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Sample records for mendelevium oxides

  1. Chemical properties of mendelevium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1980-11-01

    Even with the most intense ion beams and the largest available quantities of target isotope, about 10/sup 6/ atoms at a time is all the Md that can be produced for chemical studies. This lack of sufficient sample size coupled with the very short lifetimes of the few atoms produced has severely restricted the gathering and the broadness of our knowledge concerning the properties of Md and the heavier elements. To illustrate, the literature contains a mere eleven references to the chemical studies of Md, and none of these deal with bulk properties associated with the element bound in solid phases. Some of these findings are: Md was found to be more volatile than other actinide metals which lead to the belief that it is divalent in the metallic state; separation of Md from the other actinides can be accomplished either by reduction of Md/sup 3 +/ to the divalent state or by chromatographic separations with Md remaining in the tripositive state; extraction of Md/sup 2 +/ with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid is much poorer than the extraction of the neighboring tripositive actinides; attempts to oxidize Md/sup 3 +/ with sodium bismuthate failed to show any evidence for Md/sup 4 +/; reduction potential of Md/sup 3 +/ was found to be close to -0.1 volt; Md/sup 3 +/ can be reduced to Md(Hg) by sodium amalgams and by electrolysis; the electrochemical behavior of Md is very similar to that of Fm and can be summarized in the equation, Md/sup 2 +/ + 2e/sup -/ = Md(Hg) and E/sup 0/ = -1.50 V.; and Md cannot be reduced to a monovalent ion with Sm/sup 2 +/.

  2. Chemical properties of mendelevium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1980-01-01

    The isotope 256 Md is nearly always employed for chemical studies of this element. This nuclide can be made by bombardment of fractions of a microgram of 254 Es with intense alpha-particle beams which will produce about 10 6 atoms of 256 Md with a half-life of 77 minutes. Even with the most intense ion beams and the largest available quantities of target isotope, about 10 6 atoms at a time is all the Md that can be produced for chemical studies. This lack of sufficient sample size coupled with the very short lifetimes of the few atoms produced has severly restricted the gathering and broadening of our knowledge concerning the properties of Md and the heavier elements. To illustrate, the literature contains a mere eleven references to the chemical studies of Md, and none of these deal with bulk properties associated with element found in solid phases. Some of these findings are: Md was found to be more volatile than other actinide metals which lead to the belief that it is divalent in the metallic state; separation of Md from the other actinides can be accomplished either by reduction of Md to the divalent state or by chromatographic separations with Md remaining in the tripositive state; extraction of Md with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid is much poorer than the extraction of the neighboring tripositive actinides; attempts to oxidize Md wih sodium bismuthate failed to show any evidence of Md 4+ ; standard reduction potential of Md 3+ was found to be close to -0.1 volt; Md 3+ can be reduced to Md(Hg) by sodium amalgams and by electrolysis; the electrochemical behavior of Md is very similar to that of Fm and can be summarized in the equation, Md 2+ + 2e - = Md(Hg), and E 0 = 1.5 V

  3. Chemical properties of mendelevium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, E.K.

    1980-11-01

    Even with the most intense ion beams and the largest available quantities of target isotope, about 10 6 atoms at a time is all the Md that can be produced for chemical studies. This lack of sufficient sample size coupled with the very short lifetimes of the few atoms produced has severely restricted the gathering and the broadness of our knowledge concerning the properties of Md and the heavier elements. To illustrate, the literature contains a mere eleven references to the chemical studies of Md, and none of these deal with bulk properties associated with the element bound in solid phases. Some of these findings are: Md was found to be more volatile than other actinide metals which lead to the belief that it is divalent in the metallic state; separation of Md from the other actinides can be accomplished either by reduction of Md 3+ to the divalent state or by chromatographic separations with Md remaining in the tripositive state; extraction of Md 2+ with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid is much poorer than the extraction of the neighboring tripositive actinides; attempts to oxidize Md 3+ with sodium bismuthate failed to show any evidence for Md 4+ ; reduction potential of Md 3+ was found to be close to -0.1 volt; Md 3+ can be reduced to Md(Hg) by sodium amalgams and by electrolysis; the electrochemical behavior of Md is very similar to that of Fm and can be summarized in the equation, Md 2+ + 2e - = Md(Hg) and E 0 = -1.50 V.; and Md cannot be reduced to a monovalent ion with Sm 2+

  4. Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    The Symposium honoring the 25th Anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on March 28, 1980. The following three papers were presented: Chemical Properties of Mendelevium; Nuclear Properties of Mendelevium; and Radioactive Decay of Md Isotopes. Besides these papers there were introductory remarks, reminiscences, and concluding remarks.

  5. Studies on some physico-chemical properties of the monovalent mendelevium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenskaya, A.N.; Mikheev, N.B.; Novichenko, V.L.

    1979-01-01

    It was established that Md 3+ reduced by Yb 2+ or Eu 2+ co-crystallizes with NaCl in water-ethanol solutions. The co-crystallization coefficient is independent of the relative quantities of the solid and liquid phase, of the concentration of the reducing agent in the concentration range from 1 to 8 mg/ml, and of the concentration of the chloride ion in the solution. Basing on the knowledge of anomalous mixed crystals and on the thermodynamical analysis of the formation of truly isomorphical solid solutions and anomalous mixed crystals, it was shown that mendelevium co-crystallizing with NaCl is in its monovalent state. Besides, it was concluded that up to 1.5 M chloride concentration the monovalent mendelevium does not form stable chloride complexes in water-ethanol solutions. (author)

  6. Ethylene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about ethylene oxide, which can raise your risk of lymphoma and leukemia. Exposure may occur through industrial emissions, tobacco smoke, and the use of products sterilized with ethylene oxide, such as certain medical products or cosmetics.

  7. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  8. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  9. Selective oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Henao, Luis F.; Castro F, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    It is presented a revision and discussion about the characteristics and factors that relate activity and selectivity in the catalytic and not catalytic partial oxidation of methane and the effect of variables as the temperature, pressure and others in the methane conversion to methanol. It thinks about the zeolites use modified for the catalytic oxidation of natural gas

  10. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  11. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... one to four times daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow ...

  12. Iron Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Amonette, James E.

    2016-09-19

    Abstract: Fe oxides are common clay-sized oxide, oxyhydroxide and hydroxide soil minerals. They are compounds of Fe, O, and H that have structures based on close-packed arrays of O. The octahedral and tetrahedral cavities within these arrays are filled with either Fe3+ or Fe2+ to form Fe(O/OH)6, FeO6, or FeO4 structural units. All of the naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals usually undergo some degree of isomorphous substitution of other metal ions for Fe in their structures. Relatively simple techniques may be used to identify Fe oxides in the field based on their typical colors and magnetic properties. In the laboratory, a variety of instrumental techniques can be used to confirm phase identity and to quantify amount. Of these, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy are the most commonly used techniques. As oxides, the functional groups on their surfaces may have positive, negative, or no charge depending on pH and on the concentration and nature of other ions in the contact solution. A net positive surface charge usually is observed in soils because Fe oxides have a point-of-zero-charge in the neutral or slightly basic pHs. The functional groups on the surface form complexes with cations and anions from the aqueous phase. Their sorption and electron-buffering properties significantly affect the geochemical cycles of almost all elements having agronomic or environmental significance.

  13. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  14. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  15. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...... other RNA molecules show virtually no oxidation. The iron-storage disease hemochromatosis exhibits the most prominent general increase in RNA oxidation ever observed. Oxidation of RNA primarily leads to strand breaks and to oxidative base modifications. Oxidized mRNA is recognized by the ribosomes...

  16. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J Roland [Lakewood, CO; Liu, Ping [Irvine, CA; Smith, R Davis [Golden, CO

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  17. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  18. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    Nitroglycerin, which may be regarded as a prodrug for nitric oxide, induces a mild to moderate headache in healthy subjects. In order to study whether migraine patients are more sensitive to nitric oxide than non-migrainous subjects, four different doses of intravenous nitroglycerin were given...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...... oxide. It is suggested that nitric oxide may be partially or completely responsible for migraine pain....

  19. Zinc oxide overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  20. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  1. Sputtered tin oxide and titanium oxide thin films as alternative transparent conductive oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Boltz, Janika

    2011-01-01

    Alternative transparent conductive oxides to tin doped indium oxide have been investigated. In this work, antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide have been studied with the aim to prepare transparent and conductive films. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide belong to different groups of oxides; tin oxide is a soft oxide, while titanium oxide is a hard oxide. Both oxides are isolating materials, in case the stoichiometry is SnO2 and TiO2. In order to ach...

  2. The oxidative pulverisation of mixed oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rance, Peter; Beznosyuk, Vassily

    2005-01-01

    An investigation of the oxidation of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOx) fuels containing from 5-30% plutonium (heavy metal basis) in air and oxygen atmospheres has been undertaken. MOx pellets prepared by a co-precipitation process were oxidised at temperatures from 600 to 1200degC, samples were reduced back to the MO 2 state and then re-oxidised. Weight changes were monitored during each procedure and the phases present in the products from each treatment were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples containing up to 10% Pu were oxidised sufficiently to cause pulverisation of the fuel matrix by a single oxidation treatment at 600degC whereas samples containing higher plutonium contents required a cycle of oxidation-reduction-oxidation cause them to become fragmented. XRD data suggests the formation of plutonium-rich and plutonium-lean grains during the reduction cycle and it is suggested that the oxidation of plutonium-lean grains during re-oxidation step is responsible for the break up of the pellets during this step. (author)

  3. Effect Of Oxidation Temperature And Oxidation Time On Thickness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation has been made concerning the effect of oxidation temperature and time on the thickness of copper (I) oxides solar cells prepared by thermal oxidation method. The samples were oxidized at different oxidation temperatures and time. The different oxidation temperatures and lengths of time ware employed in ...

  4. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  5. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  6. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnOx. This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnOx. The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV)-oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials. In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnOx catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnOx materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future.

  7. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  8. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  9. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  10. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  11. Cosmological billiards and oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Buyl, S.; Paulot, L.; Henneaux, M.; Julia, B.

    2004-01-01

    We show how the properties of the cosmological billiards provide useful information (spacetime dimension and p-form spectrum) on the oxidation endpoint of the oxidation sequence of gravitational theories. We compare this approach to the other available methods: GL(n,R) subgroups and the superalgebras of dualities. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  13. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics.

  14. Death from Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and deaths, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental deaths related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  16. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  17. Oxidants for uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.; Ring, B.

    2007-01-01

    Most uranium ores are leached with sulfuric acid under oxidising conditions. This paper reviews the oxidants that have been traditionally used in uranium leaching and discusses their merits in the context of overall flow sheet considerations. Options for alternative oxidants are also discussed. In acid leaching, ferric ion in solution oxidises insoluble uranium(IV) to soluble uranium (VI). Though ferric ion may be added directly, usually an oxidant is added to the circuit to convert ferrous ion to ferric ion in the liquor so that leaching can continue. The most common oxidants are pyrolusite and sodium chlorate. Pyrolusite is relatively cheap but introduces manganese ions into the liquor and consumes twice as much acid as sodium chlorate. Sodium chlorate is a slow reacting oxidant at low temperatures and acidities, and introduces chloride into the leach liquor. Caro's acid, is a non-polluting reagent that was used successfully at the Nabarlek uranium mine, and provided very good control of oxidising conditions. Other oxidants that are now being considered to overcome the disadvantages of pyrolusite and sodium chlorate are oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and SO 2 /O 2 . Some performance data for these oxidants are presented

  18. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... on the C-3 carbons of Ala, Val, Leu, and Asp residues undergo beta-scission to give backbone alpha-carbon radicals, with the release of the side- chain as a carbonyl compound. We now show that this is a general mechanism that occurs with a wide range of oxidants. The quantitative significance...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...

  19. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...... and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function...

  20. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AASERT supported research is to develop the plasma deposition/implantation process for coating barium, strontium and calcium oxides on nickel substrates and to perform detailed surface...

  1. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    .... The vacuum are plasma deposition gun developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been used to deposit oxides and nitrides with very precise control over deposition rate and composition.

  2. CATALYTIC ENANTIOSELECTIVE ALLYLIC OXIDATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, Minze T.; Zondervan, Charon; Feringa, Bernard

    Several chiral Cu(II)-complexes of cyclic amino acids catalyse the enantioselective allylic oxidation of cyclohexene to cyclohexenyl esters. Cyclohexenyl propionate was obtained in 86% yield with e.e.'s up to 61%.

  3. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  4. Thin zirconium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oviedo, Cristina

    2000-01-01

    Polycrystalline Zr and two pure Zr single-crystal samples, one oriented with the normal to the surface parallel to the c-axis of the hcp structure (Z1) and the other with the normal perpendicular to c (Z2), were oxidised at 10 -8 , 10 -7 and 10 -6 Torr and room temperature. Oxidation kinetics, composition and thicknesses of the oxide films formed in each case were analyzed using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) as the main technique. The oxidation kinetics followed logarithmic laws in all cases. The deconvolution of XPS Zr3d peaks indicated the formation of two Zr-O compounds before the formation of ZrO 2 . Varying the photoelectrons take-off angle, the compound distribution inside the oxide films could be established. Thus, it was confirmed that the most external oxide, in contact with the gas, was ZrO 2 . The thickness of the films grown at the different pressures was determined. In the polycrystalline samples, thicknesses between 15 and 19 ± 2Angstroem were obtained for pressures between 10 -8 and 10 -6 Torr, in close coincidence with the determined ones for Z2. The thicknesses measured in Z1 were smaller, reaching 13 ± 2Angstroem for the oxidations performed at 10 -6 Torr. (author)

  5. Porous ceramics out of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunov, V.S.; Balkevich, V.L.; Vlasov, A.S.; Guzman, I.Ya.; Lukin, E.S.; Poluboyarinov, D.N.; Poliskij, R.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of manufacturing procedures and properties of oxide ceramics intended for high-temperature thermal insulation and thermal protection applications. Presented are structural characteristics of porous oxide refractories and their properties. Strength and thermal conductivity was shown to depend upon porosity. Described is a procedure for manufacturing porous ceramic materials from aluminium oxide, zirconium dioxide, magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide. The thermal resistance of porous ceramics from BeO is considerably greater than that of other high-refractoriness oxides. Listed are areas of application for porous materials based on oxides

  6. Single sheet iron oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Zhou

    activity. LDH single sheets have been reported to be effective sorbents, catalysts in electrochemical and photochemical reactions, and building thin films together with other nanomaterials for designing new functionalities. Here we focus on the delamination of FeII-FeIII LDHs into single sheet iron oxide...... was rapid compared to other iron oxides, reaching equilibrium within 60 minutes. Arsenic sorption and acid-base titration data could be successfully described with a 1pk Basic Stern Model (BSM). The point of zero charge was around 8. The intrinsic surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K...... became abundant at low pH. (3) Electrochemical reduction of chlorinated compounds using an SSI modified electrode. Here, the electrochemical reactivity of SSIs coated on indium tin oxide coated glass electrodes was investigated. Iron on the SSI modified electrode showed a typical Cyclic Voltammetry...

  7. Volume reduction by oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, H.; Hasegawa, A.; Koshiba, Y.; Yamanaka, A.

    1984-01-01

    JGC Corporation has been actively investigating the treatment of various combustible and organic wastes generated at nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants. In particular, JGC has analyzed three new technologies which produce dramatic volume reductions and complete conversion of wastes into inorganic substances for durable storage and disposal. Those technologies are; Incineration, Wet oxidation and Photooxidation. Incineration is an excellent volume reducer for combustible wastes, and wet oxidation, using hydrogen peroxide, is also a good way for reducing spent ion-exchange resins without any off-gas problems. Photooxidation is a new technology to purify polluted water for recycled use in the stations without th release of contaminated water to the environment. Polluted water may include NH4+, detergents, chelating agents and other organic decontamination agents. These VR technologies are all based on ''Oxidation'' from which the title of this paper comes

  8. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  9. Ethylene Oxide Gaseous Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Robert R.; Shull, James J.

    1962-01-01

    The duration of the equilibration period between admission of water vapor and subsequent introduction of gaseous ethylene oxide to an evacuated sterilizer chamber was studied with respect to its effect on the inactivation of spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger under simulated practical conditions. Introduction of a water-adsorbing cotton barrier between the spores and an incoming gas mixture of water vapor and ethylene oxide caused a marked increase in the observed thermochemical death time of the spore populations. This effect was negated by admission of water vapor one or more minutes prior to introduction of ethylene oxide gas. Increases in temperature and relative humidity of the system promoted passage of water vapor through the cotton barriers and diminished their effect. PMID:13890660

  10. Oxidation of orthopaedic UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Jacobson, K; Bracco, P; Brach del Prever, E M

    2002-04-01

    Retrieved EtO sterilised acetabular cups usually show much less degradation than gamma-ray sterilised cups. Some of our retrieved EtO sterilised cups did, however, reveal unexpected bulk oxidation. It was observed that this oxidation was always accompanied by whitening of the material. This whitening was found to be due to a break-up of the compression moulded material into its original particles. It was noticed that there was no oxidation in all parts, where the break-up and whitening appeared. The oxidation did, however, occur exclusively in the parts where there was a badly consolidated material. Upon examining shelf aged, unsterilised samples, it was found that the degradation was also present here. This shows that the observed phenomenon is not due to the service in vivo and that it must originate from the processing step. Just as for the retrieved samples, the shelf aged cups only showed oxidation in the bulk and not at the surface. It was concluded that the material used for the cups had been badly fused together during the compression moulding and that the machining had created a bad stress situation in the cups leading to a break-up of the particles. The mechanism that initiates the oxidation is not known, but it is believed that the distribution depends on how the internal stresses have acted to break up the structure. In the areas where the particles have been separated, there is probably a higher availability of oxygen than what is normally observed in UHMWPE.

  11. Oxidation by metal salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhon'kov, D.I.; Cheprakov, A.V.; Rodkin, M.A.; Mil'chenko, A.Yu.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation of toluene and para-substituted toluenes containing electron acceptor groups: p-toluic acid, p-methyltoluylate and p-nitrotoluene by ammonium cerium (4) nitrate and ammonium cerium (4) sulfate in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of chlorides and bromides of alkali metals is studied. The rate and selectivity of oxidative halogenation in side chain and/or aromatic ring under the conditions studied depend both on the nature of substrate and halogenide-ion and on the reaction conditions and ligand surrounding of cerium (4) atom

  12. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  13. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures

  14. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-04-27

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures.

  15. Green oxidations: Titanium dioxide induced tandem oxidation coupling reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeena, Vineet; Robinson, Ross S

    2009-01-01

    Summary The application of titanium dioxide as an oxidant in tandem oxidation type processes is described. Under microwave irradiation, quinoxalines have been synthesized in good yields from the corresponding ?-hydroxyketones.

  16. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target...

  17. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  18. Oxidative stress in myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  19. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  20. Partial Oxidation of n-Pentane over Vanadium Phosphorus Oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    The selective oxidation ofn-pentane to value-added products, maleic anhydride or phthallic anhydride by vanadium phosphorus oxide loaded on hydroxyapatites as catalysts and oxygen as oxidant was investigated. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) and cobalt- hydroxyapatite (Co-HAp) were prepared by the co-precipitation method ...

  1. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  2. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  3. Electrochemical analysis of metal oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grygar, Tomáš; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David; Pikna, L.

    90-91, - (2003), s. 45-50 ISSN 1012-0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : powder electroanalysis * Fe oxides * Mn oxides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.687, year: 2003

  4. Thin film metal-oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Shriram

    2009-01-01

    Presents an account of the fundamental structure-property relations in oxide thin films. This title discusses the functional properties of thin film oxides in the context of applications in the electronics and renewable energy technologies.

  5. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Cupric Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%. In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H2-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

  7. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms......) this enhancement effect is reduced for NO but maintained for NO2. Furthermore two temperature regimes of oxidation separated by an intermediate regime where only little oxidation takes place exist at residence times of 140 ms, if NO is the only nitrogen oxide initially present. The results were explained...

  8. Oxidative decarboxylation of levulinic acid by cupric oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yan; Lin, Lu; Shi, Jianbin; Liu, Shijie

    2010-11-05

    In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA) and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%). In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H(2)-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

  9. The aqueous chemistry of oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The Aqueous Chemistry of Oxides is a comprehensive reference volume and special topics textbook that explores all of the major chemical reactions that take place between oxides and aqueous solutions. The book highlights the enormous impact that oxide-water reactions have in advanced technologies, materials science, geochemistry, and environmental science.

  10. (VI) oxide in acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media was studied. The reaction products were analysed using infra red (IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass (GC/MS) spectroscopy. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium were cyclohexanol, ...

  11. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  12. Aerobic Oxidations of Light Alkanes over Solid Metal Oxide Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joseph T; Venegas, Juan M; McDermott, William P; Hermans, Ive

    2017-11-07

    Heterogeneous metal oxide catalysts are widely studied for the aerobic oxidations of C 1 -C 4 alkanes to form olefins and oxygenates. In this review, we outline the properties of supported metal oxides, mixed-metal oxides, and zeolites and detail their most common applications as catalysts for partial oxidations of light alkanes. By doing this we establish similarities between different classes of metal oxides and identify common themes in reaction mechanisms and research strategies for catalyst improvement. For example, almost all partial alkane oxidations, regardless of the metal oxide, follow Mars-van Krevelen reaction kinetics, which utilize lattice oxygen atoms to reoxidize the reduced metal centers while the gaseous O 2 reactant replenishes these lattice oxygen vacancies. Many of the most-promising metal oxide catalysts include V 5+ surface species as a necessary constituent to convert the alkane. Transformations involving sequential oxidation steps (i.e., propane to acrylic acid) require specific reaction sites for each oxidation step and benefit from site isolation provided by spectator species. These themes, and others, are discussed in the text.

  13. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner...... this raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some...

  14. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  15. Electrorheology of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen Ling; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Sang Guk

    2012-04-01

    Novel polarizable graphene oxide (GO) particles with oxidized groups on their edge and basal planes were prepared by a modified Hummers method, and their electro-responsive electrorheological (ER) characteristics when dispersed in silicone oil were examined with and without an electric field applied. The fibrillation phenomenon of this GO-based electro-responsive fluid was also observed via an optical microscope under an applied electric field. Both flow curves and dielectric spectra of the ER fluid were measured using a rotational rheometer and a LCR meter, respectively. Its viscoelastic properties of both storage and loss moduli were also examined using a vertical oscillation rheometer equipped with a high voltage generator, finding that the GO-based smart ER system behaves as a viscoelastic material under an applied electric field.

  16. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  17. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  18. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    been observed to decrease CO oxidation even at 500TC ( Farrauto and Wedding, 1973, p. 254) by a sulfate formation mechanism, it is likely that the...sulfated CoO, in the study of Farrauto and Wedding (1973) and that no deactivation was observed in the previously discussed study by Pope et al...This is attributed to the adsorption of HO on the catalyst surface which competes with the adsorption of ethanol. Farrauto and Wedding (1973) studied

  19. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  20. Nitrous Oxide Explosive Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    JC, Departement d’anesthesie- reanimation, CHU Angers, 49033 cedex 01, Angers, France , Ann Fr Anesth Reanim, pp 366-8, April 22, 2003. 8. “Some...Krisjansons, Doren E. Bollinger , and Rudolph Edse, ARL 62-431. September 1962. 21. “Detonability of Nitrous Oxide at Elevated Initial Pressures and...Temperatures”, James A Laughrey, Loren E. Bollinger , Rudolph Edse, ARL 62-432, September 1962. 22. “Investigation of Decomposition Characteristics

  1. Oxidative stability of polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Exnerová, Milena; Morávková, Zuzana; Trchová, Miroslava; Hromádková, Jiřina; Prokeš, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 6 (2012), s. 1026-1033 ISSN 0141-3910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626; GA ČR GAP205/12/0911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyaniline * nanotubes * oxidation stability Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.770, year: 2012

  2. Molecular theory of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheka, Elena F; Popova, Nadezhda A

    2013-08-28

    Applied to graphene oxide, the molecular theory of graphene considers its oxide as a final product in the succession of polyderivatives related to a series of oxidation reactions involving different oxidants. The graphene oxide structure is created in the course of a stepwise computational synthesis of polyoxides of the (5,5) nanographene molecule governed by an algorithm that takes into account the molecule's natural radicalization due to the correlation of its odd electrons, the extremely strong influence of the structure on properties, and a sharp response of the molecule behavior on small actions of external factors. Taking these together, the theory has allowed for a clear, transparent and understandable explanation of the hot points of graphene oxide chemistry and suggesting reliable models of both chemically produced and chemically reduced graphene oxides.

  3. Alkane oxidation by osmium tetroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Brian C; Brown, Peter; Dehestani, Ahmad; Mayer, James M

    2005-03-09

    Aqueous alkaline OsO4 at 85 degrees C oxidizes saturated alkanes, including primary, secondary, and tertiary C-H bonds. Isobutane affords tert-butanol in quantitative yield based on consumed OsO4. Cyclohexane is oxidized to a mixture of adipate and succinate. Ethane and propane are oxidized to acetate, which itself is further oxidized under the reaction conditions. A few turnovers of isobutane oxidation have been accomplished using NaIO4 as the terminal oxidant. The alkane oxidation is an example of ligand accelerated catalysis, as hydroxide binding to OsO4 is required for reaction. A concerted mechanism involving [3+2] addition of a C-H bond to two oxo groups of OsO4(OH)- is suggested, analogous to the pathways for dihydroxylation of alkenes by OsO4(L) and for addition of H2 to OsO4(L).

  4. Oxidation process of cadmium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Koshiro; Toda, Yoshitomo; Sato, Takayori

    1977-01-01

    Complicated thermogravimetric curve was observed on oxidation process of cadmium sulfide precipitate in air. Phases of various oxidation stage were identified by X-ray diffraction method. Cadmium sulfide was first oxidized to cadmium oxide at 400 0 C, while the successive reaction with sulfur dioxide and oxygen gases gave rise to cadmium sulfate. The phases such as 2 CdS. CdSO 4 , Cd 3 SO 6 and β-CdSO 4 appeared during the oxidation process up to 1100 0 C, at which all the particles were converted into cadmium oxide at 1100 0 C. Cadmium sulfide kept in nitrogen gas above 700 0 C was directly converted into cadmium oxide when oxygen gas was introduced into the furnace. (auth.)

  5. The role of oxidative debris on graphene oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Díaz, David; Velázquez, Maria Mercedes; Blanco de La Torre, Santiago; Pérez-Pisonero, Ana; Trujillano, Raquel; García Fierro, José Luis; Claramunt, Sergi; Cirera, Albert

    2013-12-02

    We study the effect of oxidative impurities on the properties of graphene oxide and on the graphene oxide Langmuir-Blodgett films (LB). The starting material was grupo Antolín nanofibers (GANF) and the oxidation process was a modified Hummers method to obtain highly oxidized graphene oxide. The purification procedure reported in this work eliminated oxidative impurities decreasing the thickness of the nanoplatelets. The purified material thus obtained presents an oxidation degree similar to that achieved by chemical reduction of the graphite oxide. The purified and non-purified graphene oxides were deposited onto silicon by means of a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) methodology. The morphology of the LB films was analyzed by field emission scanning microscopy (FE-SEM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that the LB films built by transferring Langmuir monolayers at the liquid-expanded state of the purified material are constituted by close-packed and non-overlapped nanoplatelets. The isotherms of the Langmuir monolayer precursor of the LB films were interpreted according to the Volmer's model. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-23

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SnO{sub 2} on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga{sub 2}O, In{sub 2}O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO{sub 2}, somewhat lower for In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the lowest for Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  7. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  8. The 2016 oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, M; Grundmann, M; Ramachandra Rao, M S; Mukherjee, J; Priyadarshini, M; Venkatesan, T; Fortunato, E; Barquinha, P; Branquinho, R; Salgueiro, D; Martins, R; Carlos, E; Liu, A; Shan, F K; Boschker, H; DasGupta, N; Rogers, D J; Teherani, F H; Sandana, E V; Bove, P

    2016-01-01

    Oxide electronic materials provide a plethora of possible applications and offer ample opportunity for scientists to probe into some of the exciting and intriguing phenomena exhibited by oxide systems and oxide interfaces. In addition to the already diverse spectrum of properties, the nanoscale form of oxides provides a new dimension of hitherto unknown phenomena due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio. Oxide electronic materials are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of applications including transparent electronics, optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, photonics, spintronics, thermoelectrics, piezoelectrics, power harvesting, hydrogen storage and environmental waste management. Synthesis and fabrication of these materials, as well as processing into particular device structures to suit a specific application is still a challenge. Further, characterization of these materials to understand the tunability of their properties and the novel properties that evolve due to their nanostructured nature is another facet of the challenge. The research related to the oxide electronic field is at an impressionable stage, and this has motivated us to contribute with a roadmap on ‘oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces’. This roadmap envisages the potential applications of oxide materials in cutting edge technologies and focuses on the necessary advances required to implement these materials, including both conventional and novel techniques for the synthesis, characterization, processing and fabrication of nanostructured oxides and oxide-based devices. The contents of this roadmap will highlight the functional and correlated properties of oxides in bulk, nano, thin film, multilayer and heterostructure forms, as well as the theoretical considerations behind both present and future applications in many technologically important areas as pointed out by Venkatesan. The contributions in this roadmap span several thematic groups which are represented by

  9. Solid oxide fuel cells fueled with reducible oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Steven S.; Fan, Liang Shih

    2018-01-09

    A direct-electrochemical-oxidation fuel cell for generating electrical energy includes a cathode provided with an electrochemical-reduction catalyst that promotes formation of oxygen ions from an oxygen-containing source at the cathode, a solid-state reduced metal, a solid-state anode provided with an electrochemical-oxidation catalyst that promotes direct electrochemical oxidation of the solid-state reduced metal in the presence of the oxygen ions to produce electrical energy, and an electrolyte disposed to transmit the oxygen ions from the cathode to the solid-state anode. A method of operating a solid oxide fuel cell includes providing a direct-electrochemical-oxidation fuel cell comprising a solid-state reduced metal, oxidizing the solid-state reduced metal in the presence of oxygen ions through direct-electrochemical-oxidation to obtain a solid-state reducible metal oxide, and reducing the solid-state reducible metal oxide to obtain the solid-state reduced metal.

  10. Wet oxidation catalyzed by ruthenium supported on cerium (IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, S.; Fukuda, I.; Ishida, S.

    1988-01-01

    The activity of precious meta catalysts in the wet oxidation of organic compounds was investigated. Ruthenium was the most active catalyst among the precious metals examined, and cerium (IV) oxide was the most effective support. The Ru/Ce catalyst rivaled homogeneous copper catalyst, which is used in the practical wastewater treatment, for the oxidation of n-propyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, phenol, acetamide, poly (propylene glycol), and acetic acid. In addition, it was especially effective for the oxidation of some compounds with high oxygen content such as poly (ethylene glycol), ethylene glycol, formaldehyde, and formic acid

  11. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target....... If the argument that the impact of ROS increases with age is true, then proteins would be expected to accumulate oxidised materials with age, and the rate of such accumulation should increase with time, reflecting impaired inefficiency of homeostasis. Here we review the evidence for the accumulation of oxidised......, or modified, extra- and intra-cellular proteins in vivo....

  12. Oxidation in Enceladus' Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Glein, C.; Teolis, B. D.

    2017-12-01

    The detection of molecular hydrogen in the plume of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus reports that there is positive chemical affinity for methanogenesis, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon dioxide to form methane and water [Waite et al., 2017]. Methanogenesis, however, is just one of many possible metabolic pathways that could be utilized. While some of the oxidants involved in these metabolic pathways have already been detected in the plume (i.e. carbon dioxide), sulfate, which could play an important role in several of these reactions, has not yet been observed. To constrain the amount of sulfate and other oxidants that could be present to support these metabolisms, we present a geochemical model of Enceladus' ocean based on detections made by the Cassini INMS instrument [Waite et. al, 2017]. We use a model of radiolysis on the surface of Enceladus to estimate the amount of molecular oxygen (O2) contained in the ice. We calculate the delivery rate of O2 from the surface ice to the ocean using previous estimates of the rate of ice deposition on the south polar region [Kempf et al., 2010], and the meteoritic gardening rate for the older surface of the moon. Assuming this activity has occurred over 4.5 billion years, we obtain an upper limit of > 1020 moles of O2 delivered to the ocean over Enceladus' lifetime. This large amount of oxygen could react with sulfides, reduced iron, or organic materials to produce sulfate, ferric oxyhydroxides, or carbon dioxide/carboxylic acids, respectively. We calculate upper limits on the amounts of these materials using a mineralogical model of Enceladus' core [Waite et al., 2017]. We find that the abiotic oxidation of pyrrhotite, which is the most likely pathway for sulfate production, could yield a sulfate concentration > 4 mol/(kg H2O). We suggest that oxidants should be abundant in the ocean and plume unless they are being consumed by life, the rate of ice deposition on the surface is much smaller than what has been predicted, or

  13. Sputtered tin oxide and titanium oxide thin films as alternative transparent conductive oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltz, Janika

    2011-12-12

    Alternative transparent conductive oxides to tin doped indium oxide have been investigated. In this work, antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide have been studied with the aim to prepare transparent and conductive films. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide belong to different groups of oxides; tin oxide is a soft oxide, while titanium oxide is a hard oxide. Both oxides are isolating materials, in case the stoichiometry is SnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}. In order to achieve transparent and conductive films free carriers have to be generated by oxygen vacancies, by metal ions at interstitial positions in the crystal lattice or by cation doping with Sb or Nb, respectively. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide films have been prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering (dc MS) from metallic targets. The process parameters and the doping concentration in the films have been varied. The films have been electrically, optically and structurally analysed in order to analyse the influence of the process parameters and the doping concentration on the film properties. Post-deposition treatments of the films have been performed in order to improve the film properties. For the deposition of transparent and conductive tin oxide, the dominant parameter during the deposition is the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The Sb incorporation as doping atoms has a minor influence on the electrical, optical and structural properties. Within a narrow oxygen content in the sputtering gas highly transparent and conductive tin oxide films have been prepared. In this study, the lowest resistivity in the as deposited state is 2.9 m{omega} cm for undoped tin oxide without any postdeposition treatment. The minimum resistivity is related to a transition to crystalline films with the stoichiometry of SnO{sub 2}. At higher oxygen content the films turn out to have a higher resistivity due to an oxygen excess. After post

  14. Actinide oxide photodiode and nuclear battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Milan; Usov, Igor

    2017-12-05

    Photodiodes and nuclear batteries may utilize actinide oxides, such a uranium oxide. An actinide oxide photodiode may include a first actinide oxide layer and a second actinide oxide layer deposited on the first actinide oxide layer. The first actinide oxide layer may be n-doped or p-doped. The second actinide oxide layer may be p-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is n-doped, and the second actinide oxide layer may be n-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is p-doped. The first actinide oxide layer and the second actinide oxide layer may form a p/n junction therebetween. Photodiodes including actinide oxides are better light absorbers, can be used in thinner films, and are more thermally stable than silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide.

  15. Rare Earth Oxide Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Thin rare earth (RE) oxide films are emerging materials for microelectronic, nanoelectronic, and spintronic applications. The state-of-the-art of thin film deposition techniques as well as the structural, physical, chemical, and electrical properties of thin RE oxide films and of their interface with semiconducting substrates are discussed. The aim is to identify proper methodologies for the development of RE oxides thin films and to evaluate their effectiveness as innovative materials in different applications.

  16. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  17. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    , and I) and OH on a wide range of rutile oxide surfaces. Furthermore, Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found for the adsorption of a large number of molecules (including Cl, Br and I) on transition metal oxides. In these relations the activation energies scale linearly with the dissociative...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved...

  18. Semiconductor-oxide heterostructured nanowires using postgrowth oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Ek, Martin; Vainorious, Neimantas; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Samuelson, Lars; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Reine Wallenberg, L; Borgström, Magnus T

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor-oxide heterointerfaces have several electron volts high-charge carrier potential barriers, which may enable devices utilizing quantum confinement at room temperature. While a single heterointerface is easily formed by oxide deposition on a crystalline semiconductor, as in MOS transistors, the amorphous structure of most oxides inhibits epitaxy of a second semiconductor layer. Here, we overcome this limitation by separating epitaxy from oxidation, using postgrowth oxidation of AlP segments to create axial and core-shell semiconductor-oxide heterostructured nanowires. Complete epitaxial AlP-InP nanowire structures were first grown in an oxygen-free environment. Subsequent exposure to air converted the AlP segments into amorphous aluminum oxide segments, leaving isolated InP segments in an oxide matrix. InP quantum dots formed on the nanowire sidewalls exhibit room temperature photoluminescence with small line widths (down to 15 meV) and high intensity. This optical performance, together with the control of heterostructure segment length, diameter, and position, opens up for optoelectrical applications at room temperature.

  19. Improving oxidative stability of ghee using natural oxidants from agri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and PP gave good antioxidant activity during accelerated oxidative incubation of ghee. It could be concluded that ethanol extracts under study, at a concentration of 200 ppm, can retard fat auto-oxidation. Keywords: Ghee, agri industrial by-products, natural antioxidants, stability indices. African Journal of Biotechnology, ...

  20. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms...

  1. HYDROCARBON OXIDATION OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is one of the very important and challenging areas in industrial chemistry due to the wide ranging utility of the resulting oxygenates in fine chemical synthesis. Most of the existing processes for their oxidations employ toxic and often stoich...

  2. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over niobia supported vanadium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, T.C.; Watling, T.C.; Deo, G.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Wachs, I.E.; Lercher, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane is examined over a series of catalysts, which include Nb2O5 supported monolayer V2O5 catalysts, bulk vanadia-niobia with different vanadium oxide loadings and prepared by four different methods, V2O5and Nb2O5. The intrinsic activity (TOF) of the samples

  3. It has been suggested that oxidative stress, especially oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nabipour

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... Oxidative stress has been implicated in coronary artery disease (CAD). Malondialdehyde (MDA) is lipid ... Key words: Oxidative stress, bilirubin, malondialdehyde, coronary artery disease, antioxidant capacity, homocysteine. .... logists, unaware of the patients' clinical history and biochemical results, visually ...

  4. Plutonium oxides and uranium and plutonium mixed oxides. Carbon determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of carbon in plutonium oxides and uranium plutonium mixed oxides, suitable for a carbon content between 20 to 3000 ppm. The sample is roasted in oxygen at 1200 0 C, the carbon dioxide produced by combustion is neutralized by barium hydroxide generated automatically by coulometry [fr

  5. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    non-equilibrium growth has rekindled the recent extensive investigation and progress in the field of ZnO epitaxy. In this special issue, Ohtomo and Tsukazaki, Cho et al, and Yi et al, respectively, describe the various fabrication processes such as pulsed laser deposition, molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. It should be noted that the last work among the above-mentioned papers has the potential to pave the way to nano-technology based on ZnO. This material has found other important applications as well, such as transparent conducting oxides (TCO). This field has a long research history, as is reviewed by Minami. Relatively speaking, ZnO was one of the earliest crystals (after Si, Ge, and InSb) to be prepared in a pure form, and the resultant long research history has given rise to the availability of large-area substrates. Recent progress in this topic is explained by two representative groups of authors in this field: Nause and Nemeth at Cermet Inc., and Maeda et al at Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd. In order to overcome the bottleneck of p-type conduction and control the material's properties, a clear understanding of the physical processes in ZnO is necessary. Look et al are known as the first group to report on the growth and properties of p-type ZnO layers with a valid and reasonable set of experimental data (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 1830). Here, Look contributes a more comprehensive review to this issue. Optical studies on single crystals were conducted and are reviewed here by Meyer et al and Chichibu et al. Band-gap engineering and fabrication of heterojunction or quantum structures are important technological issues. It should be emphasized that by choosing an appropriate set of concentrations (x and y), perfect lattice-matching between MgxZn1-xO and CdyZn1-yO can be attained (Makino T et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 1237). Exciton properties of multiple quantum well structures are reported by Makino et al in this issue. Other than

  6. The 2016 oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, M.; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    , spintronics, thermoelectrics, piezoelectrics, power harvesting, hydrogen storage and environmental waste management. Synthesis and fabrication of these materials, as well as processing into particular device structures to suit a specific application is still a challenge. Further, characterization......Oxide electronic materials provide a plethora of possible applications and offer ample opportunity for scientists to probe into some of the exciting and intriguing phenomena exhibited by oxide systems and oxide interfaces. In addition to the already diverse spectrum of properties, the nanoscale...... form of oxides provides a new dimension of hitherto unknown phenomena due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio. Oxide electronic materials are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of applications including transparent electronics, optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, photonics...

  7. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance...... bituminous coal (73 mW/cm2). © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  8. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance...... bituminous coal (73 mW/cm2)....

  9. Hydrogen oxidation in Azospirillum brasilense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibelius, K.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation by Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was studied in N/sub 2/-fixing and NH/sub 4//sup +/-grown batch cultures. The K/sub m/ for H/sub 2/ of O/sub 2/-dependent H/sup 3/H oxidation in whole cells was 9 uM. The rates of H/sup 3/H and H/sub 2/ oxidation were very similar, indicating that the initial H/sub 2/ activation step in the overall H/sub 2/ oxidation reaction was not rate-limiting and that H/sup 3/H oxidation was a valid measure of H/sub 2/-oxidation activity. Hydrogen-oxidation activity was inhibited irreversibly by air. In N-free cultures the O/sub 2/ optima for O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ oxidation, ranging from 0.5-1.25% O/sub 2/ depending on the phase of growth, were significantly higher than those of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reduction, 0.15-0.35%, suggesting that the H/sub 2/-oxidation system may have a limited ability to aid in the protection of nitrogenase against inactivation by O/sub 2/. Oxygen-dependent H/sub 2/ oxidation was inhibited by NO/sub 2//sup +/, NO, CO, and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ with apparent K/sub 1/ values of 20, 0.4, 28, and 88 uM, respectively. Hydrogen-oxidation activity was 50 to 100 times higher in denitrifying cultures when the terminal electron acceptor for growth was N/sub 2/O rather than NO/sub 3//sup -/, possibly due to the irreversible inhibition of hydrogenase by NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cultures.

  10. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  11. Oxidation pathways underlying the pro-oxidant effects of apigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andueza, Aitor; García-Garzón, Antonia; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Ansorena, Eduardo; Iraburu, María J; López-Zabalza, María J; Martínez-Irujo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavone, is emerging as a promising compound for the treatment of several diseases. One of the hallmarks of apigenin is the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), as judged by the oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives seen in many cell types. This study aimed to reveal some mechanisms by which apigenin can be oxidized and how apigenin-derived radicals affect the oxidation of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H(2)DCF), a probe usually employed to detect intracellular ROS. Apigenin induced a rapid oxidation of H(2)DCF in two different immortalized cell lines derived from rat and human hepatic stellate cells. However, apigenin did not generate ROS in these cells, as judged by dihydroethidium oxidation and extracellular hydrogen peroxide production. In cell-free experiments we found that oxidation of apigenin leads to the generation of a phenoxyl radical, which directly oxidizes H(2)DCF with catalytic amounts of hydrogen peroxide. The net balance of the reaction was the oxidation of the probe by molecular oxygen due to redox cycling of apigenin. This flavonoid was also able to deplete NADH and glutathione by a similar mechanism. Interestingly, H(2)DCF oxidation was significantly accelerated by apigenin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and xanthine oxidase, but not with other enzymes showing peroxidase-like activity, such as cytochrome c or catalase. We conclude that in cells treated with apigenin oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives does not measure intracellular ROS and that pro- and antioxidant effects of flavonoids deduced from these experiments are inconclusive and must be confirmed by other techniques. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  13. Polymorphism of phosphoric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, W.L.; Faust, G.T.; Hendricks, S.B.

    1943-01-01

    The melting points and monotropic relationship of three crystalline forms of phosphoric oxide were determined by the method of quenching. Previous vapor pressure data are discussed and interpreted to establish a pressure-temperature diagram (70 to 600??) for the one-component system. The system involves three triple points, at which solid, liquid and vapor (P4O10) coexist in equilibrium, namely: 420?? and 360 cm., 562?? and 43.7 cm. and 580?? and 55.5 cm., corresponding to the hexagonal, orthorhombic and stable polymorphs, respectively, and at least two distinct liquids, one a stable polymer of the other, which are identified with the melting of the stable form and the hexagonal modification, respectively. Indices of refraction of the polymorphs and glasses were determined. The density and the thermal, hygroscopic and structural properties of the several phases are discussed.

  14. Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Risø National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 °C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6A/cm2 with app. 30% H2 + 70% H2O in the inlet...... it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US$/kg H2 with an electricity price of 1.3 US¢/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test ofabout two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 °C, -0.5 A/cm2 with 50 vol% H2 the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h...

  15. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1545 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrous oxide. 184.1545 Section 184.1545 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1545 Nitrous oxide. (a) Nitrous oxide (empirical formula N2O, CAS Reg. No.... Nitrous oxide is manufactured by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Higher oxides of nitrogen...

  17. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 keV. This...

  18. Computer simulation of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, A.

    1998-01-01

    An ionic interaction model is developed which accounts for the effects of the ionic environment upon the electron densities of both cations and anions through changes in their size and shape and is transferable between materials. These variations are represented by additional dynamical variables which are handled within the model using the techniques of the Car-Parrinello method. The model parameters are determined as far as possible by input from external ab initio electronic structure calculations directed at examining the individual effects of the ionic environment upon the ions, particularly the oxide ion. Techniques for the evaluation of dipolar and quadrupolar Ewald sums in non-cubic simulation cells and the calculation of the pressure due to the terms in the potential are presented. This model is applied to the description of the perfect crystal properties and phonon dispersion curves of MgO. Consideration of the high symmetry phonon modes allows parameterization of the remaining model parameters in an unambiguous fashion. The same procedure is used to obtain parameters for CaO. These two parameter sets are examined to determine how they may be used to generate the parameters for SrO and simple scaling relationships based on ionic radii and polarizabilities are formulated. The transferability of the model to Cr 2 O 3 is investigated using parameters generated from the alkaline earth oxides. The importance of lower symmetry model terms, particularly quadrupolar interactions, at the low symmetry ion sites in the crystal structure is demonstrated. The correct ground-state crystal structure is predicted and the calculated surface energies and relaxation phenomena are found to agree well with previous ab initio studies. The model is applied to GeO 2 as a strong test of its applicability to ion environments far different from those encountered in MgO. An good description of the crystal structures is obtained and the interplay of dipolar and quadrupolar effects is

  19. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule. Kushal Chakraborty is a doctoral student at. Department of Life. Sciences and Biology at. Jadavpur University. Presently he is working on the stimulatory effects of various kinds of NSAIDs on different kinds of cells and isolation of that protein from those cells. Keywords. Nitric oxide ...

  20. Nitrous oxide and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hanjo; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence related to the effects of nitrous oxide on important perioperative patient outcomes. Proposed mechanisms include metabolic effects linked to elevated homocysteine levels and endothelial dysfunction, inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid and protein formation, and depression of chemotactic migration by monocytes. Newer large studies point to possible risks associated with the use of nitrous oxide, although data are often equivocal and inconclusive. Cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke or myocardial infarction were shown to be unchanged in previous studies, but the more recent Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anesthesia I trial shows possible associations between nitrous oxide and increased cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. There are also possible effects on postoperative wound infections and neuropsychological function, although the multifactorial nature of these complications should be considered. Teratogenicity linked to nitrous oxide use has not been firmly established. The use of nitrous oxide for routine anesthetic care may be associated with significant costs if complications such as nausea, vomiting, and wound infections are taken into consideration. Overall, definitive data regarding the effect of nitrous oxide on major perioperative outcomes are lacking. There are ongoing prospective studies that may further elucidate its role. The use of nitrous oxide in daily practice should be individualized to each patient's medical conditions and risk factors.

  1. on THICKNESS OF COPPER (|) OXIDE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-12-20

    Dec 20, 2006 ... semiconductor devices. The oxide is. Observed to be an attractive starting material for the production of solar cells for low cost terrestrial conversion of solar energy to electricity. Copper (I) oxide is one Of the earliest known photovoltaic materials and the first in which the photovOltaic effect was successfully ...

  2. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  3. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U.C.; Carminati, D.

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some...... contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils......, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process...

  4. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  5. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  6. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  7. Ethylene oxide removal by sorption on aluminium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenijević Zorana Lj.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of ethylene oxide sorption and desorption on Al2O3 sorbent were investigated. The investigations of ethylene oxide sorption on Al2O3 show that significant sorption appeared above 125°C. The removal of sorbed ethylene oxide from Al2O3 was achieved by continuous increasing of the temperature up to 450°C in air stream. The analysis of desorbed products show that 90% of adsorbed ethylene oxide is converted to CO2 and the rest consists of the three derivatives of ethylene oxide. The exact composition of desorbed organic products will be determined in further investigation. The desorption temperature profiles point out the presence of two exothermic picks, as was confirmed by detection of CO2 and derivates of ethylene oxide at these temperatures. Investigation of textural characteristics and thermal stability of Al2O3 sorbent show that there are no changes of any characteristics of Al2O3 in sorption/desorption operating temperatures regimes. Only at 700°C the specific surface area of Al2O3 decreases of about 10%. This indicates that the investigated Al2O3 is convenient material for removal of ethylene oxide by sorption.

  8. 21 CFR 172.808 - Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. 172.808 Section 172.808 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide may be...

  9. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  10. Oxide ultrathin films science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of information in one accessible book. Written by international experts from multidisciplinary fields, this in-depth exploration of oxide ultrathin films covers all aspects of these systems, starting with preparation and characterization, and going on to geometrical and electronic structure, as well as applications in current and future systems and devices. From the Contents: Synthesis and Preparation of Oxide Ultrathin Films Characterization Tools of Oxide Ultrathin Films Ordered Oxide Nanostructures on Metal Surfaces Unusual Properties of Oxides and Other Insulators in the Ultrathin Limit Silica and High-K Dielectrics Thin Films in Microelectronics Oxide Passive Films and Corrosion Protection Oxide Films as Catalytic Materials and as Models of Real Catalysts Oxide Films in Spintronics Oxide Ultrathin Films in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Transparent Conducting and Chromogenic Oxide Films as Solar Energy Materials Oxide Ultrathin Films in Sensor Applications Ferroelectricity in Ultrathin Film Capacitors T...

  11. Trends for Methane Oxidation at Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Jones, Glenn; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict a plausible reaction pathway for the methane oxidation reaction. In turn, this pathway is used to obtain trends in methane oxidation activity at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials. Reaction energetics and barriers for the elementary...... reaction steps on both the close-packed Ni{111} and stepped Ni{211} surfaces are presented. Quantum-mechanical calculations augmented with thermodynamic corrections allow appropriate treatment of the elevated temperatures in SOFCs. Linear scaling relationships are used to extrapolate the results from...

  12. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  13. Oxidants and antioxidants in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Svendsen, Ove

    2007-01-01

    Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... theoretically, oxidative stress should be easily prevented with antioxidants yet the use of antioxidants as therapy remains controversial. The present knowledge on oxidative stress in farm animals is the topic of this review.......Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... in disease or be prevented are complex questions with no simple answers. However, the considerable literature on the subject suggests that many researchers consider oxidative stress-related mechanisms to be important early events in disease development. A particularly intriguing aspect is that, at least...

  14. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulatsky, A.A.; Smirnov, S.A.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A.; Bottomley, D.; Piluso, P.; Barrachin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations

  15. Analysis and Optimization of Oxidized Heterolayers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Eicke

    1998-01-01

    .... A systematic study of the fundamental properties of the wet thermal oxides is being performed, including the dependence on oxide processing parameters, hydrogen and other dopant concentrations...

  16. Unidirectional suppression of hydrogen oxidation on oxidized platinum clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Hang; Xing, Jun; Chen, Zong Jia; Li, Zhen; Tian, Feng; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Solar-driven water splitting to produce hydrogen may be an ideal solution for global energy and environment issues. Among the various photocatalytic systems, platinum has been widely used to co-catalyse the reduction of protons in water for hydrogen evolution. However, the undesirable hydrogen oxidation reaction can also be readily catalysed by metallic platinum, which limits the solar energy conversion efficiency in artificial photosynthesis. Here we report that the unidirectional suppression of hydrogen oxidation in photocatalytic water splitting can be fulfilled by controlling the valence state of platinum; this platinum-based cocatalyst in a higher oxidation state can act as an efficient hydrogen evolution site while suppressing the undesirable hydrogen back-oxidation. The findings in this work may pave the way for developing other high-efficientcy platinum-based catalysts for photocatalysis, photoelectrochemistry, fuel cells and water-gas shift reactions.

  17. Oxides ABO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    Different types of crystal structure of ABO 4 compounds from the structures of the quartz type (BeSO 4 , BPO 4 ) with tetrahedral environment of A and B atoms to oxosalts containing isolated ions BO 4 and atoms A with high coordination number are considered. Many oxides have polymorphic modifications and undergo structural transformations when increasing pressure. MgUO 4 and AlWO 4 compounds with rutile superstructure, where two types of metal atoms are disposed in different chains are described. Uranium (6) in MgUO 4 forms two stronger bonds U-O, that leads to considerable distortion of UO 6 and MgO 6 octahedrons. In AlWO 4 the distortion occurs due to the interaction of metal-metal, that leads to different distances W-W along the chain. NaIO 4 , KIO 4 , KRuO 4 , SrMoO 4 , SrWO 4 , MNbO 4 , MTaO 4 (M = Y or 4f-metals) have the structural types of scheelite and fergusonite

  18. Plutonium oxide shipment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    While following procedures for unloading shipping containers containing plutonium oxide, SRP personnel experienced problems. While using a pipe cutter to cut through the wall of the inner container, the pipe section fell to the floor. Three empty food cans in the bottom of the inner canister also fell to the floor and a puff of smoke was observed. Personnel were evacuated and contamination was detected in the room. As a result of the investigations conducted by Westinghouse and SRP, thermal effects, food can coatings, and fuel volatiles were eliminated as the cause of the problem. Helium used to leak test the RL070 shipping container seals entered the inner canister through two weld defects resulting in a pressurization of the contents. When the end cap was removed, the inner canister vented rapidly, the food cans did not, thus creating a differential pressure across the food cans. This caused the food cans to swell. It was recommended that a dye penetrant test of all inner container welds be added. Additional unloading procedures were also recommended

  19. MOCVD superconducting oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Toshio; Yamane, Hisanori

    1991-01-01

    Preparation of high- Tc superconducting oxide films by MOCVD, their films structure and superconducting properties are reviewed from the standpoint of "nano-composites" and "fine-composites". Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) films formed on SrTiO 3(100) at 850°C showed a superconducting transition temperature with zero resistivity above 90 K. The maximum critical current density was 2.0×10 6 A/cm 2 at 77.3 K and 0 T, and 6.5×10 4 A/cm 2 at 77.3 K and 27 T. CuO and a-axis oriented YBCO grains were contained in the matrix of c-axis oriented YBCO. A transmission electron microscope observation revealed that inclusions of about 10-30 nm were embedded in the a- b plane of YBCO. MOCVD-YBCO films prepared on MgO(100) were used for superconducting devices. Some studies on the MOCVD films of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O are also reviewed.

  20. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...... processes are important in vivo and can contribute to cellular pathology....

  1. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  2. Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szanyi, Janos; Karim, Ayman M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Tran, Diana N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Qi, Gongshin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-09

    The oxidation of engine-generated NO to NO2 is an important step in the reduction of NOx in lean engine exhaust because NO2 is required for the performance of the LNT technology [2], and it enhances the activities of ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts [1]. In particular, for SCR catalysts an NO:NO2 ratio of 1:1 is most effective for NOx reduction, whereas for LNT catalysts, NO must be oxidized to NO2 before adsorption on the storage components. However, NO2 typically constitutes less than 10% of NOx in lean exhaust, so catalytic oxidation of NO is essential. Platinum has been found to be especially active for NO oxidation, and is widely used in DOC and LNT catalysts. However, because of the high cost and poor thermal durability of Pt-based catalysts, there is substantial interest in the development of alternatives. The objective of this project, in collaboration with partner General Motors, is to develop mixed metal oxide catalysts for NO oxidation, enabling lower precious metal usage in emission control systems. [1] M. Koebel, G. Madia, and M. Elsener, Catalysis Today 73, 239 (2002). [2] C. H. Kim, G. S. Qi, K. Dahlberg, and W. Li, Science 327, 1624 (2010).

  3. Catalytic oxidation. VI. Oxidation of labeled olefins over silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cant, N.W.; Hall, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The oxidation of ethylene and propylene labeled with deuterium in various positions and the cooxidation of unlabeled olefins with the corresponding 14 C-labeled epoxides have been studied over a silver catalyst. The latter measurements showed that, in both systems at 200 to 220 0 C, a portion of the CO 2 was produced by destruction of the product epoxide, but that the oxygen exchange between olefin and epoxide was nil. Oxidation of either cis- or trans-ethylene-d 2 yielded a mixture of the cis- and trans-d 2 epoxides which was about 92% equilibrated. Relative rate measurements showed that substitution of deuterium for hydrogen in ethylene increased the yield of epoxide substantially. Such kinetic isotope effects were even more pronounced with propylene for which the oxidation of CD 3 CHCH 2 and CD 3 CDCD 2 gave a 10 to 14% selectivity to the corresponding epoxides compared with 2 to 5% for CH 3 CHCH 2 , CH 3 CDCH 2 , and CH 3 CHCD 2 . The kinetic isotope effects can be qualitatively explained in terms of a normal primary effect in the further oxidation of an intermediate which is common to both epoxide formation and total oxidation. The significance of these findings to previous suggestions regarding surface intermediates and the mechanism of these oxidations is discussed. 4 figures, 5 tables

  4. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  5. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Fu-Tian [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Guang-Wei, E-mail: gwyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Wang, Yin, E-mail: yinwang@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Xing, Zhen-Jiao [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Loading manganese oxides on activated carbon effectively promotes NO oxidation. • NO adsorption-desorption on activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation. • A high Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio contributes to NO oxidation by promoting lattice O transfer. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnO{sub x})-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnO{sub x} and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnO{sub x} (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O{sub 2}, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h{sup −1}. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O{sub 2} concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnO{sub x} loading is assumed to be related to Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnO{sub x} lattice O transfer is proposed.

  6. Prohibition of Oxidizers Aboard Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-30

    RSPA proposes to amend the Hazardous Material Regulations to prohibit the carriage of oxidizers, including compressed oxygen, in passenger carrying aircraft and in Class D compartments on cargo aircraft. This proposal specifically analyzes the prohib...

  7. Peroxynitrite, a Stealthy Biological Oxidant*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is the product of the diffusion-controlled reaction of nitric oxide and superoxide radicals. Peroxynitrite, a reactive short-lived peroxide with a pKa of 6.8, is a good oxidant and nucleophile. It also yields secondary free radical intermediates such as nitrogen dioxide and carbonate radicals. Much of nitric oxide- and superoxide-dependent cytotoxicity resides on peroxynitrite, which affects mitochondrial function and triggers cell death via oxidation and nitration reactions. Peroxynitrite is an endogenous toxicant but is also a cytotoxic effector against invading pathogens. The biological chemistry of peroxynitrite is modulated by endogenous antioxidant mechanisms and neutralized by synthetic compounds with peroxynitrite-scavenging capacity. PMID:23861390

  8. Diffusion of single oxidation pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ruo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic characteristic of an oxidation pond was studied by the tracer experiment, and an empirical formula of Peclet number was obtained, which can be well applied to the model of plug flow reactor with longitudinal diffusion.

  9. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to determine whether there is a coherent body of evidence implicating oxidative damage in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism...

  10. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  11. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  12. Oxygen potentials of transuranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruyoshi Otobe; Mituso Akabori; Arai Yasuo; Kazuo Minato

    2008-01-01

    The oxygen potentials of pyrochlore-type Pu 2 Zr 2 O 7+y , fluorite-type (Pu 0.5 Zr 0.5 )O 2-x and AmO 2-x have been measured by the electromotive force (EMF) method with a zirconia solid-electrolyte. The oxygen potentials of these oxides were reviewed. The phase relations, microstructure, equilibrium state of these oxides were discussed, referring to the isothermal curve of the oxygen potentials. (authors)

  13. Irradiation effect of lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Kenji; Watanabe, Hitoshi

    1984-01-01

    Lithium oxide is the primary candidate material for the solid blanket of nuclear fusion reactors. The role of the blanket of nuclear fusion reactors is to produce tritium by the reaction of neutrons with lithium, to extract fusion energy as heat by moderating and thermalizing neutrons, and to shield superconducting magnets and others. Therefore, lithium oxide is exposed to neutrons, tritons and helium ions, and gamma ray, and suffers remarkable irradiation damage. This irradiation damage causes swelling and powdering, the promotion of tritium diffusion and the trapping of tritium, and exerts influence on tritium emission and the compatibility with structural materials. The research on the irradiation damage of lithium oxide is very important for the development of nuclear fusion reactors. In this research, in order to obtain the basic knowledge on the irradiation damage of lithium oxide, the irradiation damage in the lithium oxide irradiated with a reactor and a heavy ion accelerator was observed by electron spin resonance method and light absorption method. The experiment using the sintered piece and single crystal of lithium oxide and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Oxidative Stress in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damisela Ramírez Ramírez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging is one of the major problems that the world is facing today due to its impact on all areas of society. Objective: to determine the concentrations of advanced oxidation protein products and malondialdehyde as indicators of oxidative damage and to determine the antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and the reduced glutathione concentration in aged rats. Methods: a total of 20 male Wistar rats with a body weight of approximately 200 to 250 grams were selected to form two groups with 10 young adult rats and 10 old rats. 2 ml of blood was drawn from the paranasal sinus. The sample was collected in 5 ml vials and after being homogenized, it was sent to the Biomedical Research Center, where it was used to assess the following oxidative stress variables: degree of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense level. An analysis of variance was performed to study the behavior of the different groups. Differences were considered significant when P value was less than 0.05. Results: no significant changes were found in the concentrations of malondialdehyde and glutathione, as well as in the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in aged rats compared to young. Concentration of advanced oxidation protein products increased significantly in aged rats. Conclusions: aged rats showed an increase in oxidative damage to proteins. Antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione concentration showed no changes.

  15. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  16. 46 CFR 154.1725 - Ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethylene oxide. 154.1725 Section 154.1725 Shipping COAST....1725 Ethylene oxide. (a) A vessel carrying ethylene oxide must: (1) Have cargo piping, vent piping, and... space of an ethylene oxide cargo tank for a period of 30 days under the condition of paragraph (e) of...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  18. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  19. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that separation of the alkylene oxide piping system complies with alkylene oxide handling plans... vapor return system connected to an alkylene oxide containment system is at the same time connected to... oxide handling plans approved by the Coast Guard or the tankship's flag administration; and (2...

  20. Solid oxide electrolyser cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejgaard Jensen, S.

    2006-12-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Riso National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 deg. C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6 A/cm{sup 2} with app. 30% H{sub 2} + 70% H{sub 2}O in the inlet gas and a H{sub 2}O utilization of app. 40%. The tested SOECs were also used for CO{sub 2} electrolysis. Economy studies of CO and H2 production show that especially H{sub 2} production can be competitive in areas with cheap electricity. Assuming the above described initial performance and a lifetime of 10 years it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} with an electricity price of 1.3 US cent/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test of about two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 deg. C, -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} with 50 vol% H{sub 2} the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h. It was shown that the degradation happens at Ni/YSZ-electrode. The long term degradation is probably caused by coarsening of the Ni-particles. After onset of electrolysis operation a transient passivation/reactivation phenomena with duration of several days was observed. It was shown that the phenomenon is attributed to the SiO{sub 2} contamination at the Ni/YSZ electrode-electrolyte interface. The SiO{sub 2} arises from the albite glass sealing (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that surrounds the electrode. Si may enter the Ni/YSZ electrode via the reaction Si(OH){sub 4}(g) {r_reversible} SiO{sub 2}(l)+H{sub 2}O(g). At the active sites of the Ni/YSZ electrode steam is reduced via the reaction H{sub 2}O - 2e {yields} H{sub 2}+O{sup 2-} . This shifts the equilibrium of the first reaction to form SiO{sub 2}(l) at the active sites. After a certain time the sealing crystallizes and the SiO{sub 2}(l) evaporates from the active sites and the cell reactivates. The passivation is shown to relate to a build up of a

  1. Size of oxide vacancies in fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Norby, Poul; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the effective radii of vacancies and the stoichiometric expansion coefficient is performed on metal oxides with fluorite and perovskite structures. Using the hard sphere model with Shannon ion radii we find that the effective radius of the oxide vacancy in fluorites increases...... with increasing ion radius of the host cation and that it is significantly smaller than the radius of the oxide ion in all cases, from 37% smaller for HfO2 to 13 % smaller for ThO2. The perovskite structured LaGaO3 doped with Sr or Mg or both is analyzed in some detail. The results show that the effective radius...... of an oxide vacancy in doped LaGaO3 is only about 6 % smaller than the oxide ion. In spite of this the stoichiometric expansion coefficient (a kind of chemical expansion coefficient) of the similar perovskite, LaCrO3, is significantly smaller than the stoichiometric expansion coefficient of the fluorite...

  2. Oxidation and erosion-oxidation behavior of steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Maria de Carvalho Fernandes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature oxidation and erosion-oxidation (E-O behavior of steels AISI 1020, 304, 310, and 410 were determined. These steels were selected to evaluate the effect of chromium content on its E-O resistance. The oxidation behavior was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. A test rig in which a specimen assembly was rotated through a fluidized bed of erodent particles was used to determine the E-O behavior. Alumina powder (200 µm was used as the erodent. The E-O tests were carried out in the temperature range 25-600 °C, with average particle impact velocities of 3.5 and 15 ms-1 and impact angle of 90°. The oxidation resistance of the steels increased with chromium content. The E-O behavior of the steels was determined as wastage. The E-O wastage of the steels exposed to particle impact at low velocity was low but increased with temperature above 300 °C. The E-O wastage of the different steels exposed to particle impact at high velocity was quite similar. The wastage increased with increase in temperature above 500 °C. The increases in E-O wastage of the steels observed at temperatures above 300, 400 or 500 °C, depending on the steel, were due mainly to a transition in the dominant wastage process, from 'erosion' to 'erosion-oxidation'.

  3. Diffusion of hydrogen in iron oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in transitions metals oxides has been recently studied at room temperature through the permeability electrochemical technique. This work studies thin oxide layers grown in air or in presence of oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures up to 200 deg C. The substrate was pure iron with different superficial treatments. It was observed that these oxides reduce up to three magnitudes orders, the hydrogen stationary flux through membranes of usual thickness in comparison with iron membranes free of oxide. (Author)

  4. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  5. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  6. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III...

  7. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  9. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  10. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Neal P. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  11. Oxidative stress and leaf senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Hatami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence is an important developmental process that leads to the cell death through highly regulated genetically controlled processes in plants. Biotic and abiotic Oxidative stresses can also artificially induce senescence and increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS specifically in chloroplast. One of the important oxidative stresses is paraquat that induces deviation of electron from photosynthesis electron chain and lead to the production of more ROS in chloroplast. Plants have evolved special adoptive mechanism to reallocate nutrient to reproductive and juvenile organs in senescence and different oxidative stresses. Rubisco seems to be the most abundant protein in plants and is involved in many changes during senescence. Results In the present study, the effects of ROS on Rubisco during senescence and oxidative stresses were evaluated by measuring photosynthesis factors such as net photosynthesis rate (Pn, stomatal conductance (G, evaporation rate (E, intra cellular CO2 concentration (Ci, fluorescence and total protein during three stages of development. Our results showed that in paraquat treated plants, CO2 assimilation is the most effective factor that refers to Rubisco damages. The highest correlation and regression coefficient belonged to Ci, while correlation coefficient between photosynthesis rate and total protein was much smaller. Conclusion It appears in the early stage of oxidative stresses such as exposing to paraquat, ROS has the most effect on Rubisco activity that induces more susceptibility to Rubisco specific protease. Moreover, Rubisco deactivation acts as an initiative signal for Rubisco degradation.

  12. Oxidant activation of neutrophil collagenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukumaran, G.; Amoruso, M.A.; Berg, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidant gas exposure leads to lung injury characterized by acute inflammation, connective tissue breakdown and alveolar damage. In an effort to better understand the mechanism for oxidant gas injury human peripheral neutrophils were isolated and incubated with 14 C-proline labelled extracellular matrix. Neutrophils in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) alone (to stimulate the secretion of collagenase from specific granules) had no effect on the matrix. When neutrophils were incubated with PMA and 2 mM p-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA), the latter a known activator of collagenase, extensive degradation of the matrix was observed. The generation of the characteristic 3/4- and 1/4-clip fragments of Type I collagen was an indication that the major enzymatic activity operative was collagenase. This was further supported by its requirement for Ca 2+ and inhibition of enzymatic activity by EDTA. Further experiments indicated that 10 μM oxidized glutathione could replace APMA in activating the secreted collagenase. Since GSH is thought to be the major physiological antioxidant in the lung, the degradation of connective tissue caused by inflammation from oxidant gas injury may be attributed to the oxidation of GSH to GSSG with resultant activation of neutrophil collagenase

  13. Absorption and oxidation of nitrogen oxide in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Riisager, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for capturing nitrogen oxide, NO, from the gas phase is presented. Dilute NO gas is removed from the gas phase by ionic liquids under ambient conditions. The nitrate anion of the ionic liquid catalyzes the oxidation of NO to nitric acid by atmospheric oxygen in the presence of water...... investigations of the reaction and products are presented. The procedure reveals a new vision for removing the pollutant NO by absorption into a non-volatile liquid and converting it into a useful bulk chemical, that is, HNO3....

  14. PREPARATION OF REFRACTORY OXIDE CRYSTALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, W.R.; Shaffer, J.H.; Watson, G.M.

    1962-11-13

    A method is given for preparing uranium dioxide, thorium oxide, and beryllium oxide in the form of enlarged individual crystals. The surface of a fused alkali metal halide melt containing dissolved uranium, thorium, or beryllium values is contacted with a water-vapor-bearing inert gas stream at a rate of 5 to 10 cubic centimeters per minute per square centimeter of melt surface area. Growth of individual crystals is obtained by prolonged contact. Beryllium oxide-coated uranium dioxide crystals are prepared by disposing uranium dioxide crystals 5 to 20 microns in diameter in a beryllium-containing melt and contacting the melt with a water-vapor-bearing inert gas stream in the same manner. (AEC)

  15. Riboflavin photosensitized oxidation of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grippa, Juliana M.; de Zawadzki, Andressa; Grossi, Alberto Blak

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of the fresh meat pigment oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O, and its oxidized form metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), with triplet-state riboflavin involves the pigment protein, which is oxidatively cleaved or dimerized as shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The overall rate constant for oxidation......-excited state riboflavin by myoglobins using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and a Stern-Volmer approach. Binding of riboflavin to MbFe(III) has K = (1.2 ± 0.2) × 10 mol·L with ΔH = -112 ± 22 kJ·mol and ΔS = -296 ± 75 J·mol·K. For meat, riboflavin is concluded to be a photosensitizer for protein...

  16. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  17. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  18. A red metallic oxide photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiang; Randorn, Chamnan; Efstathiou, Paraskevi; Irvine, John T. S.

    2012-07-01

    Light absorption across the bandgap in semiconductors is exploited in many important applications such as photovoltaics, light emitting diodes and photocatalytic conversion. Metals differ from semiconductors in that there is no energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied levels; however, it is still possible to excite electrons between bands. This is evidenced by materials with metallic properties that are also strongly coloured. An important question is whether such coloured metals could be used in light harvesting or similar applications. The high conductivity of a metal would preclude sufficient electric field being available to separate photocarriers; however, the high carrier mobility in a metal might also facilitate kinetic charge separation. Here we clearly demonstrate for the first time the use of a red metallic oxide, Sr1-xNbO3 as an effective photocatalyst. The material has been used under visible light to photocatalyse the oxidation of methylene blue and both the oxidation and reduction of water assisted by appropriate sacrificial elements.

  19. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  20. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  1. Atmospheric oxidation of selected hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Olariu, R.I.

    2002-02-01

    This work presents investigations on the gas-phase chemistry of phenol and the cresol isomers performed in a 1080 l quartz glass reactor in Wuppertal and in a large-volume outdoor photoreactor EUPHORE in Valencia, Spain. The studies aimed at clarifying the oxidation mechanisms of the reactions of these compounds with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals. Product investigations on the oxidation of phenol and the cresol isomers initiated by OH radicals were performed in the 1080 l quartz glass reactor with analyses by in situ FT-IR absorption spectroscopy. The primary focus of the investigations was on the determination of product yields. This work represents the first determination and quantification of 1,2-dihydroxybenzenes in the OH oxidation of phenolic compounds. Possible reaction pathways leading to the observed products have been elucidated. (orig.)

  2. Fundamentals of metal oxide catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Hari

    The properties of metal oxide catalysts and hence, catalytic activity are highly dependent on the composition and structure of these oxides. This dissertation has 3 parts -- all directed towards understanding relationships between structure, composition and activity in metal oxide catalysts. The first part of this dissertation focuses on supported metal oxide catalysts of tungsten, vanadium and molybdenum. Mechanisms are proposed for ethanol oxidative dehydrogenation which is used to probe the acidity and reducibility of these oxide catalysts. These studies are then used to develop a novel method to quantify active redox sites and determine the nature of the active site on these catalysts -- our results show that the intrinsic redox turn-over frequency is independent of the nature of the metal oxide and its loading and that the actual rate obtained over an oxide is only a function of the number of removable oxygen atoms linking the metal to the support. The extension of Ultraviolet-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) to the study of active oxide domains in binary oxide catalysts is demonstrated for distinguishing between interacting and non-interacting domains in binary MoO x-WOx catalysts on alumina. We show also how the rigorous analysis of pre-edge features, absorption white-line intensity and the full width at half maximum of the white-line in X-ray Absorption Spectra provide determinants for metal atom coordination and domain size in supported metal oxide catalysts. The second part of this work looks at effects of structure variations on the activity of polyoxometalate catalysts that are promising for the production of Methacrylic Acid from Isobutane. The use of these catalysts is limited by structural changes that impact their performance -- an "activation" period is required before the catalysts become active for methacrylic acid production and structural changes also lead to degradation of the catalyst, which are also seen during thermal

  3. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in Indian waters and have the ability to oxidize sulfide under anaerobic conditions. These bacteria can not only mediate the sulfur cycle oxidatively but also the nitrogen cycle reductively without...

  4. Thermal oxidation and electrical properties of silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Rys, A.

    1993-02-01

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on n-type, Si-face 6H-SiC is described for both wet and dry oxidation processes, and the effect of thermal oxidation conditions on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors are investigated. The values of the oxide thickness were obtained as a function of the oxidation time at various oxidation temperatures (which were kept between 1150 and 1250 C). It was found that samples prepared by both dry and wet oxidation showed accumulation, depletion, and inversion regions under illumination, while inversion did not occur under dark conditions. The C-V characteristics of oxidized samples were improved after the oxidized samples were annealed in argon for 30 min. The relation between the oxide thickness and the oxidation time could be expressed by parabolic law, which is also used for thermal oxidation of Si.

  5. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  6. Oxide research using neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.A.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Oxide materials form a large group of technologically and scientifically important materials, and research on these types of materials is on the forefront of scientific research. The important properties of these materials, such as the electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties, are related to the structure and chemical composition of those materials. As the structure is so important in the understanding of the properties, neutron scattering is playing a key role due to its advantages in characterising the role of the oxygen. We present here some examples of the latest oxide structures studied by neutron powder diffraction at ANSTO

  7. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square-root relati......Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square...

  8. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  9. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  10. Oxidative stability of marine phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale

    of this study is to investigate the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL. In addition, this study also investigates the effect of chemical composition of MPL and Maillard reaction (interaction between lipids oxidation products with the residue of amino acids) on MPL emulsions’ stability. Firstly, MPL were...... was further investigated through measurement of secondary volatile compounds by Solid Phase Microextraction at several time intervals. On the other hand, the Maillard reaction was investigated through the measurement of color changes and pyrrole content before and after 32 days storage. Preliminary result...

  11. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fu-Tian; Yu, Guang-Wei; Wang, Yin; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnOx)-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnOx and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnOx (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O2, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h-1. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O2 concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnOx loading is assumed to be related to Mn4+/Mn3+ ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnOx lattice O transfer is proposed.

  12. Oxidation of aniline with strong and weak oxidants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sapurina, I. Yu.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2012), s. 256-275 ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyaniline * conducting polymer * oxidant Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.432, year: 2012

  13. Zinc oxide doped graphene oxide films for gas sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetna,, E-mail: chetna2288@gmail.com; Kumar, Shani; Chaudhary, S.; Kapoor, A. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Garg, A.; Chowdhuri, A.; Dhingra, V. [Department of Electronic Science, Acharya Narendra Dev College, University of Delhi, Kalkaji, New Delhi- 110019 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Graphene Oxide (GO) is analogous to graphene, but presence of many functional groups makes its physical and chemical properties essentially different from those of graphene. GO is found to be a promising material for low cost fabrication of highly versatile and environment friendly gas sensors. Selectivity, reversibility and sensitivity of GO based gas sensor have been improved by hybridization with Zinc Oxide nanoparticles. The device is fabricated by spin coating of deionized water dispersed GO flakes (synthesized using traditional hummer’s method) doped with Zinc Oxide on standard glass substrate. Since GO is an insulator and functional groups on GO nanosheets play vital role in adsorbing gas molecules, it is being used as an adsorber. Additionally, on being exposed to certain gases the electric and optical characteristics of GO material exhibit an alteration in behavior. For the conductivity, we use Zinc Oxide, as it displays a high sensitivity towards conduction. The effects of the compositions, structural defects and morphologies of graphene based sensing layers and the configurations of sensing devices on the performances of gas sensors were investigated by Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction(XRD) and Keithley Sourcemeter.

  14. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  16. Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

  17. Protective effect of nitric oxide against arsenic-induced oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of NO on alleviating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in tall fescue leaves were investigated. Arsenic (25 M) treatment induced significantly accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and led to serious lipid peroxidation in tall fescue leaves and the application of 100 M SNP before arsenic stress resulted ...

  18. Oxygen surface exchange and oxidative dehydrogenation on oxide ion conductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, C.

    2012-01-01

    The research described in this thesis mainly aims at investigation of the rate of oxygen exchange at the surface of oxide ion conductors. The introduction is given in Chapter 1. A fast and simple method, referred to as pulse 18O-16O isotopic exchange (PIE), for measurement of the rate of surface

  19. Facile Access to Graphene Oxide from Ferro-Induced Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-01-01

    Methods allowing the oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide (GO) are vital important for the production of graphene from GO. This oxidation reaction has mainly relied on strong acid strategy for 174 years, which circumvents issues associated with toxicity of reagent and product, complex post-treatment, high cost and waste generation. Here, we report a green route for performing this oxidization reaction via a ferro-induced strategy, with use of water, potassium ferrate (Fe(VI)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as reagents, to produce about 65% yield of GO (vs. 40% for Hummers’ method, the most commonly used concentrated acid strategy) and non-toxic by-products. Moreover, GO produced from this new method shows equivalent performance to those reported previously. This H2SO4-free strategy makes it possible to process graphite into GO in a safe, low-cost, time-saving, energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway, opening a promising avenue for the large-scale production of GO and GO-based materials.

  20. Oxidation kinetics of Si and SiGe by dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation and dry furnace oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozé, Fabien; Gourhant, Olivier; Blanquet, Elisabeth; Bertin, François; Juhel, Marc; Abbate, Francesco; Pribat, Clément; Duru, Romain

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of ultrathin compressively strained SiGe-On-Insulator layers by the condensation technique is likely a key milestone towards low-power and high performances FD-SOI logic devices. However, the SiGe condensation technique still requires challenges to be solved for an optimized use in an industrial environment. SiGe oxidation kinetics, upon which the condensation technique is founded, has still not reached a consensus in spite of various studies which gave insights into the matter. This paper aims to bridge the gaps between these studies by covering various oxidation processes relevant to today's technological needs with a new and quantitative analysis methodology. We thus address oxidation kinetics of SiGe with three Ge concentrations (0%, 10%, and 30%) by means of dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation, and dry furnace oxidation. Oxide thicknesses in the 50 Å to 150 Å range grown with oxidation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C were targeted. The present work shows first that for all investigated processes, oxidation follows a parabolic regime even for thin oxides, which indicates a diffusion-limited oxidation regime. We also observe that, for all investigated processes, the SiGe oxidation rate is systematically higher than that of Si. The amplitude of the variation of oxidation kinetics of SiGe with respect to Si is found to be strongly dependent on the process type. Second, a new quantitative analysis methodology of oxidation kinetics is introduced. This methodology allows us to highlight the dependence of oxidation kinetics on the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface, which is modulated by the pile-up mechanism. Our results show that the oxidation rate increases with the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface.

  1. New insight of high temperature oxidation on self-exfoliation capability of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhang; Zeng, Jie; Han, Di; Wu, Kai; Yu, Bowen; Chai, Songgang; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2018-05-04

    The preparation of graphene oxide (GO) via Hummers method is usually divided into two steps: low temperature oxidation at 35 °C (step I oxidation) and high temperature oxidation at 98 °C (step II oxidation). However, the effects of these two steps on the exfoliation capability and chemical structure of graphite oxide remain unclear. In this study, both the functional group content of graphite oxide and the entire evolution of interlayer spacing were investigated during the two steps. Step I oxidation is a slowly inhomogeneous oxidation step to remove unoxidized graphite flakes. The prepared graphite oxide can be easily self-exfoliated but contains a lot of organic sulfur. During the first 20 min of step II oxidation, the majority of organic sulfur can be efficiently removed and graphite oxide still remains a good exfoliation capability due to sharp increasing of carboxyl groups. However, with a longer oxidation time at step II oxidation, the decrease of organic sulfur content is slowed down apparently but without any carboxyl groups forming, then graphite oxide finally loses self-exfoliation capability. It is concluded that a short time of step II oxidation can produce purer and ultralarge GO sheets via self-exfoliation. The pure GO is possessed with better thermal stability and liquid crystal behavior. Besides, reduced GO films prepared from step II oxidation show better mechanical and electric properties after reducing compared with that obtained only via step I oxidation.

  2. New insight of high temperature oxidation on self-exfoliation capability of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhang; Zeng, Jie; Han, Di; Wu, Kai; Yu, Bowen; Chai, Songgang; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    The preparation of graphene oxide (GO) via Hummers method is usually divided into two steps: low temperature oxidation at 35 °C (step I oxidation) and high temperature oxidation at 98 °C (step II oxidation). However, the effects of these two steps on the exfoliation capability and chemical structure of graphite oxide remain unclear. In this study, both the functional group content of graphite oxide and the entire evolution of interlayer spacing were investigated during the two steps. Step I oxidation is a slowly inhomogeneous oxidation step to remove unoxidized graphite flakes. The prepared graphite oxide can be easily self-exfoliated but contains a lot of organic sulfur. During the first 20 min of step II oxidation, the majority of organic sulfur can be efficiently removed and graphite oxide still remains a good exfoliation capability due to sharp increasing of carboxyl groups. However, with a longer oxidation time at step II oxidation, the decrease of organic sulfur content is slowed down apparently but without any carboxyl groups forming, then graphite oxide finally loses self-exfoliation capability. It is concluded that a short time of step II oxidation can produce purer and ultralarge GO sheets via self-exfoliation. The pure GO is possessed with better thermal stability and liquid crystal behavior. Besides, reduced GO films prepared from step II oxidation show better mechanical and electric properties after reducing compared with that obtained only via step I oxidation.

  3. Fingerprinting Bacterial and Fungal Manganese Oxidation via Stable Oxygen Isotopes of Manganese Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, K. M.; Wankel, S. D.; Hansel, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are a ubiquitous mineralogical component of surface Earth and Mars. Mn(III/IV) oxides are potent environmental sorbents and oxidants that play a crucial role in the fate of organic matter. The processes by which Mn(II) oxidation occurs in natural systems are poorly understood, but a number of studies have implicated microogranisms as the primary agents of Mn(II) oxidation in terrestrial and marine environments. The ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides transcends the boundaries of biological domain, with an abundance of well-characterized prokaryotes as well as eukaryotic fungi with the ability to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides. Biological Mn(II) oxidation proceeds directly through enzymatic activity or indirectly through the production of reactive oxygen species. Building upon earlier research suggesting that stable oxygen isotope fractionation could be used to fingerprint unique Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms or distinct oxidation pathways, here we use culture-based studies of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and fungi to determine the kinetic oxygen isotope effects associated with Mn(II) oxidation. Since the oxygen molecules in Mn(III/IV) oxides are comprised of oxygen from both precursor water and molecular oxygen, we used a two-fold approach to constrain isotope fractionation with respect to each oxygen source. We used open system oxidation experiments using oxygen-18 labeled water in parallel with closed system Rayleigh distillation oxidation experiments to fully constrain isotope fractionation associated with oxygen atom incorporation during Mn(II) oxidation. Our results suggest commonalities among fractionation factors from groups of Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms that have similar oxidation mechanisms. These results suggest that stable oxygen isotopes of Mn(III/IV) oxides have the potential to distinguish between Mn(II) oxidation pathways in nature, providing a way to determine which groups of Mn(II) oxidizers may be

  4. Riboflavin photosensitized oxidation of myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippa, Juliana M; de Zawadzki, Andressa; Grossi, Alberto B; Skibsted, Leif H; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2014-02-05

    The reaction of the fresh meat pigment oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O₂, and its oxidized form metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), with triplet-state riboflavin involves the pigment protein, which is oxidatively cleaved or dimerized as shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The overall rate constant for oxidation of MbFe(II)O₂ by ³Rib is (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10⁹ L·mol⁻¹·s⁻¹ and (3.1 ± 0.4) × 10⁹ L·mol⁻¹·s⁻¹ for MbFe(III) in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4 at 25 °C as determined by laser flash photolysis. The high rates are rationalized by ground state hydrophobic interactions as detected as static quenching of fluorescence from singlet-excited state riboflavin by myoglobins using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and a Stern-Volmer approach. Binding of riboflavin to MbFe(III) has K(a) = (1.2 ± 0.2) × 10⁴ mol·L⁻¹ with ΔH° = -112 ± 22 kJ·mol⁻¹ and ΔS° = -296 ± 75 J·mol⁻¹·K⁻¹. For meat, riboflavin is concluded to be a photosensitizer for protein oxidation but not for discoloration.

  5. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanocomposites of iron oxide with conducting polymer in the form of powders of varying compositions have been studied to understand the effects of particle size, cluster size and magnetic inter-particle interactions. The sizes of the nanoparticles were estimated to be ∼ 10–20 nm from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the ...

  6. Exciton dynamics in cuprous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, D. A.; Revcolevschi, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Stutzmann, M

    2006-01-01

    This work addresses the mid-infrared properties of cuprous oxide and in particular induced absorption due to the presence of excitons. We probe the population of the non-radiative ground state of para-excitons via laser-induced changes of the transmission in the "hydrogenic" 1s-2p/1s-3p transition

  7. pyrene N-oxide isomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Structural, energetic, spectroscopic, linear and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the environ- mental mutagens 1- and 3-nitro-6-azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxides were characterized by means of Hartree–Fock as well as B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP density functional theory computations. The NLO investigations were.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  9. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  10. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square...

  11. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer BM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernard M Fischer,1,* Judith A Voynow,2,* Andrew J Ghio3,* 1Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; 3National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. Keywords: cigarette smoking, mucins, gene regulation, Chinese herbs, acupuncture, dietary antioxidants

  12. Oxidation events and skin aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammeyer, A.; Luiten, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in

  13. Corium Oxidation at Temperatures Above 2000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, Donald L.; Rempe, Joy L.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanistic model, based on a quasi-equilibrium analysis of oxidation reactions, is proposed for predicting high-temperature corium oxidation. The analysis suggests that oxide forming on the surface of corium containing uranium, zirconium, and iron is similar to the oxides formed on zirconium and uranium as long as there is a small percentage of unoxidized zirconium or uranium in the metallic phase. This is because of the higher affinity of zirconium and uranium for oxygen. Hence, oxidation rates and heat production rates are similar to (U,Zr) compounds until nearly all the uranium and zirconium in the corium oxidizes. Oxidation rates after this point are predicted to be similar to those implied by the oxide thickness present when the forming oxide ceases to be protective, and heat generation rates should be similar to those implied by iron oxidation, i.e., ∼4% of the zirconium oxidation heating rate.The maximum atomic ratio of unoxidized iron to unoxidized liquid zirconium plus uranium for the formation of a solid protective oxide below 2800 K is estimated for a temperature, T (in Kelvin), as follows:(unoxidized iron)/(unoxidized zirconium + turanium) = (1/28){5.7/exp[-(147 061 + 12.08T log(T) - 61.03T - 0.000555T 2 /1.986T)]} 1/2 .As long as this limit is not exceeded, either zirconium or uranium metal oxidation rates and heating describe the corium oxidation rate. If this limit is exceeded, diffusion of steam to the corium surface will limit the oxidation rate, and linear time-dependent growth of a nonprotective, mostly FeO, layer will occur below the protective (Zr,U) O 2 scale. When this happens, the oxidation should be at the constant rate given by the thickness of the protective layer. Heat generation should be similar to that of iron oxidation

  14. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  15. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David William

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including cobalt antimonate and vanadium antimonate. Reactivity measurements were made using a continuous flow microreactor, which was used in conjunction with a variety of characterisation techniques to determine relationships between the catalytic behaviour and the properties of the materials. The ratio of Fe/Sb in the iron antimonate catalyst affects the reactivity of the system under steady state conditions, with additional iron beyond the stoichiometric value being detrimental to the acrolein selectivity, while extra antimony provides a means of enhancing the selectivity by decreasing acrolein combustion. Studies on the single antimony oxides of iron antimonate have shown a similarity between the reactivity of 'Sb 2 O 5 ' and FeSbO 4 , and a significant difference between these and the Sb 2 O 3 and Sb 2 O 4 phases, implying that the mixed oxide catalyst has a surface mainly comprised of Sb 5+ . The lack of reactivity of Sb 2 O 4 implies a similarity of the surface with

  16. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal K Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by various oxygen containing free radicals and reactive species (collectively called "Reactive Oxygen Species" or ROS has long been attributed to cardiovascular diseases. In human body, major oxidizing species are super oxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxy nitrite etc. ROS are produced from distinct cellular sources, enzymatic and non-enzymatic; have specific physicochemical properties and often have specific cellular targets. Although early studies in nineteen sixties and seventies highlighted the deleterious effects of these species, later it was established that they also act as physiological modulators of cellular functions and diseases occur only when ROS production is deregulated. One of the major sources of cellular ROS is Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (Noxes that are expressed in almost all cell types. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generated from them under various conditions act as signal transducers. Due to their immense importance in cellular physiology, various Nox inhibitors are now being developed as therapeutics. Another free radical of importance in cardiovascular system is nitric oxide (a reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide synthase(s. It plays a critical role in cardiac function and its dysregulated generation along with superoxide leads to the formation of peroxynitrite a highly deleterious agent. Despite overwhelming evidences of association between increased level of ROS and cardiovascular diseases, antioxidant therapies using vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids have largely been unsuccessful till date. Also, there are major discrepancies between studies with laboratory animals and human trials. It thus appears that the biology of ROS is far complex than anticipated before. A comprehensive understanding of the redox biology of diseases is thus needed for developing targeted therapeutics.

  17. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-01-01

    are exposed in air at 800 °C for 3000 h and oxidation rates are measured and oxide scale microstructures are investigated. Area-specific resistances (ASR) in air at 850 °C of coated and uncoated samples are also measured. A dual layered oxide scale formed on all coated samples. The outer layer consisted of Co...

  18. Nitrous Oxide Micro Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide Micro Engines (NOME) are a new type of nitrous oxide dissociation thruster designed to generate low levels of thrust that can be used for RCS control...

  19. Inhibition experiments on anaerobic methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation is a general process important in controlling fluxes of methane from anoxic marine sediments. The responsible organism has not been isolated, and little is known about the electron acceptors and substrates involved in the process. Laboratory evidence indicates that sulfate reducers and methanogens are able to oxidize small quantities of methane. Field evidence suggests anaerobic methane oxidation may be linked to sulfate reduction. Experiments with specific inhibitors for sulfate reduction (molybdate), methanogenesis (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid), and acetate utilization (fluoroacetate) were performed on marine sediments from the zone of methane oxidation to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria are responsible for methane oxidation. The inhibition experiment results suggest that methane oxidation in anoxic marine sediments is not directly mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria. Our results are consistent with two possibilities: anaerobic methane oxidation may be mediated by an unknown organism or a consortium involving an unknown methane oxidizer and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  20. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  1. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaijer, S.C.M.; Ji, K.; van Niftrik, L.; Hoischen, A.; Speth, D.R.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to

  2. Oxidation catalysts and process for preparing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Compounds particularly suitable as oxidation catalysis are described, comprising specified amounts of uranium, antimony and tin as oxides. Processes for making and using the catalysts are described. (U.K.)

  3. Consecutive dynamic resolutions of phosphine oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortmann, Felix A.; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Otten, Edwin; Couzijn, Erik P. A.; Lutz, Martin; Minnaard, Adriaan J.

    2013-01-01

    A crystallization-induced asymmetric transformation (CIAT) involving a radical-mediated racemization provides access to enantiopure secondary phosphine oxides. A consecutive CIAT is used to prepare enantio-and diastereo-pure tert-butyl(hydroxyalkyl)phenylphosphine oxides.

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, gives researchers access to models and simulations that predict how solid oxide fuel cells...

  5. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  6. 21 CFR 172.260 - Oxidized polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.260 Oxidized polyethylene. Oxidized polyethylene may be safely...

  7. Cancer mortality in ethylene oxide workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisanti, L; Maggini, M; Raschetti, R; Alegiani, S S; Ippolito, F M; Caffari, B; Segnan, N; Ponti, A

    1993-01-01

    A cohort of 1971 chemical workers licensed to handle ethylene oxide was followed up retrospectively from 1940 to 1984 and the vital status of each subject was ascertained. No quantitative information on exposure was available and therefore cohort members were considered as presumably exposed to ethylene oxide. The cohort comprised 637 subjects allowed to handle only ethylene oxide and 1334 subjects who obtained a licence valid for ethylene oxide as well as other toxic gases. Potential confoun...

  8. Innovative Strategies to Control Oxidation in Wine

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    The topic of wine oxidation and the need of innovative strategies to prevent its extent were the subject of this PhD thesis. The complexity of the oxidative chemical reactions occurring in wine during its conservation were highlighted, and multiple analytical approaches were used to provide a more comprehensive understanding of wine oxidation and to plan tailored strategies to avoid its occurrence. The complexity of wine oxidation could be in a simplified manner attributed to the follo...

  9. Multicomponent Oxide Systems for Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-15

    both basic or acidic character. Such oxides are called amphoteric . The acid-base nature of an oxide is found to correlate reasonably well with the...basic and neutral media, whereas basic oxides will dissolve in acidic and neutral media. However, amphoteric oxi(es, although sparingly soluble in both...surfaces. In Table 1, it is shown that oxides such as A1203 and Cr20 3, which are generally thought of as protective, are in fact amphoteric , as would be

  10. Stage character of the oxidation of dialkylthiophenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, M.N.; Kazakova, O.A.

    1988-07-20

    The reasons for the stage character of the oxidation of dialkylthiophenes catalyzed by a cobalt bromide catalyst are examined. The stage character of oxidation is due to the deactivation of the catalyst by the corresponding alcohol formed during oxidation. At the first stage of the process only the products from oxidation of the /alpha/-alkyl group, i.e., the corresponding ketone, ester, and thiophenecarboxylic acid, are formed. The rate constants for their formation were calculated.

  11. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Tomofuji; Koichiro Irie; Toshihiro Sanbe; Tetsuji Azuma; Daisuke Ekuni; Naofumi Tamaki; Tatsuo Yamamoto; Manabu Morita

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress). Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. Fo...

  12. In-situ chemical oxidation of MTBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, K.L.; Marley, M.C.; Sperry, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) can be a cost-effective method for the destruction of source areas of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Several ISCO processes have been tested successfully under laboratory conditions and a few have proven successful when field tested for the destruction of MTBE. This paper reviews the state of the art with respect to MTBE oxidation for several common oxidants and Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs). Four frequently used oxidants are reviewed in this paper: hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), ozone (O 3 ), permanganate (MnO 4 - ), and persulfate (S 2 O 8 2- ). When choosing an oxidant for a specific remediation strategy, trade-offs exist between oxidant strength and stability in the subsurface. Aquifer and water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity, and soil oxidant demand (SOD) may influence the initiation and effectiveness of the ISCO reaction and may significantly increase the amount of oxidant required to treat the target contaminant. Oxidation end products are an important consideration in the selection of an oxidant, as not all oxidants have proven successful in complete mineralization of MTBE. Tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) are the major intermediate products in the oxidative reactions of MTBE and may pose a greater health hazard than MTBE. Other factors, including regulatory restrictions, need to be considered when choosing an oxidant for a specific application. This paper will highlight the chemistry of the oxidant/MTBE reactions, successes or limitations observed under laboratory and field conditions, and practical design advice when employing the oxidant. (author)

  13. Polymerization of Ethylene Oxide, Propylene Oxide, and Other Alkylene Oxides: Synthesis, Novel Polymer Architectures, and Bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberger, Jana; Niederer, Kerstin; Pohlit, Hannah; Seiwert, Jan; Worm, Matthias; Wurm, Frederik R; Frey, Holger

    2016-02-24

    The review summarizes current trends and developments in the polymerization of alkylene oxides in the last two decades since 1995, with a particular focus on the most important epoxide monomers ethylene oxide (EO), propylene oxide (PO), and butylene oxide (BO). Classical synthetic pathways, i.e., anionic polymerization, coordination polymerization, and cationic polymerization of epoxides (oxiranes), are briefly reviewed. The main focus of the review lies on more recent and in some cases metal-free methods for epoxide polymerization, i.e., the activated monomer strategy, the use of organocatalysts, such as N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and N-heterocyclic olefins (NHOs) as well as phosphazene bases. In addition, the commercially relevant double-metal cyanide (DMC) catalyst systems are discussed. Besides the synthetic progress, new types of multifunctional linear PEG (mf-PEG) and PPO structures accessible by copolymerization of EO or PO with functional epoxide comonomers are presented as well as complex branched, hyperbranched, and dendrimer like polyethers. Amphiphilic block copolymers based on PEO and PPO (Poloxamers and Pluronics) and advances in the area of PEGylation as the most important bioconjugation strategy are also summarized. With the ever growing toolbox for epoxide polymerization, a "polyether universe" may be envisaged that in its structural diversity parallels the immense variety of structural options available for polymers based on vinyl monomers with a purely carbon-based backbone.

  14. The initial oxidation of magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, M.

    2004-07-01

    Pure Magnesium samples have been oxidised in an UHV chamber under controlled conditions. Pressure range was 10{sup -10} Torr to 10{sup -7} Torr, temperature range was 273 K to 435 K. The samples have then been investigated with XPS, Ellipsometry and HERDA. Additionally, furnace oxidations at 750 Torr and 673 K have been carried out and investigated with XPS. From the XPS measurements data concerning layer thickness, composition, oxidation state and binding state have been gained. The ellipsometrie measurements yielded additional data concerning layer thickness as well as the size of the band gap of the developing oxide. With the HERDA measurements, the oxygen content within the oxide layer has been determined yielding additional information about composition and layer thickness. The layer thickness as a function of time have then been modelled with a kinetic growth model of Fromhold and Cook. For the refinement of the XPS data concerning layer thickness and composition, the pronounced plasmon excitations that occur in magnesium have been determined with two different procedures which have been developed in the methodical part of this work. The layer thickness and composition values have thus been corrected. Results: Two oxidation stages could be identified: a strong increase for the first few Langmuirs (1L = 1s x 10{sup -6} Torr), followed by a saturation'' region which was about 1.2 nm to 1.5 nm in magnitude. XPS and ellipsometry results have thereby been in very good agreement. The composition of the developing oxide showed a clear deviation from stoichiometric MgO, mainly caused by an oxygen deficiency; this deficiency has also been confirmed with the HERDA measurements. The Mg/O ratio as a function of layer thickness showed a continous decay starting from very high values for the thinnest layers (>{proportional_to}2.5) down to a saturation value of about 1.4, even for larger layer thicknesses gained with the furnace oxidations. The determination of

  15. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  16. 49 CFR 173.323 - Ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethylene oxide. 173.323 Section 173.323... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.323 Ethylene oxide. (a) For packaging ethylene oxide in non-bulk packagings, silver mercury or any of its alloys or copper may not be used in any...

  17. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  18. 29 CFR 1910.105 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrous oxide. 1910.105 Section 1910.105 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.105 Nitrous oxide. The piped systems for the in-plant transfer and distribution of nitrous oxide shall be designed, installed, maintained, and...

  19. Nitrous oxide emissions from estuarine intertidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Markusse, R.M.; Vlug, T.; Nat, F.J.W.A. van der

    1995-01-01

    From September 1990 through December 1991 nitrous oxide flux measurements were made at 9 intertidal mud flat sites in the Scheldt Estuary. Nitrous oxide release rates were highly variable both between sites and over time at any one site. Annual nitrous oxide fluxes vary from about 10 mmol N m-2 at

  20. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate...

  3. Oxidation zones and secondary ore deposits enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Particular activity of oxidation of ore deposits caused by participation in these processes of oxygen, carbon acids and other acids, iron sulfates, copper, forming at the oxidation of sulfides. Besides of this at sulphides oxidation evolve a lot of heat which intensive the process

  4. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Benedetti, M.F.; Ponthieu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to

  5. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  6. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS Edward C. Schneider...United States Government. AFIT-ENP-14-M-33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS...33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES Edward C. Schneider, BS Captain, USAF Approved

  7. 76 FR 38036 - Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation amends the propylene oxide tolerance on ``nut, tree, group...), announcing the Agency's proposal to amend the propylene oxide tolerance (40 CFR 180.491) on ``nut, tree...

  8. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...

  9. Graphene oxide reduction recipes, spectroscopy, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of new materials labeled ""graphene oxides."" It provides a comprehensive overview of graphene oxide-based nanomaterials in terms of their synthesis, structures, properties, and extensive applications in catalysis, separation, filtration, energy storage and conversion. The book also covers emerging research on graphite oxides and the impact of the research on fundamental and applied sciences.

  10. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  11. Synthesis, characterization and application of semiconducting oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanostructured; Cu2O nanostructures; electrolysis based oxidation; aligned ZnO nanorods. Abstract. In the present study, we report the synthesis, characterization and application of nanostructured oxide materials. The oxide ... The copper electrode served as a sacrificial anode for the synthesis of different nanostructures.

  12. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid...

  13. Limits to the adherence of oxide scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.; Manning, M.I.

    1989-10-01

    Fracture mechanics is used to identify criteria under which uniform oxide scales may be expected to fail due to rapidly applied strains. The most common failure mode occurs when the strain, ε, builds up in the scale until the strain energy density per unit area exceeds the fracture surface energy, γ, of the oxide. This produces spalling when ε > (2γ/hE) 1/2 , where h is the scale thickness and E is the oxide Youngs modulus. In thin scales, as the external strain is applied to the oxide via the metal substrate, it is clear that no further strain can be applied to the oxide if the substrate has itself been strained beyond yield. This gives rise to extended oxide adherence in which the oxide cracks and forms a series of islands but remains attached to the deformed metal. When the oxide thickness is less than its comminution limit, the flaw size necessary for brittle fracture exceeds the oxide thickness and the oxide yields in a ductile manner without cracking. The results are presented as maps of failure strain versus oxide thickness for various oxide systems such as Fe 3 O 4 , Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 and NiO. The observed cases of spalling are found to lie within the predicted regions. (author)

  14. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  15. on the oxidation stability of lubricating oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    The internal combustion engine is a model oxidator, since it contains a hydrocarbon motor oil with air under agitation at high temperatures. In addition, metals such as copper, lead, nickel, chromium and iron, used for the manufacture of the engines, are effective oxidation catalysts which increases the rate of oxidation. The.

  16. Oxide electronics : increasing trends and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, Guus; Jones, Val

    2006-01-01

    Oxide materials exhibit a wide range of functional properties, such as isolators, superconductors, ferromagnets and ferroelectrics. This diversity in materials properties opened the very active research area of “oxide electronics”. Nowadays, it is possible to control the growth of oxide thin films

  17. Oxidized Lipoprotein as a Major Vessel Cell Proliferator in Oxidized Human Serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiro Saito

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is correlated with the incidence of several diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer, and oxidized biomolecules have been determined as biomarkers of oxidative stress; however, the detailed molecular relationship between generated oxidation products and the promotion of diseases has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, to clarify the role of serum oxidation products in vessel cell proliferation, which is related to the incidence of atherosclerosis and cancer, the major vessel cell proliferator in oxidized human serum was investigated. Oxidized human serum was prepared by free radical exposure, separated using gel chromatography, and then each fraction was added to several kinds of vessel cells including endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. It was found that a high molecular weight fraction in oxidized human serum specifically induced vessel cell proliferation. Oxidized lipids were contained in this high molecular weight fraction, while cell proliferation activity was not observed in oxidized lipoprotein-deficient serum. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins induced vessel cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that oxidized lipoproteins containing lipid oxidation products function as a major vessel cell proliferator in oxidized human serum. These findings strongly indicate the relevance of determination of oxidized lipoproteins and lipid oxidation products in the diagnosis of vessel cell proliferation-related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer.

  18. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  20. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  1. [Oxidative stress in Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Inés; Cerrillo, Elena; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Iborra, Marisa; Rausell, Francisco; Tortosa, Luis; Beltrán, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation that is most frequently located in the region of the terminal ileum. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the disease are not yet well defined, the unregulated immune response is associated with high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These elements are associated with complex systems known as antioxidant defenses, whose function is ROS regulation, thereby preventing the harmful effects of these elements. However, the presence of an imbalance between ROS production and ROS elimination by antioxidants has been widely described and leads to oxidative stress. In this article, we describe the most significant findings on oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidation technologies for groundwater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeks, R.E.; Smith, L.P.; Perry, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Xerox Corporation has pilot tested three UV/Oxidation processes for the treatment of contaminated groundwater containing chlorinated and non-chlorinated organic solvents. The technologies pilot tested included the ULTROX system developed by ULTROX International, the perox-pure process of Peroxidation Systems, Inc. and the Rayox process by Solarchem Environmental Systems. The three processes use a combination of ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide to oxidize organic solvents in water. The ULTROX system includes ozone as part of the treatment. Data gathered during pilot testing demonstrated that these processes are effective in the destruction of organic contaminants in groundwater. These results are discussed in regard to applicability to the groundwater remediation at the Xerox Facilities in Webster and Blauvelt, New York

  3. Photosensitized oxidation of unsaturated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The photosensitized oxidation or singlet oxygenation of unsaturated hydrocarbon polymers and of their model compounds was reviewed. Emphasis was on cis and trans forms of 1,4-polyisoprene, 1,4-polybutadiene and 1,2-poly(1,4-hexadiene), and on 1,4-poly(2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene). The microstructural changes which occur in these polymers on reaction with O2-1 in solution were investigated by infrared H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The polymers were shown to yield allylic hydroperoxides with shifted double bonds according to the ene mechanism established for simple olefins. The photosensitized oxidation of the above unsaturated polymer exhibited zero order kinetics, the relative rates paralleling the reactivities of the corresponding simple olefins towards O2-1.

  4. Supercritical Water Oxidation Program (SCWOP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Purpose of SCWOP is to develop and demonstrate supercritical water oxidation as a viable technology for treating DOE hazardous and mixed wastes and to coordinate SCWO research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities. The process involves bringing together organic waste, water, and an oxidant (air, O 2 , etc.) to temperatures and pressures above water's critical point (374 C, 22.1 MPa); organic destruction is >99.99% efficient, and the resulting effluents (mostly water, CO 2 ) are relatively benign. Pilot-scale (300--500 gallons/day) SCWO units are to be constructed and demonstrated. Two phases will be conducted: hazardous waste pilot plant demonstration and mixed waste pilot demonstration. Contacts for further information and for getting involved are given

  5. Electron collisions with ethylene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, T C; Bettega, M H F

    2009-01-01

    We present elastic cross sections for electron collisions with ethylene oxide. Our results compare well in shape with the experimental total cross section obtained by Szmytkowski et al.. We found a shape resonance at around 5 eV, which is in agreement with the observations of Allan and Andric and Szmytkowski et al.. Allan and Andric reported another low energy shape resonance which is not present in our results.

  6. Graphene oxide physics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jijun; Li, Fen

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of graphene oxides (GO)  from atomic structures and fundamental properties to technological applications. Atomic structural models, electronic properties, mechanical properties, optical properties, and functionalizing and compositing of GO are illustrated. Moreover, the excellent physical and chemical properties offer GO promising applications in electronic nanodevices, chemical sensors and catalyst, energy storage, and biotechnology, which are also presented in this book. Therefore, this book is of interest to researchers in physics, chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience.

  7. Growth of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowhiskers have been prepared using a multilayer ZnO(50 nm)/Zn(20 nm)/ZnO(2 m) structure on a polished stainless steel (SS) substrate by high rate magnetron sputtering. The formation of uniformly distributed ZnO nanowhiskers with about 20 nm dia. and 2 to 5 m length was observed after a ...

  8. Chemistry of nitrogen oxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of nitrogen oxide compounds including: nitrates and nitrites, nitrosyl compounds of transition metals, rare earth, transition metal and actinide complexes, where nitrite- and nitrate ions are presented as ligands, is considered. Oxonitrate compounds, e.g. RbUO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 are also considered. The values of lengths and angles of bonds for some of these compounds are presented, volatility of Cd, Be and other metal nitrates are also discussed

  9. Electron collisions with ethylene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, T C; Bettega, M H F, E-mail: tcf03@fisica.ufpr.b, E-mail: bettega@fisica.ufpr.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Parana (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    We present elastic cross sections for electron collisions with ethylene oxide. Our results compare well in shape with the experimental total cross section obtained by Szmytkowski et al.. We found a shape resonance at around 5 eV, which is in agreement with the observations of Allan and Andric and Szmytkowski et al.. Allan and Andric reported another low energy shape resonance which is not present in our results.

  10. Growth of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowhiskers have been prepared using a multilayer. ZnO(50 nm)/Zn(20 nm)/ZnO(2 µm) structure on a polished stainless steel (SS) sub- strate by high rate magnetron sputtering. The formation of uniformly distributed ZnO nanowhiskers with about 20 nm dia. and 2 to 5 µm length was observed ...

  11. Electronic Structure at Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    electronic properties of rnio 3 (r = pr, nd, eu, ho and y) perovskites studied by resonant soft x-ray magnetic powder diffraction. Journal of Physics...artificially nanostructured materials based on transition metal oxides, thereby enabling the design of materials with desired correlated electron properties ... properties . The means of achieving this goal is the implementation and development of the hybrid methodology of density functional theory and

  12. Thermal expansion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodukhin, A.V.; Kruzhalov, A.V.; Mazurenko, V.G.; Maslov, V.A.; Medvedev, V.A.; Polupanova, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    Precise measurements of temperature dependence of the coefficient of linear expansion in the 22-320 K temperature range on beryllium oxide monocrystals are conducted. A model of thermal expansion is suggested; the range of temperature dependence minimum of the coefficient of thermal expansion is well described within the frames of this model. The results of the experiment may be used for investigation of thermal stresses in crystals

  13. ASSESSMENT OF GALLIUM OXIDE TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    heterojunction to implement p-n junctions. This would bring a large number of new device types into play, especially for power electronics where Ga2O3 is...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0167 ASSESSMENT OF GALLIUM OXIDE TECHNOLOGY Burhan Bayraktaroglu Devices for Sensing Branch Aerospace... Devices for Sensing Branch Aerospace Component & Subsystems Division *//Signature// ROSS W. DETTMER Chief Devices for Sensing Branch

  14. Self-assembled silicon oxide nanojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L W; Tang, Y H; Chen, C S

    2009-01-01

    Novel silicon oxide nanojunction structures with various shapes, such as X type, Y type, T type, ringlike and treelike, are fabricated in a self-assembled manner by the hydrothermal method without any metallic catalyst. In the silicon oxide nanojunctions, both the silicon oxide nanowire part and the junction part consist of the same chemical composition, forming homogeneous homojunctions and being made suitable for application in nanoscale optoelectronics devices. The formation of silicon oxide nanojunctions may be influenced by the surrounding environment in the reaction kettle, growth space among the silicon oxide nanowires and the weight of SiO droplets at the growth tip.

  15. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-29

    soluble oxides that relations like eq. (3) are significant. The oxides of several metal oxides have been found to be amphoteric , i.e., their solution...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR

  16. Inorganic Sulfur Oxidation by Aureobasidium pullulans

    OpenAIRE

    Killham, K.; Lindley, N. D.; Wainwright, M.

    1981-01-01

    Aureobasidium pullulans (de Bary) Arnaud isolated from the phylloplane of sycamore exposed to heavy atmospheric pollution oxidized S0 to S2O32−, S4O62−, and SO42− in vitro. The intermediates S2O32− and S4O62− were also oxidized to SO42−. Cell-free extracts of A. pullulans also oxidized reduced forms of S, the oxidation increasing linearly with increasing protein concentration, showing that the process is enzymatic. The possible role of fungi in S oxidation in soils is discussed.

  17. Inorganic Sulfur Oxidation by Aureobasidium pullulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killham, K.; Lindley, N. D.; Wainwright, M.

    1981-01-01

    Aureobasidium pullulans (de Bary) Arnaud isolated from the phylloplane of sycamore exposed to heavy atmospheric pollution oxidized S0 to S2O32−, S4O62−, and SO42− in vitro. The intermediates S2O32− and S4O62− were also oxidized to SO42−. Cell-free extracts of A. pullulans also oxidized reduced forms of S, the oxidation increasing linearly with increasing protein concentration, showing that the process is enzymatic. The possible role of fungi in S oxidation in soils is discussed. PMID:16345859

  18. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This handbook summarizes commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced photochemical oxidation (APO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and solids. Similar information from pilot- and bench-scale evaluations of APO processes is also included to supplement the commercial-scale data. Performance and cost data is summarized for various APO processes, including vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis, ultraviolet (UV)/oxidation, photo-Fenton, and dye- or semiconductor-sensitized APO processes. This handbook is intended to assist engineering practitioners in evaluating the applicability of APO processes and in selecting one or more such processes for site-specific evaluation.APO has been shown to be effective in treating contaminated water and air. Regarding contaminated water treatment, UV/oxidation has been evaluated for the most contaminants, while VUV photolysis has been evaluated for the fewest. Regarding contaminated air treatment, the sensitized APO processes have been evaluated for the most contaminants, while VUV photolysis has been evaluated for the fewest.APO processes for treating contaminated solids generally involve treatment of contaminated slurry or leachate generated using an extraction process such as soil washing. APO has been shown to be effective in treating contaminated solids, primarily at the bench-scale level. Information

  19. Anelastic spectroscopy in superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque Gimenez, J.M. de; Grandini, C.R.; Santos, D.L. dos; Cunha, A.G. da

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of the high Tc superconductors, several works have been made about the different properties of these materials. Anelastic spectroscopy experiments are sensitive tools to the study of defects in solids and phase transitions. By this technique, we can distinguish the different types of atomic jumps that happen to different temperatures. The intensity of the peaks in the anelastic spectrum and the ''step'' in the torsional modulus are related with the concentration of the relaxing entities, and the position of the peaks is determined by its mobility. In this paper, the study on Bi and Sm based superconducting oxides was made by anelastic relaxation measurements using a torsion pendulum. The samples were submitted to successive thermal treatments in high vacuum, in the temperature range between 100 K and 650 K, heating rate about 1 K/min. For Bi based superconducting oxides the results shown two peaks, that were associated to interstitial oxygen mobility and to orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition. For Sm based superconducting oxides the results shown a relaxation peak that was attributed to the jumps of the oxygen atoms in the inter-chains O1 and O5 of the lattice. (orig.)

  20. Anelastic spectroscopy in superconducting oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque Gimenez, J.M. de [USP, Inst. de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); UNESP, Dept. de Fisica, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Grandini, C.R.; Santos, D.L. dos [UNESP, Dept. de Fisica, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Cunha, A.G. da [UFES, Dept. de Fisica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery of the high Tc superconductors, several works have been made about the different properties of these materials. Anelastic spectroscopy experiments are sensitive tools to the study of defects in solids and phase transitions. By this technique, we can distinguish the different types of atomic jumps that happen to different temperatures. The intensity of the peaks in the anelastic spectrum and the ''step'' in the torsional modulus are related with the concentration of the relaxing entities, and the position of the peaks is determined by its mobility. In this paper, the study on Bi and Sm based superconducting oxides was made by anelastic relaxation measurements using a torsion pendulum. The samples were submitted to successive thermal treatments in high vacuum, in the temperature range between 100 K and 650 K, heating rate about 1 K/min. For Bi based superconducting oxides the results shown two peaks, that were associated to interstitial oxygen mobility and to orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition. For Sm based superconducting oxides the results shown a relaxation peak that was attributed to the jumps of the oxygen atoms in the inter-chains O1 and O5 of the lattice. (orig.)

  1. Biological applications of graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2016-01-01

    Graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. However, the lower water-solubility and the irreversible aggregation due to the strong π-π stacking hinder the wide application of graphene nanosheets in biomedical field. Thus, graphene oxide (GO), one derivative of graphene, has been used more frequently in the biological system owing to its relatively higher water solubility and biocompatibility. Recently, it has been demonstrated that nanomaterials with different functional groups on the surface can be used to bind the drug molecules with high affinity. GO has different functional groups such as H, OH and O on its surface; it can be a potential candidate as a drug carrier. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene like structures are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles spin polarized calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on DNA/RNA nucleobases on graphene oxide. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene oxide by applied charging.

  2. Electrochemical oxidation of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almon, A.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Both silver catalyzed and direct electrochemical oxidation of organic species are examined in analytical detail. This paper describes the mechanisms, reaction rates, products, intermediates, capabilities, limitations, and optimal reaction conditions of the electrochemical destruction of organic waste. A small bench-top electrocell being tested for the treatment of small quantities of laboratory waste is described. The 200-mL electrochemical cell used has a processing capacity of 50 mL per day, and can treat both radioactive and nonradioactive waste. In the silver catalyzed process, Ag(I) is electrochemically oxidized to Ag(II), which attacks organic species such as tributylphosphate (TBP), tetraphenylborate (TPB), and benzene. In direct electrochemical oxidation, the organic species are destroyed at the surface of the working electrode without the use of silver as an electron transfer agent. This paper focuses on the destruction of tributylphosphate (TBP), although several organic species have been destroyed using this process. The organic species are converted to carbon dioxide, water, and inorganic acids

  3. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  4. Metal oxides for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinge; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Metal oxides (MOs) are the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust and are ingredients in traditional ceramics. MO semiconductors are strikingly different from conventional inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and III-V compounds with respect to materials design concepts, electronic structure, charge transport mechanisms, defect states, thin-film processing and optoelectronic properties, thereby enabling both conventional and completely new functions. Recently, remarkable advances in MO semiconductors for electronics have been achieved, including the discovery and characterization of new transparent conducting oxides, realization of p-type along with traditional n-type MO semiconductors for transistors, p-n junctions and complementary circuits, formulations for printing MO electronics and, most importantly, commercialization of amorphous oxide semiconductors for flat panel displays. This Review surveys the uniqueness and universality of MOs versus other unconventional electronic materials in terms of materials chemistry and physics, electronic characteristics, thin-film fabrication strategies and selected applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, diodes and memories.

  5. Oxidized limonene and oxidized linalool - concomitant contact allergy to common fragrance terpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus; Johansen, Jeanne D; Garcia-Bravo, Begoña; Giménez Arnau, Ana; Goh, Chee-Leok; Nixon, Rosemary; White, Ian R

    2016-05-01

    Limonene and linalool are common fragrance terpenes. Both oxidized R-limonene and oxidized linalool have recently been patch tested in an international setting, showing contact allergy in 5.2% and 6.9% of dermatitis patients, respectively. To investigate concomitant reactions between oxidized R-limonene and oxidized linalool in consecutive dermatitis patients. Oxidized R-limonene 3.0% (containing limonene hydroperoxides 0.33%) and oxidized linalool 6% (linalool hydroperoxides 1%) in petrolatum were tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Australia, Denmark, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. A total of 281 patients reacted to either oxidized R-limonene or oxidized linalool. Of these, 25% had concomitant reactions to both compounds, whereas 29% reacted only to oxidized R-limonene and 46% only to oxidized linalool. Of the 152 patients reacting to oxidized R-limonene, 46% reacted to oxidized linalool, whereas 35% of the 200 patients reacting to oxidized linalool also reacted to oxidized R-limonene. The majority of the patients (75%) reacted to only one of the oxidation mixtures, thus supporting the specificity of the reactions. The concomitant reactions to the two fragrance allergens suggest multiple sensitizations, which most likely reflect the exposure to the different fragrance materials in various types of consumer products. This is in accordance with what is generally seen for patch test reactions to fragrance materials. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Nylon/Graphene Oxide Electrospun Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Menchaca-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide is obtained by treating graphite with strong oxidizers. The bulk material disperses in basic solutions yielding graphene oxide. Starting from exfoliated graphite, different treatments were tested to obtain the best graphite oxide conditions, including calcination for two hours at 700°C and ultrasonic agitation in acidic, basic, or peroxide solutions. Bulk particles floating in the solution were filtered, rinsed, and dried. The graphene oxide obtained was characterized under SEM and FTIR techniques. On the other hand, nylon 6-6 has excellent mechanical resistance due to the mutual attraction of its long chains. To take advantage of the properties of both materials, they were combined as a hybrid material. Electrochemical cells were prepared using porous silica as supporting electrode of the electrospun nylon/graphene oxide films for electrochemical testing. Polarization curves were performed to determine the oxidation/reduction potentials under different acidic, alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The oxidation condition was obtained in KOH and the reduction in H2SO4 solutions. Potentiostatic oxidation and reduction curves were applied to further oxidize carbon species and then reduced them, forming the nylon 6-6/functionalized graphene oxide composite coating. Electrochemical impedance measurements were performed to evaluate the coating electrochemical resistance and compared to the silica or nylon samples.

  7. Association of Oxidative Stress with Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem; Noreen, Hamsa; Castro-Gomes, Vitor; Mohammadzai, Imdadullah; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    When concentrations of both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species exceed the antioxidative capability of an organism, the cells undergo oxidative impairment. Impairments in membrane integrity and lipid and protein oxidation, protein mutilation, DNA damage, and neuronal dysfunction are some of the fundamental consequences of oxidative stress. The purpose of this work was to review the associations between oxidative stress and psychological disorders. The search terms were the following: "oxidative stress and affective disorders," "free radicals and neurodegenerative disorders," "oxidative stress and psychological disorders," "oxidative stress, free radicals, and psychiatric disorders," and "association of oxidative stress." These search terms were used in conjunction with each of the diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and World Health Organization's International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. Genetic, pharmacological, biochemical, and preclinical therapeutic studies, case reports, and clinical trials were selected to explore the molecular aspects of psychological disorders that are associated with oxidative stress. We identified a broad spectrum of 83 degenerative syndromes and psychiatric disorders that were associated with oxidative stress. The multi-dimensional information identified herein supports the role of oxidative stress in various psychiatric disorders. We discuss the results from the perspective of developing novel therapeutic interventions.

  8. Accelerated evaporation of water on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Shi, Guosheng

    2017-03-29

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the evaporation of nanoscale volumes of water on patterned graphene oxide is faster than that on homogeneous graphene oxide. The evaporation rate of water is insensitive to variation in the oxidation degree of the oxidized regions, so long as the water film is only distributed on the oxidized regions. The evaporation rate drops when the water film spreads onto the unoxidized regions. Further analysis showed that varying the oxidation degree observably changed the interaction between the outmost water molecules and the solid surface, but the total interaction for the outmost water molecules only changed a very limited amount due to the correspondingly regulated water-water interaction when the water film is only distributed on the oxidized regions. When the oxidation degree is too low and some unoxidized regions are also covered by the water film, the thickness of the water film decreases, which extends the lifetime of the hydrogen bonds for the outmost water molecules and lowers the evaporation rate of the water. The insensitivity of water evaporation to the oxidation degree indicates that we only need to control the scale of the unoxidized and oxidized regions for graphene oxide to regulate the evaporation of nanoscale volumes of water.

  9. Kinetics of oxidic phase dissolution in acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorichev, I.G.; Kipriyanov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    The critical analysis of the experimental data on dissolution kinetics of metal oxides (BeO, V 2 O 5 , UO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , Ta 2 O 5 etc.) in acid media is carried out. Kinetic peculiarities of oxide dissolution are explained on the basis of the notions of electron- proton theory. It is established that the surface nonstoichiometric ccomposition of oxide phase and potential jump, appearing on the interface of the oxide-electrolyte phase are the important factors, determining the dissolution rate of a solid phase. The dissolution rate of metal oxides is limited by the transition of protons into the solid oxide phase. Morphological models of heterogeneous kinetics are used when explaining kinetic regularities of oxide dissolution process [ru

  10. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    properties to the widely discussed gold catalysts. Literature results were summarized for alcohol oxidation, epoxidation, amine oxidation, phenol hydroxylation, silane and sulfide oxidation, (side-chain) oxidation of alkyl aromatic compounds, hydroquinone oxidation and cyclohexane oxidation. It was found...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a catalyst...... contact while leaching could be excluded. The silver catalyst was most active when calcined over a short time at 500 °C potentially due to the formation of silver-oxygen species. Removal of these species might be a deactivation mechanism as was suggested by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis...

  11. Spent fuel. Dissolution and oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.

    1989-03-01

    Data from studies of the low temperature air oxidation of spent fuel were retrieved in order to provide a basis for comparison between the mechanism of oxidation in air and corrosion in water. U 3 O 7 is formed by diffusion of oxygen into the UO 2 lattice. A diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the fuel matric was calculated for 25 degree C to be in the range of 10 -23 to 10 -25 m 2 /s. The initial rates of U release from spent fuel and from UO 2 appear to be similar. The lowest rates (at 25 degree c >10 -4 g/(m 2 d)) were observed under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions the rates depend mainly of the nature and concentraion of the oxidant and/or on corbonate. In contact with air, typical initial rates at room temperature were in the range between 0.001 and 0.1 g/(m 2 d). A study of apparent U solubility under oxidizing conditions was performed and it was suggested that the controlling factor is the redox potential at the UO 2 surface rather than the E h of the bulk solution. Electrochemical arguments were used to predict that at saturation, the surface potential will eventually reach a value given by the boundaries at either the U 3 O 7 /U 3 O 8 or the U 3 O 7 /schoepite stability field, and a comparison with spent fuel leach data showed that the solution concentration of uranium is close to the calculated U solubility at the U 3 O 7 /U 3 O 8 boundary. The difference in the cumulative Sr and U release was calculated from data from Studsvik laboratory. The results reveal that the rate of Sr release decreases with the square root of time under U-saturated conditions. This time dependence may be rationalized either by grain boundary diffusion or by diffusion into the fuel matrix. Hence, there seems to be a possibility of an agreement between the Sr release data, structural information and data for oxygen diffusion in UO 2 . (G.B.)

  12. Oxidation behavior of rhenium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.C.; Joshi, A.; Packer, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Oxidation of polycrystalline Re has been studied at temperatures from 1,500 to 1,900 C. During oxidation volatile Re-oxides were emitted in the form of smoke and resulted in dramatic surface recessions of the samples. XRD analysis indicated that ReO 3 was the primary oxide present in the condensed vapor deposits. Preferential oxidation of Re, manifested by the formation of crystallographic facets, was noted on the oxidized surfaces. Etchpits and islands bounded by high-symmetry planes showing a 6-fold symmetry were formed thereon, suggesting that the kinetics of oxidation are slower on close-packed planes. It is demonstrated that surface recession rate, dR/dt, which is equivalent to weight change per unit area and time (dW/A·dt), can be used to characterize oxidation behavior. The overall surface recessions of both the PM-Re and CVD-Re generally increased with oxidation duration and temperature. The CVD-Re exhibits lower recession rates than the PM-Re in the temperature range examined, which is attributable to the stronger basal-plane texture and larger grain size of CVD-Re. Oxidation of PM-Re was observed to be anisotropic. At 1500 degree C, oxidation rates on the direction I (rolling plane) were higher. At higher temperatures (1,700 and 1,900 C), on the other hand, an opposite result was obtained. The differential oxidation rate of the PM-Re is suggested to originate from the synergistic effects of temperature-dependent oxidation behavior and basal-plane texture that have evolved during sample processing. This hypothesis is consistent with the fact that similar activation energies were obtained for the oxidation of CVD-Re and PM-Re (I)

  13. Contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria to ammonia oxidation in two nitrifying reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithep, Papitchaya; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan

    2018-03-01

    In this study, two laboratory nitrifying reactors (NRI and NRII), which were seeded by sludge from different sources and operated under different operating conditions, were found to possess distinct dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Ammonia-oxidizing archaeal (AOA) amoA genes outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) amoA genes in reactor NRI, while only AOB amoA genes were detectable in reactor NRII. The AOA amoA gene sequences retrieved from NRI were characterized within the Nitrososphaera sister cluster of the group 1.1b Thaumarchaeota. Two inhibitors for ammonia oxidation, allylthiourea (ATU) and 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO), were applied individually and as a mixture to observe the ammonia-oxidizing activity of both microorganisms in the reactors' sludge. The results indicated that AOA and AOB jointly oxidized ammonia in NRI, while AOB played the main role in ammonia oxidation in NRII. DNA-stable isotope probing with labeled 13 C-HCO 3 - was performed on NRI sludge. Incorporation of 13 C into AOA and AOB implied that both microorganisms may perform autotrophy during ammonia oxidation. Taken together, the results from this study provide direct evidence demonstrating the contribution of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation in the nitrifying reactors.

  14. 75 FR 57463 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental... Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft. The EPA is releasing this... for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and oxides of sulfur (SO X ). Because NO X , SO X , and their...

  15. 75 FR 70258 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second... (summary of options for elements of the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) standard...

  16. An engineered polypeptide around nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide: copying plants for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Sarvi, Bahram; Haghighi, Behzad

    2015-09-14

    Synthesis of new efficient catalysts inspired by Nature is a key goal in the production of clean fuel. Different compounds based on manganese oxide have been investigated in order to find their water-oxidation activity. Herein, we introduce a novel engineered polypeptide containing tyrosine around nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide, which was shown to be a highly active catalyst toward water oxidation at low overpotential (240 mV), with high turnover frequency of 1.5 × 10(-2) s(-1) at pH = 6.3 in the Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxidation range. The compound is a novel structural and efficient functional model for the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II. A new proposed clever strategy used by Nature in water oxidation is also discussed. The new model of the water-oxidizing complex opens a new perspective for synthesis of efficient water-oxidation catalysts.

  17. Methodology for the effective stabilization of tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  18. Uranium oxidation: Characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water by infrared and sorption analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, E. L.; Smyrl, N. R.; Condon, J. B.; Eager, M. H.

    1984-04-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. The results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. Inert gas sorption analyses and diffuse reflectance infrared studies combined with electron microscopy prove valuable in defining the chemistry and morphology of the oxidic products and hydrated intermediates.

  19. Non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction characterization and SEM observations of fibrous and ligneous biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lu, Ke-Miao; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Lin, Ta-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction of biomass is studied. • Two fibrous biomasses and two ligneous biomasses are tested. • SEM observations of four biomasses are provided. • Fibrous biomass is more sensitive to O 2 concentration than ligneous biomass. • The performance of non-oxidative torrefaction is better than that of oxidative torrefaction. - Abstract: Oxidative torrefaction is a method to reduce the operating cost of upgrading biomass. To understand the potential of oxidative torrefaction and its impact on the internal structure of biomass, non-oxidative and oxidative torrefaction of two fibrous biomass materials (oil palm fiber and coconut fiber) and two ligneous ones (eucalyptus and Cryptomeria japonica) at 300 °C for 1 h are studied and compared with each other. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations are also performed to explore the impact of torrefaction atmosphere on the lignocellulosic structure of biomass. The results indicate that the fibrous biomass is more sensitive to O 2 concentration than the ligneous biomass. In oxidative torrefaction, an increase in O 2 concentration decreases the solid yield. The energy yield is linearly proportional to the solid yield, which is opposite to the behavior of non-oxidative torrefaction. The performance of non-oxidative torrefaction is better than that of oxidative torrefaction. As a whole, ligneous biomass can be torrefied in oxidative environments at lower O 2 concentrations, whereas fibrous biomass is more suitable for non-oxidative torrefaction

  20. Catalysis science of supported vanadium oxide catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Israel E

    2013-09-07

    Supported vanadium oxide catalysts contain a vanadium oxide phase deposited on a high surface area oxide support (e.g., Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, etc.) and have found extensive applications as oxidation catalysts in the chemical, petroleum and environmental industries. This review of supported vanadium oxide catalysts focuses on the fundamental aspects of this novel class of catalytic materials (molecular structures, electronic structures, surface chemistry and structure-reactivity relationships). The molecular and electronic structures of the supported vanadium oxide phases were determined by the application of modern in situ characterization techniques (Raman, IR, UV-vis, XANES, EXAFS, solid state (51)V NMR and isotopic oxygen exchange). The characterization studies revealed that the supported vanadium oxide phase consists of two-dimensional surface vanadia sites dispersed on the oxide supports. Corresponding surface chemistry and reactivity studies demonstrated that the surface vanadia sites are the catalytic active sites for oxidation reactions by supported vanadia catalysts. Combination of characterization and reactivity studies demonstrate that the oxide support controls the redox properties of the surface vanadia sites that can be varied by as much as a factor of ~10(3).

  1. CO-oxidation catalysts: Low-temperature CO oxidation over Noble-Metal Reducible Oxide (NMRO) catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of CO to CO2 is an important reaction technologically and environmentally and a complex and interesting reaction scientifically. In most cases, the reaction is carried out in order to remove CO as an environmental hazard. A major application of heterogeneous catalysts is catalytic oxidation of CO in the exhaust of combustion devices. The reaction over catalysts in exhaust gas is fast and often mass-transfer-limited since exhaust gases are hot and O2/CO ratios are high. The main challenges to catalyst designers are to control thermal sintering and chemical poisoning of the active materials. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form unique catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  2. Greenlighting Photoelectrochemical Oxidation of Water by Iron Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Riha, Shannon C.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2014-12-23

    Hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) is one of just a few candidate electrode materials that possess all of the following photocatalyst-essential properties for scalable application to water oxidation: excellent stability, earth-abundance, suitability positive valence-band-edge energy, and significant visible light absorptivity. Despite these merits, hematites modest oxygen evolution reaction kinetics and its poor efficiency in delivering photogenerated holes, especially holes generated by green photons, to the electrode/solution interface, render it ineffective as a practical water-splitting catalyst. Here we show that hole delivery and catalytic utilization can be substantially improved through Ti alloying, provided that the alloyed material is present in ultrathin-thin-film form. Notably, the effects are most pronounced for charges photogenerated by photons with energy comparable to the band gap for excitation of Fe(3d) -> Fe(3d) transitions (i.e., green photons). Additionally, at the optimum Ti substitution level the lifetimes of surface-localized holes, competent for water oxidation, are extended. Together these changes explain an overall improvement in photoelectrochemical performance, especially enhanced internal quantum efficiencies, observed upon Ti(IV) incorporation.

  3. Protein oxidation in aging and the removal of oxidized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, Annika; König, Jeannette; Grune, Tilman

    2013-10-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated constantly within cells at low concentrations even under physiological conditions. During aging the levels of ROS can increase due to a limited capacity of antioxidant systems and repair mechanisms. Proteins are among the main targets for oxidants due to their high rate constants for several reactions with ROS and their abundance in biological systems. Protein damage has an important influence on cellular viability since most protein damage is non-repairable, and has deleterious consequences on protein structure and function. In addition, damaged and modified proteins can form cross-links and provide a basis for many senescence-associated alterations and may contribute to a range of human pathologies. Two proteolytic systems are responsible to ensure the maintenance of cellular functions: the proteasomal (UPS) and the lysosomal system. Those degrading systems provide a last line of antioxidative protection, removing irreversible damaged proteins and recycling amino acids for the continuous protein synthesis. But during aging, both systems are affected and their proteolytic activity declines significantly. Here we highlight the recent advantages in the understanding of protein oxidation and the fate of these damaged proteins during aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Posttranslational Protein modifications in biology and Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Poly[(ethylene oxide)-co-(methylene ethylene oxide)]: A hydrolytically-degradable poly(ethylene oxide) platform

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Pontus; Lee, Bongjae F.; van den Berg, Sebastiaan A.; Pressly, Eric D.; Lee, Annabelle; Hawker, Craig J.; Lynd, Nathaniel A.

    2012-01-01

    A facile method for imparting hydrolytic degradability to poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), compatible with current PEGylation strategies, is presented. By incorporating methylene ethylene oxide (MEO) units into the parent PEO backbone, complete degradation was defined by the molar incorporation of MEO, and the structure of the degradation byproducts was consistent with an acid-catalyzed vinyl-ether hydrolysis mechanism. The hydrolytic degradation of poly[(ethylene oxide)-co-(methylene ethylene oxi...

  5. Oxidative stress in androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prie, B E; Iosif, L; Tivig, I; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Androgenetic alopecia is not considered a life threatening disease but can have serious impacts on the patient's psychosocial life. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are considered responsible for the presence of androgenetic alopecia. Recent literature reports have proved the presence of inflammation and also of oxidative stress at the level of dermal papilla cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia Objective: We have considered of interest to measure the oxidative stress parameters in the blood of patients with androgenetic alopecia Methods and results: 27 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 25 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiols levels were measured on plasma samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) activities, and also non protein thiols levels together with TEAC activity were determined on erythrocytes samples No statistically significant changes were observed for TEAC erythrocytes, non-protein thiols, GPx and CAT activities. Significantly decreased (palopecia. For plasma samples decreased TEAC activity (palopecia are indicators of oxidative stress presence in these patients. Significantly decreased SOD activity but no change in catalase, glutathione peroxidase, non protein thiols level and total antioxidant activity in erythrocytes are elements which suggest the presence of a compensatory mechanism for SOD dysfunction in red blood cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia. AAG = androgenetic alopecia, MDA = malondialdehyde, SOD = superoxide dismutase, CAT = catalase, GPx = glutathione peroxidase, GSH = glutathione, GST = glutathione transferase, SH = thiols, TEAC = trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ABTS = 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), CDNB = 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene.

  6. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawal HA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humaira Aziz Sawal,1 Kashif Asghar,2 Matthias Bureik,3 Nasir Jalal4 1Healthcare Biotechnology Department, Atta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, 2Basic Sciences Research, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; 3Health Science Platform, School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; 4Health Science Platform, Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Abstract: The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to

  7. Nitric oxide and hypoxia signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Man, H S; Tsui, Albert K Y; Marsden, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production is catalyzed by three distinct enzymes, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The production of NO by vascular endothelium relies mainly on eNOS. Curiously, iNOS and nNOS also are relevant for vascular NO production in certain settings. By relaxing vascular smooth muscle, the classical view is that NO participates in O2 homeostasis by increasing local blood flow and O2 delivery. It is now appreciated that NO has an even more fundamental role in cellular oxygen sensing at the cellular and physiological level. A key component of cellular oxygen sensing is the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) that activates a transcriptional program to promote cellular survival under conditions of inadequate oxygen supply. Important new insights demonstrate that HIF protein is stabilized by two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in the O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) NO-dependent S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components including HIF-α. The need for these two complementary pathways to HIF activation arises because decreased oxygen delivery can occur not only by decreased ambient oxygen but also by decreased blood oxygen-carrying capacity, as with anemia. In turn, NO production is tightly linked to O2 homeostasis. O2 is a key substrate for the generation of NO and impacts the enzymatic activity and expression of the enzymes that catalyze the production of NO, the nitric oxide synthases. These relationships manifest in a variety of clinical settings ranging from the unique situation of humans living in hypoxic environments at high altitudes to the common scenario of anemia and the use of therapeutics that can bind or release NO. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  9. Simulation of 3D mesoscale structure formation in concentrated aqueous solution of the triblock polymer surfactants (ethylene oxide)(13)(propylene oxide)(30)(ethylene oxide)(13) and (propylene oxide)(19)(ethylene oxide)(33)(propylene oxide)(19). Application of dynamic mean-field density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlimmeren, BAC; Maurits, NM; Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    1999-01-01

    We simulate the microphase separation dynamics of aqueous solutions of the triblock polymer surfactants (ethylene oxide)(13)(propylene oxide)(30)(ethylene oxide)(13) and (propylene oxide)(19)(ethylene oxide)(33)(propylene oxide)(19) by a dynamic variant of mean-field density functional theory for

  10. Interaction mechanisms between slurry coatings and solid oxide fuel cell interconnect alloys during high temperature oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Åsa Helen; Mikkelsen, L.; Hendriksen, P.V.

    2012-01-01

    oxidation rate constant was reduced with 50–90% of that for uncoated alloy. One coating consisting of MnCo2O4 did not significantly affect the oxidation rate of the alloy, and just as for uncoated samples break-away oxidation occurred for MnCo2O4 coated samples. The interaction mechanisms between......Six different coatings consisting of fluorite-, corundum-, spinel- or perovskite-type oxides were deposited on a Fe22Cr alloy (Crofer 22APU) and oxidized at 900°C in moisturized air.Five of the coatings prevented break-away oxidation otherwise observed for the uncoated alloy, and the parabolic...

  11. The mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed by nanolayered manganese oxides: New insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Abbasi Isaloo, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Herein we consider the mechanism of water oxidation by nanolayered manganese oxide in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Based on membrane-inlet mass spectrometry results, the rate of H2((18))O exchange of μ-O groups on the surface of the nanolayered Mn-K oxide, and studies on water oxidation in the presence of different ratios of acetonitrile/water we propose a mechanism for water oxidation by nanolayered Mn oxides in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of cerium oxide and nickel oxide-incorporated aluminium matrix for marine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, P. Muhamed; Shibli, S.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study signifies the role of nickel oxide along with cerium oxide on barrier protection of aluminium as a metal matrix composite for marine applications. The incorporation of cerium oxide and nickel oxide in pure aluminium had improved the corrosion resistance and microstructure of the composite. A relatively anodic and stable OCP was exhibited throughout the period during long-term evaluation. Both nickel oxide and cerium oxide acted synergistically to reduce corrosion in aluminium. The mechanisms of barrier protection of the composites are discussed predominantly based on extensive impedance analysis. The results signify the scope of potential use of the composite in marine environment.

  13. Selective oxidation of isobutane on V–Mo–O mixed oxide catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHITA MITRAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Four V–Mo–O mixed metal oxides were prepared, characterized and tested for the selective oxidation of isobutane in the temperature range 350–550 °C, at atmospheric pressure. Isobutane was mainly oxidized to iso-butene and carbon oxides. The systems with low vanadium contents showed low activities but high isobutene selectivities, while the systems with high vanadium contents showed high activities with high carbon oxides selectivities. The effects of temperature, contact time and the molar ratio iso-butane to oxygen on the conversion of isobutane and the selectivity of the oxidation were studied.

  14. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2014-04-08

    A simple procedure is provided by which the hydroxyl termini of poly(ethylene oxide) can be appended with functional groups to a useful extent by reaction and precipitation. The polymer is dissolved in warmed toluene, treated with an excess of organic base and somewhat less of an excess of a reactive acylating reagent, reacted for several hours, then precipitated in isopropanol so that the product can be isolated as a solid, and salt byproducts are washed away. This procedure enables functionalization of the polymer while not requiring laborious purification steps such as solvent-solvent extraction or dialysis to remove undesirable side products.

  15. Anodic oxide films on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, A.; Di Quarto, F.; Sunseri, C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphology of anodic oxide films on tungsten, obtained in various conditions of anodization. Studies were made of the growth of porous films, whose thickness increases with time and depends upon the current density. Temperature and electrolyte composition influence the film morphology. Gravimetric measurements of film dissolution at 70 0 C show that after a transient time, the rate of metal dissolution and that of film formation coincide. The porous films thicken because tungsten dissolves as WO 2 2+ and precipitates as WO 3 .H 2 O. (author)

  16. Oxidative stability of krill oil (Euphausia superba)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Bruheim, I.

    conditions. These compounds include Strecker degradation compounds and pyrroles. Some of these compounds may have antioxidative effect. Commercial scale processing of krill prior to extraction may affect the oxidative stability of krill oil. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to compare lipid...... oxidation in krill oil produced in a commercial process and krill oil carefully extracted from frozen krill in the laboratory. Krill oil was incubated at different temperatures (20, 30 and 40 oC) for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 weeks, under conditions of constant stirring while being exposed to air. The oxidative......Krill oil has been reported in many studies to have high oxidative stability when evaluated by peroxide value (PV) and anisidine value (AV). However, recent studies have shown that other compounds than primary and secondary oxidation products are formed when krill oil is exposed to oxidative...

  17. Selective Oxidation of Biomass-Derived Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modvig, Amalie Elise

    . The objective of this dissertation was to develop new, alternative and sustainable methods for oxidative catalytic upgrading of biomass-derived compounds, with focus on oxidation of glycolaldehyde and simple alcohols as model substrates for larger sugars. Supported gold nanoparticle were studied...... for the selective oxidation of glycolaldehyde to glycolic acid, which has found applications in various industries. Limitations by competing reactions and catalyst deactivation was observed, affording up to 68% of glycolic acid at mild and aqueous conditions. The green oxidant, molecular oxygen, was applied...... for these oxidations and the reaction took place under base-free conditions. Oxidation of glycolaldehyde was further studied in the formation of formic acid. Efficient release of hydrogen from formic acid has proven formic acid a viable precursor for hydrogen, facilitating safe transportation and storage. Hydrogen has...

  18. Protein oxidation in muscle foods: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marianne; Heinonen, Marina; Baron, Caroline P.

    2011-01-01

    insight into the reactions involved in the oxidative modifications undergone by muscle proteins. Moreover, a variety of products derived from oxidized muscle proteins, including cross-links and carbonyls, have been identified. The impact of oxidation on protein functionality and on specific meat quality...... in this topic has led to highlight the influence that Pox may have on meat quality and human nutrition. Recent studies have contributed to solid scientific knowledge regarding basic oxidation mechanisms, and in advanced methodologies to accurately assess Pox in food systems. Some of these studies have provided......Protein oxidation in living tissues is known to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of relevant degenerative diseases, whereas the occurrence and impact of protein oxidation (Pox) in food systems have been ignored for decades. Currently, the increasing interest among food scientists...

  19. Primary atmospheric oxidation mechanism for toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaretu, Cristian O; Lichtman, Eben I; Hadler, Amelia B; Elrod, Matthew J

    2009-01-08

    The products of the primary OH-initiated oxidation of toluene were investigated using the turbulent flow chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique at temperatures ranging from 228 to 298 K. A major dienedial-producing pathway was detected for the first time for toluene oxidation, and glyoxal and methylglyoxal were found to be minor primary oxidation products. The results suggest that secondary oxidation processes involving dienedial and epoxide primary products are likely responsible for previous observations of glyoxal and methylglyoxal products from toluene oxidation. Because the dienedial-producing pathway is a null cycle for tropospheric ozone production and glyoxal and methylglyoxal are important secondary organic aerosol precursors, these new findings have important implications for the modeling of toluene oxidation in the atmosphere.

  20. Applications of Oxide Coatings in Photovoltaic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Calnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metalloid and metal based oxides are an almost unavoidable component in the majority of solar cell technologies used at the time of writing this review. Numerous studies have shown increases of ≥1% absolute in solar cell efficiency by simply substituting a given layer in the material stack with an oxide. Depending on the stoichiometry and whether other elements are present, oxides can be used for the purpose of light management, passivation of electrical defects, photo-carrier generation, charge separation, and charge transport in a solar cell. In this review, the most commonly used oxides whose benefits for solar cells have been proven both in a laboratory and industrial environment are discussed. Additionally, developing trends in the use of oxides, as well as newer oxide materials, and deposition technologies for solar cells are reported.

  1. Characterization of TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Eligenes S.; Pereira, Andre L.S.; Lima, Helder L.; Barroso, Maria K. de A.; Barros, Matheus de O.; Morais, Joao P.S.; Borges, Maria de F.; Rosa, Morsyleide de F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose, as a preliminary research for further application in nanocomposites. Bacterial cellulose (BC) was selectively oxidized at C-6 carbon by TEMPO radical. Oxidized bacterial cellulose (BCOX) was characterized by TGA, FTIR, XRD, and zeta potential. BCOX suspension was stable at pH 7.0, presented a crystallinity index of 83%, in spite of 92% of BC, because of decrease in the free hydroxyl number. FTIR spectra showed characteristic BC bands and, in addition, band of carboxylic group, proving the oxidation. BCOX DTG showed, in addition to characteristic BC thermal events, a maximum degradation peak at 233 °C, related to sodium anhydro-glucuronate groups formed during the cellulose oxidation. Thus, BC can be TEMPO-oxidized without great loss in its structure and properties. (author)

  2. Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress.

  3. Molecule production on interstellar oxide grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duley, W.W.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The microscopic nature of the surface of metal oxides is discussed, and a variety of surface defects are described. The chemical activity of these defects form the basis for the well-known catalytic properties of oxide materials. The types of defects likely to occur on interstellar oxide grains are investigated. Guided by extensive laboratory data on the catalytic properties of oxide materials, a list is given of reactions likely to occur on oxide grains in the interstellar medium. A specific model is proposed for the site which catalyses H 2 formation on interstellar grain surfaces. Sites of importance in the formation of the molecules are proposed to be of the (OH - ) type, as commonly observed on the surface of oxide materials. Under a plausible set of assumptions, molecular formation rates are estimated for low-density clouds, and it is suggested that the mechanisms described here will contribute significantly to interstellar chemistry. (author)

  4. Oxidation behaviour of metallic glass foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, B.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 434 Dougherty Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States)], E-mail: bbarnard@utk.edu; Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 434 Dougherty Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); Demetriou, M.D.; Johnson, W.L. [Department of Materials Science, Keck Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the effects of porosity on the oxidation behaviour of bulk-metallic glasses were investigated. Porous Pd- and Fe-based bulk-metallic glass (BMG) foams and Metglas ribbons were studied. Oxidizing experiments were conducted at 70 deg. C, and around 80 deg. C below glass-transition temperatures, (T{sub g}s). Scanning-electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) studies revealed little evidence of oxidation at 70 deg. C. Specimens exhibited greater oxidation at T{sub g} - 80 deg. C. Oxides were copper-based for Pd-based foams, Fe-, Cr-, and Mo-based for Fe-based foams, and Co-based with borosilicates likely for the Metglas. Pd-based foams demonstrated the best oxidation resistance, followed by Metglas ribbons, followed by Fe-based foams.

  5. Plasma oxidation as a tool to design oxide films at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schennach, R.; Grady, T.; Naugle, D.G.; Parga, J.R.; McWhinney, H.; Cocke, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Interfacial oxidation, an established approach to produce surface thin films for catalysts, corrosion, ware protective coatings and electronic structures is currently performed by thermal, anodic, and plasma methods. Fundamental physical-chemical models that can allow film design, particularly on alloys are lacking and plasma oxidation is the least studied of these methods. In this work, plasma oxidation of three CuZr alloys (CuZr 2 , CuZr, and Cu 51 Zr 14 ) has been studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and depth profiling methods. The dependence of the resulting oxide film on alloy composition and sample temperature during plasma oxidation is investigated. In contrast to thermal and electrochemical oxidation which lead to the formation of a zirconium oxide film, plasma oxidation leads to the formation of a copper oxide or metallic copper overlayer depending on temperature and copper concentration in the bulk. It is shown that plasma oxidation can be used to design oxide films at room temperature, which require high temperatures using thermal oxidation and are not achievable by anodic oxidation

  6. Ozone oxidative post-conditioning reduces oxidative protein damage in patients with disc hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Fernández, Olga Sonia; Pantoja, Marelis; Díaz Soto, María Teresa; Dranguet, Jaqueline; García Insua, Martina; Viebhan-Hánsler, Renata; Menéndez Cepero, Silvia; Calunga Fernández, José L

    2012-01-01

    Although inflammation in disc hernia (DH) has been recognized and it is a well-known process mediated by loss of the cellular redox balance, only a few studies about the impact of chronic oxidative stress on this neurological disorder have been made. Ozone therapy has been widely used with clinical efficacy in DH. This work aimed at characterizing the systemic redox status of patients with low back pain and neck pain as well as studying if ozone oxidative post-conditioning modified the pathological oxidative stress and protected against oxidative protein damage and if there is any relationship between oxidative changes and pain in both DH. Redox status of 33 patients with diagnosis of DH by computerized axial tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and clinical evaluations was studied. Ozone was administered by paravertebral way. After ozone treatment, plasmatic levels of antioxidant/pro-oxidant markers, pain, and life quality disability parameters were evaluated. One hundred percent of patients showed a severe oxidative stress. Major changes in superoxide dismutase activity, total hydroperoxides, advanced oxidation protein products, fructolysine content, and malondialdehyde were observed. After ozone oxidative post-conditioning, there was a re-establishment of patients' cellular redox balance as well as a decrease in pain in both DH. A relationship between indicators of oxidative protein damage and pain was demonstrated. Ozone therapy protected against oxidation of proteins and reduced the pain. Relationship between markers of oxidative protein damage, disability parameters, and pain suggests the role of oxidative stress in the pathological processes involved in DH.

  7. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects. 333. S 250 MK III were used to find out the particle size distributions in the final oxide products. 3. Results and discussion. 3.1 Phase identification. The dhkl values of all oxide products were compared with the JCPDS files: 24–81 and 25–1402. All were found to be mainly γ-Fe2O3 ...

  8. Oxidation as ?The Stress of Life?

    OpenAIRE

    Malinin, Nikolay L.; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple biological consequences of oxidative stress are known to contribute to aging and aging-related pathologies. It was recently shown that (carboxyalkyl)pyrroles (CAPs), the end products of phospholipid oxidation serve as a novel class of endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and promote the process of angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss implications of these findings in the context of age-related pathologies, including tumorigenesis. Accumulation of oxidation products i...

  9. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  10. Gas transport in solid oxide fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    He, Weidong; Dickerson, James

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary research and emerging measurement technologies associated with gas transport in solid oxide fuel cells. Within these pages, an introduction to the concept of gas diffusion in solid oxide fuel cells is presented. This book also discusses the history and underlying fundamental mechanisms of gas diffusion in solid oxide fuel cells, general theoretical mathematical models for gas diffusion, and traditional and advanced techniques for gas diffusivity measurement.

  11. Superlubricating graphene and graphene oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Erdemir, Ali; Choi, Junho; Berman, Diana

    2018-02-13

    A system and method for forming at least one of graphene and graphene oxide on a substrate and an opposed wear member. The system includes graphene and graphene oxide formed by an exfoliation process or solution processing method to dispose graphene and/or graphene oxide onto a substrate. The system further includes an opposing wear member disposed on another substrate and a gas atmosphere of an inert gas like N2, ambient, a humid atmosphere and a water solution.

  12. Nuts and oxidation: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Mònica Bulló; Patricia López-Uriarte; Patricia Casas-Agustench; Nancy Babio; Jordi Salas-Salvadó

    2009-01-01

    Nuts and oxidation: a systematic review In recent years, nuts have received special attention because of their potential role in preventing cardiovascular disease. Because nuts are very rich in total fat that can potentially be oxidized and their skins contain several antioxidants, studies have been conducted to evaluate the potential effect of nut consumption on oxidative stress. This review evaluates the in vitro and in vivo studies conducted in animals or humans to analyze the effect of...

  13. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species...... and temperature. Given the increasing nitrate pollution of freshwater ecosystems, the collective gut of benthic macrofauna might constitute an increasingly important yet hitherto overlooked link in the global nitrous oxide budget....

  14. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  15. Mediator oxidation systems in organic electrosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogibin, Yurii N; Elinson, Michail N; Nikishin, Gennady I

    2009-01-01

    The data on the use of mediator oxidation systems activated by electric current (anodic or parallel anodic and cathodic) in organic electrosynthesis are considered and generalised. Electrochemical activation of these systems permits successful application of catalytic versions and easy scaling of mediator-promoted processes. Chemical and environmental advantages of electrochemical processes catalysed by mediator oxidation systems are demonstrated. Examples of the application of organic and inorganic mediators for the oxidation of various classes of organic compounds under conditions of electrolysis are given.

  16. Metallothermic reduction of rare earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Rare earth oxides can be reduced to rare earth metals by a novel, high yield, metallothermic process. The oxides are dispersed in a suitable, molten, calcium chloride bath along with sodium metal. The sodium reacts with the calcium chloride to produce calcium metal which reduces the rare earth oxides to rare earth metals. The metals are collected in a discrete layer in the reaction vessel

  17. Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Loren P.; Al-Hasan, Yazan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that pr...

  18. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  19. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sabeti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions

  20. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of AMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, R.; Sieber, M.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMCs) consisting of high-strength alloys and ceramic reinforcement phases exhibit a high potential for security relevant lightweight components due to their high specific mechanical properties. However, their application as tribologically stressed components is limited because of their susceptibility against fatigue wear and delamination wear. Oxide ceramic protective coatings produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) can solve these problems and extend the possible applications of AMCs. The substrate material was powder metallurgically processed using alloy EN AW 2017 and SiC or Al2O3 particles. The influence of material properties like particle type, size and volume fraction on coating characteristics is clarified within this work. An alkaline silicate electrolyte was used to produce PEO coatings with technically relevant thicknesses under bipolar-pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The particle type proved to have the most significant effect on the coating properties. Whereas compactness and thickness are not deteriorated by the incorporation of thermodynamically stable alumina particles, the decomposition of silica particles during the PEO processes causes an increase of the porosity. The higher silica particle content decreases also the coating thickness and hardness, which leads in particular to reduction of the wear resistance of the PEO coatings. Finally, different approaches for the reduction of the coating porosity of silica reinforced AMCs are discussed.

  1. Chemically Assisted Photocatalytic Oxidation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Jean; Wu, Chang-Yu; Mazyck, David; Teixeira, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    The chemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation system (CAPOS) has been proposed for destroying microorganisms and organic chemicals that may be suspended in the air or present on surfaces of an air-handling system that ventilates an indoor environment. The CAPOS would comprise an upstream and a downstream stage that would implement a tandem combination of two partly redundant treatments. In the upstream stage, the air stream and, optionally, surfaces of the air-handling system would be treated with ozone, which would be generated from oxygen in the air by means of an electrical discharge or ultraviolet light. In the second stage, the air laden with ozone and oxidation products from the first stage would be made to flow in contact with a silica-titania photocatalyst exposed to ultraviolet light in the presence of water vapor. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the photocatalytic action would react with both carbon containing chemicals and microorganisms to eventually produce water and carbon dioxide, and ozone from the first stage would be photocatalytically degraded to O2. The net products of the two-stage treatment would be H2O, CO2, and O2.

  2. [Nitric oxide and human aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbararsh, N A; Kuvshinov, D Iu; Chichilenko, M V; Kolesnikov, A O

    2011-01-01

    More than in 500 17-21-year-old medical students stress reactivity (SR), biological age (BA), arterial pressure (AP) and nitric oxide (NO) metabolites excretion to the alveolar air [nitrates and nitrites concentration (NNC) in alveolar condensate] were determined in rest and before examinations during 1995-2204. AP, BA and NNC were measured in various trimesters of individual year (IY, the period from one person's birthday to another). During this period girls' AP changes insignificantly. The AP of youths is higher than in girls and increases during IV-IY trimester (10-12 months after birthday). The youths NNC decreases from the II to the IV-IY trimesters, but in girls there is a tendency to NNC increase during the IV-IY trimester their NNC negatively correlates (r = -0,34) with their systolic AP Among youths and girls with equal AP, NNC is significantly higher in girls. NNC decreases with the SR rise; this decrease develops during the examination stress too, but in girls NNC decrease is less. BA in youths is higher than in girls and increases during the IV-IY trimester. In youths BA negatively correlates (r = -0,60) with NNC. Taking into mind the "stress theory" of aging (P. Parsons, 1995) our data may be a basis to assumption that nitric oxide is a "molecule of anti-aging".

  3. Oxidative spectroelectrochemistry of two representative coumarins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xinran; He Jianbo; Wang Yan; Zhu Yanwu; Tian Jingjing

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of two isomeric coumarins, umbelliferone (UF, 7-hydroxycoumarin) and benzotertonic acid (BA, 4-hydroxycoumarin), were comparatively studied in aqueous buffer solutions by cyclic voltammetry, in situ long-path-length thin-layer UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry and ex situ ATR-FTIR spectrometry. Both the coumarins undergo the completely irreversible oxidation but following totally different oxidation mechanisms. The 7-OH but not the 4-OH group can contribute to antioxidative activity of coumarin via an electron transfer mechanism. Electro-oxidation of UF occurs at the 7-OH position and produces an insulating polymer film at the electrode surface, which probably consists of a poly(ethylene oxide) backbone with coumarin side groups. The toxicity-related coumarin 3,4-epoxide is a possible intermediate in the UF oxidation. Electro-oxidation of BA occurs at the C 3 =C 4 double bond, also yielding a non-conductive film at the electrode surface. In this process salicylaldehyde as the possible intermediate undergoes further oxidation to form the poly(aryl ether) film. The knowledge of the mechanisms of UF and BA oxidation should be helpful in understanding the roles and conversion of coumarins in their biological and chemical processes.

  4. Oxidative shielding and the cost of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jonathan D; Vitikainen, Emma I K; Stott, Iain; Cant, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction and lifespan are constrained by trade-offs which prevent their simultaneous increase. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the possibility that this cost of reproduction is mediated by oxidative stress. However, empirical tests of this theory have yielded equivocal support. We carried out a meta-analysis to examine associations between reproduction and oxidative damage across markers and tissues. We show that oxidative damage is positively associated with reproductive effort across females of various species. Yet paradoxically, categorical comparisons of breeders versus non-breeders reveal that transition to the reproductive state is associated with a step-change reduction in oxidative damage in certain tissues and markers. Developing offspring may be particularly sensitive to harm caused by oxidative damage in mothers. Therefore, such reductions could potentially function to shield reproducing mothers, gametes and developing offspring from oxidative insults that inevitably increase as a consequence of reproductive effort. According to this perspective, we hypothesise that the cost of reproduction is mediated by dual impacts of maternally-derived oxidative damage on mothers and offspring, and that mothers may be selected to diminish such damage. Such oxidative shielding may explain why many existing studies have concluded that reproduction has little or no oxidative cost. Future advance in life-history theory therefore needs to take account of potential transgenerational impacts of the mechanisms underlying life-history trade-offs. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  5. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2015-11-01

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  6. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles are neuroprotective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Raitano, Joan; Chan, S.-W.

    2006-01-01

    The responses of cells exposed to nanoparticles have been studied with regard to toxicity, but very little attention has been paid to the possibility that some types of particles can protect cells from various forms of lethal stress. It is shown here that nanoparticles composed of cerium oxide or yttrium oxide protect nerve cells from oxidative stress and that the neuroprotection is independent of particle size. The ceria and yttria nanoparticles act as direct antioxidants to limit the amount of reactive oxygen species required to kill the cells. It follows that this group of nanoparticles could be used to modulate oxidative stress in biological systems

  7. Oxidation of carbon monoxide by perferrylmyoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libardi, Silvia H; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Perferrylmyoglobin is found to oxidize CO in aerobic aqueous solution to CO2. Tryptophan hydroperoxide in the presence of tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrinate-iron(III) or simple iron(II)/(III) salts shows similar reactivity against CO. The oxidation of CO is for tryptophan hydroperoxide concluded...... to depend on the formation of alkoxyl radicals by reductive cleavage by iron(II) or on the formation of peroxyl radicals by oxidative cleavage by iron(III). During oxidation of CO, the tryptophan peroxyl radical was depleted with a rate constant of 0.26 ± 0.01 s(-1) for CO-saturated aqueous solution of pH 7...

  8. Catalytic wet oxidation of black liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Riera, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The major aspects of wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation have been reviewed in this work paying special attention to the reaction mechanisms, kinetics and the industrial process. In the experimental section a set of heterogeneous catalysts have been tested in the wet oxidation of non-wood black liquor. The oxidation runs were performed batchwise in a laboratory-scale mechanically stirred slurry reactor for 1 h at a temperature of 170°C and total pressure of 12 bar. Pure oxygen w...

  9. Advanced Wastewater Photo-oxidation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pioneer Astronautics proposes an advanced photocatalytic oxidation reactor for enhancing the reliability and performance of Water Recovery Post Processing systems...

  10. 'Methane oxidation on supported gold catalysts'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Guido

    2008-01-01

    the energy stored in the molecule available, is a major research challenge. In this PhD thesis, CH4 oxidation on nanoparticular gold is studied both experimentally and theoretically. In the course of this PhD project, CH4 oxidation was experimentally found more likely to form CO2 and H2O than other low index...... steady-state activity measurements were performed to obtain the reaction rates for CO and H2 oxidation. These reactions were studied on three different gold particle sizes using either O2 or N2O as oxidation agents. Using particle size distributions obtained from TEM analysis, it was found that the CO...

  11. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  12. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Tomofuji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress. Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. For instance, previous animal studies suggested that experimental periodontitis induces oxidative damage of the liver and descending aorta by increasing circulating oxidative stress. In addition, it has been revealed that clinical parameters in chronic periodontitis patients showed a significant improvement 2 months after periodontal treatment, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of reactive oxygen metabolites in plasma. Improvement of periodontitis by periodontal treatment could reduce the occurrence of circulating oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent studies indicate that the increase in circulating oxidative stress following diabetes mellitus and inappropriate nutrition damages periodontal tissues. In such cases, therapeutic approaches to systemic oxidative stress might be necessary to improve periodontal health.

  13. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Feng [Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Chen, Xi, E-mail: xichen@columbia.edu [International Center for Applied Mechanics, SV Laboratory, School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides are investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the ideal strength of nanoribbon decreases in comparison with that of 2D phosphorene. The Young's modulus of armchair nanoribbon has a remarkable size effect because of the edge relaxations. The analysis of the stress-strain relation indicates that, owing to chemisorbed oxygen atoms, the ideal strength and Young's modulus of 2D phosphorene oxide are greatly reduced along the zigzag direction, especially upon high oxidation ratios. In addition, strain and oxidation have significant impacts on phonon dispersion.

  14. Inorganic sulfur oxidation by Aureobasidium pullulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killham, K.; Lindley, N.D.; Wainwright, M.

    1981-10-01

    Aureobasidium pullulans (de Bary) Arnaud isolated from the phylloplane of sycamore exposed to heavy atmospheric pollution oxidized S/sup 0/ to S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, S/sub 4/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Cell-free extracts of A. pullulans also oxidized reduced forms of S, the oxidation increasing linearly with increasing protein concentration, showing that the process is enzymatic. The possible role of fungi in S oxidation in soils is discussed.

  15. Doped oxide nanoarchitectures for device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupan, O.; Railean, S.; Sontea, V.; Pocaznoi, I.; Chow, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: We present an experimental approach to study magnesium and cadmium-alloyed zinc oxide nanorods and their integration in wavelength-tunable light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Doped zinc oxide were deposited on p-GaN substrates. Low-dimensional ternary structures have been obtained for magnesium sulfate, cadmium chloride concentration in the deposition bath. Accordingly to SEM observations the cadmium-alloyed zinc oxide have a nanorod morphology. Structural analyses demonstrate that the zinc oxide nanomaterial is doped with the magnesium or cadmium incorporated within ZnO nanorods. Reported results are of great importance for wavelength-tunable LED and nanosensors applications. (authors)

  16. Oxidation behavior of metallic interconnect in solid oxide fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Wenying; Yang, Jiajun; Yan, Dong; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Jian, Li

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation behavior of integrated interconnect with bipolar plate and corrugated sheet made by ferrite steel SUS430 is investigated and compared in simulated environment and in a realistic stack. Electrical current is found to have a direction-related impact on the thickness of the Cr2O3/MnCr2O4 composite oxide scale. Oxide scale of the interconnect aged in the stack exhibits a dual-layered structure of a complex Mn-Cr oxide layer covered by iron oxide. The oxidation rates vary greatly depending on its local environment, with different thermal, electrical density, as well as gas composition conditions. By analyzing the thickness distribution of oxide scale and comparing them with the simulated test result, the oxidation behavior of interconnect in stack is described in high definition. ASR distribution is also conducted by calculation, which could help further understanding the behavior of stack degradation.

  17. Effect of the Lithium Oxide Concentration on a Reduction of Lanthanide Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In-Kyu; Jeong, Myeong-Soo; Do, Jae-Bum; Seo, Chung-Seok

    2007-01-01

    The pyrochemical reduction process of spent oxide fuel is one of the options to handle spent PWR fuels in Korea. After spent oxide fuel is converted to a metallic form, fission products will be removed from the resultant uranium and higher actinide metals by an electrorefining process. The chemical behaviors of lanthanide oxides during the pyrochemical process has been extensively studied. It was also reported that about 30 to 50% of several lanthanide oxides were reduced to corresponding metals by an electrolytic reduction process having 1 wt% of a lithium oxide concentration. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), however, has been used 3 wt% of lithium oxide to increase the applied current of the electrolytic reduction process. Though it was reported that U 3 O 8 was reduced to uranium metal having a high reduction yield at 3 wt% of the Li 2 O concentration, the effect of the lithium oxide concentration on the reduction of lanthanide oxides has not been clarified

  18. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  19. Mononuclear metavanadate catalyses gas phase oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde employing dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Tom; Khairallah, George N; Wimala, Samantha A S Y; Ang, Yien C; O'Hair, Richard A J; Wedd, Anthony G

    2006-11-21

    Multistage mass spectrometry experiments reveal a sequence of gas phase reactions for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde with a mononuclear oxo vanadate anion as the catalyst and dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  20. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  1. Low temperature thermal oxidation of nitric oxide in polluted air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Oliver; Ljungström, Evert; Svensson, Roger

    High concentrations of NO x (1500ppb) and high NO → NO2 conversion rates (100ppbh -1) have been measured in Göteborg during winter-time inversion periods. The conversion takes place without being significantly affected by light and the ozone concentration is always extremely low on these occasions. The dependence of the thermal oxidation 2 NO+ O2→ 2 NO2 on temperature, humidity and catalytic activity of different surfaces has been investigated in an extensive kinetic study. The reaction rate has a strong negative temperature dependence with apparent activation energies of -3.5 kj mole -1 for r.h. = 55 % and -7.3 kj mole -1for dry conditions. The reaction is surface catalysed and the experiments indicate that the thermal oxidation takes place in two steps, one rapid equilibrium reaction, forming intermediates such as N 2O 2 or NO 3, and one rate-determining step in which NO 2 is formed. The presence of an aerosol surface increased the reaction rate very slightly, while street surface material had a more significant influence. When the flow reactor walls were coated with salt-snow or road dirt mixtures to simulate the surface of a winter street, the reaction rate increased typically to 3.5 × 10 4M -2s -1 from 2.1 ×10 4M -2s -1 for a clean reactor at -2°C. These values should be compared with the generally accepted value for the reaction rate, which is 1.5 × 10 4M -2s -1 at 25°C. The experimental results allow conversion rates of ~100 NOppbh -1 at rush hours and ~ 40 NO ppb h -1 for normal or low traffic to be rationalized in terms of the thermal NO → NO2 reaction only, at an NO concentration of ~ 1000 ppb.

  2. Aspiperidine oxide, a piperidine N-oxide from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus indologenus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lene Maj; Kildgaard, Sara; Jaspars, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    A novel secondary metabolite, aspiperidine oxide, was isolated from the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus indologenus. The structure of aspiperidine oxide was determined from extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis supported by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The structure revealed a rare...... piperidine N-oxide, not observed in filamentous fungi before. A biosynthetic pathway towards aspiperidine oxide is proposed, based on tentative identification of intermediates from UHPLC-DAD-HRMS data....

  3. USING PROPYLENE OXIDE AND ETHYLENE OXIDE BLOCK COPOLYMERS FOR DISINTEGRATION OF PETROLEUM EMULSIONS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    SURFACE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES, PETROLEUM PRODUCTS), (*PETROLEUM PRODUCTS, SURFACE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES), COLLOIDS, ETHYLENE OXIDE , ETHYLENEDIAMINE, GLYCOLS, COPOLYMERIZATION, POLYETHYLENE PLASTICS, DESALINATION, USSR

  4. Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance in Animal Nutrition and Health: The Role of Protein Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Celi, Pietro; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress (OS), and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism, and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functi...

  5. Oxidant/antioxidant balance in animal nutrition and health: the role of protein oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro eCeli; Pietro eCeli; Gianfranco eGabai

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress, and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional m...

  6. Applying of spectroscopy 1HNMR in analysis of block copolymers of propylene oxide and ethylene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janik, R.; Plucinski, J.

    1980-01-01

    It was examined the precision and conformity of results of determination of ethylene oxide content in block copolymers of propylene oxide and ethylene oxide (nonionic surface active agents of Pluronic type) by means of spectroscopy 1 HNMR. It was found a full suitability of this method for preparations containing ca. 6/80% by weight of ethylene oxide in molecule, what corresponds to the range appearing in the commercial products. (author)

  7. Biaxial (Tension-Torsion) Testing of an Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    black laser printer toner powder through for uniform stochastic speckle patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 xi Figure Page...4.23 Laser printer toner speckling procedure on involute oxide-oxide CMC tube . . 54 4.24 Laser printer toner speckling on involute oxide-oxide CMC tube...without introducing significant surface defects or leaving cleaning products residuals such as strands of textiles or paper byproducts from cleaning and

  8. Oxidative stress response in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Soares Netto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress response in plants is still poorly understood in comparison with the correspondent phenomenon in bacteria, yeast and mammals. For instance, nitric oxide is assumed to play various roles in plants although no nitric oxide synthase gene has yet been isolated. This research reports the results of a search of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for homologous sequences involved in the oxidative stress response. I have not found any gene similar to nitric oxide synthase in the SUCEST database although an alternative pathway for nitric oxide synthesis was proposed. I have also found several genes involved in antioxidant defense, e.g. metal chelators, low molecular weight compounds, antioxidant enzymes and repair systems. Ascorbate (vitamin C is a key antioxidant in plants because it reaches high concentrations in cells and is a substrate for ascorbate peroxidase, an enzyme that I found in different isoforms in the SUCEST database. I also found many enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants, which may be potential targets for genetic manipulation. The engineering of plants for increased vitamin C and E production may lead to improvements in the nutritional value and stress tolerance of sugarcane. The components of the antioxidant defense system interact and their synthesis is probably closely regulated. Transcription factors involved in regulation of the oxidative stress response in bacteria, yeast and mammals differ considerably among themselves and when I used them to search the SUCEST database only genes with weak similarities were found, suggesting that these transcription regulators are not very conserved. The involvement of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in plant defense against pathogens is also discussed.A resposta ao estresse oxidativo não é bem conhecida em plantas como em bactérias, leveduras e humanos. Por exemplo, assume-se que óxido nítrico tem várias fun

  9. Oxidation of propane with oxygen, nitrous oxide and oxygen/nitrous oxide mixture over Co- and Fe-zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novoveská, K.; Bulánek, R.; Wichterlová, Blanka

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 100, 3-4 (2005), s. 315-319 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/03/1120 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : propene * propane oxidation * nitrous oxide * Fe-ZSM-5 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.365, year: 2005

  10. The oxidative coupling of methane and the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over a niobium promoted lithium doped magnesium oxide catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, H.M.; Swaan, H.M.; Li, X.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The promoting effect of niobium in a Li/MgO catalyst for the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) and for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ODHE) has been studied in some detail. It has been found that a Li/Nb/MgO catalyst with 16 wt % niobium showed the highest activity for the C2 production

  11. The distinguishing characteristics of interlayer oxidation zone and burial ancient ground oxidation zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhanshi; Zhou Wenbin

    1998-01-01

    The author discusses the main characteristics of interlayer oxidation zones and the burial ancient ground oxidation zones of Uranium deposit No. 512 in Xinjiang Uigur municipality. The epigenetic genesis, depending on some aquifer, the tongue-like in section, having the zonation along dip direction and having certain mineral assemblage are the typical features for interlayer oxidation zones

  12. On the formation of iron(III) oxides via oxidation of iron(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongiovanni, R.; Pelizzetti, E. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Analitica; Borgarello, E. [Eniricerche SpA, Milan (Italy); Meisel, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Formation of iron oxides in aqueous salt solutions is reviewed. The discussion is focused on the oxidation of iron(II) and the following hydrolysis process that leads to the formation of a solid phase from homogeneous solutions. Results from our own studies on the kinetics of the oxidation reactions and the ensuing growth processes are presented.

  13. Mobility of chromium in inorganic oxides, Spectroscopic fingerprinting of oxidation states and coordination environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoofs, B.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mobility of Crn+ in inorganic oxides has been investigated by combined diffuse reflectance (DR)-EPR spectroscopies as a function of the Cr oxidation state, the type of inorganic oxide (silica, alumina and mordenite) and the environmental conditions (hydrated and dehydrated state). Crn+ ions

  14. Effect of oxide ion concentration on the electrochemical oxidation of carbon in molten LiCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J. W.; Choi, I. K.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The continuous measurement of lithium oxide concentration was required in DOR (Direct Oxide Reduction) process, which converts spent nuclear fuel to metal form, for the reactivity monitor and effective control of the process. The concentration of lithium oxide was measured by the electrochemical method, which was based on the phenomenon that carbon atoms of glassy carbon electrode electrochemically react with oxygen ions of lithium oxide in molten LiCl medium. From the results of electrode polarization experiments, the trend of oxidation rate of carbon atoms was classified into two different regions, which were proportional and non-proportional ones, dependent on the amount of lithium oxide. Below about 2.5 wt % Li 2 O, as the carbon atom ionization rate was fast enough for reacting with diffusing lithium oxide to the surface of carbon electrode. In this concentration range, the oxidation rate of carbon atoms was controlled by the diffusion of lithium oxide, and the concentration of lithium oxide could be measured by electrochemical method. But, above 2.5 wt % Li 2 O, the oxidation rate of carbon atoms was controlled by the applied electrochemical potential, because the carbon atom ionization rate was suppressed by the huge amounts of diffusing Li 2 O. Above this concentration, the electrochemical method was not applicable to determine the concentration of lithium oxide

  15. Equilibrating metal-oxide cluster ensembles for oxidation reactions using oxygen in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira A. Weinstock; Elena M. G. Barbuzzi; Michael W. Wemple; Jennifer J. Cowan; Richard S. Reiner; Dan M. Sonnen; Robert A. Heintz; James S. Bond; Craig L. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Although many enzymes can readily and selectively use oxygen in water--the most familiar and attractive of all oxidants and solvents, respectively–-the design of synthetic catalysts for selective water-based oxidation processes utilizing molecular oxygen remains a daunting task. Particularly problematic is the fact that oxidation of substrates by O2 involves radical...

  16. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  17. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in liquid phase under nitrogen atmosphere over vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of a variet...

  18. Electrochemical Oxidation by Square-Wave Potential Pulses in the Imitation of Oxidative Drug Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri-Nigjeh, Eslam; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Bruins, Andries P.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemistry combined with mass spectrometry (EC-MS) is an emerging analytical technique in the imitation of oxidative drug metabolism at the early stages of new drug development. Here, we present the benefits of electrochemical oxidation by square-wave potential pulses for the oxidation of

  19. Volcano Relations for Oxidation of Hydrogen Halides over Rutile Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja; Man, Isabela C.; Hansen, Heine A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the heterogeneously catalysed oxidation of HX (X=Cl, Br and I) on the RuO2 (110) surface with DFT. We also solve a micro-kinetic model of HX oxidation and compare oxidation activity at different coverages. We further establish linear energy relations for the reaction intermediates ...

  20. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Yan; Tong, Xi-Li; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Han, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ying-Yong; Jin, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Yong; Guo, Xiang-Yun

    2012-02-11

    Cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) were prepared by reducing copper acetate supported on graphite oxide using diethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent. The Cu(2)O/RGO composite exhibits excellent catalytic activity and remarkable tolerance to methanol and CO in the oxygen reduction reaction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JoAnn Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this project was to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involved both experimental and modeling efforts. The team was comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective was to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. The results suggested that homogeneous mercury oxidation is below 10% which is not consistent with previous data of others and work which was completed early in this research program. Previous data showed oxidation above 10% and up to 100%. However, the previous data are suspect due to apparent oxidation occurring within the sampling system where hypochlorite ion forms in the KCl impinger, which in turn oxidized mercury. Initial tests with entrained iron oxide particles injected into a flame reactor suggest that iron present on fly ash particle surfaces can promote heterogeneous oxidation of mercury in the presence of HCl under entrained flow conditions. Using the data generated above, with homogeneous reactions accounting for less than 10% of the oxidation, comparisons were made to pilot- and full-scale data. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions, as with the case of iron oxide, and adsorption on solid carbon must be taking place in the full-scale system. Modeling of mercury oxidation using parameters from the literature was conducted to further study the contribution of homogeneous pathways to Hg oxidation in coal combustion systems. Calculations from the literature used rate parameters developed in different studies, in some cases using transition state theory with a range of approaches and basis sets, and in other cases

  2. Classification of Simple Oxides: A Polarizability Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Vesselin; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2002-01-01

    A simple oxide classification has been proposed on the basis of correlation between electronic polarizabilities of the ions and their binding energies determined by XPS. Three groups of oxides have been considered taking into account the values obtained on refractive-index- or energy-gap-based oxide ion polarizability, cation polarizability, optical basicity, O 1s binding energy, metal (or nonmetal) binding energy, and Yamashita-Kurosawa's interaction parameter of the oxides. The group of semicovalent predominantly acidic oxides includes BeO, B2O3, P2O5, SiO2, Al2O3, GeO2, and Ga2O3 with low oxide ion polarizability, high O 1s binding energy, low cation polarizability, high metal (or nonmetal) outermost binding energy, comparatively low optical basicity, and strong interionic interaction, leading to the formation of strong covalent bonds. Some main group oxides so-called ionic or basic such as CaO, In2O3, SnO2, and TeO2 and most transition metal oxides show relatively high oxide ion polarizability, O 1s binding energy in a very narrow medium range, high cation polarizability, and low metal (or nonmetal) binding energy. Their optical basicity varies in a narrow range and it is close to that of CaO. The group of very ionic or very basic oxides includes CdO, SrO, and BaO as well as PbO, Sb2O3, and Bi2O3, which possess very high oxide ion polarizability, low O 1s binding energy, very high cation polarizability, and very low metal (or nonmetal) binding energy. Their optical basicity is higher than that of CaO and the interionic interaction is very weak, giving rise to the formation of very ionic chemical bonds.

  3. Oxides gets environmentally-friendly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    method to overcome these difficulties by converting heat directly into electricity at the source. However, the requirements for the materials are not easily satisfied even by current state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Not only must they possess high thermoelectric performance, they must also...... presents the general considerations for the design and construction of a high frequency rotary AMR device [2]. Recently we have also clearly showed the potential value of the mixed valence manganese ceramics as magnetocaloric materials for application in devices [3]. The strength of the materials lies...... be stable at high temperatures and be composed of nontoxic and low-cost elements, and must be able to be processed and shaped cheaply. Oxides are among the strongest candidate materials for this purpose. This talk provides an overview of the development on such materials at DTU Energy Conversion. In order...

  4. Combuster. [low nitrogen oxide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, R. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A combuster is provided for utilizing a combustible mixture containing fuel and air, to heat a load fluid such as water or air, in a manner that minimizes the formation of nitrogen oxide. The combustible mixture passes through a small diameter tube where the mixture is heated to its combustion temperature, while the load fluid flows past the outside of the tube to receive heat. The tube is of a diameter small enough that the combustible mixture cannot form a flame, and yet is not subject to wall quench, so that combustion occurs, but at a temperature less than under free flame conditions. Most of the heat required for heating the combustible mixture to its combustion temperature, is obtained from heat flow through the walls of the pipe to the mixture.

  5. Advanced Oxidation Degradation of Diclofenac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, William J.; Song Weihua

    2012-01-01

    Advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs), utilize free radical reactions to directly degrade chemical contaminants as an alternative to traditional water treatment. This study reports the absolute rate constants for reaction of diclofenac sodium and the model compound (2, 6-dichloraniline) with the two major AO/RP radicals; the hydroxyl radical (•OH) and hydrated electron (e - aq ). The bimolecular reaction rate constants (M -1 s -1 ) for diclofenac for •OH was (9.29 ± 0.11) x 10 9 , and, for e- aq was (1.53 ± 0.03) x10 9 . Preliminary degradation mechanisms are suggested based on product analysis using 60 Co γ-irradiation and LC-MS for reaction by-product identification. The toxicity of products was evaluated using the Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria method. (author)

  6. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  7. Creep of Oxide Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    earth oxide. -3- There are several rare earth sesquioxide compounds which could be included in Table 1, but only Y2 0 3 and Sc2 0 3 have been listed. This...was done since the rare earth sesquioxides all have densities considerably higher than yttria without any significant advantage in terms of melting...9.1 ɞ.1 ɚ.1 germanium < 69 < 0.16% < 330 < 180 < 260 gold ɘ.02 ɚ.8 ɘ.03 ɘ.002 <,0.001 hafnium 0.8% < 230 < 0.6 < 0.3 < 0.4 holmium < 1.9 < 5.1

  8. Solid oxide electrolysis: Concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Areum; Ju, Young-Wan; Kim, Guntae

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy resources such as solar energy, wind energy, hydropower or geothermal energy have attracted significant attention in recent years. Renewable energy sources have to match supply with demand, therefore it is essential that energy storage devices (e.g., secondary batteries) are developed. However, secondary batteries are accompanied with critical problems such as high cost for the limited energy storage capacity and loss of charge over time. Energy storage in the form of chemical species, such as H2 or CO2, have no constraints on energy storage capacity and will also be essential. When plentiful renewable energy exists, for example, it could be used to convert H2O into hydrogen via water electrolysis. Also, renewable energy resources could be used to reduce CO2 into CO and recycle CO2 and H2O into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in solid oxide electrolysis (SOE).

  9. Crumpled nanopaper from graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaofei; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2012-01-11

    Graphene oxide (GO) in aqueous solution was aerosolized and rapidly dried to produce crumpled nanopaper-like sheets. Online size selection and aerosol mass analysis was used to determine the fractal dimension (D) of crumpled GO nanosheets as 2.54 ± 0.04. That is identical to macroscale materials, such as crumpled balls of paper and foil. Thermal reduction of crumpled GO nanosheets did not change D, even after loss of nearly 25% of the nanosheets mass. We demonstrate that D is able to be tuned by altering solvent conditions. A 10% acetone mixture increased D to 2.68 ± 0.02. Calculations of the confinement force show that crumpling of GO nanosheets is driven by the capillary force associated with rapid solvent loss. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. pH-sensor properties of electrochemically grown iridium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthuis, Wouter; Robben, M.A.M.; Bergveld, Piet; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    The open-circuit potential of an electrochemically grown iridium oxide film is measured and shows a pH sensitivity between −60 and −80 mV/pH. This sensitivity is found to depend on the state of oxidation of the iridium oxide film; for a higher state of oxidation (or more of the oxide in the high

  11. Zinc oxide tetrapod nanocrystal diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Marcus Christian

    Advances in fabrication and analysis tools have allowed the synthesis and manipulation of functional materials with features comparable to fundamental physical length scales. Many interesting properties inherently due to quantum size effects have been observed in nanometre scale structures. It is hoped that these nanoscale structures will play a key role in future materials and devices that exploit their unique properties. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band-gap transparent and piezoelectric semiconductor material. It also has a large exciton binding energy which allows for stable ultraviolet light emission at room temperature. There are therefore foreseeable applications in optoelectronic devices which include ultraviolet photosensitive devices and light emitting diodes. Nanoscale structures formed from ZnO are interesting as they possess many of the properties inherent form the bulk but are also subject to various quantum size effects that may occur at the nanoscale. To date, the study of ZnO nanostructures is a relatively recent endeavour with the vast majority of reports being made within the last five years. ZnO is unique in that it forms a family of nanoscale structures. These structures include nanoscale wires, rods, hexagons, tetrapods, ribbons, rings, flowers and helixes. This work is focussed on the study of zinc oxide tetrapod crystalline nanoscale structures and their devices. We have synthesised ZnO tetrapods using chemical vapour transport techniques. Photoluminescence characterisation revealed the presence of optically active surface defects that could be quenched with a simple surface treatment. We have also for the first time observed resonant cavity modes in a single ZnO tetrapod nanocrystal. An ultraviolet sensitive Schottky diode was fabricated from a single ZnO tetrapod using focussed ion-beam assisted deposition techniques. The device characteristics observed were modelled and successfully shown to result from an illumination induced reduction in

  12. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  13. Nitric oxide signaling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J David; Man, H S Jeffrey; Marsden, Philip A

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is classically viewed as a regulator of vasomotor tone. NO plays an important role in regulating O(2) delivery through paracrine control of vasomotor tone locally and cardiovascular and respiratory responses centrally. Very soon after the cloning and functional characterization of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), studies on the interaction between O(2) and NO made the paradoxical finding that hypoxia led to decreases in eNOS expression and function. Why would decreases in O(2) content in tissues elicit a loss of a potent endothelial-derived vasodilator? We now know that restricting our view of NO as a regulator of vasomotor tone or blood pressure limited deeper levels of mechanistic insight. Exciting new studies indicate that functional interactions between NO and O(2) exhibit profound complexity and are relevant to diseases states, especially those associated with hypoxia in tissues. NOS isoforms catalytically require O(2). Hypoxia regulates steady-state expression of the mRNA and protein abundance of the NOS enzymes. Animals genetically deficient in NOS isoforms have perturbations in their ability to adapt to changes in O(2) supply or demand. Most interestingly, the intracellular pathways for O(2) sensing that evolved to ensure an appropriate balance of O(2) delivery and utilization intersect with NO signaling networks. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization and transcriptional activity is achieved through two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in O(2)-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components. Recent findings support a role for S-nitrosothiols as hypoxia-mimetics in certain biological and/or disease settings, such as living at high altitude, exposure to small molecules that can bind NO, or anemia.

  14. Evaporative oxidation treatability test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

  15. Protoporphyrin IX and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, S; Vanore, G; Batlle, A

    1999-09-01

    The short- and long-term pro-oxidant effect of protoporphyrin IX (PROTO) administration to mice was studied in liver. A peak of liver porphyrin accumulation was found 2 h after the injection of PROTO (3.5 mg/kg, i.p.); then the amount of porphyrins diminished due to biliar excretion. After several doses of PROTO (1 dose every 24 h up to 5 doses) a sustained enhancement of liver porphyrins was observed. The activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase was induced 70-90% over the control values 4 h after the first injection of PROTO and stayed at these high levels throughout the period of the assay. Administration of PROTO induced rapid liver damage, involving lipid peroxidation. Hepatic GSH content was increased 2h after the first injection of PROTO, but then decreased below the control values which were maintained after several doses of porphyrin. After a single dose of PROTO, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) was rapidly induced, suggesting that superoxide radicals had been generated. Increased levels of hydrogen peroxide coming from the reaction catalyzed by SOD and lipid peroxides as a consequence of membrane peroxidation, induced the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), while decreased GSH levels induced glutathione reductase (GRed) activity. However after 5 doses of PROTO, the activity of SOD was reduced reaching control values. GPx and catalase activities slowly went down, while GRed continued increasing as long as the levels of GSH were kept very low. TBARS values, although lower than those observed after a single dose of PROTO, remained above control values; Glutathione S-transferase activity was instead greatly diminished, indicating sustained liver damage. Our findings would indicate that accumulation of PROTO in liver induces oxidative stress, leading to rapid increase in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes to avoid or revert liver damage. However, constant accumulation of porphyrins provokes a liver damage so severe that the

  16. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  17. Evaporative oxidation treatability test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment

  18. Polymerization of ethylene oxide using yttrium isopropoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Young K.; Stevels, W.M.; Ankone, Martinus J.K.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Kim, Sung W.; Feijen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Well defined poly(ethylene oxide)s were prepared using yttrium isopropoxide as an initiator. End group analysis using 1H- and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed that only polymers with isopropyl ether and hydroxyl end groups were produced. The molecular weight is controlled by the initial amount of

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1147 - Ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethylene oxide. 1926.1147 Section 1926.1147 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Ethylene oxide. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1047 - Ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethylene oxide. 1915.1047 Section 1915.1047 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1047 Ethylene oxide. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section...

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATION MICROWAVE-ASSISTED OXIDATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds is a fundamental transformation in organic chemistry since carbonyl compounds are widely used as intermediates both in manufacturing and research [1]. Although the oxidation of organic compounds under non-aqueous conditions has become an effective technique for ...

  2. Thermochromatographic volatility studies of plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, S.; Taut, S.; Vahle, A.; Fanghaenel, Th.

    2002-01-01

    The volatility of plutonium oxides in the O 2 -H 2 O (g) /SiO 2(s) system has been studied by thermochromatography. The experimental results indicate the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) by moist oxygen. (orig.)

  3. Oxidation and Reduction: Too Many Definitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2011-01-01

    IUPAC gives several different definitions of oxidation: loss of electrons, increase in oxidation state, loss of hydrogen, or gain of oxygen. Most introductory or general chemistry textbooks use all of these definitions at one time or another, which can lead to some confusion in the minds of first-year chemistry students. Some paradoxical…

  4. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding whether the current standard for NO2 sufficiently protects public health. Nitrogen Oxide is one of six principal (or

  5. Organic fragments from graphene oxide: Isolation, characterization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As-prepared graphene oxide (GO) contains oxidative debris which can be washed using basic solutions. We present the isolation and characterization of these debris. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used to monitor the separation of the debris in various solvents in the presence of different protic and aprotic alkylamino ...

  6. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentration and a sharp decline in antioxidant defences . [1] Among the causes of enhanced free radical production, hyperglycemia and hyper insulinemia seem to play a major role , [2,3] Hyperglycemia is the more easily modifiable factor among the two and good glycemic control can reduce the oxidative stress. Controversy pers ists regarding the other possible mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and whether oxidative stress normalizes with adequate metabolic control alone. The role of oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro and micro angiopathy [4,5] Prospective trials are now underway addressing the controversial issues of possible role of pharmacological antioxidants in preventing or at least de laying the onset of diabetic complications.

  7. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  8. Modelling oxide formation and growth on platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, Heather A.; Jerkiewicz, Gregory; Eikerling, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    We present a mathematical model of oxide formation and growth on platinum. The motivation stems from the necessity to understand platinum dissolution in the cathode catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. As is known, platinum oxide formation and reduction are strongly linked to platinum dissolution processes. However, a consistent model of the oxidation processes on platinum does not exist. Our oxide growth model links interfacial exchange processes between platinum and oxygen ions with the transport of oxygen ion vacancies via diffusion and migration. A parametric analysis is performed to rationalize vital trends in oxide growth kinetics. The rate determining step of oxide formation and growth is identified as the extraction of platinum atoms at the metal-oxide interface. A kinetic effect is observed while adjusting the potential when growing the oxide layer, and the solution indicates that a structural change occurs at high potentials, around 1.5 VRHE. The model compares well to experimental data for various materials from various sources.

  9. Hepatic Antioxidant, Oxidative Stress And Histopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatic Antioxidant, Oxidative Stress And Histopathological Changes Induced By Nicotine In A Gender Based Study In Adult Rats. ... mechanism upon the sex dependent difference. Keywords: Liver, Nicotine, Sex, Oxidative Stress, Antioxidants. Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol. 26 (2) 2008: pp.

  10. Consecutive dynamic resolutions of phosphine oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortmann, Felix A.; Chang, Mu Chieh; Otten, Edwin; Couzijn, Erik P A; Lutz, Martin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828971; Minnaard, Adriaan J.

    2014-01-01

    A crystallization-induced asymmetric transformation (CIAT) involving a radical-mediated racemization provides access to enantiopure secondary phosphine oxides. A consecutive CIAT is used to prepare enantio- and diastereo-pure tert-butyl(hydroxyalkyl)phenylphosphine oxides. © 2014 The Royal Society

  11. Kinetics of Oxidation of Fe–6Si

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lashin, Abdel Rahman; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Svoboda, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 5-6 (2008), s. 359-374 ISSN 0030-770X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : iron silicon * Mössbauer spectroscopy * XRD * iron oxides * oxidation kinetics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.359, year: 2008

  12. Oxidation of carbynes: signatures in infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cinquanta, Eugenio; Manini, Nicola; Ravagnan, Luca; Caramella, Lucia; Onida, Giovanni; Milani, Paolo; Rudolf, Petra

    2014-01-01

    We report and solidly interpret the infrared spectrum of both pristine and oxidized carbynes embedded in a pure-carbon matrix. The spectra probe separately the effects of oxidation on sp- and on sp 2-hybridized carbon, and provide information on the stability of the different structures in an

  13. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets

  14. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2, manganese dioxide (MnO2, nickel oxides (NiO and cobalt oxide (Co3O4, have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4, and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors.

  15. An Overview of β-Oxidation Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Moczulski

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids (FAs are components of cell membrane, enzymes, and hormones and are one of the most important energy sources for many organisms. There are several types of fatty-acid oxidative degradation processes in the cell, namely alpha-, beta-, and omega-oxidation, which take place in specialized cellular structures: mitochondria and peroxisomes. The best-known pathway is β-oxidation taking place in the matrix of mitochondria. It is responsible for the degradation of straight-chain FAs. The pathway of β-oxidation of fatty acids is comprised of at least 25 enzymes and specific transport proteins. Deficiencies in 18 of them have been demonstrated to cause disease in humans. These diseases show a wide variety of symptoms, which can be expressed at random, one at a time, or in sets, characteristic of the individual rather than the metabolic character of the disease. Disorders of β-oxidation are believed to cause about 1–3�0of unexplained sudden infant deaths (SIDS. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP and the syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome, which have significant neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality, have also been associated with β-oxidation deficiency in fetuses. This review summarizes recent observations on disorders associated with fatty-acid oxidation: deficiencies of β-oxidation enzymes, namely VLCAD, TFP and LCHAD, MCAD, MCKAT, M/SCHAD, and SCAD, and deficiencies of the enzymes TCP I, CT, and CPT II of the carnitine cycle.

  16. Ion and mixed conducting oxides as catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gellings, P.J.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper gives a survey of the catalytic properties of solid oxides which display oxygen ion or mixed (i.e. ionic + electronic) conductivity. Particular consideration is given to the oxidation-reduction reactions of gas phase components, but attention is also devoted to oxygen exchange between gas

  17. Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme in charge of nitric oxide production, plays a crucial role in vascular biology. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting the gene encoding for eNOS (eNOS) on coronary artery diseases remains under debate and no data were ...

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of substituted benzylamines in aquo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrochemical oxidation of nine para- and meta-substituted benzylamines in varying mole fractions of acetic acid in water has been investigated in the presence of 0.1 M sulphuric acid as supporting electrolyte. The oxidation potentials correlate well with Hammett's substituent constants affording negative reaction ...

  19. Organic fragments from graphene oxide: Isolation, characterization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. As-prepared graphene oxide (GO) contains oxidative debris which can be washed using basic solutions. We present the isolation and characterization of these debris. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used to monitor the separation of the debris in various solvents in the presence of different protic and aprotic.

  20. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    and limits the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, all these mechanisms be- ing strongly involved in the atherogenic process5. Moreover, as a potent vasodi- latator, NO is deeply engaged in the regulation of blood pressure. In vascular endothelium, NO is con- stitutively produced from L-arginine by endothelial nitric oxide ...

  2. An Acidity Scale for Binary Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the classification of binary oxides as acidic, basic, or amphoteric. Demonstrates how a numerical scale for acidity/basicity of binary oxides can be constructed using thermochemical data for oxoacid salts. Presents the calculations derived from the data that provide the numeric scale values. (TW)

  3. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  4. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  5. Photobiocatalytic alcohol oxidation using LED light sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauch, M.C.R.; Schmidt, S.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; oppelt, K.; Kara, S; Hollmann, F.

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic oxidation of NADH using a flavin photocatalyst and a simple blue LED light source is reported. This in situ NAD+ regeneration system can be used to promote biocatalytic, enantioselective oxidation reactions. Compared to the traditional use of white light bulbs this method enables

  6. Measuring oxide trapping parameters in MOS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, J.

    1978-01-01

    System for controlled injection of electrons or holes into oxide layer of MOS capacitor can be used to measure oxide trapping parameters. Since trapping mechanisms can cause degradation and ultimate failure of MOS elements exposed to ionizing radiation, system can be helpful in predicting device tolerance.

  7. Thermochemically active iron titanium oxide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Miller, James E.

    2018-01-16

    A thermal oxidation-reduction cycle is disclosed that uses iron titanium oxide as the reactive material. The cycle may be used for the thermal splitting of water and/or carbon dioxide to form hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide. The formed compounds may be used as syngas precursors to form fuels.

  8. OPA oxidation rates in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veriansyah, Bambang; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Jong-Chol; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2005-09-30

    Supercritical water oxidation can effectively destroy a large variety of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization and complex industrial chemical. An important design consideration in the development of supercritical water oxidation is the information on the oxidation rate. In this paper, the oxidation rate of isopropyl amine (OPA), one of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization, was investigated under supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) conditions in an isothermal tubular reactor. H2O2 was used as the oxidant. The reaction temperatures were ranged from 684 to 891 K and the residence times varied from 9 to 18s at a fixed pressure of 25 MPa. The conversion of OPA was monitored by analyzing total organic carbon (TOC) on the liquid effluent samples. The initial TOC concentrations of OPA varied from 7.21 to 143.78 mmol/l at the conversion efficiencies from 88.94 to 99.98%. By taking into account the dependence of reaction rate on oxidant and TOC concentration, a global power-law rate expression was regressed from 38 OPA experimental data. The resulting pre-exponential factor was 2.46(+/-0.65)x10(3)l(1.37)mmol(-0.37)s(-1); the activation energy was 64.12+/-1.94 kJ/mol; and the reaction orders for OPA (based on TOC) and oxidant were 1.13+/-0.02 and 0.24+/-0.01, respectively.

  9. A novel mechanism of oxidative genotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genotoxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established. The underlying mechanism involves oxidation of DNA by ROS. However, we have recently shown that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the major mediator of oxidative stress, can also cause genomic damage indirectly. Thus, H2O2 at pathologically relevant ...

  10. In between matters, interfaces in complex oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zalk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complex oxides are emerging as a versatile class of materials, exhibiting a wide variety of properties. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the properties of complex-oxide interfaces can differ considerably from those of the bulk. This opens up the possibility of tuning and

  11. In Between Matters : Interfaces in Complex Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zalk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complex oxides are emerging as a versatile class of materials, exhibiting a wide variety of properties. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the properties of complex-oxide interfaces can differ considerably from those of the bulk. This opens up the possibility of tuning and

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion in the development of catalysis, magnetism, molec- ular architectures and materials chemistry. Oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds is one of the most pivotal functional group transformations in organic synthesis. Three important natural enzymes used for oxidation reactions are cytochrome P-450, per- oxidases ...

  13. Organic fragments from graphene oxide: Isolation, characterization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. As-prepared graphene oxide (GO) contains oxidative debris which can be washed using basic solutions. We present the isolation and characterization of these debris. ... presence/absence of types of bases in different solutions used in the current study and ... epoxy and carboxylic acid groups upon treatment of GO.

  14. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  16. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  17. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  18. Inhibiting mitochondrial β-oxidation selectively reduces levels of nonenzymatic oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Schönfeld and Reiser recently hypothesized that fatty acid β-oxidation is a source of oxidative stress in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited brain mitochondrial β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP) and measured oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites in the rat brain. Upon MEP treatment, levels of several nonenzymatic auto-oxidative PUFA metabolites were reduced with few effects on enzymatically derived metabolites. Our finding confirms the hypothesis that reduced fatty acid β-oxidation decreases oxidative stress in the brain and β-oxidation inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for brain disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  19. Elaboration and characterisation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide powders by the sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hours, T.

    1988-01-01

    The two classical sol-gel processes, colloidal and polymeric are studied for the preparation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide high performance powders. In the colloidal process, controlled and reproducible conditions for the preparation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide sols from salts or alkoxides are developed and the hydrothermal synthesis monodisperse hafnium oxide colloids is studied. The polymeric process is studied with hafnium ethyl-hexylate, hydrolysis kinetics for controlled preparation of sols and gels is investigated. Each step of preparation is detailed and powders obtained are characterized [fr

  20. Nanoroses of nickel oxides: Synthesis, electron tomography study, and application in CO oxidation and energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Fihri, Aziz

    2012-04-11

    Nickel oxide and mixed-metal oxide structures were fabricated by using microwave irradiation in pure water. The nickel oxide self-assembled into unique rose-shaped nanostructures. These nickel oxide roses were studied by performing electron tomography with virtual cross-sections through the particles to understand their morphology from their interior to their surface. These materials exhibited promising performance as nanocatalysts for CO oxidation and in energy storage devices. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nanoroses of nickel oxides: synthesis, electron tomography study, and application in CO oxidation and energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fihri, Aziz; Sougrat, Rachid; Rakhi, Raghavan Baby; Rahal, Raed; Cha, Dongkyu; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Alshareef, Husam N; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-07-01

    Nickel oxide and mixed-metal oxide structures were fabricated by using microwave irradiation in pure water. The nickel oxide self-assembled into unique rose-shaped nanostructures. These nickel oxide roses were studied by performing electron tomography with virtual cross-sections through the particles to understand their morphology from their interior to their surface. These materials exhibited promising performance as nanocatalysts for CO oxidation and in energy storage devices. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Electron donating and acid-base properties of cerium oxide and its mixed oxides with alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugunan, S.; Jalaja, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The electron donating properties of cerium oxide activated at 300, 500 and 800 degC and of its mixed oxides with alumina were examined based on the adsorption of electron acceptors exhibiting different electron affinities. The surface acidity/basicity of the oxides was determined by titrimetry; the H 0,max values are given. The limit of electron transfer from the oxide surface lies within the region of 1.77 and 2.40 eV in terms of the electron affinity of the electron acceptor. Cerium oxide promotes the electron donor nature of alumina while leaving the limit of electron transfer unchanged. 2 tabs., 4 figs., 13 refs

  3. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Duan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches.

  4. Structural behaviour of nitrogen in oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghauri, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in molten oxides has significant consideration for two quite different types of engineering materials. The implication of a knowledge of the role of nitrogen in these oxides for refining high nitrogen steels in obvious but similar nitrogen-bearing oxide melts are of critical importance in the densification of silicon nitride ceramics. Present paper discusses structural behaviour and phase equilibria qualitatively in the light of knowledge available on slag structure through infrared and x-ray diffraction. Nitrogen solubility in glasses and related sialon based ceramics may be of paramount importance to understand the role of nitrogen in these materials as these oxides are similar in composition, structure and characteristics to sintering glasses in nitrogen ceramics. It is quite logical to infer that the same oxide model can be applied in order to massively produce nitrogen alloyed steels which are actively competing to be the materials of the next century. (author)

  5. Electrochemical preparation of new uranium oxide phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Lyalyushkin, N.V.; Bove, A.L.; Komarov, V.K.; Kapshukov, I.I.

    1992-01-01

    Behaviour of uranium ions in oxidation states 3+ and 4+ in molten chlorides of alkali metals in the temperature range of 700-900 degC in the atmosphere of an inert gas was studied by the method of cyclic voltametry. It is shown that as a result of introduction of crystal uranium dioxide into the salt melt formation of uranium oxide ions of the composition UO + and UO 2+ occurs, the ions participating in electrode reactions and bringing about formation of the following uranium oxides on the cathode: UO and, presumably, U 3 O 4 . Oxides UO and U 3 O 4 are thermodynamically unstable at low temperatures and decompose into uranium oxide of the composition UO 2-x , where x varies from 0 to 0.05, and metal uranium

  6. Oxidation of glycerol by Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLARIDGE, C A; HENDLIN, D

    1962-12-01

    Claridge, C. A. (Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, N.J.) and David Hendlin. Oxidation of glycerol by Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 84:1181-1186. 1962.-The nature of the factors in yeast autolysate essential for the oxidation of glycerol by Streptococcus faecalis F24 was examined. Two factors appear to be involved in the oxidation of glycerol. One factor was shown to be an inducer of the enzyme system required for glycerol oxidation; the other was shown to be alpha-lipoic acid. Minute quantities of glucose will "spark" growth of S. faecalis in a medium containing glycerol and acetate as carbon sources, probably by supplying sufficient energy for induction of the glycerol-oxidation system.

  7. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  8. Simvastatin and oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne Tofte; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Nielsen, Torben Kjær

    2016-01-01

    -blinded, placebo-controlled study in which subjects were treated with either 40 mg of simvastatin or placebo for 14 days. The endpoints were six biomarkers for oxidative stress, which represent intracellular oxidative stress to nucleic acids, lipid peroxidation and plasma antioxidants, that were measured in urine...... in mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and II and might thereby reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that simvastatin may reduce oxidative stress in humans in vivo. We conducted a randomized, double...... in parallel with the reduction in plasma cholesterol. In healthy young male volunteers, short-term simvastatin treatment, which considerably reduces cholesterol, does not lead to a clinically relevant reduction in a panel of measures of oxidative stress. Whether simvastatin has effects on oxidative stress...

  9. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  10. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases.

  11. Biological nitric oxide signalling: chemistry and terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Tassiele A; da Silva, Roberto S; Miranda, Katrina M; Switzer, Christopher H; Wink, David A; Fukuto, Jon M

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen oxide signalling and stress is an area of extreme clinical, pharmacological, toxicological, biochemical and chemical research interest. The utility of nitric oxide and derived species as signalling agents is due to their novel and vast chemical interactions with a variety of biological targets. Herein, the chemistry associated with the interaction of the biologically relevant nitrogen oxide species with fundamental biochemical targets is discussed. Specifically, the chemical interactions of nitrogen oxides with nucleophiles (e.g. thiols), metals (e.g. hemeproteins) and paramagnetic species (e.g. dioxygen and superoxide) are addressed. Importantly, the terms associated with the mechanisms by which NO (and derived species) react with their respective biological targets have been defined by numerous past chemical studies. Thus, in order to assist researchers in referring to chemical processes associated with nitrogen oxide biology, the vernacular associated with these chemical interactions is addressed. PMID:23617570

  12. Experimental study of oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, S; Deng, Xiaohong; Tuo, J

    1998-01-01

    of the use of 2-nitropropane as a model for oxidative DNA damage relate particularly to formation of 8-aminoguanine derivatives that may interfere with HPLC-EC assays and have unknown consequences. Other model compounds for induction of oxidative DNA damage, such as ferric nitriloacetate, iron dextran...... studies provide powerful tools to investigate agents inducing and preventing oxidative damage to DNA and its role in carcinogenesis. So far, most animal experiments have concerned 8-oxodG and determination of additional damaged bases should be employed. An ideal animal model for prevention of oxidative......Animal experiments allow the study of oxidative DNA damage in target organs and the elucidation of dose-response relationships of carcinogenic and other harmful chemicals and conditions as well as the study of interactions of several factors. So far the effects of more than 50 different chemical...

  13. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur AGENCY: Environmental... Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of... policy assessment by two weeks, EPA is committed to issuing a proposal addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO...

  14. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  15. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  16. The oxidation of acid azo dye AY 36 by a manganese oxide containing mine waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Catherine E.; Kielar, Filip; Johnson, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study looks at the oxidative breakdown of the amine containing dye acid yellow 36 by a Mn oxide containing mine waste. ► The oxidation proceeds by successive one electron transfers between the dye molecule and the Mn oxide minerals. ► The initial decolorization of the dye is rapid, but does not involve the cleavage of the azo bond. -- Abstract: The oxidative breakdown of acid azo dye acid yellow 36 (AY 36) by a Mn oxide containing mine tailings is demonstrated. The oxidation reaction is pH dependent with the rate of decolorization increasing with decreasing pH. The oxidation reaction mechanism is initiated at the amino moiety and proceeds via successive, one electron transfers from the dye to the Mn oxide minerals. The reaction pathway involves the formation of a number of colorless intermediate products, some of which hydrolyze in a Mn oxide-independent step. Decolorization of the dye is rapid and is observed before the cleavage of the azo-bond, which is a slower process. The terminal oxidation products were observed to be p-benzoquinone and 3-hydroxybenzenesulfonate. The reaction order of the initial decolorization was determined to be pseudo fractional order with respect to pH and pseudo first order with respect to dye concentration and Mn tailings’ surface area

  17. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernigan, Glenn Geoffrey [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu2O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu2O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu2O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N2 and CO2. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu2O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  18. Spectrographic determination of impurities in high-purity tantalum oxide and niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.T.G.; Russell, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of spectrographic methods by direct current arc excitation and carrier distillation for the determination of impurities in tantalum and niobium oxides are described. Iron, silicon, aluminium, titanium, calcium, silver, tin, magnesium, and manganese can be determined in tantalum oxide and niobium oxide in concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 p.p.m. Niobium can be determined in tantalum oxide in concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 p.p.m. Tantalum cannot be determined in niobium oxide, and tungsten cannot be determined in either matrix as a result of the absence of sensitive lines in the spectra of these elements. Relative standard deviations of analyte element concentrations are in the region of 0,18 for tantalum oxide samples, and 0,13 for niobium oxide samples. A detailed laboratory method is included. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  19. Novel synthesis and shape-dependent catalytic performance of Cu-Mn oxides for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixun; Wang, Honglei; Wu, Xingxing; Ye, Qinglan; Xu, Xuetang; Li, Bin; Wang, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Transition metal oxides with large specific surface area are attractive for high-activity catalysts, and hierarchical structures of transition metal oxides with porous feature possess the structural advantage in the transfer of gaseous reactant and product. In this work, porous Cu-Mn oxides with high surface area were successfully obtained through low-temperature coprecipitation method in alcohol/water solvent and then post-annealing. The addition of alcohol showed great influences on the shape and catalytic performances for CO oxidation. Dumbbell-like Cu-Mn oxide particles with splitting ends displayed high catalytic activity and a complete conversion of CO was achieved at 45 °C, suggesting a shape-dependent catalytic activity. The oxidative activity was attributed to a combination of factors including specific surface area, active surface oxygen species and Mn(IV) cations. The results may supply a new thought to design high-performance Cu-Mn oxide catalysts.

  20. Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance in Animal Nutrition and Health: The Role of Protein Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Pietro; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress (OS), and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism, and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional modifications. Protein oxidation seems to be involved in pathological conditions, such as respiratory diseases and parasitic infection; however, some studies also suggest that protein oxidation plays a crucial role in the regulation of important physiological functions, such as reproduction, nutrition, metabolism, lactation, gut health, and neonatal physiology. As the characterization of the mechanisms by which OS may influence metabolism and health is attracting considerable scientific interest, the aim of this review is to present veterinary scientists and clinicians with various aspects of oxidative damage to proteins.

  1. From molecular to colloidal manganese vanadium oxides for water oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Forster, Johannes; Anjass, Montaha H; Daboss, Sven; Kranz, Christine; Streb, Carsten

    2017-10-19

    The spontaneous, sonication-driven conversion of a molecular manganese vanadium oxide water oxidation catalyst, (n-Bu 4 N) 3 [Mn 4 V 4 O 17 (OAc) 3 ] × 3H 2 O, into colloidal manganese vanadium oxide particles (average particle size ca. 70 nm) together with their stability and chemical water oxidation activity is reported. The nanoparticulate metal oxide colloid (approximate composition: VMn 5 O 10 ·ca. 6H 2 O·ca. 0.2nBu 4 N + ) is formed spontaneously when the molecular precursor is sonicated in water. The particles show water oxidation activity when combined with Ce IV as the oxidant, are stable even under highly acidic reaction conditions and can be recovered and reused.

  2. Mechanism of 1, 1-d2 propene oxidation over oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portefaix, J.L.; Figueras, F.; Forissier, M.

    1980-01-01

    CD 2 CHCH 3 was oxidized over bismuth molybdate, tin-antimony mixed oxides and supported molybdenum and vanadium oxide catalysts. The deuterium retention is high ( > 90%) in the recovered propene. Percentage retentions of deuterium in the acrolein agree with literature data when bismuth molybdate is used as catalyst. On Sb-Sn-O and supported Mo and V oxides, no isotope effect is noticed for the abstraction of the second hydrogen from the olefin. The slow step of the reaction may therefore be different for the oxidation of propene on Bi-Mo-O and Sb-Sn-O. The ethanal produced by oxidation of CD 2 CHCH 3 contains only minor amounts of deuterium, whatever the catalyst used. It is suggested that partial oxidation of propene to acrolein and C-C bond rupture are parallel reactions which involve different intermediates. Possible mechanisms adapted from organic chemistry are presented to explain these findings. 4 tables

  3. Catalytic Activity of Oxidized Carbon Black and Graphene Oxide for the Crosslinking of Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Acocella

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article compares the catalytic activities of oxidized carbon black (oCB and graphene oxide (eGO samples on the kinetics of a reaction of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA with a diamine, leading to crosslinked insoluble networks. The study is mainly conducted by rheometry and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Following the same oxidation procedure, CB samples are more efficiently oxidized than graphite samples. For instance, CB and graphite samples with high specific surface areas (151 and 308 m2/g, as oxidized by the Hummers’ method, exhibit O/C wt/wt ratios of 0.91 and 0.62, respectively. Due to the higher oxidation levels, these oCB samples exhibit a higher catalytic activity toward the curing of epoxy resins than fully exfoliated graphene oxide.

  4. Water oxidation by amorphous cobalt-based oxides: volume activity and proton transfer to electrolyte bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingan, Katharina; Ringleb, Franziska; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Heidkamp, Jonathan; Chernev, Petko; Gonzalez-Flores, Diego; Risch, Marcel; Fischer, Anna; Dau, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Water oxidation in the neutral pH regime catalyzed by amorphous transition-metal oxides is of high interest in energy science. Crucial determinants of electrocatalytic activity were investigated for a cobalt-based oxide film electrodeposited at various thicknesses on inert electrodes. For water oxidation at low current densities, the turnover frequency (TOF) per cobalt ion of the bulk material stayed fully constant for variation of the thickness of the oxide film by a factor of 100 (from about 15 nm to 1.5 μm). Thickness variation changed neither the nanostructure of the outer film surface nor the atomic structure of the oxide catalyst significantly. These findings imply catalytic activity of the bulk hydrated oxide material. Nonclassical dependence on pH was observed. For buffered electrolytes with pKa values of the buffer base ranging from 4.7 (acetate) to 10.3 (hydrogen carbonate), the catalytic activity reflected the protonation state of the buffer base in the electrolyte solution directly and not the intrinsic catalytic properties of the oxide itself. It is proposed that catalysis of water oxidation occurs within the bulk hydrated oxide film at the margins of cobalt oxide fragments of molecular dimensions. At high current densities, the availability of a proton-accepting base at the catalyst-electrolyte interface controls the rate of water oxidation. The reported findings may be of general relevance for water oxidation catalyzed at moderate pH by amorphous transition-metal oxides. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Genes Involved in Oxidation and Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Platz, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    We are evaluating whether polymorphisms in genes involved in the genesis of oxidative species, detoxification of oxidative species, or repair of oxidative DNA damage influence risk of prostate cancer...

  6. Anaerobic Oxidation of Hydrocarbon Contaminants in Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lovley, Derek

    1999-01-01

    .... Pristine harbor sediments did not have a significant potential for anaerobic PAH oxidation, but could be adapted for PAH oxidation by exposure to PAhs or inoculation with PAH-oxidizing microrganisms...

  7. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  8. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the

  9. Chemically abrupt interface between Ce oxide and Fe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.G.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Kim, S.G.; Hwang, Chanyong

    2005-01-01

    A chemically abrupt Fe/Ce oxide interface can be formed by initial oxidation of an Fe film followed by deposition of Ce metal. Once a Ce oxide layer is formed on top of Fe, it acts a passivation barrier for oxygen diffusion. Further deposition of Ce metal followed by its oxidation preserve the abrupt interface between Ce oxide and Fe films. The Fe and Ce oxidation states have been monitored at each stage using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  10. Atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Runrun; Pan, Shanshan; Li, Yun; Wang, Liming

    2014-06-26

    The atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene initiated by OH radical addition is investigated by quantum chemistry calculations at M06-2X, G3MP2-RAD, and ROCBS-QB3 levels and by kinetics calculation by using transition state theory and unimolecular reaction theory coupled with master equation (RRKM-ME). The predicted branching ratios are 0.15, 0.59, 0.05, and 0.14 for OH additions to ipso, ortho, meta, and para positions (forming R1-R4 adducts), respectively. The fate of R2, R4, and R1 is investigated in detail. In the atmosphere, R2 reacts with O2 either by irreversible H-abstraction to form o-cresol (36%), or by reversible recombination to R2-1OO-syn and R2-3OO-syn, which subsequently cyclize to bicyclic radical R2-13OO-syn (64%). Similarly, R4 reacts with O2 with branching ratios of 61% for p-cresol and 39% for R4-35OO-syn, while reaction of R1 and O2 leads to R1-26OO-syn. RRKM-ME calculations show that the reactions of R2/R4 with O2 have reached their high-pressure limits at 760 Torr and the formation of R2-16O-3O-s is only important at low pressure, i.e., 5.4% at 100 Torr. The bicyclic radicals (R2-13OO-syn, R4-35OO-syn, and R1-26OO-syn) will recombine with O2 to produce bicyclic alkoxy radicals after reacting with NO. The bicyclic alkoxy radicals would break the ring to form products methylglyoxal/glyoxal (MGLY/GLY) and their corresponding coproducts butenedial/methyl-substituted butenedial as proposed in earlier studies. However, a new reaction pathway is found for the bicyclic alkoxy radicals, leading to products MGLY/GLY and 2,3-epoxybutandial/2-methyl-2,3-epoxybutandial. A new mechanism is proposed for the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene based on current theoretical and previous theoretical and experimental results. The new mechanism predicts much lower yield of GLY and much higher yield of butenedial than other atmospheric models and recent experimental measurements. The new mechanism calls for detection of proposed products 2

  11. Occurrence of lipid oxidation products in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, P B

    1986-01-01

    Lipid oxidation products are ubiquitous in foods, although much variation exists in the levels present. Although these levels are generally low, the problem of lipid oxidation severely compromises the quality of some foods and limits the shelf-life of others. Lipid oxidation represents a key barrier in the development of new food products and processes, especially convenience items and processes required to manufacture them. Deleterious changes in foods caused by lipid oxidation include loss of flavour, development of off-flavours, loss of colour, nutrient value and functionally, and the accumulation of compounds which may be detrimental to the health of consumers. All foods that contain lipids are susceptible to oxidation but especially affected are foods which are dehydrated, subjected to high temperatures or cooked and subsequently stored, e.g. dehydrated eggs, cheeses and meats, foods fried in frying oils, and cooked (uncured) meats. Specific examples of compounds which are of health concern include lipid peroxides and the free radicals involved in their formation and propagation, malonaldehyde, and several cholesterol oxidation products. Coronary artery disease (CAD) may be in part caused by the consumption of lipid oxidation products.

  12. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant System in Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Andrukhov, Oleh; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease, which is initiated by bacterial infection and subsequently progressed by aberrant host response. It can result in the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and have an influence on systemic health. When periodontitis occurs, reactive oxygen species, which are overproduced mostly by hyperactive neutrophils, could not be balanced by antioxidant defense system and cause tissues damage. This is characterized by increased metabolites of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and protein damage. Local and systemic activities of antioxidants can also be influenced by periodontitis. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index have been used to evaluate the oxidative stress associated with periodontitis. Studies have confirmed that inflammatory response in periodontitis is associated with an increased local and systemic oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant capacity. Our review focuses on increased oxidative stress in periodontal disease, specifically, on the relationship between the local and systemic biomarkers of oxidative stress and periodontitis and their association with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Also, the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammation, and the effects of periodontal therapy on oxidative stress parameters will be discussed. PMID:29180965

  13. Oxidation of Good's buffers by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanghua; Chasteen, N Dennis

    2006-02-15

    Good's zwitterionic buffers are widely used in biological and biochemical research in which hydrogen peroxide is a solution component. This study was undertaken to determine whether Good's buffers exhibit reactivity toward H(2)O(2). It is found that H(2)O(2) oxidizes both morpholine ring-containing buffers (e.g., Mops, Mes) and piperazine ring-containing zwitterionic buffers (e.g., Pipes, Hepes, and Epps) to produce their corresponding N-oxide forms. The percentage of oxidized buffer increases as the concentration of H(2)O(2) increases. However, the rate of oxidation is relatively slow. For example, no oxidized Mops was detected 2h after adding 0.1M H(2)O(2) to 0.1M Mops (pH 7.0), and only 5.7% was oxidized after 24h exposure to H(2)O(2). Thus, although all of these buffers can be oxidized by H(2)O(2), their slow reaction does not significantly perturb levels of H(2)O(2) in the time frame and at the concentrations of most biochemical studies. Therefore, the previously reported rapid loss of H(2)O(2) produced from the ferroxidase reaction of ferritin is unlikely due to reaction of H(2)O(2) with buffer, a conclusion supported by the fact that H(2)O(2) is also lost rapidly when the solution pH of the ferroxidase reaction is controlled by a pH stat apparatus in the absence of buffer.

  14. Monolithic graphene oxide sheets with controllable composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jae Hwan; Kwak, Jinsung; Kim, Sung-Dae; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Jong Jin; Park, Soon-Dong; Choi, Jae-Kyung; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Park, Kibog; Kim, Sung Youb; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Young-Woon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2014-02-28

    Graphene oxide potentially has multiple applications and is typically prepared by solution-based chemical means. To date, the synthesis of a monolithic form of graphene oxide that is crucial to the precision assembly of graphene-based devices has not been achieved. Here we report the physical approach to produce monolithic graphene oxide sheets on copper foil using solid carbon, with tunable oxygen-to-carbon composition. Experimental and theoretical studies show that the copper foil provides an effective pathway for carbon diffusion, trapping the oxygen species dissolved in copper and enabling the formation of monolithic graphene oxide sheets. Unlike chemically derived graphene oxide, the as-synthesized graphene oxide sheets are electrically active, and the oxygen-to-carbon composition can be tuned during the synthesis process. As a result, the resulting graphene oxide sheets exhibit tunable bandgap energy and electronic properties. Our solution-free, physical approach may provide a path to a new class of monolithic, two-dimensional chemically modified carbon sheets.

  15. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  16. Oxidative stress and wasting in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Meguid, Michael M; Preziosa, Isabella; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo

    2007-07-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is becoming a critical component in the comprehensive approach to cancer patients because it influences morbidity, mortality and quality of life. Consequently, pathogenic mechanisms have been elucidated to facilitate development of better therapies. Reported findings indicate that increased production of reactive oxygen species and reduced activity of antioxidant enzymes contribute to development of anorexia and cachexia in cancer. Systemic inflammation impairs tryptophan handling, promoting oxidative stress, which appears to mimic hypothalamic negative feedback signalling. Thus, tryptophan contributes to cancer anorexia by stimulating hypothalamic serotonergic activity and promoting oxidative stress, because neuroinflammation facilitates tryptophan degradation into free radical generators via the kynurenine pathway. Upregulation of protein degradation by increased oxidative stress has been documented in cancer. Also, hypothalamic, cytokine-mediated suppression of fatty acid oxidation reduces food intake, and triggers mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative gene expression in skeletal muscle, thus potentially increasing oxidative stress. Increased oxidative stress contributes to cancer anorexia and cachexia. Preliminary clinical data on the efficacy of antioxidant therapy in cancer patients are encouraging, but uncertainty persists regarding the optimal dose and timing of administration. Also, better biological/genetic characterization of those cancer patients who are more likely to obtain significant clinical benefits appears necessary.

  17. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mula, Guido, E-mail: guido.mula@unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Tiddia, Maria V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Falqui, Andrea [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Palmas, Simonetta; Mascia, Michele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica Chimica e dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Piazza d' Armi, 09126 Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of the electrochemical oxidation process of porous silicon. We analyze the effect of the layer thickness (1.25–22 μm) and of the applied current density (1.1–11.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, values calculated with reference to the external samples surface) on the oxidation process by comparing the galvanostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and the optical specular reflectivity of the samples. The results of EIS were interpreted using an equivalent circuit to separate the contribution of different sample parts. A different behavior of the electrochemical oxidation process has been found for thin and thick samples: whereas for thin samples the oxidation process is univocally related to current density and thickness, for thicker samples this is no more true. Measurements by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy using a Scanning Electron Microscopy confirmed that the inhomogeneity of the electrochemical oxidation process is increased by higher thicknesses and higher currents. A possible explanation is proposed to justify the different behavior of thin and thick samples during the electrochemical process. - Highlights: • A multidisciplinary approach on porous Si electrochemical oxidation is proposed. • Electrochemical, optical, and structural characterizations are used. • Layer thickness and oxidation current effects are shown. • An explanation of the observed behavior is proposed.

  18. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant System in Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease, which is initiated by bacterial infection and subsequently progressed by aberrant host response. It can result in the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and have an influence on systemic health. When periodontitis occurs, reactive oxygen species, which are overproduced mostly by hyperactive neutrophils, could not be balanced by antioxidant defense system and cause tissues damage. This is characterized by increased metabolites of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and protein damage. Local and systemic activities of antioxidants can also be influenced by periodontitis. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index have been used to evaluate the oxidative stress associated with periodontitis. Studies have confirmed that inflammatory response in periodontitis is associated with an increased local and systemic oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant capacity. Our review focuses on increased oxidative stress in periodontal disease, specifically, on the relationship between the local and systemic biomarkers of oxidative stress and periodontitis and their association with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Also, the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammation, and the effects of periodontal therapy on oxidative stress parameters will be discussed.

  19. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  20. Creep-Rupture and Fatigue Behaviors of Notched Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Oxide/oxide composites are being considered for use in high temperature aerospace applications where their inherent resistance to oxidation provides for better long life properties at high temperature...

  1. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  2. Oxidation rate in ferritic superheater materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, I.

    1992-05-01

    On the steam side of superheater tubes, compact oxide layers are formed which have a tendency to crack and flake off (exfoliate). Oxide particles then travel with the steam and can give rise to erosion damage in valves and on turbine blades. In an evaluation of conditions in superheater tubes from Swedish power boilers, it was found that the exfoliation frequency for one material quality (SS 2218) was greater than for other qualities. Against this background, a literature study has been carried out in order to determine which mechanisms govern the build-up of oxide and the exfoliation phenomenon. The study reveals that the oxide morphology is similar on all ferritic steels with Cr contents up to 5%. and that the oxide properties can therefore be expected to be similar. The reason why the exfoliation frequency is greater for tubes of SS 2218 is probably that the tubes have been exposed to higher temperatures. SS 2218 (2.25 Cr) is normally used in a higher temperature range which is accompanied by improved strength data as compared with SS 2216 (1 Cr). The principal cause of the exfoliation is said to be stresses which arise in the oxide during the cooling-down process associated with shutdowns. The stresses give rise to longitudinal cracks in the oxide, and are formed as a result of differences in thermal expansion between the oxide and the tube material. In addition, accounts are presented of oxidation constants and growth velocities, and thickness and running time. These data constitute a valuable basis for practical estimates of the operating temperature in routine checks and investigations into damage in superheater tubes. (au)

  3. Supercritical waste oxidation pump investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, G.; Garcia, K.

    1993-02-01

    This report investigates the pumping techniques and pumping equipment that would be appropriate for a 5,000 gallon per day supercritical water oxidation waste disposal facility. The pumps must boost water, waste, and additives from atmospheric pressure to approximately 27.6 MPa (4,000 psia). The required flow ranges from 10 gpm to less than 0.1 gpm. For the higher flows, many commercial piston pumps are available. These pumps have packing and check-valves that will require periodic maintenance; probably at 2 to 6 month intervals. Several commercial diaphragm pumps were also discovered that could pump the higher flow rates. Diaphragm pumps have the advantage of not requiring dynamic seals. For the lower flows associated with the waste and additive materials, commercial diaphragm pumps. are available. Difficult to pump materials that are sticky, radioactive, or contain solids, could be injected with an accumulator using an inert gas as the driving mechanism. The information presented in this report serves as a spring board for trade studies and the development of equipment specifications

  4. Nitric oxide in cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huiwen; Wang, Lei; Mollica, Molly; Re, Anthony T; Wu, Shiyong; Zuo, Li

    2014-10-10

    Cancer metastasis is the spread and growth of tumor cells from the original neoplasm to further organs. This review analyzes the role of nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule, in the regulation of cancer formation, progression, and metastasis. The action of NO on cancer relies on multiple factors including cell type, metastasis stage, and organs involved. Various chemotherapy drugs cause cells to release NO, which in turn induces cytotoxic death of breast, liver, and skin tumors. However, NO has also been clinically connected to a poor cancer prognosis because of its role in angiogenesis and intravasation. This supports the claim that NO can be characterized as both pro-metastatic and anti-metastatic, depending on specific factors. The inhibition of cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis pathways by NO donors has been proposed as a novel therapy to various cancers. Studies suggest that NO-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs act on cancer cells in several ways that may make them ideal for cancer therapy. This review summarizes the biological significance of NO in each step of cancer metastasis, its controversial effects for cancer progression, and its therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Studies of Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Current studies at NASA Glenn on oxide thermodynamics are discussed. Previous studies on the vaporization of B2O3 in reducing atmospheres led to inconsistent studies when B was used as a reductant. It is shown that liquid B2O3 does not wet B and a clear phase separation was noted in the Knudsen cell. This problem was solved by using FeB and Fe2B to supply a different and constant activity of B. The thermodynamic data thus derived are compared to quantum chemical composite calculations. A major problem in high temperature mass spectrometry is the determination of accurate ionization cross sections, particularly for molecules. The method of Deutsch and Mark shows promise and some sample calculations are discussed. Finally current studies on the thermodynamics of rare earth silicates are discussed. Here the problems are obtaining a measurable signal from SiO2 vaporization and non-equilibrium vaporization. The use of a Ta reducing agent provides a stronger signal, which is related to silica activity. The Whitman-Motzfeld relation adapted to KEMS measurements is applied to obtain equilibrium pressures.

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orthofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    The report contains the documentation of a presentation given at the conference 'Greenhouse Gases: Mitigation Options' organised by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R and D Programme from 22-25 August 1995 in London. Using IPCC recommended procedures, anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) in Austria for the base year 1990 were estimated to be around 4,800 metric tons (t). The uncertainties are high particularly for the emissions from agricultural soils. About 62 % of total emissions come from agriculture, 26 % from the energy sector, and 11 % from the industrial processes sector. Projections for the year 2000 show that emissions will grow by about 15 %. This is mainly due to unwanted side-effects of pollution control technologies (e.g. 3-way catalytic converters for cars, fluidised bed combustion in industry, and denitrification processes in waste water treatment plants). The national emission estimates were spatially disaggregated to a district level using a top-down model. Arithmetic average and median emission densities in the districts are 1.2 and 0.6 kg per hectare. (author)

  7. Treating leachate by Fenton oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Iván Méndez Novelo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leachates are formed from liquids, mainly rainwater, percolating through solid wastes during stabilisation. Their composition is variable and highly toxic; leachate treatment is therefore a complex task. Leachates represent a high risk to health due to the Yucatan Peninsula’s highly permeable soil. The results are presented from applying the Fenton process to treating leachate from the sanitary Merida landfill, Yucatan, Mexico. The Fenton process consists of treating the contaminant load with an H2O2 and FeSO4 combination in acidic conditions. Optimal reaction time, pH value, Fenton reagent dose, post treatment coagulation – flocculation doses and increased biodegradability index were all determined. Optimal oxidation conditions and doses were 202+ minute contact time, 4 pH, 600 mg/L H2O2 concentration and 1,000 mg/L Fe. Average organic matter removal rate, measured as CODS and TOC, were 78% and 87% respectively. The biodegradability index increased from 0.07 to 0.11 during the Fenton process and up to 0.13 when the Fenton process was followed by coagulation-flocculation.

  8. Fatty acid oxidation promotes reprogramming by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and inhibiting protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyu; Liu, Fei; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Huang, Zan; Zou, Dayuan; Chen, Qin; Li, Jianxin; Gao, Xiang

    2018-02-26

    Changes in metabolic pathway preferences are key events in the reprogramming process of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The optimization of metabolic conditions can enhance reprogramming; however, the detailed underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. By comparing the gene expression profiles of somatic cells, intermediate-phase cells, and iPSCs, we found that carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt)1b, a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid oxidation, was significantly upregulated in the early stage of the reprogramming process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from transgenic mice carrying doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Yamanaka factor constructs were used for reprogramming. Various fatty acid oxidation-related metabolites were added during the reprogramming process. Colony counting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) were used to calculate reprogramming efficiency. Fatty acid oxidation-related metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Seahorse was used to measure the level of oxidative phosphorylation. We found that overexpression of cpt1b enhanced reprogramming efficiency. Furthermore, palmitoylcarnitine or acetyl-CoA, the primary and final products of Cpt1-mediated fatty acid oxidation, also promoted reprogramming. In the early reprogramming process, fatty acid oxidation upregulated oxidative phosphorylation and downregulated protein kinase C activity. Inhibition of protein kinase C also promoted reprogramming. We demonstrated that fatty acid oxidation promotes reprogramming by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and inhibiting protein kinase C activity in the early stage of the reprogramming process. This study reveals that fatty acid oxidation is crucial for the reprogramming efficiency.

  9. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Zirconium Alloy with Nano structured Oxide Layer in Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. J.; Kim, J. W.; Park, J. W.; Cho, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    If the temperature of the cladding materials increases above 1000 .deg. C, which can be caused by a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), Zr becomes an auto-oxidation catalyst and hence produces a huge amount of hydrogen gas from water. Therefore, many investigations are being carried out to prevent (or reduce) the hydrogen production from Zr-based cladding materials in the nuclear reactors. Our team has developed an anodization technique by which nanostructured oxide can be formed on various flat metallic elements such as Al, Ti, and Zr-based alloy. Anodization is a simple electrochemical technique and requires only a power supply and an electrolyte. In this study, Zr-based alloys with nanostructured oxide layers were oxidized by using Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and compared with the pristine one. It reveals that the nanostructured oxide layer can prevent oxidation of substrate metal in air. Oxidation behavior of the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy and the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer evaluated by measuring weight gain (TGA). In comparison with the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy, weight gain of the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer is lower than 10% even for 12 hours oxidation in air.

  10. Cholesteryl ester acyl oxidation and remodeling in murine macrophages: formation of oxidized phosphatidylcholine[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of eukaryotic cell membranes, regulating fluidity and permeability of the bilayer. Outside the membrane, cholesterol is esterified to fatty acids forming cholesterol esters (CEs). Metabolism of CEs is characterized by recurrent hydrolysis and esterification as part of the CE cycle; however, since recombinant 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) was shown to oxidize cholesteryl linoleate of LDL, there has been interest in CE oxidation, particularly in the context atherogenesis. Studies of oxidized CE (oxCE) metabolism have focused on hydrolysis and subsequent reverse cholesterol transport with little emphasis on the fate the newly released oxidized fatty acyl component. Here, using mass spectrometry to analyze lipid oxidation products, CE metabolism in murine peritoneal macrophages was investigated. Ex vivo macrophage incubations revealed that cellular 15-LO directly oxidized multiple CE substrates from intracellular stores and from extracellular sources. Freshly harvested murine macrophages also contained 15-LO-specific oxCEs, suggesting the enzyme may act as a CE-oxidase in vivo. The metabolic fate of oxCEs, particularly the hydrolysis and remodeling of oxidized fatty acyl chains, was also examined in the macrophage. Metabolism of deuterated CE resulted in the genesis of deuterated, oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPC). Further experiments revealed these oxPC species were formed chiefly from the hydrolysis of oxidized CE and subsequent reacylation of the oxidized acyl components into PC. PMID:22665166

  11. Global DNA methylation and oxidative stress biomarkers in workers exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wu, Wei-Te; Liao, Hui-Yi [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chao-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Jung, Wei-Ting [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hui-Ling, E-mail: huilinglee3573@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • Global methylation and oxidative DNA damage levels in nanomaterial handling workers were assessed. • 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate of workers exposed to nanoparticles was higher. • 8-OHdG was negatively correlated with global methylation. • Exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles may lead to global methylation and DNA oxidative damage. - Abstract: This is the first study to assess global methylation, oxidative DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation in workers with occupational exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials (NMs). Urinary and white blood cell (WBC) 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) 8-isoprostane were measured as oxidative stress biomarkers. WBC global methylation was measured as an epigenetic alteration. Exposure to TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2,} and indium tin oxide (ITO) resulted in significantly higher oxidative biomarkers such as urinary 8-OHdG and EBC 8-isoprostane. However, significantly higher WBC 8-OHdG and lower global methylation were only observed in ITO handling workers. Significant positive correlations were noted between WBC and urinary 8-OHdG (Spearman correlation r = 0.256, p = 0.003). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was found between WBC 8-OHdG and global methylation (r = −0.272, p = 0.002). These results suggest that exposure to metal oxide NMs may lead to global methylation, DNA oxidative damage, and lipid peroxidation.

  12. Studies on O/M ratio determination in uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampath, S.; Chawla, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Thermogravimetric studies were carried out in unsintered and sintered samples of uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide under different atmospheric conditions (air, argon and moist argon/hydrogen). Moisture loss was found to occur below 200 0 C for uranium dioxide samples, upto 700 0 C for sintered plutonium dioxide and negligible for sintered samples. The O/M ratios for non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide (sintered and unsintered), plutonium dioxide and mixed uranium and plutonium oxides (sintered) could be obtained with a precision of +- 0.002. Two reference states UOsub(2.000) and UOsub(2.656) were obtained for uranium dioxide and the reference state MOsub(2.000) was used for other cases. For unsintered plutonium dioxide samples, accurate O/M ratios could not be obtained of overlap of moisture loss with oxygen loss/gain. (author)

  13. Recent advances in Phytosterol Oxidation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Yvonne; McCarthy, Florence O; O'Brien, Nora M

    2014-04-11

    Phytosterols and their oxidation products have become increasingly investigated in recent years with respect to their roles in diet and nutrition. We present a comprehensive review of recent literature on Phytosterol Oxidation Products (POP) identifying critical areas for future investigation. It is evident that POP are formed on food storage/preparation; are absorbed and found in human serum; do not directly affect cholesterol absorption; have evidence of atherogenicity and inflammation; have distinct levels of cytotoxicity; are implicated with high levels of oxidative stress, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated caspase activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron oxides characterization by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basurto Sanchez, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work rust development on low carbon wire surface after the conformation process at different temperatures was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The characterization was made by determining the following spectral parameters; 1) Quadrupole splitting, 2) Isomer shift, and 3) Magnetic splitting. The area quantification determined the percentage amount of three different iron oxides. These iron oxides were: a) Wustite (Fe O), b) Hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ), and c) Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) which were present in the rust studied. With the results it was possible to establish the best temperature to favor the development of each of these iron oxides. (Author)

  15. Partial oxidation of 2-propanol on perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumathi, R.; Viswanathan, B.; Varadarajan, T.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Partial oxidation of 2-propanol was carried out on AB{sub 1-x}B`{sub x}O{sub 3} (A=Ba, B=Pb, Ce, Ti; B`=Bi, Sb and Cu) type perovskite oxides. Acetone was the major product observed on all the catalysts. All the catalysts underwent partial reduction during the reaction depending on the composition of the reactant, nature of the B site cation and the extent of substitution at B site. The catalytic activity has been correlated with the reducibility of the perovskite oxides determined from Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR) studies. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Radiation on Oxide Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    AD-All 149 MCA LASS PRINCETON J. F/6 18/8 EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON OXIDE MATERIALS.(U) NO0V 51 S W HUGSES. N1 THOMAS CAA3-77-C-0159 UNCLASSIFIED PRRL...79-CR-12 NDL-CR-79-159-1 N 111 1 4 9HDL-CR-79-159-1 L E- November 1981 EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON OXIDE MATERIALS by Gary W. Hughes and John H. Thomas...COVERED FINAL REPORT (9-26-77 to 9-25-78) EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON OXIDE MATERIALS 6, PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER PRRL-79-CR- 12 7. AUTHOR(s) S

  17. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.

    2001-01-01

    Binary and ternary electrocatalysts are provided for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. The binary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate selected from the group consisting of NiWO.sub.4 or CoWO.sub.4 or a combination thereof, and 2) Group VIII noble metal catalyst supported on the substrate. The ternary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate as described above, and 2) a catalyst comprising Group VIII noble metal, and ruthenium oxide or molybdenum oxide or a combination thereof, said catalyst being supported on said substrate.

  18. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Santa Fe, NM; Mendoza, Daniel [Santa Fe, NM; Chen, Chun-Ku [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  19. CO oxidation on gold nanoparticles: Theoretical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remediakis, Ioannis; Lopez, Nuria; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of our theoretical results regarding CO oxidation on both oxide-supported and isolated gold nanoparticles. Using Density Functional Theory we have studied the adsorption of molecules and the oxidation reaction of CO on gold clusters. Low-coordinated sites on the gold...... nanoparticles can adsorb small inorganic molecules such as O2 and CO, and the presence of these sites is the key factor for the catalytic properties of supported gold nanoclusters. Other contributions, induced by the presence of the support, can provide parallel channels for the reaction and modulate the final...

  20. Nitrous oxide use and endotracheal tube rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, E L; Schelkun, P M; Vincent, S K

    1988-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is an important and widely used anesthetic agent. However, during lengthy surgical procedures, significant amounts of nitrous oxide diffuse into the endotracheal tube cuff, causing sequelae that may include increased cuff pressures, tracheal trauma, increased postoperative discomfort, and cuff rupture. In this paper, two cases are presented in which the endotracheal tube cuff used to deliver this anesthetic agent ruptured after more than four hours of surgery. Two simple means of limiting the diffusion of nitrous oxide into the cuff and thus preventing this occurrence are described.