01). All patients were afebrile before transfer to HITH. Admissions for pyelonephritis were brief with inpatients having a shorter length of stay than home patients (median: 3 vs. 4.5 days; P = 0.002). Unplanned readmission rates were comparable across all groups. Transfer to HITH resulted in a saving of AU$178,180. Children with pyelonephritis and meningitis can feasibly receive OPAT. Age, treatment duration and fever influence this decision. None of these should be barriers to OPAT, and the cost savings support change in practice.

  8. Características clínico-microbiológicas de la meningitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae resistente a la penicilina Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis resistant to penicillin clinical and microbiological characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Demóstenes Gómez-Barreto; Ernesto Calderón-Jaimes; Romeo S. Rodríguez; Luz Elena Espinosa de los Monteros; Maricruz Juárez

    1999-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Evaluar la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana de Streptococcus pneumoniae aislado del líquido cefalorraquídeo de niños con meningitis, así como describir y comparar las características clínicas y microbiológicas, el tratamiento y la evolución del padecimiento entre niños infectados con cepas sensibles y resistentes a la penicilina y la cefalosporina. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Treinta y ocho niños con meningitis neumocócica fueron incluidos prospectivamente en el Programa Institucional de Vigi...

  9. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Mehmeti, Murat

    2014-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to present the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis in the developing country of Kosovo. Data were collected from active surveillance of bacterial meningitis cases treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in the years 2000 (first post-war year) and 2010. Meningitis cases in 2000 compared with 2010 showed a 35.5% decline in incidence (from 4.8 to 3.1 cases per 100,000 population) and a decrease in the case fatality rate from 10% to 5%. In children, there was a lower mortality rate (5% versus 2%) and a lower incidence of neurological complications (13% versus 16%) as compared to adults (32% versus 10% and 16% versus 35%, respectively). Neisseria meningitidis was the most common pathogen of bacterial meningitis in both study periods. Bacterial meningitis was most prevalent in the pediatric population, and showed an increase in the median age, from three years in 2000 to seven years in 2010. A steady number of bacterial meningitis cases in adults throughout last decade (around 20 cases per year) was recorded. During the last decade, gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis that are unrelated to the introduction of new vaccines, but are partly due to the improvement of living conditions.

  11. Medical students, clinical preventive services, and shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Carole W; Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Margaret

    2002-11-01

    Improving access to preventive care requires addressing patient, provider, and systems barriers. Patients often lack knowledge or are skeptical about the importance of prevention. Physicians feel that they have too little time, are not trained to deliver preventive services, and are concerned about the effectiveness of prevention. We have implemented an educational module in the required family practice clerkship (1) to enhance medical student learning about common clinical preventive services and (2) to teach students how to inform and involve patients in shared decision making about those services. Students are asked to examine available evidence-based information for preventive screening services. They are encouraged to look at the recommendations of various organizations and use such resources as reports from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force to determine recommendations they want to be knowledgeable about in talking with their patients. For learning shared decision making, students are trained to use a model adapted from Braddock and colleagues(1) to discuss specific screening services and to engage patients in the process of making informed decisions about what is best for their own health. The shared decision making is presented and modeled by faculty, discussed in small groups, and students practice using Web-based cases and simulations. The students are evaluated using formative and summative performance-based assessments as they interact with simulated patients about (1) screening for high blood cholesterol and other lipid abnormalities, (2) screening for colorectal cancer, (3) screening for prostate cancer, and (4) screening for breast cancer. The final student evaluation is a ten-minute, videotaped discussion with a simulated patient about screening for colorectal cancer that is graded against a checklist that focuses primarily on the elements of shared decision making. Our medical students appear quite willing to accept shared decision making as

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompetent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanjie, Zhu; Jianghan, Chen; Nan, Xu; Xiaojun, Wang; Hai, Wen; Wanqing, Liao; Julin, Gu

    2012-03-01

    To describe clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompetent children. Immunocompetent children with cryptococcal meningitis who attended Changzheng Hospital between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. During the 10 years reviewed, 11 children with cryptococcal meningitis were admitted to Changzheng hospital and identified as immunocompetent. The 11 children had a median age of 7.25 years. Headache (100%), fever (81.8%), nausea or vomiting (63.6%) and visual or hearing damage or loss (36.4%) were the most common symptoms before treatment. There is no evidence for other site infection of cryptococcus although all the cryptococcal antigen titre is high in blood. All the patients received amphotericin B or AmB liposome with 5-flucytosine for at least 6 weeks followed by fluconazole or itraconazole as consolidation treatment for at least 12 weeks. Nine patients were cured mycologically; however, sequela of visual damage was showed in one patient. Cryptococcal meningitis seems to be uncharacteristic of symptoms, and central nervous system may be the only common site for infection. Amphotericin B with 5-flucytosine should be the choice of induction treatment in this group of patients. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Clinical and genetic correlates of decision making in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Clementi, Maurizio; Collantoni, Enrico; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Decision-making (DM) abilities have been found to be impaired in anorexia nervosa (AN), but few data are available about the characteristics and correlates of this cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to provide data on DM functioning in AN using both veridical and adaptive paradigms. While in veridical DM tasks, the individual's ability to predict a true/false response is measured, adaptive DM is the ability to consider both internal and external demands in order to make a good choice, in the absence of a single true "correct" answer. The participants were 189 women, of whom 91 were eating-disordered patients with a lifetime diagnosis of anorexia nervosa, and 98 were healthy women. All the participants underwent clinical, neuropsychological, and genetic assessment. The cognitive evaluation included a set of neuropsychological tasks and two decision-making tests: The Iowa Gambling Task and the Cognitive Bias Task. Anorexia nervosa patients showed significantly poorer performances on both decision-making tasks than healthy women. The Cognitive Bias Task revealed that anorexia nervosa patients employed significantly more context-independent decision-making strategies, which were independent from diagnostic subtype, handedness, education, and psychopathology. In the whole sample (patients and controls), Cognitive Bias Task performance was independently predicted by lifetime anorexia nervosa diagnosis, body mass index at assessment, and 5-HTTLPR genotype. Patients displayed poor decision-making functioning in both veridical and adaptive situations. The difficulties detected in anorexia nervosa individuals may affect not only the ability to consider the future outcomes of their actions (leading to "myopia for the future"), but also the capacity to update and review one's own mindset according to new environmental stimuli.

  14. Review of idiopathic eosinophilic meningitis in dogs and cats, with a detailed description of two recent cases in dogs : review and clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Williams

    2008-05-01

    Caesarian section after developing a non-responsive inertia 8 days prior to presentation. This animal's clinical signs included status epilepticus seizures unrelated to hypocalcaemia and warranted induction of a barbiturate coma. She died 4 hours later. Post mortem and histopathological findings in the brain were almost identical to those of the Boerboel and she also showed histological evidence of recent active intravascular haemolysis with microcyte formation. Rabies, distemper and Neospora caninum immunohistochemical stains were negative in the brains of both dogs. Immunohistochemical staining of the cerebral and meningeal exudates of the Beagle for T- and B-lymphocyte (CD3 and CD79a markers showed a predominance of T-lymphocytes with fewer scattered B lymphocytes. A possible allergic response to amoxicillin / clavulanate is considered, as this appeared to be the only feature common to the recent history of both animals. An overview of EME in humans, dogs and cats is given and the previously published cases of idiopathic EME in dogs and the single published cat case are briefly reviewed.

  15. Understanding complex clinical reasoning in infectious diseases for improving clinical decision support design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Roosan; Weir, Charlene R; Jones, Makoto; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Samore, Matthew H

    2015-11-30

    Clinical experts' cognitive mechanisms for managing complexity have implications for the design of future innovative healthcare systems. The purpose of the study is to examine the constituents of decision complexity and explore the cognitive strategies clinicians use to control and adapt to their information environment. We used Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) methods to interview 10 Infectious Disease (ID) experts at the University of Utah and Salt Lake City Veterans Administration Medical Center. Participants were asked to recall a complex, critical and vivid antibiotic-prescribing incident using the Critical Decision Method (CDM), a type of Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA). Using the four iterations of the Critical Decision Method, questions were posed to fully explore the incident, focusing in depth on the clinical components underlying the complexity. Probes were included to assess cognitive and decision strategies used by participants. The following three themes emerged as the constituents of decision complexity experienced by the Infectious Diseases experts: 1) the overall clinical picture does not match the pattern, 2) a lack of comprehension of the situation and 3) dealing with social and emotional pressures such as fear and anxiety. All these factors contribute to decision complexity. These factors almost always occurred together, creating unexpected events and uncertainty in clinical reasoning. Five themes emerged in the analyses of how experts deal with the complexity. Expert clinicians frequently used 1) watchful waiting instead of over- prescribing antibiotics, engaged in 2) theory of mind to project and simulate other practitioners' perspectives, reduced very complex cases into simple 3) heuristics, employed 4) anticipatory thinking to plan and re-plan events and consulted with peers to share knowledge, solicit opinions and 5) seek help on patient cases. The cognitive strategies to deal with decision complexity found in this study have important

  16. Medication-related clinical decision support alert overrides in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanji, Karen C; Seger, Diane L; Slight, Sarah P; Amato, Mary G; Beeler, Patrick E; Her, Qoua L; Dalleur, Olivia; Eguale, Tewodros; Wong, Adrian; Silvers, Elizabeth R; Swerdloff, Michael; Hussain, Salman T; Maniam, Nivethietha; Fiskio, Julie M; Dykes, Patricia C; Bates, David W

    2018-05-01

    To define the types and numbers of inpatient clinical decision support alerts, measure the frequency with which they are overridden, and describe providers' reasons for overriding them and the appropriateness of those reasons. We conducted a cross-sectional study of medication-related clinical decision support alerts over a 3-year period at a 793-bed tertiary-care teaching institution. We measured the rate of alert overrides, the rate of overrides by alert type, the reasons cited for overrides, and the appropriateness of those reasons. Overall, 73.3% of patient allergy, drug-drug interaction, and duplicate drug alerts were overridden, though the rate of overrides varied by alert type (P 75% of the time. The vast majority of duplicate drug, patient allergy, and formulary substitution alerts were appropriate, suggesting that these categories of alerts might be good targets for refinement to reduce alert fatigue. Almost three-quarters of alerts were overridden, and 40% of the overrides were not appropriate. Future research should optimize alert types and frequencies to increase their clinical relevance, reducing alert fatigue so that important alerts are not inappropriately overridden.

  17. Group A Streptococcal meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bovenkerk, Sandra; Man, Wing Kit; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-07-01

    We report on the incidence, clinical characteristics, and bacterial genotype of group A streptococcal (GAS) meningitis in the Netherlands. We assessed the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of patients with GAS meningitis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2013. GAS was identified in 26 of 1322 patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (2%); 9 cases (35%) occurred in the first four months of 2013. GAS meningitis was often preceded by otitis or sinusitis (24 of 26 [92%]) and a high proportion of patients developed complications during clinical course (19 of 26 [73%]). Subdural empyema occurred in 8 of 26 patients (35%). Nine patients underwent mastoidectomy and in 5 patients neurosurgical evacuation of the subdural empyema was performed. Five of 26 patients (19%) died and 11 of 21 surviving patient had neurologic sequelae (52%). Infection with the emm1 and cc28 GAS genotype was associated with subdural empyema (both 4 of 6 [67%] vs. 2 of 14 [14%]; P = 0.037). GAS meningitis is an uncommon but severe disease. Patients are at risk for empyema, which is associated with infection with the emm1 and cc28 genotype. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S. G. B.; Brouwer, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; Hensen, E. F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849855 Abstract We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in

  19. Cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients : pooled analysis and systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Wenjie; Chen, Min; Liu, Jia; Hagen, Ferry; Ms, Abdullah; Al-Hatmi, A M S; Zhang, Peilian; Guo, Yun; Boekhout, Teun; Deng, Danqi; Xu, Jianping; Pan, Weihua; Liao, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an important fungal infection among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. We conducted a pooled analysis and systematic review to describe the epidemiological and clinical profile of cryptococcal meningitis in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. From two hospitals in

  20. Dexamethasone treatment in adults with pneumococcal meningitis: risk factors for death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    In experimental meningitis, adjunctive treatment with steroids reduces cerebrospinal fluid inflammation and thereby improves neurological outcome. On the basis of these findings, several clinical trials have assessed treatment with adjunctive steroids in bacterial meningitis, with conflicting

  1. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Komulainen, Jorma; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2012-01-01

    the use of computer-based clinical decision support (eCDS) in primary care and how different professional groups experience it. Our aim was to describe specific reasons for using or not using eCDS among primary care professionals. METHODS: The setting was a Finnish primary health care organization with 48...... professionals receiving patient-specific guidance at the point of care. Multiple data (focus groups, questionnaire and spontaneous feedback) were analyzed using deductive content analysis and descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The content of the guidance is a significant feature of the primary care professional...

  2. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo NOVAIS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate these occurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  3. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago OLIVEIRA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate theseoccurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  4. Clinical decision-making and secondary findings in systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T; Brothers, K B; Erdmann, P; Langanke, M

    2016-05-21

    Systems medicine is the name for an assemblage of scientific strategies and practices that include bioinformatics approaches to human biology (especially systems biology); "big data" statistical analysis; and medical informatics tools. Whereas personalized and precision medicine involve similar analytical methods applied to genomic and medical record data, systems medicine draws on these as well as other sources of data. Given this distinction, the clinical translation of systems medicine poses a number of important ethical and epistemological challenges for researchers working to generate systems medicine knowledge and clinicians working to apply it. This article focuses on three key challenges: First, we will discuss the conflicts in decision-making that can arise when healthcare providers committed to principles of experimental medicine or evidence-based medicine encounter individualized recommendations derived from computer algorithms. We will explore in particular whether controlled experiments, such as comparative effectiveness trials, should mediate the translation of systems medicine, or if instead individualized findings generated through "big data" approaches can be applied directly in clinical decision-making. Second, we will examine the case of the Riyadh Intensive Care Program Mortality Prediction Algorithm, pejoratively referred to as the "death computer," to demonstrate the ethical challenges that can arise when big-data-driven scoring systems are applied in clinical contexts. We argue that the uncritical use of predictive clinical algorithms, including those envisioned for systems medicine, challenge basic understandings of the doctor-patient relationship. Third, we will build on the recent discourse on secondary findings in genomics and imaging to draw attention to the important implications of secondary findings derived from the joint analysis of data from diverse sources, including data recorded by patients in an attempt to realize their

  5. cryptococcus meningitis in a cohort of hiv positive kenyan patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In sub-. Saharan Africa with the highest prevalence of HIV/AIDS, response to treatment of cryptococcal meningitis has seldom been assessed. Objective: To describe the clinical features, laboratory findings, CD4+ cell counts and clinical outcome after a two-week treatment course of patients having cryptococcal meningitis.

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30?48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only...

  7. Bacterial meningitis in Nottingham.

    OpenAIRE

    Ispahani, P.

    1983-01-01

    Records of 171 cases of bacterial meningitis admitted to Nottingham hospitals from January 1974 to June 1980 were reviewed. The distribution of organisms producing meningitis and the factors influencing mortality in different age groups were assessed. Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 69% of all proven cases. The overall mortality was 26% being lowest in patients with meningococcal meningitis (0%) and highest in those with pneumococcal m...

  8. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Anish Mehta; Rohan R Mahale; Uchil Sudhir; Mahendra Javali; Rangasetty Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no pri...

  9. CT in meningitis purulenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fujiwara, Katsuhiko; Iino, Shigeru; Ochi, Masaharu; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Twenty nine infants with meningitis purulenta were classified into 5 groups according to CT findings in the acute stage: cerebral infarction group, subdural hygroma group, ventricular enlargement group, and a group of other diseases. In each group, clinical findings, surgical procedures and prognosis were evaluated. In the cerebral infarction group, although 3 of 4 patients underwent V-P shunt or subdural drainage, remarkable sequelae were found in all the cases. Of 4 subdural hygroma patients, 2 had subdural drainage, and 4 of 8 patients with ventricular enlargement underwent V-P shunt. All the patients of the two groups had favorable prognosis without any sequela. A patient with cerebral herniation in the group of other diseases died in its acute stage. Eleven infants without abnormal CT findings showed normal psychomotor development. (Ueda, J.)

  10. Clinical Decision Support Knowledge Management: Strategies for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Alswailem, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems have been shown to increase quality of care, patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Such systems depend mainly on two types of content; the clinical information related to patients and the medical knowledge related to the specialty that informs the system rules and alerts. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, the Health Information Technology Affairs worked on identifying best strategies and recommendations for successful CDSS knowledge management. A review of literature was conducted to identify main areas of challenges and factors of success. A qualitative survey was used over six months' duration to collect opinions, experiences and suggestions from both IT and healthcare professionals. Recommendations were categorized into ten main topics that should be addressed during the development and implementation of CDSS knowledge management tools in the hospital.

  11. Artificial intelligence framework for simulating clinical decision-making: a Markov decision process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Casey C; Hauser, Kris

    2013-01-01

    In the modern healthcare system, rapidly expanding costs/complexity, the growing myriad of treatment options, and exploding information streams that often do not effectively reach the front lines hinder the ability to choose optimal treatment decisions over time. The goal in this paper is to develop a general purpose (non-disease-specific) computational/artificial intelligence (AI) framework to address these challenges. This framework serves two potential functions: (1) a simulation environment for exploring various healthcare policies, payment methodologies, etc., and (2) the basis for clinical artificial intelligence - an AI that can "think like a doctor". This approach combines Markov decision processes and dynamic decision networks to learn from clinical data and develop complex plans via simulation of alternative sequential decision paths while capturing the sometimes conflicting, sometimes synergistic interactions of various components in the healthcare system. It can operate in partially observable environments (in the case of missing observations or data) by maintaining belief states about patient health status and functions as an online agent that plans and re-plans as actions are performed and new observations are obtained. This framework was evaluated using real patient data from an electronic health record. The results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach; such an AI framework easily outperforms the current treatment-as-usual (TAU) case-rate/fee-for-service models of healthcare. The cost per unit of outcome change (CPUC) was $189 vs. $497 for AI vs. TAU (where lower is considered optimal) - while at the same time the AI approach could obtain a 30-35% increase in patient outcomes. Tweaking certain AI model parameters could further enhance this advantage, obtaining approximately 50% more improvement (outcome change) for roughly half the costs. Given careful design and problem formulation, an AI simulation framework can approximate optimal

  12. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P meningitis (P meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  13. Aseptic and Bacterial Meningitis: Evaluation, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Hillary R; Boyle, Sean D

    2017-09-01

    The etiologies of meningitis range in severity from benign and self-limited to life-threatening with potentially severe morbidity. Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency that requires prompt recognition and treatment. Mortality remains high despite the introduction of vaccinations for common pathogens that have reduced the incidence of meningitis worldwide. Aseptic meningitis is the most common form of meningitis with an annual incidence of 7.6 per 100,000 adults. Most cases of aseptic meningitis are viral and require supportive care. Viral meningitis is generally self-limited with a good prognosis. Examination maneuvers such as Kernig sign or Brudzinski sign may not be useful to differentiate bacterial from aseptic meningitis because of variable sensitivity and specificity. Because clinical findings are also unreliable, the diagnosis relies on the examination of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from lumbar puncture. Delayed initiation of antibiotics can worsen mortality. Treatment should be started promptly in cases where transfer, imaging, or lumbar puncture may slow a definitive diagnosis. Empiric antibiotics should be directed toward the most likely pathogens and should be adjusted by patient age and risk factors. Dexamethasone should be administered to children and adults with suspected bacterial meningitis before or at the time of initiation of antibiotics. Vaccination against the most common pathogens that cause bacterial meningitis is recommended. Chemoprophylaxis of close contacts is helpful in preventing additional infections.

  14. Clinical genomics information management software linking cancer genome sequence and clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Stuart; Jiao, Wei; Brown, Andrew M K; Petrocelli, Teresa; Tran, Ben; Zhang, Tong; McPherson, John D; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Onetto, Nicole; Hudson, Thomas J; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Using sequencing information to guide clinical decision-making requires coordination of a diverse set of people and activities. In clinical genomics, the process typically includes sample acquisition, template preparation, genome data generation, analysis to identify and confirm variant alleles, interpretation of clinical significance, and reporting to clinicians. We describe a software application developed within a clinical genomics study, to support this entire process. The software application tracks patients, samples, genomic results, decisions and reports across the cohort, monitors progress and sends reminders, and works alongside an electronic data capture system for the trial's clinical and genomic data. It incorporates systems to read, store, analyze and consolidate sequencing results from multiple technologies, and provides a curated knowledge base of tumor mutation frequency (from the COSMIC database) annotated with clinical significance and drug sensitivity to generate reports for clinicians. By supporting the entire process, the application provides deep support for clinical decision making, enabling the generation of relevant guidance in reports for verification by an expert panel prior to forwarding to the treating physician. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endodontic retreatment. Aspects of decision making and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, T

    2001-01-01

    regardless of assessment method. Compared with Standard gamble Visual Analogue Scale systematically produced lower ratings. U-values were found to change considerably in both the short and long-term. Any significant correlation between endodontists' U-values and retreatment prescriptions could not be demonstrated. Surgical and nonsurgical retreatment were randomly assigned to 95 "failed" root filled teeth in 92 patients. Cases were followed clinically and radiographically for four years postoperatively. At the 12-month recall a statistically significant higher healing rate was observed for teeth retreated surgically. At the final 48-month recall no systematic difference was detected. Patients were found to be more subject to postoperative discomfort when teeth were retreated surgically compared with nonsurgically. Consequently, surgical retreatment tended to be associated with higher indirect costs than a nonsurgically approach. In the final part of the thesis it is argued that retreatment decision making in everyday clinical practice normally should be based on simple principles. It is suggested that in order to achieve the best overall consequence a periapical lesion in a root filled tooth that is not expected to heal should be retreated. Arguments to withhold retreatment should be based on (i) respect for patient autonomy, (ii) retreatment risks or (iii) retreatment costs.

  16. Transforming clinical practice guidelines and clinical pathways into fast-and-frugal decision trees to improve clinical care strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Hozo, Iztok; Dale, William

    2018-02-27

    Contemporary delivery of health care is inappropriate in many ways, largely due to suboptimal Q5 decision-making. A typical approach to improve practitioners' decision-making is to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPG) by guidelines panels, who are instructed to use their judgments to derive practice recommendations. However, mechanisms for the formulation of guideline judgments remains a "black-box" operation-a process with defined inputs and outputs but without sufficient knowledge of its internal workings. Increased explicitness and transparency in the process can be achieved by implementing CPG as clinical pathways (CPs) (also known as clinical algorithms or flow-charts). However, clinical recommendations thus derived are typically ad hoc and developed by experts in a theory-free environment. As any recommendation can be right (true positive or negative), or wrong (false positive or negative), the lack of theoretical structure precludes the quantitative assessment of the management strategies recommended by CPGs/CPs. To realize the full potential of CPGs/CPs, they need to be placed on more solid theoretical grounds. We believe this potential can be best realized by converting CPGs/CPs within the heuristic theory of decision-making, often implemented as fast-and-frugal (FFT) decision trees. This is possible because FFT heuristic strategy of decision-making can be linked to signal detection theory, evidence accumulation theory, and a threshold model of decision-making, which, in turn, allows quantitative analysis of the accuracy of clinical management strategies. Fast-and-frugal provides a simple and transparent, yet solid and robust, methodological framework connecting decision science to clinical care, a sorely needed missing link between CPGs/CPs and patient outcomes. We therefore advocate that all guidelines panels express their recommendations as CPs, which in turn should be converted into FFTs to guide clinical care. © 2018 John Wiley

  17. Impact of a Clinical Decision Support System on Pharmacy Clinical Interventions, Documentation Efforts, and Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Calloway, Stacy; Akilo, Hameed A.; Bierman, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Health care organizations are turning to electronic clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) to increase quality of patient care and promote a safer environment. A CDSS is a promising approach to the aggregation and use of patient data to identify patients who would most benefit from interventions by pharmacy clinicians. However, there are limited published reports describing the impact of CDSS on clinical pharmacy measures. In February 2011, Good Shepherd Medical Center, a 425-bed acute car...

  18. Enteroviral Meningitis: Peculiarities of the Course and Diagnosis at the Present Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Shostakovych-Koretskaya

    2016-11-01

    the observed cases, enteroviral serous meningitis developed in mild to moderate clinical from, without any residuals or mortality. C-reactive protein is a reliable routine criterion for decision of antibiotics prescription. It is recommended to include additional studies (cardiac markers of necrosis, heart ultrasound, ECG into the mandatory list of examinations when establishing the diagnosis of enteroviral infection.

  19. Recurrent meningitis--a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janocha-Litwin, Justyna; Simon, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses epidemiology, aetiology and the most important predisposing factors associated with recurrent meningitis, as well as the possibilities to prevent this particularly challenging clinical problem. The frequency of recurrent meningitis is estimated to be 2-9%. However, the case fatality is lower compared to a single episode of meningitis. The main causes of recurrent meningitis are considered to be: head injury, congenital or acquired (post-traumatic or post-surgical) cranial or spinal defects, chronic intracranial inflammation, complement system dysfunction, as well as congenital and acquired humoral or cellular immunodeficiency.

  20. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  1. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du

    2006-01-01

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  2. Clinical characteristics and expression of Th1-Th2 cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui BU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Cryptococcal meningitis (CM is the most common fungal infection of central nervous system, caused by Cryptococcus neoformans infection of the meninges. The development and prognosis of CM depend on the patient's own immune function to some extent, and are relative to the imbalance of helper T lymphocyte (Th1/Th2. This study aims to explore the hidden role of the local Th1/ Th2 immune response in the pathophysiological process of CM.  Methods The levels of Th1 cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and Th2 cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. CSF cytology changes were monitored dynamically to understand the outcome status of patients with CM.  Results The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in CM patients [(11.17 ± 1.50 and (18.74 ± 2.97 pg/ml, respectively] were significantly lower than that in control patients [(17.69 ± 2.34 and (28.83 ± 3.55 pg/ml; P = 0.000, for all]. However, the levels of IL-10 in CM patients [(43.65 ± 10.12 pg/ml] were significantly higher than that in control patients [(7.80 ± 1.30 pg/ml, P = 0.000]. The CSF IFN-γ and TNF-α levels in acute phase of CM patients [(11.17 ± 1.50 pg/ml and (18.74 ± 2.97 pg/ml, respectively] were significantly lower than that in stable phase of CM patients [(17.70 ± 2.34 and (22.93 ± 1.53 pg/ml; P = 0.000, for all]. On the other hand, the levels of IL-10 were significantly higher in the acute phase than that in stable phase [(43.65 ± 10.12 and (22.93 ± 7.39 pg/ml, respectively; P = 0.000]. The ratios of Th1/Th2 were used to assess the contribution of Th1/Th2 immunity in acute and stable phase of CM patients. The ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 and TNF-α/IL-10 measured in acute phase of CM patients were significantly lower than that in control patients (P = 0.000, for all. These ratios in acute phase patients were also significantly lower than that in stable phase patients

  3. ANDISCRIMINATED ASEPTIC MENINGITIS CASE BETWEEN RICKETTSIA AND LEPTOSPIRAL MENINGITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Davut; Sencan, İrfan; Yıldırım, Mustafa; Güçlü, Ertuğrul; Yavuz, Tevfik; Karabay, Oğuz

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsial meningitis and leptospiral meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis in patients exposed to endemic areas. In this report we describe a case of aseptic meningitis in which neither a rickettsial nor leptospiral etiology could be established

  4. TB Meningitis in HIV-Positive Patients in Europe and Argentina: Clinical Outcome and Factors Associated with Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie W. Efsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The study aimed at describing characteristics and outcome of tuberculous meningitis (TBM in HIV-positive patients and comparing these parameters with those of extrapulmonary TB (TBEP and pulmonary TB (TBP. Methods. Kaplan-Meier estimation and Poisson regression models were used to assess the mortality following TB diagnosis and to evaluate potential prognostic factors for the 3 groups of TB patients separately. Results. A total of 100 patients with TBM, 601 with TBEP, and 371 TBP were included. Patients with TBM had lower CD4 cell counts and only 17.0% received antiretroviral therapy (ART at TB diagnosis. The cumulative probability of death at 12 months following TB was 51.2% for TBM (95% CI 41.4–61.6%, 12.3% for TBP (8.9–15.7%, and 19.4% for TBEP (16.1–22.6 (P<0.0001; log-rank test. For TBM, factors associated with a poorer prognosis were not being on ART (adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR 4.00 (1.72–9.09, a prior AIDS diagnosis (aIRR=4.82 (2.61–8.92, and receiving care in Eastern Europe (aIRR=5.41 (2.58–11.34. Conclusions. TBM among HIV-positive patients was associated with a high mortality rate, especially for patients from Eastern Europe and patients with advanced HIV-infection, which urgently calls for public health interventions to improve both TB and HIV aspects of patient management.

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found

  6. Outcome Assessments in Clinical Trials of Cryptococcal Meningitis: Considerations on Use of Early Fungicidal Activity as a Potential Surrogate Endpoint for All-Cause Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo Mauricio; Powers, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a common disease in resource-challenged settings, with a high mortality within weeks of disease onset. Mortality remains high with current treatments, so more effective interventions are needed to decrease mortality. There has been interest in using the outcome assessment of quantification of fungus from cerebrospinal fluid as a replacement (surrogate) endpoint for all-cause mortality (ACM) as a means of decreasing sample size in randomized clinical trials in CM. To evaluate a biomarker as a potential surrogate endpoint to replace ACM requires several steps. This paper discusses the issues of determining whether the context of a disease is one where a potential surrogate endpoint is rational, the types of outcome assessments that might qualify as potential surrogates, and the process for evaluation of the evidence that a chosen biomarker is a valid replacement for ACM in the given context of use. We then apply those principles to the context of randomized clinical trials of CM. PMID:26306077

  7. Clinical implementation of RNA signatures for pharmacogenomic decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Weihua Tang1, Zhiyuan Hu2, Hind Muallem1, Margaret L Gulley1,21Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, NC, USAAbstract: RNA profiling is increasingly used to predict drug response, dose, or toxicity based on analysis of drug pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. Before implementing multiplexed RNA arrays in clinical practice, validation studies are carried out to demonstrate sufficient evidence of analytic and clinical performance, and to establish an assay protocol with quality assurance measures. Pathologists assure quality by selecting input tissue and by interpreting results in the context of the input tissue as well as the technologies that were used and the clinical setting in which the test was ordered. A strength of RNA profiling is the array-based measurement of tens to thousands of RNAs at once, including redundant tests for critical analytes or pathways to promote confidence in test results. Instrument and reagent manufacturers are crucial for supplying reliable components of the test system. Strategies for quality assurance include careful attention to RNA preservation and quality checks at pertinent steps in the assay protocol, beginning with specimen collection and proceeding through the various phases of transport, processing, storage, analysis, interpretation, and reporting. Specimen quality is checked by probing housekeeping transcripts, while spiked and exogenous controls serve as a check on analytic performance of the test system. Software is required to manipulate abundant array data and present it for interpretation by a laboratory physician who reports results in a manner facilitating therapeutic decision-making. Maintenance of the assay requires periodic documentation of personnel competency and laboratory proficiency. These strategies are shepherding genomic arrays into clinical settings to provide added

  8. Peripheral Exophytic Oral Lesions: A Clinical Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of peripheral oral exophytic lesions might be quite challenging. This review article aimed to introduce a decision tree for oral exophytic lesions according to their clinical features. General search engines and specialized databases including PubMed, PubMed Central, Medline Plus, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, Embase, and authenticated textbooks were used to find relevant topics by means of keywords such as “oral soft tissue lesion,” “oral tumor like lesion,” “oral mucosal enlargement,” and “oral exophytic lesion.” Related English-language articles published since 1988 to 2016 in both medical and dental journals were appraised. Upon compilation of data, peripheral oral exophytic lesions were categorized into two major groups according to their surface texture: smooth (mesenchymal or nonsquamous epithelium-originated and rough (squamous epithelium-originated. Lesions with smooth surface were also categorized into three subgroups according to their general frequency: reactive hyperplastic lesions/inflammatory hyperplasia, salivary gland lesions (nonneoplastic and neoplastic, and mesenchymal lesions (benign and malignant neoplasms. In addition, lesions with rough surface were summarized in six more common lesions. In total, 29 entities were organized in the form of a decision tree in order to help clinicians establish a logical diagnosis by a stepwise progression method.

  9. Clinical decision support system for the diagnosis of adolescence health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsouri, Irene; Nikou, Amalia; Pampalou, Machi; Lentza, Maria; Spyridakis, Paulos; Mathiopoulou, Natassa; Konsoulas, Dimitris; Lampou, Marianna; Alexiou, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    It is common that children confront psychological problems when they reach puberty. These problems could easily be overcome, but in many cases they could be severe, leading to social estrangement or worse in madness or death. According to information collected we designed a questionnaire about the psychology of adolescents in order to help people in that age or their elders find out if they have health issues. We used already published researches and material concerning all the psychological problems a child can confront in order to make a reliable questionnaire and to develop the clinical decision support system. Our main objective is to publish and administrate a web-based free tool for sharing medical knowledge about any psychological disease a child can already have or develop during puberty.

  10. Exploration Clinical Decision Support System: Medical Data Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Tony; Shetye, Sandeep; Shaw, Tianna (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Clinical Decision Support (ECDS) System project is intended to enhance the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element for extended duration, deep-space mission planning in HRP. A major development guideline is the Risk of "Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Conditions". ECDS attempts to mitigate that Risk by providing crew-specific health information, actionable insight, crew guidance and advice based on computational algorithmic analysis. The availability of inflight health diagnostic computational methods has been identified as an essential capability for human exploration missions. Inflight electronic health data sources are often heterogeneous, and thus may be isolated or not examined as an aggregate whole. The ECDS System objective provides both a data architecture that collects and manages disparate health data, and an active knowledge system that analyzes health evidence to deliver case-specific advice. A single, cohesive space-ready decision support capability that considers all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available at present. Hence, this Task is a newly coordinated development effort by which ECDS and its supporting data infrastructure will demonstrate the feasibility of intelligent data mining and predictive modeling as a biomedical diagnostic support mechanism on manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations has been the research and development of both image and clinical text-based computer-aided patient diagnosis. Human anatomical images displaying abnormal/pathological features have been annotated using controlled terminology templates, marked-up, and then stored in compliance with the AIM standard. These images have been filtered and disease characterized based on machine learning of semantic and quantitative feature vectors. The next phase will evaluate disease treatment response via quantitative linear

  11. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  12. Robot decisions: on the importance of virtuous judgment in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhaus, Petra

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this article is to argue for the necessity of emotional professional virtues in the understanding of good clinical practice. This understanding is required for a proper balance of capacities in medical education and further education of physicians. For this reason an ideal physician, incarnating the required virtues, skills and knowledge is compared with a non-emotional robot that is bound to moral rules. This fictive confrontation is meant to clarify why certain demands on the personality of the physician are justified, in addition to a rule- and principle-based moral orientation and biomedical knowledge and skills. Philosophical analysis of thought experiments inspired by science fiction literature by Isaac Asimov. Although prima facie a rule-oriented robot seems more reliable and trustworthy, the complexity of clinical judgment is not met by an encompassing and never contradictory set of rules from which one could logically derive decisions. There are different ways how the robot could still work, but at the cost of the predictability of its behaviour and its moral orientation. In comparison, a virtuous human doctor who is also bound to these rules, although less strictly, will more reliably keep at moral objectives, be understandable, be more flexible in case the rules come to their limits, and will be more predictable in these critical situations. Apart from these advantages of the virtuous human doctor referring to her own person, the most problematic deficit of the robot is its lacking deeper understanding of the inner mental events of patients which makes good contact, good communication and good influence impossible. Although an infallibly rule-oriented robot seems more reliable at first view, in situations that require complex decisions like clinical practice the agency of a moral human person is more trustworthy. Furthermore, the understanding of the patient's emotions must remain insufficient for a non-emotional, non-human being. Because

  13. An Outbreak of Meningococcal Meningitis Among Children in Azare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningococcal meningitis is a serious disease with high morbidity and mortality among children. It occurs in epidemics in the African meningitic belt. This study reports the epidemiology, clinical features and outcome of an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in children. From January to December 2003, twenty two ...

  14. Is it possible to differentiate tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis (TBM and CM) are the most common causes of opportunistic meningitis in HIV-infected patients.[1-5]. TBM and CM share similar clinical and laboratory features, resulting in delays to diagnosis and poorer outcomes, particularly in settings where confirmatory diagnosis is not possible ...

  15. Is it possible to differentiate tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis (TBM and CM) are the most common causes of opportunistic meningitis in HIVinfected patients from resource-limited settings, and the differential diagnosis is challenging. Objective. To compare clinical and basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics between TBM ...

  16. Steroids in adults with acute bacterial meningitis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; de Gans, Jan; McIntyre, Peter; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is uncommon but causes significant mortality and morbidity, despite optimum antibiotic therapy. A clinical trial in 301 patients showed a beneficial effect of adjunctive steroid treatment in adults with acute community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis, but data on other

  17. Chemical meningitis in metrizamide myelography. A report of seven cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, T.; Hesselberg, J.P.; Anda, S.; Dale, L.; Hellum, K.

    1986-01-01

    Seven patients with acute chemcial meningitis after metrizamide myelography are described. Five of the cases occurred within a time span of two months. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings in the acute stage of the illness were similar to findings in acute bacterial meningitis. Possible causes of this complication are discussed. (orig.).

  18. Development of a clinical decision model for thyroid nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhardt John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid nodules represent a common problem brought to medical attention. Four to seven percent of the United States adult population (10–18 million people has a palpable thyroid nodule, however the majority (>95% of thyroid nodules are benign. While, fine needle aspiration remains the most cost effective and accurate diagnostic tool for thyroid nodules in current practice, over 20% of patients undergoing FNA of a thyroid nodule have indeterminate cytology (follicular neoplasm with associated malignancy risk prevalence of 20–30%. These patients require thyroid lobectomy/isthmusectomy purely for the purpose of attaining a definitive diagnosis. Given that the majority (70–80% of these patients have benign surgical pathology, thyroidectomy in these patients is conducted principally with diagnostic intent. Clinical models predictive of malignancy risk are needed to support treatment decisions in patients with thyroid nodules in order to reduce morbidity associated with unnecessary diagnostic surgery. Methods Data were analyzed from a completed prospective cohort trial conducted over a 4-year period involving 216 patients with thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound (US, electrical impedance scanning (EIS and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNA prior to thyroidectomy. A Bayesian model was designed to predict malignancy in thyroid nodules based on multivariate dependence relationships between independent covariates. Ten-fold cross-validation was performed to estimate classifier error wherein the data set was randomized into ten separate and unique train and test sets consisting of a training set (90% of records and a test set (10% of records. A receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC curve of these predictions and area under the curve (AUC were calculated to determine model robustness for predicting malignancy in thyroid nodules. Results Thyroid nodule size, FNA cytology, US and EIS characteristics were highly predictive of

  19. Incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of HIV-1-associated cryptococcal meningitis during the highly active antiretroviral therapy era: a nationwide cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touma M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Madeleine Touma,1 Line D Rasmussen,2 Raquel Martin-Iguacel,2 Frederik Neess Engsig,3 Nina Breinholt Stærke,4 Mette Stærkind,5 Niels Obel,1 Magnus Glindvad Ahlström1 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 5Department of Infectious Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection with advanced immunosuppression predisposes to cryptococcal meningitis (CM. We describe the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of CM in HIV-infected individuals during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era.Methods: A nationwide, population-based cohort of HIV-infected individuals was used to estimate incidence and mortality of CM including risk factors. A description of neurological symptoms of CM at presentation and follow-up in the study period 1995–2014 was included in this study.Results: Among 6,351 HIV-infected individuals, 40 were diagnosed with CM. The incidence rates were 3.7, 1.8, and 0.3 per 1000 person-years at risk in 1995–1996, 1997–1999, and 2000–2014, respectively. Initiation of HAART was associated with decreased risk of acquiring CM [incidence rate ratio (IRR, 0.1 (95% CI, 0.05–0.22]. African origin was associated with increased risk of CM [IRR, 2.05 (95% CI, 1.00–4.20]. The main signs and symptoms at presentation were headache, cognitive deficits, fever, neck stiffness, nausea, and vomiting. All individuals diagnosed with CM had a CD4+ cell count <200 cells/µl [median 26; interquartile range (IQR, 10–50]. Overall, mortality following CM was high and mortality in the first 4 months has not changed substantially over time. However, individuals who survived generally had a

  20. Kriptokokal meningitis: Aspek klinis dan diagnosis laboratorium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrida .

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Kriptokokosis merupakan infeksi yang disebabkan oleh jamur Cryptococcus neoformans, infeksi ini secara luas ditemukan di dunia dan umumya dialami oleh penderita dengan sistem imun yang rendah. Munculan klinis terutama adalah meningitis dan meningoensefalitis yang dikenal dengan kriptokokal meningitis. Sejalan dengan infeksi HIV yang menjadi pandemi, kriptokokosis sebagai infeksi oportunistik juga semakin berkembang di dunia. Kriptokokal meningitis merupakan infeksi oportunistik kedua paling umum yang terkait dengan AIDS di Afrika dan Asia Selatan dengan kejadian kriptokokosis 15%-30% ditemukan pada pasien dengan AIDS. Tanpa pengobatan dengan antifungal yang spesifik, mortalitas dilaporkan 100% dalam dua minggu setelah munculan klinis kriptokokosis dengan meningoensefalitis pada populasi terinfeksi HIV. Di Indonesia, sebelum pandemi AIDS kasus kriptokokosis jarang dilaporkan. Sejak tahun 2004, seiring dengan pertambahan pasien terinfeksi HIV, Departemen Parasitologi FKUI mencatat peningkatan insidensi kriptokokal meningitis pada penderita AIDS yaitu sebesar 21,9%. Faktor yang terkait dengan virulensi Cryptococcus neoformans adalah adanya kapsul polisakarida, produksi melanin dan sifat thermotolerance. Imunitas yang dimediasi oleh sel memiliki peranan penting dalam pertahanan pejamu terhadap Cryptococcus. Pemeriksaan laboratorium penunjang untuk diagnosis adalah pemeriksaan mikroskopis langsung menggunakan tinta India, deteksi antigen, metode enzyme immunoassay, kultur, dan metode molekular. Kata kunci: kriptokokal meningitis, Cryptococcus neoformans,infeksi oportunistik Abstract Cryptococcosis is an infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, that is widely found worldwide and generally experienced by patients with immunodeficiency. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis is the major clinical symptoms in cryptococcal meningitis. Coincide with the pandemic of HIV infection, cryptococcosis as an opportunistic infection is also growing in the

  1. Genotype and mating type distribution within clinical Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates from patients with cryptococcal meningitis in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Delio José; Pedrosa, André Luiz; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Leite Maffei, Claudia Maria; Trilles, Luciana; Dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2010-06-01

    We molecularly characterized 81 cryptococcal isolates recovered from cerebrospinal fluid samples of 77 patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2007 as having cryptococcal meningitis in Uberaba Minas Gerais, Brazil. Fifty-seven (74%) were male with a mean age 35.6 years. Seventy-two (88.9%) of the isolates were from 68 AIDS patients and cryp-tococcosis was the first AIDS-defining condition in 38 (55.9%) patients. Cryptococcosis and AIDS were simultaneously diagnosed in 25 (65.8%) of these 38 patients. Genotypes were characterized through the use of URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphisms analysis, the genetic variability was determined using PCR-fingerprinting with the minisatellite-specific primer M13, and the mating type and serotypes were established by PCR. Seventy-six of the 81 isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans (93.8%), while the remaining five were C. gattii (6.1%), but all were mating type alpha. C. neoformans isolates were genotype VNI (serotype A), while C. gattii isolates were VGII. Four of the latter isolates were identical, but only two were from AIDS patients. Six of the nine isolates from non-AIDS patients were VNI. PCR fingerprints of the isolates from two of the three AIDS patients with clinical relapse were 100% identical. The predominance of VNI and mating type alpha is in accordance with data from other parts of the world. The occurrence of VGII in Minas Gerais indicates a geographical expansion within Brazil.

  2. Pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation: preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Both clinical data and laboratory studies demonstrated the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation. This review examines strategies to prevent post-implant meningitis. Medline/PubMed database; English articles after 1980. Search terms: cochlear implants, pneumococcus meningitis, streptococcus pneumonia, immunization, prevention. Narrative review. All articles relating to post-implant meningitis without any restriction in study designs were assessed and information extracted. The presence of inner ear trauma as a result of surgical technique or cochlear implant electrode array design was associated with a higher risk of post-implant meningitis. Laboratory data demonstrated the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing meningitis induced via the hematogenous route of infection. Fibrous sealing around the electrode array at the cochleostomy site, and the use of antibiotic-coated electrode array reduced the risk of meningitis induced via an otogenic route. The recent scientific data support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendation of pneumococcal vaccination for the prevention of meningitis in implant recipients. Nontraumatic cochlear implant design, surgical technique, and an adequate fibrous seal around the cochleostomy site further reduce the risk of meningitis. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Fiona; Heyderman, Robert S; Panagiotou, Stavros; Tunkel, Allan R; Solomon, Tom

    2016-12-17

    Over the past several decades, the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children has decreased but there remains a significant burden of disease in adults, with a mortality of up to 30%. Although the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis is not completely understood, knowledge of bacterial invasion and entry into the CNS is improving. Clinical features alone cannot determine whether meningitis is present and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid is essential for diagnosis. Newer technologies, such as multiplex PCR, and novel diagnostic platforms that incorporate proteomics and genetic sequencing, might help provide a quicker and more accurate diagnosis. Even with appropriate antimicrobial therapy, mortality is high and so attention has focused on adjunctive therapies; adjunctive corticosteroids are beneficial in certain circumstances. Any further improvements in outcome are likely to come from either modulation of the host response or novel approaches to therapy, rather than new antibiotics. Ultimately, the best hope to reduce the disease burden is with broadly protective vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevations of novel cytokines in bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kilpatrick, Laurie; Shah, Samir S; Abbasi, Soraya; Harris, Mary C

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is challenging to diagnose in infants, especially in the common setting of antibiotic pre-treatment, which diminishes yield of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures. Prior studies of diagnostic markers have not demonstrated sufficient accuracy. Interleukin-23 (IL-23), interleukin-18 (IL-18) and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) possess biologic plausibility, and may be useful as diagnostic markers in bacterial meningitis. In a prospective cohort study, we measured IL-23, IL-18 and sRAGE levels in CSF. We compared differences between infected and non-infected infants, and conducted receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses to identify individual markers and combinations of markers with the best diagnostic accuracy. 189 infants <6 months, including 8 with bacterial meningitis, 30 without meningitis, and 151 with indeterminate diagnosis (due to antibiotic pretreatment) were included. CSF IL-23, IL-18 and sRAGE levels were significantly elevated in infants with culture proven meningitis. Among individual markers, IL-23 possessed the greatest accuracy for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (area under the curve (AUC) 0.9698). The combination of all three markers had an AUC of 1. IL-23, alone and in combination with IL-18 and sRAGE, identified bacterial meningitis with excellent accuracy. Following validation, these markers could aid clinicians in diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and decision-making regarding prolongation of antibiotic therapy.

  5. Appreciative inquiry enhances cardiology nurses’ clinical decision making when using a clinical guideline on delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsegaard, Helle; Schrader, Anne-Marie; Rom, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    The current study responds to implementation challenges with translating evidence-based knowledge into practice. We explore how appreciative inquiry can be used in in-house learning sessions for nurses to enhance their knowledge in using a guideline on delirium as part of clinical decision making....... Through 18 sessions with 3–12 nurses, an appreciative inquiry approach was used. Specialist nurses from the Heart Centre of Copenhagen and senior lecturers from the Department of Nursing at Metropolitan University College facilitated the sessions. Field notes from the sessions were analysed using open...... and axial coding drawing on the principles of grounded theory. The study shows that appreciative inquiry was meaningful to cardiology nurses in providing them with knowledge of using a guideline on delirium in clinical decision making, the main reasons being a) data on a current patient were included, b...

  6. MR of childhood tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeman, J.; Donald, P.; Hewlett, R.

    1988-12-01

    MR imaging was performed on 27 children with stage II-III tuberculous meningitis for the specific purpose of examining the brainstem, as well as comparison with other CT features of the disease. In addition to defining the ischemic disturbances of basal ganglia and diencephalon more clearly, MR also demonstrates the frequent occurrence of parenchymal signal abnormalities in the brainstem and adjacent temporal lobes, which are invisible or uncertain on CT. Although the presence of brainstem abnormalities on MR correlated well with clinical findings of brainstem dysfunction, clinical staging on admission remains the best prognostic indicator in advanced TBM. We also review the MR features of basal exudation, hydrochephalus and tuberculoma.

  7. Brain ventricular dimensions and relationship to outcome in adult patients with bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporrborn, Janni L; Knudsen, Gertrud B; Sølling, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that changes in brain ventricle size are key events in bacterial meningitis. This study investigated the relationship between ventricle size, clinical condition and risk of poor outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Adult patients diagnosed...... with bacterial meningitis admitted to two departments of infectious diseases from 2003 through 2010 were identified. Clinical and biochemical data as well as cerebral computed tomographic images were collected. The size of the brain ventricles were presented as a Ventricle to Brain Ratio (VBR). Normal range...... changes in size as a consequence of meningitis. Increased brain ventricle size in the acute phase of bacterial meningitis was associated with increased mortality....

  8. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  9. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  10. Clinical decision making in restorative dentistry, endodontics, and antibiotic prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Yehuda; Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of geographic location of graduation (Israel, Eastern Europe, Latin America) on decision making regarding management of dental caries, periapical lesions, and antibiotic prescribing routines. A questionnaire was given to ninety-eight general practitioners regarding demographic and work habits. Photographs of lesions were shown on a screen. Participants reported recommended treatment and whether they would routinely prescribe antibiotics following regular endodontic treatment, retreatment, and impacted third molar surgical extraction in healthy patients. There was a 94 percent (n=92) response rate, of which eighty-five responses were used in the data analysis. Surgical treatment of asymptomatic enamel caries lesions was not recommended by most of the subjects, and surgery was recommended for DEJ caries lesions in low or moderate caries risk patients, both without significant differences between geographic regions of dental school graduation. Israelis had a lower frequency of retreatment in asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post restoration (without crown) compared to Latin Americans and East Europeans. Most of the participants would not retreat asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post and crown. After third molar surgery, 46 percent of participants routinely prescribed antibiotics. Significantly more Latin American graduates prescribed antibiotics following endodontic treatment, retreatment, and third molar extractions (pantibiotics) and overtreatment (caries) among young practitioners reflect failure of undergraduate education in proper use of antibiotics and management of the carious lesions according to the patient's clinical presentation and caries risk assessment rather than routinely undertaking surgical caries treatment.

  11. Pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldhoff, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infectious disease, involving the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and the subarachnoid space. In the Netherlands most common causative agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae (72%) and Neisseria meningitidis (11%). The incidence of pneumococcal

  12. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, people may have problems with speech or hearing, vision problems, and hallucinations. Symptoms that might require emergency treatment include loss of consciousness, seizures, muscle weakness, or sudden severe dementia. Symptoms of meningitis, which may appear ...

  13. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This Page Causes and How it Spreads Signs and Symptoms Causes ...

  14. Bacterial Meningitis in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 80 infantile patients (ages 30-365 days; 47 male, 33 female with culture-proven bacterial meningitis seen over a 16 year period (1986-2001 is reported from Taiwan.

  15. Factitious Bacterial Meningitis Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E.; Thrupp, L.; Uchiyama, N.; Hawkins, B.; Wolvin, B.; Greene, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nonviable gram-negative bacilli were seen in smears of cerebrospinal fluid from eight infants in whom bacterial meningitis was ruled out. Tubes from commercial kits were the source of the factitious organisms. PMID:7153328

  16. Creating and sharing clinical decision support content with Web 2.0: Issues and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Kashyap, Vipul; Thomas, Sean M; Sittig, Dean F

    2009-04-01

    Clinical decision support is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. However, developing a comprehensive package of decision support interventions is costly and difficult. If used well, Web 2.0 methods may make it easier and less costly to develop decision support. Web 2.0 is characterized by online communities, open sharing, interactivity and collaboration. Although most previous attempts at sharing clinical decision support content have worked outside of the Web 2.0 framework, several initiatives are beginning to use Web 2.0 to share and collaborate on decision support content. We present case studies of three efforts: the Clinfowiki, a world-accessible wiki for developing decision support content; Partners Healthcare eRooms, web-based tools for developing decision support within a single organization; and Epic Systems Corporation's Community Library, a repository for sharing decision support content for customers of a single clinical system vendor. We evaluate the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to enable collaborative development and sharing of clinical decision support systems through the lens of three case studies; analyzing technical, legal and organizational issues for developers, consumers and organizers of clinical decision support content in Web 2.0. We believe the case for Web 2.0 as a tool for collaborating on clinical decision support content appears strong, particularly for collaborative content development within an organization.

  17. Digital technology and clinical decision making in depression treatment: Current findings and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A; Bauer, Amy M; Atkins, David C

    2017-06-01

    Clinical decision making encompasses a broad set of processes that contribute to the effectiveness of depression treatments. There is emerging interest in using digital technologies to support effective and efficient clinical decision making. In this paper, we provide "snapshots" of research and current directions on ways that digital technologies can support clinical decision making in depression treatment. Practical facets of clinical decision making are reviewed, then research, design, and implementation opportunities where technology can potentially enhance clinical decision making are outlined. Discussions of these opportunities are organized around three established movements designed to enhance clinical decision making for depression treatment, including measurement-based care, integrated care, and personalized medicine. Research, design, and implementation efforts may support clinical decision making for depression by (1) improving tools to incorporate depression symptom data into existing electronic health record systems, (2) enhancing measurement of treatment fidelity and treatment processes, (3) harnessing smartphone and biosensor data to inform clinical decision making, (4) enhancing tools that support communication and care coordination between patients and providers and within provider teams, and (5) leveraging treatment and outcome data from electronic health record systems to support personalized depression treatment. The current climate of rapid changes in both healthcare and digital technologies facilitates an urgent need for research, design, and implementation of digital technologies that explicitly support clinical decision making. Ensuring that such tools are efficient, effective, and usable in frontline treatment settings will be essential for their success and will require engagement of stakeholders from multiple domains. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bacterial meningitis antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R; Raymond, J; Hees, L; Pinquier, D; Grimprel, E; Levy, C

    2017-12-01

    The implementation of pneumococal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) 7 then 13 valent (Prevenar13 ®) in 2010-2011 has significantly changed the profile of pneumococcal meningitis. Since 3 years, the National Pediatric Meningitis Network of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Group (GPIP) and the National Reference Centre of Pneumococci have reported no cases of meningitis due to pneumococcus resistant to third-generation cephalosporins (3GC): cefotaxime or ceftriaxone. In the light of these new data, vancomycin should no longer be prescribed at the initial phase of pneumococcal meningitis treatment (confirmed or only suspected) and this antibiotic should only be added when 3GC minimum inhibitory concentration of the strain isolated is greater than 0.5mg/L. For meningococcal meningitis, nearly 20% of strains have decreased susceptibility to penicillin and amoxicillin, but all remain susceptible to 3GC. The National Pediatric Meningitis Network is a valuable tool because it has been sufficiently exhaustive and sustainable over 15 years. Maintaining this epidemiologic surveillance will allow us to adapt, if necessary, new regimens for subsequent changes that could be induced by vaccination and/or antibiotic uses. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  19. An exploration of the correlates of nurse practitioners' clinical decision-making abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiah-Lian; Hsu, Hsiu-Ying; Chang, Chin-Fu; Lin, Esther Ching-Lan

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated nurse practitioners' clinical decision-making abilities and the factors that affect these abilities. Nurse practitioners play an important role in clinical care decision-making; however, studies exploring the factors that affect their decision-making abilities are lacking. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was employed. A purposive sample of 197 nurse practitioners was recruited from a medical centre in central Taiwan. Structured questionnaires consisting of the Knowledge Readiness Scale, the Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and the Clinical Decision-Making Model Inventory were used to collect data. The intuitive-analytical type was the most commonly used decision-making model, and the intuitive type was the least frequently used model. The decision-making model used was significantly related to the nurse practitioners' work unit. Significant differences were noted between the nurse practitioners' clinical decision-making models and their critical thinking dispositions (openness and empathy). The nurse practitioners' years of work experience, work unit, professional knowledge and critical thinking disposition (openness and empathy as well as holistic and reflective dispositions) predicted the nurse practitioners' analytical decision-making scores. Age, years of nurse practitioner work experience, work unit and critical thinking disposition (holistic and reflective) predicted the nurse practitioners' intuitive decision-making scores. This study contributes to the topic of clinical decision-making by describing various types of nurse practitioner decision-making. The factors associated with analytic and intuitive decision-making scores were identified. These findings might be beneficial when planning continuing education programmes to enhance the clinical decision-making abilities of nurse practitioners. The study results showed that nurse practitioners demonstrated various clinical decision-making types across different work units

  20. Parametric vs. Nonparametric Regression Modelling within Clinical Decision Support

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Zvárová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2017), s. 21-27 ISSN 1805-8698 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01251S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support systems * decision rules * statistical analysis * nonparametric regression Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability

  1. Decaying relevance of clinical data towards future decisions in data-driven inpatient clinical order sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2017-06-01

    Determine how varying longitudinal historical training data can impact prediction of future clinical decisions. Estimate the "decay rate" of clinical data source relevance. We trained a clinical order recommender system, analogous to Netflix or Amazon's "Customers who bought A also bought B..." product recommenders, based on a tertiary academic hospital's structured electronic health record data. We used this system to predict future (2013) admission orders based on different subsets of historical training data (2009 through 2012), relative to existing human-authored order sets. Predicting future (2013) inpatient orders is more accurate with models trained on just one month of recent (2012) data than with 12 months of older (2009) data (ROC AUC 0.91 vs. 0.88, precision 27% vs. 22%, recall 52% vs. 43%, all P<10 -10 ). Algorithmically learned models from even the older (2009) data was still more effective than existing human-authored order sets (ROC AUC 0.81, precision 16% recall 35%). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than using only the most recent (2012) data, unless applying a decaying weighting scheme with a "half-life" of data relevance about 4 months. Clinical practice patterns (automatically) learned from electronic health record data can vary substantially across years. Gold standards for clinical decision support are elusive moving targets, reinforcing the need for automated methods that can adapt to evolving information. Prioritizing small amounts of recent data is more effective than using larger amounts of older data towards future clinical predictions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of HIV-1-associated cryptococcal meningitis during the highly active antiretroviral therapy era: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma, Madeleine; Rasmussen, Line D; Martin-Iguacel, Raquel; Engsig, Frederik Neess; Stærke, Nina Breinholt; Stærkind, Mette; Obel, Niels; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with advanced immunosuppression predisposes to cryptococcal meningitis (CM). We describe the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of CM in HIV-infected individuals during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. A nationwide, population-based cohort of HIV-infected individuals was used to estimate incidence and mortality of CM including risk factors. A description of neurological symptoms of CM at presentation and follow-up in the study period 1995-2014 was included in this study. Among 6,351 HIV-infected individuals, 40 were diagnosed with CM. The incidence rates were 3.7, 1.8, and 0.3 per 1000 person-years at risk in 1995-1996, 1997-1999, and 2000-2014, respectively. Initiation of HAART was associated with decreased risk of acquiring CM [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 0.1 (95% CI, 0.05-0.22)]. African origin was associated with increased risk of CM [IRR, 2.05 (95% CI, 1.00-4.20)]. The main signs and symptoms at presentation were headache, cognitive deficits, fever, neck stiffness, nausea, and vomiting. All individuals diagnosed with CM had a CD4 + cell count <200 cells/µl [median 26; interquartile range (IQR), 10-50)]. Overall, mortality following CM was high and mortality in the first 4 months has not changed substantially over time. However, individuals who survived generally had a favorable prognosis, with 86% (18/21) returning to the pre-CM level of activity. The incidence of HIV-associated CM has decreased substantially after the introduction of HAART. To further decrease CM incidence and associated mortality, early HIV diagnosis and HAART initiation seems crucial.

  3. Meningitis following spinal anaesthesia in an obstetric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Mine; Kizilkaya, Mehmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Dogan, Nazim; Parlak, Mehmet; Can, Fatma Kesmez; Bayar, Meral

    2014-07-01

    Meningitis following lumbar puncture and spinal anaesthesia is a rare but serious complication. A 19-year-old woman was administered spinal anaesthesia at another centre prior to a Caesarean section. The following day she experienced headaches. On the fourth day, she started vomiting and having convulsions, and became agitated. Meningitis was diagnosed based on a clinical examination and analysis of a lumbar puncture sample. After 21 days of treatment, she was discharged. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with headaches following spinal anaesthesia. The causes of meningitis following spinal anaesthesia are debated, and it is difficult to distinguish between aseptic and bacterial meningitis. It should be compulsory to wear a face mask while performing a dural puncture. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Research on Clinical Decisions Made Daily in Family Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2017-01-01

    This issue presents research on the types of decisions that are required daily in family medicine. Patients often make these health decisions, and family physicians help patients with these decisions daily. Patients and their family physicians discuss when to quit screening for colon cancer, which treatment to choose for localized prostate cancer, when to test for pertussis when a cough is present, whether to take prescribed medications, how to complete more preventive services, and how to understand the "new genetics", and family physician use of telehealth. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. Computed Tomography Study Of Complicated Bacterial Meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To monitor the structural intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis using computed tomography (CT) scan. Retrospective study of medical and radiological records of patients who underwent CT scan over a 4 year period. AUniversityTeachingHospital in a developing country. Thirty three patients with clinically and ...

  6. Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis And Dexamethasone Adjunctive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Neonatal bacterial meningitis is devastating, with attendant high mortality and neurological sequelae. We, therefore, aimed to delineate its current incidence, etiologic, clinical, laboratory spectra, and the effect of steroid therapy on the outcome. Methodology: Babies admitted from1992 to 1995 in the Special Care ...

  7. Long-term neuropsychiatric consequences of aseptic meningitis in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Andersen, Henning; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2015-06-01

    Aseptic meningitis is considered a benign and self-limiting clinical condition. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. The existing literature is scarce on the potential long-term neuropsychiatric consequences of aseptic meningitis. Previous studies have primarily been retrospective and differences in methodologies make it difficult to draw conclusions regarding the prevalence and nature of neuropsychiatric manifestations. However, studies have reported decreased psychomotor speed and impaired executive and visuo-constructive functions following aseptic meningitis. Larger controlled prospective studies are urgently needed to elucidate the neuropsychiatric complications of aseptic meningitis.

  8. Possibilities of immunocytochemical phenotyping of cells in cerebrospinal fluid while children’s bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Karev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative dynamic clinical and immunomorphological researches of children’s cerebrospinal fluid were made during bacterial purulent meningitis (caused by Neisseria meningitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza. Regularities connected with presence of CD3 lymphocytes were discovered. They depended on etiology and phase of disease. Children with meningococcal meningitis, pneumococcal meningitis or hemophilic meningitis had different levels of CD3 lymphocytes in cerebrospinal fluid while different phases of disease.

  9. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard, Sonja E; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30-48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23-129/mm). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84-228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis.

  10. La méningite « prise en grippe » ? Meningitis versus Swine flu?An Ethnography of Decision-making at the Niger National Committee of Epidemic Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumy Thiongane

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available La maîtrise des problèmes de santé publique au Niger est conditionnée aux exigences des institutions internationales compétentes dans le domaine sanitaire. Alors qu’on pourrait s’attendre à ce que ces exigences soient d’ordre pratique, elles façonnent également la représentation du risque épidémique. A travers l’ethnographie de prise de décision au sein d’un comité d’experts nigériens et européens au moment de la pandémie annoncée de grippe AH1N1, et pendant l’épidémie de méningite la plus importante connue au Niger depuis plus d’une décennie, cet article met en lumière les représentations différentes du risque. Il montre que des logiques conflictuelles président à la gestion des épidémies et que l’enjeu fondamental réside dans l’existence et la mise à disposition des ressources permettant de maîtriser les maladies infectieuses. Cette étape dépend fortement de la manière dont les institutions internationales se représentent le risque sanitaire. En outre, la question du paradigme de la préparation à l’épidémie de méningite est confrontée à des contingences souvent construites.The control of public health issues in Niger requires obeying the requirements of the international institutions for health. While we might expect that such requirements are practical, they also construct the representation of epidemic risk. Through an ethnography of decision-making within a Nigerian and European expert committee during the onset of the AH1N1 influenza pandemic and the most important meningitis epidemic in Niger for over a decade, this paper highlights the differences between the representations of risk. It shows that different and conflicting logics govern the management of epidemic and that the most important issue concerns the availability of resources and their provision that allow the control of infectious diseases. This step depends strongly on how international institutions represent the

  11. Spinal meningeal cyst: analysis with low-field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongzhou; Chen Yejia; Chen Ronghua; Chen Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of spinal meningeal cyst in low-field MRI and to discuss its classification, subtype, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. Methods: Forty-two patients (20 male, 22 female) were examined with sagittal T 1 -and T 2 -, axial T 2 -weighted MR imaging. Twelve patients were also examined with contrast-enhanced MRI. Results: The cysts were classified using Nakors' classification as type Ia extradural meningeal cysts (4 patients), type Ib sacral meningeal cysts (32), type II extradural meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers (4), and type III spinal intradural meningeal cysts (2). All 42 spinal meningeal cysts had well-defined boundaries with low T 1 and high T 2 signal intensities similar to cerebral spinal fluid. In type Ia, the lesions were often on the dorsum of mid-lower thoracic spinal cord compressing the spinal cord and displacing the extradural fat. In type Ib, the lesions were in the sacral canal with fat plane between the cyst and dural sac. In type II, the lesions contained nerve roots and were lateral to the dural sac. In type III, the lesions were often on the dorsum of spinal cord compressing and displacing the spinal cord anteriorly. Conclusion: Low-field MRI can clearly display the spinal meningeal cyst. Types Ia and Ib spinal meningeal cysts had typical features and can be easily diagnosed. Types II and III should be differentiated from cystic schwannomas and enterogenous cysts, respectively. (authors)

  12. Aspectos radiográficos e tomográficos de hemangiossarcoma de meninges causando síndrome da cauda eqüina em um Pastor Alemão Radiographic and tomographic aspects of meningeal hemangiosarcoma in a German Shepherd dog with clinical signs of cauda equina sindrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Brandão de Campos Fonseca Pinto

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O hemangiossarcoma é uma neoplasma altamente maligna da linha de células endoteliais e que, portanto, pode ter origem em qualquer tecido com vasos sangüíneos. Descreve-se um caso raro de hemangiossarcoma de meninge em um cão Pastor Alemão de 8 anos de idade, com manifestações clínicas de síndrome da cauda eqüina. O diagnóstico foi realizado com base nos achados clínicos, radiográficos, tomográficos e histopatológicos.Hemangiosarcoma is a highly malignant neoplasia derived from the endothelial cell line and, therefore, can arise in any tissue with blood vessels. A case of a rare meningeal site of hemangiosarcoma in an eight-year old German Shepherd dog with clinical signs of cauda equina sindrome is described. The diagnosis was made based on clinical, radiographic, tomographic and histopathological findings.

  13. External validation of clinical decision rules for children with wrist trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, Marjolein A. M.; Walenkamp, Monique M. J.; Dubois, Bente F. H.; Slaar, Annelie; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical decision rules help to avoid potentially unnecessary radiographs of the wrist, reduce waiting times and save costs. The primary aim of this study was to provide an overview of all existing non-validated clinical decision rules for wrist trauma in children and to externally validate these

  14. External validation of clinical decision rules for children with wrist trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Mulders (Marjolein A. M.); M.M.J. Walenkamp (Monique); B.F.H. Dubois (Bente F. H.); A. Slaar (Annelie); J.C. Goslings (Carel); N.W.L. Schep (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Clinical decision rules help to avoid potentially unnecessary radiographs of the wrist, reduce waiting times and save costs. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to provide an overview of all existing non-validated clinical decision rules for wrist trauma in children

  15. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  16. Características clínicas e laboratoriais da meningite asséptica associada à vacina tríplice viral Clinical and laboratory features of aseptic meningitis associated with measles-mumps-rubella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Lucena

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Descrever os achados epidemiológicos, clínicos e liquóricos dos casos de meningite asséptica associada à vacina tríplice viral (sarampo, caxumba e rubéola, ocorridos no Estado da Bahia após campanha de vacinação em massa promovida pelo Ministério da Saúde do Brasil em agosto de 1997, e comparar esses casos aos de meningite asséptica não associada à vacina ocorridos no mesmo ano. Métodos. Entre março e outubro de 1997, foi realizado acompanhamento prospectivo de todos os indivíduos com idade de 1 a 12 anos admitidos no Hospital Couto Maia com diagnóstico clínico e laboratorial de meningite asséptica. A população do estudo foi dividida em dois grupos, representando indivíduos vacinados e não vacinados. Foram coletadas informações demográficas, clínicas e laboratoriais para ambos os grupos. Resultados. No mês de setembro, logo após a campanha de vacinação, 74 casos de meningite asséptica foram atendidos no Hospital Couto Maia, em comparação com a média mensal de 7,5 casos. Verificamos maior freqüência de rigidez de nuca e níveis mais altos de celularidade liquórica nas crianças cuja meningite foi associada à vacina. Por outro lado, houve maior número de casos com comprometimento encefálico no grupo de meningites não associadas à vacinação. Conclusões. Embora a meningite pós-vacinal tenha curso mais benigno, seu tratamento continua gerando custos com exames complementares e internações. As campanhas de vacinação em larga escala devem utilizar vacinas contendo cepas menos reatogênicas.Objective. To describe epidemiological, clinical, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings in cases of aseptic meningitis associated with measles-mumps-rubella vaccination following a mass immunization campaign in the Brazilian state of Bahia in August 1997 promoted by the country's Ministry of Health, and to compare these cases to the cases of aseptic meningitis not associated with the vaccine that

  17. CT finding of cryptococcal meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, H.; Ueda, M.; Ito, K.; Matsuoka, T. (Ohkawara Neurosurgical Hospital, Muroran (Japan))

    1981-08-01

    We have experienced 14 cases of cryptococcal meningitis in the last 6 years. Their neurological signs, CT findings, and prognoses were studied. They fall into three types: the brain-stem-encephalitis type, the cortical-encephalitis type, and the meningitis type, according to the clinical course. The first type (6 cases) revealed mainly cerebellar signs, eye-movement damage, and so forth. The second type (5 cases) demonstrated ''Personality'' changes, chiefly aphasia. The third type (5 cases) did not show any focal signs. Prognosis of the brain-stem-encephalitis type was very poor, with a 50% mortality rate. In the survivors, also, clinical signs did not disappear for a long time. Repeated CT was performed in 13 among the 14 cases; abnormal CT findings were revealed in 5 cases because of cryptococcal infection. Granuloma shadow and ventriculitis shadow were observed in 3 cases each. These abnormal findings disappeared upon treatment except in one case. The clinical signs are not completely related with the CT finding, but it is useful that the site which has been infiltrated by the cryptococcus can be observed. Abnormal CT findings were observed in the 4 cases of the brain-stem-encephalitis type among the 5 abnormal cases. It is very useful to know the severity of the condition.

  18. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Rapid Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis Using a Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Jy Ben

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: The microarray method provides a more accurate and rapid diagnostic tool for bacterial meningitis compared to traditional culture methods. Clinical application of this new technique may reduce the potential risk of delay in treatment.

  20. Chemical Meningitis with Intracranial Tumours | De Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with intracranial epidermoid tumours who had a chemical meningitis as part of their clinical course, are described. The importance of recognising this as a presenting complaint is stressed. The pathogenesis and treatment are discussed.

  1. Antituberculosis drug resistance patterns in adults with tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senbayrak, Seniha; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Erdem, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to antituberculosis drugs is an increasingly common clinical problem. This study aimed to evaluate drug resistance profiles of TBM isolates in adult patients in nine European countries involving 32 centers to ...

  2. Enhancing clinical decision making: development of a contiguous definition and conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffen, Jennifer; Corbridge, Susan J; Slimmer, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a term frequently used to describe the fundamental role of the nurse practitioner; however, other terms have been used interchangeably. The purpose of this article is to begin the process of developing a definition and framework of clinical decision making. The developed definition was "Clinical decision making is a contextual, continuous, and evolving process, where data are gathered, interpreted, and evaluated in order to select an evidence-based choice of action." A contiguous framework for clinical decision making specific for nurse practitioners is also proposed. Having a clear and unique understanding of clinical decision making will allow for consistent use of the term, which is relevant given the changing educational requirements for nurse practitioners and broadening scope of practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and ca...

  4. Independent association between rate of clearance of infection and clinical outcome of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: analysis of a combined cohort of 262 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, T.; Muzoora, C.; Brouwer, A.E.; Meintjes, G.; Longley, N.; Taseera, K.; Rebe, K.; Loyse, A.; Jarvis, J.; Bekker, L.G.; Wood, R.; Limmathurotsakul, D.; Chierakul, W.; Stepniewska, K.; White, N.J.; Jaffar, S.; Harrison, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progress in therapy for cryptococcal meningitis has been slow because of the lack of a suitable marker of treatment response. Previously, we demonstrated the statistical power of a novel endpoint, the rate of clearance of infection, based on serial quantitative cultures of cerebrospinal

  5. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  6. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  7. Emerging fluconazole resistance: Implications for the management of cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpoza, Edward; Rhein, Joshua; Abassi, Mahsa

    2018-03-01

    We present the case of an HIV-seropositive individual with cryptococcal meningitis who was found to have a fluconazole resistant strain of Cryptococcus neoformans . The individual required multiple rounds of amphotericin and fluconazole 800-1200 mg after several episodes of clinical relapse. Cerebrospinal fluid sterilization was achieved and maintained with high doses of fluconazole. This case demonstrates the emerging dilemma of increasing rates of fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus and the clinical difficulties in meningitis management.

  8. Emerging fluconazole resistance: Implications for the management of cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Mpoza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an HIV-seropositive individual with cryptococcal meningitis who was found to have a fluconazole resistant strain of Cryptococcus neoformans. The individual required multiple rounds of amphotericin and fluconazole 800–1200 mg after several episodes of clinical relapse. Cerebrospinal fluid sterilization was achieved and maintained with high doses of fluconazole. This case demonstrates the emerging dilemma of increasing rates of fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus and the clinical difficulties in meningitis management.

  9. Características clínicas e laboratoriais de meningites piogênicas em adultos Clinical and laboratorial characteristics of pyogenic meningitis in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irênio Gomes

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados dados do prontuário de 176 pacientes com idade igual ou superior a 15 anos, internados no Hospital Couto Maia, no período de janeiro de 1990 a dezembro de 1992, em Salvador-BA, com o diagnóstico de meningite piogênica. Observamos, em ordem decrescente, maior percentagem de pacientes com N. meningitidis (56,7%, S. pneumoniae (37,5% e E.coli. (3,3%. A letalidade foi maior no grupo com meningite pneumocócica. No grupo de indivíduos com meningite por pneumococo verificamos que a média etária e de leucócitos no sangue periférico foram superiores quando comparadas com o grupo de portadores de meningite meningocócica. Por outro lado, neste último grupo a média de glicorraquia foi maior. A presença de lesões cutâneas hemorrágicas mostrou-se preditora da etiologia meningocócica.We reviewed the charts of 176 adult patients, admitted with a diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis, in the Hospital Couto Maia, from January 1990 to December 1992. All the patients had community-acquired meningitis. In 120 patients we could identify the causative agent on Gram's staining and culture. The most common pathogens were N. meningitidis (56.7% S. pneumoniae (37.5% and E. coli (3.3%. The overall lethality rate was 19.8% and the lethality was greater in the group with streptococcus meningitis (31.8%. The mean age and the leukocyte in the peripheral blood were greater in the group with S. pneumoniae meningitis than in the meningococal group. Cutaneous hemorrhagic lesions was an excellent predictor meningococcal meningitis.

  10. [International outcomes from attempts to implement a clinical decision support system in gastroenterology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Josceli Maria; Hummel, Anderson Diniz; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Pisa, Ivan Torres; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at describing the recent experience acquired with the implementation and use of clinical decision support system in gastroenterology in order to determine the level of development, tests used and advantages that such a system can offer to the medical practice. A search in the PubMed, LILACS and ISI Web of Knowledge databases for studies in decision-making support systems in gastroenterology including original papers produced from 2005 to 2010 was performed. A total of 104 scientific papers were retrieved initially. These were analyzed using inclusion and exclusion criteria, thus yielding nine studies for further analysis. The clinical decision support system analyzed in the present study showed a great variety of clinical problems regarding the investigation of a disease and the determination of a diagnosis. Eighty-nine per cent of the studies showed experimental models for clinical decision support system development. Seventy-eight per cent of the studies described the outcomes obtained with artificial intelligence technique. Two studies compared the clinical decision support system performance with that of a doctor, and only one research work described a controlled study evidencing improvements in the medical practice. The studies analyzed showed evidence of potential benefits that clinical decision support system can bring to the clinical practice. However, further controlled studies performed in medical day-to-day conditions and environment should be performed in order to provide more clear evidence of the usefulness of clinical decision support system in the medical practice.

  11. With a little help from a computer: discriminating between bacterial and viral meningitis based on dominance-based rough set approach analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Ewelina; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Słowiński, Roman; Błaszczyński, Jerzy; Michalak, Michał; Wysocki, Jacek

    2017-08-01

    Differential Diagnosis of bacterial and viral meningitis remains an important clinical problem. A number of methods to assist in the diagnoses of meningitis have been developed, but none of them have been found to have high specificity with 100% sensitivity.We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 148 children hospitalized in St. Joseph Children's Hospital in Poznań. In this study, we applied for the first time the original methodology of dominance-based rough set approach (DRSA) to diagnostic patterns of meningitis data and represented them by decision rules useful in discriminating between bacterial and viral meningitis. The induction algorithm is called VC-DomLEM; it has been implemented as software package called jMAF (http://www.cs.put.poznan.pl/jblaszczynski/Site/jRS.html), based on java Rough Set (jRS) library.In the studied group, there were 148 patients (78 boys and 70 girls), and the mean age was 85 months. We analyzed 14 attributes, of which only 4 were used to generate the 6 rules, with C-reactive protein (CRP) being the most valuable.Factors associated with bacterial meningitis were: CRP level ≥86 mg/L, number of leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ≥4481 μL, symptoms duration no longer than 2 days, or age less than 1 month. Factors associated with viral meningitis were CRP level not higher than 19 mg/L, or CRP level not higher than 84 mg/L in a patient older than 11 months with no more than 1100 μL leukocytes in CSF.We established the minimum set of attributes significant for classification of patients with meningitis. This is new set of rules, which, although intuitively anticipated by some clinicians, has not been formally demonstrated until now.

  12. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy. PMID:21772793

  13. Modeling information flows in clinical decision support: key insights for enhancing system effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Stephanie; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Patel, Vimla L; Shortliffe, Edward H; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental challenge in the field of clinical decision support is to determine what characteristics of systems make them effective in supporting particular types of clinical decisions. However, we lack such a theory of decision support itself and a model to describe clinical decisions and the systems to support them. This article outlines such a framework. We present a two-stream model of information flow within clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs): reasoning about the patient (the clinical stream), and reasoning about the user (the cognitive-behavioral stream). We propose that CDSS "effectiveness" be measured not only in terms of a system's impact on clinical care, but also in terms of how (and by whom) the system is used, its effect on work processes, and whether it facilitates appropriate decisions by clinicians and patients. Future research into which factors improve the effectiveness of decision support should not regard CDSSs as a single entity, but should instead differentiate systems based on their attributes, users, and the decision being supported. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis.

  15. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis,

  16. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Komulainen, Jorma; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2012-01-01

    's intention to use eCDS. The decisive reason for using or not using the eCDS is its perceived usefulness. Functional characteristics such as speed and ease of use are important but alone these are not enough. Specific information technology, professional, patient and environment features can help or hinder...

  17. The Effect of Client Case Complexity on Clinical Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, M.; Pieters, J.M.; Witteman, C.L.M.; Lehmann, S.R.S.

    2014-01-01

    In mental health care, clinicians' treatment decisions are expected to be based on the formulation (i.e., exploration of the causing and maintaining mechanisms) of the client's problems. Previous research showed two things: clinicians' case formulations mainly contain descriptive information instead

  18. The effect of client case complexity on clinical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, Marleen; Pieters, Julius Marie; Witteman, C.L.M.; Lehmann, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    In mental health care, clinicians’ treatment decisions are expected to be based on the formulation (i.e., exploration of the causing and maintaining mechanisms) of the client’s problems. Previous research showed two things: clinicians’ case formulations mainly contain descriptive information instead

  19. Clinical decision making in dermatology: observation of consultations and the patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex process and might be influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Little is known about this process in dermatology. The aim of this study was to explore the different types of management decisions made in dermatology and to identify factors influencing those decisions from observation of consultations and interviews with the patients. 61 patient consultations were observed by a physician with experience in dermatology. The patients were interviewed immediately after each consultation. Consultations and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and their content analysed using thematic content analysis. The most common management decisions made during the consultations included: follow-up, carrying out laboratory investigation, starting new topical treatment, renewal of systemic treatment, renewal of topical treatment, discharging patients and starting new systemic treatment. Common influences on those decisions included: clinical factors such as ineffectiveness of previous therapy, adherence to prescribing guidelines, side-effects of medications, previous experience with the treatment, deterioration or improvement in the skin condition, and chronicity of skin condition. Non-clinical factors included: patient's quality of life, patient's friends or relatives, patient's time commitment, travel or transportation difficulties, treatment-related costs, availability of consultant, and availability of treatment. The study has shown that patients are aware that management decisions in dermatology are influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Education programmes should be developed to improve the quality of decision making. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Acute care of patients with bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetefeld, H R; Dohmen, C

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening emergency that is still associated with high mortality and poor outcome. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, therapy, and prognosis in bacterial meningitis. Prognostic factors which could be influenced positively are identified and a focused procedure in the emergency setting and for the treatment of complications are provided. This work is based on a literature search (PubMed, guidelines) and personal experience (standard operating procedures, SOP). Despite improved health care, bacterial meningitis is still associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome, which has remained largely unaltered during recent decades. Diagnosis and, more importantly, effective therapy of bacterial meningitis are often delayed, having an immediate negative influence on clinical outcome. Neurological and nonneurological complications often necessitate intensive care and may occur rapidly or in the further course of the disease. Immediate initiation of effective therapy is crucial to positively influence mortality and neurological outcome. Antibiotics should be administered within 30 min after admission. To achieve this, a focused and well-organized procedure in the emergency setting is necessary. Because of intra- and extracranial complications, patients need to be treated on intensive care units including neurological expertise and interdisciplinary support.

  1. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of

  2. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberg Ryan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language process definition language (XPDL. The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent. We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We

  3. Giant Leaking Colloid Cyst Presenting with Aseptic Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhtevari, Mehrdad Hosseinzadeh; Sharifi, Guive; Jabbari, Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colloid cysts are benign third ventricle lesions that need to be diagnosed correctly because of their association with sudden death. Chemical or aseptic meningitis is a rare presentation of a colloid cyst. METHODS: We present a case of a 69-year-old man with fever, alteration of mental...... status, and meningismus. Microbiological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed aseptic meningitis. Brain imaging revealed a third ventricular colloid cyst with hydrocephalus. RESULTS: The tumor was resected via endoscopic intervention. There were no persistent operative complications related...... to the endoscopic procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Chemical or aseptic meningitis is an unusual clinical manifestation of a colloid cyst, complicating the differential diagnosis, especially in the elderly....

  4. Streptococcus suis Meningitis: First Case Reported in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Michaud

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Very few Streptococcus suis infections in humans have been reported in Canada, although the condition is frequent in pigs. Meningitis, often accompanied by severe hearing loss, is the most common clinical manifestation. The disease is an occupational illness affecting persons in contact with pigs and may be underdiagnosed because of misidentification of the responsible bacterium. Since Quebec is the leading province for swine production in Canada, physicians and microbiologists should be aware of this infection, especially when a streptococcal meningitis is diagnosed in swine workers. The first case of S suis type 2 meningitis reported in Quebec is described.

  5. User-centered design to improve clinical decision support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Julian; Chuang, Emmeline; Goldzweig, Caroline; Cain, Cindy L; Sugar, Catherine; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2017-08-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated the ability of user-centered design to make clinical decision support systems more effective and easier to use. However, studies of user-centered design have rarely examined more than a handful of sites at a time, and have frequently neglected the implementation climate and organizational resources that influence clinical decision support. The inclusion of such factors was identified by a systematic review as "the most important improvement that can be made in health IT evaluations." (1) Identify the prevalence of four user-centered design practices at United States Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinics and assess the perceived utility of clinical decision support at those clinics; (2) Evaluate the association between those user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support. We analyzed clinic-level survey data collected in 2006-2007 from 170 VA primary care clinics. We examined four user-centered design practices: 1) pilot testing, 2) provider satisfaction assessment, 3) formal usability assessment, and 4) analysis of impact on performance improvement. We used a regression model to evaluate the association between user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support, while accounting for other important factors at those clinics, including implementation climate, available resources, and structural characteristics. We also examined associations separately at community-based clinics and at hospital-based clinics. User-centered design practices for clinical decision support varied across clinics: 74% conducted pilot testing, 62% conducted provider satisfaction assessment, 36% conducted a formal usability assessment, and 79% conducted an analysis of impact on performance improvement. Overall perceived utility of clinical decision support was high, with a mean rating of 4.17 (±.67) out of 5 on a composite measure. "Analysis of impact on performance

  6. Paediatric Investigators Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada (PICNIC study of aseptic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Joan L

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The seasonality, clinical and radiographic features and outcome of aseptic meningitis have been described for regional outbreaks but data from a wider geographic area is necessary to delineate the epidemiology of this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was completed of children presenting with aseptic meningitis to eight Canadian pediatric hospitals over a two-year period. Results There were 233 cases of proven enteroviral (EV meningitis, 495 cases of clinical aseptic meningitis and 74 cases of possible aseptic meningitis with most cases occurring July to October. Headache, vomiting, meningismus and photophobia were more common in children ≥ 5 years of age, while rash, diarrhea and cough were more common in children Conclusion The clinical presentation of aseptic meningitis varies with the age of the child. Absence of CSF pleocytosis is common in infants

  7. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  8. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a rare but important and often challenging diagnosis for the physician. Intake of antimicrobials, steroids, anal- gesics amongst others has been implicated. Signs and symptoms generally develop within 24-48 hours of drug ingestion. The pa- tient often ...

  9. The professional medical ethics model of decision making under conditions of clinical uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B

    2013-02-01

    The professional medical ethics model of decision making may be applied to decisions clinicians and patients make under the conditions of clinical uncertainty that exist when evidence is low or very low. This model uses the ethical concepts of medicine as a profession, the professional virtues of integrity and candor and the patient's virtue of prudence, the moral management of medical uncertainty, and trial of intervention. These features combine to justifiably constrain clinicians' and patients' autonomy with the goal of preventing nondeliberative decisions of patients and clinicians. To prevent biased recommendations by the clinician that promote such nondeliberative decisions, medically reasonable alternatives supported by low or very low evidence should be offered but not recommended. The professional medical ethics model of decision making aims to improve the quality of decisions by reducing the unacceptable variation that can result from nondeliberative decision making by patients and clinicians when evidence is low or very low.

  10. Artificial Intelligence Framework for Simulating Clinical Decision-Making: A Markov Decision Process Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Casey C.; Hauser, Kris

    2013-01-01

    In the modern healthcare system, rapidly expanding costs/complexity, the growing myriad of treatment options, and exploding information streams that often do not effectively reach the front lines hinder the ability to choose optimal treatment decisions over time. The goal in this paper is to develop a general purpose (non-disease-specific) computational/artificial intelligence (AI) framework to address these challenges. This serves two potential functions: 1) a simulation environment for expl...

  11. Strategies to facilitate shared decision-making about pediatric oncology clinical trial enrollment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eden G; Wakefield, Claire E; Signorelli, Christina; Cohn, Richard J; Patenaude, Andrea; Foster, Claire; Pettit, Tristan; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-02-11

    We conducted a systematic review to identify the strategies that have been recommended in the literature to facilitate shared decision-making regarding enrolment in pediatric oncology clinical trials. We searched seven databases for peer-reviewed literature, published 1990-2017. Of 924 articles identified, 17 studies were eligible for the review. We assessed study quality using the 'Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool'. We coded the results and discussions of papers line-by-line using nVivo software. We categorized strategies thematically. Five main themes emerged: 1) decision-making as a process, 2) individuality of the process; 3) information provision, 4) the role of communication, or 5) decision and psychosocial support. Families should have adequate time to make a decision. HCPs should elicit parents' and patients' preferences for level of information and decision involvement. Information should be clear and provided in multiple modalities. Articles also recommended providing training for healthcare professionals and access to psychosocial support for families. High quality, individually-tailored information, open communication and psychosocial support appear vital in supporting decision-making regarding enrollment in clinical trials. These data will usefully inform future decision-making interventions/tools to support families making clinical trial decisions. A solid evidence-base for effective strategies which facilitate shared decision-making is needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.T.; Holm, D.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background. Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. Methods. Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. Results. Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  13. Rheumatoid meningitis: a rare complication of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Chwalisz, Bart; Pfannl, Rolf; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2015-07-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman with a 23-year history of rheumatoid arthritis, who presented with a 2-week history of headache and cognitive/behavioural changes. On the basis of clinical features, radiology, laboratory data and meningeal biopsy, a diagnosis of rheumatoid meningitis was performed. High-dose intravenous methylprednisolone was used as initial treatment followed by oral prednisone. The patient's symptoms improved and repeat MRI scans confirmed resolution of the meningeal lesions. The clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid meningitis is difficult, but it must be considered in patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis presenting with neurological symptoms. Glucocorticoids or other immunomodulatory therapy are the mainstay of treatment. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Towards patient-centered colorectal cancer surgery : focus on risks, decisions and clinical auditing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Heleen Simone

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore several aspects of both clinical decision making and quality assessment in colorectal cancer surgery. Part one focusses on benefits and risks of treatment options, preoperative information provision and Shared Decision Making (SDM); part two investigates changes

  15. mHealth for Clinical Decision-Making in Sub-Saharan Africa : A Scoping Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adepoju, Ibukun-Oluwa Omolade; Albersen, Bregje Joanna Antonia; De Brouwere, Vincent; van Roosmalen, Jos; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a bid to deliver quality health services in resource-poor settings, mobile health (mHealth) is increasingly being adopted. The role of mHealth in facilitating evidence-based clinical decision-making through data collection, decision algorithms, and evidence-based guidelines, for

  16. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  17. GRADE Guidelines: 16. GRADE evidence to decision frameworks for tests in clinical practice and public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schünemann, Holger J.; Mustafa, Reem; Brozek, Jan; Santesso, Nancy; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon; Scholten, Rob; Langendam, Miranda; Leeflang, Mariska M.; Akl, Elie A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Meerpohl, Joerg; Hultcrantz, Monica; Bossuyt, Patrick; Oxman, Andrew D.; Singh, Jasvinder; Lange, Stefan; Parmelli, Elena; Moberg, Jenny; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Davoli, Marina; Nowak, Artur; Dietl, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) interactive evidence to decision (EtD) frameworks for tests and test strategies for clinical, public health, or coverage decisions. Study Design and Setting: As part of the GRADE Working Group's

  18. GRADE Guidelines : 16. GRADE evidence to decision frameworks for tests in clinical practice and public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schünemann, Holger J.; Mustafa, Reem A.; Brozek, Jan; Santesso, Nancy; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon; Scholten, Rob; Langendam, Miranda W; Leeflang, Mariska; Akl, Elie A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Meerpohl, Joerg; Hultcrantz, Monica; Bossuyt, Patrick Mm; Oxman, Andrew D.; Schünemann, Holger J.; Mustafa, Reem A.; Brozek, Jan; Santesso, Nancy; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Scholten, Rob; Langendam, Miranda W; Bossuyt, Patrick Mm; Leeflang, Mariska; Singh, Jasvinder; Meerpohl, Joerg; Hultcrantz, Monica; Guyatt, Gordon; Oxman, Andrew D.; Lange, Stefan; Parmelli, Elena; Moberg, Jenny; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Davoli, Marina; Nowak, Artur; Dietl, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) interactive evidence to decision (EtD) frameworks for tests and test strategies for clinical, public health, or coverage decisions. Study Design and Setting As part of the GRADE Working Group's

  19. The role of pediatricians as key stakeholders in influencing immunization policy decisions for the introduction of meningitis B vaccine in Canada: The Ontario perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Hirotaka; Cutcliffe, Nora; Dobson, Simon; Fisman, David; Gold, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    As key stakeholders in immunization policy decisions, the Pediatricians of Ontario held an accredited conference on January 18, 2014, to discuss prevention of invasive meningococcal disease. Five key recommendations were put forth regarding immunization strategies to protect children from meningococcal serogroup B disease. The recently approved four-component meningococcal B (4CMenB) vaccine should be recommended and funded as part of Ontario’s routine immunization schedule and should also be mandated for school attendance. Public funding for 4CMenB immunization is justified based on current MenB epidemiology, vaccine coverage, cost effectiveness and acceptability, as well as legal, political and ethical considerations related to 4CMenB immunization, particularly because routine recommendations and funding are currently in place for vaccination against meningococcal serogroups that cause significantly less disease in Canada than MenB. Broadly, the goals are to assist individual practitioners in advocating the benefits of 4CMenB vaccination to parents, and to counterbalance recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Canadian Paediatric Society. PMID:26361485

  20. [Community acquired bacterial meningitis in patients over 60].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora Mora, Luis A; Arco Espinosa, Micke E de; Plumet, Javier; Micheli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis has a global mortality rate of 135000 cases per year. In Argentina over the last 12 years, the annual incidence rate has been 5.5/100 000. About 20% of patients present neurological sequelae, which are more common in patients aged 60 or older. Our objective here is to determine the clinical characteristics, the most common causes and to measure evolution in patients over 60 years old diagnosed with meningitis and treated at the Hospital de Clinicas José de San Martín. This is a retrospective study based on a review of medical records from 2003 to 2013 that takes into account patients older than 60 who were diagnosed with acute bacterial meningitis acquired in the community by a microbiological diagnosis of CSF or those included due to a high suspicion of bacterial meningitis (pleocitosis > 2000 cells/mm3, proteins > 220 mg/dl, glycorrhachia meningitis, nosocomial, postoperative and other nonbacterial meningitis were excluded. Sixty nine patients were included, 45 (65%) were women with an average age of 78 ± 10.6 years. Only 40% had the triad of classical meningitis symptoms (stiff neck, fever and altered mental status). In 52% of the patients germs developed in the CSF, the most frequent being Streptococcus pneumoniae present in 47% of cases. Lethality rate was 41%, all of them by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Only 24 (35%) cases were admitted into intensive care. The main sequelae present were motor disorders (12%) and hearing loss (5%).

  1. A statistical model for predicting the retrieval rate of separated instruments and clinical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lin

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: A statistical model relating to root canal curvature and depth of separated instruments was established to evaluate the retrieval rate of separated instruments, and the result of this formulation may provide clues for clinical decision-making.

  2. Use of intracranial pressure monitoring in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lykke; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Nielsen, Troels H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with severe bacterial meningitis where intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has been performed. METHODS: A retrospective observational study including patients admitted 1st(.) January 2005 to 31st(.) December 2014...... CT scans with signs of elevated ICP. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe meningitis should be admitted to intensive care units and evaluated for ICP monitoring regardless of head CT findings....

  3. Cervical Spinal Meningeal Melanocytoma Presenting as Intracranial Superficial Siderosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Srirama Jayamma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a rare pigmented tumor of the leptomeningeal melanocytes. This rare entity results in diagnostic difficulty in imaging unless clinical and histopathology correlation is performed. In this case report, we describe a case of meningeal melanocytoma of the cervical region presenting with superficial siderosis. Extensive neuroradiological examination is necessary to locate the source of the bleeding in such patients. Usually, the patient will be cured by the complete surgical excision of the lesion.

  4. Cryptococcal meningitis: epidemiology, immunology, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Peter R; Jarvis, Joseph N; Panackal, Anil A; Fisher, Matthew C; Molloy, Síle F; Loyse, Angela; Harrison, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis is by far the most common cause of adult meningitis in many areas of the world that have high HIV seroprevalence. In most areas in Sub-Saharan Africa, the incidence of cryptococcal meningitis is not decreasing despite availability of antiretroviral therapy, because of issues of adherence and retention in HIV care. In addition, cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-seronegative individuals is a substantial problem: the risk of cryptococcal infection is increased in transplant recipients and other individuals with defects in cell-mediated immunity, and cryptococcosis is also reported in the apparently immunocompetent. Despite therapy, mortality rates in these groups are high. Over the past 5 years, advances have been made in rapid point-of-care diagnosis and early detection of cryptococcal antigen in the blood. These advances have enabled development of screening and pre-emptive treatment strategies aimed at preventing the development of clinical infection in patients with late-stage HIV infection. Progress in optimizing antifungal combinations has been aided by evaluation of the clearance rate of infection by using serial quantitative cultures of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Measurement and management of raised CSF pressure, a common complication, is a vital component of care. In addition, we now better understand protective immune responses in HIV-associated cases, immunogenetic predisposition to infection, and the role of immune-mediated pathology in patients with non-HIV associated infection and in the context of HIV-associated immune reconstitution reactions.

  5. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  6. Meningeal infiltration in recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Fan, Y.-F.

    2000-01-01

    Permeative infiltration of the meninges appears to be a distinct form of recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The present report of eight patients with recurrent NPC illustrates meningeal infiltration following basal foramina extension. Seven of the eight patients (88%) showed jugular foramen involvement. Three patients had concomitant infiltration of the foramen magnum. There was one patient showing spread through the foramen lacerum. Only four (50%) of these patients had clinically detectable tumour in the nasopharynx, while the other half showed deep submucosal recurrence with endoscopically unremarkable findings. Permeative meningeal infiltration appears to be a distinct form of NPC recurrence. It is important to recognize this phenomenon so as to optimize the treatment options. The imaging studies were reviewed and the following features were recorded: local nasopharyngeal recurrence, the manner of intracranial spread and site of meningeal infiltration. Four patients had only MRI, two had only CT and two patients had both CT and MRI. The presence or absence of intracranial tumour before treatment was also recorded. Two observers reviewed the images and results were arrived at by consensus. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Donald R; Hurwitz, Eric L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Neck pain (NP) is a common cause of disability. Accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment have been elusive. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule) has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based guide in applying the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to ...

  8. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Donald R; Hurwitz, Eric L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP) is common and costly. Development of accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment has been identified as a research priority. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule) has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based means to apply the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. T...

  9. Development and evaluation of learning module on clinical decision-making in Prosthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Saee; Lambade, Dipti; Chahande, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Best practice strategies for helping students learn the reasoning skills of problem solving and critical thinking (CT) remain a source of conjecture, particularly with regard to CT. The dental education literature is fundamentally devoid of research on the cognitive components of clinical decision-making. Aim: This study was aimed to develop and evaluate the impact of blended learning module on clinical decision-making skills of dental graduates for planning prosthodontics rehabilita...

  10. The role of emotion in clinical decision making: an integrative literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Desirée; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Rowley, Joanne; Sutherland, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditionally, clinical decision making has been perceived as a purely rational and cognitive process. Recently, a number of authors have linked emotional intelligence (EI) to clinical decision making (CDM) and calls have been made for an increased focus on EI skills for clinicians. The objective of this integrative literature review was to identify and synthesise the empirical evidence for a role of emotion in CDM. Methods A systematic search of the bibliographic databases PubMed,...

  11. Accuracy of intuition in clinical decision-making among novice clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amanda; Zulkosky, Kristen; White, Krista; Pretz, Jean

    2017-05-01

    To assess the reliance on intuitive and analytical approaches during clinical decision-making among novice clinicians and whether that reliance is associated with accurate decision-making. Nurse educators and managers tend to emphasize analysis over intuition during clinical decision-making though nurses typically report some reliance on intuition in their practice. We hypothesized that under certain conditions, reliance on intuition would support accurate decision-making, even among novices. This study utilized an experimental design with clinical complication (familiar vs. novel) and decision phase (cue acquisition, diagnosis and action) as within-subjects' factors, and simulation role (observer, family, auxiliary nurse and primary nurse) as between-subjects' factor. We examined clinical decision-making accuracy among final semester pre-licensure nursing students in a simulation experience. Students recorded their reasoning about emerging clinical complications with their patient during two distinct points in the simulation; one point involved a familiar complication and the other a relatively novel complication. All data were collected during Spring 2015. Although most participants relied more heavily on analysis than on intuition, use of intuition during the familiar complication was associated with more accurate decision-making, particularly in guiding attention to relevant cues. With the novel complication, use of intuition appeared to hamper decision-making, particularly for those in an observer role. Novice clinicians should be supported by educators and nurse managers to note when their intuitions are likely to be valid. Our findings emphasize the integrated nature of intuition and analysis in clinical decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Development and evaluation of learning module on clinical decision-making in Prosthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Saee; Lambade, Dipti; Chahande, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Best practice strategies for helping students learn the reasoning skills of problem solving and critical thinking (CT) remain a source of conjecture, particularly with regard to CT. The dental education literature is fundamentally devoid of research on the cognitive components of clinical decision-making. Aim: This study was aimed to develop and evaluate the impact of blended learning module on clinical decision-making skills of dental graduates for planning prosthodontics rehabilitation. Methodology: An interactive teaching module consisting of didactic lectures on clinical decision-making and a computer-assisted case-based treatment planning software was developed Its impact on cognitive knowledge gain in clinical decision-making was evaluated using an assessment involving problem-based multiple choice questions and paper-based case scenarios. Results: Mean test scores were: Pretest (17 ± 1), posttest 1 (21 ± 2) and posttest 2 (43 ± 3). Comparison of mean scores was done with one-way ANOVA test. There was overall significant difference in between mean scores at all the three points (P posttest 1 > pretest. Conclusion: Blended teaching methods employing didactic lectures on the clinical decision-making as well as computer assisted case-based learning can be used to improve quality of clinical decision-making in prosthodontic rehabilitation for dental graduates. PMID:26929504

  13. Development and evaluation of learning module on clinical decision-making in Prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Saee; Lambade, Dipti; Chahande, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Best practice strategies for helping students learn the reasoning skills of problem solving and critical thinking (CT) remain a source of conjecture, particularly with regard to CT. The dental education literature is fundamentally devoid of research on the cognitive components of clinical decision-making. This study was aimed to develop and evaluate the impact of blended learning module on clinical decision-making skills of dental graduates for planning prosthodontics rehabilitation. An interactive teaching module consisting of didactic lectures on clinical decision-making and a computer-assisted case-based treatment planning software was developed Its impact on cognitive knowledge gain in clinical decision-making was evaluated using an assessment involving problem-based multiple choice questions and paper-based case scenarios. Mean test scores were: Pretest (17 ± 1), posttest 1 (21 ± 2) and posttest 2 (43 ± 3). Comparison of mean scores was done with one-way ANOVA test. There was overall significant difference in between mean scores at all the three points (P posttest 1 > pretest. Blended teaching methods employing didactic lectures on the clinical decision-making as well as computer assisted case-based learning can be used to improve quality of clinical decision-making in prosthodontic rehabilitation for dental graduates.

  14. Evaluation of posttraumatic recurrent bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Özcan; Uysal, Cem; Varol, Sefer; Tekin, Recep; Bozkurt, Fatma; Bekçibaşı, Muhammed; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2015-07-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis may develop as a complication after head trauma. The aim of this study was to present the demographic, clinical, microbiological and radiological characteristics of adult patients who presented with recurrent bacterial meningitis attacks after trauma. Using a retrospective approach, the medical records of patients with acute recurrent bacterial meningitis (RBM) were reviewed, and those who had a history of trauma were included into the study. RBM was diagnosed based on clinical, bacteriologic and laboratory results. Demographic characteristics, clinical course, laboratory test results including cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF), radiological images, and the applied treatments were evaluated. A total of two hundred and twelve patients with acute bacterial meningitis were included into the study. RBM was diagnosed in twenty-five patients (11.8%), and in 18 of these patients (8.5%), the attacks had occurred subsequent to a trauma. In the CSF cultures of four patients, S. pneumoniae growth was observed. CT cisternography indicated CSF leaks in eleven patients. Moreover, bone fractures were observed in the CT images of ten patients. Ceftriaxone therapy was prescribed to 83% of the patients. Eight patients had a history of a fall in childhood, and five were involved in traffic accidents before acute bacterial meningitis. Four of the patients developed epilepsy and one developed deafness as sequelae. Since RBM attacks are frequently observed following trauma, in patients with a history of trauma who present with meningitis, the risk of recurrence should be considered.

  15. The Effect of Algorithm-Based Learning on Clinical Decision Making Abilities of Medical Emergency Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Asayesh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Improvement of students’ clinical decision making is one of the main challenges in medical education. There are numerous ways to improve these skills. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of algorithm-based learning on clinical decision making abilities of medical emergency students. Method: in this experimental study, twenty five medical emergency students were randomly assigned to algorithm based learning group  (n=13 and control group  (n=12. Student in algorithm-based learning group were educated the diagnosis and treatment of selected medical emergency situation with algorithmic approach. Education in the control group was conducted by a routine lecture, along with copies of educational content. Three-hour training period was held for both groups  (two separate sessions with an interval day. After intervention, clinical decision making of the students in both group were measured by clinical scenarios and clinical decision making self-efficacy scale. Results: The mean of acquired scores from clinical scenarios among students in algorithm-based learning group was 17.50  (±1.67 and in the control group was 14.50 (±2.63. The differences was statistically significant  (t=0.006, P=0.006. The students in algorithm-based learning group had better scores in the clinical decision making in terms of self-efficacy scale and it was 13.30 (1.57 and in the control group this mean was 10.32  (3.05. In this case, the differences was statistically significant (t=3.01, P=0.009. Conclusion: algorithm-based learning is effective in improvement of clinical decision making and applying of this method along with other educational methods could promote students’ clinical decision making especially in medical emergency situations.

  16. Dexamethasone in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gans, Jan; van de Beek, Diederik

    2002-01-01

    Background: Mortality and morbidity rates are high among adults with acute bacterial meningitis, especially those with pneumococcal meningitis. In studies of bacterial meningitis in animals, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids has beneficial effects. Methods: We conducted a prospective,

  17. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, Martine; van de Beek, Diederik; Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; Schmand, Ben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  18. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  19. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and cause meningitis after establishment of local infection are the dissemination of fungal cells to the bloodstream and invasion through the blood brain barrier to reach the CNS. In this review, we use cryptococcal CNS infection as an example to describe the current molecular understanding of fungal meningitis, including the establishment of the infection, dissemination, and brain invasion. Host and microbial factors that contribute to these infection steps are also discussed. PMID:22460646

  20. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelmers, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new.

  1. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelmers, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new. (orig.)

  2. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... materials remain limited to mostly developed countries. There is need to adopt measures to further facilitate dissemination of current information of effective health to care providers and policymakers in resource-poor countries. This review is aimed at re-enforcing the need for applying best-evidence into clinical practice

  3. Surgical oncologic emergencies : Decision making and clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosscher, Marianne Roberta Frederiek

    2015-01-01

    Oncologic emergencies are acute, potentially life threatening conditions that have developed as a result of malignant disease or cancer treatment. The clinical outcome of patients with symptoms caused by malignant disease is often poor and short term mortality is high. In an emergency situation,

  4. A study to explore if dentists' anxiety affects their clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipchase, S Y; Chapman, H R; Bretherton, R

    2017-02-24

    Aims To develop a measure of dentists' anxiety in clinical situations; to establish if dentists' anxiety in clinical situations affected their self-reported clinical decision-making; to establish if occupational stress, as demonstrated by burnout, is associated with anxiety in clinical situations and clinical decision-making; and to explore the relationship between decision-making style and the clinical decisions which are influenced by anxiety.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary Dental Care.Subjects and methods A questionnaire battery [Maslach Burnout Inventory, measuring burnout; Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire, measuring decision-making style; Dealing with Uncertainty Questionnaire (DUQ), measuring coping with diagnostic uncertainty; and a newly designed Dentists' Anxieties in Clinical Situations Scale, measuring dentists' anxiety (DACSS-R) and change of treatment (DACSS-C)] was distributed to dentists practicing in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. Demographic data were collected and dentists gave examples of anxiety-provoking situations and their responses to them.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported anxiety in various clinical situations on a 11-point Likert Scale (DACSS-R) and self-reported changes in clinical procedures (Yes/No; DACSS-C). The DACSS was validated using multiple t-tests and a principal component analysis. Differences in DACSS-R ratings and burnout, decision-making and dealing with uncertainty were explored using Pearson correlations and multiple regression analysis. Qualitative data was subject to a thematic analysis.Results The DACSS-R revealed a four-factor structure and had high internal reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.94). Those with higher DACSS-R scores of anxiety were more likely to report changes in clinical procedures (DACSS-C scores). DACSS-R scores were associated with decision-making self-esteem and style as measured by the MDMQ and all burnout subscales, though not with scores on the DUQ scale

  5. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  6. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Gregory J; Boyle, Scott N; Brinner, Kristin M; Osheroff, Jerome A

    2009-10-08

    Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures), and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In addition, to represent meaningful benefits to personalized

  7. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  8. An integrated, ethically driven environmental model of clinical decision making in emergency settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lisa

    2013-02-01

    To explore the relationship between multiple variables within a model of critical thinking and moral reasoning. A quantitative descriptive correlational design using a purposive sample of 200 emergency nurses. Measured variables were accuracy in clinical decision-making, moral reasoning, perceived care environment, and demographics. Analysis was by bivariate correlation using Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients, chi square and multiple linear regression analysis. The elements as identified in the integrated ethically-driven environmental model of clinical decision-making (IEDEM-CD) corrected depict moral reasoning and environment of care as factors significantly affecting accuracy in decision-making. The integrated, ethically driven environmental model of clinical decision making is a framework useful for predicting clinical decision making accuracy for emergency nurses in practice, with further implications in education, research and policy. A diagnostic and therapeutic framework for identifying and remediating individual and environmental challenges to accurate clinical decision making. © 2012, The Author. International Journal of Nursing Knowledge © 2012, NANDA International.

  9. Patient-Centered Decision Support: Formative Usability Evaluation of Integrated Clinical Decision Support With a Patient Decision Aid for Minor Head Injury in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Edward R; Hess, Erik P; Guo, George; Breslin, Maggie; Lopez, Kevin; Pavlo, Anthony J; Abujarad, Fuad; Powsner, Seth M; Post, Lori A

    2017-05-19

    The Canadian Computed Tomography (CT) Head Rule, a clinical decision rule designed to safely reduce imaging in minor head injury, has been rigorously validated and implemented, and yet expected decreases in CT were unsuccessful. Recent work has identified empathic care as a key component in decreasing CT overuse. Health information technology can hinder the clinician-patient relationship. Patient-centered decision tools to support the clinician-patient relationship are needed to promote evidence-based decisions. Our objective is to formatively evaluate an electronic tool that not only helps clinicians at the bedside to determine the need for CT use based on the Canadian CT Head Rule but also promotes evidence-based conversations between patients and clinicians regarding patient-specific risk and patients' specific concerns. User-centered design with practice-based and participatory decision aid development was used to design, develop, and evaluate patient-centered decision support regarding CT use in minor head injury in the emergency department. User experience and user interface (UX/UI) development involved successive iterations with incremental refinement in 4 phases: (1) initial prototype development, (2) usability assessment, (3) field testing, and (4) beta testing. This qualitative approach involved input from patients, emergency care clinicians, health services researchers, designers, and clinical informaticists at every stage. The Concussion or Brain Bleed app is the product of 16 successive iterative revisions in accordance with UX/UI industry design standards. This useful and usable final product integrates clinical decision support with a patient decision aid. It promotes shared use by emergency clinicians and patients at the point of care within the emergency department context. This tablet computer app facilitates evidence-based conversations regarding CT in minor head injury. It is adaptable to individual clinician practice styles. The resultant tool

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate: a differential biomarker for bacterial and viral meningitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, Mudasir; Wani, Wasim Ahmad; Malik, Muzaffar Ahmad; Mir, Mohd Rafiq; Ashraf, Younis; Kawoosa, Khalid; Ali, Syed Wajid

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the performance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate as a biomarker to differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children, and to define an optimal CSF lactate concentration that can be called significant for the differentiation. Methods: Children with clinical findings compatible with meningitis were studied. CSF lactate and other conventional CSF parameters were recorded. Results: At a cut-off value of 3 mmol/L, CSF lactate had a sensitivit...

  11. Eosinophilic meningitis: a case series and review of literature of Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Gnathostoma spinigerum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, I; Barot, S; Madvariya, M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis is defined as the presence of >10 eosinophils/μL in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or at least 10% eosinophils in the total CSF leukocyte count. Eosinophilic meningitis has been reported in two case series and two case reports in India till date and has not been reported in children below 15 years of age. We present two children with eosinophilic meningitis with peripheral eosinophilia and the proposed etiologic agents based on the clinical setting and their response to antihelminthic agents.

  12. Spinal meningeal melanocytoma with benign histology showing leptomeningeal spread: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Seon Jeong; Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hoon; Lee, In Sook

    2013-01-01

    Meningeal melanocytoma is a rare benign tumor with relatively good prognosis. However, local aggressive behavior of meningeal melanocytoma has been reported, especially in cases of incomplete surgical resection. Malignant transformation was raised as possible cause by prior reports to explain this phenomenon. We present an unusual case of meningeal melanocytoma associated with histologically benign leptomeningeal spread and its subsequent aggressive clinical course, and describe its radiological findings.

  13. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barocci, Simone; Mancini, Alessio; Canovari, Benedetta; Petrelli, Enzo; Sbriscia-Fioretti, Emanuela; Licci, Alberto; D'Addesa, Simona; Petrini, Giancarlo; Giacomini, Marinella; Renzi, Antonella; Migali, Antonio; Briscolini, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of meningitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a stem cell transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy for cutaneous chronic graft-versus host disease. A 59-year-old woman had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (from a matched unrelated donor) 13 months previously for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. She was on regular hematologic follow-up. Though her previous malignancy has been in remission, she was immunosuppressed due to the pharmacological treatment. We describe a meningitis caused by a typical food-borne pathogen, dangerous in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Moreover the bacterium had a multidrug resistance, a rare characteristic in clinical listeriosis. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are key factors in these cases. We chose ampicillin and rifampicin that allowed a complete resolution of the clinical manifestations.

  15. Pseudooutbreak of cryptococcal meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hopfer, R L; Katz, R L; Fainstein, V

    1982-01-01

    A pseudooutbreak of cryptococcal meningitis was caused by the use of contaminated albumin solution used in the preparation of Papanicolaou-stained slides of cerebrospinal fluid. Organisms were seen in cytocentrifuge preparations, but not in India ink preparations of cerebrospinal fluid specimens. Cryptococcal antigen tests were positive and Cryptococcus neoformans was cultured from the albumin-treated cerebrospinal fluid specimens and from the albumin solution.

  16. Pseudooutbreak of cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfer, R L; Katz, R L; Fainstein, V

    1982-01-01

    A pseudooutbreak of cryptococcal meningitis was caused by the use of contaminated albumin solution used in the preparation of Papanicolaou-stained slides of cerebrospinal fluid. Organisms were seen in cytocentrifuge preparations, but not in India ink preparations of cerebrospinal fluid specimens. Cryptococcal antigen tests were positive and Cryptococcus neoformans was cultured from the albumin-treated cerebrospinal fluid specimens and from the albumin solution. Images PMID:7050150

  17. Mondini dysplasia with recurrent meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M Y; Lee, P I; Lee, C Y; Hsu, C J

    1996-01-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a congenital malformation of the inner ear, commonly associated with hearing impairment, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea/rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis. Two such cases are described, with hearing impairment, cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, and several episodes of meningitis. Diagnosis was confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography. After surgical correction of the malformation, there was no recurrent episode of meningitis at subsequent follow-up. To avoid the suffering and the sequelae of recurrent meningitis, an early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention are crucial for such patients.

  18. MR angiography in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Jayantee; Prasad, Sreeram; Maurya, Pradeep K.; Misra, Usha K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)), Email: drukmisra@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Sunil (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Infarctions in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are common but there is a paucity of studies on MR angiography (MRA). Purpose: To evaluate the pattern and predictors of MRA abnormality in patients with TBM. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven patients with TBM were subjected to clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRA evaluation. The severity of meningitis, focal deficit, CSF findings, and stroke co-morbidities were recorded. Presence of exudates, infarction, hydrocephalous, and tuberculoma on MRI were noted. On intracranial MRA, occlusion or more than 50% narrowing of proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and basilar artery were considered abnormal. The MRA abnormality was correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings. Results: Sixty-seven patients, aged 3-75 years (median 34 years) were included. MRI was abnormal in 61 (91%) patients; basal exudates in 24, hydrocephalous in 23, tuberculoma in 33, and infarction in 40. MRA was abnormal in 34 (50.7%); MCA was most commonly involved (n = 21), followed by PCA (n = 14), ICA (n = 8), ACA (n 5), basilar artery (n = 5), and vertebral and superior cerebellar artery (1 each). One-fourth of the patients had abnormality in both anterior and posterior circulations. MRA abnormality was related to hydrocephalous and infarction; corresponding infarct was present in 61.8% patients; 41.7% patients with abnormal MRA developed infarct at 3 months but none with normal MRA. Conclusion: Half the patients with TBM had MRA abnormality involving both anterior and posterior circulations and 61.8% of them had corresponding infarcts

  19. Anaerobic bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Jun; Lien, Chia-Yi; Chien, Chun-Chih; Huang, Chi-Ren; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2018-01-22

    Anaerobic infection is a very uncommon condition in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), and its clinical characteristics have yet to be clarified. We enrolled 540 patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis during a study period of 30 years (1986-2015), of whom 13 (2.4%) had anaerobic infections. These 13 patients were eight men and five women, aged 22-77 years. Among them, 53.8% (7/13) had a postneurosurgical state as the preceding event, and 79.6% (10/13) had underlying medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, liver cirrhosis, cerebral infarct and alcoholism. Nosocomial and mixed infections were found in 15.5% (2/13) and 46.1% (6/13) of the patients, respectively. A total of 14 anaerobic strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including nine Gram-negative (G(-)) strains: Fusobacterium nucleatum (3), Prevotella species (3) and Bacteroides fragilis (3), and five Gram-positive (G(+)) strains: Propionibacterium acnes (3) and Peptostreptococcus micros (also known as Parvimonas micra) (2). All of the implicated G(+) anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to penicillin, and no multiple drug-resistant strains were found among the implicated G(-) anaerobic bacteria. Despite treatment, 30.8% (4/13) of the patients died. Of the nine survivors, 22.2% (2/9) had a full recovery, while the other 77.8% (7/9) had varying degrees of neurological deficits. Compared with the good outcome group (n = 6, modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores: 0-2), the poor outcome group (n = 7, mRS scores ≧3) had higher incidence of seizure. These results may offer a preliminary view of the clinical characteristics of anaerobic ABM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. External validation of clinical decision rules for children with wrist trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Marjolein A M; Walenkamp, Monique M J; Dubois, Bente F H; Slaar, Annelie; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2017-05-01

    Clinical decision rules help to avoid potentially unnecessary radiographs of the wrist, reduce waiting times and save costs. The primary aim of this study was to provide an overview of all existing non-validated clinical decision rules for wrist trauma in children and to externally validate these rules in a different cohort of patients. Secondarily, we aimed to compare the performance of these rules with the validated Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules. We included all studies that proposed a clinical prediction or decision rule in children presenting at the emergency department with acute wrist trauma. We performed external validation within a cohort of 379 children. We also calculated the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of each decision rule. We included three clinical decision rules. The sensitivity and specificity of all clinical decision rules after external validation were between 94% and 99%, and 11% and 26%, respectively. After external validation 7% to 17% less radiographs would be ordered and 1.4% to 5.7% of all fractures would be missed. Compared to the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules only one of the three other rules had a higher sensitivity; however both the specificity and the reduction in requested radiographs were lower in the other three rules. The sensitivity of the three non-validated clinical decision rules is high. However the specificity and the reduction in number of requested radiographs are low. In contrast, the validated Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules has an acceptable sensitivity and the greatest reduction in radiographs, at 22%, without missing any clinically relevant fractures.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kilpatrick, Laurie; Shah, Samir S; Abbasi, Soraya; Harris, Mary C

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial meningitis poses diagnostic challenges in infants. Antibiotic pretreatment and low bacterial density diminish cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture yield, while laboratory parameters do not reliably identify bacterial meningitis. Pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in bacterial meningitis and may be useful diagnostic adjuncts when CSF cultures are negative. In a prospective cohort study of infants, we used cytometric bead arrays to measure tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12 in CSF. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and Principal component analysis (PCA) were used to determine cytokine combinations that identified bacterial meningitis. Six hundred and eighty four infants bacterial meningitis. IL-6 and IL-10 were the individual cytokines possessing greatest accuracy in diagnosis of culture proven bacterial meningitis (ROC analyses; area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) 0.91; 0.9103 respectively), and performed as well as, or better than combinations identified using ROC and PCA. CSF cytokines were highly correlated with each other and with CSF white blood cell count (WBC) counts in infants with meningitis. A subset of antibiotic pretreated culture-negative subjects demonstrated cytokine patterns similar to culture positive subjects. CSF cytokine levels may aid diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, and facilitate decision-making regarding treatment for culture negative meningitis.

  2. The value of participatory development to support antimicrobial stewardship with a clinical decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Wentzel, Jobke; Hendrix, Ron; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are guideline- or expert-driven. They are focused on (clinical) content, not on supporting real-time workflow. Thus, CDSSs fail to optimally support prudent antimicrobial prescribing in daily

  3. The value of participatory development to support antimicrobial stewardship with a clinical decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Wentzel, M.J.; Hendrix, Ron; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    Background Current clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are guideline- or expert-driven. They are focused on (clinical) content, not on supporting real-time workflow. Thus, CDSSs fail to optimally support prudent antimicrobial prescribing in daily

  4. LERM (Logical Elements Rule Method): A method for assessing and formalizing clinical rules for decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medlock, Stephanie; Opondo, Dedan; Eslami, Saeid; Askari, Marjan; Wierenga, Peter; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to create a step-by-step method for transforming clinical rules for use in decision support, and to validate this method for usability and reliability. Methods: A sample set of clinical rules was identified from the relevant literature. Using an iterative approach

  5. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Quantitative ultrasound texture analysis for clinical decision making support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie Ying; Beland, Michael; Konrad, Joseph; Tuomi, Adam; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general ultrasound (US) texture-analysis and machine-learning framework for detecting the presence of disease that is suitable for clinical application across clinicians, disease types, devices, and operators. Its stages are image selection, image filtering, ROI selection, feature parameterization, and classification. Each stage is modular and can be replaced with alternate methods. Thus, this framework is adaptable to a wide range of tasks. Our two preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis and adenomyosis diagnosis. For steatosis, we collected US images from 288 patients and their pathology-determined values of steatosis (%) from biopsies. Two radiologists independently reviewed all images and identified the region of interest (ROI) most representative of the hepatic echotexture for each patient. To parameterize the images into comparable quantities, we filter the US images at multiple scales for various texture responses. For each response, we collect a histogram of pixel features within the ROI, and parameterize it as a Gaussian function using its mean, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skew to create a 36-feature vector. Our algorithm uses a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. Using a threshold of 10%, we achieved 72.81% overall accuracy, 76.18% sensitivity, and 65.96% specificity in identifying steatosis with leave-ten-out cross-validation (p<0.0001). Extending this framework to adenomyosis, we identified 38 patients with MR-confirmed findings of adenomyosis and previous US studies and 50 controls. A single rater picked the best US-image and ROI for each case. Using the same processing pipeline, we obtained 76.14% accuracy, 86.00% sensitivity, and 63.16% specificity with leave-one-out cross-validation (p<0.0001).

  7. Clinical judgment and decision-making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided.

  8. MRI of primary meningeal sarcomas in two children: differential diagnostic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfluger, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Klinikum Innenstadt, Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Weil, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Klinikum Innenstadt, Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Weis, S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Neuropathology; Bise, K. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Neuropathology; Egger, J. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Paediatrics; Hadorn, H.B. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Paediatrics; Hahn, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Klinikum Innenstadt, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Meningeal sarcomas are very rare, highly aggressive tumours affecting children more frequently than adults. The clinical course and MRI of meningeal sarcomas in two cases are discussed with special regard to possible misinterpretation. In one case MRI demonstrated a circumscribed mass in contact with the meninges, with central areas of haemorrhage. In the other, a case of primary leptomeningeal sarcomatosis, several MRI examinations over the course of almost a year were unhelpful, despite severe neurological complaints. Then MRI revealed meningeal contrast enhancement all over the brain and spinal canal, together with cerebral infarcts. MRI of meningeal sarcomas has not been discussed in the literature. MRI did not permit specific diagnosis, but enabled visualisation of the extent of the tumour and/or meningeal involvement. Early histological diagnosis is indispensable for adequate treatment. (orig.)

  9. MRI of primary meningeal sarcomas in two children: differential diagnostic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, T.; Weil, S.; Weis, S.

    1997-01-01

    Meningeal sarcomas are very rare, highly aggressive tumours affecting children more frequently than adults. The clinical course and MRI of meningeal sarcomas in two cases are discussed with special regard to possible misinterpretation. In one case MRI demonstrated a circumscribed mass in contact with the meninges, with central areas of haemorrhage. In the other, a case of primary leptomeningeal sarcomatosis, several MRI examinations over the course of almost a year were unhelpful, despite severe neurological complaints. Then MRI revealed meningeal contrast enhancement all over the brain and spinal canal, together with cerebral infarcts. MRI of meningeal sarcomas has not been discussed in the literature. MRI did not permit specific diagnosis, but enabled visualisation of the extent of the tumour and/or meningeal involvement. Early histological diagnosis is indispensable for adequate treatment. (orig.)

  10. Bacterial meningitis in patients with HIV: A population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Kiril E B; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-03-01

    We studied occurrence, disease course, and prognosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in HIV-infected adults in the Netherlands. We performed a nationwide, prospective cohort study. Patients over 16 years old with bacterial meningitis were included. Data on patient history, symptoms and signs on admission, laboratory findings, radiologic examination, treatment, and outcome were collected prospectively. For HIV-positive patients additional information was collected retrospectively. From March 2006 to December 2013, 1354 episodes of community-acquired meningitis were included in the cohort. Thirteen patients were HIV-infected (1.0%). The annual incidence of bacterial meningitis was 8.3-fold higher (95%CI 4.6-15.1, P bacterial meningitis as compared to the general population despite cART therapy. Clinical presentation and outcome of patients with acute bacterial meningitis with and without HIV are similar. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Partitioning knowledge bases between advanced notification and clinical decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlawsky, Tara; Li, Jianrong; Jalan, Srikant; Stern, Edie; Williams, Rose; Lussier, Yves A

    2005-01-01

    Due to the varying rates of change of ephemeral administrative and enduring clinical knowledge in decision support systems (DSSs), the functional partition of knowledge base (KB) components can lead to more efficient and cost-effective system implementation and maintenance. Our prototype loosely couples a clinical event monitor developed by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) with a secure notification service proxy developed by IBM Research to form a novel and complex clinical event communication service.

  12. Surgical Resection during Chemotherapy of Pulmonary Cryptococcoma in a Patient with Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuji; Satomi, Kazuo

    We herein report the case of a 72-year-old-man with pulmonary cryptococcoma along with cryptococcal meningitis who underwent surgery for pulmonary lesions while receiving chemotherapy. We noted two major clinical issues. First, the presence of pulmonary cryptococcoma had a detrimental influence on the cryptococcal meningitis. Second, resolution of the pulmonary cryptococcoma through antifungal therapy had a beneficial influence on the recovery from cryptococcal meningitis. As observed in the current case with pulmonary and meningeal cryptococcosis, surgery for pulmonary cryptococcoma with continuous antifungal treatment should be considered for cases where the symptoms respond poorly to antifungal therapy and radiographic abnormalities persist.

  13. A social-technological epistemology of clinical decision-making as mediated by imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baalen, Sophie; Carusi, Annamaria; Sabroe, Ian; Kiely, David G

    2017-10-01

    In recent years there has been growing attention to the epistemology of clinical decision-making, but most studies have taken the individual physicians as the central object of analysis. In this paper we argue that knowing in current medical practice has an inherently social character and that imaging plays a mediating role in these practices. We have analyzed clinical decision-making within a medical expert team involved in diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), a rare disease requiring multidisciplinary team involvement in diagnosis and management. Within our field study, we conducted observations, interviews, video tasks, and a panel discussion. Decision-making in the PH clinic involves combining evidence from heterogeneous sources into a cohesive framing of a patient, in which interpretations of the different sources can be made consistent with each other. Because pieces of evidence are generated by people with different expertise and interpretation and adjustments take place in interaction between different experts, we argue that this process is socially distributed. Multidisciplinary team meetings are an important place where information is shared, discussed, interpreted, and adjusted, allowing for a collective way of seeing and a shared language to be developed. We demonstrate this with an example of image processing in the PH service, an instance in which knowledge is distributed over multiple people who play a crucial role in generating an evaluation of right heart function. Finally, we argue that images fulfill a mediating role in distributed knowing in 3 ways: first, as enablers or tools in acquiring information; second, as communication facilitators; and third, as pervasively framing the epistemic domain. With this study of clinical decision-making in diagnosis and treatment of PH, we have shown that clinical decision-making is highly social and mediated by technologies. The epistemology of clinical decision-making needs

  14. Implementing an integrative multi-agent clinical decision support system with open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyad Shirabad, Jelber; Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Farion, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex multi-stage process. Decision support can play an important role at each stage of this process. At present, the majority of clinical decision support systems have been focused on supporting only certain stages. In this paper we present the design and implementation of MET3-a prototype multi-agent system providing an integrative decision support that spans over the entire decision making process. The system helps physicians with data collection, diagnosis formulation, treatment planning and finding supporting evidence. MET3 integrates with external hospital information systems via HL7 messages and runs on various computing platforms available at the point of care (e.g., tablet computers, mobile phones). Building MET3 required sophisticated and reliable software technologies. In the past decade the open source software movement has produced mature, stable, industrial strength software systems with a large user base. Therefore, one of the decisions that should be considered before developing or acquiring a decision support system is whether or not one could use open source technologies instead of proprietary ones. We believe MET3 shows that the answer to this question is positive.

  15. Clinical decision making on the use of physical restraint in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqian Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical restraint is a common nursing intervention in intensive care units and nurses often use it to ensure patients' safety and to prevent unexpected accidents. However, existing literature indicated that the use of physical restraint is a complex one because of inadequate rationales, the negative physical and emotional effects on patients, but the lack of perceived alternatives. This paper is aimed to interpret the clinical decision-making theories related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units in order to facilitate our understanding on the use of physical restraint and to evaluate the quality of decisions made by nurses. By reviewing the literature, intuition and heuristics are the main decision-making strategies related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units because the rapid and reflexive nature of intuition and heuristics allow nurses to have a rapid response to urgent and emergent cases. However, it is problematic if nurses simply count their decision-making on experience rather than incorporate research evidence into clinical practice because of inadequate evidence to support the use of physical restraint. Besides that, such a rapid response may lead nurses to make decisions without adequate assessment and thinking and therefore biases and errors may be generated. Therefore, despite the importance of intuition and heuristics in decision-making in acute settings on the use of physical restraint, it is recommended that nurses should incorporate research evidence with their experience to make decisions and adequate assessment before implementing physical restraint is also necessary.

  16. Clinical Decision Making and Mental Health Service Use Among Persons With Severe Mental Illness Across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, Suzanne; Zenter, Nadja; Ay, Esra-Sultan; Loos, Sabine; Slade, Mike; De Rosa, Corrado; Luciano, Mario; Berecz, Roland; Glaub, Theodora; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Krogsgaard Bording, Malene; Rössler, Wulf; Kawohl, Wolfram; Puschner, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    The study explored relationships between preferences for and experiences of clinical decision making (CDM) with service use among persons with severe mental illness. Data from a prospective observational study in six European countries were examined. Associations of baseline staff-rated (N=213) and patient-rated (N=588) preferred and experienced decision making with service use were examined at baseline by using binomial regressions and at 12-month follow-up by using multilevel models. A preference by patients and staff for active patient involvement in decision making, rather than shared or passive decision making, was associated with longer hospital admissions and higher costs at baseline and with increases in admissions over 12 months (p=.043). Low patient-rated satisfaction with an experienced clinical decision was also related to increased costs over the study period (p=.005). A preference for shared decision making may reduce health care costs by reducing inpatient admissions. Patient satisfaction with decisions was a predictor of costs, and clinicians should maximize patient satisfaction with CDM.

  17. Bacteriële meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe disease which affects 35.000 Europeans each year and has a mortality rate of about 20%. During the past 25 years the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed significantly due to the implementation of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria

  18. Do not forget tuberculous meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is relatively uncommon compared with other types of meningitis and so it is easy to forget to consider it as an explanation for a patient's presenting problem. If untreated TBM is fatal in most cases. Who is at risk? Children under aged 5 years,. •. The elderly,. •. HIV infected patients (in these ...

  19. A pilot study of distributed knowledge management and clinical decision support in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Simonaitis, Linas; Goldberg, Howard S; Paterno, Marilyn D; Schaeffer, Molly; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Wright, Adam; Middleton, Blackford

    2013-09-01

    Implement and perform pilot testing of web-based clinical decision support services using a novel framework for creating and managing clinical knowledge in a distributed fashion using the cloud. The pilot sought to (1) develop and test connectivity to an external clinical decision support (CDS) service, (2) assess the exchange of data to and knowledge from the external CDS service, and (3) capture lessons to guide expansion to more practice sites and users. The Clinical Decision Support Consortium created a repository of shared CDS knowledge for managing hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease in a community cloud hosted by Partners HealthCare. A limited data set for primary care patients at a separate health system was securely transmitted to a CDS rules engine hosted in the cloud. Preventive care reminders triggered by the limited data set were returned for display to clinician end users for review and display. During a pilot study, we (1) monitored connectivity and system performance, (2) studied the exchange of data and decision support reminders between the two health systems, and (3) captured lessons. During the six month pilot study, there were 1339 patient encounters in which information was successfully exchanged. Preventive care reminders were displayed during 57% of patient visits, most often reminding physicians to monitor blood pressure for hypertensive patients (29%) and order eye exams for patients with diabetes (28%). Lessons learned were grouped into five themes: performance, governance, semantic interoperability, ongoing adjustments, and usability. Remote, asynchronous cloud-based decision support performed reasonably well, although issues concerning governance, semantic interoperability, and usability remain key challenges for successful adoption and use of cloud-based CDS that will require collaboration between biomedical informatics and computer science disciplines. Decision support in the cloud is feasible and may be a reasonable

  20. Potential Role of Methylation Marker in Glioma Supporting Clinical Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Roszkowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The IDH1/2 gene mutations, ATRX loss/mutation, 1p/19q status, and MGMT promoter methylation are increasingly used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers of gliomas. However, the effect of their combination on radiation therapy outcome is discussable. Previously, we demonstrated that the IDH1 c.G395A; p.R132H mutation was associated with longer survival in grade II astrocytoma and GBM (Glioblastoma. Here we analyzed the MGMT promoter methylation status in patients with a known mutation status in codon 132 of IDH1, followed by clinical and genetic data analysis based on the two statuses. After a subtotal tumor resection, the patients were treated using IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with 6 MeV photons. The total dose was: 54 Gy for astrocytoma II, 60 Gy for astrocytoma III, 60 Gy for glioblastoma, 2 Gy per day, with 24 h intervals, five days per week. The patients with MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 somatic mutation (OS = 40 months had a better prognosis than those with MGMT methylation alone (OS = 18 months. In patients with astrocytoma anaplasticum (n = 7 with the IDH1 p.R132H mutation and hypermethylated MGMT, the prognosis was particularly favorable (median OS = 47 months. In patients with astrocytoma II meeting the above criteria, the prognosis was also better than in those not meeting those criteria. The IDH1 mutation appears more relevant for the prognosis than MGMT methylation. The IDH1 p.R132H mutation combined with MGMT hypermethylation seems to be the most advantageous for treatment success. Patients not meeting those criteria may require more aggressive treatments.

  1. Comparison of amphotericin B with fluconazole in the treatment of acute AIDS-associated cryptococcal meningitis. The NIAID Mycoses Study Group and the AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saag, M S; Powderly, W G; Cloud, G A; Robinson, P; Grieco, M H; Sharkey, P K; Thompson, S E; Sugar, A M; Tuazon, C U; Fisher, J F

    1992-01-09

    Intravenous amphotericin B, with or without flucytosine, is usually standard therapy for cryptococcal meningitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Fluconazole, an oral triazole agent, represents a promising new approach to the treatment of cryptococcal disease. In a randomized multicenter trial, we compared intravenous amphotericin B with oral fluconazole as primary therapy for AIDS-associated acute cryptococcal meningitis. Eligible patients, in all of whom the diagnosis had been confirmed by culture, were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either fluconazole (200 mg per day) or amphotericin B. Treatment was considered successful if the patient had had two consecutive negative cerebrospinal fluid cultures by the end of the 10-week treatment period. Of the 194 eligible patients, 131 received fluconazole and 63 received amphotericin B (mean daily dose, 0.4 mg per kilogram of body weight in patients with successful treatment and 0.5 mg per kilogram in patients with treatment failure; P = 0.34). Treatment was successful in 25 of the 63 amphotericin B recipients (40 percent; 95 percent confidence interval, 26 percent to 53 percent) and in 44 of the 131 fluconazole recipients (34 percent; 95 percent confidence interval, 25 percent to 42 percent) (P = 0.40). There was no significant difference between the groups in overall mortality due to cryptococcosis (amphotericin vs. fluconazole, 9 of 63 [14 percent] vs. 24 of 131 [18 percent]; P = 0.48); however, mortality during the first two weeks of therapy was higher in the fluconazole group (15 percent vs. 8 percent; P = 0.25). The median length of time to the first negative cerebrospinal fluid culture was 42 days (95 percent confidence interval, 28 to 71) in the amphotericin B group and 64 days (95 percent confidence interval, 53 to 67) in the fluconazole group (P = 0.25). Multivariate analyses identified abnormal mental status (lethargy, somnolence, or obtundation) as the most important

  2. Principles of effective therapy of bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarova K.A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of cerebrospinal fluid is essential for effective treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the basic principles of the treatment of bacterial meningitis. IP!adherence included patients received in-patient treatment with the diagnosis of meningitis. Research conducted in the department neuro-communicable diseases №1 Clinical Children's Hospital №2 named A.F.Garaeva, follow Isa-CSF in 25 patients (aged 1 to 10 years BGM!time personal cause. According to the authors to clarify the etiological factors in BGF is expedient to appoint panampitsillina (polusinte-matic drug penicillin in high doses. Summarizing the above outlined can come to the conclusion that the effectiveness of those causal therapy, when given their pectoralis complications and course of the disease may be assessed only on the basis of liquorologic research.

  3. Computerized clinical decision support systems for chronic disease management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Tamara

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs may improve chronic disease management, which requires recurrent visits to multiple health professionals, ongoing disease and treatment monitoring, and patient behavior modification. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve the processes of chronic care (such as diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of disease and associated patient outcomes (such as effects on biomarkers and clinical exacerbations. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews database, Inspec, and reference lists for potentially eligible articles published up to January 2010. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the use of CCDSSs to usual practice or non-CCDSS controls. Trials were eligible if at least one component of the CCDSS was designed to support chronic disease management. We considered studies 'positive' if they showed a statistically significant improvement in at least 50% of relevant outcomes. Results Of 55 included trials, 87% (n = 48 measured system impact on the process of care and 52% (n = 25 of those demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Sixty-five percent (36/55 of trials measured impact on, typically, non-major (surrogate patient outcomes, and 31% (n = 11 of those demonstrated benefits. Factors of interest to decision makers, such as cost, user satisfaction, system interface and feature sets, unique design and deployment characteristics, and effects on user workflow were rarely investigated or reported. Conclusions A small majority (just over half of CCDSSs improved care processes in chronic disease management and some improved patient health. Policy makers, healthcare administrators, and practitioners should be aware that the evidence of CCDSS effectiveness is limited, especially with respect to the small number and size of studies

  4. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin G. Mark

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT, may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods: Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age >40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results: One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9-98.2]. The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9-98.2]. Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6-100.0]. Conclusion: Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease.

  5. Clinical decision making in the recognition of dying: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul; Dowding, Dawn; Johnson, Miriam

    2017-01-25

    Recognising dying is an essential clinical skill for general and palliative care professionals alike. Despite the high importance, both identification and good clinical care of the dying patient remains extremely difficult and often controversial in clinical practice. This study aimed to answer the question: "What factors influence medical and nursing staff when recognising dying in end-stage cancer and heart failure patients?" This study used a descriptive approach to decision-making theory. Participants were purposively sampled for profession (doctor or nurse), specialty (cardiology or oncology) and grade (senior vs junior). Recruitment continued until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with NHS medical and nursing staff in an NHS Trust which contained cancer and cardiology tertiary referral centres. An interview schedule was designed, based on decision-making literature. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed and analysed using thematic framework. Data were managed with Atlas.ti. Saturation was achieved with 19 participants (7 seniors; 8 intermediate level staff; 4 juniors). There were 11 oncologists (6 doctors, 5 nurses) and 8 cardiologists (3 doctors, 5 nurses). Six themes were generated: information used; decision processes; modifying factors; implementation; reflecting on decisions and related decisions. The decision process described was time-dependent, ongoing and iterative, and relies heavily on intuition. This study supports the need to recognise the strengths and weaknesses of expertise and intuition as part of the decision process, and of placing the recognition of dying in a time-dependent context. Clinicians should also be prepared to accept and convey the uncertainty surrounding these decisions, both in practice and in communication with patients and carers.

  6. Potential Impact on Clinical Decision Making via a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of men with prostate cancer is fraught with uncertainty as physicians and patients balance efficacy with potential toxicity and diminished quality of life. Utilization of genomics as a prognostic biomarker has improved the informed decision-making process by enabling more rationale treatment choices. Recently investigations have begun to determine whether genomic information from tumor transcriptome data can be used to impact clinical decision-making beyond prognosis. Here we discuss the potential of genomics to alter management of a patient who presented with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. We suggest that this information help selecting patients for advanced imaging, chemotherapies, or clinical trial.

  7. Managed care and clinical decision-making in child and adolescent behavioral health: provider perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T; Garcia, Christine I; Hansell, Stephen; Rosato, Mark G; Minsky, Shula

    2003-03-01

    This study investigated how managed care affects clinical decision-making in a behavioral health care system. Providers serving children and adolescents under both managed and unmanaged care (n = 28) were interviewed about their awareness of differences between the benefit arrangements, how benefits affect clinical decision-making, outcomes and quality of care; and satisfaction with care. Quantitative and qualitative findings indicated that providers saw both advantages and disadvantages to managed care. Although most providers recognized the advantages of managed care in increasing efficiency, many were concerned that administrative pressures associated with managed care compromise service quality.

  8. Meningitis bacteriana aguda

    OpenAIRE

    D. Rodrigo Blamey, Dr.

    2014-01-01

    La Meningitis Bacteriana Aguda (MBA) de adquisición comunitaria es una enfermedad prevalente en todo el mundo; constituye siempre una emergencia médica y se asocia a una alta morbimortalidad. Su epidemiología es variable y los principales agentes en adultos son S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae y L. monocitogenes. En Chile existe un sistema de vigilancia recientemente implementado que permitirá un mejor diagnóstico epidemiológico. Las manifestaciones clínicas clásicas no siempre e...

  9. Changes in bacterial meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, P E; Barclay, S M; Galloway, W H; Cole, G F

    1990-01-01

    In 1964, one of us (WHG) undertook a retrospective study of bacterial meningitis in childhood in the north east of Scotland during the period 1946-61. We have recently carried out a similar review of cases occurring during 1971-86, to compare the incidence, mortality, and bacteriological patterns. During the earlier period 285 cases occurred, a total incidence of 16.9/100,000 children per year. In the later period 274 children were affected, an annual incidence of 17.8/100,000. The overall mo...

  10. Soluble urokinase receptor is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with purulent meningitis and is associated with fatal outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens D

    2004-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator system has been suggested to play a pathophysiological role in brain damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate CSF levels of suPAR in 183 patients clinically suspected of having meningitis on admission. Of these, 54 patients were found to have purulent...... meningitis, 63 had lymphocytic meningitis, 12 had encephalitis, and 54 patients were suspected of, but had no evidence of, meningitis. There was a significant difference in suPAR levels among patient groups (Kruskal Wallis test, p ... infection (purulent meningitis: median suPAR 2.41 microg/l (range 0.12-35), lymphocytic meningitis: 1.10 microg/l (0.15-5.31), and encephalitis (1.77 microg/l (0.17-11.7)) than in patients without meningitis (0.64 microg/l (0-5.34) (Dunn's multiple comparison test, p

  11. Many faces of rationality: Implications of the great rationality debate for clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Elqayam, Shira

    2017-10-01

    Given that more than 30% of healthcare costs are wasted on inappropriate care, suboptimal care is increasingly connected to the quality of medical decisions. It has been argued that personal decisions are the leading cause of death, and 80% of healthcare expenditures result from physicians' decisions. Therefore, improving healthcare necessitates improving medical decisions, ie, making decisions (more) rational. Drawing on writings from The Great Rationality Debate from the fields of philosophy, economics, and psychology, we identify core ingredients of rationality commonly encountered across various theoretical models. Rationality is typically classified under umbrella of normative (addressing the question how people "should" or "ought to" make their decisions) and descriptive theories of decision-making (which portray how people actually make their decisions). Normative theories of rational thought of relevance to medicine include epistemic theories that direct practice of evidence-based medicine and expected utility theory, which provides the basis for widely used clinical decision analyses. Descriptive theories of rationality of direct relevance to medical decision-making include bounded rationality, argumentative theory of reasoning, adaptive rationality, dual processing model of rationality, regret-based rationality, pragmatic/substantive rationality, and meta-rationality. For the first time, we provide a review of wide range of theories and models of rationality. We showed that what is "rational" behaviour under one rationality theory may be irrational under the other theory. We also showed that context is of paramount importance to rationality and that no one model of rationality can possibly fit all contexts. We suggest that in context-poor situations, such as policy decision-making, normative theories based on expected utility informed by best research evidence may provide the optimal approach to medical decision-making, whereas in the context

  12. Clinical and laboratorial characteristics of bacterial meningitis in children Características clínicas e laboratoriais de meningites bacterianas em crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Lucena

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Data from the records of 528 children under 15 years old with diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis, admitted at the Hospital Couto Maia between 1990 and 1992 were analyzed. Bacterial meningitis was more frequent in children under the age of 1 year (37.8%. The most common etiologic agent was H. influenzae (42.2%. The global letality was 20.9%. Individual predictors of poor outcome were: absence of the "classic triad", CSF cell count under 1000 /mm³, age under 2 years, presence of seizures, depressed sensorium, and S. pneumoniae as causal agent.Foram analisados dados de prontuário de 528 crianças com faixa etária entre 1 mês e 15 anos e diagnóstico de meningite bacteriana aguda, admitidas no Hospital Couto Maia entre 1990 e 1992. Meningite bacteriana foi mais frequente em crianças com idade inferior a 1 ano (37,8%. O agente etiológico mais comum foi H. influenzae (42,2%. A letalidade global foi 20,9% e os fatores preditivos de pior prognóstico foram: ausência da "tríade clássica" (febre, vômitos e rigidez de nuca, celularidade do líquido cefalorraquidiano inferior a 1000 /mm³, idade inferior a 2 anos, presença de convulsões, alteração do nível de consciência e S. pneumoniae como agente causal.

  13. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Michael E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. Methods Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the 2003 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain into a computerized decision support system (DSS to encourage good opioid prescribing practices during primary care visits. We based the DSS on the existing ATHENA-DSS. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision of the DSS by a diverse team including guideline authors, medical informatics experts, clinical content experts, and end-users to convert the written clinical practice guideline into a computable algorithm to generate patient-specific recommendations for care based upon existing information in the electronic medical record (EMR, and a set of clinical tools. Results The iterative revision process identified numerous and varied problems with the initially designed system despite diverse expert participation in the design process. The process of operationalizing the guideline identified areas in which the guideline was vague, left decisions to clinical judgment, or required clarification of detail to insure safe clinical implementation. The revisions led to workable solutions to problems, defined the limits of the DSS and its utility in clinical practice, improved integration into clinical workflow, and improved the clarity and accuracy of system recommendations and tools. Conclusions Use of this iterative process led to development of a multifunctional DSS that met the approval of the clinical practice guideline authors, content experts, and clinicians involved in testing. The

  14. Cryptococcal meningitis presenting with recurrent syncope in a patient with chronic lymphoid leukemia: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The clinical presentations of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-negative patients may be different from that infected with HIV. We report a case of 75-year old male with chronic lymphoid leukemia presenting with recurrent syncope, bi-frontal headache and diplopia. This case discusses the atypical presentations of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-negative patients and its importance of early diagnosis. PMID:19178720

  15. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, S.; Brouwer, M.; van den Ende, A.; Hensen, E.F.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 849-855 We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two

  16. Bacterial meningitis in solid organ transplant recipients: a population-based prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K. E. B.; Brouwer, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at risk of infections of the central nervous system. However, the incidence and clinical course of bacterial meningitis in SOT recipients are unclear. We studied occurrence, disease course, and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in SOT recipients in the

  17. Combining data and meta-analysis to build Bayesian networks for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yet, Barbaros; Perkins, Zane B; Rasmussen, Todd E; Tai, Nigel R M; Marsh, D William R

    2014-12-01

    Complex clinical decisions require the decision maker to evaluate multiple factors that may interact with each other. Many clinical studies, however, report 'univariate' relations between a single factor and outcome. Such univariate statistics are often insufficient to provide useful support for complex clinical decisions even when they are pooled using meta-analysis. More useful decision support could be provided by evidence-based models that take the interaction between factors into account. In this paper, we propose a method of integrating the univariate results of a meta-analysis with a clinical dataset and expert knowledge to construct multivariate Bayesian network (BN) models. The technique reduces the size of the dataset needed to learn the parameters of a model of a given complexity. Supplementing the data with the meta-analysis results avoids the need to either simplify the model - ignoring some complexities of the problem - or to gather more data. The method is illustrated by a clinical case study into the prediction of the viability of severely injured lower extremities. The case study illustrates the advantages of integrating combined evidence into BN development: the BN developed using our method outperformed four different data-driven structure learning methods, and a well-known scoring model (MESS) in this domain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Constructing a clinical decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy using a Bayesian Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrave, C; Deegan, T; Gibbs, A; Poulsen, M; Moores, M; Harden, F; Mengersen, K

    2014-01-01

    A decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is being developed using a Bayesian Network (BN) to graphically describe, and probabilistically quantify, the many interacting factors that are involved in this complex clinical process. Outputs of the BN will provide decision-support for radiation therapists to assist them to make correct inferences relating to the likelihood of treatment delivery accuracy for a given image-guided set-up correction. The framework is being developed as a dynamic object-oriented BN, allowing for complex modelling with specific subregions, as well as representation of the sequential decision-making and belief updating associated with IGRT. A prototype graphic structure for the BN was developed by analysing IGRT practices at a local radiotherapy department and incorporating results obtained from a literature review. Clinical stakeholders reviewed the BN to validate its structure. The BN consists of a sub-network for evaluating the accuracy of IGRT practices and technology. The directed acyclic graph (DAG) contains nodes and directional arcs representing the causal relationship between the many interacting factors such as tumour site and its associated critical organs, technology and technique, and inter-user variability. The BN was extended to support on-line and off-line decision-making with respect to treatment plan compliance. Following conceptualisation of the framework, the BN will be quantified. It is anticipated that the finalised decision-making framework will provide a foundation to develop better decision-support strategies and automated correction algorithms for IGRT.

  19. A system dynamics model of clinical decision thresholds for the detection of developmental-behavioral disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Christopher Sheldrick

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical decision-making has been conceptualized as a sequence of two separate processes: assessment of patients’ functioning and application of a decision threshold to determine whether the evidence is sufficient to justify a given decision. A range of factors, including use of evidence-based screening instruments, has the potential to influence either or both processes. However, implementation studies seldom specify or assess the mechanism by which screening is hypothesized to influence clinical decision-making, thus limiting their ability to address unexpected findings regarding clinicians’ behavior. Building on prior theory and empirical evidence, we created a system dynamics (SD model of how physicians’ clinical decisions are influenced by their assessments of patients and by factors that may influence decision thresholds, such as knowledge of past patient outcomes. Using developmental-behavioral disorders as a case example, we then explore how referral decisions may be influenced by changes in context. Specifically, we compare predictions from the SD model to published implementation trials of evidence-based screening to understand physicians’ management of positive screening results and changes in referral rates. We also conduct virtual experiments regarding the influence of a variety of interventions that may influence physicians’ thresholds, including improved access to co-located mental health care and improved feedback systems regarding patient outcomes. Results Results of the SD model were consistent with recent implementation trials. For example, the SD model suggests that if screening improves physicians’ accuracy of assessment without also influencing decision thresholds, then a significant proportion of children with positive screens will not be referred and the effect of screening implementation on referral rates will be modest—results that are consistent with a large proportion of published

  20. Building a normative decision support system for clinical and operational risk management in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornalba, Chiara; Bellazzi, Roberto G; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a decision support system for risk management in hemodialysis (HD) departments. The proposed system exploits a domain ontology to formalize the problem as a Bayesian network. It also relies on a software tool, able to automatically collect HD data, to learn the network conditional probabilities. By merging prior knowledge and the available data, the system allows to estimate risk profiles both for patients and HD departments. The risk management process is completed by an influence diagram that enables scenario analysis to choose the optimal decisions that mitigate a patient's risk. The methods and design of the decision support tool are described in detail, and the derived decision model is presented. Examples and case studies are also shown. The tool is one of the few examples of normative system explicitly conceived to manage operational and clinical risks in health care environments.

  1. CEREBROSPINAL FLUID LACTATE IN MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Bindu Krishnan Padma; Deepa Kunju Krishnan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Meningitis is an inflammation of meninges and subarachnoid space and is often associated with cerebritis. Acute bacterial meningitis is one of the most common serious infections in children. Viral meningitis has a much more favourable prognosis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis has got an important role in the diagnosis of neurological disorders. CSF lactate can be elevated in disorders like subarachnoid haemorrhage, bacterial meningitis, status epilepticus and inborn error...

  2. The contribution of MRI to the diagnosis of diffuse meningeal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzberg, B.; Kastner, J.; Ferda, J.

    2004-01-01

    We analysed MRI findings in patients in whom a diffuse abnormality of the meninges was revealed by MRI. We looked at T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo or fast spin-echo images and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. There were 15 patients with abnormalities on MRI, clinically suspected in ten. Four had meningoencephalitis, one meningeal and subcortical sarcoidosis nodules, four meningeal malignancies - one disseminated oligodendroglioma, one with meningeal infiltration around an adenocarcinoma, three meningeal infiltration by a haematological malignancy, and one a chronic subdural haematoma without a history of injury. We excluded patients with primary meningeal tumours and typical injury-related meningeal bleeding. The relatively small number of patients is due to both the infrequency of diffuse meningeal disease and to the low frequency of suspected meningeal pathology as an indication for MRI. The latter's diagnostic contribution is greatest in infectious disease and neoplastic infiltration, and less obvious in haematological malignancies. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images are most useful. (orig.)

  3. The role of emotion in clinical decision making: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Desirée; Hutchinson, Marie; Hurley, John; Rowley, Joanne; Sutherland, Joanna

    2017-12-15

    Traditionally, clinical decision making has been perceived as a purely rational and cognitive process. Recently, a number of authors have linked emotional intelligence (EI) to clinical decision making (CDM) and calls have been made for an increased focus on EI skills for clinicians. The objective of this integrative literature review was to identify and synthesise the empirical evidence for a role of emotion in CDM. A systematic search of the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsychINFO, and CINAHL (EBSCO) was conducted to identify empirical studies of clinician populations. Search terms were focused to identify studies reporting clinician emotion OR clinician emotional intelligence OR emotional competence AND clinical decision making OR clinical reasoning. Twenty three papers were retained for synthesis. These represented empirical work from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches and comprised work with a focus on experienced emotion and on skills associated with emotional intelligence. The studies examined nurses (10), physicians (7), occupational therapists (1), physiotherapists (1), mixed clinician samples (3), and unspecified infectious disease experts (1). We identified two main themes in the context of clinical decision making: the subjective experience of emotion; and, the application of emotion and cognition in CDM. Sub-themes under the subjective experience of emotion were: emotional response to contextual pressures; emotional responses to others; and, intentional exclusion of emotion from CDM. Under the application of emotion and cognition in CDM, sub-themes were: compassionate emotional labour - responsiveness to patient emotion within CDM; interdisciplinary tension regarding the significance and meaning of emotion in CDM; and, emotion and moral judgement. Clinicians' experienced emotions can and do affect clinical decision making, although acknowledgement of that is far from universal. Importantly, this occurs in the in the absence of a

  4. Bacterial meningitis complicating the course of liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Pasquale; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Esposito, Silvano

    2017-12-01

    Meningitis is rarely reported in studies investigating bacterial infections in patients affected by liver cirrhosis. We investigated the findings of bacterial meningitis in patients affected by liver cirrhosis referred to our department in a 16-year period. Patients with cirrhosis and bacterial meningitis were enrolled. Cirrhosis was defined by liver histology or clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonographic and endoscopic findings. Bacterial meningitis was defined by cerebro-spinal fluid pleocytosis (>10/mcl) and characteristic clinical presentation. Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test were employed as appropriate for statistical analysis. Forty-four patients with bacterial meningitis and cirrhosis were enrolled in the study. Sex ratio (male:female) was 1.4:1 and median (IQR) age was 64 (55-72) years. Cirrhosis was viral in 40 patients. At admission, median (IQR) MELD score was 12 (9-14), and median (IQR) Child-Pugh score was 8 (6-10). Other conditions associated with immunodepression were present in 22 (50%) cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes were the agents more frequently identified. An extra-meningeal focus of infection was identified in 17 (39%) cases. Main symptoms at admission were fever, nuchal rigidity, and an obtunded or comatose status, and at least 2 of these were reported in 37 (84%) episodes. Cerebro-spinal fluid showed high cells, low CSF/serum glucose ratio, and elevated protein. Seventeen patients (39%) died and 8 (18%) reported sequelae. High MELD and Child-Pugh scores were related to the mortality risk (p < 0.001). The findings of blood and cerebro-spinal fluid analysis were not predictive of outcome. Bacterial meningitis should be considered in cirrhotics presenting with fever and altered conscience status. MELD and Child-Pugh scores predicted prognosis.

  5. Supporting therapy selection in computerized clinical guidelines by means of decision theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montani, Stefania; Terenziani, Paolo; Bottrighi, Alessio

    2007-01-01

    Supporting therapy selection is a fundamental task for a system for the computerized management of clinical guidelines (GL). The goal is particularly critical when no alternative is really better than the others, from a strictly clinical viewpoint. In these cases, decision theory appears to be a very suitable means to provide advice. In this paper, we describe how algorithms for calculating utility, and for evaluating the optimal policy, can be exploited to fit the GL management context.

  6. Paying for treatments? Influences on negotiating clinical need and decision-making for dental implant treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Exley, Catherine E; Rousseau, Nikki S; Steele, Jimmy; Finch, Tracy; Field, James; Donaldson, Cam; Thomason, J Mark; May, Carl R; Ellis, Janice S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study is to examine how clinicians and patients negotiate clinical need and treatment decisions within a context of finite resources. Dental implant treatment is an effective treatment for missing teeth, but is only available via the NHS in some specific clinical circumstances. The majority of people who receive this treatment therefore pay privately, often at substantial cost to themselves. People are used to paying towards dental treatment costs. However,...

  7. Competencies in nursing students for organized forms of clinical moral deliberation and decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Bart Cusveller; Jeanette den Uil-Westerlaken

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor-prepared nurses are expected to be competent in moral deliberation and decision-making (MDD) in clinical practice. It is unclear, however, how this competence develops in nursing students. This study explores the development of nursing students’ competence for participating in organized

  8. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  9. Doing the right things and doing things right : inpatient drug surveillance assisted by clinical decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter J.; Suijkerbuijk, Bas O.; Nannan Panday, Prashant V.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    Increased budget constraints and a continuous focus on improved quality require an efficient inpatient drug surveillance process. We describe a hospital-wide drug surveillance strategy consisting of a multidisciplinary evaluation of drug surveillance activities and using clinical decision support to

  10. Decision-tree induction to detect clinical mastitis with automatic milking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, C.; Mollenhorst, H.; Feelders, A.; Pietersma, D.; Hogeveen, H.

    2010-01-01

    a b s t r a c t This study explored the potential of using decision-tree induction to develop models for the detection of clinical mastitis with automatic milking. Sensor data (including electrical conductivity and colour) of over 711,000 quarter milkings were collected from December 2006 till

  11. Clinical decision-making to facilitate appropriate patient management in chiropractic practice: 'the 3-questions model'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorin-Woods Lyndon G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A definitive diagnosis in chiropractic clinical practice is frequently elusive, yet decisions around management are still necessary. Often, a clinical impression is made after the exclusion of serious illness or injury, and care provided within the context of diagnostic uncertainty. Rather than focussing on labelling the condition, the clinician may choose to develop a defendable management plan since the response to treatment often clarifies the diagnosis. Discussion This paper explores the concept and elements of defensive problem-solving practice, with a view to developing a model of agile, pragmatic decision-making amenable to real-world application. A theoretical framework that reflects the elements of this approach will be offered in order to validate the potential of a so called '3-Questions Model'; Summary Clinical decision-making is considered to be a key characteristic of any modern healthcare practitioner. It is, thus, prudent for chiropractors to re-visit the concept of defensible practice with a view to facilitate capable clinical decision-making and competent patient examination skills. In turn, the perception of competence and trustworthiness of chiropractors within the wider healthcare community helps integration of chiropractic services into broader healthcare settings.

  12. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  13. Teaching metacognition in clinical decision-making using a novel mnemonic checklist: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Keng Sheng; Durning, Steven J; van Merriënboer, Jeroen Jg

    2016-12-01

    Metacognition is a cognitive debiasing strategy that clinicians can use to deliberately detach themselves from the immediate context of a clinical decision, which allows them to reflect upon the thinking process. However, cognitive debiasing strategies are often most needed when the clinician cannot afford the time to use them. A mnemonic checklist known as TWED (T = threat, W = what else, E = evidence and D = dispositional factors) was recently created to facilitate metacognition. This study explores the hypothesis that the TWED checklist improves the ability of medical students to make better clinical decisions. Two groups of final-year medical students from Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia, were recruited to participate in this quasi-experimental study. The intervention group (n = 21) received educational intervention that introduced the TWED checklist, while the control group (n = 19) received a tutorial on basic electrocardiography. Post-intervention, both groups received a similar assessment on clinical decision-making based on five case scenarios. The mean score of the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group (18.50 ± 4.45 marks vs. 12.50 ± 2.84 marks, p metacognition in clinical decision-making. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  14. Forms of Knowledge Incorporated in Clinical Decision-making among Newly-Graduated Nurses: A Metasynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri; Elgaard Sørensen, Erik; Grønkjær, Mette

    2014-01-01

    the knowledge that informs clinical decision-making among newly-graduated nurses. Qualitative studies were retrieved from CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPE, ERIC and GOOGLE-Scholar and subsequently selected by pre-defined inclusion criteria and critically appraised using CASP. Metaphors identified in the analytical process...

  15. Advances in Clinical Decision Support: Highlights of Practice and the Literature 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenders, R A

    2017-08-01

    Introduction: Advances in clinical decision support (CDS) continue to evolve to support the goals of clinicians, policymakers, patients and professional organizations to improve clinical practice, patient safety, and the quality of care. Objectives: Identify key thematic areas or foci in research and practice involving clinical decision support during the 2015-2016 time period. Methods: Thematic analysis consistent with a grounded theory approach was applied in a targeted review of journal publications, the proceedings of key scientific conferences as well as activities in standards development organizations in order to identify the key themes underlying work related to CDS. Results: Ten key thematic areas were identified, including: 1) an emphasis on knowledge representation, with a focus on clinical practice guidelines; 2) various aspects of precision medicine, including the use of sensor and genomic data as well as big data; 3) efforts in quality improvement; 4) innovative uses of computer-based provider order entry (CPOE) systems, including relevant data displays; 5) expansion of CDS in various clinical settings; 6) patient-directed CDS; 7) understanding the potential negative impact of CDS; 8) obtaining structured data to drive CDS interventions; 9) the use of diagnostic decision support; and 10) the development and use of standards for CDS. Conclusions: Active research and practice in 2015-2016 continue to underscore the importance and broad utility of CDS for effecting change and improving the quality and outcome of clinical care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  16. Clinic-based Point of Care Transabdominal Ultrasound for Monitoring Crohn's Disease: Impact on Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Kerri; Tanyingoh, Divine; Petersen, Frauke; Kucharzik, Torsten; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Wilson, Alex; Kannengiesser, Klaus; Maaser, Christian

    2015-09-01

    The use of cross-sectional imaging is important to characterise inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] activity, extent, and location and to exclude complications, regardless of symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of routine use of sonography in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. A total of 49 patients with Crohn's disease were prospectively evaluated. Clinical symptoms (Harvey-Bradshaw Index [HBI]), disease character, serological markers of inflammation [C-reactive protein], and endoscopic evaluation were collected and reviewed by two independent IBD-specialty physicians. Clinical decisions regarding management were recorded. A separate, blinded physician then performed bowel ultrasound [US] and graded disease activity:] as inactive, mild, or active. A second blinded physician read and graded a sub-set of the US images. Clinical decisions of both IBD-physicians after US were independently recorded. Changes in clinical management following US information and inter-rater agreement on US disease activity parameters were evaluated. The concordance between US, CRP and clinical symptoms [HBI] were analysed. Follow-up data after US evaluation were collected. Clinical decisions were changed after ultrasound assessment in 30/49 [60%] and 28/48 [58%] of cases, for each physician respectively [p management. The agreement in overall score between the US reviewers was good, ĸ = 0.749 [0.5814, 0.9180], p management and is an important adjunct to routine clinical and laboratory assessment. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Application of the Stockholm Hierarchy to Defining the Quality of Reference Intervals and Clinical Decision Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikaris, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The Stockholm Hierarchy is a professional consensus created to define the preferred approaches to defining analytical quality. The quality of a laboratory measurement can also be classified by the quality of the limits that the value is compared with, namely reference interval limits and clinical decision limits. At the highest level in the hierarchy would be placed clinical decision limits based on clinical outcome studies. The second level would include both formal reference interval studies (studies of intra and inter-individual variations) and clinical decision limits based on clinician survey. While these approaches are commonly used, they require a lot of resources to define accurately. Placing laboratory experts on the third level would suggest that although they can also define reference intervals by consensus, theirs aren’t as well regarded as clinician defined limits which drive clinical behaviour. Ideally both analytical and clinical considerations should be made, with clinicians and laboratorians both having important information to consider. The fourth level of reference intervals would be for those defined by survey or by regulatory authorities because of the focus on what is commonly achieved rather than what is necessarily correct. Finally, laboratorians know that adopting reference limits from kit inserts or textbook publications is problematic because both methodological issues and reference populations are often not the same as their own. This approach would rank fifth and last. When considering which so called ‘common’ or ‘harmonised reference intervals’ to adopt, both these characteristics and the quality of individual studies need to be assessed. Finally, we should also be aware that reference intervals describe health and physiology while clinical decision limits focus on disease and pathology, and unless we understand and consider the two corresponding issues of test specificity and test sensitivity, we cannot assure the quality of

  18. Tuberculous meningitis in children: a review of clinical, laboratory, epidemiological, and therapeutic aspects and of the usefulness of BCG vaccination Meningitis tuberculosa en niños: una revisión de aspectos clínicos, de laboratorio, epidemiológicos y terapéuticos y de la utilidad de la vacunación con BCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José William Cornejo Ochoa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Tuberculous meningitis is the most frequent extrapulmonary form of tuberculosis in underdeveloped countries, among them Colombia. It is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In this article a review is presented of the following aspects of the disease: clinical, epidemiological, therapeutic, prophylactic by means of BCG vaccination, laboratory diagnosis, and tomographic findings.

    La tuberculosis meníngea (MTB es la enfermedad tuberculosa extrapulmonar más frecuente en los países del tercer mundo, incluida Colombia, y tiene tasas altas de morbilidad y mortalidad. En este artículo se presenta una revisión de la literatura sobre los siguientes aspectos de la enfermedad: clínicos, epidemiológicos, de laboratorio, tomográficos, terapéuticos y de prevención con la vacuna BCG.

  19. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Park, Young Seo [College of Medicine, Asan Meidcal Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord.

  20. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Park, Young Seo

    1991-01-01

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord